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Sample records for gas phase nucleation

  1. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  2. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  3. Numerical analysis of an impinging jet reactor for the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-06-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  4. Fission gas bubble nucleated cavitational swelling of the alpha-uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1992-04-01

    Cavitational swelling has been identified as a potential swelling mechanism for the alpha uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The trends of U-Pu-Zr swelling data prior to fuel cladding contact can be interpreted in terms of unrestrained cavitational driven swelling. It is theorized that the swelling mechanisms at work in the alpha uranium phase can be modeled by single vacancy and single interstitial kinetics with intergranular gas bubbles providing the void nuclei, avoiding the use of complicated defect interaction terms required for the calculation of void nucleation. The focus of the kinetics of fission gas evolution as it relates to cavitational swelling is prior to the formation of a significant amount of interconnected porosity and is on the development of small intergranular gas bubbles which can act as void nuclei. Calculations for the evolution of intergranular fission gas bubbles show that they provide critical cavity sizes (i.e., the size above which the cavity will grow by bias-driven vacancy flux) consistent with the observed incubation dose for the onset of rapid swelling and gas release.

  5. Pore-scale interfacial dynamics during gas-supersaturated water injection in porous media - on nucleation, growth and advection of disconnected fluid phases (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ioannidis, M.

    2010-12-01

    Degassing and in situ development of a mobile gas bubbles occur when injecting supersaturated aqueous phase into water-saturated porous media. Supersaturated water injection (SWI) has potentially significant applications in remediation of soils contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids and in enhanced oil recovery. Pore network simulations indicate the formation of a region near the injection boundary where gas phase nuclei are activated and grow by mass transfer from the flowing supersaturated aqueous phase. Ramified clusters of gas-filled pores develop which, owing to the low prevailing Bond number, grow laterally to a significant extent prior to the onset of mobilization, and are thus likely to coalesce. Gas cluster mobilization invariably results in fragmentation and stranding, such that a macroscopic region containing few tenuously connected large gas clusters is established. Beyond this region, gas phase nucleation and mass transfer from the aqueous phase are limited by diminishing supply of dissolved gas. New insights into SWI dynamics are obtained using rapid micro-visualization in transparent glass micromodels. Using high-speed imaging, we observe the nucleation, initial growth and subsequent fate (mobilization, fragmentation, collision, coalescence and stranding) of CO2 bubbles and clusters of gas-filled pores and analyze cluster population statistics. We find significant support for the development of invasion-percolation-like patterns, but also report on hitherto unaccounted for gas bubble behavior. Additionally, we report for the first time on the acoustic emission signature of SWI in porous media and relate it to the dynamics of bubble nucleation and growth. Finally, we identify the pore-scale mechanisms associated with the mobilization and subsequent recovery of a residual non-aqueous phase liquid due to gas bubble dynamics during SWI.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster nucleation during inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnochtchekov, Pavel; Averback, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of vapor-phase nucleation of germanium in an argon atmosphere were performed and a unexpected channel of nucleation was observed. This channel, vapor-induced cluster splitting, is important for more refractory materials since the critical nucleus size can fall below the size of a dimer. As opposed to conventional direct vapor nucleation of the dimer, which occurs by three-body collisions, cluster-splitting nucleation is a second-order reaction. The most important cluster-splitting reaction is the collision of a vapor atom and a trimer that leads to the formation of two dimers. The importance of the cluster-splitting nucleation channel relative to the direct vapor nucleation channel is observed to increase with decreasing vapor density and increasing ratio of vapor to carrier gas atoms.

  7. Nonclassical nucleation theory for the gas-liquid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxtoby, David W.; Evans, R.

    1988-12-01

    We use density functional methods to develop a new nonclassical theory for the homogeneous nucleation of the gas to liquid phase transition. The extent of agreement between our results and the classical prediction of Becker, Döring, and Zeldovich is strongly dependent on the range of the attractive potential which we employ. We show that our predictions are consistent with experimental data using cloud chambers, and we suggest several directions in which experimentalists might look in order to find nonclassical effects. In particular, we suggest that cavitation (gas bubble formation in a liquid subjected to tensile stress) should nucleate at a significantly greater rate than that predicted by classical theory.

  8. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  9. Nucleation and growth of Nb nanoclusters during plasma gas condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, K. R.; Jiao, C. Q.; DeCerbo, J. N.

    2013-06-21

    Niobium nanoclusters were produced using a plasma gas condensation process. The influence of gas flow rate, aggregation length, and source current on the nanocluster nucleation and growth were analyzed. Nanoclusters with an average diameter from 4 nm to 10 nm were produced. Cluster size and concentration were tuned by controlling the process inputs. The effects of each parameter on the nucleation zone, growth length, and residence time was examined. The parameters do not affect the cluster formation and growth independently; their influence on cluster formation can be either cumulative or competing. Examining the nucleation and growth over a wide combination of parameters provided insight into their interactions and the impact on the growth process. These results provide the opportunity for a broader understanding into the nucleation and growth of nanoclusters and some insights into how process parameters interact during deposition. This knowledge will enhance the ability to create nanoclusters with desired size dispersions.

  10. Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of crystalline materials. This is particularly true for crystallization in solution, which is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. There have been significant recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The foremost of these are the two-step mechanism of nucleation and the notion of the solution–crystal spinodal. According to the two-step mechanism, the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, polymers, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. At high supersaturations typical of most crystallizing systems, the generation of crystal embryos occurs in the spinodal regime, where the nucleation barrier is negligible. The solution-crystal spinodal helps to understand the role of heterogeneous substrates in nucleation and the selection of crystalline polymorphs. Importantly, these ideas provide powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters. PMID:21132117

  11. Nucleation and growth of Mg condensate during supersonic gas quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, A.; Brooks, G. A.; Nagle, M.

    2008-05-01

    A one-dimensional model based on classical nucleation and growth has been developed as a diagnostic tool for predicting the impact of different process conditions and nozzle geometries on particle size distributions produced from supersonic quenching of magnesium vapours. The model was validated against experimental data for water and SF 6, showing good qualitative agreement with the data. For the cases in the study—magnesium concentration from 1 to 20 mol% and the inlet temperature varying from 1600 to 1900 K—the model predicts that 99% of the condensation is due to growth of particles nucleated during an initial high nucleation rate stage. The ultimate average particle size is therefore dependent on the magnitude of the nucleation rate during that initial stage of nucleation and to the degree of subsequent growth of those particles which are, in turn, a complex function of the conditions in the nozzle. The distribution of condensate size is somewhat sensitive to the inlet temperature of nozzle, increasing the temperature from 1600 to 1900 K increases the mean size of the condensate by 25%. The molar concentration of magnesium in the gas affects the final particle size but this does not follow a simple trend. The size distribution of particles predicted from the model is very sensitive to changes in surface tension and sticking coefficient, highlighting the need for a more rigorous treatment of these parameters.

  12. Nucleation and Growth of Gas Hydrate in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, S. A.; Osegovic, J. P.; Young, J. C.; Max, M. D.; Ames, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale nucleation of gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas and seawater are brought together under suitable pressure-temperature conditions or where dissolved hydrate-forming gas in saturated or near-saturated seawater is chilled or brought to higher pressures. Profuse formation of hydrate shells on gas bubbles and nucleation of at least five different forms of gas hydrate have been achieved in fresh natural seawater. Growth of masses of solid gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas reactant dissolved in seawater is brought into the vicinity of the hydrate. The gas concentration of the enriched water in the vicinity of hydrate is higher than the hydrate equilibrium gas concentration. Hydrate growth under these conditions is accelerated due to the chemical potential difference between the enriched water and the hydrate crystals, which induces mass flux of dissolved hydrate forming gas into new hydrate crystals. As long as water enriched in the hydrate-forming gas is circulated into the vicinity of the hydrate, growth proceeds into the water space. Experimental approaches for growth of examples of solid masses of hydrate are presented. Results of these experiments provide an insight into the growth of gas hydrate under natural conditions where interstitial water in marine sediments is captured by burial from open seawater, and where solid gas hydrate forms on the seafloor. By using fresh natural seawater, which is a chemically and materially complex fluid, our experiments in pressurized, refrigerated reactors should closely track the growth history of solid hydrate in the natural environment. In our model for hydrate growth in sediments, nearly complete pore fill by diagenetic hydrate can best be accomplished by nucleation of hydrate at a point source within the pore water or at a particular point on sediment particulate, with growth outward into the water space that is refreshed with ground water having high concentrations of hydrate-forming gas. Best growth can be achieved by circulation of water through constricting pore space although dissolved gas will also migrate along diffusion gradients.

  13. Phase-field modeling of submonolayer growth with the modulated nucleation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Jin, K. X.

    2015-10-01

    In this letter, we perform the phase-field simulations to investigate nucleation regime of submonolayer growth via a quantified nucleation term. Results show that the nucleation related kinetic coefficients have changed the density of islands and critical sizes to modulate the nucleation regime. The scaling behavior of the island density can be agreed with the classical theory only when effects of modulations have been quantified. We expect to produce the quantitative descriptions of nucleation for submonolayer growth in phase-field models.

  14. Nucleation and growth studies of crystalline carbon phases at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Radhika C.

    Understanding the nucleation and early stage growth of crystals from the vapor phase is important for realizing large-area single-crystal quality films, controlled synthesis of nanocrystals, and the possible discovery of new phases of materials. Carbon provides the most interesting system because all its known crystalline phases (diamond, graphite and carbon nanotubes) are technologically important materials. Hence, this dissertation is focused on studying the nucleation and growth of carbon phases synthesized from the vapor phase. Nucleation experiments were performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor, and the resulting carbon nanocrystals were analyzed primarily using electron nanodiffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These studies led to the discovery of two new crystalline phases of sp 3 carbon other than diamond: face-centered and body-centered cubic carbon. Nanodiffraction results revealed possible hydrogen substitution into diamond-cubic lattices, indicating that these new phases probably act as intermediates in diamond nucleation. Nucleation experiments also led to the discovery of two new morphologies for sp2 carbon: nanocrystals of graphite and tapered, hollow 1-D structures termed here as "carbon nanopipettes". A Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm was developed to simulate the growth of individual diamond crystals from the vapor phase, starting with small clusters of carbon atoms (or seeds). Specifically, KMC simulations were used to distinguish the kinetic rules that give rise to a star-shaped decahedral morphology compared to decahedral crystals. KMC simulations revealed that slow adsorption on the {111} step-propagation sites compared to kink sites leads to star-decahedral crystals, and higher adsorption leads to decahedral crystals. Since the surfaces of the nanocrystals of graphite and nanopipettes were expected to be composed primarily of edge-plane sites, the electrochemical behavior of both these materials were investigated with compounds requiring chemisorption, specifically biologically important species. Both these materials exhibited a stable and reversible voltammetric behavior for dopamine (a neurotransmitter) similar to that of graphite edge planes. Furthermore, a simple bottom-up concept utilizing the tapered morphology of the nanopipettes was developed to assemble a nanoarray sensor for fast cyclic voltammetry. In summary, the main outcomes of this dissertation include: the discovery of new crystalline carbon phases, understanding kinetic faceting of multiply twinned diamond crystals and tapered morphologies of carbon nanotubes, and development of new electrode materials based on sp2 carbon nanocrystals for sensing biologically important analytes.

  15. Nucleation of the diamond phase in aluminium-solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Precipitation was studied from fcc solid solutions with silicon, germanium, copper and magnesium. Of all these elements only silicon and germanium form diamond cubic (DC) precipitates in fcc Al. Nucleation of the DC structure is enhanced if both types of atom are dissolved in the fcc lattice. This is interpreted as due to atomic size effects in the prenucleation stage. There are two modes of interference of fourth elements with nucleation of the DC phase in Al + Si, Ge. The formation of the DC phase is hardly affected if the atoms (for example, copper) are rejected from the (Si, Ge)-rich clusters. If additional types of atom are attracted by silicon and/or germanium, DC nuclei are replaced by intermetallic compounds (for example Mg2Si).

  16. Observing classical nucleation theory at work by monitoring phase transitions with molecular precision

    PubMed Central

    Sleutel, Mike; Lutsko, Jim; Van Driessche, Alexander E.S.; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Maes, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that many phase transitions do not follow nucleation pathways as envisaged by the classical nucleation theory. Many substances can traverse intermediate states before arriving at the stable phase. The apparent ubiquity of multi-step nucleation has made the inverse question relevant: does multistep nucleation always dominate single-step pathways? Here we provide an explicit example of the classical nucleation mechanism for a system known to exhibit the characteristics of multi-step nucleation. Molecular resolution atomic force microscopy imaging of the two-dimensional nucleation of the protein glucose isomerase demonstrates that the interior of subcritical clusters is in the same state as the crystalline bulk phase. Our data show that despite having all the characteristics typically associated with rich phase behaviour, glucose isomerase 2D crystals are formed classically. These observations illustrate the resurfacing importance of the classical nucleation theory by re-validating some of the key assumptions that have been recently questioned. PMID:25465441

  17. Nucleation of a Non-Equilibrium Phase in a First Order Phase Transition; BCC ^4He from Superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. A.; Elbaum, C.

    1996-03-01

    We report new observations of nucleation and phase transitions in superfluid helium four in which a metastable solid phase nucleates and grows from the overpressured liquid in preference to the stable phase. Ultimately, the stable phase nucleates from the superfluid independently and the metastable phase disappears. While the persistence of a phase in a metastable state is fairly common, the type of nucleation into a phase out of equilibrium described here does not appear to have been previously reported. We offer an account of these events in terms of interfacial free energy differences and resulting relative nucleation probabilities for different values of supercooling. Both classical and quantum mechanical evaluations of nucleation probabilities give qualitatively similar results.

  18. Experimental studies of the vapor phase nucleation of refractory compounds. VI. The condensation of sodium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Daniel M; Ferguson, Frank T; Heist, Richard H; Nuth, Joseph A

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the condensation of sodium vapor and the formation of a sodium aerosol as it occurs in a gas evaporation condensation chamber. A one-dimensional model describing the vapor transport to the vapor/aerosol interface was employed to determine the onset supersaturation, in which we assume the observed location of the interface is coincident with a nucleation rate maximum. We then present and discuss the resulting nucleation onset supersaturation data within the context of nucleation theory based on the liquid droplet model. Nucleation results appear to be consistent with a cesium vapor-to-liquid nucleation study performed in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. PMID:16108655

  19. Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleations in the surface phase transition: Si(111)4 × 1-In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyungjoon; Jeon, Youjin; Yeo, Jonghoon; Lee, Geunseop

    2015-06-01

    Homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleations in a reduced-dimensional system undergoing a first-order structural phase transition were examined by using low electron energy diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. The high-temperature 4 × 1 phase of a Si(111)-In surface was supercooled at temperatures below the transition temperature ({T}{{c}}) and evolved slowly into a low-temperature 8 × 2 phase with time. The transition rate decreased significantly as the temperature approached {T}{{c}}. The kinetics of the observed homogeneous nucleation was analyzed by classical nucleation theory. The introduction of oxygen atoms reduced the hysteresis and accelerated nucleation significantly, showing that the {T}{{c}}-raising oxygen impurity plays the role of a nucleation seed for heterogeneous nucleation.

  20. Measurements of Ice Nucleation in Arctic Mixed Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. D.; Glen, A.; Zelenyuk, A. N.; MacDonald, A. M.; Liu, P.; Leaitch, R.

    2008-12-01

    Here we present in-flight measurements of ice nuclei (IN) data collected with a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) from onboard the Canadian Convair during the recent Indirect and Semidirect Effects of Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). During ISDAC, Arctic haze containing aerosols from several distinctly different sources including Asian dust and Siberia coal fire plants, were sampled. The corresponding range in aerosol-cloud interactions and overall influence of outside aerosol masses on the Arctic atmosphere was variable as well. During the project, ice nuclei were sampled in-cloud and out-of-cloud and in the presence of multiple distinct aerosol layers. The CFDC was operated at controlled temperatures in the range of -10 degrees C to -40 degrees C and over a wide range of supersaturations with respect to ice. Observed IN concentrations varied from frequent values of 0.01 per liter to spikes as high as approximately 10 per liter during Arctic haze events. The multiple factors contributing to this high degree of variability in ice nuclei will be discussed in an effort to determine what drives ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds in the Arctic.

  1. Critical velocity for vortex nucleation in a finite-temperature Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagg, G. W.; Pattinson, R. W.; Barenghi, C. F.; Parker, N. G.

    2016-02-01

    We use classical field simulations of the homogeneous Bose gas to study the breakdown of superflow due to vortex nucleation past a cylindrical obstacle at finite temperature. Thermal fluctuations modify the vortex nucleation from the obstacle, turning antiparallel vortex lines (which would be nucleated at zero temperature) into wiggly lines, vortex rings, and even vortex tangles. We find that the critical velocity for vortex nucleation decreases with increasing temperature and scales with the speed of sound of the condensate, becoming zero at the critical temperature for condensation.

  2. Monte Carlo tests of nucleation concepts in the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    The conventional theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor is tested by Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice gas (Ising) model with nearest-neighbor attractive interactions on the simple cubic lattice. The theory considers the nucleation process as a slow (quasistatic) cluster (droplet) growth over a free energy barrier ΔF*, constructed in terms of a balance of surface and bulk term of a critical droplet of radius R*, implying that the rates of droplet growth and shrinking essentially balance each other for droplet radius R=R*. For heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces, the barrier is reduced by a factor depending on the contact angle. Using the definition of physical clusters based on the Fortuin-Kasteleyn mapping, the time dependence of the cluster size distribution is studied for quenching experiments in the kinetic Ising model and the cluster size ℓ* where the cluster growth rate changes sign is estimated. These studies of nucleation kinetics are compared to studies where the relation between cluster size and supersaturation is estimated from equilibrium simulations of phase coexistence between droplet and vapor in the canonical ensemble. The chemical potential is estimated from a lattice version of the Widom particle insertion method. For large droplets it is shown that the physical clusters have a volume consistent with the estimates from the lever rule. Geometrical clusters (defined such that each site belonging to the cluster is occupied and has at least one occupied neighbor site) yield valid results only for temperatures less than 60% of the critical temperature, where the cluster shape is nonspherical. We show how the chemical potential can be used to numerically estimate ΔF* also for nonspherical cluster shapes.

  3. Monte Carlo tests of nucleation concepts in the lattice gas model.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    The conventional theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in a supersaturated vapor is tested by Monte Carlo simulations of the lattice gas (Ising) model with nearest-neighbor attractive interactions on the simple cubic lattice. The theory considers the nucleation process as a slow (quasistatic) cluster (droplet) growth over a free energy barrier ΔF(*), constructed in terms of a balance of surface and bulk term of a critical droplet of radius R(*), implying that the rates of droplet growth and shrinking essentially balance each other for droplet radius R=R(*). For heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces, the barrier is reduced by a factor depending on the contact angle. Using the definition of physical clusters based on the Fortuin-Kasteleyn mapping, the time dependence of the cluster size distribution is studied for quenching experiments in the kinetic Ising model and the cluster size ℓ(*) where the cluster growth rate changes sign is estimated. These studies of nucleation kinetics are compared to studies where the relation between cluster size and supersaturation is estimated from equilibrium simulations of phase coexistence between droplet and vapor in the canonical ensemble. The chemical potential is estimated from a lattice version of the Widom particle insertion method. For large droplets it is shown that the physical clusters have a volume consistent with the estimates from the lever rule. Geometrical clusters (defined such that each site belonging to the cluster is occupied and has at least one occupied neighbor site) yield valid results only for temperatures less than 60% of the critical temperature, where the cluster shape is nonspherical. We show how the chemical potential can be used to numerically estimate ΔF(*) also for nonspherical cluster shapes. PMID:23767652

  4. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  5. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  6. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  7. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces.

  8. Aluminum matrix composite solidification in microgravity: Effect of the reinforcing phase on nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, F.; Patuelli, C.; Giunchi, G.; Grenni, A.

    Among all the solidification processings available for metal matrix composite (MMC) fabrication, the gas pressure liquid infiltration method, recently developed, is very simple and fast. The molten aluminum can be infiltrated either in a preform made up of a three-dimensional array of fibers (SiC whiskers), or in a porous ceramic network. The resulting microstructures present rather low dislocation densities and, short solidification times can avoid interface phase formation. A series of samples with different orientations and volume fractions of the reinforcement, i.e. with different porosity, were examined in order to investigate the reinforcing phase and convection effects on the nucleation and growth of the solid nuclei in the constrained environment existing between the preform fibers.

  9. Nucleation kinetics of polymorphic transition from phase II to phase III of hexachloroethane: Metastability/unstability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yoshikata

    1987-10-01

    The conversions of the transition from phase II to III of C 2Cl 6 were measured for the range between 38.81 and 41.15°C (the transition point: 43.64°C). A simple model was devised appropriate to the present mononucleus transition. Using this, the induction periods, that are inversely proportional to the nucleation rates, were extracted from the observed curves. The resulting induction periods varied from 0.07 to 1500 h. In terms of the classical nucleation theory, though its applicability for such a wide variation is questionable, it was shown that there are two temperature regions bounded at about 40.8°C in which nucleation behaviours are different. As shown in the previous papers, the growth rates of the same transition were too fast to measure below a certain threshold temperature which was lower than 41.9°C. These threshold behaviours in nucleation and growth were tentatively attributed to the change-over from metastability to unstability.

  10. Electron diffraction data on nucleation and growth of an hcp phase in homogeneous (Ar) and heterogeneous (Ar-Kr) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylchenko, O. G.; Kovalenko, S. I.; Konotop, O. P.; Samovarov, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    The nucleation and growth of the hcp phase in homogeneous (Ar) and heterogeneous (Ar-Kr) clusters formed in adiabatically expanding supersonic jets of the inert gases are studied by electron diffraction. The average size of the clusters ranges from 2 × 103 to 1 × 105 atoms/cluster. A threshold size of the clusters is found at which an hcp phase forms along with the fcc structure. The relative amount of the hcp phase in the single crystal clusters increases with their size. The relative volume of the hcp phase in the heterogeneous clusters exceeds that in homogeneous clusters of the same size. A correlation is established between the relative volume of the hcp phase in the clusters and the number of "defect" planes contained in the fcc matrix from which hcp phase nucleates. It is found that in very large (δ ≥ 150 Å) polycrystalline aggregations the fraction of the hcp phase reaches a maximum and does not increase as the clusters become larger. A mechanism is proposed for the nucleation and growth of the hcp phase in inert gas clusters.

  11. Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins via a disordered high-density state: Phenomenological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weichun; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-05-01

    Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins triggers numerous phenomena in laboratory, industry, and in healthy and sick organisms. Recent simulations and experiments with protein crystals suggest that the formation of an ordered crystalline nucleus is preceded by a disordered high-density cluster, akin to a droplet of high-density liquid that has been observed with some proteins; this mechanism allowed a qualitative explanation of recorded complex nucleation kinetics curves. Here, we present a simple phenomenological theory that takes into account intermediate high-density metastable states in the nucleation process. Nucleation rate data at varying temperature and protein concentration are reproduced with high fidelity using literature values of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the system. Our calculations show that the growth rate of the near-critical and supercritical ordered clusters within the dense intermediate is a major factor for the overall nucleation rate. This highlights the role of viscosity within the dense intermediate for the formation of the ordered nucleus. The model provides an understanding of the action of additives that delay or accelerate nucleation and presents a framework within which the nucleation of other ordered protein solid phases, e.g., the sickle cell hemoglobin polymers, can be analyzed.

  12. Role of Dynamic Nucleation at Moving Boundaries in Phase and Microstructure Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karma, Alain; Trivedi, Rohit

    1999-01-01

    Solidification microstructures that form under steady-state growth conditions (cells, dendrites, regular eutectics, etc.) are reasonably well understood in comparison to other, more complex microstructures, which form under intrinsically non-steady-state growth conditions due to the competition between the nucleation and growth of several phases. Some important practical examples in this latter class include microstructures forming in peritectic systems in highly undercooled droplets, and in strip cast stainless steels. Prediction of phase and microstructure selection in these systems has been traditionally based on (1) heterogeneous nucleation on a static interface, and (2) comparing the relative growth rate of different phase/microstructures under steady-state growth conditions. The formation of new phases, however, occurs via nucleation on, or ahead of, a moving boundary. In addition, the actual selection process is controlled by a complex interaction between the nucleation process and the growth competition between the nuclei and the pre-existing phase under non-steady-state conditions. As a result, it is often difficult to predict which microstructure will form and which phases will be selected under prescribed processing conditions. This research addresses this critical role of nucleation at moving boundaries in the selection of phases and solidification microstructures through quantitative experiments and numerical modeling in peritectic systems. In order to create a well characterized system in which to study this problem, we focus on the directional solidification of hypo- and hyper-peritectic alloys in the two-phase region, imposing a large enough ratio of temperature gradient/growth rate (G/V(sub p)) to suppress the morphological instability of both the parent (alpha) and peritectic (Beta) phases, i.e. each phase alone would grow as a planar front. Our combined experimental and theoretical results show that, already in this simplified case, the growth competition of these two phases leads to a rich variety of microstructures that depend sensitively upon the relative importance of nucleation, diffusion, and convection.

  13. Role of Nucleation and Growth in Two-Phase Microstructure Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jong Ho Shin

    2008-05-01

    During the directional solidification of peritectic alloys, a rich variety of two-phase microstructures develop, and the selection process of a specific microstructure is complicated due to the following two considerations. (1) In contrast to many single phase and eutectic microstructures that grow under steady state conditions, two-phase microstructures in a peritectic system often evolve under non-steady-state conditions that can lead to oscillatory microstructures, and (2) the microstructure is often governed by both the nucleation and the competitive growth of the two phases in which repeated nucleation can occur due to the change in the local conditions during growth. In this research, experimental studies in the Sn-Cd system were designed to isolate the effects of nucleation and competitive growth on the dynamics of complex microstructure formation. Experiments were carried out in capillary samples to obtain diffusive growth conditions so that the results can be analyzed quantitatively. At high thermal gradient and low velocity, oscillatory microstructures were observed in which repeated nucleation of the two phases was observed at the wall-solid-liquid junction. Quantitative measurements of nucleation undercooling were obtained for both the primary and the peritectic phase nucleation, and three different ampoule materials were used to examine the effect of different contact angles at the wall on nucleation undercooling. Nucleation undercooling for each phase was found to be very small, and the experimental undercooling values were orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory of nucleation. A new nucleation mechanism is proposed in which the clusters of atoms at the wall ahead of the interface can become a critical nucleus when the cluster encounters the triple junction. Once the nucleation of a new phase occurs, the microstructure is found to be controlled by the relative growth of the two phases that give rise to different oscillatory microstructures that depend on the imposed velocity and the size of the sample. At low thermal gradient to velocity ratio, a steady-state composite microstructure is observed. Two mechanisms of composite microstructure formation were examined: (1) the formation of the peritectic phase in the intercellular region of the primary phase where the solute rejected by the primary phase is absorbed by the peritectic phase. The peritectic phase forms a small distance behind the growing primary phase front. (2) The second mechanism is the coupled growth of the two phases with a macroscopically planar interface, as in the case of eutectic growth. Detailed studies showed that this composite microstructure, although it appears as a eutectic microstructure, did not grow in the coupled manner at the advancing interface in the Sn-cd system. However, a new observation was made when experiments were carried out in thin ampoule of Ta. The peritectic phase nucleated at the wall-interface triple junction and grew along the wall, while the primary phase continued to grow at the center, giving rise to a steady-state couple growth at some specific velocity. The mechanism of coupled growth in this case was shown to be operative due to the presence of a finite contact angle at the wall, and this was demonstrated by including the contact angle effect at the wall in the rod eutectic growth model. The experimental results were summarized to map out the conditions of thermal gradient and velocity on the regimes of composite and oscillatory microstructure formation. The formation of complex time-dependent microstructures was then discussed in terms of the time-dependent dynamics of planar interface growth.

  14. Ice nucleation by combustion ash particles at conditions relevant to mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umo, N. S.; Murray, B. J.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Jones, J. M.; Lea-Langton, A. R.; Malkin, T. L.; O'Sullivan, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Williams, A.

    2014-11-01

    Ice nucleating particles can modify cloud properties with implications for climate and the hydrological cycle; hence, it is important to understand which aerosol particle types nucleate ice and how efficiently they do so. It has been shown that aerosol particles such as natural dusts, volcanic ash, bacteria and pollen can act as ice nucleating particles, but the ice nucleating ability of combustion ashes has not been studied. Combustion ashes are major by-products released during the combustion of solid fuels and a significant amount of these ashes are emitted into the atmosphere either during combustion or via aerosolization of bottom ashes. Here, we show that combustion ashes (coal fly ash, wood bottom ash, domestic bottom ash, and coal bottom ash) nucleate ice in the immersion mode at conditions relevant to mixed-phase clouds. Hence, combustion ashes could play an important role in primary ice formation in mixed-phase clouds, especially in clouds that are formed near the emission source of these aerosol particles. In order to quantitatively assess the impact of combustion ashes on mixed-phase clouds, we propose that the atmospheric abundance of combustion ashes should be quantified since up to now they have mostly been classified together with mineral dust particles. Also, in reporting ice residue compositions, a distinction should be made between natural mineral dusts and combustion ashes in order to quantify the contribution of combustion ashes to atmospheric ice nucleation.

  15. Interfacial free energy adjustable phase field crystal model for homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Huang, Yunhao

    2016-05-18

    To describe the homogeneous nucleation process, an interfacial free energy adjustable phase-field crystal model (IPFC) was proposed by reconstructing the energy functional of the original phase field crystal (PFC) methodology. Compared with the original PFC model, the additional interface term in the IPFC model effectively can adjust the magnitude of the interfacial free energy, but does not affect the equilibrium phase diagram and the interfacial energy anisotropy. The IPFC model overcame the limitation that the interfacial free energy of the original PFC model is much less than the theoretical results. Using the IPFC model, we investigated some basic issues in homogeneous nucleation. From the viewpoint of simulation, we proceeded with an in situ observation of the process of cluster fluctuation and obtained quite similar snapshots to colloidal crystallization experiments. We also counted the size distribution of crystal-like clusters and the nucleation rate. Our simulations show that the size distribution is independent of the evolution time, and the nucleation rate remains constant after a period of relaxation, which are consistent with experimental observations. The linear relation between logarithmic nucleation rate and reciprocal driving force also conforms to the steady state nucleation theory. PMID:27117814

  16. Homogeneous bubble nucleation in binary systems of liquid solvent and dissolved gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    A formulation of the classical nucleation theory (CNT) is developed for bubble nucleation in a binary system composed of a liquid solvent and a dissolved gas. The theoretical predictions are compared to the experimental nucleation data of four binary mixtures, i.e. diethylether - nitrogen, propane - carbon dioxide, isobutane - carbon dioxide, and R22 (chlorodifluoromethane) - carbon dioxide. The presented CNT formulation is found to improve the precision of the simpler theoretical method of Ward et al. [J. Basic Eng. 92 (10), 71-80, 1970] based on the weak-solution approximation. By analyzing the available experimental nucleation data, an inconsistency in the data reported by Mori et al. [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 19 (10), 1153-1159, 1976] for propane - carbon dioxide and R22 - carbon dioxide is identified.

  17. Theoretical study of vapor-liquid homogeneous nucleation using stability analysis of a macroscopic phase.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Calderón, Bernardo

    2012-10-14

    Stability analysis is generally used to verify that the solution to phase equilibrium calculations corresponds to a stable state (minimum of the free energy). In this work, tangent plane distance analysis for stability of macroscopic mixtures is also used for analyzing the nucleation process, reconciling thus this analysis with classical nucleation theories. In the context of the revised nucleation theory, the driving force and the nucleation work are expressed as a function of the Lagrange multiplier corresponding to the mole fraction constraint from the minimization problem of stability analysis. Using a van der Waals fluid applied to a ternary mixture, Lagrange multiplier properties are illustrated. In particular, it is shown how the Lagrange multiplier value is equal to one on the binodal and spinodal curves at the same time as the driving force of nucleation vanishes on these curves. Finally, it is shown that, on the spinodal curve, the nucleation work from the revised and generalized nucleation theories are characterized by two different local minima from stability analysis, irrespective of any interfacial tension models. PMID:23061836

  18. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects.

  19. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, M; Sagis, L M C

    2014-12-14

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a metastable phase and a nucleating phase, we derive the fundamental dynamics for this phenomenon, based on continuous Fokker-Planck equations. We are readily able to treat non-isothermal nucleation even when the nucleating cores cannot be attributed intensive thermodynamic properties. In addition, we capture the dynamics of the time-dependent metastable phase being continuously expelled from the nucleating phase, and keep rigorous track of the volume corrections to the dynamics. Within our framework the definition of a thermodynamic nuclei temperature is manifest. For the special case of nucleation of a gas phase towards its vapor-liquid coexistence, we illustrate that our approach is capable of reproducing recent literature results obtained by more microscopic considerations for the suppression of the nucleation rate due to nonisothermal effects. PMID:25494727

  20. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments

  1. Collector phase transitions during vapor-solid-solid nucleation of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chze, Caroline; Geelhaar, Lutz; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Riechert, Henning

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the nucleation of Ni-induced GaN nanowires by in situ and ex situ experiments. Three nucleation stages are evidenced. In the first two stages, different crystal structures of the Ni collectors are identified. Real-time monitoring of the Ga desorption allows the amount of Ga incorporated in the collectors to be quantified. A transition of their crystal structure prior to nanowire growth is found to be in agreement with the thermodynamically stable phase sequence of the relevant phase diagrams. PMID:20715843

  2. Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Clouds: Parameterization Evaluation and Climate Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Ghan, S. J.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J. S.; Klein, S. A.; Demott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    There are still large uncertainties on ice nucleation mechanisms and ice crystal numbers in mixed-phase clouds, which affects modeled cloud phase, cloud lifetime and radiative properties in the Arctic clouds in global climate models. In this study we evaluate model simulations with three mixed-phase ice nucleation parameterizations (Phillips et al., 2008; DeMott et al., 2009; Meyers et al. 1992) against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) observations using the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 4 (CAM4) running in the single column mode (SCAM) and in the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT) forecasts. It is found that SCAM and CAPT with the new physically-based ice nucleation schemes (Phillips et al., 2008; DeMott et al., 2009) produce a more realistic simulation of the cloud phase structure and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets against observations during the ISDAC than the CAM with an oversimplified Meyers et al. (1992). Both SCAM simulations and CAPT forecasts suggest that the ice number concentration could play an important role in the simulated mixed-phase cloud microphysics, and thereby needs to be realistically represented in global climate models. The global climate implication of different ice nucleation parameterizations are also be studied.

  3. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol in helium: the effect of carrier gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Stratmann, Frank

    2006-04-28

    Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor of 1-propanol was studied using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a noncondensable carrier gas and the influence of its pressure on observed nucleation rates was investigated. The isothermal nucleation rates were determined by a photographic method that is independent on any nucleation theory. In this method, the trajectories of growing droplets are recorded using a charge coupled device camera and the distribution of local nucleation rates is determined by image analysis. The nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol were carried out at four isotherms 260, 270, 280, and 290 K. In addition, the pressure dependence was investigated on the isotherms 290 K (50, 120, and 180 kPa) and 280 K (50 and 120 kPa). The isotherm 270 K was measured at 25 kPa and the isotherm 260 K at 20 kPa. The experiments confirm the earlier observations from several thermal diffusion chamber investigations that the homogeneous nucleation rate of 1-propanol tends to increase with decreasing total pressure in the chamber. In order to reduce the possibility that the observed phenomenon is an experimental artifact, connected with the generally used one-dimensional description of transfer processes in the chamber, a recently developed two-dimensional model of coupled heat, mass, and momentum transfer inside the chamber was used and results of both models were compared. It can be concluded that the implementation of the two-dimensional model does not explain the observed effect. Furthermore the obtained results were compared both to the predictions of the classical theory and to the results of other investigators using different experimental devices. Plotting the experimental data on the so-called Hale plot shows that our data seem to be consistent both internally and also with the data of others. Using the nucleation theorem the critical cluster sizes were obtained from the slopes of the individual isotherms and compared with the Kelvin prediction. The influence of total pressure on the observed isothermal nucleation rate was studied in another experiment, where not only temperature but also supersaturation was kept constant as the total pressure was changed. It was shown that the dependence of the nucleation rate on pressure gets stronger as pressure decreases. PMID:16674134

  4. Tetragonal Lysozyme Nucleation and Crystal Growth: The Role of the Solution Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sumida, John; Maxwell, Daniel; Gorti, Sridhar; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates a dominant role of solution phase interactions in nucleating and growing tetragonal lysozyme crystals. These interactions are extensive, even at saturation, and may be a primary cause of misoriented regions in crystals grown on Earth. Microgravity, by limiting interfacial concentrations to diffusion-controlled levels, may benefit crystal quality by also reducing the extent of associated species present at the interface.

  5. Metastability in fluctuation-driven first-order transitions: Nucleation of lamellar phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenberg, P.C.; Swift, J.B.

    1995-08-01

    The nucleation of a lamellar phase from a supercooled homogeneous phase in a fluctuation-driven first-order transition is studied, based on a phenomenological free energy due to Brazovskii (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 68, 175 (1975) [Sov. Phys. JETP 41, 85 (1975)]). The absence of phase coexistence in the corresponding mean-field approximation makes application of the standard droplet theory of homogeneous nucleation problematic. A self-consistent coarse-graining procedure is introduced to overcome this difficulty, and the barrier height for nucleation of a critical droplet is estimated in the weak-coupling limit. Contrary to earlier estimates, the critical droplet shape is shown to be anisotropic in general. Some effects of distortions and defects in the lamellar structure are considered and are shown to affect the critical droplet only very near coexistence, where the probability of nucleation vanishes. The coarse-graining procedure introduced here follows from a novel application of the momentum-shell renormalization-group method to systems in the Brazovskii class. Possible applications of the theory to the microphase separation transition in diblock copolymers and to Rayleigh-Benard convection are briefly discussed.

  6. Deciphering gas implantation rate effects on bubble nucleation in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhangcan; Wirth, Brian

    2015-11-01

    We use the object kinetic Monte Carlo code KSOME to study the sub-surface helium clustering behaviour in tungsten at various conditions relevant to plasma exposure of divertor surfaces. In particular, we have investigated helium implantation fluxes from 1020 to 1027 m-2s-1 at temperatures from 400K to 1600K for 100-eV helium ions implanted below tungsten surfaces as a function of pre-existing vacancy concentration. For these conditions, the helium retention rate, the surface areal density of adatoms, and the number density of clusters are analysed. A phase diagram is constructed to summarize the results, which maps the ratio of self-trapped helium to vacancy-trapped helium with respect to the helium flux, the target temperature, and the concentration of pre-existing vacancy. According to the phase diagram, the boundary between the self-trapping dominant regime and the vacancy-trapping dominant regime can be distinguished. In general, pre-existing vacancies are dominant in trapping helium atoms for low fluxes and high temperatures, while self-trapping is dominant for high fluxes. These results provide important insight into the mechanisms of helium clustering for plasma facing components in fusion reactors.

  7. Quantized hard-x-ray phase vortices nucleated by aberrated nanolenses

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, Konstantin M.; Paganin, David M.; Vine, David J.; Schmalz, Jelena A.; Suzuki, Yoshio; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Yagi, Naoto; Jakubek, Jan; Altissimo, Matteo; Clark, Jesse N.

    2011-01-15

    Quantized x-ray phase vortices, namely, screw-type topological defects in the wave fronts of a coherent monochromatic scalar x-ray wave field, may be spontaneously nucleated by x-ray lenses. Phase retrieval is used to reconstruct the phase and amplitude of the complex disturbance created by aberrated gold nanolenses illuminated with hard x rays. A nanoscale quantized x-ray vortex-antivortex dipole is observed, manifest both as a pair of opposite-helicity branch points in the Riemann sheets of the multivalued x-ray phase map of the complex x-ray field and in the vorticity of the associated Poynting vector field.

  8. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nathaniel F; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P; Haglund, Richard F; Hilton, David J

    2016-03-31

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of [Formula: see text] ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state. PMID:26932975

  9. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; Nag, Joyeeta; Prasankumar, Rohit P.; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.; Hilton, David J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5+/- 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  10. On the nucleation and propagation of phase transformation fronts in a NiTi alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.A.; Kyriakides, S.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper the authors present an experimental methodology for simultaneous full field monitoring of the deformation and thermal changes in NiTi during mechanically unstable regimes associated with the pseudoelastic material response. The deformation history is established by photographically recording surface changes of a brittle coating as austenite-martensite phase transition fronts traverse the specimen. Temperature changes are monitored by infrared thermal imaging. Synchronized sets of optical and thermal images and the corresponding stress histories are presented for uniaxial experiments conducted at two relatively slow end-displacement rates. The results help clarify the interactions among the prevailing heat transfer conditions, the loading rate and the fundamental sensitivity of transformation stress to temperature. It is shown that, during loading, nucleation of martensite in an austenitic region is a distinct event requiring a higher stress than the stress required subsequently to continue the transformation. By contrast, the nucleation stress of austenite in a martensitic region during unloading is lower than the stress required to continue the transformation. This distinction between the nucleation and propagation stresses, coupled with the local temperature change caused by the latent heats of the two transformations, govern the number of nucleations of a new phase. It is also shown that coexisting transition fronts tend to propagate at the same speed which is inversely proportional to the number of fronts in the specimen.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in molecular clusters of hexafluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in TeF[sub 6] and SeF[sub 6] clusters containing 100-350 molecules were carried out. Simulations successfully reproduced the crystalline structures observed in electron diffraction studies of large clusters (containing about 10[sup 4] molecules) of the same materials. When the clusters were cooled, they spontaneously underwent the same bcc the monoclinic phase transition in simulations as in experiment, despite the million-fold difference in the time scales involved. Other transitions observed included melting and freezing. Several new techniques based on molecular translation and orientation were introduced to identify different condensed phases, to study nucleation and phase transitions, and to define characteristic temperatures of transitions. The solid-state transition temperatures decreased with cluster size in the same way as did the melting temperature, in that the depression of transition temperature was inversely proportional to the cluster radius. Rotational melting temperatures, as inferred from the rotational diffusion of molecules, coincided with those of the solid-state transition. Nucleation in liquid-solid and bcc-monoclinic transitions started in the interior of clusters on cooling, and at the surface on heating. Transition temperatures on cooling were always lower than those on heating due to the barriers to nucleation. Linear growth rates of nuclei in freezing were an order of magnitude lower than those in the bcc-monoclinic transition. Revealing evidence about the molecular behavior associated with phase changes was found. Simulations showed the formation of the actual transition complexes along the transition pathway, i.e., the critical nuclei of the new phase. These nuclei, consisting of a few dozen molecules, were distinguishable in the midst of the surrounding matter.

  12. Bubble nucleation in first-order inflation and other cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. Departments of Physics and Astronomy Astrophysics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637-1433 ); Weinberg, E.J. Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 ); Widrow, L.M. )

    1992-09-15

    We address in some detail the kinematics of bubble nucleation and percolation in first-order cosmological phase transitions, with the primary focus on first-order inflation. We study how a first-order phase transition completes, describe measures of its progress, and compute the distribution of bubble sizes. For example, we find that the typical bubble size in a successful transition is of order 1% to 100% of the Hubble radius, and depends very weakly on the energy scale of the transition. We derive very general conditions that must be satisfied by {Gamma}/{ital H}{sup 4} to complete the phase transition ({Gamma}=bubble nucleation rate per unit volume; {ital H}=expansion rate; physically, {Gamma}/{ital H}{sup 4} corresponds to the volume fraction of space occupied by bubbles nucleated over a Hubble time). In particular, {Gamma}/{ital H}{sup 4} must exceed 9/4{pi} to successfully end inflation. To avoid the deleterious effects of bubbles nucleated early during inflation on primordial nucleosynthesis and on the isotropy and spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation, during most of inflation {Gamma}/{ital H}{sup 4} must be less than order 10{sup {minus}4}--10{sup {minus}3}. Our constraints imply that in a successful model of first-order inflation the phase transition must complete over a period of at most a few Hubble times and all but preclude individual bubbles from providing an interesting source of density perturbation. We note, though, that it is just possible for Poisson fluctuations in the number of moderately large-size bubbles to lead to interesting isocurvature perturbations, whose spectrum is not scale invariant. Finally, we analyze in detail several recently proposed models of first-order inflation.

  13. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Stanley, H Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments. PMID:26095898

  14. The Gas Nucleation Process Study of Anatase TiO2 in Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Maoshui; Xu, Yu; Dai, Linjun; Wang, Tiantian; Li, Xue; Wang, Dexin; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke; Huang, Xiaojiang; Shi, Jianjun; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The gas phase nucleation process of anatase TiO2 in atmospheric non-thermal plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is studied. The particles synthesized in the plasma gas phase at different power density were collected outside of the reactor. The structure of the collected particles has been investigated by field scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The analysis shows that uniform crystalline nuclei with average size of several nanometers have been formed in the scale of micro second through this reactive atmospheric plasma gas process. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles increases with power density. The high density of crystalline nanonuclei in the plasma gas phase and the low gas temperature are beneficial to the fast deposition of the 3D porous anatase TiO2 film.

  15. Underbarrier nucleation kinetics in a metastable quantum liquid near the liquid-gas spinodal line

    SciTech Connect

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.; Okuda, Y.

    2005-02-01

    We develop a theory that incorporates the relaxation properties of a condensed medium into the quantum decay of a metastable liquid near the liquid-gas spinodal line at low temperatures. We find that both the regime and the rate of quantum nucleation strongly depend on the relaxation time and its temperature behavior. The quantum nucleation rate slows down with decreasing relaxation time. We also discuss the low-temperature experiments on cavitation in normal {sup 3}He and superfluid {sup 4}He at negative pressures. It is the drastic distinctions in the properties of the high-frequency sound mode and in the temperature behavior of the relaxation time that make the quantum cavitation kinetics in {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He completely different.

  16. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons. PMID:16784271

  17. A study to investigate phase transitions and nucleation kinetics of nickel and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, F. A.; Yildiz, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the homogeneous nucleation kinetics of copper and nickel system during cooling process using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The calculation is carried out for a different number of atoms consisting of 500, 2048, 8788 and 13,500 based on embedded atom method (EAM). It is observed that the melting points for the both model increases with increasing the size of systems (i.e. the number of atoms) as expected from Parrinello and Rahman MD method. The interfacial free energies and critical nucleus radius of nickel and copper are also determined by molecular dynamics, and the results are consistent with the classical nucleation theory. The structural development and phase transformation are also determined from the radial distribution function (RDF) and local bond orientational order parameters (LBOO).

  18. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  19. Equations for nucleation of hydrogen gas pores during solidification of aluminium seven weight percent silicon alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, R.C.; Sridhar, S.; Lee, P.D.

    1999-11-19

    Producing metallic parts for aerospace and automotive industries in as-cast shapes is both less expensive and faster than many competitive manufacturing techniques. However, the occurrence of casting defects such as porosity limits the use of cast parts especially in high tolerance applications. In this work an empirical approach is followed to produce useable equations that reproduce the behavior of the material and which may then and in predicting the formation of gas porosity within solidification models. The approach of Charbon and Rappaz for grain nucleation during solidification is used to provide the form of the equations. Some possible explanations of the observed behavior are also presented.

  20. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  1. Report on the Implementation of Homogeneous Nucleation Scheme in MARMOT-based Phase Field Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-30

    In this report, we summarized our effort in developing mesoscale phase field models for predicting precipitation kinetics in alloys during thermal aging and/or under irradiation in nuclear reactors. The first part focused on developing a method to predict the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei such as the sizes and concentration profiles of critical nuclei, and nucleation barrier. These properties are crucial for quantitative simulations of precipitate evolution kinetics with phase field models. Fe-Cr alloy was chosen as a model alloy because it has valid thermodynamic and kinetic data as well as it is an important structural material in nuclear reactors. A constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method was developed to search for the energy minimum path during nucleation. With the method we are able to predict the concentration profiles of the critical nuclei of Cr-rich precipitates and nucleation energy barriers. Simulations showed that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nucleus strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The Cr concentration inside the critical nucleus is much smaller than the equilibrium concentration calculated by the equilibrium phase diagram. This implies that a non-classical nucleation theory should be used to deal with the nucleation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloys. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. A number of interesting phenomena were observed from the simulations: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrated that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei into phase field modeling in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation. In most alloys the matrix phase and precipitate phase have different concentrations as well as different crystal structures. For example, Cu precipitates in FeCu alloys have fcc crystal structure while the matrix Fe-Cu solid solution has bcc structure at low temperature. The WBM model and KimS model, where both concentrations and order parameters are chosen to describe the microstructures, are commonly used to model precipitations in such alloys. The WBM and KimS models have not been implemented into Marmot yet. In the second part of this report, we focused on implementing the WBM and KimS models into Marmot. The Fe-Cu alloys, which are important structure materials in nuclear reactors, was taken as the model alloys to test the models.

  2. Nanoscale Phase Stability Reversal During the Nucleation and Growth of Titanium Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummmer, D. R.; Heaney, P. J.; Kubicki, J. D.; Kent, P. R.; Post, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Fine-grained titanium oxide minerals are important in soils, where they affect a variety of geochemical processes. They are also industrially important as catalysts, pigments, food additives, and dielectrics. Recent research has indicated an apparent reversal of thermodynamic stability between TiO2 phases at the nanoscale thought to be caused by an increased contribution of surface energy to the total free energy. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments in which titanium oxides crystallize from aqueous TiCl4 solutions confirm that anatase, a metastable phase, is always the first phase to nucleate under our range of initial conditions. Rutile peaks are observed only minutes after the first appearance of anatase, after which anatase abundance slowly decreases while rutile continues to form. Whole pattern refinement of diffraction data reveals that lattice constants of both phases increase throughout the crystallization process. In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations and kinetic modeling indicate that anatase does not undergo a solid-state transformation to the rutile structure as once thought. Instead, anatase appears to re-dissolve and then feed the growth of already nucleated rutile nanocrystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to model 1, 2, and 3 nm particles of both mineral phases. The total surface energies calculated from these models did yield lower values for anatase than for rutile by 8-13 kJ/mol depending on particle size, indicating that surface free energy is sufficient to account for stability reversal. However, these whole-particle surface energies were much higher than the sum of energies of each particle's constituent crystallographic surfaces. We attribute the excess energy to defects associated with the edges and corners of nanoparticles, which are not present on a 2-D periodic surface. This previously unreported edge and corner energy may play a dominant role in the stability reversal of nanocrystalline titanium oxides, as well as other mineral systems susceptible to reversals in phase stability at the nanoscale.

  3. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  4. Phase-field simulation of irradiated metals Part II : Gas bubble kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P. C.; El-Azab, A.; Wolf, D.

    2011-01-01

    The phase-field model developed in Part I of this work is expanded to include fission gas generation, diffusion, and segregation within bubbles nucleated both homogeneously and heterogeneously along grain boundaries. Illustrative results are presented that characterize bubble growth and shrinkage, as well as the bubble density, size and nucleation rate as a function of the irradiation conditions. Finally, intergranular bubble characteristics such as shape, pinning energy and bubble density are investigated.

  5. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Steady-state and transient nucleation of a new phase in a first-order transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, I. M.

    1988-06-01

    Examples of crystallization of glasses and of the condensation of excitons to form an electron-hole liquid in germanium are used to study the kinetics of nucleation of a new phase. There are considerable advantages in tackling such model systems rather than other systems undergoing a first-order phase transition. Attention is drawn to two different nucleation regimes: transient and quasisteady-state. Special consideration is given to nucleation in an open system from which nuclei of the new phase may be removed rapidly as a result of diffusion or drift to absorbing walls. In such cases very strong supersaturation may be reached and the threshold of the appearance of a new phase may be independent of temperature.

  6. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Krishnan, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The local atomic structures of undercooled liquid metals are presumed to be icosahedral; this order is incompatible with translational periodicity, constituting a barrier to the nucleation of the crystal phase. The extended atomic structure of the icosahedral quasicrystal (i-phase) is similar to that presumed in the undercooled liquid. Therefore, a comparison of the maximum undercooling in alloys that form the i-phase with those that form crystal phases provides a probe of the liquid structure.

  7. Thin interface analysis of a phase-field model for epitaxial growth with nucleation and Ehrlich-Schwoebel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C. L.; Luo, B. C.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, R. L.; Jin, K. X.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we perform thin interface analysis of a quantitative phase field model for epitaxial growth where nucleation and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier have been considered. Results show that once the nucleation term is introduced into the phase-field model, modification must be carried out to get rid of the extrinsic “kinetic nucleation effect”. While in the ES effect, the asymmetric diffusivity accounts for an irrational step motion that leads the model to deviate from the sharp-interface approximation, hence another modification for the attachment time should be carried. Attributed to these modifications, the phase-field model is more quantitative in describing step flow dynamics in the sharp-interface limit, as well as exhibiting the more convergence of the steady-state velocity with respect to the step width for larger scale simulations. Our analysis and modifications explore the quantitative linking between atom motions and step dynamics.

  8. Inherent structures of phase-separating binary mixtures: Nucleation, spinodal decomposition, and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sarmistha; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-03-01

    An energy landscape view of phase separation and nonideality in binary mixtures is developed by exploring their potential energy landscape (PEL) as functions of temperature and composition. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study a model that promotes structure breaking in the solute-solvent parent binary liquid, at low temperatures. The PEL of the system captures the potential energy distribution of the inherent structures (IS) of the system and is obtained by removing the kinetic energy (including that of intermolecular vibrations). The broader distribution of the inherent structure energy for structure breaking liquid than that of the structure making liquid demonstrates the larger role of entropy in stabilizing the parent liquid of the structure breaking type of binary mixtures. At high temperature, although the parent structure of the structure breaking binary mixture is homogenous, the corresponding inherent structure is found to be always phase separated, with a density pattern that exhibits marked correlation with the energy of its inherent structure. Over a broad range of intermediate inherent structure energy, bicontinuous phase separation prevails with interpenetrating stripes as signatures of spinodal decomposition. At low inherent structure energy, the structure is largely phase separated with one interface where as at high inherent structure energy we find nucleation type growth. Interestingly, at low temperature, the average inherent structure energy () exhibits a drop with temperature which signals the onset of crystallization in one of the phases while the other remains in the liquid state. The nonideal composition dependence of viscosity is anticorrelated with average inherent structure energy.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous nucleation and growth in a phase-field model using cell dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2008-02-28

    The homogeneous nucleation and growth in a simplest two-dimensional phase field model is numerically studied using the cell dynamics method. The whole process from nucleation to growth is simulated and is shown to follow closely the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) scenario of phase transformation. Specifically the time evolution of the volume fraction of new stable phase is found to follow closely the KJMA formula. By fitting the KJMA formula directly to the simulation data, not only the Avrami exponent but the magnitude of nucleation rate and, in particular, of incubation time are quantitatively studied. The modified Avrami plot is also used to verify the derived KJMA parameters. It is found that the Avrami exponent is close to the ideal theoretical value m=3. The temperature dependence of nucleation rate follows the activation-type behavior expected from the classical nucleation theory. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of incubation time does not follow the exponential activation-type behavior. Rather the incubation time is inversely proportional to the temperature predicted from the theory of Shneidman and Weinberg [J. Non-Cryst. Solids 160, 89 (1993)]. A need to restrict thermal noise in simulation to deduce correct Avrami exponent is also discussed. PMID:18315058

  10. Possible nucleation of a 2D superconducting phase on WO single crystals surface doped with Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, S.; Tsabba, Y.

    WO3 crystals with a surface composition of Na0.05WO3 were grown. These crystals exhibit a sharp diamagnetic step in magnetization at 91 K, and a magnetic hysteresis below this temperature. As the temperature is lowered below 100 K in transport measurements, a sharp metal to insulator transition is observed, this is followed by a sharp decrease in the resistivity when the temperature is lowered to about 90 K. When the surface of the crystals was covered by gold the depth of the diamagnetic step had decreased considerably. These results indicate a possible nucleation of a superconducting phase on the surface of these crystals. This is a non cuprate system exhibiting a critical temperature in the HTS range.

  11. An anisotropic phase-field crystal model for heterogeneous nucleation of ellipsoidal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieler, R.; Hubert, J.; Li, D.; Verleye, B.; Haberkern, R.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-11-01

    We derive a generalized model for isotropic as well as anisotropic crystal lattice systems of arbitrary Poisson ratio within the framework of the continuum phase-field crystal (PFC) approach (Elder and Grant 2004 Phys. Rev. E 70 051606). To this end we extend the simplest PFC model defined by a free energy functional, which is based upon the Swift-Hohenberg model of pattern formation (Swift and Hohenberg 1993 Phys. Rev. A 15 851) to a conservative, anisotropic Langevin equation. By studying heterogeneous nucleation of ellipsoidal colloids at a wall, we demonstrate the capacity of our approach to contribute to the more precise understanding of condensed matter systems built up from non-spherical units at the atomic scale. In particular we address the question of how (a) the orientation of the ellipsoids as well as (b) the interaction potential with the wall determine the resulting contact angle.

  12. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystal and Polytetrahedral-Phase Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, Anup K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, T. J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2003-01-01

    From extensive ground based work on the phase diagram and undercooling studies of Ti-Zr-Ni alloys, have clearly identified the composition of three different phases with progressively increasing polytetrahedral order such as, (Ti/Zr), the C14 Laves phase, and the i-phase, that nucleate directly from the undercooled liquid. The reduced undercooling decreases progressively with increasing polytetrahedral order in the solid, supporting Frank s hypothesis. A new facility for direct measurements of the structures and phase transitions in undercooled liquids (BESL) was developed and has provided direct proof of the primary nucleation of a metastable icosahedral phase in some Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. The first measurements of specific heat and viscosity in the undercooled liquid of this alloy system have been completed. Other than the importance of thermo-physical properties for modeling nucleation and growth processes in these materials, these studies have also revealed some interesting new results (such as a maximum of C(sup q, sub p) in the undercooled state). These ground-based results have clearly established the necessary background and the need for conducting benchmark nucleation experiments at the ISS on this alloy system.

  13. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor); Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, R. J.; Rogers, J.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Holland-Moritz, D.

    2003-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si, for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron x-ray and high flux neutron facilities, this is shown here.

  14. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation Behavior of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.

    2003-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si[3], for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron x-ray and high flux neutron facilities, this is shown here.

  15. The Connection Between Local Icosahedral Order in Metallic Liquids and the Nucleation of Ordered Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Over fifty years ago, David Turnbull showed that the temperature of many metallic liquids could be decreased far below their equilibrium melting temperature before crystallization occurred. To explain those surprising results, Charles Frank hypothesized that the local structures of undercooled metallic liquids are different from those of crystal phases, containing a significant degree of icosahedral order that is incompatible with extended periodicity. Such structural differences must create a barrier to the formation crystal phases, explaining the observed undercooling behavior. If true, the nucleation from the liquid of phases with extended icosahedral order should be easier. Icosahedral order is often favored in small clusters, as observed recently in liquid-like clusters of pure Pb on the (111) surface of Si(3), for example. However, it has never been shown that an increasing preference for icosahedral phase formation can be directly linked with the development of icosahedral order in the undercooled liquid. Owing to the combination of very recent advances in levitation techniques and the availability of synchrotron X-ray and high flux neutron facilities.

  16. Distinct Nucleation and Propagation Phases of Northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C.; Creager, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    Northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events appear to have distinct nucleation and propagation phases. We find that there is a roughly linear increase in tremor amplitude over the first ~5 days of each ETS event. We observe a corresponding linear increase in the areal distribution of tremor. These episodes typically initiate down dip, and after approximately 5 days have organized and migrated to fill the up-dip/down-dip width of the tremorgenic zone. After this time, tremor amplitudes vary wildly, modulated by tidal stresses, as the tremor propagates along strike in one or both directions at roughly 8 km/day, continuing for 4-5 weeks. Inter-ETS tremor swarms can begin similarly to ETS events, but do not reach the maximum area and amplitude of ETS events, and instead die away in less than 5-10 days. Since the increase in tremor amplitude during the nucleation phase is proportional to the increase in tremoring area, the source amplitude per unit area is approximately constant, indicating a constant radiated energy rate per unit area associated with tremor. In order to estimate tremor amplitude we use three-component seismograms from temporary deployments and permanent stations (Array of Arrays, CAFE, PNSN, TA) to estimate the amplitude of tremor bursts at the source location, using a method similar to Maeda and Obara (JGR, 2009). Source amplitude, or radiated energy rate, is proportional to the root-mean square of band limited (1.5-5.5 Hz) ground velocity for each 5-minute window. Station ground velocities and tremor locations, determined by a waveform envelope cross-correlation method (Wech and Creager, GRL, 2008), are inverted to obtain source amplitude and station statics, taking into account geometrical spreading and attenuation. The result is a catalog of source amplitudes for each of 40,000 tremor locations in northern Cascadia from 2006 to 2011.

  17. An Effective Continuum Model for the Liquid-to-Gas Phase Change in a Porous Medium Driven by Solute Diffusion: II. Constant Liquid Withdrawal Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-15

    This report describes the development of an effective continuum model to describe the nucleation and subsequent growth of a gas phase from a supersaturated, slightly compressible binary liquid in a porous medium, driven by solute diffusion.This report also focuses on the processes resulting from the withdrawal of the liquid at a constant rate. As before, the model addresses two stages before the onset of bulk gas flow, nucleation and gas phase growth. Because of negligible gradients due to gravity or viscous forces, the critical gas saturation, is only a function of the nucleation fraction.

  18. Inclusion phases and the nucleation of acicular ferrite in submerged arc welds in high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. M.; Corbett, J. M.; Kerr, H. W.

    1986-09-01

    Series of submerged arc welds of HSLA steel made with three different fluxes and metallic additions of Ti, Mo, and Cr have been examined to study the inclusions and their role in the nucleation of acicular ferrite. Inclusion phases and compositions have been analyzed by electron diffraction and X-ray microanalysis. These analyses have shown that the inclusions contained many different compounds, the proportions of each depending upon both the flux and metallic additions. Six inclusion phases have been identified: galaxite (Al2O3 ? MnO), a titanium-rich compound (probably TiO), a copper sulfide, a manganese sulfide, a silica, and an aluminum-rich phase. No correlation was found between the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal and either average inclusion composition or individual inclusion phases. No epitaxial relationships between inclusions and adjacent ferrite grains could be identified. It has been concluded that inclusions nucleate acicular ferrite by acting as inert substrates according to the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation. Because most inclusions are multi-phase and are touched by several ferrite grains, it has also been concluded that each inclusion can nucleate several ferrite grains, due to local regions of high surface energy on the inclusion.

  19. Application of Phase-field Method in Predicting Gas Bubble Microstructure Evolution in Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Henager, Charles H.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-04-30

    Fission product accumulation and gas bubble microstructure evolution in nuclear fuels strongly affect thermo-mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity, gas release, volumetric swelling and cracking, and hence the fuel performance. In this paper, a general phase-field model is developed to predict gas bubble formation and evolution. Important materials processes and thermodynamic properties including the generation of gas atoms and vacancies, sinks for vacancies and gas atoms, the elastic interaction among defects, gas re-solution, and inhomogeneity of elasticity and diffusivity are accounted for in the model. The simulations demonstrate the potential application of the phase-field method in investigating 1) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles at defects; 2) effect of elastic interaction, inhomogeneity of material properties, and gas re-solution on gas bubble microstructures; and 3) effective properties from the output of phase-field simulations such as distribution of defects, gas bubbles, and stress fields.

  20. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  1. Nucleation and growth phases in the polymerization of coat and scaffolding subunits into icosahedral procapsid shells.

    PubMed Central

    Prevelige, P E; Thomas, D; King, J

    1993-01-01

    The polymerization of protein subunits into precursor shells empty of DNA is a critical process in the assembly of double-stranded DNA viruses. For the well-characterized icosahedral procapsid of phage P22, coat and scaffolding protein subunits do not assemble separately but, upon mixing, copolymerize into double-shelled procapsids in vitro. The polymerization reaction displays the characteristics of a nucleation limited reaction: a paucity of intermediate assembly states, a critical concentration, and kinetics displaying a lag phase. Partially formed shell intermediates were directly visualized during the growth phase by electron microscopy of the reaction mixture. The morphology of these intermediates suggests that assembly is a highly directed process. The initial rate of this reaction depends on the fifth power of the coat subunit concentration and the second or third power of the scaffolding concentration, suggesting that pentamer of coat protein and dimers or trimers of scaffolding protein, respectively, participate in the rate-limiting step. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8471727

  2. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique ‘two-step' dynamics, with a robust ‘plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation. PMID:26478194

  3. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-10-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (η) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of η exhibits unique `two-step' dynamics, with a robust `plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  4. Studies of Nucleation, Growth, Specific Heat, and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Croat, T. K.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Undercooling experiments and thermal physical property measurements of metallic alloys on the International Space Station (ISS) are planned. This recently-funded research focuses on fundamental issues of the formation and structure of highly-ordered non-crystallographic phases (quasicrystals) and related crystal phases (crystal approximants), and the connections between the atomic structures of these phases and those of liquids and glasses. It extends studies made previously by us of the composition dependence of crystal nucleation processes in silicate and metallic glasses, to the case of nucleation from the liquid phase. Motivating results from rf-levitation and drop-tube measurements of the undercooling of Ti/Zr-based liquids that form quasicrystals and crystal approximants are discussed. Preliminary measurements by electrostatic levitation (ESL) are presented.

  5. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF IRRADIATED METALS: PART II: GAS BUBBLE KINETICS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C Millett; Anter El-Azab

    2011-01-01

    We present a phase-field model for inert gas bubble formation and evolution in irradiated metals. The model evolves vacancy, self-interstitial, and fission gas atoms through a coupled set of Cahn-Hilliard and Allen-Cahn equations, capturing the processes of defect generation, recombination, annihilation at GB sinks, as well as intragranular and intergranular bubble nucleation and growth in polycrystalline microstructures. Illustrative results are presented that characterize bubble growth and shrinkage, as well as the bubble density, size and nucleation rate as a function of varying irradiation conditions. Finally, intergranular bubble characteristics such as shape, pinning energy on GB motion, and bubble density are investigated.

  6. Reduced sediment melting at 7.5-12 GPa: phase relations, geochemical signals and diamond nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, G. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Bulatov, V. K.; Höfer, H. E.; Gerdes, A.; Woodland, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    Melting of carbonated sediment in the presence of graphite or diamond was experimentally investigated at 7.5-12 GPa and 800-1600 °C in a multianvil apparatus. Two starting materials similar to GLOSS of Plank and Langmuir (Chem Geol 145:325-394, 1998) were prepared from oxides, carbonates, hydroxides and graphite. One mixture (Na-gloss) was identical in major element composition to GLOSS, and the other was poorer in Na and richer in K (K-gloss). Both starting mixtures contained ~6 wt% CO2 and 7 wt% H2O and were doped at a ~100 ppm level with a number of trace elements, including REE, LILE and HFSE. The near-solidus mineral assemblage contained a silica polymorph (coesite or stishovite), garnet, kyanite, clinopyroxene, carbonates (aragonite and magnesite-siderite solid solution), zircon, rutile, bearthite and hydrous phases (phengite and lawsonite at <9 GPa and the hydrous aluminosilicates topaz-OH and phase egg at >10 GPa). Hydrous phases disappear at ~900 °C, and carbonates persist up to 1000-1100 °C. At temperatures >1200 °C, the mineral assemblage consists of coesite or stishovite, kyanite and garnet. Clinopyroxene stability depends strongly on the Na content in the starting mixture; it remains in the Na-gloss composition up to 1600 °C at 12 GPa, but was not observed in K-gloss experiments above 1200 °C. The composition of melt or fluid changes gradually with increasing temperature from hydrous carbonate-rich (<10 wt% SiO2) at 800-1000 °C to volatile-rich silicate liquids (up to 40 wt% SiO2) at high temperatures. Trace elements were analyzed in melts and crystalline phases by LA ICP MS. The garnet-melt and clinopyroxene-melt partition coefficients are in general consistent with results from the literature for volatile-free systems and silicocarbonate melts derived by melting carbonated peridotites. Most trace elements are strongly incompatible in kyanite and silica polymorphs ( D < 0.01), except for V, Cr and Ni, which are slightly compatible in kyanite ( D > 1). Aragonite and Fe-Mg carbonate have very different REE partition coefficients ( D Mst-Sd/L ~ 0.01 and D Arg/L ~ 1). Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf are strongly incompatible in both carbonates. The bearthite/melt partition coefficients are very high for LREE (>10) and decrease to ~1 for HREE. All HFSE are strongly incompatible in bearthite. In contrast, Ta, Nb, Zr and Hf are moderately to strongly compatible in ZrSiO4 and TiO2 phases. Based on the obtained partition coefficients, the composition of a mobile phase derived by sediment melting in deep subduction zones was calculated. This phase is strongly enriched in incompatible elements and displays a pronounced negative Ta-Nb anomaly but no Zr-Hf anomaly. Although all experiments were conducted in the diamond stability field, only graphite was observed in low-temperature experiments. Spontaneous diamond nucleation and the complete transformation of graphite to diamond were observed at temperatures above 1200-1300 °C. We speculate that the observed character of graphite-diamond transformation is controlled by relationships between the kinetics of metastable graphite dissolution and diamond nucleation in a hydrous silicocarbonate melt that is oversaturated in C.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of fission gas bubble nucleation in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.-Y.; Andersson, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study helium and xenon gas bubble nucleation in UO2. For helium bubbles, the pressure release mechanism is by creating defects on the oxygen sublattice. Helium atoms diffuse away from the bubbles into nearby bulk UO2, thus forming a diffuse interface. For xenon bubbles, over-pressurized bubbles containing xenon can displace uranium atoms, which tend to aggregate around the xenon bubble as a pressure release mechanism. MD simulations of xenon atoms in pre-existing voids suggest that xenon atoms and the replaced uranium atoms occur in a 1:1 ratio, although kinetic factors may reduce that ratio depending on availability of xenon atoms and vacancies around the bubble. Finally, MD simulations suggest that for small bubbles (1-5 xenon atoms), the xenon bubble nucleus at UO2 grain-boundaries has much lower formation energy compared to that of bubbles of similar sizes in the bulk. However, when the xenon bubble grows into larger sizes, this energy difference is reduced.

  8. Phase-field simulations of gas density within bubbles under irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Anter El-Azab; Michael Tonks

    2011-05-01

    Phase-field simulations are used to study the evolution of gas density within irradiation-induced bubbles. In our simulations, the dpa rate, gas production rate, and defect diffusivities are systematically varied to understand their effect on bubble nucleation rates, bubble densities, and the distribution of gas concentration within bubbles and in the solid regions. We find that gas densities within bubbles fluctuate drastically in the early nucleation stages, when growth rates are highest, but converge to steady-state values during the later coarsening stages. The steady-state gas densities within bubbles correspond with the ratio of total accumulated vacancy content divided by the total accumulated gas content, in agreement with a thermodynamic analysis concerning free-energy minimization.

  9. Effects of strain on phonon interactions and phase nucleation in several semiconductor and nano particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Robert E.

    Raman scattering is utilized to explore the effects of applied pressure and strain on anharmonic phonon interactions and nucleation of structural transitions in several bulk and nanoparticle semiconductor systems. The systems investigated are bulk ZnS and ZnSe in several isotopic compositions, InP/CdS core/shell nanoparticles exhibiting confined and surface optical Raman modes, and amorphous selenium films undergoing photo-induced crystallization. The anharmonic decay of long-wavelength optical modes into two-phonon acoustic combinations modes is studied in 64Zn32S, 64Zn34S, natZnatS bulk crystals by measuring the TO(Gamma) Raman line-shape as a function of applied hydrostatic pressure. The experiments are carried out at room temperature and 16K for pressures up to 150 kbars using diamond-anvil cells. The most striking effects occur in 68Zn32S where the TO(Gamma) peak narrows by a factor of 10 and increases in intensity at pressures for which the TO(Gamma) frequency has been tuned into a gap in the two-phonon density of states (DOS). In all the isotopic compositions, the observed phonon decay processes can be adequately explained by a second order perturbation treatment of the anharmonic coupling between TO(Gamma) and TA + LA combinations at various critical points, combined with an adiabatic bond-charge model for the phonon DOS and the known mode Gruneisen parameters. Bulk ZnSe crystals exhibit very different behavior. Here we find that anharmonic decay alone can not explain the excessive (˜ 60 cm-1 ) broadening in the TO(Gamma) Raman peak observed as the pressure approaches to within 50kbar of the ZB -> B1 phase transition (at P ˜ 137 kbar). Rather the broadening appears to arise from antecedent nucleation of structural changes within nanoscopic domains, with the mechanism for line-shape changes being mode mixing via localization and disorder instead of anharmonicity. To sort out these contributions, pressure experiments on natural ZnSe and on isotopically pure 68Zn76Se are compared. Again we use an appropriate bond-charge model to obtain the phonon DOS. It is concluded that the antecedent nucleation mechanism is much more important in ZnSe than in ZnS. In order to further investigate interactions of vibrational modes in spatially confined systems, pressure-Raman experiments are carried out on InP/CdS core/shell nanoparticles. This system differs from most other core/shell nanoparticles systems, in that the near degeneracy of the bulk InP TO(Gamma) and CdS LO(Gamma) phonons leads to possible cross-interface mode coupling. Different confined and surface (or interface) optical modes are studied as a function of pressure up 65 kbar at 373 and 230 K. The results are compared with the predictions of dielectric continuum theory using a phenomenological macroscopic approach (PMA) to include the pressure dependence. Three different pressure media are employed, and the effects on the surface modes of their different static dielectric constants are investigated. The pressure-shifts of the observed confined and surface modes are well accounted for without the need to include cross-interface coupling. We conclude that the conventional boundary condition, of vanishing phonon amplitude at the heterointerface, remains valid in the InP/CdS nanoparticle system, in spite of the near degeneracy of the bulk optical phonons. Photo-induced crystallization in amorphous selenium (a-Se) was also explored in this dissertation, as another example of a nanoscopic nucleation process influenced by strain, in this case internal strain. In order to observe photo-crystallization, the Raman spectra of commercial a-Se films used as targets in high-gain avalanche rushing photodetectors (HARP) cameras was studied at temperatures in the range 260 - 330 K. We find a rich temperature behavior that reflects the competition of changes in viscosity and strain, and defines four distinct regimes. These results are in qualitative accord with a theory by R.B.Stephens treating the effects of local strain on the secondary growth of crystalline nuclei in a-Se. We were able to conclude that the growth of trigonal selenium is driven by local strain, and that the relaxation of this strain field around the glass transition temperature suppresses crystalline growth until thermally assisted processes accelerate the photo-crystallization at higher temperatures. The observed nucleation kinetics was also found to be relevant to understanding the formation of blemishes in the output images of advanced HARP video cameras.

  10. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    SciTech Connect

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  11. On the effect of pressure and carrier gas on homogeneous water nucleation.

    PubMed

    Fransen, M A L J; Hrubý, J; Smeulders, D M J; van Dongen, M E H

    2015-04-28

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of water droplets were measured at a nucleation temperature close to 240 K in a Pulse-Expansion Wave Tube (PEWT). Several measures were taken to improve the data obtained with the PEWT. For instance, the molar water vapor fraction was determined with three independent techniques. The resulting standard uncertainty of the supersaturation was within 1.8%. Results are given for water nucleation in helium at 100 kPa and at 1000 kPa and in nitrogen at 1000 kPa. Two trends were observed: (i) the values of the nucleation rate of water in helium at 1000 kPa are slightly but significantly higher (factor 3) than its values at 100 kPa and (ii) nucleation rates of water in nitrogen at 1000 kPa are clearly higher (factor 10) than in helium at the same pressure. It is argued that the explanation of the two observed trends is different. For case (i), it is the insufficient thermalization of the growing water clusters in helium at the lowest pressure that has a reducing effect on the nucleation rate, although a full quantitative agreement has not yet been reached. For case (ii), thermal effects being negligible, it is the pressure dependency of the surface tension, much stronger for nitrogen than for helium, that explains the trends observed, although also here a full quantitative agreement has not yet been achieved. PMID:25933764

  12. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  13. Melting and nucleation temperatures of three salt hydrate phase change materials under static pressures up to 800 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Eva; Mehling, Harald; Werner, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are used for efficient thermal energy storage. When a PCM melts and solidifies, it absorbs and releases a large amount of heat within a small temperature interval. Salt hydrates are interesting PCMs with high storage density, but their solidification is often problematic due to large subcooling. From thermodynamic theory, it should be possible to cause nucleation by applying high pressure to the subcooled melt, and thereby reduce subcooling. However, for the design of a pressure based triggering system there are still many unknown factors. In this context, we investigated the pressure dependence of the melting and nucleation temperatures. We present experimental data of three inorganic PCMs under static pressures up to 800 MPa. For NaOAc · 3H2O we observed a shifting of the nucleation temperature from -20°C at ambient pressure to +40°C at 800 MPa. This confirms that within this pressure range, the nucleation temperature of NaOAc · 3H2O is shifted above room temperature. For CaCl2 · 6H2O, a good agreement with reported melting temperature data was observed, and the range of experimental data was extended. For KF · 4H2O, the shift of the melting temperature was found to differ considerably from theoretic predictions.

  14. Transient nucleation in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

  15. The effects of hygroscopicity on ice nucleation of fossil fuel combustion aerosols in mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.; Popovicheva, O.

    2013-04-01

    Fossil fuel black carbon and organic matter (ffBC/OM) are often emitted together with sulfate, which coats the surface of these particles and changes their hygroscopicity. Observational studies at cirrus temperatures (?-40 C) show that the hygroscopicity of soot particles can modulate their ice nucleation ability. Here, we implement a scheme for 3 categories of soot (hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hygroscopic) on the basis of laboratory data and specify their ability to act as ice nuclei at mixed-phase temperatures by extrapolating the observations using a published deposition/condensation/immersion freezing parameterization. The new scheme results in significant changes to anthropogenic forcing in mixed-phase clouds. The net forcing in our offline model studies varies from 0.111 to 1.059 W m-2 depending on the ice nucleation capability of hygroscopic soot particles. The total anthropogenic cloud forcing and whole-sky forcing with the new scheme are 0.06 W m-2 and -2.45 W m-2, respectively, but could be more positive (by about 1.17 W m-2) if hygroscopic soot particles are allowed to nucleate ice particles. The change in liquid water path dominates the anthropogenic forcing in mixed-phase clouds.

  16. A Refined Approach to Bubble Nucleation and Polymer Foaming Process: Dissolved Gas and Cluster Size Effects

    PubMed

    Lee; Flumerfelt

    1996-12-25

    A refined approach to bubble nucleation is presented and applied to polymer foaming process. The integral overall energy balance and the integral Clausius-Duhem inequality are used to analyze a bubble nucleation experiment. The computation of long-range intermolecular potential results in expressions for surface tension, work, and critical work for cluster formation, as functions of the Hamaker constant, molecular and/or repeat unit interaction distance, molar fractions of each component, and cluster radius. The variation of surface tension with cluster size, temperature, and pressure is determined in terms of well-known macroscopic properties and compared with available experimental data. PMID:8978536

  17. Phase field models for heterogeneous nucleation: Application to inoculation in alpha-solidifying Ti-Al-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, M.; Eiken, J.; Hecht, U.

    2014-02-01

    This paper aims at briefly reviewing phase field models applied to the simulation of heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth, with special emphasis on grain refinement by inoculation. The spherical cap and free growth model (e.g. A.L. Greer, et al., Acta Mater. 48, 2823 (2000)) has proven its applicability for different metallic systems, e.g. Al or Mg based alloys, by computing the grain refinement effect achieved by inoculation of the melt with inert seeding particles. However, recent experiments with peritectic Ti-Al-B alloys revealed that the grain refinement by TiB2 is less effective than predicted by the model. Phase field simulations can be applied to validate the approximations of the spherical cap and free growth model, e.g. by computing explicitly the latent heat release associated with different nucleation and growth scenarios. Here, simulation results for point-shaped nucleation, as well as for partially and completely wetted plate-like seed particles will be discussed with respect to recalescence and impact on grain refinement. It will be shown that particularly for large seeding particles (up to 30 ?m), the free growth morphology clearly deviates from the assumed spherical cap and the initial growth - until the free growth barrier is reached - significantly contributes to the latent heat release and determines the recalescence temperature.

  18. Finite-Size Effects on Liquid-Solid Phase Coexistence and the Estimation of Crystal Nucleation Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statt, Antonia; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fluid in equilibrium in a finite volume V with particle number N at a density ρ =N /V exceeding the onset density ρf of freezing may exhibit phase coexistence between a crystalline nucleus and surrounding fluid. Using a method suitable for the estimation of the chemical potential of dense fluids, we obtain the excess free energy due to the surface of the crystalline nucleus. There is neither a need to precisely locate the interface nor to compute the (anisotropic) interfacial tension. As a test case, a soft version of the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures is treated. While our analysis is appropriate for crystal nuclei of arbitrary shape, we find the nucleation barrier to be compatible with a spherical shape and consistent with classical nucleation theory.

  19. Gas phase kinetics during normal combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, C. F.; Boggs, T. L.; Eisel, J. L.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The role of gas phase kinetics during combustion was explored in the steady state modeling efforts and in the analysis of ignition phenomena. In both cases it was shown that the combustion characteristics of some high energy ingredients and propellants are strongly affected, if not dictated, by the gas phase reactions which take place.

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V.

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V ˙ ≡ d V / d t , x ˙ , and T ˙ . The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for T ˙ is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal.

  1. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V̇≡dV/dt, ẋ, and Ṫ. The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for Ṫ is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal. PMID:26254656

  2. Quantification of gypsum crystal nucleation, growth, and breakage rates in a wet flue gas desulfurization pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, B.B.; Kiil, S.; Johnsson, J.E.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of nucleation, growth and breakage on the particle size distribution (PSD) of gypsum crystals produced by the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. The steady state PSD, obtained in a falling film wet FGD pilot plant during desulfurization of a 1000 ppm(V) SO{sub 2} gas stream, displayed a strong nonlinear behaviour (in a ln(n(l)) vs. I plot) at the lower end of the particle size range, compared to the well-known linear mixed suspension mixed product removal model. A transient population balance breakage model, fitted to experimental data, was able to model an increase in the fraction of small particles, but not to the extent observed experimentally. A three-parameter, size-dependent growth model, previously used for sodium sulphate decahydrate and potash alum, was able to describe the experimental data, indicating either size-dependent integration kinetics or growth rate dispersion.

  3. Two-step nucleation of the g-phase in a Ti-45Al-18Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Goyel, Sonalika; Rios, Orlando; Kesler, Michael; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh

    2010-01-01

    Phase transformations in a high Nb TieAleNb alloy (Ti-45Al-18Nb at%) upon cooling were studied. This alloy solidifies as single b-phase, which upon cooling under equilibrium conditions, is expected to follow the b / b g / b g s / g s transformation path. The DTA analysis confirmed two transformation events as manifested by two peaks upon cooling. However, compositional and structural characterization of samples with different heat treatment schedules, including slow cooling (9 C/min), revealed that the s-phase did not form upon cooling. The two DTA peaks observed in the cooling cycle of the alloy are proven to be associated with the two-stage formation of the g-phase. Detailed microstructural evaluations showed that the g-phase nucleated in two discrete stages and exhibited two different morphologies. The absence of the s-phase is believed to be due to the lack of enough driving force at high temperatures. The aging of a fast cooled sample, yielding an equilibrated microstructure, substantiated the presence of the s-phase.

  4. Studies on pressure response of gas bubbles contributions of condensed droplets in bubbles generated by a uniform nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a tiny gas bubble under reduced pressure is investigated in its relation to cavitation. Equations of motion are formulated for gas mixtures inside the bubble and numerical calculations performed for several examples. The conclusions are as follows: (1) at the onset of bubble growth, the gas mixture inside it adiabatically expands and the temperature decreases. Condensed droplets appear inside the gas mixture due to a uniform nucleation and the temperature recovers, thus the motion of the bubble is apparently isothermal; (2) the evaporation and condensation coefficient largely affects bubble motions (maximum radius, period and rate of attenuation of the bubble oscillation) including the uniform contraction; (3) the oscillation period of the bubble is longer as the equilibrium bubble radius is larger when the surrounding pressure decreases stepwise. In this circumstance the temperature inside the bubble is kept constant due to condensation evaporation phenomena and is nearly isothermal; and (4) when the surrounding pressure decreases in a stepwise fashion, the critical pressure bubble radius relation becomes closer to that for the isothermal process if the bubble radius is larger than 8 microns.

  5. Tetragonal Lysozyme Nucleation and Crystal Growth: The Role of the Solution Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sumida, John; Maxwell, Daniel; Gorti, Sridhar

    2002-01-01

    Lysozyme, and most particularly the tetragonal form of the protein, has become the default standard protein for use in macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth studies. There is a substantial body of experimental evidence, from this and other laboratories, that strongly suggests this proteins crystal nucleation and growth is by addition of associated species that are preformed by standard reversible concentration-driven self association processes in the bulk solution. The evidence includes high resolution AFM studies of the surface packing and of growth unit size at incorporation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements of intermolecular distances in dilute solution, dialysis kinetics, and modeling of the growth rate data. We have developed a selfassociation model for the proteins crystal nucleation and growth. The model accounts for the obtained crystal symmetry, explains the observed surface structures, and shows the importance of the symmetry obtained by self-association in solution to the process as a whole. Further, it indicates that nucleation and crystal growth are not distinct mechanistically, but identical, with the primary difference being the probability that the particle will continue to grow or dissolve. This model also offers a possible mechanism for fluid flow effects on the growth process and how microgravity may affect it. While a single lysozyme molecule is relatively small (M.W. = 14,400), a structured octamer in the 4(sub 3) helix configuration (the proposed average sized growth unit) would have a M.W. = 115,000 and dimensions of 5.6 x 5.6 x 7.6 nm. Direct AFM measurements of growth unit incorporation indicate that units as wide as 11.2 nm and as long as 11.4 nm commonly attach to the crystal. These measurements were made at approximately saturation conditions, and they reflect the sizes of species that both added or desorbed from the crystal surface. The larger and less isotropic the associated species the more likely that it will be oriented to some degree in a flowing boundary layer, even at the low flow velocities measured about macromolecule crystals. Flow-driven effects resulting in misorientation upon addition to and incorporation into the crystal need only be a small fraction of a percentage to significantly affect the resulting crystal. One Earth, concentration gradient driven flow will maintain a high interfacial concentration, i.e., a high level (essentially that of the bulk solution) of solute association at the interface and higher growth rate. Higher growth rates mean an increased probability that misaligned growth units are trapped by subsequent growth layers before they can be desorbed and try again, or that the desorbing species will be smaller than the adsorbing species. In microgravity the extended diffusive boundary layer will lower the interfacial concentration. This results in a net dissociation of aggregated species that diffuse in from the bulk solution, i.e., smaller associated species, which are more likely able to make multiple attempts to correctly bind, yielding higher quality crystals.

  6. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  7. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  8. Atmospheric nucleation: Measurements, mechanisms, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Chongai

    New particle formation by nucleation of gas-phase species significantly influences the size distributions and number concentrations of atmospheric aerosols. These nucleated particles are formed at rates that are orders of magnitude higher than were predicted by early models and grow at rates that are typically ten times faster than can be explained by the condensation of sulfuric acid alone. The resultant aerosols exert a significant impact on global climate by affecting the earth's radiation balance directly through the scattering and absorption of incident solar radiation, and indirectly through their role as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). High formation rates and fast growth to CCN sizes ensure that NPF contributes significantly to the global CCN population. It is the primary goal of the research described in this thesis to develop robust models, constrained by measurement, for the sequential formation of CCN from the nucleation of gas-phase precursors. To this end, my thesis focuses on four topics: the development of nucleation rate parameterizations from correlations between formation rates of 1 nm particles and gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations in diverse environments; the development of a cluster formation mechanism incorporating energetic barriers at the smallest clusters; the derivation of a simple, dimensionless criterion determining whether or not NPF would occur on a particular day; and the determination of the survival probability of newly formed particles (3 nm) as they grow to a CCN-active size (100 nm).

  9. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  10. Sulfate aerosol nucleation, primary emissions, and cloud radiative forcing in the aerosol- climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; Rast, S.; Stier, P.; Feichter, J.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol nucleation from the gas phase is a major source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei and consequently of cloud droplets. Nucleation can therefore act upon cloud radiative properties, cloud lifetimes, and precipitation rates via the first and second indirect aerosol effect. However, freshly nucleated particles measure a few nanometers in diameter, and need to grow to sizes of tens of nanometers in order to participate in atmospherically relevant processes. Depending on the availability of condensable molecules, this process may proceed on time scales between minutes to days. Concurrently, the aerosol particles that formed from the gas phase compete with aerosol particles emitted from the surface for condensable material. Therefore, cloud radiative properties, cloud lifetimes, and precipitation rates will depend to various degrees on aerosol nucleation rates and on the individual nucleation pathways. We have implemented a scheme describing the formation of new particles from the gas phase based on laboratory thermochemical data for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water into the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. Here we discuss the role of new particle formation from the gas phase for cloud radiative properties and the contributions of the considered nucleation pathways as well as of particulate sulfate emissions. Our simulations show that sulfate aerosol nucleation plays an important role for cloud radiative forcing, in particular over the oceans and in the southern hemisphere. A comparison of the simulated cloud radiative forcing with satellite observations shows the best agreement when both neutral and charged nucleation proceed, with neutral nucleation playing a minor role in the current model version. In contrast, switching off nucleation leads to a systematic bias of the results away from the observations, indicating an important role of aerosol nucleation in the climate system. Discrepancies of results and observations, in particular in the northern hemisphere may be possibly explained with unaccounted nucleation mechanisms, such as ternary and organic nucleation.

  11. Nucleation Behavior of Oxygen-Acetylene Torch-Produced Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E.

    2003-01-01

    A mechanism is presented for the nucleation of diamond in the combustion flame environment. A series of six experiments and two associated simulations provide results from which the mechanism was derived. A substantial portion of the prior literature was reviewed and the data and conclusions from the previous experimenters were found to support the proposed mechanism. The nucleation mechanism builds on the work of previous researchers but presents an approach to nucleation in a detail and direction not fully presented heretofore. This work identifies the gas phase as the controlling environment for the initial formation steps leading to nucleation. The developed mechanism explains some of the difficulty which has been found in producing single crystal epitaxial films. An experiment which modified the initial gas phase precursor using methane and carbon monoxide is presented. Addition of methane into the precursor gases was found to be responsible for pillaring of the films. Atomic force microscopy surface roughness data provides a reasonable look at suppression of nucleation by carbon monoxide. Surface finish data was taken on crystals which were open to the nucleation environment and generally parallel to the substrate surface. The test surfaces were measured as an independent measure of the instantaneous nucleation environent. A gas flow and substrate experiment changed the conditions on the surface of the sample by increasing the gas flow rate while remaining on a consistent point of the atomic constituent diagram, and by changing the carbide potential of the substrate. Two tip modification experiments looked at the behavior of gas phase nucleation by modifying the shape and behavior of the flame plasma in which the diamond nucleation is suspected to occur. Diamond nucleation and growth was additionally examined using a high-velocity oxygen fuel gun and C3H6 as the fuel gas phase precursor with addition of carbon monoxide gas 01 addition of liquid toluene.

  12. Site-selective patterning of organic luminescent molecules via gas phase deposition.

    PubMed

    Hao, Juanyuan; Lu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Hu, Wei; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongyu; Wu, Ying; Wang, Yue; Chi, Lifeng

    2008-05-20

    In this paper, we present a bottom-up approach to pattern organic luminescent molecules with a feature size down to sub-100 nm over wafer-sized areas. This method is based on the selective gas deposition of organic molecules on self-organized patterned structures, which consist of an organic monolayer with two different phases rather than different materials. The site selectivity is controllable by deposition rate and the pattern features. The reason for the site selectivity may be due to the nucleation and diffusion behaviors of the deposited organic molecules on different monolayer phases. PMID:18370416

  13. Sizes of nanobubbles from nucleation rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilemski, G.

    2003-03-01

    In homogeneous bubble nucleation, the critical nucleus typically has nanometer dimensions. The volume V of a critical bubble can be determined from the simple equation (partial W/partial p)_T=V, where W is the reversible work of nucleus formation and p is the ambient pressure of the liquid phase in which bubble formation is occurring. The relation, W/kT=-ln J+ln A, where J is the steady state nucleation rate and A is the weakly pressure-dependent kinetic prefactor, allows V to be determined from rate measurements. The original derivation of this equation for V from the nucleation theorem was limited to one-component, ideal gas bubbles with a gas density much smaller than that of the ambient liquid. [D. Kashchiev, Nucleation: basic theory with applications (Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford, 2000) p. 226.] The result is actually much more general, and it will be shown that it applies to multi-component, nonideal gas bubbles, provided the same density inequality holds. When the bubble phase and liquid densities are comparable, a more complicated, but also general and rigorous result is found.

  14. Nucleation at the fluctuation induced first order phase transition to superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. E.; Radievsky, A. V.; Zeltser, A. S.

    1994-08-01

    The kinetics of fluctuations arising from vortex pairs in a superconductor at the phase transition from the paraphase to the ordered state is studied. It is shown by numerical simulations that these pairs are generated by typical configurations of the two-component order parameter due to its interaction with a (gauge) electromagnetic field. The role of these excitations in the first order phase transition is discussed.

  15. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  16. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  17. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  18. Initial nucleation site formation due to acoustic droplet vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Brian Fowlkes, J.; Bull, Joseph L.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) is the selective vaporization of liquid microdroplets using ultrasound, resulting in gas bubbles. The ADV process has been proposed as a tool in biomedical applications such as gas embolotherapy, drug delivery, and phase-change contrast agents. Using a 7.5 MHz focused transducer, the initial gas nucleus formed in perfluorocarbon microdroplets was directly visualized using ultra-high speed imaging. The experimental results of initial nucleation site location were compared to a 2D axisymmetric linear acoustic model investigating the focal spot of the acoustic wave within the microdroplets. Results suggest a wavelength to droplet diameter dependence on nucleation site formation.

  19. Link between liquid structure and the nucleation barrier for icosahedral quasicrystal, polytetrahedral, and simple crystalline phases in Ti-Zr-Ni alloys: Verification of Frank's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G. W.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Croat, T. K.; Rathz, T. J.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Kelton, K. F.

    2005-11-01

    Comprehensive undercooling experiments on a large number of simple crystalline, polytetrahedral, and icosahedral quasicrystalline phase forming compositions in Ti-Zr-Ni alloys have been carried out using electrostatic levitation (ESL) techniques for containerless processing. Consistent with Frank’s hypothesis, a direct correlation was found between the reduced undercooling [ ΔTr=(Tl-Tr)/Tl , where Tr and Tl are the nucleation and liquidus temperatures, respectively] and the icosahedral short-range order in the solid. The reduced undercooling is less for liquids that form the icosahedral quasicrystal ( i phase) than for those that form the hcp C14 Laves polytetrahedral phase. For many compositions near 21at.% Ni, the primary nucleation of a metastable i phase instead of a stable C14 Laves phase demonstrates that the interfacial free energy between the liquid and the i phase is smaller than between the liquid and the C14 Laves phase, indicating icosahedral local order in the undercooled liquid. This is in agreement with a classical-nucleation-theory-based estimate of the interfacial free energy and the work of formation of the critical cluster from the undercooling data. Taken together with high-energy x-ray diffraction studies of the undercooled liquid, these results demonstrate that the local structure of liquids in Ti-Zr-Ni alloys is icosahedral, as postulated by Frank over a half century ago.

  20. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  1. Isothermal nucleation and growth kinetics of Pd/Ag alloy phase via in-situ time-resolved high-temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayturk, Mahmut Engin; Payzant, E Andrew; Speakman, Scott A; Ma, Yi Hua

    2008-01-01

    Among several different approaches to form Pd/Ag alloys for hydrogen separation applications, ex-situ studies carried by conventional X-ray point scanning detectors might fail to reveal the key aspects of the phase transformation between Pd and Ag metals. In this respect, in-situ time-resolved high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) was employed to study the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth kinetics. By the use of linear position sensitive detectors, advanced optics and profile fitting with the use of JADE-6.5 software, isothermal phase evolution of the Pd/Ag alloy at 500 C, 550 C and 600 C under hydrogen atmosphere were quantified to elucidate the mechanistic details of the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth pattern. Analysis of the HTXRD data by the Avrami model indicated that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was instantaneous where the growth mechanism was through diffusion-controlled one-dimensional thickening of the Pd/Ag alloy layer. The value of the Avrami exponent, n, was found to increase with temperature with the values of 0.34, 0.39 and 0.67 at 500oC, 550oC and 600oC, respectively. In addition, parabolic rate law analysis suggested that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was through a heterogeneous nucleation mode, in which the nucleation sites were defined as the non-equilibrium defects. The cross-sectional SEI micrographs indicated that the Pd/Ag alloy phase growth was strongly dependent upon the deposition morphology of the as-synthesized Pd and Ag layers formed by the electroless plating. Based on the Avrami model and the parabolic rate law, the estimated activation energies for the phase transformation were 236.5 and 185.6 kJ/mol and in excellent agreement with the literature values (183-239.5 kJ/mol).

  2. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  3. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  4. Polymorphic phase transition among the titania crystal structures using a solution-based approach: from precursor chemistry to nucleation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Girish; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystalline titania are a robust candidate for various functional applications owing to its non-toxicity, cheap availability, ease of preparation and exceptional photochemical as well as thermal stability. The uniqueness in each lattice structure of titania leads to multifaceted physico-chemical and opto-electronic properties, which yield different functionalities and thus influence their performances in various green energy applications. The high temperature treatment for crystallizing titania triggers inevitable particle growth and the destruction of delicate nanostructural features. Thus, the preparation of crystalline titania with tunable phase/particle size/morphology at low to moderate temperatures using a solution-based approach has paved the way for further exciting areas of research. In this focused review, titania synthesis from hydrothermal/solvothermal method, conventional sol-gel method and sol-gel-assisted method via ultrasonication, photoillumination and ILs, thermolysis and microemulsion routes are discussed. These wet chemical methods have broader visibility, since multiple reaction parameters, such as precursor chemistry, surfactants, chelating agents, solvents, mineralizer, pH of the solution, aging time, reaction temperature/time, inorganic electrolytes, can be easily manipulated to tune the final physical structure. This review sheds light on the stabilization/phase transformation pathways of titania polymorphs like anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) under a variety of reaction conditions. The driving force for crystallization arising from complex species in solution coupled with pH of the solution and ion species facilitating the orientation of octahedral resulting in a crystalline phase are reviewed in detail. In addition to titanium halide/alkoxide, the nucleation of titania from other precursors like peroxo and layered titanates are also discussed. The non-aqueous route and ball milling-induced titania transformation is briefly outlined; moreover, the lacunae in understanding the concepts and future prospects in this exciting field are suggested.

  5. Polymorphic phase transition among the titania crystal structures using a solution-based approach: from precursor chemistry to nucleation process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Girish; Rao, K S R Koteswara

    2014-10-21

    Nanocrystalline titania are a robust candidate for various functional applications owing to its non-toxicity, cheap availability, ease of preparation and exceptional photochemical as well as thermal stability. The uniqueness in each lattice structure of titania leads to multifaceted physico-chemical and opto-electronic properties, which yield different functionalities and thus influence their performances in various green energy applications. The high temperature treatment for crystallizing titania triggers inevitable particle growth and the destruction of delicate nanostructural features. Thus, the preparation of crystalline titania with tunable phase/particle size/morphology at low to moderate temperatures using a solution-based approach has paved the way for further exciting areas of research. In this focused review, titania synthesis from hydrothermal/solvothermal method, conventional sol-gel method and sol-gel-assisted method via ultrasonication, photoillumination and ILs, thermolysis and microemulsion routes are discussed. These wet chemical methods have broader visibility, since multiple reaction parameters, such as precursor chemistry, surfactants, chelating agents, solvents, mineralizer, pH of the solution, aging time, reaction temperature/time, inorganic electrolytes, can be easily manipulated to tune the final physical structure. This review sheds light on the stabilization/phase transformation pathways of titania polymorphs like anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) under a variety of reaction conditions. The driving force for crystallization arising from complex species in solution coupled with pH of the solution and ion species facilitating the orientation of octahedral resulting in a crystalline phase are reviewed in detail. In addition to titanium halide/alkoxide, the nucleation of titania from other precursors like peroxo and layered titanates are also discussed. The non-aqueous route and ball milling-induced titania transformation is briefly outlined; moreover, the lacunae in understanding the concepts and future prospects in this exciting field are suggested. PMID:24969423

  6. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  7. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  8. Gas-Phase Photoionization Of A Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Giuliani, A.; Nicolas, C.; Gil, J.-F.; Lemaire, J.; Refregiers, M.; Nahon, L.

    2010-07-01

    We present preliminary results on gas phase photoionization of electrosprayproduced multiply protonated cytochrome c protein (104 amino acids; ˜12.4 kDa), which has been achieved with a newly developed experimental system for spectroscopy of electrosprayed ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap using a monochromatized vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and tandem mass spectrometry method. The investigation of proteins in the gas phase, where they are free of the influence of counterions and solvent molecules, offer a possibility to understand their intrinsic molecular properties. However, due to limited both ion densities and available number of photons, the use of synchrotron radiation for the trapped ions spectroscopy is a rather challenging task. The feasibility of coupling a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ion trap with soft x-ray synchrotron beamline and the first successful use of synchrotron radiation for spectroscopy of electrosprayed negative ions stored in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap have been demonstrated only recently (R. Thissen et al., 2008, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 223001; A. Giulliani et al., Proc. 57th ASMS Conf., Philadelphia, 2009). The present results are the first reported on photoionization of kDa species in the gas phase and are valuable regarding both a fundamental interest of accessing physical properties of large biological ions isolated in vacuo and potential development of a new technique for proteomics.

  9. Bursts of particle nucleation in storm outflows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, I. J.; Clement, C. F.; Twohy, C. H.; Weinheimer, A.; Campos, T.

    2003-04-01

    Nucleation of atmospheric aerosol is an inherently intermittent process. The concentrations of gas phase precursors are unevenly distributed in the atmosphere, and the ambient temperature varies too, leading to localised regions where nucleation is favoured thermodynamically. The non-linear dependence of the nucleation rate on the thermodynamic driving forces causes particle production be even more localised. Furthermore, the nucleation of particles depletes the concentration of precursor, so that production can quickly terminate. Together, these features of the system and process cause nucleation to occur in localised bursts. We have developed simple models of nucleation bursts, and recently were able to test the model predictions by analysing measurements of particles produced when precursor-bearing air flows out of the tops of large scale storm clouds. These flows are very favourable for particle production since existing aerosol, which competes for condensation, has been scavenged within the cloud. Also, the temperatures are very low at the top of the troposphere. Estimates show that storm outflows could constitute a very significant source of atmospheric particles. While the nucleation bursts are indeed localised, on the spatial scales associated with major storms they can be viewed as operating rather uniformly across a large part of the atmosphere. We are then able to apply a simple analysis of the production and transport. As part of the SUCCESS campaign, the concentrations of atmospheric gases and condensation nuclei in the outflow of a major storm were measured aboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft. The data provide an excellent opportunity to study nucleation, growth and coagulation of particles. The data are consistent with the binary nucleation of droplets of water and sulphuric acid produced in the storm outflow by the oxidation of sulphur dioxide. We conclude that a 5 minute burst of nucleation was followed by growth and coagulation over a period of about 5 hours until measured by the aircraft. Both the mass and number concentrations of the observed aerosol can be reproduced by this analysis within a timescale consistent with that of the storm. Somewhat surprisingly, our models suggest that the final particle number concentration is very insensitive to the initial sulphur dioxide concentration, which might have implications in considering the effect of increases in atmospheric pollution on particle production.

  10. Using priority growth orientation of crystallite of the Monte Carlo method to study the process of crystal nucleation and growth in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Chen, Manjiao; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen; Fan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    The technique of “crystallite growth preferred orientation” was presented based on the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of grain growth, and its factor was used to establish a lattice coordinate tracking method. The nucleation and growth of crystal from the liquid phase throughout the whole simulation were examined. Changes in solid fraction and crystallite size were counted via simulation by lattice tracking. Results showed that the established model could properly reflect crystallite nucleation and growth. The model was also determined capable of accurately estimating the number of solid phase fraction and achieving change in crystallite size by the lattice tracking method. The change in solid fraction and MC step (MCS) satisfied the S curve during simulation. The crystallite growth index was 0.477, which was relatively close to the theoretical value of 0.5.

  11. Gas phase equilibrium structure of histamine.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Rykov, Anatolii N; Grikina, Olga E; Khaikin, Leonid S

    2016-02-17

    The first gas electron diffraction (GED) experiment for histamine was carried out. The equilibrium structure of histamine in the gas phase was determined on the basis of the data obtained. The refinement was also supported by the rotational constants obtained in previous studies [B. Vogelsanger, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113, 7864-7869; P. Godfrey, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1998, 120, 10724-10732] and quantum chemical calculations. The proposed mechanism of tautomerization by simultaneous intermolecular transfer of hydrogens in a histamine dimer helps to explain the distribution of tautomers in different experiments. The estimations of the conformational interconversion times provided the explanation for the absence of some conformers in the rotational spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26845147

  12. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  13. The strong influence of internal stresses on the nucleation of a nanosized, deeply undercooled melt at a solid-solid phase interface.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I; Warren, James A

    2015-04-01

    The effect of elastic energy on nucleation and disappearance of a nanometer size intermediate melt (IM) region at a solid-solid (S1S2) phase interface at temperatures 120 K below the melting temperature is studied using a phase-field approach. Results are obtained for broad range of the ratios of S1S2 to solid-melt interface energies, k(E), and widths, k(δ). It is found that internal stresses only slightly promote barrierless IM nucleation but qualitatively alter the system behavior, allowing for the appearance of the IM when k(E) < 2 (thermodynamically impossible without mechanics) and elimination of what we termed the IM-free gap. Remarkably, when mechanics is included within this framework, there is a drastic (16 times for HMX energetic crystals) reduction in the activation energy of IM critical nucleus. After this inclusion, a kinetic nucleation criterion is met, and thermally activated melting occurs under conditions consistent with experiments for HMX, elucidating what had been to date mysterious behavior. Similar effects are expected to occur for other material systems where S1S2 phase transformations via IM take place, including electronic, geological, pharmaceutical, ferroelectric, colloidal, and superhard materials. PMID:25789667

  14. Substrate-free gas-phase synthesis of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dato, Albert Manglallan

    Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms tightly packed in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The material possesses remarkable properties and has been envisioned for use in numerous applications. Contemporary graphene production techniques require substrates or graphite crystals to create graphene. Furthermore, these approaches involve multiple steps, and sometimes non-ambient conditions, to produce atomically-thin sheets. This dissertation presents the first substrate-free gas-phase graphene synthesis method. The technique can synthesize graphene in a single step at atmospheric pressure, without the use of graphite or substrates. The novel synthesis method was discovered through experiments that tested the hypothesis that graphene could be synthesized through the delivery of alcohols into argon plasmas. The experiments presented in this dissertation were conducted in an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Solid carbon materials were produced by delivering liquid ethanol droplets directly into argon plasmas. Numerous characterization techniques were used to unambiguously prove that the synthesized materials were clean and highly ordered graphene sheets. Additional studies investigated the effects of variable experimental parameters on the graphene synthesis process. The applied microwave power did not significantly affect the types of structures produced in the reactor. Lowering the volumetric flow rate of the plasma gas resulted in the synthesis of graphitic particles. The composition of the precursors delivered into the reactor also affected graphene synthesis. Graphene was not produced through the delivery of methanol or isopropyl alcohol droplets. However, graphene was obtained through dimethyl ether, which is an organic compound with the same atomic composition as ethanol. Thus, the flow rate and precursor composition significantly affected the nucleation, growth, and residence time of the materials created during experiments. A practical application for the synthesized graphene is also presented in this dissertation. The sheets were found to be an ideal support structure for the transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanoparticles coated with molecular layers. The substrate-free gas-phase method is capable of rapid and continuous graphene synthesis at ambient pressure. The simplicity of the approach makes it scalable for industrial graphene production. The novel technique presented in this dissertation could substantially enable graphene research and applications.

  15. Cavitation nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-05-01

    For his dissertation research at Harvard, Bob Apfel chose the subject of homogeneous nucleation, and conceived of some ingenious experiments to test existing theories. By selecting a small microdroplet of liquid, he could make the reasonable assumption that no inhomogeneities were present to serve as preferential sites for liquid rupture. However, Bob also studied dirty liquids, as well as very clean ones, and wrote some seminal papers on inhomogeneous nucleation, in which he developed the Golden rule: Know thy liquid! Currently, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of cavitation generation in vivo, particularly in blood, and, for this case, the nucleation conditions are much different than those for normal liquids. In this presentation, I will review some of Bob's pioneering studies and present some of our latest studies of cavitation inception, both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  17. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, K.

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of some nuclei (e.g. 1H, 13C, 19F, 29Si or 31P, I=1/2) gives strong signals which allow analytical studies of gaseous compounds. The other magnetic nuclei have low natural abundance or/and contain an electric quadrupole moment and their NMR signals are rather weak. In our laboratory we have developed new experimental techniques, which permit us to monitor several micrograms of chemical compounds in gaseous matrices. Applying this approach we have observed magnetic shielding of various nuclei, including 17O and 33S at the natural abundance, in the gas phase as a function of density. Density-dependent spin-spin couplings were also found for many chemical compounds. It has been shown that NMR gas-phase studies can easily be extended on molecules, which exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and are liquids at room temperature. All the latter NMR experimental results obtained for gaseous matrices are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of phase transformations caused by nucleation and subsequent anisotropic growth: Extension of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of isothermal phase transformations were performed based on a temperature- and time-dependent nucleation rate and a temperature-dependent and time-independent anisotropic growth rate (linear growth). One- or two-dimensional anisotropic growth in two-dimensional space is considered and nucleation occurs randomly throughout space. The MC simulations show that parallel growth of anisotropically growing transformation products with identical convex shape can be described accurately by the kinetic theory due to Johnson, Mehl, Avrami, and Kolmogorov (JMAK), but nonparallel anisotropic growth, orthogonal in the present work, incorporating blocking up to all relevant orders leads to hard impingement that results in strong deviations from JMAK kinetics. A transparent analytical description extending on, but incorporating the JMAK theory has been developed that turns out to accurately reproduce the numerical results of all present MC simulation, leading to improved understanding of how impingement should be incorporated in JMAK theory.

  20. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results indicate that the substance is amphiphilic in character leading finally to micelle formation. Diehl, K., Quick, C., Matthias-Maser, S., Mitra, S. K., and Jaenicke, R.: The ice nucleation ability of pollen, part I, Atmos. Res., 58, 75-87, 2001. Diehl, K., Matthias-Maser, S., Jaenicke, R., and Mitra, S. K.: The ice nucleation ability of pollen, part II, Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133, 2002. Pummer, B., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S., Grothe, H.; Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen; Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 2541 - 2550, 2012.

  1. Phase ordering kinetics of the Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, K.; Majumdar, S.N.; Sachdev, S.

    1996-12-01

    We study the approach to equilibrium of a Bose gas to a superfluid state. We point out that dynamic scaling, characteristic of far from equilibrium phase-ordering systems, should hold. We stress the importance of a nondissipative Josephson precession term in driving the system to a new universality class. A model of coarsening in dimension {ital d}=2, involving a quench between two temperatures below the equilibrium superfluid transition temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}), is exactly solved and demonstrates the relevance of the Josephson term. Numerical results on quenches from above {ital T}{sub {ital c}} in {ital d}=2,3 provide evidence for the scaling picture postulated. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Gas phase acidity of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Deprotonation thermochemistry of benzene derivatives C 6H 5X (X = H, F, Cl, OH, NH 2, CN, CHO, NO 2, CH 3, C 2H 5, CHCH 2, CCH) has been examined at the G3B3 level of theory. For X = F, Cl, CN, CHO and NO 2, the most favorable deprotonation site is the ortho position of the phenyl ring. This regio-specificity is directly related to the field/inductive effect of the substituent. G3B3 gas phase acidities, Δ acidH° and Δ acidG°, compare within less than 4 kJ mol -1 with experimental data. A noticeable exception is nitrobenzene for which tabulated acidity appear to be underestimated by ca. 120 kJ mol -1.

  3. Phase transitions in a gas of anyons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, R.; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.; Richer, J.

    2010-10-01

    We continue our numerical Monte Carlo simulation of a gas of closed loops on a 3 dimensional lattice, however, now in the presence of a topological term added to the action which corresponds to the total linking number between the loops. We compute the linking number using a novel approach employing certain notions from knot theory. Adding the topological term converts the particles into anyons. Interpreting the model as an effective theory that describes the 2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the asymptotic strong-coupling regime, the topological linking number simply corresponds to the addition to the action of the Chern-Simons term. The system continues to exhibit a phase transition as a function of the vortex mass as it becomes small. We find the following new results. The Chern-Simons term has no effect on the Wilson loop. On the other hand, it does effect the 't Hooft loop of a given configuration, adding the linking number of the 't Hooft loop with all of the dynamical vortex loops. We find the unexpected result that both the Wilson loop and the 't Hooft loop exhibit a perimeter law even though there are no massless particles in the theory, in both phases of the theory. It should be noted that our method suffers from numerical instabilities if the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term is too large; thus, we have restricted our results to small values of this parameter. Furthermore, interpreting the lattice loop gas as an effective theory describing the Abelian Higgs model is only known to be true in the infinite coupling limit; for strong but finite coupling this correspondence is only a conjecture, the validity of which is beyond the scope of this article.

  4. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Bouchoux, Guy; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-18

    The goal of this work was to obtain a detailed insight on the gas-phase protonation energetic of adenosine using both mass spectrometric experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental approach used the extended kinetic method with nanoelectrospray ionization and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. This method provides experimental values for proton affinity, PA(adenosine) = 979 +/- 1 kJ.mol (-1), and for the "protonation entropy", Delta p S degrees (adenosine) = S degrees (adenosineH +) - S degrees (adenosine) = -5 +/- 5 J.mol (-1).K (-1). The corresponding gas-phase basicity is consequently equal to: GB(adenosine) = 945 +/- 2 kJ.mol (-1) at 298K. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of 974 kJ.mol (-1) after consideration of isodesmic proton transfer reactions with pyridine as the reference base. Moreover, computations clearly showed that N3 is the most favorable protonation site for adenosine, due to a strong internal hydrogen bond involving the hydroxyl group at the 2' position of the ribose sugar moiety, unlike observations for adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, where protonation occurs on N1. The existence of negligible protonation entropy is confirmed by calculations (theoretical Delta p S degrees (adenosine) approximately -2/-3 J.mol (-1).K (-1)) including conformational analysis and entropy of hindered rotations. Thus, the calculated protonation thermochemical properties are in good agreement with our experimental measurements. It may be noted that the new PA value is approximately 10 kJ.mol (-1) lower than the one reported in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database, thus pointing to a correction of the tabulated protonation thermochemistry of adenosine. PMID:18720985

  5. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  6. Buckyball Nucleation of HiPco Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to enhance nucleation of single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) in the HiPco process, selectively producing 10,10 tubes, something which until now has not been thought possible. This is accomplished by injecting C60, or a derivative of C60, solubilized in supercritical CO2 together with a transition metal carboneal cocatalyst into the HiPco reactor. This is a variant on the supercritical disclosure. C60 has never been used to nucleate carbon nanotubes in the gas phase. C60 itself may not have adequate solubility in supercritical CO2. However, fluorinated C60, e.g., C60F36, is easy to make cheaply and should have much enhanced solubility.

  7. Nucleation of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinero, Valeria

    2009-03-01

    The freezing of water into ice is a ubiquitous transformation in nature, yet the microscopic mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice has not yet been elucidated. One of the reasons is that nucleation happens in time scales that are too fast for an experimental characterization and two slow for a systematic study with atomistic simulations. In this work we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the monatomic model of water mW[1] to shed light into the mechanism of homogeneous nucleation of ice and its relationship to the thermodynamics of supercooled water. Cooling of bulk water produces either crystalline ice or low- density amorphous ice (LDA) depending on the quenching rate. We find that ice crystallization occurs faster at temperatures close to the liquid-liquid transition, defined as the point of maximum inflection of the density with respect to the temperature. At the liquid-liquid transition, the time scale of nucleation becomes comparable to the time scale of relaxation within the liquid phase, determining --effectively- the end of the metastable liquid state. Our results imply that no ultraviscous liquid water can exist at temperatures just above the much disputed glass transition of water. We discuss how the scenario is changed when water is in confinement, and the relationship of the mechanism of ice nucleation to that of other liquids that present the same phase behavior, silicon [2] and germanium [3]. [4pt] [1] Molinero, V. & Moore, E. B. Water modeled as an intermediate element between carbon and silicon. Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2008). Online at http://pubs.acs.org/cgi- bin/abstract.cgi/jpcbfk/asap/abs/jp805227c.html [0pt] [2] Molinero, V., Sastry, S. & Angell, C. A. Tuning of tetrahedrality in a silicon potential yields a series of monatomic (metal-like) glass formers of very high fragility. Physical Review Letters 97, 075701 (2006).

  8. Solid-liquid surface tensions of critical nuclei and nucleation barriers from a phase-field-crystal study of a model binary alloy using finite system sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Muhammad Ajmal; Kundin, Julia; Emmerich, Heike; Oettel, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Phase-field-crystal (PFC) modeling has emerged as a computationally efficient tool to address crystal growth phenomena on atomistic length and diffusive time scales. We use a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal model for a binary system based on Elder et al. [Phys. Rev. B 75, 064107 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevB.75.064107] to study critical nuclei and their liquid-solid phase boundaries, in particular the nucleus size dependence of the liquid-solid interface tension as well as of the nucleation barrier. Critical nuclei are stabilized in finite systems of various sizes, however, the extracted interface tension as function of the nucleus radius r is independent of system size. We suggest a phenomenological expression to describe the dependence of the extracted interface tension on the nucleus radius r for the liquid-solid system. Moreover, the numerical PFC results show that this dependency can not be fully described by the nonclassical Tolman formula.

  9. Instabilities in Lean Gas-Phase Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K.; Bockhorn, H.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Emerson, D.; Haldenwang, P.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    Lean burning is the burning of fuel-air mixtures with less than the chemically- balanced (stoichiometric) mixture. It produces a significant increase in fuel efficiency and reduction in pollution. However, the limits and control of lean burning are still not well understood.This is the motivation behind the study of instabilities in lean gas-phase combustion under microgravity conditions via direct numerical simulations and comparison of the results with experimental data.The goal is to gain fundamental insights in order to identify and understand the intrinsic chemical and fluid dynamical mechanisms responsible for these instabilities.The potential of this microgravity combustion research includes the development of technology that would reduce pollution and fire and explosion hazards, improve hazardous waste incineration and increase efficiency of the conversion of chemical energy to electric power or motive force.The results from this fundamental research will thus benefit chemical engineering and power generation. Its wide range of applications in industry includes lean-burning car engines.

  10. Spaceborne lidar observations of the ice-nucleating potential of dust, polluted dust, and smoke aerosols in mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude; Choi, Yong-Sang

    2014-06-01

    Previous laboratory studies and in situ measurements have shown that dust particles possess the ability to nucleate ice crystals, and smoke particles to some extent as well. Even with coatings of pollutants such as sulphate and nitrate on the surface of dust particles, it has been shown that polluted dust particles are still able to nucleate ice in the immersion, deposition, condensation, and contact freezing modes, albeit less efficiently than unpolluted dust. The ability of these aerosols to act as ice nuclei in the Earth's atmosphere has important implications for the Earth's radiative budget and hence global climate change. Here we determine the relationship between cloud thermodynamic phase and dust, polluted dust, and smoke aerosols individually by analyzing their vertical profiles over a ˜5 year period obtained by NASA's spaceborne lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization. We found that when comparing the effects of temperature and aerosols, temperature appears to have the dominant influence on supercooled liquid cloud fraction. Nonetheless, we found that aerosols still appear to exert a strong influence on supercooled liquid cloud fraction as suggested by the existence of negative temporal and spatial correlations between supercooled liquid cloud fraction and frequencies of dust aerosols from around the world, at the -10°C, -15°C, -20°C, and -25°C isotherms. Although smoke aerosol frequencies were also found to be negatively correlated with supercooled liquid cloud fraction, their correlations are weaker in comparison to those between dust frequencies and supercooled liquid cloud fraction. For the first time, we show this based on observations from space, which lends support to previous studies that dust and potentially smoke aerosols can globally alter supercooled liquid cloud fraction. Our results suggest that the ice-nucleating ability of these aerosols may have an indirect climatic impact that goes beyond the regional scale, by influencing cloud thermodynamic phase globally.

  11. Nucleation in the presence of long-range interactions. [performed on ferroelectric barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P.

    1989-01-01

    Unlike droplet nucleation near a liquid-gas critical point, the decay of metastable phases in crystalline materials is strongly affected by the presence of long-range forces. Field quench experiments performed on the ferroelectric barium titanate indicate that nucleation in this material is markedly different from that observed in liquids. In this paper, a theory for nucleation at a first-order phase transition in which the mediating forces are long range is presented. It is found that the long-range force induces cooperative nucleation and growth processes, and that this feedback mechanism produces a well-defined delay time with a sharp onset in the transformation to the stable phase. Closed-form expressions for the characteristic onset time and width of the transition are developed, in good agreement with numerical and experimental results.

  12. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  13. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  14. [Effect of inert gas xenon on the functional state of nucleated cells of peripheral blood during freezing].

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Utemov, S V; Knyazev, M G; Kostyaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    A new method of preservation of nucleated cells in the electric refrigerator with xenon. After slow freezing and storage is even one day at -80 °C persists for more than 60% leukocytes. Cell membranes are resistant to the vital dye. In 85% of granulocytes stored baseline lysosomal-cationic protein, reduced lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity. Cryopreservation of biological objects in inert gases is a promising direction in the practice of medicine and can be an alternative to the traditional method using liquid nitrogen. PMID:26027341

  15. The effects of fluid turbulence on metal vapor nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Garrick, Sean

    2010-11-01

    The rising need for clean, renewable energy sources has led to recent studies on hydrogen production via hydrolysis of zinc nanoparticles. Aerosol or gas-phase processes are favored in many industrial applications due to its advantage in controlling particle size distribution and the resultant chemical conversion. The rising need for clean, renewable energy sources has led to recent studies on hydrogen production via hydrolysis of zinc nanoparticles. Aerosol or gas-phase processes are favored in many industrial applications due to its advantage in controlling particle size distribution and the resultant chemical conversion. In this work we study the formation of metal particles in a shear flows. Direct numerical simulation of homogeneous metal vapor nucleation in laminar and turbulent flows are performed for a variety of metals. The flows consist of hot metal vapor issuing into cooler inert gas. As the metal vapor cools, nanoparticles form and are transported throughout the flow-field. Homogeneous nucleation is simulated using classical nucleation theory and two approaches to representing the surface tension. The effects of three-dimensional turbulent mixing are also analyzed. The results suggest that fluid, thermal and species mixing greatly affects the nucleation dynamics. We report on the effects of vapor concentration level, fluid mixing, and particle surface tension on the conversion from metal vapor to metal nanoparticles.

  16. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  17. Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

    2008-08-26

    Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

  18. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of arginine.

    PubMed

    Bouchoux, Guy; Desaphy, Sylvain; Bourcier, Sophie; Malosse, Christian; Bimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum

    2008-03-20

    The gas-phase basicity (GB), proton affinity (PA), and protonation entropy (DeltapS degrees (M)=S degrees (MH+)-S degrees (M)) of arginine (Arg) have been experimentally determined by the extended kinetic method using an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. This method provides GB(Arg)=1004.3+/-2.2 (4.9) kJ.mol(-1) (indicated errors are standard deviations, and in parentheses, 95% confidence limits are given). Consideration of previous experimental data using a fast atom bombardment ionization tandem sector mass spectrometer slightly modifies these estimates since GB(Arg)=1005.9+/-3.1 (6.6) kJ.mol(-1). Lower limits of the proton affinity, PA(Arg)=1046+/-4 (7) kJ.mol(-1), and of the "protonation entropy", DeltapS degrees (Arg)=S degrees (ArgH+)-S degrees (Arg)=-27+/-7 (15) J.mol(-1).K(-1), are also provided by the experiments. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of ca. 1053 kJ.mol-1 after consideration of isodesmic proton-transfer reactions with guanidine as the reference base. Computations including explicit treatment of hindered rotations and mixing of conformers confirm that a noticeable entropy loss does occur upon protonation, which leads to a theoretical DeltapS degrees (Arg) term of ca. -45 J.mol(-1).K(-1). The following evaluated thermochemical parameter values are proposed: GB(Arg)=1005+/-3 kJ.mol(-1); PA(Arg)=1051+/-5 kJ.mol(-1), and DeltapS degrees (Arg)=-45+/-12 J.mol(-1).K(-1). PMID:18288831

  19. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  20. Regional air quality - Atmospheric nucleation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Gun

    Nanoparticles have been studied for the importance of the health effects and global energy balances. New particle formation from gas species, also known as nucleation, is one of the important pathways to the budget of the nanoparticles as well as direct emissions. This work focuses on the details of nucleation events such as nucleation rate and involving gas species using computational programs. A computationally efficient new multi-component aerosol dynamics model that simulates the full aerosol size distribution and composition starting at a diameter of 0.8 nm, Dynamic Model for Aerosol Nucleation (DMAN), is developed. The model uses a two-moment sectional algorithm manipulating both the aerosol number and mass distributions, and successfully reproduced analytical solutions. Three chemical components, sulfate, ammonium, and non-volatile organics are tracked explicitly. Using ternary (sulfuric acid-ammonia-water) nucleation parameterization, the model is able to reproduce nucleation events from their start to completion. The simulations suggest that ammonia availability controls the nucleation bursts in the northeastern US. Six nucleation parameterization are tested using the DMAN model. Weak, moderate, and strong nucleation events together with days without nucleation from the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) are selected for the evaluation. The ability of the different theories to reproduce the occurrence or lack of a nucleation event is evaluated. The ternary sulfuric acid-ammonia-water theory was the only one that was successful for all days. Sensitivity tests of the remaining parameterizations suggest that increasing or decreasing the corresponding nucleation rates does not change the overall performance of the parameterizations when both the nucleation and non-nucleation days are included in the tests. A three-dimensional chemical transport model (PMCAMx-UF) is developed incorporating the DMAN model in order to investigate a special scale and frequency of nucleation events. The model can use a variety of nucleation theories and parameterizations. The model simulates seventeen days from July 12 to July 28, 2001 in the Eastern U.S using the ternary sulfuric acid-ammonia-water nucleation theory with a scaling factor. The model predicts nucleation events that extend over scales of 100s to 1000 km in the midwest and northeastern U.S. The first comparison with the PAQS measurement dataset is promising both for the frequency, time of onset and strength of the nucleation events. PMCAMx-UF correctly predicts the occurrence or lack of nucleation in Pittsburgh more than 80%, although the model has a tendency of overpredicting nucleation.

  1. Investigating the Microphysics of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds using Large Eddy Simulations: The Importance of Liquid-Dependent Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Gillian; Connolly, Paul J.; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Crosier, Jonathan; Lloyd, Gary; Bower, Keith N.

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to comprehend and accurately model the Arctic climate is currently hindered by a lack of observations of the atmospheric processes unique to this region. A significant source of uncertainty in such models may be found in our representation of aerosol-cloud interactions [1]: for example, there are unanswered questions concerning the relationship between the ice-nucleating Arctic aerosol and the unique cloud microphysics observed in this region [2]. In an effort to address this issue, the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign of 2013 was conducted in the vicinity of the Svalbard archipelago, carrying out in-situ airborne observations of the mixed-phase clouds in this region. This campaign was split into two segments - one in spring, the other in summer - with airborne- and surface-based measurement platforms utilised in each. During the spring campaign, a range of microphysics and remote-sensing instruments were active on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements' (FAAM) BAe146 aircraft to produce a detailed record of the observed Arctic atmosphere. These data were used to conduct a modelling investigation with a focus on ice nucleation: the Large Eddy Model (LEM) - a cloud-resolving model developed by the UK Met Office - was initialised from these observations and simulations were performed to allow the resultant cloud evolution, structure and microphysics to be examined. Models on various scales notoriously have issues with reproducing persistent, mixed-phase Arctic clouds [2,3] and, upon first inspection, the LEM was no different: the modelled cloud dissipated quickly, thus inaccurately replicating the long-lived, mixed-phase clouds observed. However, by considering the discrepancies between the model output and aircraft observations, the treatment of cloud microphysics within the LEM has been developed to improve the simulation of the observed clouds. A long-lived, mixed-phase cloud of similar microphysical properties to those observed is achieved, providing an indication that the realistic simulation of Arctic clouds is strongly dependent on the ice nucleus parameterisation used. References: [1] Curry, J. A. et al., 1996. Overview of Arctic Cloud and Radiation Characteristics. Journal of Climate, 9, 1731-1764. [2] Prenni, A. J. et al., 2007. Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 88, 541-550. [3] Morrison, H. et al., 2012. Resilience of persistent Arctic mixed-phase clouds. Nature Geoscience, 5, 11-17.

  2. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  3. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold.

    PubMed

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T

    2013-12-21

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd(+) in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18(+), Au25(+), Au38(+) and Au102(+) ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag(+), Pt(2+), Pd(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+) and Cr(3+)) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38(+). While other metal ions like Cu(2+) help forming Au25(+) selectively, Fe(2+) catalyzes the formation of Au25(+) over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution. PMID:24146135

  4. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  5. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part II: Two-dimensional characterization and boundary kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    A companion paper presented the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients were a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation through the source term of the conservation law and of kinetics through an interfacial velocity field. This model overcomes an important shortcoming of existing phase-field models, namely that the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. In this paper, we present a number of numerical calculations - in one and two dimensions - that characterize our formulation. These calculations illustrate (i) highly-sensitive rate-dependent nucleation; (ii) independent prescription of the forward and backward nucleation stresses without changing the energy landscape; (iii) stick-slip interface kinetics; (iii) the competition between nucleation and kinetics in determining the final microstructural state; (iv) the effect of anisotropic kinetics; and (v) the effect of non-monotone kinetics. These calculations demonstrate the ability of this formulation to precisely prescribe complex nucleation and kinetics in a simple and transparent manner. We also extend our conservation statement to describe the kinetics of the junction lines between microstructural interfaces and boundaries. This enables us to prescribe an additional kinetic relation for the boundary, and we examine the interplay between the bulk kinetics and the junction kinetics.

  6. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  7. Effects of the source temperature on the formation of a metastable HgI 2 phase and consequences for the nucleation and growth behaviors in PVT ampoules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun-Xian; Shih, Chen-Tsung; Zhou, Han-Tang; Luo, Ying-Zi; Liao, Jian-Liang; Chiu, Kuan-Cheng

    2006-04-01

    By examining the nucleation and growth phenomena for HgI 2 crystals in physical vapor transport ampoules with a variation of temperatures of the source powder side Tsou and of the crystal growth side Tcry both are near its solid-solid phase transition temperature T=127 C, our experimental results reveal that under Tphase structure of the as-grown HgI 2 crystal is surprisingly governed by Tsou; (2) the temperature range of existence for the metastable ?-HgI 2 phase in crystal growth side is about 17 C below Tc; and (3) by turning a rotating motor to act as mechanical perturbations, this temperature range of existence for ?-phase now reduces to about 11 C below Tc. To explain these phenomena, especially for the metastable ?-phase formed at T

  8. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  9. Phase-separation induced homogeneous nucleation and growth of Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanoparticles in chalcohalide glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Anping; Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The phase-separation induced nucleation and growth of Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanocrystals has been studied for the first time. It is experimentally evidenced that the doped active rare earth ions are incorporated into the Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanocrystals, resulting in the intensified down- and up-conversion emissions. - Highlights: • A novel transparent glass ceramic containing Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanocrystals was fabricated. • Crystallization behaviors of Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanophase are systematically investigated. • The up-/down-conversion emissions are greatly intensified after crystallization. - Abstract: The phase-separation induced nucleation and growth of Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanocrystals has been studied in the GeS{sub 2}-Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}-La{sub 2}S{sub 3}-LaCl{sub 3}-CsCl system for the first time. Remarkably, the precipitated chloride nanocrystals are spherical and distributed homogeneously in the glass matrix. Benefiting from the uniform structure, high transparency of the glass ceramic is maintained after heat treatment by reducing adverse optical scattering. As revealed by the absorption spectra and Judd–Ofelt calculations, the doped active rare earth ions are partially partitioned into the low-phonon-energy Cs{sub 3}LaCl{sub 6} nanocrystals, resulting in the decrease of the non-radiative transition probabilities and therefore intensified photoluminescence emission of Nd{sup 3+} and up-conversion one of Er{sup 3+}.

  10. Dissolution of two-phase microsystems: Gas and liquid microparticle dissolution and dehydration of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Phillip Brent

    A main focus of this research is to develop techniques to study the dissolution process of two-phase microsystems on a single microparticle basis. This dissertation introduces a systematic approach to investigate the formation of microparticles to fulfill the need for rational design of microspheres for a range of applications. This novel method is based on the micropipet manipulation technique and can essentially test any system, where the continuous phase is a liquid and the dispersed phase is practically any phase, a gas (foam), a liquid (emulsion), or a solid (suspension). It is possible to study single microparticle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter scale, which is on the same size-scale as particles created in bulk suspensions, microsphere processes, and applications. The ability to create, isolate, observe, and manipulate individual gas, liquid or solid microparticles in a well-defined and controlled liquid environment was found to be ideal to study gas microbubbles and microparticles, liquid microdroplets, and the dehydration of dissolved solutes. Subsequently, one can directly measure the dissolution rate and, when a solute is present, calculate its concentration during the dissolution process. Microbubble or microdroplet dissolution in a second phase is driven by two independent factors, a concentration gradient (undersaturation of the dispersed phase in the continuous phase) and a pressure gradient (due to the Laplace-overpressure inside the microparticle created by the surface tension). Experimentally, each of these driving forces can be independently tested. Both the gas microparticle and pure liquid microdroplet dissolution can be predicted by a simple theory based on the diffusion coefficient and solubility limit of the dispersed phase in the continuous phase. The dehydration of a salt ion solution microdroplet results in the nucleation and growth of a crystal, while the dehydration of proteins leads to glassification of the protein. The water remaining in the glassified protein microsphere is on the order of a water monolayer surrounding each protein molecule. Both observation and measurement of dehydration within a single microdroplet is the basis to understanding microparticle formation for use in drug delivery systems and biomolecule preservation.

  11. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  12. Communication: Fourier-transform infrared probing of remarkable quantities of gas trapped in cold homogeneously nucleated nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; Devlin, J Paul

    2013-07-14

    Studies of catalyzed all-vapor gas-hydrate formation on a sub-second timescale have been extended with a special focus on liquid-droplet compositions at the instant of hydrate crystallization. This focus has been enabled by inclusion of methanol in the all-vapor mixture. This slows droplet to gas-hydrate conversion near 200 K to a time scale suited for standard FTIR sampling. Such droplet data are sought as a guide to ongoing efforts to reduce the amount of guest catalyst required for instant formation of the gas hydrates. For the same reason, all-vapor sampling has also been extended to the generation of long-lived liquid droplets with reduced or no water content. Observations of single-solvent droplets show that surprising quantities of gas molecules are trapped during rapid droplet growth. For example, CO2 is trapped at levels near 50 mol. % in droplets of acetone, tetrahydrofuran, or trimethylene oxide formed under CO2 pressures of several Torr in a cold-chamber at 170 K. Less but significant amounts of gas are trapped at higher temperatures, or in methanol or water-methanol droplets. The droplet metastability appears to commonly lead to formation of bubbles larger than the original nanodroplets. Besides serving as a guide for the all-vapor gas-hydrate studies, the semiquantitative evidence of extensive trapping of gases is expected to have a role in future studies of atmospheric aerosols. PMID:23862921

  13. Direct synthesis of ordered L10 FePt nanoparticles in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Ping

    2005-03-01

    Uniform L10 FePt nanoparticle is one of the candidates for future extremely high magnetic recording media. Chemical methods of fabricating FePt nanoparticles require post-annealing process that usually leads to particle agglomeration^1. We have developed a controllable approach to fabricate ordered FePt nanoparticles with uniform size and free of particle agglomeration based on nanocluster deposition technique^2. In the approach, FePt nanoparticles were generated through gas-phase aggregation using magnetron sputtering at high argon pressure. Differential pressure forces drove the particles flying through an on-line infrared heater where particles transform from disordered A1 phase into ordered L10 phase. Particle nucleation, growth and ordering happened at separated sequential stages in vacuum. FePt nanoparticle size can be controlled by adjusting various deposition parameters including sputtering power density, argon pressure, aggregation length, etc. Without further treatment, FePt nanoparticles with on-line heating showed high anisotropy that verified the direct deposition of the L10 phase particles. References: *Z. R. Dai, S. Sun, and Z. L. Wang, Nano Lett. 1, 443 (2001) *H. Haberland, M. Karrais, M. Mall, Y. Thurner, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 3266 (1992)

  14. Experimental investigation and modeling of diamond nucleation on silica substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koritala, Rachel Elizabeth

    1997-08-01

    Thin films created using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have numerous applications. In order for these films to function effectively it is often necessary to better control their properties. This can be accomplished through a more thorough understanding of the initial stages of a film's growth. At this stage, when nucleation occurs, the microstructure of a film is determined and this has a significant influence on its properties. Two materials which are currently grown using CVD are diamond and silicon nitride. In this research, an investigation of the nucleation of both of these materials is conducted. Deposition of diamond was carried out with a microwave plasma system, while silicon nitride was nucleated using an impinging-jet reactor. Several characterization techniques were employed, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The primary focus of the work was on diamond nucleation. Deposition was conducted on three different substrates, including silicon, oxidized silicon and silica. Several differences in experimental results were observed between the substrates. In order to explain these variations a kinetic model was developed which considers the influence of the substrate on the local gas phase chemistry. The model reveals that the concentration of oxygen is greater near silica substrates. TEM and PEELS show the presence of amorphous carbon islands on silica substrates after a pretreatment step. It is probable that these serve as nucleation sites for crystalline diamond. An additional kinetic model was developed which considers the islands as mixtures of spsp2 and spsp3 carbon. It was found that the lower surface energy of graphite and higher supersaturation ratio of diamond lead to an enhancement of nucleation. Silicon nitride was deposited on an interlayer that was found to consist of amorphous silicon nitride and crystalline silicon. The structure of the interlayer changed as it was deposited until eventually nucleation of crystalline Sisb3Nsb4 became favorable.

  15. Geographical and diurnal features of amine-enhanced boundary layer nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Laaksonen, A.; Korhonen, H.; Malila, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Mielonen, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kühn, T.; Arola, A.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-09-01

    Amines have recently been found to be an important ingredient in the nucleation and initial growth of atmospheric aerosols; however, global estimates of the spatial and temporal extent of amine-enhanced nucleation are currently missing. We utilize two recently published laboratory data sets of amine-sulfuric acid nucleation to evaluate the accuracy of previously published nucleation parameterizations and to produce a new amine-enhanced new particle formation (NPF) parameterization that better reproduces the laboratory observations at atmospherically relevant sulfuric acid concentrations. We implement and compare the amine-enhanced NPF parameterizations and a kinetic nucleation parameterization within the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ and find that the spatial features of amine-enhanced and kinetic NPF are clearly different. Amine-enhanced NPF is limited to areas near the source regions of amine due to its short gas phase residence time of 6.9 h, whereas kinetic nucleation (which depends only on sulfuric acid concentration) produces particles more uniformly across the globe due to long-range transport of SO2. The notably stronger land-sea contrast in amine-enhanced nucleation simulations is in line with relatively rare atmospheric observations of NPF over open oceans. However, when the uptake of gas phase amine molecules to aerosol particles is limited according to previously published estimates (0.2% of collisions leading to uptake), the amine-enhanced NPF parameterization predicts in some regions unrealistically high NPF rates (˜1000 cm-3 s-1) compared to typical observations. Our results indicate that amine-enhanced nucleation may be an important particle formation mechanism near amine source regions but also highlights the need for more tightly defined constraints on the spatial and temporal distribution of amine emissions, gas-to-particle partitioning mechanisms of amines, and condensation and coagulation sinks in global models.

  16. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part I: Formulation and one-dimensional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    The motion of microstructural interfaces is important in modeling twinning and structural phase transformations. Continuum models fall into two classes: sharp-interface models, where interfaces are singular surfaces; and regularized-interface models, such as phase-field models, where interfaces are smeared out. The former are challenging for numerical solutions because the interfaces need to be explicitly tracked, but have the advantage that the kinetics of existing interfaces and the nucleation of new interfaces can be transparently and precisely prescribed. In contrast, phase-field models do not require explicit tracking of interfaces, thereby enabling relatively simple numerical calculations, but the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. This prevents straightforward calibration of phase-field models to experiment and/or molecular simulations, and breaks the multiscale hierarchy of passing information from atomic to continuum. Consequently, phase-field models cannot be confidently used in dynamic settings. This shortcoming of existing phase-field models motivates our work. We present the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients are a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation - through the source term of the conservation law - and kinetics - through a distinct interfacial velocity field. A formal limit of the kinetic driving force recovers the classical continuum sharp-interface driving force, providing confidence in both the re-parametrized energy and the evolution statement. We present some 1D calculations characterizing the formulation; in a companion paper, we present more extensive 2D calculations.

  17. Gas phase acetaldehyde production in a continuous bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Soon Ook . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Trantolo, D.J. . Center for Biotechnology Engineering); Wise, D.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA . Center for Biotechnology Engineering)

    1993-08-20

    The gas phase continuous production of acetaldehyde was studied with particular emphasis on the development of biocatalyst (alcohol oxidase on solid phase support materials) for a fixed bed reactor. Based on the experimental results in a batch bioreactor, the biocatalysts were prepared by immobilization of alcohol oxidase on Amberlite IRA-400, packed into a column, and the continuous acetaldehyde production in the gas phase by alcohol oxidase was performed. The effects of the reaction temperature, flow rates of gaseous stream, and ethanol vapor concentration on the performance of the continuous bioreactor were investigated.

  18. Simulation Approach for Microscale Noncontinuum Gas-Phase Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; Gallis, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    In microscale thermal actuators, gas-phase heat transfer from the heated beams to the adjacent unheated substrate is often the main energy-loss mechanism. Since the beam-substrate gap is comparable to the molecular mean free path, noncontinuum gas effects are important. A simulation approach is presented in which gas-phase heat transfer is described by Fourier's law in the bulk gas and by a wall boundary condition that equates the normal heat flux to the product of the gas-solid temperature difference and a heat transfer coefficient. The dimensionless parameters in this heat transfer coefficient are determined by comparison to Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for heat transfer from beams of rectangular cross section to the substrate at free-molecular to near-continuum gas pressures. This simulation approach produces reasonably accurate gas-phase heat-transfer results for wide ranges of beam geometries and gas pressures. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  20. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Comparison of models

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1998-09-01

    Two models are commonly used to analyze gas-phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s law with a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or dust) to combine transport due to diffusion and advection that includes porous medium effects. The two approaches are compared in this paper.

  1. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  2. Evaluation of phase envelope on natural gas, condensate and gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promkotra, S.; Kangsadan, T.

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally gas hydrate are generated by condensate and natural gas. Natural gas and condensate samples are collected from a gas processing plant where is situated in the northeastern part of Thailand. Physical properties of the API gravity and density of condensate are presented in the range of 55-60° and 0.71-0.76 g/cm3. The chemical compositions of petroleum-field water are analyzed to evaluate the genesis of gas hydrate by experimental procedure. The hydrochemical compositions of petroleum-field waters are mostly the Na-Cl facies. This condition can estimate how the hydrate forms. Phase envelope of condensate is found only one phase which is liquid phase. The liquid fraction is 100% at 15°C and 101.327 kPa, with the critical pressure and temperature of 2,326 kPa and 611.5 K. However, natural gas can be separated in three phases which are vapor, liquid and solid phase with the pressure and temperature at 100 kPa and 274.2 K. The hydrate curves explicit both hydrate zone and nonhydrate zone. Phase envelope of gas hydrate from the phase diagram indicates the hydrate formation. The experimental results of hydrate form can correlate to the hydrate curve. Besides, the important factor of hydrate formation depends on impurity in the petroleum system.

  3. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  4. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  5. Substrate orientation effects on the nucleation and growth of the Mn+1AXn phase Ti2AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Persson, Per O. A.˚.; Guenette, Mathew C.; Rosén, Johanna; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The Mn+1AXn (MAX) phases are ternary compounds comprising alternating layers of a transition metal carbide or nitride and a third "A-group" element. The effect of substrate orientation on the growth of Ti2AlC MAX phase films was investigated by studying pulsed cathodic arc deposited samples grown on sapphire cut along the (0001), (101¯0), and (11¯02) crystallographic planes. Characterization of these samples was by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. On the (101¯0) substrate, tilted (101¯8) growth of Ti2AlC was found, such that the TiC octahedra of the MAX phase structure have the same orientation as a spontaneously formed epitaxial TiC sublayer, preserving the typical TiC-Ti2AlC epitaxial relationship and confirming the importance of this relationship in determining MAX phase film orientation. An additional component of Ti2AlC with tilted fiber texture was observed in this sample; tilted fiber texture, or axiotaxy, has not previously been seen in MAX phase films.

  6. Field driven ferromagnetic phase nucleation and propagation from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films

    SciTech Connect

    Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian M.; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-12-09

    We investigate the reversal process in antiferromagnetically coupled [Co/Pt]{sub X-1}/{l_brace}Co/Ru/[Co/Pt]{sub X-1}{r_brace}{sub 16} multilayer films by combining magnetometry and Magnetic soft X-ray Transmission Microscopy (MXTM). After out-of-plane demagnetization, a stable one dimensional ferromagnetic (FM) stripe domain phase (tiger-tail phase) for a thick stack sample (X=7 is obtained), while metastable sharp antiferromagnetic (AF) domain walls are observed in the remanent state for a thinner stack sample (X=6). When applying an external magnetic field the sharp domain walls of the thinner stack sample transform at a certain threshold field into the FM stripe domain wall phase. We present magnetic energy calculations that reveal the underlying energetics driving the overall reversal mechanisms.

  7. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  8. Novel kinetic scheme for the ammonium perchlorate gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, H.; Sheshadri, T.S.; Jain, V.K. )

    1990-01-11

    A novel gas-phase kinetic scheme for ammonium perchlorate (AP) deflagration involving 22 reactions among 18 species is developed. The kinetic scheme is based on a study of the effect of initial conditions on the solution of the differential equations of adiabatic constant-pressure combustion kinetics. The existence of condensed-phase reaction products provides alternate pathways for the consumption of NH{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4} produced by gas-phase dissociation of AP. Theoretically obtained temperature-time profiles of the novel scheme do not change when the conventional reaction pathways are included, indicating that the novel scheme is a substantially faster rate process. The new scheme does not involve the species ClO, which has long been considered a critical component of the AP gas phase and which is included in the conventional reaction pathways. The new scheme develops faster overall reaction rates, steeper temperature-time profiles, and in a deflagration model will result in higher heat-transfer rates from gas phase to the condensed phase.

  9. Capillary gas chromatography with two new moderately high temperature phases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatography test results are presented for two new moderately high-temperature phases of Dexsil 400-GC with free hydroxyl end groups (uncapped) and with end groups covered by trimethyl silyl groups (capped). The two Dexsil 400-GC phases were tested for their ability to resolve N-TFA-DL-(+)-2-butyl esters and n-butyl esters, as well as fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbon standards. Generally the more polar uncapped phase was superior to the capped phase in all separation comparisons, except for the hydrocarbons.

  10. Aerosol droplets: Nucleation dynamics and photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorell, Ruth

    This talk addresses two fundamental aerosol processes that play a pivotal role in atmospheric processes: The formation dynamics of aerosol particles from neutral gas phase precursors and photochemical reactions in small aerosol droplets induced by ultraviolet and visible light. Nucleation is the rate determining step of aerosol particle formation. The idea behind nucleation is that supersaturation of a gas leads to the formation of a critical cluster, which quickly grows into larger aerosol particles. We discuss an experiment for studying the size and chemical composition of critical clusters at the molecular level. Much of the chemistry happening in planetary atmospheres is driven by sunlight. Photochemical reactions in small aerosol particles play a peculiar role in this context. Sunlight is strongly focused inside these particles which leads to a natural increase in the rates of photochemical reactions in small particles compared with the bulk. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been recognised but so far escaped direct observation and quantification. The development of a new experimental setup has finally made it possible to directly observe this nanofocusing effect in droplet photokinetics. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and ETH Zurich.

  11. Simulating the size distribution and chemical composition of ultrafine particles during nucleation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, JaeGun; Adams, Peter J.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    We describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient new multicomponent aerosol dynamics model that simulates the full aerosol size distribution and composition starting at a diameter of 0.8 nm. The model uses a recently developed ternary (sulfuric acid-ammonia-water) nucleation parameterization and a two-moment sectional algorithm, simulating both the aerosol number and mass distributions. Three chemical components, sulfate, ammonium, and non-volatile organics are simulated. The model is evaluated first against analytical solutions of the coagulation and condensation equations and then against ambient measurements from the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. The model is able to reproduce nucleation events from their start to completion. The simulations suggest that ammonia availability controls the nucleation bursts in the northeastern US. The first stage of the nucleation event in that area is the nucleation burst with growth of neutral ultrafine particles. In a second stage, the gas phase ammonia concentration approaches zero, the nucleation burst stops and the ultrafine particles become acidic growing by condensation of sulfuric acid. The present model is thirty times faster than comparable high-resolution models of aerosol dynamics and nucleation.

  12. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Alan P.

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  13. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  14. Analysis of the gas phase reactivity of chlorosilanes.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Stefano; Masi, Maurizio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2013-06-27

    Trichlorosilane is the most used precursor to deposit silicon for photovoltaic applications. Despite of this, its gas phase and surface kinetics have not yet been completely understood. In the present work, it is reported a systematic investigation aimed at determining what is the dominant gas phase chemistry active during the chemical vapor deposition of Si from trichlorosilane. The gas phase mechanism was developed calculating the rate constant of each reaction using conventional transition state theory in the rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator approximation. Torsional vibrations were described using a hindered rotor model. Structures and vibrational frequencies of reactants and transition states were determined at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, while potential energy surfaces and activation energies were computed at the CCSD(T) level using aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. As gas phase and surface reactivities are mutually interlinked, simulations were performed using a microkinetic surface mechanism. It was found that the gas phase reactivity follows two different routes. The disilane mechanism, in which the formation of disilanes as reaction intermediates favors the conversion between the most stable monosilane species, and the radical pathway, initiated by the decomposition of Si2HCl5 and followed by a series of fast propagation reactions. Though both mechanisms are active during deposition, the simulations revealed that above a certain temperature and conversion threshold the radical mechanism provides a faster route for the conversion of SiHCl3 into SiCl4, a reaction that favors the overall Si deposition process as it is associated with the consumption of HCl, a fast etchant of Si. Also, this study shows that the formation of disilanes as reactant intermediates promotes significantly the gas phase reactivity, as they contribute both to the initiation of radical chain mechanisms and provide a catalytic route for the conversion between the most stable monosilanes. PMID:23731215

  15. Gas purification in the dense phase at the CATS terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, P.J.; Carnell, P.J.H.; Rhodes, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    The purification and transportation of natural gas at very high pressures can help to minimize the capital cost of pipelines and processing equipment. However, complex mixtures of hydrocarbons undergo unusual phase changes, such as retrograde condensation, as the temperature and pressure are altered. The Central Area Transmission System (CATS) is a joint venture of Amoci, BG, Amerada Hess, Phillips, Agip and Fina operated by Amoco on behalf of the owners. The design of the CATS terminal has provided an interesting processing challenge. The terminal receives a total of 1.6 Bscf/d of rich gas from a number of offshore fields. All are relatively sweet but the small amounts of H{sub 2}S and Hg are removed. Fixed bed technology was selected as the most economic purification process, while minimizing hydrocarbon loss and operator involvement. Conventionally, the raw gas would be split into the different hydrocarbon fractions and each would be processed separately. This would require the installation of a large number of reactors. A more elegant solution is to treat the gas on arrival at the terminal in the dense phase. This option raised questions around whether a fixed bed would be prone to fouling, could the pressure drop be kept low enough to avoid phase separation and would inadvertent wetting by condensation cause problems. Details are given of the test work carried out to prove the viability of using fixed bed technology for dense phase gas processing, the eventual design adopted and the performance over the first year of service.

  16. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrehedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    By investigating the properties of quasicrystals and quasicrystal-forming liquid alloys, we may determine the role of ordering of the liquid phase in the formation of quasicrystals, leading to a better fundamental understanding of both the quasicrystal and the liquid. A quasicrystal is solid characterized by a symmetric but non-periodic arrangement of atoms, usually in the form of an icosahedron (12 atoms, 20 triangular faces). It is theorized that the short-range order in liquids takes this same form. The degree of ordering depends on the temperature of the liquid, and affects many of the liquid s properties, including specific heat, viscosity, and electrical resistivity. The MSFC role in this project includes solidification studies, phase diagram determination, and thermophysical property measurements on the liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys, all by electrostatic levitation (ESL). The viscosity of liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys is measured by the oscillating drop method, both in the stable and undercooled liquid state. The specific heat of solid, undercooled liquid, and stable liquid are measured by the radiative cooling rate of the droplets.

  17. Characterizing protein crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish V.

    We developed an experimental microfluidic based technique to measure the nucleation rates and successfully applied the technique to measure nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals. The technique involves counting the number of samples which do not have crystals as a function of time. Under the assumption that nucleation is a Poisson process, the fraction of samples with no crystals decays exponentially with the decay constant proportional to nucleation rate and volume of the sample. Since nucleation is a random and rare event, one needs to perform measurements on large number of samples to obtain good statistics. Microfluidics offers the solution of producing large number of samples at minimal material consumption. Hence, we developed a microfluidic method and measured nucleation rates of lysozyme crystals in supersaturated protein drops, each with volume of ˜ 1 nL. Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) describes the kinetics of nucleation and predicts the functional form of nucleation rate in terms of the thermodynamic quantities involved, such as supersaturation, temperature, etc. We analyzed the measured nucleation rates in the context of CNT and obtained the activation energy and the kinetic pre-factor characterizing the nucleation process. One conclusion is that heterogeneous nucleation dominates crystallization. We report preliminary studies on selective enhancement of nucleation in one of the crystal polymorprhs of lysozyme (spherulite) using amorphous mesoporous bioactive gel-glass te{naomi06, naomi08}, CaO.P 2O5.SiO2 (known as bio-glass) with 2-10 nm pore-size diameter distribution. The pores act as heterogeneous nucleation centers and claimed to enhance the nucleation rates by molecular confinement. The measured kinetic profiles of crystal fraction of spherulites indicate that the crystallization of spherulites may be proceeding via secondary nucleation pathways.

  18. Nucleation and growth of Ag nanoparticles on amorphous carbon surface from vapor phase formed by vacuum evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Dmitry G.; Pavlova, Lydia M.; Savitsky, Andrey I.; Trifonov, Alexey Yu.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of experimental study of Ag nanoparticle arrays on thin film of amorphous carbon. The arrays were formed by means of vapor phase deposition on non-heated substrate. The investigation was carried out using TEM technique. It has been found that the size of the particles and their surface density significantly depend on the amount of condensing substance. In particular, increasing the portion of evaporating Ag material from 5.1 to 47.5 mg results in drastic reduction of surface density of the particles from ~8,000 to ~40 µm-2, whereas the predominant particle size changes from ~7 to ~60 nm. We present phenomenological description of the process: directed flow of silver atoms to growing Ag particles takes place during condensation.

  19. Nucleation and growth of Ag islands on the (.sqroot.3 × .sqroot.3)R30° phase of Ag on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, A.; Unal, B.; Ho, K.-M.; Wang, C.-Z.; Evans, J. W.; Tringides, M. C.; Thiel, P. A.

    2011-06-06

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to measure densities and characteristics of Ag islands that form on the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o}-Ag phase on Si(111), as a function of deposition temperature. Nucleation theory predicts that the logarithm of island density varies linearly with inverse deposition temperature. The data show two linear regimes. At 50-125 K, islands are relatively small, and island density decreases only slightly with increasing temperature. At 180-250 K, islands are larger and polycrystalline, and island density decreases strongly with increasing temperature. At 300 K, Ag atoms can travel for distances of the order of 1 {micro}m. Assuming that Ag diffusion occurs via thermally activated motion of single atoms between adjacent sites, the data can be explained as follows. At 50-125 K, the island density does not follow conventional Arrhenius scaling due to limited mobility and a consequent breakdown of the steady-state condition for the adatom density. At {approx} 115-125 K, a transition to conventional Arrhenius scaling with critical nucleus size (i = 1) begins, and at 180-250 K, i > 1 prevails. The transition points indicate a diffusion barrier of 0.20-0.23 eV and a pairwise Ag-Ag bond strength of 0.14 eV. These energy values lead to an estimate of i {approx} 3-4 in the regime 180-250 K, where island density varies strongly with temperature.

  20. Gas-phase diffusivity and tortuosity of structured soils.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Thorbjørn, Anne; Jensen, Maria P; Pedersen, Mette; Moldrup, Per

    2010-06-25

    Modeling gas-phase diffusion of volatile contaminants in the unsaturated zone relies on soil-gas diffusivity models often developed for repacked and structureless soil columns. These suffer from the flaw of not reflecting preferential diffusion through voids and fractures in the soil, thus possibly causing an underestimation of vapor migration towards building foundations and vapor intrusion to indoor environments. We measured the ratio of the gas diffusion coefficient in soil and in free air (D(p)/D(0)) for 42 variously structured, intact, and unsaturated soil cores taken from 6 Danish sites. Whilst the results from structureless fine sand were adequately described using previously proposed models, results that were obtained from glacial clay till and limestone exhibited a dual-porosity behavior. Instead, these data were successfully described using a dual-porosity model for gas-phase diffusivity, considering a presence of drained fractures surrounded by a lower diffusivity matrix. Based on individual model fits, the tortuosity of fractures in till and limestone was found to be highest in samples with a total porosity <40%, suggesting soil compaction to affect the geometry of the fractures. In summary, this study highlights a potential order of magnitude underestimation associated in the use of classical models for prediction of subsurface gas-phase diffusion coefficients in heterogeneous and fractured soils. PMID:20421139

  1. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  2. Selected Examples of Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion chemistry is an area in mass spectrometry that has received much research interest since the mid fifties of the last century. Although the focus of mass spectrometric research has shifted the last twenty years largely to life science studies, including proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there are still several groups in the world active in gas-phase ion chemistry of both positive and negative ions, either unimolecularly and/or bimolecularly. In this tutorial lecture the formation and determination of tautomeric ion structures and intra-ionic catalyzed tautomerization in the gas phase will be discussed. In addition, an example of formation of different tautomeric structures in protic and aprotic solvents under electrospray ionization conditions will be given, as established by gas-phase infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy. This will be followed by presenting an example of time-resolved MS/MS which enables to identify the structure of an ion, generated at a particular molecular ion lifetime. At the end of the lecture the power of ion mobility will be shown in elucidating the mechanism of epimerization of bis-Tröger bases having chiral nitrogen centers. PMID:24349921

  3. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  4. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  5. The Dipeptide Ala-Gly in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Celina; Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The dipeptide Ala-Gly has been examined in gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy in the frequency region 3-12 GHz. Three rotamers have been detected in the supersonic expansion. The quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N (I=1) nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of one conformer.

  6. Nucleation of copper during supersonic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1989-12-01

    Nucleation of copper vapor during gas expansion in a supersonic nozzle is investigated. Time scales for nucleation delay and supersaturation doubling are considered in establishing the need for non-steady state nucleation theory. A population balance model is constructed for tracking the size spectrum of stable clusters formed from self nucleation and exposed to supersaturated gas. It is found that at average cooling rates exceeding 10{sup 7} K/s, copper vapor exists in a highly nonequilibrium concentration at the nozzle exit. Copper condensation is severely limited by the nucleation kinetics and the available residence time. It is influenced by the monomer concentration and the nozzle exit pressure and temperature. The size spectrum of stable clusters is dominated by small clusters containing fewer than fifteen molecules. Nucleation persists throughout the expansion process because of the inability of the vapor condensation processes to relieve supersaturation buildup due to rapid gas cooling. Nucleation rate is sensitive to the surface energy of the clusters corresponding to the critical size. Monte-Carlo simulations of admissible cluster configurations are recommended for determining statistically-averaged surface energies of clusters containing two-to-twenty molecules. 7 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04257j

  8. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates particulate-phase sulfate and ammonium. In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics for sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, and chloride have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Compared to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and thus could improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing, SWCF) on the global scale. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry could further improve the prediction of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD on the global scale. IMN can improve the prediction of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe as well as AOD and CDNC on the global scale. The explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics using the ISORROPIA II model improves the prediction of all major PM2.5 components and their gaseous precursors in some regions as well as downwelling shortwave radiation, SWCF, and cloud condensation nuclei at a supersaturation of 0.5% on the global scale. For simulations of 2001-2005 with all the modified and new treatments, the improved model predicts that on global average, SWCF increases by 2.7 W m-2, reducing the normalized mean bias (NMB) of SWCF from -5.4 to 1.2%. Uncertainties in emissions can largely explain the inaccurate prediction of precursor gases (e.g., SO2, NH3, and NO) and primary aerosols (e.g., black carbon and primary organic matter). Additional factors leading to the discrepancies between model predictions and observations include assumptions associated with equilibrium partitioning for fine particles assumed in ISORROPIA II, irreversible gas/particle mass transfer treatment for coarse particles, uncertainties in model treatments such as dust emissions, secondary organic aerosol formation, multi-phase chemistry, cloud microphysics, aerosol-cloud interaction, dry and wet deposition, and model parameters (e.g., accommodation coefficients and prefactors of the nucleation power law) as well as uncertainties in model configuration such as the use of a coarse-grid resolution.

  9. Electrochemical Nucleation of Stable N2 Nanobubbles at Pt Nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianjin; Wiedenroth, Hilke S; German, Sean R; White, Henry S

    2015-09-23

    Exploring the nucleation of gas bubbles at interfaces is of fundamental interest. Herein, we report the nucleation of individual N2 nanobubbles at Pt nanodisk electrodes (6–90 nm) via the irreversible electrooxidation of hydrazine (N2H4 → N2 + 4H(+) + 4e(–)). The nucleation and growth of a stable N2 nanobubble at the Pt electrode is indicated by a sudden drop in voltammetric current, a consequence of restricted mass transport of N2H4 to the electrode surface following the liquid-to-gas phase transition. The critical surface concentration of dissolved N2 required for nanobubble nucleation, CN2,critical(s), obtained from the faradaic current at the moment just prior to bubble formation, is measured to be ∼0.11 M and is independent of the electrode radius and the bulk N2H4 concentration. Our results suggest that the size of stable gas bubble nuclei depends only on the local concentration of N2 near the electrode surface, consistent with previously reported studies of the electrogeneration of H2 nanobubbles. CN2,critical(s) is ∼160 times larger than the N2 saturation concentration at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The residual current for N2H4 oxidation after formation of a stable N2 nanobubble at the electrode surface is proportional to the N2H4 concentration as well as the nanoelectrode radius, indicating that the dynamic equilibrium required for the existence of a stable N2 nanobubble is determined by N2H4 electrooxidation at the three phase contact line. PMID:26322525

  10. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  11. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  12. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  13. Flavin adenine dinucleotide structural motifs: from solution to gas phase.

    PubMed

    Molano-Arevalo, Juan Camilo; Hernandez, Diana R; Gonzalez, Walter G; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2014-10-21

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H](+) and [M + Na](+)molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a "stack" to a "close" conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the "solvation" effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  14. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  15. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  16. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  17. Liquid-gas phase transition of strange hadronic matter

    SciTech Connect

    P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  18. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway. PMID:26894440

  19. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  20. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  1. Star formation via the phase transition of an adiabatic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, Joel E.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    1988-01-01

    An analytic model based on a second-order accurate global virial analysis is used to describe two stable equilibrium states for rotating gas clouds: a pressure-supported, diffuse state and a rotationally supported, compact state. Diffuse and compact equilibrium sequences are identified along which slow, secular evolution of a gas cloud can occur. A virial analysis provides analytic expressions for the limiting masses of gas clouds at points of dynamical instability. The minimum mass below which external triggers of any amplitude cannot effectively induce star formation is identified for adiabatic gas clouds. It is suggested that fluctuations in the ISM of some galaxies may actually cause star formation to proceed primarily via a phase transition, rather than via the classical Jeans instability.

  2. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  3. Communication: Bubbles, crystals, and laser-induced nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Brandon C.; LaRue, Jerry L.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Doherty, Michael F.; Peters, Baron

    2011-05-01

    Short intense laser pulses of visible and infrared light can dramatically accelerate crystal nucleation from transparent solutions; previous studies invoke mechanisms that are only applicable for nucleation of ordered phases or high dielectric phases. However, we show that similar laser pulses induce CO2 bubble nucleation in carbonated water. Additionally, in water that is cosupersaturated with argon and glycine, argon bubbles escaping from the water can induce crystal nucleation without a laser. Our findings suggest a possible link between laser-induced nucleation of bubbles and crystals.

  4. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  5. Lattice-gas models of phase separation: interfaces, phase transitions, and multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. ); Zaleski, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Momentum-conserving lattice gases are simple, discrete, microscopic models of fluids. This review describes their hydrodynamics, with particular attention given to the derivation of macroscopic constitutive equations from microscopic dynamics. Lattice-gas models of phase separation receive special emphasis. The current understanding of phase transitions in these momentum-conserving models is reviewed; included in this discussion is a summary of the dynamical properties of interfaces. Because the phase-separation models are microscopically time irreversible, interesting questions are raised about their relationship to real fluid mixtures. Simulation of certain complex-fluid problems, such as multiphase flow through porous media and the interaction of phase transitions with hydrodynamics, is illustrated.

  6. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  7. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer coefficient.

  9. Drag reduction in two-phase gas-liquid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, D.D.

    1987-02-01

    A considerable amount of drag reduction is observed in various flow regimes for two-phase gas-liquid flow of drag reducing fluids. Various attempts have been made to correlate the amount of drag reduction, but comparison with single phase flow of drag reducing fluids has not been done in a satisfactory manner. It is well known that single phase flow of drag reducing fluids exhibits a diameter effect. In order to account for this, a plot of percent drag reduction versus friction velocity, ..mu../sup */, in the absence of a polymer additive gives a simple method of estimating the amount of drag reduction for a given flow rate and pipe diameter. For two-phase flow no such comparison has been made.

  10. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Démery, V.; Monsarrat, R.; Dean, D. S.; Podgornik, R.

    2016-01-01

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one-dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting low-density disordered and high-density ordered phases, separated by a first-order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three-dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  11. Electron diffraction studies of supersonic jets. 8. Nucleation of various phases of SF/sub 6/, SeF/sub 6/, and TeF/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Bartell, L.S.; Valente, E.J.; Caillat, J.C.

    1987-05-07

    Old microcrystals of SF/sub 6/, SeF/sub 6/, and TeF/sup 6/ are condensed when the gaseous hexafluorides in monatomic carriers flow supersonically through aminiature Laval nozzle. Electron diffraction records of the condensates display strong Debye-Scherrer rings. The diffraction patterns depend markedly upon the carrier gas and expansion conditions. For the hexafluorides of sulfur and selenium the well-known body-centered plastic cubic phase forms if the molecular weight of the carrier gas is low and the subject mole fraction exceeds several percent. A phase II of low symmetry begins to appear only at low mole fractions of SF/sub 6/ and requires a carrier at least has heavy as argon. Phase II appears for SeF/sub 6/ with argon carrier under all conditions examined and with neon under extreme conditions. It appears readily even with helium in the case of TeF/sub 6/, provided the subject mole fraction is comparatively high. At lower mole fractions and total pressures another, as yet unidentified, phase III of TeF/sub 6/ is produced. Patterns of phase II are well accounted for by the triclinic lattice P1, Z = 3. Refinements based on this space group, for the two compounds yielding nearly pure phase II, led to the following cell constants (3sigma): SeF/sub 6/ (T < 140 K), a = 14.51 (8) A, b = 8.22 (3) A, c = 4.92 (3) A, ..cap alpha.. = 85.6 (3)/sup 0/; ..beta.. = 93.7 (4)/sup 0/, ..gamma.. = 88.14 (4)/sup 0/; TeF/sub 6/ (T < 160 K.), a = 14.99 (7) A, b = 8.53 (3) A, c = 5.06 (3) A, ..cap alpha.. = 85.6 (3)/sup 0/, ..beta.. = 93.5 (3)/sup 0/ = 88.9 (3)/sup 0/.

  12. Phase separation of a driven granular gas in annular geometry.

    PubMed

    Díez-Minguito, Manuel; Meerson, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    This work investigates phase separation of a monodisperse gas of inelastically colliding hard disks confined in a two-dimensional annulus, the inner circle of which represents a "thermal wall." When described by granular hydrodynamic equations, the basic steady state of this system is an azimuthally symmetric state of increased particle density at the exterior circle of the annulus. When the inelastic energy loss is sufficiently large, hydrodynamics predicts spontaneous symmetry breaking of the annular state, analogous to the van der Waals-like phase separation phenomenon previously found in a driven granular gas in rectangular geometry. At a fixed aspect ratio of the annulus, the phase separation involves a "spinodal interval" of particle area fractions, where the gas has negative compressibility in the azimuthal direction. The heat conduction in the azimuthal direction tends to suppress the instability, as corroborated by a marginal stability analysis of the basic steady state with respect to small perturbations. To test and complement our theoretical predictions we performed event-driven molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of this system. We clearly identify the transition to phase separated states in the MD simulations, despite large fluctuations present, by measuring the probability distribution of the amplitude of the fundamental Fourier mode of the azimuthal spectrum of the particle density. We find that the instability region, predicted from hydrodynamics, is always located within the phase separation region observed in the MD simulations. This implies the presence of a binodal (coexistence) region, where the annular state is metastable. The phase separation persists when the driving and elastic walls are interchanged, and also when the elastic wall is replaced by weakly inelastic one. PMID:17358142

  13. Terahertz wave generation from gas plasma using a phase compensator with attosecond phase-control accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Jianming; Zhang, X.-C.

    2009-01-12

    We report the use of a precise phase compensator for the generation of intense terahertz waves from laser-induced gas plasma excited by a femtosecond pulse ({omega}) and its second harmonic (2{omega}) at both close contact and standoff distances. The attosecond accuracy phase-control capability of the device enables further optimization of the terahertz emission from gas plasma and elimination of the temporal walkoff between the {omega} and 2{omega} pulses traveling in dispersive media, resulting in intense terahertz generation at a distance of over 100 m by sending the optical beams far away and focusing them locally.

  14. Acoustic Instabilities Driven by Slip Between a Condensed Phase and the Gas Phase in Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCicco, M.; Buckmaster, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of gas turbine combustion chambers, this study describes how slip affects the response time of fuel sprays to pressure fluctuations in a gaseous flow field. Slip between the condensed and gas phases is shown to cause fuel vapor mass fraction fluctuations upstream of the reaction zone. A resulting oscillating heat release can drive the pressure fluctuations, depending on the phase difference between them. This generates an acoustic instability. With relevance to previous experimental results, differences are explored in the evaporation characteristics among three different fuel sprays (JP-4, JP-5, and D-2) in relation to their effect on the magnitude of the fuel vapor mass fraction perturbations.

  15. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter; Smuth, James

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  16. The organic matter of Comet Halley as inferred by joint gas phase and solid phase analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, F. R.; Korth, A.; Kissel, J.

    1991-04-01

    During encounters with Comet Halley, the experiment PICCA onboard Giotto measured the gas-phase organic ion composition of the coma, and the experiment PUMA onboard Vega-1 measured the dust composition. Joining both results gives a consistent picture of the parent organic matter from which dust and gas is produced: a complex unsaturated polycondensate, which splits during coma formation into the more refractory C=C,C-N-containing dust part and the more volatile C=C,C-O-containing gas part. The responsible exothermal chemical reactions, which are triggered by sunlight, may play a major role in the dynamics of coma formation.

  17. Measurements of the Aerosol Size Distribution Down to 1 Nanometer to Investigate Aerosol Nucleation and Initial Growth During the GoAmazon Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, C.; Artaxo, P.; Backman, J.; Kim, S.; Kulmala, M. T.; Martin, S. T.; Petäjä, T.; Seco, R.; Smith, J. N.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric particle nucleation is an important environmental nano-scale process, with field measurements and modeling studies indicating that freshly nucleated particles are a significant source of global cloud condensation nuclei. However, our understanding of atmospheric nucleation and its influence on climate is limited as few ambient measurements have been made of either the nucleation rate (at 1 nm) or the initial growth rate of newly formed clusters (from 1 to 3 nm), both of which are necessary to constrain and investigate the nucleation mechanism and to develop process-level models. Aerosol nucleation and initial growth were investigated during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) campaign spanning the wet and dry seasons of 2014 downwind of the city of Manaus, Brazil. Aerosol measurement was accomplished through the deployment of a condensation particle counter-based electrical mobility spectrometer, optimized for the detection of aerosol down to 1 nm in diameter. An electrometer-based neutral air ion spectrometer was also deployed at the same location to measure the neutral and charged fraction of aerosol down to 1.5 nm in diameter. From these size distribution measurements, periods of nucleation will be identified, and the resulting nucleation rates and initial growth rates will be presented. Concurrent and co-located measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid will provide the opportunity to investigate the functional contribution of sulfuric acid to the observed nucleation rate and initial growth rate.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  19. Model of boron diffusion from gas phase in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, O. V.; Mokhov, E. N.

    2011-06-15

    Boron diffusion from the gas phase in silicon carbide is described on the basis of a two-component model. 'Shallow' boron, i.e., boron at silicon sites, is a slow component with a high surface concentration. Its diffusivity is proportional to the concentration of positively charged intrinsic point defects, which are presumably interstitial silicon atoms. 'Deep' boron, i.e., impurity-defect pairs of boron-carbon vacancy, is a fast component with lower surface concentration. The ratio between the surface concentrations of the components depends on the pressure of silicon or carbon vapors in the gas phase. The diffusion and interaction of components are described by the set of diffusion-reaction equations. The diffusion retardation observed on the concentration-profile tail is related to the capture of impurity-defect pairs and excess vacancies by traps of background impurities and defects.

  20. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  1. Gas phase dynamics of triplet formation in benzophenone.

    PubMed

    Spighi, Gloria; Gaveau, Marc-André; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoît

    2014-05-28

    Benzophenone is a prototype molecule for photochemistry in the triplet state through its high triplet yield and reactivity. We have investigated its dynamics of triplet formation under the isolated gas phase conditions via femtosecond and nanosecond time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. This represents the complete evolution from the excitation in S2 to the final decay of T1 to the ground state S0. We have found that the triplet formation can be described almost as a direct process in preparing T1, the lowest reacting triplet state, from the S1 state after S2 → S1 internal conversion. The molecule was also deposited by a pick-up technique on cold argon clusters providing a soft relaxation medium without evaporation of the molecule and the mechanism was identical. This cluster technique is a model for medium influenced electronic relaxation and provides a continuous transition from the isolated gas phase to the relaxation dynamics in solution. PMID:24728443

  2. Gas-phase terpene oxidation products: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calogirou, A.; Larsen, B. R.; Kotzias, D.

    Terpenes are emitted in large quantities from vegetation into the troposphere, where they react readily with ozone, OH and NO 3 radicals leading to a number of oxidation products. The current knowledge about gas-phase terpene oxidation products is reviewed. Their formation and decomposition pathways, their products and their relevance for the troposphere, and their chemical analysis are discussed. Data on oxidation kinetics, and product yields is presented for 23 terpenes and 65 oxidation products. A total of 84 references are quoted.

  3. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  4. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Gold- and Silica-Coated Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boies, Adam Meyer

    2011-12-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of separate core-shell materials are of interest for a variety of biomedical and industrial applications. By combining different materials at the nanoscale, particles can exhibit enhanced or multi-functional behavior such as plasmon resonance combined with superparamagnetism. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis processes are promising because they can continuously produce particles with high mass-yield rates. In this dissertation, new methods are investigated for producing gas-phase coatings of nanoparticles in an "assembly-line" fashion. Separate processes are developed to create coatings from silica and gold that can be used with a variety of core-particle chemistries. A photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) method is used to produce silica coatings from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) on the surface of nanoparticles (diameter ˜5--70 nm). Tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) of the process demonstrates that particle coatings can be produced with controllable thicknesses (˜1--10 nm) by varying system parameters such as precursor flow rate. Electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy confirm that the photo-CVD films uniformly coat the particles and that the coatings are silica. In order to describe the coating process a chemical mechanism is proposed that includes gas-phase, surface and photochemical reactions. A chemical kinetics model of the mechanism indicates that photo-CVD coating proceeds primarily through the photodecomposition of TEOS which removes ethyl groups, thus creating activated TEOS species. The activated TEOS then adsorbs onto the surface of the particle where a series of subsequent reactions remove the remaining ethyl groups to produce a silica film with an open site for further attachment. The model results show good agreement with the experimentally measured coating trends, where increased TEOS flow increases coating thickness and increased nitrogen flow decreases coating thickness. Gold decoration of nanoparticles is accomplished by evaporation of solid gold in the presence of an aerosol flow. A hot-wire generation method is developed where gold particles are produced from a composite gold-platinum wire. Investigations of the hot-wire generator show that it can produce particles with a range of sizes and that more uniform, non-agglomerated particles are produced when using smaller diameter tubes where gas velocities across the wire are higher and recirculation zones are diminished. When gold is evaporated in the presence of silica nanoparticles, the silica aerosol is decorated by gold through either homogeneous gold nucleation and subsequent scavenging by the silica nanoparticles, or by heterogeneous nucleation on the silica surface in which the gold "balls up" due to the high surface tension of gold on silica. In both cases the resulting particles exhibit a plasmon absorbance resonance typical of gold nanoparticles (lambda˜550 nm). Finally, the silica coating and gold decoration processes are combined with a thermal plasma technique for synthesizing iron-oxide to produce tri-layer nanoparticles.

  5. A varying polytropic gas universe and phase space analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we will consider a phenomenological model of a dark fluid that is able to explain an accelerated expansion of our low redshift universe and the phase transition to this accelerated expanding universe. Recent developments in modern cosmology towards understanding of the accelerated expansion of the large scale universe involve various scenarios and approaches. Among these approaches, one of well-known and accepted practice is modeling of the content of our universe via dark fluid. There are various models of dark energy fluid actively studied in recent literature and polytropic gas is among them. In this work, we will consider a varying polytropic gas which is a phenomenological modification of polytropic gas. Our model of varying polytropic dark fluid has been constructed to analogue to a varying Chaplygin gas actively discussed in the literature. We will consider interacting models, where dark matter is a pressureless fluid, to have a comprehensive picture. Phase space analysis is an elegant mathematical tool to earn general understanding of large scale universe and easily see an existence of a solution to cosmological coincidence problem. Imposing some constraints on parameters of the models, we found late time attractors for each case analytically. Cosmological consequences for the obtained late time attractors are discussed.

  6. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  7. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  8. Parenchymal mechanics, gas mixing, and the slope of phase III.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2013-07-01

    A model of parenchymal mechanics is revisited with the objective of investigating the differences in parenchymal microstructure that underlie the differences in regional compliance that are inferred from gas-mixing studies. The stiffness of the elastic line elements that lie along the free edges of alveoli and form the boundary of the lumen of the alveolar duct is the dominant determinant of parenchymal compliance. Differences in alveolar size cause parallel shifts of the pressure-volume curve, but have little effect on compliance. However, alveolar size also affects the relation between surface tension and pressure during the breathing cycle. Thus regional differences in alveolar size generate regional differences in surface tension, and these drive Marangoni surface flows that equilibrate surface tension between neighboring acini. Surface tension relaxation introduces phase differences in regional volume oscillations and a dependence of expired gas concentration on expired volume. A particular example of different parenchymal properties in two neighboring acini is described, and gas exchange in this model is calculated. The efficiency of mixing and slope of phase III for the model agree well with published data. This model constitutes a new hypothesis concerning the origin of phase III. PMID:23599394

  9. Evidence of Microporous Carbon Nanosheets Showing Fast Kinetics in both Gas Phase and Liquid Phase Environments.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Qiang; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Despite the great advantages of microporous carbons for applications in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices, direct experiment data and theoretical calculations on the relevance of properties and structures are quite limited. Herein, two model carbon materials are designed and synthesized, i.e., microporous carbon nanosheets (MCN) and microporous carbon spheres (MCS). They both have nearly same composition, surface chemistry, and specific surface area, known morphology, but distinguishable diffusion paths. Based on these two types of materials, a reliable relationship between the morphology with different diffusion paths and adsorption kinetics in both gas phase and liquid phase environments is established. When used for CO2 capture, MCN shows a high saturated CO2 capacity of 8.52 ?mol m(-2) and 18.4 mmol cm(-3) at 273 K and ambient pressure, and its calculated first-order rate constant is ?7.4 times higher than that of MCS. Moreover, MCN shows a quick and high uptake of Cr (VI) and a higher-rate performance for supercapacitors than MCS does. These results strongly confirm that MCN exhibits improved kinetics in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices due to its shorter diffusion paths and larger exposed geometrical area resulting from the nanosheet structure. PMID:26192395

  10. Gas-phase and particulate products from the atmospheric degradation of an isoxazole fungicide.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Borrás, Esther; Muñoz, Amalia

    2013-08-01

    The isoxazole structure is present in several pesticides. However, there is a lack of information about its degradation products after the release to the atmosphere. The main atmospheric reactions of hymexazol (5-methylisoxazol-3-ol), selected as representative model, were investigated at a large outdoor simulation chamber. The predominant products of atmospheric degradations were gaseous nitrogen derivates (nitric acid, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, nitrous acid, and peroxyacetylnitrate), ozone, and small oxygenated compounds (formic acid, formaldehyde, and methylglyoxal). The aerosol yields were lower than 5%, and an OH rate-dependence was observed in the nucleation, particle growth, and size distribution. Also, the chemical composition of minor multi-oxygenated products was studied for OH-photo-oxidations. More than 20 products were detected in the gas or particulate phase. The most abundant were heterocyclic cleavage products with C4-chain and oxygenated moieties at positions 1 and 3, such as 3,4-dioxobutanoic acid, 3-oxobutanoic acid, and 3-oxobutanal. The suggested reaction pathway is the opening of heterocycle ring by the cleavage of N-O bond and C-N bond, releasing nitrogen oxides. PMID:23602658

  11. Grain structures in gas tungsten-arc welds of austenitic stainless steels with ferrite primary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafuerte, J. C.; Kerr, H. W.

    1990-03-01

    The grain structures were investigated in full penetration gas tungsten-arc (GTA) welds in sheets of 304 and 321 austenitic stainless steels for a range of welding conditions. In type 321 steel welds, fine equiaxed ferrite dendrites were observed in the ferrite phase. The equiaxed structure was ascribed to heterogeneous nucleation of ferrite on Ti-rich cuboidal inclusions present in this steel, since these inclusions were observed at the origin of equiaxed dendrites. In type 304 welds, the ferrite grains were columnar, except in less complete penetration specimens, where a few coarse equiaxed dendrites appeared to originate from the weld surface. The secondary austenitic grain structure was columnar in both steels. In type 304 steel, the columnar austenitic grain structure did not necessarily correspond to the primary ferrite grains. In type 321 steel, the secondary austenite was columnar despite the equiaxed structure of the primary ferrite. Factors which affect the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) are discussed. The failure to form equiaxed austenitic grains in type 321 steel is ascribed to austenite growing across the space between ferrite grains instead of renucleating on the primary equiaxed ferrite.

  12. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en ordre de grandeur mais la méthode donne également correctement les autres caractéristiques ; par exemple l'ordre des processus en traçant simplement la courbe des données expérimentales.

  13. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer coefficients for the CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system. For the CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system, the enhanced factor is not only dependent on the liquid mass transfer coefficients, but also the chemical reaction rates.

  15. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 μs, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the hypergolic liquid propellant combination of MMH and RFNA or pure nitric acid. The first and most important effort focuses on furthering the understanding of condensed phase reactions between MMH and nitric acid. To accomplish this goal diluted MMH and nitric acid were studied in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. By tracking the generation or destruction of specific chemical species in the reacting fluid we can measure the reaction progress as a function of reactant concentration and temperature. This work provides the propulsion community with a quantitative global condensed phase reaction rate equation for MMH/nitric acid. The second effort focuses on improving understanding the recently proposed gas phase hypergolic reaction mechanisms using a streak camera based ultraviolet and visible spectrometer. The time resolution on the streak camera system allows for detailed investigation of the pre-ignition and early stage gas phase species present during the reaction between MMH and RFNA.

  16. Gas-Phase Chemical Models of Interstellar Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Hsin

    A large gas-phase chemical model of interstellar molecular clouds containing almost 4,000 gas-phase reactions involving 409 species are developed. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observed abundances in TMC1. The effects of rapid neutral-neutral reactions in the gas phase on the synthesis of complex species is studied via a series of model calculations. Reactions between O or N atoms and carbon clusters C n are critical in hindering the synthesis of complex species. Neutral-neutral reactions involving molecular hydrogen (HAARs) are shown to aid molecular synthesis. Bistability in large gas-phase chemical networks of dense clouds is examined. The dependence of bistability on the parameter ζn H for a wide range of elemental depletions is investigated. We confirm that bistability can exist at steady-state for a range of ζn H, and the range of bistability is dependent on elemental depletions and networks utilized. The steady-state results for a variety of molecules in both the HIP and LIP solutions at a high density near 3 104 cm-3 with a standard cosmic ionization rate are also present. A model of time-dependent gas-phase chemistry in a spatially inhomogeneous cloud which is exposed on one side to an isotropic radiation field is presented. Shielding due to H2, CO and dust particles are fully considered. The cloud hydrogen number density is a function of cloud depth varying as (1-cr)-2 where r is the depth into the cloud. The cloud temperature is kept constant at 30 K. The cloud is divided into 43 slabs, which are defined so that the photodissociation rate of CO is halved as one proceeds to the next slab. Models with three different sets of initial conditions regarding hydrogen are presented here. The first model starts with atomic hydrogen in all slabs, the second starts with molecular hydrogen, and the third utilizes an H/H2 fraction with larger value in the outer slabs. The fractional abundance profiles and integrated column densities for selected species as functions of cloud depth at different times are discussed. A comparison between fractional abundances with observations in TMC1 is given. Total integrated column densities obtained via a weighting procedure are designed for unresolved distant sources.

  17. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to furnish a vivid picture of the structural and dynamic features of these aggregates. Thus, in this review, we will focus on the most important achievements gained in recent years by both these investigative tools. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35: 170-187, 2016. PMID:26113001

  18. Experimental Studies in Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy Peter

    Ice nuclei play a critical role in the formation of precipitation in mixed phase clouds. Modification of IN concentrations can lead to changes in cloud lifetimes and precipitation size. Presented in this study are experimental investigations into ice nuclei in an ongoing effort to reduce the uncertainties that ice nuclei have on cloud processes and climate. This research presents a new version of the cold stage drop freezing assay to investigate the time-dependence of heterogeneous nucleation. The temperature range for the instrument spans from the melting point of water to the homogeneous freezing limit of ˜-38 deg C. Temperature stability for the instrument allowed for experimental operation for up to four days while interrogating the same sample. Up to a one hundred fold increase in the number of analyzed drops was accomplished through an in-house written automated drop freezing detection software package. Combined instrument design improvements allow for the analysis of IN concentrations down to ˜10-8 ice nuclei per picoliter of sample water. A new variant of the multiple-component stochastic model for heterogeneous ice nucleation was used to investigate the time dependence of heterogeneous freezing processes. This was accomplished by analyzing how the changes in the cooling rate can impact the observed nucleation rate. The model employed four material-dependent parameters to accurately capture the observed freezing of water drops containing Arizona Test Dust. The parameters were then used to accurately predict the freezing behavior of the drops in time dependent experiments. The time dependence freezing of a wide range of materials was then investigated. These materials included the minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite, the biological proxy ice nuclei contained within the product Icemax, and flame soot generated from the incomplete combustion of ethylene gas. The time dependence for ice nuclei collected from rainwater samples was also investigated. The data show that the time dependence for all investigated materials was weak. The drop freezing assay was then employed to test the hypothesis that certain macromolecules derived from burst pollen could be efficient ice nuclei. In a new method, air samples were collected during the height of the 2013 pollen season using a particle-in-liquid impinger and the solutions were transferred to the drop freezing assay to be analyzed for ice nuclei activity. The IN concentration in collected rainwater was analyzed and compared to IN concentrations near the ground to determine if potential IN enhancement due to pollen bursting at the surface was also found within clouds. No general trend was observed between ambient pollen counts and observed IN concentrations, suggesting that ice nuclei multiplication via pollen sac rupturing and the subsequent release of macromolecules was not prevalent for the pollen types and meteorological conditions typically encountered in the Southeastern US. Additional field tests were performed in conjunction with the Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor which used UV fluorescence to determine the possible fraction of biological aerosol present at the measurement site. This instrument was operated in parallel with the particle-in-liquid impinger allowing for a comparison of ambient immersion mode ice nuclei and fluorescent particle concentrations. Two case studies provided evidence that the active release of biological ice nuclei was causally coordinated with the arrival of a cold-frontal boundary, which can loft the nuclei to seed the frontal cloud rain band.

  19. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF THE INTERMEDIATE PHASES FORMED DURING THE NUCLEATION OF YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} FILM

    SciTech Connect

    WU,L.; ZHU,Y.; SLOVYOV,V.F.; WIESMANN,H.J.; SUENAGA,M.

    2001-08-05

    Recently, considerable efforts have been made in growing bi-axially aligned thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) films on a flexible, textured metallic substrate for electrical power applications. The BaF{sub 2} post-deposition annealing process is one of the most promising methods. To understand the nucleation and growth mechanism of YBCO in this process, extended transmission electron microscopy analysis has been made. Here, we report on the evolution of Ba-Y oxy-fluoride which is pertinent to the epitaxial YBCO nucleation process on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrate.

  20. Revision of the thermodynamics of the proton in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Nsangou, Mama

    2014-11-20

    Proton transfer is ubiquitous in various physical/chemical processes, and the accurate determination of the thermodynamic parameters of the proton in the gas phase is useful for understanding and describing such reactions. However, the thermodynamic parameters of such a proton are usually determined by assuming the proton as a classical particle whatever the temperature. The reason for such an assumption is that the entropy of the quantum proton is not always soluble analytically at all temperatures. Thereby, we addressed this matter using a robust and reliable self-consistent iterative procedure based on the Fermi-Dirac formalism. As a result, the free proton gas can be assumed to be classical for temperatures higher than 200 K. However, it is worth mentioning that quantum effects on the gas phase proton motion are really significant at low temperatures (T ≤ 120 K). Although the proton behaves as a classical particle at high temperatures, we strongly recommend the use of quantum results at all temperatures, for the integrated heat capacity and the Gibbs free energy change. Therefore, on the basis of the thermochemical convention that ignores the proton spin, we recommend the following revised values for the integrated heat capacity and the Gibbs free energy change of the proton in gas phase and, at the standard pressure (1 bar): ΔH0→T = 6.1398 kJ mol(-1) and ΔG0→T = -26.3424 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it is important noting that the little change of the pressure from 1 bar to 1 atm affects notably the entropy and the Gibbs free energy change of the proton. PMID:25338234

  1. Nucleational Energy Traps and Their Role in Crystal Structure Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, T. D.; Galatas, A. C.; Chen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Crystallization has been one of the most important topics in a wide array of fields because of its importance to biology, atmospheric science, material science, etc. Unlike vapor-liquid nucleation, crystallization has an added level of complexity because the nucleation process can form anything from a perfectly ordered single crystal to an amorphous solid. When a nucleating cluster consists of a few dozen molecules, a large majority of the particles are exposed on the surface of the cluster unlike in the bulk phase where the majority of the particles are contained within the interior. As a consequence a cluster must attempt to minimize the surface area while simultaneously maximizing the intermolecular interactions within the cluster in order to maintain stability. The ideal bulk phase configuration is often less stable due to these factors and will not form directly from the gas/liquid phase. Instead the clusters can adopt many non-crystalline structures due to their incredibly high stability at these small cluster sizes. Once these non-crystalline clusters aggregate enough molecules they can attempt to transition from the non-crystalline structure into an ordered crystalline structure; however, if there is a sizable free energy barrier for this crystalline transition the cluster can become trapped in these states and subsequently the formation of an ordered crystal will be unfeasible. This of course can yield physical properties that are significantly different from that of the bulk.This talk will discuss the simulational study of the underlying nucleation mechanics and their role in the formation of atmospheric ice. The focus will be on the formation of energy traps at small cluster sizes and how these traps are avoided by reducing the conformational degrees of freedom.

  2. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions. PMID:26843366

  3. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chayen, Naomi E

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions. PMID:26843366

  4. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  5. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  6. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  7. Effect of electron factor (number of electron holes) on kinetics of nucleation, growth, and dissolution of phases during long-term high-temperature holdings of 0.45C-26Cr-33Ni-2Si-2Nb superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudskoi, A. I.; Anastasiadi, G. P.; Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Oryshchenko, A. S.; Fuks, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of phase transformations that occur in the structure and changes in the phase composition of the cast 0.45C-26Cr-33Ni-2Si-2Nb superalloy held at a temperature of 1150°C for times of up to 100 h have been explained based on a computerized theoretical analysis of the results of experimental investigations. It has been shown that the factor that determines the direction of the process of transformation of the structure (nucleation, growth, and dissolution of various phases) in Fe-Cr-Ni-based alloys during long-term high-temperature holdings is the number of electron holes in the electron shells of chemical elements and the phases they form. Kinetically, the process is limited by the diffusion of a substitutional element with a greatest ratio of its concentration in the new phase to that in the matrix ( C ph/ C 0).

  8. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  9. The Vacuum Bubble Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo

    2009-07-10

    We study the nucleation of a vacuum bubble via the vacuum-to-vacuum tunneling transition in curved spacetime. We consider Coleman-de Luccia's semiclassical approximation at zero temperature in pure Einstein theory of gravity and the theory with nonminimal coupling. We discuss the dynamics of a nucleated vacuum bubble.

  10. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  11. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods [1-6]. Dilitometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics [7]. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov [8]. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation temperature can be measured by noncontact optical pyrometry, the mass of the sample is known, and post processing analysis can be conducted on the sample. The disadvantages are that temperature measurement must have exceptionally high precision, and it is not possible to isolate specific heterogeneous sites as in droplet dispersions.

  12. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  13. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  14. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-11-01

    Nucleation from the gas phase is an important source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei, which form cloud droplets. We have implemented in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM a new scheme for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water based on laboratory data, and nucleation of an organic compound and sulfuric acid using a parametrization of cluster activation based on field measurements. We give details of the implementation, compare results with observations, and investigate the role of the individual aerosol nucleation mechanisms for clouds and the Earth's radiative forcing. The results of our simulations are most consistent with observations when neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid proceed throughout the troposphere and nucleation due to cluster activation is limited to the forested boundary layer. The globally averaged annual mean contributions of the individual nucleation processes to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation via the direct, semi-direct, indirect cloud-albedo and cloud-lifetime effects in our simulations are -1.15 W/m2 for charged H2SO4/H2O nucleation, -0.235 W/m2 for cluster activation, and -0.05 W/m2 for neutral H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The overall effect of nucleation is -2.55 W/m2, which exceeds the sum of the individual terms due to feedbacks and interactions in the model. Aerosol nucleation contributes over the oceans with -2.18 W/m2 to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation, compared to -0.37 W/m2 over land. We explain the higher effect of aerosol nucleation on Earth's radiative forcing over the oceans with the larger area covered by ocean clouds, due to the larger contrast in albedo between clouds and the ocean surface compared to continents, and the larger susceptibility of pristine clouds owing to the saturation of effects. The large effect of charged nucleation in our simulations is not in contradiction with small effects seen in local measurements: over southern Finland, where cluster activation proceeds efficiently, we find that charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water contributes on average less than 10% to ultrafine aerosol concentrations, in good agreement with observations.

  15. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-05-01

    Nucleation from the gas phase is an important source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei, which form cloud droplets. We have implemented in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM a new scheme for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water based on laboratory data, and nucleation of an organic compound and sulfuric acid using a parametrization of cluster activation based on field measurements. We give details of the implementation, compare results with observations, and investigate the role of the individual aerosol nucleation mechanisms for clouds and the Earth's radiative budget. The results of our simulations are most consistent with observations when neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid proceed throughout the troposphere and nucleation due to cluster activation is limited to the forested boundary layer. The globally averaged annual mean contributions of the individual nucleation processes to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation via the direct, semi-direct, indirect cloud-albedo and cloud-lifetime effects in our simulations are -1.15 W/m2 for charged H2SO4/H2O nucleation, -0.235 W/m2 for cluster activation, and -0.05 W/m2 for neutral H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The overall effect of nucleation is -2.55 W/m2, which exceeds the sum of the individual terms due to feedbacks and interactions in the model. Aerosol nucleation contributes over the oceans with -2.18 W/m2 to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation, compared to -0.37 W/m2 over land. We explain the higher effect of aerosol nucleation on Earth's radiative budget over the oceans with the larger area covered by ocean clouds, due to the larger contrast in albedo between clouds and the ocean surface compared to continents, and the larger susceptibility of pristine clouds owing to the saturation of effects. The large effect of charged nucleation in our simulations is not in contradiction with small effects seen in local measurements: over southern Finland, where cluster activation proceeds efficiently, we find that charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water contributes on average less than 10% to ultrafine aerosol concentrations, in good agreement with observations.

  16. Phase-locked measurements of gas-liquid horizontal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2014-11-01

    A flow of gas and liquid in a horizontal pipe can be described in terms of various flow regimes, e.g. wavy stratified, annular or slug flow. These flow regimes appear at characteristic gas and liquid Reynolds numbers and feature unique wave phenomena. Wavy stratified flow is populated by low amplitude waves whereas annular flow contains high amplitude and long lived waves, so called disturbance waves, that play a key role in a liquid entrainment into the gas phase (droplets). In a slug flow regime, liquid-continuous regions travel at high speeds through a pipe separated by regions of stratified flow. We use a refractive index matched dynamic shadowgraphy technique using a high-speed camera mounted on a moving robotic linear rail to track the formation and development of features characteristic for the aforementioned flow regimes. We show that the wave dynamics become progressively more complex with increasing liquid and gas Reynolds numbers. Based on the shadowgraphy measurements we present, over a range of conditions: (i) phenomenological observations of the formation, and (ii) statistical data on the downstream velocity distribution of different classes of waves. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  17. Off-gas recycle for long-term low temperature gas phase uranium decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, R.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

    1994-07-01

    In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile UF{sub 6}, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric ClF{sub 3} for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. Laboratory-scale experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of using LTLT gas phase decontamination with ClF{sub 3} to remove uranium deposits from this equipment. A mobile gas phase system is being designed to demonstrate the decontamination process on a full scale. If used to decontaminate the GDPs, the LTLT process would use large amounts of ClF{sub 3} and exhaust large volumes of by-product gases (ClF, C1O{sub 2}F, etc.). Initially, the excess ClF{sub 3} and reaction byproducts will be destroyed in a KOH scrubber. This paper describes a proposed system that could recover the excess ClF{sub 3}and regenerate the reaction by-products into ClF{sub 3} for use in decontamination of additional equipment. Use of this regeneration and recovery system would reduce raw material costs and also reduce the waste scrubber sludge disposal costs by reducing the amount of corrosive gases fed to the scrubber.

  18. Nucleation and Crystallization in nucleated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Christoph; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Wurm, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization is commonly considered as nucleation followed by a growth process. Here we apply the recently developed technique, differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC), for a unique, new look at the crystal growth of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL carbon nanotube composites from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity during temperature treatments by employing cooling and heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. First, the crystal nucleation and overall crystallization half times were determined simultaneously in the range of temperatures where crystallization of PCL occurs. After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model a new methodology is described, which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The structures seem to range from having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms at temperatures from the glass transition to equilibrium melting (increasingly perfect and larger crystals). The mechanisms and kinetics of growth (if any) involve a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection. E. Zhuravlev, J.W.P. Schmelzer, B. Wunderlich and C. Schick, Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Polymer 52 (2011) 1983-1997.

  19. Zinc Nucleation and Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, B. Patrick; Nuth, J. A., III; Lilleleht, L. U.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report our experiences with zinc nucleation in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced by a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Nucleation is induced by cooling and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, at least partially crystalline zinc particles. Size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples of particles are also extracted for later analysis by SEM. The initially rapid increase in particle size is followed by a slower period of growth. We apply Scaled Nucleation Theory to our data and find that the derived critical temperature of zinc, the critical cluster size at nucleation, and the surface tension values are all in reasonably good agreement with their accepted literature values.

  20. Method and reactor system for rapid kill gas injection to gas phase polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.E.; Hagerty, R.O.; Jacob, F.W.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a method of terminating, under emergency conditions, an olefin polymerization reaction conducted in the presence of a transition metal-based catalyst system in a substantially vertical gas phase reactor comprising a reactants inlet at the first end thereof and a venting means at the second end thereof to maintain the temperature of the reaction below the sintering temperature of the polymer. The method comprises opening the venting means and injecting an amount of a kill gas into the reaction medium in the reactor sufficient to terminate the reaction.

  1. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  2. Gas-phase energetics of thorium fluorides and their ions.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-02-14

    Gas-phase thermochemistry for neutral ThF(n) and cations ThF(n)(+) (n = 1-4) is obtained from large-basis CCSD(T) calculations, with a small-core pseudopotential on thorium. Electronic partition functions are computed with the help of relativistic MRCI calculations. Geometries, vibrational spectra, electronic fine structure, and ion appearance energies are tabulated. These results support the experimental results by Lau, Brittain, and Hildenbrand for the neutral species, except for ThF. The ion thermochemistry is presented here for the first time. PMID:23137388

  3. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  4. Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagamadova, A. M.; Omaev, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods on silicon and glass substrates has been studied. Using the proposed method, arrays of ZnO nanorods can be grown on these substrates without preliminary deposition of a thin ZnO sublayer and/or metal catalyst. The influence of the temperature regime, substrate arrangement, and growth time on the synthesis is considered. The shape, dimensions, and orientation of nanorods have been studied by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Luminescence spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns of oriented arrays of nanorods have been investigated.

  5. The solar system/interstellar medium connection - Gas phase abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    Gas-phase abundances in the outer solar system are presented as diagnostics of the interstellar medium at the time of the solar system formation, some 4.55 billion years ago. Possible influences of the thermal and chemical histories of the primitive solar nebula and of the processes which led to the formation and evolution of the outer planets and comets on the elemental and molecular composition of the primordial matter are outlined. The major components of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of the comae of comets are identified, and the cosmogonical and cosmological implications are discussed.

  6. Phase diagram of van der Waals-like phase separation in a driven granular gas.

    PubMed

    Khain, Evgeniy; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2004-11-01

    Equations of granular hydrostatics are used to compute the phase diagram of the recently discovered van der Waals-like phase separation in a driven granular gas. The model two-dimensional system consists of smooth hard disks in a rectangular box, colliding inelastically with each other and driven by a "thermal" wall at zero gravity. The spinodal line and the critical point of the phase separation are determined. Close to the critical point, the spinodal and binodal (coexistence) lines are determined analytically. Effects of the finite size of the confining box in the direction parallel to the thermal wall are investigated. These include suppression of the phase separation by heat conduction in the lateral direction and a change from supercritical to subcritical bifurcation. PMID:15600606

  7. Gas-liquid phase separation in charged colloidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reščič, Jurij; Linse, Per

    2001-06-01

    A model system of charged spherical macroions and oppositely charged point counterions with a macroion-charge to counterion-charge ratio Zr=10 was investigated by employing a temperature and density scaling Monte Carlo simulation method. This approach allowed for a determination of the relative free energies among arbitrary number of thermodynamic states over a substantial region of the state space. Here, relative free energies were determined for the macroion volume fraction interval 0.04<φM<0.24 at different values of the electrostatic coupling parameter ΓII≡ZI2LB/RM, where ZI denotes the counterion charge, LB the Bjerrum length, and RM the macroion radius. The binodal curve separating the one-phase system and a gas-liquid two-phase region was determined near the critical point which was determined to φMcr=0.15 and ΓIIcr=2.6.

  8. Gas-Phase and Particle-Phase Reaction and Kinetics of Epoxydiols from Photooxidation of Isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, N. C.; Chan, A. W.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2009-12-01

    The emission of isoprene from deciduous plants is estimated to be upwards of 500 Tg a year and plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry over large regions of the globe. Both laboratory and field measurements have found evidence of large amounts of isoprene derivatives in secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). SOA formation has been shown to be favored under low-NOx conditions, producing aerosols with high concentrations of tetrols, sulfate esters, and C5 repeating polymeric species. The exact gas phase chemical precursors of the organics found in these SOAs are still debated. Recently, it has been shown that under low-NOx conditions the photooxidation of isoprene will result in the formation of isoprene epoxydiols. We have studied the gas-phase, aerosol-phase, and liquid-phase reactivity of a number of alkane epoxydiols. Experiments on the production of epoxydiols from the photooxidation of isoprene and butadiene as well as the uptake of these species by aerosol seed particles were performed in the Caltech dual 28-m3 environmental chamber. The gas-phase loss of the epoxydiols by aerosol uptake was monitored by chemical ionization mass spectrometry along with the products of the photooxidation of the epoxydiols. The organic composition of aerosols from the uptake of epoxydiols as well as from the photooxidation of isoprene was determined by a number of mass spectrometry techniques from chamber filter samples. Finally, the products and kinetics of the liquid-phase acid hydrolysis of the epoxides was determined by NMR. The epoxydiols were found to be readily incorporated into acidic aerosols by reactive uptake as well as partitioning. The organic composition of the SOAs from uptake of epoxydiols or the photooxidation of isoprene by acidic seeds were found to be very similar to the products of the acidic hydrolysis of the epoxydiols consisting of tetrols, sulfate esters, and polymeric species.

  9. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  10. Partitioning of organic aerosol components between gas phase and particulate phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, M.; Mentel, T. F.; Henk, H.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Otjes, R. P.; Blom, M. J.; ten Brink, H. M.

    2003-12-01

    To understand the role of organics in aerosols both the particulate composition and the gas/vapor phase composition must determined simultaneously. Ammonium sulfates and dicarboxylic acids are major components of continental, tropospheric aerosols. We performed two experiments in which we studied the partitioning of organic aerosol components between the gas and the particulate phase. As model systems we chose (NH4HSO_4 + glutaric acid) aerosol and ((NH4)HSO_4 + methyl glyoxal) aerosol (an oxidation product of isoprene). The experiment were performed in the large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ-Jülich at room temperature. The relative humidity was constantly increased in the course of the experiment (40 -> 90% r.h., 60 -> 90% r.h.).\

  11. Nucleation and stabilization of carbon-rich structures in interstellar media

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, N.; Král, P.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: pkral@uic.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the conditions under which carbon clusters of different sizes form and stabilize. We describe the approach to equilibrium by simulating tenuous carbon gas dynamics to long times. First, we use reactive molecular dynamics simulations to describe the nucleation of long chains, large clusters, and complex cage structures in carbon- and hydrogen-rich interstellar gas phases. We study how temperature, particle density, the presence of hydrogen, and carbon inflow affect the nucleation of molecular moieties with different characteristics, in accordance with astrophysical conditions. We extend the simulations to densities that are orders of magnitude lower than current laboratory densities, to temperatures that are relevant to circumstellar environments of planetary nebulae, and microsecond formation times. We correlate cluster size distributions from the simulations with thermodynamic equilibrium at low temperatures and gas densities, where entropy plays a significant role.

  12. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly-simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+). In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Comparing to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions, as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF)) on globe. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry further improves the predictions of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD over globe. IMN can improve the predictions of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe, as well as AOD and CDNC over globe. The explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics using ISORROPIA II improves the predictions of all major PM2.5 components and their gaseous precursors in some regions, as well as near-surface temperature and specific humidity, precipitation, downwelling shortwave radiation, SWCF, and cloud condensation nuclei at a supersaturation of 0.5% over globe. With all the modified and new treatments, the improved model predicts that on a global average, SWCF decreases by 2.9 W m-2, reducing the overprediction of SWCF from 7.9% to 0.9%. Uncertainties in emissions can explain largely the inaccurate predictions of precursor gases (e.g., SO2, NH3, and NO) and primary aerosols (e.g., black carbon and primary organic matter). Additional factors leading to discrepancies between model predictions and observations include uncertainties in model treatments such as dust emissions, secondary organic aerosol formation, multiple-phase chemistry, cloud microphysics, aerosol-cloud interaction, and dry and wet deposition.

  13. Gas-phase reactions of cyclopropenylidene with protonated alkyl amines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziqing; Tan, Lei; Yang, Yang; Dai, Mingji; Tureček, František; Ouyang, Zheng; Xia, Yu

    2016-04-21

    Vinylidene carbenes (C3H2) are of high interest to interstellar, combustion, and organic chemistry. Due to their high instability, the direct experimental investigation of their chemical reactivity has rarely been achieved. Herein, we report a first study on the reactions of cyclopropenylidene (c-C3H2) with protonated alkyl amines in the gas phase using a home-built ion trap mass spectrometer. The high gas-phase basicity (GB) of ((1)A1) c-C3H2 (calculated as 920 kJ mol(-1)) facilitates the formation of a proton-bound dimer with protonated amines as the first step in the reaction. The dimer can stay as it is or rearrange to a covalent product. The formation of the covalent complex is highly exothermic and its yield is affected by the GB of alkyl amines. The highest yield (82%) was achieved when the GB of the amine was slightly lower but comparable to that of c-C3H2. Our results demonstrate a new reaction pathway of c-C3H2, which has long been considered as a "dead end" in interstellar carbon chemistry. PMID:26978226

  14. Ultrafast non-radiative decay of gas-phase nucleosides.

    PubMed

    De Camillis, Simone; Miles, Jordan; Alexander, Grace; Ghafur, Omair; Williams, Ian D; Townsend, Dave; Greenwood, Jason B

    2015-09-28

    The ultrafast photo-physical properties of DNA are crucial in providing a stable basis for life. Although the DNA bases efficiently absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation, this energy can be dissipated to the surrounding environment by the rapid conversion of electronic energy to vibrational energy within about a picosecond. The intrinsic nature of this internal conversion process has previously been demonstrated through gas phase experiments on the bases, supported by theoretical calculations. De-excitation rates appear to be accelerated when individual bases are hydrogen bonded to solvent molecules or their complementary Watson-Crick pair. In this paper, the first gas-phase measurements of electronic relaxation in DNA nucleosides following UV excitation are reported. Using a pump-probe ionization scheme, the lifetimes for internal conversion to the ground state following excitation at 267 nm are found to be reduced by around a factor of two for adenosine, cytidine and thymidine compared with the isolated bases. These results are discussed in terms of a recent proposition that a charge transfer state provides an additional internal conversion pathway mediated by proton transfer through a sugar to base hydrogen bond. PMID:26299204

  15. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  16. CHAOS II. Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2015-07-01

    We have observed NGC 5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs on the Large Binocular Telescope we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O iii] ?4363, [N ii] ?5755, [S iii] ?6312) and thus measure direct gas-phase abundances in 29 individual H ii regions. [O iii] ?4363 is only detected in two H ii regions, both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC 5194 and find excellent agreement ({{? }}[{log}({{O}}/{{H}})]? 0.05) for all but one region. We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC 5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (? ? 0.08 dex), most of which can be attributed to random error and not to intrinsic dispersion. The gas-phase abundance gradient is consistent with the gradients observed in other interacting galaxies, which tend to be shallower than gradients measured in isolated galaxies. The N/O ratio (< {log}({{N}}/{{O}})> =-0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10), relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretical models.

  17. Crystal nucleation in Pd-Si alloys. [in containerless environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drehman, A. J.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the crystal phase nucleation in undercooled droplets of Pd-Si alloys with composition near the Pd(84.5)Si(15.5) eutectic composition is reported. Molten droplets are released at the top of a drop tube and solidify (to either a crystalline or glassy state) during descent. This provides a containerless (and nearly gravity free) environment so that nucleation due to container walls or vibrations is eliminated. It is found that crystallization, due to homogeneous nucleation, is bypassed in droplets of 1 mm diameter when cooled at 760 K/sec. From this an upper limit of the homogeneous nucleation rate is estimated. Results are compared with a previously published study of nucleation in 0.06 mm to 0.33 mm diameter droplets, which indicated that nucleation results from heterogeneous surface nucleation and that the number of these nuclei is dependent on the atmosphere in the drop tube.

  18. Ice nucleation terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  19. Multicomponent Dynamical Nucleation Theory And Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Garrett, Bruce C.

    2004-01-01

    Vapor to liquid multi-component nucleation is a dynamical process governed by a delicate interplay between condensation and evaporation. Since the population of the vapor phase is dominated by monomers at reasonable supersaturations, the formation of clusters is governed by monomer association and dissociation reactions. Since no potential energy barrier exists the formation of a cluster is impeded by a free energy of activation that is entropic in nature. Dynamical Nucleation Theory provides a framework in which equilibrium evaporation rate constants can be calculated and the corresponding condensation rate constants determined from detailed balance. The nucleation rate can then be obtained by solving the kinetic equations. The rate constants governing the multi-step kinetics of multi-component nucleation including sensitivity analysis and the influence of possible contaminants will be presented and discussed.

  20. Synthesis of Cu nanopowders by condensation from the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepkasov, IV; Gafner, Yu Ya; Zobov, K. V.; Batoroev, S. B.; Bardakhanov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to determine the most efficient regimes of copper nanoparticles synthesis, a series of experiments were conducted by evaporation and subsequent condensation of the raw material in an argon atmosphere. During the tests it was found that an increase of evaporation rate increases significantly the average size of the synthesized particles. However, the study of the dependence of dimensional parameters of the produced clusters on the intensity of the buffer gas flow rate has encountered significant difficulties associated because the results significantly divergent from the previously conducted experiments on the synthesis of transition metal oxides. In order to solve this contradiction the computer simulation was held of copper atoms condensation from the gas phase for the three different cooling rates and for the two final temperatures T = 373 K and T = 77 K. It was found after analysis that the rate of cooling of the gas mixture and the final temperature directly influences the number and the size of particles produced. For instance, with the 10 times of cooling rate decreases the average size of the particles obtained had increased by 2.7 times at a final temperature of 77 K and by 3.1 times at Tf = 373 K.

  1. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  2. ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICULATE AND GAS PHASE CONTRIBUTIONS TO VASCULAR TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicular emissions (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 days, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein, 3-nitrotyrosine, and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  3. Experimental study of Gas Phase Formation and Evolution in Low fO2 Planetary Basalts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Wetzel, D. T.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    The existence of a gas phase in planetary basaltic magmas is demonstrated by the ubiquitous presence of vesicles in returned lunar samples and meteorites as well as basalts from Earth and Mars. Additionally, formation of the fine-grained glass bead deposits during eruption of lunar picritic glasses required a large gas-bubble volume (> 90%) at the time of eruption/fragmentation. Up to 100-200 ppm levels of H, S, Cl and F still remain as diffusion-loss profiles in individual lunar glass beads SIMS (1), and higher volatile concentrations occur in olivine melt inclusions (2). The composition and origin of such volcanic gases were investigated by experiments on a volatile (C-O-H-S-Cl-F)-bearing picritic glass composition as a function of fO2 near iron-wustite (IW). The C-O-H species dissolved in gas-saturated basaltic melt above IW-0.5 are carbonate, OH and H2O with 100 to 10,000 ppm H2O in the sample; below IW-0.5, the C-species present (Raman and FTIR) are Fe(CO)5 (iron pentacarbonyl) and lesser CH4 [3]. The change in melt speciation in part reflects a change in calculated speciation in the coexisting gas [4]. The carbon solubility in these experimental melts increases linearly with increasing pressure; the more oxidized glasses contain 32-620 ppm C for pressures of 98 to 980 MPa, the reduced glasses contain 8-240 ppm C for pressures between 36 and 900 MPa. Thus, the C solubility of the more reduced Fe-carbonyl and CH4 is about one-half that of carbonate at the same pressure, and indicates the carrying capacity for C in reduced (i.e., lunar) magmas is much lower than it is in present day terrestrial magmas. Varioles up to 200 um in diameter formed in some experiments with higher dissolved water contents (1%); they have radiating crystalline textures (olivine, glass and poorly crystallized graphite) initiated at a central nucleation site. A sharp peak in the variole Ramen spectra indicates methane as well as CO is released during variole formation and a reaction such as 2CO = C +CO2 formed the graphite. Several series of experiments on chips of low fO2 glass created at high pressure quantify S, Cl and F partitioning into the H2O-CO gas phase with decompression steps from 200 to 40 MPa. A gas formed with the first pressure drop, indicating melt supersaturation with CO and/or CH4; H2O and lesser amounts of S, Cl and F partitioned into the initial gas, and continued to do so with additional drops in pressure. The ubiquitous Fe-metal seen in lunar picritic glasses may form by graphite oxidation, but also may form by breakdown of Fe(CO)5 as the melt continues to saturate during ascent. [1] A. E. Saal et al.(2008) Nature 454, 192-195. [2] E. H. Hauri et al (2011) Science 333, 213 -215. [3] Wetzel, D., Rutherford, M.J. Jacobsen S.D., Hauri, E.H., and Saal, A.E., (submitted); Nature Geoscience Aug. 1, 2012. [4] Zhang, C. and Duan, Z. (2009) GCA, 73, 2089-2102.

  4. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  5. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  6. Nucleation Pathways of CO2 Condensation under Mesoporous Templated Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Byran, Matthew S.; Warren, Garfield T.; Sokol, Paul E.; Indiana University Team; NIST Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) are important elements in reducing greenhouse gas emission and combating global warming. The adsorption behavior of CO2 under mesoporous confinement at room temperature is particularly relevant. , Small Angle Scattering of X-ray (SAXS) and Neutron (SANS) were used to probe the adsorption process of CO2 under such mesoporous confinement MCM-41 and details of nucleation pathways were mapped out by fitting the scattering intensities with adsorption models. From both experiments, the nucleation of CO2 on the inner pore surface of MCM-41 is found to be a two-step process; high density liquid phase CO2 first forms uniform layers following the long range translational symmetry of the porous matrix, above one CO2 filling, determined by the pore size and temperature, capillary condensation initiates. The nucleation sites formed during capillary condensation start to separate the long range symmetry from the one at uniform layers. Finally, SAXS and SANS techniques are compared and they both showed their unique properties of probing the filling-dependent structures of adsorbed CO2 under such mesoporous system.

  7. Nonstationary homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of homogeneous condensation is reviewed and equations describing this process are presented. Numerical computer solutions to transient problems in nucleation (relaxation to steady state) are presented and compared to a prior computation.

  8. Specific, trace gas induced phase transition in copper(II)oxide for highly selective gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Palzer, S.

    2014-08-01

    Here, we present results on the investigation of the percolation phase transition in copper(II)oxide (CuO) and show how it may be used to determine trace gas concentrations. This approach provides a highly selective sensing mechanism for the detection of hydrogen sulfide even in oxygen depleted atmospheres. In real-world applications, this scenario is encountered in biogas plants and natural gas facilities, where reliable H2S sensing and filtering are important because of the destructive effects H2S has on machinery. As opposed to gas detection via standard metal-oxide reaction routes, the percolation dynamics are demonstrated to be independent of the surface morphology in accordance with the universality of phase transitions. The sensing behavior of ink-jet printed CuO layers was tested for a large set of parameters including layer temperature, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and oxygen concentration, as well as the sensitivity towards other gas species. The electrical percolation of the sensing layer is heralded by a dramatic drop in the overall resistivity of the CuO layer for temperatures below 200 °C. The observed percolation phenomena in this temperature regime are unique to H2S even in comparison with related volatile thio-compounds making the sensing mechanism highly selective. At elevated temperatures above 300 °C, the phase transition does not occur. This enables two distinct operational modes which are tunable via the sensor temperature and also allows for resetting the sensing layer after an electrical breakthrough.

  9. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  10. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-01

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  11. Musculoskeletal-induced Nucleation in Altitude Decompression Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal activity has the potential to both improve and compromise decompression safety. Exercise enhances inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but it may also promote bubble nuclei formation (nucleation), which can lead to gas phase separation and bubble growth and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of musculoskeletal activity and the level of tissue supersaturation may be critical to the net effect. There are limited data available to evaluate cost-benefit relationships. Understanding the relationship is important to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nucleation in exercise prebreathe protocols and to quantify risk in gravity and microgravity environments. Data gathered during NASA's Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) studies combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise followed by low pressure (4.3 psi; altitude equivalent of 30,300 ft [9,235 m]) microgravity simulation to produce two protocols used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity. Both the Phase II/CEVIS (cycle ergometer vibration isolation system) and ISLE (in-suit light exercise) trials eliminated ambulation to more closely simulate the microgravity environment. The CEVIS results (35 male, 10 female) serve as control data for this NASA/Duke study to investigate the influence of ambulation exercise on bubble formation and the subsequent risk of DCS.

  12. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2014-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Conceptually, deposition nucleation is the only pathway that does not involve liquid water, but occurs by direct water vapor deposition onto a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact pore condensation and freezing (PCF) occurring in voids and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and host water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Homogeneous ice nucleation is expected to occur below 235 K when at least one pore is filled with water. Ice nucleation in pores may also happen in immersion mode but with a lower probability because it requires at least one active site in a water filled pore. Therefore a significant enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency is expected when temperature falls below 235 K. For a deposition nucleation process from water vapor no discontinuous change in ice nucleation efficiency should occur at T = 235 K because no liquid water is involved in this process. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T = 230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T = 210-230 K in pores with D = 2.5-3.5 nm. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters (Dp) of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with Dp = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with Dp = 3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHi > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Given the pore structure of clay minerals, PCF should be highly efficient for T < 235 K and may occur at T > 235 K in particles that exhibit active sites for immersion freezing within pores. Most ice nucleation studies on clay minerals and mineral dusts indeed show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K in accordance with PCF and are not explicable by the classical view of deposition nucleation. PCF is probably also the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism below water saturation for glassy, soot, and volcanic ash aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition onto a solid surface.

  13. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, S. M.; Hollingsworth, A. M.; Humbles, J.; Leblanc, C.; Potin, P.; McFiggans, G.

    2009-12-01

    Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s) by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I2 when first exposed to air. I2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv). A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently emitting kelp species and localised in time to shortly after these seaweeds are uncovered by a receding tide.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, S. M.; Hollingsworth, A. M.; Humbles, J.; Leblanc, C.; Potin, P.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-07-01

    Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s) by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I2 when first exposed to air. I2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv). A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently emitting kelp species and localised in time to shortly after these seaweeds are uncovered by a receding tide.

  15. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  16. Optical properties of anthocyanins in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaochuan; Calzolari, Arrigo; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase optical properties of the six most common anthocyanins are studied using time-dependent density-functional theory. Different anthocyanins are classified into three groups, according to the number of low-frequency peaks displayed in the UV-vis spectrum. This behavior is analyzed in terms of one-electron transitions and interaction effects, the latter being rationalized using a suitable double-pole model. Moving from PBE to hybrid exchange-correlation functionals results in a hypsochromic shift of the optical gap. While the colors thus predicted do not quite match those observed in solution, thus highlighting the importance of solvation effects, adoption of hybrid functionals remarkably determines a greater chromatic uniformity of different molecules, in qualitative agreement with experimental evidence in acidic solutions.

  17. The gas phase acidities of substituted silanoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan

    Ab initio molecular orbital methods at the CBS-Q level of theory have been used to study the structure, gas phase acidities and vibrational spectra of silanoic acid, HSiO2H, and several of its derivatives RSiO2H (R = F, Cl, NH2, OH and CH3). Geometry optimizations were performed at the MP2(FC)/6-31G(†) level of theory. The syn forms always are more stable than the anti. The silanoic acid derivatives are more acidic than their parent oxygen acid analogues. The fundamental vibrational frequencies have been computed using the MP2(Full)/6-31G(d) method. The ν(Si=O) = 1261 cm-1 value agrees with the experimentally determined normal mode (1249 cm-1) in silanoic acid.

  18. Gas-phase syntheses for interstellar carboxylic and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Petrie, Simon; Bohme, Diethard K.

    2003-02-01

    We report experimental results that demonstrate gas-phase, ionic syntheses of glycine and β-alanine, as well as acetic and propanoic acid, from smaller molecules found in space; in doing so, we infer the formation of these acids in the interstellar environment. We show that ionized glycine and β-alanine are produced in the reactions of hydroxylamine ions, NH2OH+, with acetic and propanoic acid respectively. Even more promising in the context of interstellar synthesis are our results that demonstrate the corresponding production of the protonated amino acids from analogous reactions with protonated hydroxylamine. The striking specificity of these syntheses for the β-isomer of alanine suggests that the amino acids of CI (Carbonaceous Ivona) chondrite meteorites are products of interstellar chemistry and supports the hypothesis that these meteorites are of cometary origin.

  19. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  20. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-H···N between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  1. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  2. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  3. Ceramic microreactors for heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Knitter, Regina; Liauw, Marcel A

    2004-08-01

    The high surface to volume ratio of microchannel components offers many advantages in micro chemical engineering. It is obvious, however, that the reactor material and corrosion phenomena play an important role when applying these components. For chemical reactions at very high temperatures or/and with corrosive reactants involved, microchannel components made of metals or polymers are not suited. Hence, a modular microreactor system made of alumina was developed and fabricated using a rapid prototyping process chain. With exchangeable inserts the system can be adapted to the requirements of various reactions. Two heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions (oxidative coupling of methane, isoprene selective oxidation to citraconic anhydride) were investigated to check the suitability of the system at temperatures of up to 1000 degrees C. Apart from the high thermal and chemical resistance, the lack of any blind activity was found to be another advantage of ceramic components. PMID:15269808

  4. Excited-state tautomerization of gas-phase cytosine.

    PubMed

    Triandafillou, Catherine G; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2013-11-21

    In order to investigate experimentally observed phototautomerization of gas-phase cytosine, several excited-state tautomerization mechanisms were characterized at the EOM-CCSD and TDDFT levels. All pathways that took place exclusively on the S1 surface were found to have significant barriers that were much higher than the barriers involved in radiationless decay of cytosine tautomers through conical intersections back to the ground state; tautomerization in this fashion cannot compete with radiationless relaxation. However, an alternative possibility is that the conical intersections that facilitate radiationless decay could also facilitate tautomerization. Barrierless pathways indicate that it is energetically possible that bifurcation at the conical intersections can lead to a subset of the population reaching different tautomers. This could be an explanation for the observed tautomerization of keto cytosine after exposure to low-energy UV light. PMID:24094271

  5. Gas-phase interaction of protonated lysine with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, Marko; Srzic, Dunja; Klasinc, Leo

    2006-07-01

    Gas-phase interaction of LysH+ with D2O has been investigated in order to elucidate the H/D exchange reaction mechanism and possibility of water assisted ion-zwitterion structure formation. The proceed of the interaction is modeled by DFT calculations. Potential energy profiles for: the perturbation from ion-molecule to ion-zwitterion structure, the "flip-flop" and the "bridging" mechanism are presented. Analysis of H/D exchange kinetics results for LysH+ with D2O and CD3OD measured in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer agree with ion-molecule structure of LysH+. Both experimental and theoretical findings suggest that during interaction of LysH+ with D2O isotopic exchange is favored over the water assisted conformational change from ion-molecule into ion-zwitterion structure.

  6. Uv Spectroscopy on Gas Phase Cu(I)-BIPYRIDYL Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuang; Christopher, Casey; Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal complexes with bipyridine ligands are of great interest in metal-organic chemistry, since they are prototypes for many applications in photochemistry and homogeneous catalysis. Under-coordinated bipyridyl complexes are elusive species in the condensed phase, and the ligand-induced changes in electronic structure are of fundamental interest. We present UV photodissociation spectra of mass-selected monocationic copper(I)-bipyridyl complexes [bpy-Cu-L]+ with different ligands (L = H2O, D2, N2, MeOH, Cl). Complexes were prepared via electrospray ionization of copper/bipyridine solutions followed by accumulation and buffer gas cooling in a cryogenic Paul trap. In addition, we show spectra of similar species based on copper oxide, [bpy-CuO-L]+.

  7. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  8. Reduced-background gas-phase absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R

    1998-08-15

    We propose and demonstrate a new method for single-shot multiplex absorption spectroscopy that permits enhanced sensitivity in the simultaneous measurement of multiple spectral lines in rapidly changing gas-phase media, such as turbulent flames. It uses an ultrashort laser pulse that propagates through the absorbing medium, for which the relevant absorption information resides in the free-induction decay that is trailing behind the transmitted pulse. Time gating out most of the transmitted pulse, but not the free-induction decay, enhances the relative fraction of light that contains absorption information when the spectrum is measured. This procedure reduces the background associated with the input light, thus enhancing detection sensitivity. PMID:18087501

  9. Photosynthesis of a combinatorial peptide library in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunyoung; Glover, Matthew S; Reilly, James P; Clemmer, David E

    2015-09-15

    A strategy for generating large numbers of peptides from a relatively small number of precursors based on photosynthetic combination in the gas phase is presented. In this approach, electrospray ionization is used to create a combination of proton-bound dimers from a specified set of peptides present in solution. The dimers are then accumulated and isolated in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Photoexcitation (at 157 nm) leads to water elimination and the formation of larger peptide sequences that are characterized by subsequent isolation and collision-induced dissociation. The method is illustrated by using a set of four enkephalin-related and acetylated peptides to generate 12 larger peptide sequences. The ability to synthesize, isolate, and characterize many amino acid sequences from only a few precursors provides a fast and efficient means of characterizing properties of such species (e.g., dissociation patterns and reactivities). PMID:26285100

  10. Low-energy electron collisions with gas-phase uracil.

    PubMed

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    2006-11-01

    We have studied gas-phase collisions between slow electrons and uracil molecules with a view to understanding the resonance structure of the scattering cross section. Our symmetry-resolved results for elastic scattering, computed in the fixed-nuclei, static-exchange and static-exchange-plus-polarization approximations, provide locations for the expected pi* shape resonances and indicate the possible presence of a low-energy sigma* resonance as well. Electron-impact excitation calculations were carried out for low-lying triplet and singlet excitation channels and yield a very large singlet cross section. We discuss the connection between the resonances found in our elastic cross section and features observed in dissociative attachment. PMID:17100436

  11. Homogeneous nucleation of predominantly cubic ice confined in nanoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Duran, Hatice; Steinhart, Martin; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-03-11

    The nucleation mechanism of water can be precisely regulated by confinement within nanoporous alumina. We found a transition from heterogeneous nucleation of hexagonal ice (Ih) to homogeneous nucleation of predominantly cubic ice (Ic) with decreasing pore diameter. These results lead to a phase diagram of water under confinement. It contains a (stable) predominant Ic form, a form known to exist only in the upper atmosphere. Possible applications range from cryopreservation to construction materials like cement. PMID:25686014

  12. Phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Guo, G.-C.

    2011-09-15

    We study the phase separation of a spin-polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling near a wide Feshbach resonance. As a result of the competition between spin-orbit coupling and population imbalance, the phase diagram for a uniform gas develops a rich structure of phase separation involving topologically nontrivial gapless superfluid states. We then demonstrate the phase separation induced by an external trapping potential and discuss the optimal parameter region for the experimental observation of the gapless superfluid phases.

  13. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  14. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  15. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. PMID:26213024

  16. Optimal grade transitions in a gas phase polyethylene reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, K.B.; MacGregor, J.F. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that using gas-phase technology many grades of polyethylene can be produced in a single reactor. For a series of three polyethylene products, model-based dynamic optimization is used to determine optimal grade changeover policies. Optimal manipulated variable profiles are determined for hydrogen and butene feed rates, reactor temperature setpoint, gas bleed flow, catalyst feed rate, and bed level setpoint. It is shown that large transitions in melt index are hampered by slow hydrogen dynamics, and that the time required for such a transition can be reduced by manipulating the temperature setpoint and the bleed stream flow. Reduction of the bed level and catalyst feed rates during changeovers can significantly reduce the quantity of off-specification polymer produced. it is demonstrated that melt index and density are not sufficient to characterize the properties of polymer produced during grade transitions, and that the shape of the cumulative copolymer composition distribution is very sensitive to the grade changeover policy used.

  17. AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH DURING LAMINAR TUBE FLOW: MAXIMUM SATURATIONS AND NUCLEATION RATES. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approximate method of estimating the maximum saturation, the nucleation rate, and the total number nucleated per second during the laminar flow of a hot vapour–gas mixture along a tube with cold walls is described. The basis of the approach is that the temperature an...

  18. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  19. Gas phase synthesis of two ensembles of silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; de Jong, M. M.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    Dusty plasmas provide a very favorable environment for the growth of silicon nanocrystals. For application of silicon nanocrystals in a solar cell, the fabrication of monodisperse silicon quantum dots has been challenging. We report a single step method to synthesize silicon (Si) nanoparticles in a custom designed dedicated plasma reactor. The nanoparticles produced in the gas phase belong to two different phases exhibiting different structural and optical properties. Particles made in the bulk of the plasma are aggregates of crystalline particles with a mean size of 100 nm. Particles made in locally enhanced plasma regions produced at holes present in the grounded electrode contain free-standing quantum sized particles with crystallites (with mean size of 2.95 nm) embedded within an amorphous matrix. We provide insight on different plasma processes leading to the formation of aggregates and free-standing particles. We hypothesize that the free standing particles are formed due to the excess energetic electrons present in locally enhanced discharges.

  20. Energy effects in bubble nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Bubble size and number produced by desorption are important considerations for certain industrial processes such as flotation, gas stripping, and some types of chemical reactions and mass transfer. The size and number of bubbles produced by the desorption of supersaturated gases from water are shown to be a primary function of the energy available for bubble formation in a flowing system; this energy is that not dissipated in turbulence and friction. The number of nucleation sites is greatly increased when certain impurities are present, particularly surface-active agents. Low saturation pressures can produce very large numbers of very small bubbles when added energy is provided for discharge. High gas concentrations produce excess large bubbles which pass up rapidly through the much slower rising bubble mass. A combination of low saturation pressure followed by higher pressure for flow, such as by liquid pumping, results in bubble characteristics which can be controlled for applications.

  1. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    André, Yamina Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès

    2014-05-21

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 μm/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10{sup −9} m{sup 2}/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  2. Probing the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochodzalla, Josef

    1996-05-01

    The prospect of creating a state of matter resembling that of the pre-hadronic phase of the early universe or of the core of today's neutron stars is one of the prime motivations to study relativistic heavy ion collisions. Unquestionable, the transition to the quark-gluon plasma represents the most spectacular example of a phase transition in nuclear matter. The complex structure of the hadronic components and the many facets of their interaction, however, offer the opportunity to observe in addition several other, exciting nuclear state transitions. Already two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon - nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Looking for signals of this phase transition the ALADIN collaboration studied the decay of projectile spectators produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Fragment multiplicities and correlations observed in projectile fragmentation at beam energies between 600 and 1000 MeV per nucleon are found to be invariant with respect to a change of the target mass or the beam energy when plotted as a function of the summed charge of complex fragments, Z_bound. The dependence of the fragment multiplicity on the projectile mass follows a linear scaling law. For Au+Au reactions at E/A=600 MeV, the mass and the excitation energy of the decaying pre-fragments were determined from the measured fragment and neutron distributions. A temperature scale was derived from observed yield ratios of He and Li isotopes. The relation between this isotope temperature and the excitation energy of the system exhibits a behavior which is reminiscent of a phase transition. The nuclear vapor regime takes over at an excitation energy of 10 MeV per nucleon, a temperature of 5 MeV and may be characterized by a density of 0.15-0.3 normal nuclear density. In order to explore the influence of an explosive radial flow, we also investigated central Au+Au collisions in the energy range between 50 and 200 MeV per nucleon. The latter experiment aims at a comparison of isotope temperatures and temperatures extracted from excited state populations. Simultaneously, the space-time extend will be explored by two-particle correlations. Supported by the Deutsche Forschunggemeinschaft under Contract No. Po256/2-1.

  3. Assessing nucleation in cloud formation modelling for Brown Dwarf and Exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Graham; Helling, Christiane; Giles, Helen; Bromley, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Context. Substellar objects such as Brown Dwarfs and hot Jupiter exoplanets are cool enough that clouds can form in their atmospheres (Helling & Casewell 2014; A&ARv 22)). Unlike Earth, where cloud condensation nuclei are provided by the upward motion of sand or ash, in Brown Dwarf and hot Jupiters these condensation seeds form from the gas phase. This process proceeds in a stepwise chemical reaction of single monomer addition of a single nucleation species, referred to as homogeneous nucleation. The rate at which these seeds form is determined by the local thermodynamic conditions and the chemical composition of the local gas phase. Once the seed particles have formed, multiple materials are thermally stable and grow almost simultaneously by chemical surface reactions. This results in the growth of the condensation seeds to macroscopic particles of μm size. At the same time, the gas phase becomes depleted. Once temperatures become too high for thermal stability of the cloud particle, it evaporates until its constituents return to the gas phase. Convection from deeper atmospheric layers provides element replenishment to upper, cooler layers allowing the cloud formation process to reach a stationary state (Woitke & Helling 2003; A&A 399). Aims. The most efficient nucleation is a 'winner takes all' process as the losing molecules will condense on the surface of the faster nucleating seed particle. We apply new molecular (TiO2)N-cluster and SiO vapour data to our cloud formation model in order to re-asses the question of the primary nucleation species. Methods. We apply density functional theory (B3LYP, 6-311G(d)) using the computational chemistry package GAUSSIAN 09 to derive updated thermodynamical data for (TiO2)N-clusters as input for our TiO2 seed formation model. We test both TiO2 and SiO as primary nucleates assuming a homogeneous nucleation process and by solving a system of dust moment equations and element conservation for a pre-scribed Brown Dwarf/hot Jupiter DRIFT-PHOENIX atmospheric model temperature-pressure structure. Results. We present updated Gibbs free energies for the new (TiO2)N-clusters. We discuss the effect of this new data on the resulting cloud structure and cloud properties like particle number density, grain sizes and grain composition. We find SiO to be the more efficient nucleation species. However, subsequent SiO condensation onto seed particle mantles result in element depletion, reducing the number density of gaseous SiO and reducing the efficiency of nucleation. Therefore, TiO2 remains therefore the primary nucleation species (Lee et al. 2014; arXiv:1410.6610).

  4. Selective and sensitive chromogenic detection of cyanide and HCN in solution and in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Gotor, Raúl; Costero, Ana M; Gil, Salvador; Parra, Margarita; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Sancenón, Félix; Gaviña, Pablo

    2013-06-25

    Two triphenylmethane based chemodosimeters for selective and chromogenic sensing of cyanide anions in aqueous environments and of hydrogen cyanide in gas phase were prepared and studied. PMID:23680816

  5. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  6. Nucleation of protein fibrillation by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia; Xue, Wei-Feng; Lynch, Iseult; Lindman, Stina; Thulin, Eva; Radford, Sheena E; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2007-05-22

    Nanoparticles present enormous surface areas and are found to enhance the rate of protein fibrillation by decreasing the lag time for nucleation. Protein fibrillation is involved in many human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, and dialysis-related amyloidosis. Fibril formation occurs by nucleation-dependent kinetics, wherein formation of a critical nucleus is the key rate-determining step, after which fibrillation proceeds rapidly. We show that nanoparticles (copolymer particles, cerium oxide particles, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes) enhance the probability of appearance of a critical nucleus for nucleation of protein fibrils from human beta(2)-microglobulin. The observed shorter lag (nucleation) phase depends on the amount and nature of particle surface. There is an exchange of protein between solution and nanoparticle surface, and beta(2)-microglobulin forms multiple layers on the particle surface, providing a locally increased protein concentration promoting oligomer formation. This and the shortened lag phase suggest a mechanism involving surface-assisted nucleation that may increase the risk for toxic cluster and amyloid formation. It also opens the door to new routes for the controlled self-assembly of proteins and peptides into novel nanomaterials. PMID:17485668

  7. Nucleation of protein fibrillation by nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia; Xue, Wei-Feng; Lynch, Iseult; Lindman, Stina; Thulin, Eva; Radford, Sheena E.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles present enormous surface areas and are found to enhance the rate of protein fibrillation by decreasing the lag time for nucleation. Protein fibrillation is involved in many human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, and dialysis-related amyloidosis. Fibril formation occurs by nucleation-dependent kinetics, wherein formation of a critical nucleus is the key rate-determining step, after which fibrillation proceeds rapidly. We show that nanoparticles (copolymer particles, cerium oxide particles, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes) enhance the probability of appearance of a critical nucleus for nucleation of protein fibrils from human β2-microglobulin. The observed shorter lag (nucleation) phase depends on the amount and nature of particle surface. There is an exchange of protein between solution and nanoparticle surface, and β2-microglobulin forms multiple layers on the particle surface, providing a locally increased protein concentration promoting oligomer formation. This and the shortened lag phase suggest a mechanism involving surface-assisted nucleation that may increase the risk for toxic cluster and amyloid formation. It also opens the door to new routes for the controlled self-assembly of proteins and peptides into novel nanomaterials. PMID:17485668

  8. Interface microcrack nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Genady P.

    1994-04-01

    THE ZENER-STROH mechanism of microcrack nucleation by a dislocation pile-up or band impinging upon an interface has been believed to be one of the basic mechanisms of microcrack nucleation in polycrystalline materials. In the case of different elastic properties of composite constituents, this problem is accurately solved in the present paper. The minimum number of elementary dislocations in the band necessary to form a microcrack, as well as the interface microcrack length are found in terms of physical properties and the number of elementary dislocations in the band. A band bears a stronger singularity than a pile-up, and therefore the obtained solution can serve as an upper bound estimate of the solution for the pile-up. The results of the paper may be used for the direct measurement of the true interface surface energy by an experimental observation of the nucleation of an interface microcrack.

  9. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  10. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  11. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  12. Trimethylsilyl derivatization of nucleic acid anions in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    1997-03-01

    Ion-molecule reactions between nucleic acid anions, [M-nH]n, formed via electrospray ionization, and trimethylsilylchloride have been investigated in an ion trap mass spectrometer at a helium bath gas pressure of 1 mtorr. Three types of reactions are observed: (i) SN2(Si) when n > 1 ; (ii) adduct formation when n = 1 ; and (iii) addition followed by elimination of HCl when n = 1 and where an acidic phosphate proton is present (e.g., 5'-pdA). The kinetics of these reactions have been studied for various anions derived from the following deoxyadenosine species: 5'-pdA; 5'-pppdA, 5'-d(AA)-3'; 5'-d(AAA)-3' and 5'-d(AAAA)-3'. The following reactivity order is observed: [M-2H]2- of 5'-pppdA > [M-2H]2- of 5'-d(AAA)-3' > [M-3H]3- of 5'-d(AAAA)-3' > [M-3H + TMS]2- of 5'-d(AAAA)-3' > [M-2H]2- of 5'-d(AAAA)-3' > [M-H]- of 5'-pdA >> [M-H]- of 5'-d(AA)-3' > [M-H]- of 5'-d(AAA)-3'. In addition, the collision-induced dissociation reactions of the products of these reactions have been studied. Decomposition reactions are consistent with trimethylsilyl attachment on the phosphodiester linkage(s) in oligonucleotides and on the phosphate moieties of 5'-pdA and 5'-pppdA. Comparison of data acquired for modified and unmodified oligonucleotide anions of the same charge state reveal that TMS modification can significantly alter the favored dissociation channels, giving rise to sequence information. The results suggest that gas phase TMS derivatization of oligonucleotide anions, combined with tandem mass spectrometry, can provide sequence information complementary to that derived from unmodified anions.

  13. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range (0.505 to 0.575) and compared to classical nucleation rate calculations. The experimental nucleation rate density varies with volume fraction more slowly than expected theoretically. Gravity may influence nucleation because crystal nuclei are more dense than the surrounding fluid and may be gravitationally convected. The largest observed crystal size was near volume fraction 0.52. Near the freezing point, crystals should grow to large size because nuclei are sparse and there is plenty of room to grow without contacting other crystals. Near melting the opposite is true, with crystals growing into one another shortly after nucleation. The maximum crystal size seen near 0.52 volume fraction suggests that gravitational stresses are limiting crystal growth near freezing.

  14. Nucleation in super-saturated products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volmer, M.; Weber, A.

    1988-01-01

    The procedure used is based on theories of W. Gibbs. The formation of the liquid phase from a supersaturated vapor of a pure substance is first considered. A comparison is made with experience in the area of nucleation. Generally known facts and experiments are mentioned. Liquid nuclei and crystal nuclei are examined.

  15. Gas phase processing of nanostructured titania particles and films: Environmentally benign methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guixiang

    This dissertation is a study of the gas phase synthesis using flame aerosol reactors to produce nanostructured particles and films with desired features as size, morphology, agglomeration state, crystalline phase composition and modified solid state properties. The following particles/films were produced: titania, lead titanate, Mn-Zn ferrite, Fesp{3+} doped titania and nanocomposites of FeO/TiO. On supercooling titania droplets in flames, metastable anatase was preferentially nucleated. At high flame temperatures of 1570sp°C, 100% anatase spherical titania particles were obtained; at 900 ˜ 1430sp°C, polyhedral shaped particles with mixtures of anatase and rutile were obtained; and at 400sp°C, amorphous titania was obtained. A 3-D computer simulation was used to study the aggregration and restructuring of small clusters in flames. These small aggregates are fractal-like and comply with the fractal power law only in a statistical sense, with a decrease in fractal dimension as the clusters become smaller. A cluster-restructuring model was developed to simulate the topological evolution in a high temperature sintering process. The fractal dimension was found to increase as sintering proceeded for small clusters, in contrast to large clusters where the fractal dimension remained constant. A light scattering technique was used to capture the sintering restructuring of nanosized titania particles in flames by in situ determination of the fractal dimension change of titania agglomerates. Laser Induced Fluorescence was used to optimize flame conditions to produce perovskite structured lead titanate particles in flame reactors. Also, the flame reaction provides a novel method to synthesize Fe(III) doped titania. As the doping concentrations varied from trace to comparable to TiOsb2, solid state properties of titania were modified. Substitutionally doped ferric ion accelerated the anatase-rutile transformation in flames, resulting in a more compact lattice structure and generating oxygen deficiency defects, as revealed by the increased shifting and broadening of anatase peaks in the Raman spectra. Further the UV/VIS absorption spectra was observed to be shifted towards the visible. As the iron dopant increased to the amount of comparable with titanium, the as produced pseudo binary mixture of FeO/TiO had superparamagnetic characteristics indicated by Mossbauer and magnetization measurements. Flame assisted aerosol coating processes were used to deposited titania films onto stainless steel and silica substrates. Deposition mechanisms were studied and related to the film characteristics. Interesting solid state properties were observed as the film thickness diminished to nanoscales. The titania films were tested to have a good anti-corrosive characteristics and other exciting functionality having wide applications.

  16. Homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrates: unrealistic under realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Molinero, Valeria; Doherty, Michael F; Peters, Baron

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrates are ice-like inclusion compounds with importance to the oil and natural gas industry, global climate change, and gas transportation and storage. The molecular mechanism by which these compounds form under conditions relevant to industry and nature remains mysterious. To understand the mechanism of methane hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous solutions, we performed simulations at controlled and realistic supersaturation. We found that critical nuclei are extremely large and that homogeneous nucleation rates are extremely low. Our findings suggest that nucleation of methane hydrates under these realistic conditions cannot occur by a homogeneous mechanism. PMID:23148735

  17. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  18. Gas phase production and loss of isoprene epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kelvin H; Crounse, John D; St Clair, Jason M; Bennett, Nathan B; Nguyen, Tran B; Seinfeld, John H; Stoltz, Brian M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2014-02-20

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) form in high yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions. These compounds contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Their gas-phase chemistry has, however, remained largely unexplored. In this study, we characterize the formation of IEPOX isomers from the oxidation of isoprene by OH. We find that cis-β- and trans-β-IEPOX are the dominant isomers produced, and that they are created in an approximate ratio of 1:2 from the low-NO oxidation of isoprene. Three isomers of IEPOX, including cis-β- and trans-β, were synthesized and oxidized by OH in environmental chambers under high- and low-NO conditions. We find that IEPOX reacts with OH at 299 K with rate coefficients of (0.84 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), (1.52 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), and (0.98 ± 0.05) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the δ1, cis-β, and trans-β isomers. Finally, yields of the first-generation products of IEPOX + OH oxidation were measured, and a new mechanism of IEPOX oxidation is proposed here to account for the observed products. The substantial yield of glyoxal and methylglyoxal from IEPOX oxidation may help explain elevated levels of those compounds observed in low-NO environments with high isoprene emissions. PMID:24476509

  19. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  20. Visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations.

    PubMed

    Daly, Steven; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations has been studied experimentally by action-spectroscopy in a modified linear ion trap between 220 and 590 nm and by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Three bands are observed that can be assigned to the electronic transitions S0 → S1, S0 → S3, and S0 → (S8,S9) according to the theoretical prediction. While the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the S3 and S8/S9 transitions, a large shift in the value of the calculated S1 transition energy is observed. A theoretical analysis of thermochromism, potential vibronic effects, and-qualitatively-electron correlation revealed it is mainly the latter that is responsible for the failure of TDDFT to accurately reproduce the S1 transition energy, and that a significant thermochromic shift is also present. Finally, we investigated the nature of the excited states by analyzing the excitations and discussed their different fragmentation behavior. We hypothesize that different contributions of local versus charge transfer excitations are responsible for 1-photon versus 2-photon fragmentation observed experimentally. PMID:25961329

  1. Gas-phase Chemistry of the Cyanate Ion, OCN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2015-10-01

    Cyanate (OCN-) is the only ion to date whose presence has been confirmed in the icy mantles that coat interstellar dust grains. Understanding the chemical behavior of cyanate at a fundamental level is therefore integral to the advancement of astrochemistry. We seek to unravel the chemistry of this intriguing anion through a combination of gas-phase experiments and theoretical explorations. Our approach is twofold: first, employing a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus, the reactions between OCN- and three of the most abundant atomic species in the interstellar medium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, are examined. Hydrogen atoms readily react by associative detachment, but the remarkable stability of OCN- does not give rise to an observable reaction with either nitrogen or oxygen atoms. To explain these results, the potential energy surfaces of several reactions are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Second, collision induced dissociation experiments involving deprotonated uracil, thymine, and cytosine in an ion trap mass spectrometer reveal an interesting connection between these pyrimidine nucleobase anions and OCN-. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and explore the possible role of OCN- as a biomolecule precursor.

  2. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  3. Microwave spectrum and gas phase structure of maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Oncer, Onur; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of maleimide was measured in the 5-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, all unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and an sbnd ND, deuterium substituted isotopologue. The parent (or normal isotopologue) rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and quadrupole coupling constants are A = 6815.3251(12) MHz, B = 2361.85011(64) MHz, C = 1754.32750(64) MHz, DJ = 0.232(24) kHz, DJK = 0.546(54) kHz, 1.5?aa = 2.4227(53) MHz, and 0.25(?bb-?cc) = 1.3679(15) MHz. A best fit gas phase structure was determined using the experimental rotational constants of the isotopologues and some parameters from calculations. The inertial defect is ? = -0.054 amu 2, indicating a planar structure for maleimide, with no large amplitude motions observed on the sbnd NH hydrogen atom. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ provided rotational constants which are much closer (within 1-2%) to the experimental values compared to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated values.

  4. A transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of annealing induced γ-phase nucleation, clustering, and interfacial dynamics in reactively sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A. K. Nanda Subramanian, B.; Prasanna, S.; Jayakumar, S.; Rao, G. Mohan

    2015-03-28

    Pure α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits a very high degree of thermodynamical stability among all metal oxides and forms an inert oxide scale in a range of structural alloys at high temperatures. We report that amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films sputter deposited over crystalline Si instead show a surprisingly active interface. On annealing, crystallization begins with nuclei of a phase closely resembling γ-Alumina forming almost randomly in an amorphous matrix, and with increasing frequency near the substrate/film interface. This nucleation is marked by the signature appearance of sharp (400) and (440) reflections and the formation of a diffuse diffraction halo with an outer maximal radius of ≈0.23 nm enveloping the direct beam. The microstructure then evolves by a cluster-coalescence growth mechanism suggestive of swift nucleation and sluggish diffusional kinetics, while locally the Al ions redistribute slowly from chemisorbed and tetrahedral sites to higher anion coordinated sites. Chemical state plots constructed from XPS data and simple calculations of the diffraction patterns from hypothetically distorted lattices suggest that the true origins of the diffuse diffraction halo are probably related to a complex change in the electronic structure spurred by the a-γ transformation rather than pure structural disorder. Concurrent to crystallization within the film, a substantially thick interfacial reaction zone also builds up at the film/substrate interface with the excess Al acting as a cationic source.

  5. School Heating - Gas vs. Electric. Phase 1A - Effect on Construction Costs, (Updating Phase 1 Report Dated January 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valvoda, Frank R.

    Phase 1A updates the original study of January 1965 and contains the sevenmost recent schools which in their development stages were bid for both gas and electric heating systems. In all cases the bids were for first cost, not for ultimate operating expense. Although the differences were relatively minor, six out of the seven gas bids were lower…

  6. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-09-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in aerosol particles produced from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material and from a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA droplets suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  7. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes-Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. his phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impur...

  10. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  11. DETERMINATION OF GAS-PHASE DIMETHYL SULFATE AND MONOMETHYL HYDROGEN SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical techniques have been developed for the collection and determination of gas phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid in the flue lines and plumes of power plants and in the ambient atmosphere. The techniques involve the collection of the gas phase species in ...

  12. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport. PMID:26519629

  13. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  14. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in binary metallic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. V.; Spaepen, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method for calculating the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in binary metallic melts is developed. The free energy of crystallization is derived from regular solution models for the liquid and solid and is used, together with model-based estimates of the interfacial tension, to calculate the nucleation frequency from the classical theory. The method can account for the composition dependence of the maximum undercooling observed in a number of experiments on small droplet dispersions. It can also be used to calculate the driving force for crystal growth and to obtain more precise estimates of the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in glass-forming alloys. This method, although approximate, is simple to apply, and requires only knowledge of the phase diagram and a few readily available thermodynamic quantities as input data.

  15. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Lass, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    A hollow sphere model is developed to predict the range of supersaturation ratio values for refractory metal vapors in a proposed experimental nucleation apparatus. Since the experiments are to be carried out in a microgravity environment, the model neglects the effects of convection and assumes that the only transfer of vapors through an inert gas atmosphere is by conduction and molecular diffusion. A consistent set of physical properties data is assembled for the various candidate metals and inert ambient gases expected to be used in the nucleation experiments. Transient partial pressure profiles are computed for the diffusing refractory species for two possible temperature distributions. The supersaturation ratio values from both candidate temperature profiles are compared with previously obtained experimetnal data on a silver-hydrogen system. The model is used to simulate the diffusion of magnesium vapor through argon and other inert gas atmospheres over ranges of initial and boundary conditions. These results identify different combinations of design and operating parameters which are liekly to produce supersaturation ratio values high enough to induce homogeneous nucleation in the apparatus being designed for the microgravity nucleation experiments.

  16. Triplet-state energies and substituent effects of excited aroyl compounds in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong-Ping; Aue, Walter A.

    2000-01-01

    Triplet-state energy values obtained from the gas phase are still scarce. In this study, the triplet-state energies of 58 aroyl compounds, introduced as gas chromatographic peaks at atmospheric pressure and typically 473 K, have been determined from the 0-0 bands of their n→π* type phosphorescence spectra in excited nitrogen. Correlations of those gas-phase triplet-state energies with Hammett constants could be observed for substituted acetophenones, benzaldehydes and benzophenones.

  17. DNA-Assisted β-phase Nucleation and Alignment of Molecular Dipoles in PVDF Film: A Realization of Self-Poled Bioinspired Flexible Polymer Nanogenerator for Portable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Abiral; Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Garain, Samiran; Alam, Md Mehebub; Haeberle, Jörg; Henkel, Karsten; Schmeisser, Dieter; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-08-01

    A flexible nanogenerator (NG) is fabricated with a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film, where deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the agent for the electroactive β-phase nucleation. Denatured DNA is co-operating to align the molecular -CH2/-CF2 dipoles of PVDF causing piezoelectricity without electrical poling. The NG is capable of harvesting energy from a variety of easily accessible mechanical stress such as human touch, machine vibration, football juggling, and walking. The NG exhibits high piezoelectric energy conversion efficiency facilitating the instant turn-on of several green or blue light-emitting diodes. The generated energy can be used to charge capacitors providing a wide scope for the design of self-powered portable devices. PMID:26189605

  18. The Gas-Phase Deuterium Fractionation of Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Yoshihiro; Roberts, Helen; Herbst, Eric

    2005-03-01

    The dominant mechanism for the deuteration of formaldehyde in the gas phase of low-temperature interstellar cloud cores occurs via reaction with the deuterating ions H2D+, HD+2, and D+3. Until now, it has been assumed that deuteration leads to an ion that, on recombination with electrons, can produce a deuterated neutral species with a statistical branching fraction. Quantum chemical calculations reported here, however, show an entirely different picture, in which the deuteration of formaldehyde leads to the molecular ion H2COD+, where the deuterium binds only on the oxygen side of the molecule. The structure is quite stable, while an alternative structure, H2DCO+, cannot be produced in a straightforward manner. Dissociative recombination of H2COD+ to reproduce a formaldehyde structure then removes the deuteration if the dissociation is direct, i.e., it occurs without change of structure. There are several possible indirect mechanisms by which dissociative recombination can lead to HDCO, however. For example, if the direct products are HCOD+H, it is possible that subsequent isomerization to HDCO can occur, although this involved process is unlikely. Another possibility is isomerization during the actual dissociation of the H2COD intermediate. Models of deuterium fractionation in which dissociative recombination is predominantly direct are presented, and it is found that the deuterium fractionation of formaldehyde to form both HDCO and D2CO can still occur via other mechanisms, although with less efficiency than previously obtained. If the dissociative recombination is half indirect, however, then we can recover the previously calculated efficiency.

  19. Gas-phase identity nucleophilic substitution reactions of cyclopropenyl halides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Kon; Li, Hong Guang; Lee, Bon-Su; Kim, Chan Kyung; Lee, Hai Whang; Lee, Ikchoon

    2002-03-22

    The gas-phase identity nucleophilic substitution reactions of halide anions (X = F, Cl, and Br) with cyclopropenyl halides, X(-) + (CH)(3)X <= => X(CH)(3) + X(-), are investigated theoretically at four levels of theory, B3LYP/6-311+G**, MP2/6-311+G**, G2(+)MP2//MP2/6-311+G**, and G2(+)//MP2/6-311+G**. Four types of reaction paths, the sigma-attack S(N)2, pi-attack S(N)2'-syn, and S(N)2'-anti and sigmatropic 1,2-shift, are possible for all the halides. In the fluoride anion reactions, two types of stable adducts, syn- and anti-1,2-difluorocyclopropyl anions, can exist on the triple-well-type potential energy surface of the identity substitution reactions with rearrangement of double bond (C=C), S(N)2'-syn, and S(N)2'-anti processes. The TSs for the sigma-attack S(N)2 paths have "open" (loose) structures so that the ring positive charges are high rendering strong aromatic cyclopropenyl (delocalized) cation-like character. In contrast, in the pi-attack S(N)2' paths, a lone pair is formed at the unsubstituted carbon (C3), which stabilizes the 1,2-dihalocyclopropyl (delocalized) anion-like TS by two strong n(C)-sigma*(C-F) vicinal charge-transfer delocalization interactions. The barrier height increases in the order S(N)2'-anti < sigma-attack S(N)2 < S(N)2'-syn for X = Cl and Br, whereas for X = F the order is changed to S(N)2'-anti < S(N)2'-syn < sigma-attack S(N)2 due to the stable difluoro adduct formation. The sigmatropic 1,2-shift (circumambulatory) reactions have high activation barriers and cannot interfere with the substitution reactions. PMID:11895417

  20. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  1. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  2. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  3. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O-) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)-, C4H3N4-/C4HN3O-, C4H2N3-, C3NO-/HC(HCN)CN-, OCN-, CN-, and O-. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  5. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine.

    PubMed

    Dawley, M Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Carmichael, Ian; Denifl, Stephan; Ptasińska, Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C5H4N4O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp - H) anion (C5H3N4O(-)) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp - NH)(-), C4H3N4 (-)/C4HN3O(-), C4H2N3 (-), C3NO(-)/HC(HCN)CN(-), OCN(-), CN(-), and O(-). Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules. PMID:26049525

  6. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase products. These two techniques allow us to investigate the effect of energy source and initial CH4 concentration on the degree of nitrogen incorporation in both the gas and solid phase products.

  7. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  8. The Relative Importance of Aqueous-Phase and Gas-Phase Phenol Oxidation as Sources of SOA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, C.; Smith, J.

    2010-12-01

    The oxidation of phenols is a source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the gas phase as well as in aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog drops and water-containing aerosol particles). The relative importance of the gas- and aqueous-phase pathways depends largely on three factors: (1) the partitioning of phenols between the gaseous and condensed phases, (2) the rates of reaction in each phase, and (3) the yields of SOA in each phase. Our goal in this work is to determine the relative importance of these two pathways as sources of SOA. Using previously published rate constants, as well as newly determined kinetics and SOA yield data in the aqueous phase, we find that in a cloudy atmosphere both aqueous- and gas-phase sinks are significant for phenols with high vapor pressures (e.g., phenol itself), but that aqueous-phase sinks can dominate for phenols with lower vapor pressures (e.g., phenols with multiple hydroxy or methoxy substituents). In regions with wood combustion (a major source of phenols), our calculations indicate that destruction of phenols within wood smoke particles is very important and that reaction with particulate triplet excited states is a major sink.

  9. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of γ = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  10. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements in supersaturated water vapor.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jirí

    2008-11-01

    The rate of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapors of water was studied experimentally using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a carrier gas. Our study covers a range of nucleation rates from 3x10(-1) to 3x10(2) cm(-3) s(-1) at four isotherms: 290, 300, 310, and 320 K. The molecular content of critical clusters was estimated from the slopes of experimental data. The measured isothermal dependencies of nucleation rate of water on saturation ratio were compared with the prediction of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation, the empirical prediction of Wolk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10 (2002)], the scaled model of Hale [Phys. Rev. A 33, 4156 (1986)], and the former nucleation onset data. PMID:19045352

  11. Study on measures to improve gas-liquid phase mixing in a multiphase pump impeller under high gas void fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Zhu, H. W.; Ding, K.; Qiang, R.

    2012-11-01

    Rotodynamic multiphase pump can transport crude gas-liquid mixture produced from oil well, and is regarded as the good choice of oil-gas multiphase transportation in offshore product system, for its advantages that compact structure, large flow rate, not sensitive to solid particles in the fluid. However, it is prone to bring about gas-liquid separation within the impeller under high gas void fraction. To solve the problem, this paper presents several measures to break gas packet and inhibit gas-liquid separation, such as, depositing the short blades, opening holes at the blades where gas packets gather, using T-shaped blades, etc. Then, CFD software was used to simulate the flow fields which were added measures to inhibit gas-liquid separation. The results show that streamlines in three new impellers distribute more evenly than in original impeller, the gas-liquid two phases mixed degree was improved, and the gas-liquid separation was inhibited to some extent. However, adding the short blades and using T-blade impeller failed to improve the differential pressure of impellers. So the placement and the geometrical parameters of the measures inhibiting gas-liquid separation should be further optimized.

  12. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Water in pores can freeze in immersion mode at T > 235 K if the pore walls contain an active site. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with T = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Many clay minerals and mineral dusts show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K. Such an increase is difficult to explain when ice nucleation is supposed to occur by a deposition mechanism, but evident when assuming freezing in pores, because for homogeneous ice nucleation only small pore volumes are needed, while heterogeneous ice nucleation requires larger pore structures to contain at least one active site for immersion nucleation. Together, these pieces of evidence strongly suggest that ice nucleation within pores should be the prevailing freezing mechanism of clay minerals for RHw below water saturation. Extending the analysis to other types of ice nuclei shows that freezing in pores and cracks is probably the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism for glassy and volcanic ash aerosols at RHw below water saturation. Freezing of water in carbon nanotubes might be of significance for ice nucleation by soot aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition on a solid surface. Inspection of ice nuclei with a close lattice match to ice, such as silver iodide or SnomaxTM, show that for high ice nucleation efficiency below water saturation the presence of impurities or cracks on the surface may be essential. Soluble impurities promote the formation of a liquid phase below water saturation in patches on the surface or as a complete surface layer that offers an environment for immersion freezing. If porous aerosol particles come in contact with semivolatile vapors, these will condense preferentially in pores before a coating on the surface of the particles is formed. A pore partially filled with condensed species attracts water at lower RHw than an empty pore, but the aqueous solution that forms in the pore will freeze at a higher RHi than pure water. The ice nucleation ability of pores completely filled with condensed organic species might be totally impeded. Pores might also be important for preactivation, the capability of a particle to nucleate ice at lower RHi in subsequent experiments when compared to the first initial ice nucleation event. Preactivation has often been explained by persistence of ice embryos at specific sites like dislocations, steps, kinks or pores. However, it is not clear how such features can preserve an ice embryo at RHi < 100%. Rather, ice embryos could be preserved when embedded in water. To keep liquid water at RHw well below 100%, narrow pores are needed but to avoid a strong melting point depression large pores are favorable. A narrow pore opening and a large inner volume are combined in "ink bottle" pores. Such "ink bottle" pores would be suited to preserve ice at RHi < 100% and can arise e.g. in spaces between aggregated particles.

  13. Bleb Nucleation through Membrane Peeling.

    PubMed

    Alert, Ricard; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-02-12

    We study the nucleation of blebs, i.e., protrusions arising from a local detachment of the membrane from the cortex of a cell. Based on a simple model of elastic linkers with force-dependent kinetics, we show that bleb nucleation is governed by membrane peeling. By this mechanism, the growth or shrinkage of a detached membrane patch is completely determined by the linker kinetics, regardless of the energetic cost of the detachment. We predict the critical nucleation radius for membrane peeling and the corresponding effective energy barrier. These may be typically smaller than those predicted by classical nucleation theory, implying a much faster nucleation. We also perform simulations of a continuum stochastic model of membrane-cortex adhesion to obtain the statistics of bleb nucleation times as a function of the stress on the membrane. The determinant role of membrane peeling changes our understanding of bleb nucleation and opens new directions in the study of blebs. PMID:26919015

  14. Bleb Nucleation through Membrane Peeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alert, Ricard; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-02-01

    We study the nucleation of blebs, i.e., protrusions arising from a local detachment of the membrane from the cortex of a cell. Based on a simple model of elastic linkers with force-dependent kinetics, we show that bleb nucleation is governed by membrane peeling. By this mechanism, the growth or shrinkage of a detached membrane patch is completely determined by the linker kinetics, regardless of the energetic cost of the detachment. We predict the critical nucleation radius for membrane peeling and the corresponding effective energy barrier. These may be typically smaller than those predicted by classical nucleation theory, implying a much faster nucleation. We also perform simulations of a continuum stochastic model of membrane-cortex adhesion to obtain the statistics of bleb nucleation times as a function of the stress on the membrane. The determinant role of membrane peeling changes our understanding of bleb nucleation and opens new directions in the study of blebs.

  15. Three-phase measurements of oil and gas trapping in sand packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mansoori, Saleh K.; Iglauer, Stefan; Pentland, Christopher H.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2009-10-01

    We measure the trapped saturations of oil and gas as a function of initial saturation in water-wet sand packs. We start with a water-saturated column and inject octane (oil), while water and oil are produced from the bottom. Once water production has ceased, air (gas) then enters from the top, allowing oil and gas to drain under gravity for different times. Finally water is then injected from the bottom to trap both oil and gas. The columns are sliced and the fluids analyzed using gas chromatography. We find that for high initial gas saturations more gas can be trapped in the presence of oil than in a two-phase (gas/water) system. The residual gas saturation can be over 20% compared to 14% in two-phase flow [Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Pentland CH, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurements of non-wetting phase trapping applied to carbon dioxide storage. Energy Procedia 2009;1(1):3173-80]. This is unlike previous measurements on consolidated media, where the trapped gas saturation is either similar or lower to that reached in an equivalent two-phase experiment. For lower initial gas saturation, the amount of trapping follows the initial-residual trend seen in two-phase experiments. The amount of oil trapped is insensitive to initial gas saturation or the amount of gas that is trapped, again in contrast to measurements on consolidated media. More oil is trapped than would be predicted from an equivalent two-phase (oil/water) system, although the trapped saturation is never larger than the maximum reached in two-phase flow (around 11%) [Pentland CH, Al Mansoori SK, Iglauer S, Bijeljic B, Blunt MJ. Measurement of non-wetting phase trapping in sand packs. In: SPE 115697, proceedings of the SPE annual technical conference and exhibition, Denver, Colorado, USA; 21-24 September 2008]. These initially surprising results are explained in the context of oil layer stability and the competition between snap-off and piston-like advance. In two-phase systems, displacement is principally by cooperative piston-like advance with relatively little trapping, whereas in consolidated media snap-off is generally more significant. However, oil layer collapse events during three-phase waterflooding rapidly trap the oil which acts as a barrier to direct water/gas displacement, except by snap-off, leading to enhanced gas trapping.

  16. Gas-phase production of single-walled carbon nanotubes from carbon monoxide: a review of the hipco process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    The latest process for producing large quantities of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to emerge from the Rice University, dubbed HiPco, is living up to its promise. The current production rates approach 450 mg/h (or 10 g/day), and nanotubes typically have no more than 7 mol % of iron impurities. Second-generation HiPco apparatus can run continuously for 7-10 days at a time. In the HiPco process nanotubes grow in high-pressure, high-temperature flowing CO on catalytic clusters of iron. Catalyst is formed in situ by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, which is delivered intact within a cold CO flow and then rapidly mixed with hot CO in the reaction zone. Upon heating, the Fe(CO)5 decomposes into atoms that condense into larger clusters. SWNTs nucleate and grow on these particles in the gas phase via CO disproportionation: CO + CO --> CO2 + C (SWNT), catalyzed by the Fe surface. The concentration of CO2 produced in this reaction is equal to that of carbon and can therefore serve as a useful real-time feedback parameter. It was used to study and optimize SWNT production as a function of temperature, pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration. The results of the parametric study are in agreement with current understanding of the nanotube formation mechanism.

  17. Two-phase gas bubble-liquid boundary layer flow along vertical and inclined surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Epstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of a two-phase gas bubble-liquid boundary layer along vertical and inclined porous surfaces with uniform gas injection is investigated experimentally and analytically. Using argon gas and water as the working fluids, a photographical study of the two-phase boundary layer flow has been performed for various angles of inclination ranging from 45/sup 0/ to 135/sup 0/ and gas injection rates ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 m/s. An integral method has been employed to solve the system of equations governing the two-phase motion. The effects of the gas injection rate and the angle of inclination on the growth of the boundary layer have been determined. The predicted boundary layer thickness is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The calculated axial liquid velocity and the void fraction in the two-phase region are also presented along with the observed flow behavior.

  18. A new method for measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Perraud, V. M.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately predicting particle formation and growth from gas phase precursors is an essential component of modeling the impact of particulate matter on human health, visibility and climate. While the reactions of ammonia with nitric and sulfuric acids to form particulate nitrate and sulfate particles is well known, it has been recently recognized that gas-phase amines, even at low ppb levels, significantly enhance particle formation from common atmospheric acids. As a result, accurate data on the sources, sinks and typical background concentrations of gas-phase amines, are crucial to predicting new particle formation in the atmosphere. However, gas-phase amines are notoriously difficult to measure, as they have a tendency to stick to surfaces, including sampling lines and inlets. In addition, background amine concentrations in the atmosphere are typically a few ppb or lower, requiring low detection limits for ambient sampling techniques. Here we report the development of a simple, reliable method for detection of gas-phase amines at atmospherically relevant concentrations using collection on a cation exchange sorbent followed by in-line extraction and ion chromatography. Gas-phase standards of several amines and ammonia are used to characterize the technique and results from ambient samples in an agricultural area are presented. The application of this technique to field measurements as well as to laboratory measurements of new particle formation from gas-phase ammonia and amines are discussed.

  19. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  20. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  1. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  2. Gas-phase spectroscopy of a vinylheptafulvene chromophore.

    PubMed

    Elm, Jonas; Stockett, Mark; Houmøller, Jørgen; Åxman Petersen, Michael; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic spectral properties of the dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch, free of solvent interactions, were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A quaternary ammonium group was incorporated via an ethylene bridge to allow for the transfer of charged molecules to the gas phase by electrospray ionization, leaving the chromophore part itself neutral. Absorption by the two isomers was identified from ion dissociation (i.e., action spectroscopy) using a home-built sector instrument. Several fragment ions were observed, and dissociation occurred both at the charge tag side chain and at the chromophore unit itself. We measured an absorption band of VHF with a maximum at 430 ± 20 nm (2.9 eV ± 0.1 eV) but no band was discernible for the DHA in the visible region. This shows that little interconversion between the two isomers occurs during the electrospray and the subsequent trapping in an octopole for 25 ms; the latter is needed to produce ion bunches for spectroscopy where a pulsed laser system is used. For comparison, density functional theoretical calculations predicted lowest-energy vertical excitations of 3.33 eV to 3.48 eV for the DHA and 3.02 eV to 3.08 eV for the VHF (the ranges are based on the use of different functionals), which correspond to a maximal deviation between theory and experiment of 0.1 eV in the case of the VHF. The absorption by the bare ions is significantly blue-shifted compared to that by VHF in acetonitrile solution (2.64 eV), but similar within the experimental uncertainty to that by VHF in cyclohexane (2.78 eV); the transition, therefore has a significant charge-transfer character. Finally, we find that the absorption of two photons is needed to cause fragmentation of the VHF on the microsecond time scale, which indicates that prompt fragmentation from the electronically excited state or prior to the intramolecular vibrational redistribution of the excess energy plays no role. This is of particular importance for the use of the photosystem in advanced materials or molecular electronics where high photostability is required to allow for numerous isomerization cycles. PMID:26307736

  3. Gas phase studies of the competition between substitution and elimination reactions.

    PubMed

    Gronert, Scott

    2003-11-01

    Gas phase studies allow for the examination of organic reaction mechanisms in the absence of solvation effects and therefore probe the intrinsic reactivity of the reaction partners. The competition between substitution and elimination reactions has been a topic of interest for decades, but it has been difficult to examine in the gas phase because both pathways generally lead to the same ionic product and cannot be distinguished by mass spectrometry. By using dianions as nucleophiles, the reactions produce two ionic products, one of which identifies the mechanism. With this approach, we have examined a variety of substituent effects on the gas phase competition between substitution and elimination. In addition, we have found that similar processes occur during collisional activation of salt complexes that contain a dianion and a tetraalkylammonium cation. Overall, the results show that the gas phase studies probe the same fundamental features found in the condensed phase and provide valuable insights into reaction mechanisms. PMID:14622032

  4. Application Of Phase Doppler Particle Anemometer For Studying Turbulent Gas-Particle Flows At Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lixing

    2007-06-01

    The phase Doppler particle anemometer (PDPA) made by both Aerometrcis Inc. and Dantec Inc. are used to measure the time-averaged gas and particle velocities, RMS values of gas and particle fluctuation velocities, gas-particle velocity correlations, gas turbulence modification and particle concentration for turbulent swirling and non-swirling gas-particle flows and also gas-particle flows with combustion in the Laboratory of Two-phase Flows and Combustion, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. For strongly swirling gas-particle flows with swirl numbers greater than unity (s=1.5 and s=2.1), it is found that their gas-particle flow behavior is different among each other and is different from that for weakly swirling flows. For example, there are no central reverse flows and there are enlarged solid-body rotation zones for swirling flows with s=1.5. The behavior of swirling gas-particle flows depends on the swirl number and the flow configuration. For sudden-expansion gas-particle flows it is found that the gas-particle velocity correlation has the distribution similar to that of gas and particle RMS fluctuation velocities and its magnitude is smaller than that of both gas and particle RMS fluctuation velocities. For turbulence modification in sudden-expansion flows it is found that the separating flows increase the gas-turbulence enhancement tendency in comparison with the pipe flows. For combusting gas-particle flows it is found that combustion reduces the velocity slip between the gas and particle phases.

  5. Genetic Algorithms and Nucleation in VIH-AIDS transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranon, Armando

    2003-03-01

    VIH to AIDS transition has been modeled via a genetic algorithm that uses boom-boom principle and where population evolution is simulated with a cellular automaton based on SIR model. VIH to AIDS transition is signed by nucleation of infected cells and low probability of infection are obtained for different mutation rates in agreement with clinical results. A power law is obtained with a critical exponent close to the critical exponent of cubic, spherical percolation, colossal magnetic resonance, Ising Model and liquid-gas phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Computations were carried out at UAM-A Supercomputing Lab and author acknowledges financial support from Division of CBI at UAM-A.

  6. The gas-phase thermal chemistry of tetralin and related model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malandra, J.

    1993-05-01

    The thesis is divided into 5 papers: gas-phase thermal decomposition of tetralin; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 3-benzocycloheptenone and 1,3, 4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzothiepin-2,2-dioxide (model systems for gas-phase pyrolysis of tetralin); high-temperature gas-phase reactions of o-allylbenzyl radicals generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of is(o-allylbenzyl) oxalate; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane; and flash vacuum pyrolysis of o-allyltoluene, o-(3-butenyl)toluene and o-(pentenyl)toluene were also used.

  7. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G

    2009-07-21

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity. PMID:19419792

  8. Gas phase dispersion in compost as a function of different water contents and air flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.

    2009-07-01

    Gas phase dispersion in a natural porous medium (yard waste compost) was investigated as a function of gas flow velocity and compost volumetric water content using oxygen and nitrogen as tracer gases. The compost was chosen because it has a very wide water content range and because it represents a wide range of porous media, including soils and biofilter media. Column breakthrough curves for oxygen and nitrogen were measured at relatively low pore gas velocities, corresponding to those observed in for instance soil vapor extraction systems or biofilters for air cleaning at biogas plants or composting facilities. Total gas mechanical dispersion-molecular diffusion coefficients were fitted from the breakthrough curves using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the advection-dispersion equation and used to determine gas dispersivities at different volumetric gas contents. The results showed that gas mechanical dispersion dominated over molecular diffusion with mechanical dispersion for all water contents and pore gas velocities investigated. Importance of mechanical dispersion increased with increasing pore gas velocity and compost water content. The results further showed that gas dispersivity was relatively constant at high values of compost gas-filled porosity but increased with decreasing gas-filled porosity at lower values of gas-filled porosity. Results finally showed that measurement uncertainty in gas dispersivity is generally highest at low values of pore gas velocity.

  9. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Ferguson, F. T.; Stephens, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Modifications to the nucleation apparatus suggested by our first microgravity flight campaign are complete. These included a complete 'repackaging' of the equipment into three racks along with an improved vapor spout shutter mechanism and additional thermocouples for gas temperature measurements. The 'repackaged' apparatus was used in two KC-135 campaigns: one during the week of June 3, 1991 consisting of two flights with Mg and two with Zn, and another series consisting of three flights with Zn during the week of September 23, 1991. Our effort then was focused on the analysis of these data, including further development of the mathematical models to generate the values of temperature and supersaturation at the observed points of nucleation. The efforts to apply Hale's Scaled Nucleation Theory to our experimental data have met with only limited success, most likely due to still inadequate temperature field determination. Work on the development of a preliminary particle collector system designed to capture particles from the region of nucleation and condensation, as well as from other parts of the chamber, are discussed.

  10. Volumes of critical bubbles from the nucleation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilemski, Gerald

    2006-09-01

    A corollary of the nucleation theorem due to Kashchiev [Nucleation: Basic Theory with Applications (Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford, 2000)] allows the volume V* of a critical bubble to be determined from nucleation rate measurements. The original derivation was limited to one-component, ideal gas bubbles with a vapor density much smaller than that of the ambient liquid. Here, an exact result is found for multicomponent, nonideal gas bubbles. Provided a weak density inequality holds, this result reduces to Kashchiev's simple form which thus has a much broader range of applicability than originally expected. Limited applications to droplets are also mentioned, and the utility of the pT,x form of the nucleation theorem as a sum rule is noted.

  11. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  12. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be reconciled, and that is suitable for application in atmospheric modeling studies.

  13. The gas-phase metallicity of central and satellite galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, Anna; Gallazzi, Anna; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2012-09-01

    We exploit the galaxy groups catalogue of Yang et al. and the galaxy properties measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Releases 4 and 7 to study how the gas-phase metallicities of star-forming galaxies depend on environment. We find that satellite and central galaxies follow a qualitatively similar stellar mass (M★)-gas-phase metallicity relation, whereby their gas-phase metallicity increases with M★. Satellites, though, have higher gas-phase metallicities than equally massive centrals, and this difference increases with decreasing stellar mass. We find a maximum offset of 0.06 dex at log(M★/h-2 M⊙) ≃ 8.25. At fixed halo mass, centrals are more metal rich than satellites by ˜0.5 dex on average. This is simply due to the fact that, by definition, centrals are the most massive galaxies in their groups, and the fact that gas-phase metallicity increases with stellar mass. More interestingly, we also find that the gas-phase metallicity of satellites increases with halo mass (Mh) at fixed stellar mass. This increment is more pronounced for less massive galaxies, and, at M★ ≃ 109 h-2 M⊙, corresponds to ˜0.15 dex across the range 11 < log (Mh/h-1 M⊙) < 14. We also show that low-mass satellite galaxies have higher gas-phase metallicities than central galaxies of the same stellar metallicity. This difference becomes negligible for more massive galaxies of roughly solar metallicity. We demonstrate that the observed differences in gas-phase metallicity between centrals and satellites at fixed M★ are not a consequence of stellar mass stripping (advocated by Pasquali et al. in order to explain similar differences but in stellar metallicity), nor to the past star formation history of these galaxies as quantified by their surface mass density or gas mass fraction. Rather, we argue that these trends probably originate from a combination of three environmental effects: (i) strangulation, which prevents satellite galaxies from accreting new, low-metallicity gas which would otherwise dilute their interstellar medium; (ii) ram pressure stripping of the outer gas disc, thereby inhibiting radial inflows of low-metallicity gas and (iii) external pressure provided by the hot gas of the host halo which prevents metal-enriched outflows from escaping the galaxies. Each of these three mechanisms naturally explains why the difference in gas-phase metallicity between centrals and satellites increases with decreasing stellar mass and with increasing host halo mass, at least qualitatively. However, more detailed simulations and observations are required in order to discriminate between these mechanisms, and to test, in detail, whether they are consistent with the data.

  14. An investigation into the flow behavior of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in normal gravity with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.; Heist, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid behavior in normal gravity of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in an enclosed circular cylinder heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above was investigated. Flow visualization was used to obtain qualitative data on both systems. The use of thermochromatic liquid crystal particles as liquid phase flow tracers was evaluated as a possible means of simultaneously gathering both flow pattern and temperature gradient data for the two phase system. The results of the flow visualization experiments performed on both systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the behavior of such systems in a reduced gravity environment and aid in the verification of a numerical model of the system.

  15. Substrate orientation effects on the nucleation and growth of the M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} phase Ti{sub 2}AlC

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D.; Guenette, Mathew C.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.; Persson, Per O. A.; Rosen, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    The M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} (MAX) phases are ternary compounds comprising alternating layers of a transition metal carbide or nitride and a third ''A-group'' element. The effect of substrate orientation on the growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC MAX phase films was investigated by studying pulsed cathodic arc deposited samples grown on sapphire cut along the (0001), (1010), and (1102) crystallographic planes. Characterization of these samples was by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. On the (1010) substrate, tilted (1018) growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC was found, such that the TiC octahedra of the MAX phase structure have the same orientation as a spontaneously formed epitaxial TiC sublayer, preserving the typical TiC-Ti{sub 2}AlC epitaxial relationship and confirming the importance of this relationship in determining MAX phase film orientation. An additional component of Ti{sub 2}AlC with tilted fiber texture was observed in this sample; tilted fiber texture, or axiotaxy, has not previously been seen in MAX phase films.

  16. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results. PMID:14871013

  17. Development of Numerical Simulation Method for Compressible Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation method of compressible gas-liquid two-phase flow is developed for analyses of a cavitation bubble. Thermodynamic state of both phases is described with stiffened gas equation of state. Interface of two phases is captured by Level-Set method. As internal energy jump between two phases is critical for the stability of computation, total energy equation is modified so that inviscid flux of energy is smoothly connected across the interface. Detail of governing equations as well as their discretization is described followed by the result of one-dimensional simple example computation.

  18. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DEPOSITION OF A COMPOUND THAT PARTITIONS BETWEEN GAS AND PARTICULATE PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    How will atmospheric deposition behave for a compound when it reversibly sorbs between gas and atmospheric particulate phases? Two factors influence the answer. What physical mechanisms occur in the sorption process? What are the concentration and composition of atmospheric par...

  19. On Prognosis of Epitaxy from Gas Phase Process to Improve Properties of Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, E. L.; Bulaeva, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we analyzed mass and heat transport in a reactor from gas phase during growth an epitaxial layer. Based on results of the analysis we analyzed dependences of properties of grown layers on parameters of technological process.

  20. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  1. How to control bubble nucleation from superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomello, Alberto; Amabili, Matteo; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Superhydrophobicity is realized by entrapping gas bubbles inside surface roughness. While this strategy affords remarkable surface properties, it enhances the risk of cavitation from these gas nuclei at negative pressures. Here we use free energy molecular dynamics simulations and an extension of the classical nucleation theory to show that the relevant nucleation rates and barriers can be controlled by engineering the surface structure. Mimicking the re-entrant and chemically heterogeneous structure found in the leaves of the Salvinia molesta allows one both to stabilize the gas pockets against liquid intrusion and to reduce the risk of cavitation.

  2. Direct nucleation of crystalline SiGe on substrates by reactive thermal CVD with Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and GeF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizawa, Fumio; Shiota, Kunihiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Hanna, Junichi

    1997-07-01

    Polycrystalline SiGe (poly-SiGe) film growth by reactive thermal CVD with a gaseous mixture of Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and GeF{sub 4} was investigated on various substrates such as Al, Cr, Pt, Si, ITO, ZnO and thermally grown SiO{sub 2}. In Ge-rich film growth, SEM observation in the early stage of the film growth revealed that direct nucleation of crystallites took place on the substrates. The nucleation was governed by two different mechanisms: one was a heterogeneous nucleation on the surface and the other was a homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase. In the former case, the selective nucleation was observed at temperatures lower than 400 C on metal substrates and Si, where the activation of adsorbed GeF{sub 4} on the surface played a major role for the nuclei formation, leading to the selective film growth. On the other hand, the direct nucleation did not always take place in Si-rich film growth irrespective of the substrates and depended on the growth rate. In a growth rate of 3.6nm/min, the high crystallinity of poly-Si{sub 0.95}Ge{sub 0.05} in a 220nm-thick film was achieved at 450 C due to the no initial deposition of amorphous tissue on SiO{sub 2} substrates.

  3. Optical pyrometer based on the gas phase photoacoustic effect.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangling; Diebold, Gerald J

    2016-05-15

    A photoacoustic cell containing an infrared active gas and equipped with a pair of infrared transmitting windows that alternately views two bodies at different temperatures through a pair of chopping wheels acts as a differential detector of the radiation emitted by the two bodies. A theory for the photoacoustic signal shows that the device acts to monitor the difference in the incidances between the two bodies integrated over the absorptions of the gas in the cell. Experiments are reported showing that the response of the pyrometer depends on the relative temperatures of heated bodies, the absorption coefficient of the gas in the cell, and the modulation frequency of the chopping wheels. The instrument is shown to be a sensitive detector of a null in the integrated incidance of the two bodies. PMID:27176967

  4. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  5. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  6. Sulfur hexafluoride: Optimal use as a gas-phase, infrared sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, A.E.; Ludwick, L.M.; White, D.; Andrews, D.E.; Godbey, S.E. )

    1992-12-01

    Investigations into the use of sulfur hexafluoride, SF[sub 6], as a gas-phase, infrared photochemical sensitizer have revealed several interesting phenomena. The expedient use of SF[sub 6] can produce an optimal quantity of nitrated product in the gas-phase, laser-induced nitration of cyclopentane. The optimal utilization of sulfur hexafluoride required critical optimization of both frequency and quantity. The results are described herein. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  8. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  9. Detection Of Gas-Phase Polymerization in SiH4 And GeH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han; Perry, Joseph W.; Allevato, Camillo E.

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of laser light found to indicate onset of gas-phase polymerization in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) of photoconductive amorphous hydrogenated silicon/germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) film. In PECVD process, film deposited from radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma of silane (SiH4) and germane (GeH4) diluted with hydrogen. Gas-phase polymerization undesirable because it causes formation of particulates and defective films.

  10. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  11. Homogeneous Dislocation Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Asad; Maloney, Craig

    2012-02-01

    We perform atomistic computer simulations to study the mechanism of homogeneous dislocation nucleation (HDN) in a 2D hexagonal crystalline film under circular indentation. The nucleation process is governed by vanishing of energy associated with a single normal mode. For fixed film thickness, L, the spatial extent, ξ, of the critical mode grows with indenter radius, R. For fixed R/L, ξ scales roughly as ξ˜L^0.4. We perform a mesoscale analysis to determine the lowest energy normal mode for regions of varying radius, rmeso, centered on the critical mode's core. The energy of the lowest normal mode λmeso->0 rapidly as rmeso->ξ. The lowest mode shows a spatial extent, ξmeso, which increases sublinearly for rmeso<=ξ and saturates at rmeso 1.5; ξ. We demonstrate that the ξmeso/ ξ versus rmeso/ ξ curve is universal (independent of L or R). Hence small regions, rmeso<=ξ, can reveal the presence of incipient instability but give excellent estimates for the critical mode's energy and spatial extent only for rmeso>=1.5; ξ. Thus HDN is a quasi-local phenomenon.

  12. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  13. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  14. Investigation of Nucleation Bursts During the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, C. O.; Khlystov, A. Y.; Wittig, B.; Pandis, S. N.; Zhou, Y.; Bein, K.; Wexler, A. S.; Misra, C.; Sioutas, C.

    2002-12-01

    Homogeneous nucleation is one of the major sources of atmospheric particles on a global scale. Understanding nucleation is important for quantifying its role in shaping the ambient aerosol distribution and its effects on cloud properties and the planetary energy balance. Over 100 days with nucleation events were investigated during a sampling campaign sampling continental aerosols in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Over 90,000 size distributions were collected over 12 months using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers (SMPS) at three locations, including both urban and rural sites. Particle size distributions were measured down to 3 nm at the main site and to 10 nm at the other sites. The frequency of nucleation events was surprising. Approximately 50% of the study days were characterized by nucleation events. These events appear to occur over a large area and are not directly related to the emissions from the urban area. Some nucleation events occurred near simultaneously at samplers 500 km apart. Theories under investigation for the nucleation mechanism include sulfuric acid-water, sulfuric acid-water-ammonia, and secondary organic nucleation. The chemistry of the freshly nucleated and growing particles was investigated by collecting over 20,000 single particle mass spectra using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry on particles as small as 20 nm. Results of TDMA and hygroscopic growth measurements of nuclei mode particles will also be presented. A large number of high-frequency gas, particle, and meteorological measurements were taken with collocated instruments. Data will be analyzed to elucidate possible cause-effect relationships and the dataset will be compared to theoretical estimates of nucleation rates for a number of mechanisms.

  15. Nucleation Rate Analysis of Methane Hydrate from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C.; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T.; Amadeu K. Sum

    2015-01-06

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Moreover, various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP)more » methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates were calculated by MFPT and SP methods and are within 5%; the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.« less

  16. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation of Eco Logic International's gas-phase chemical reduction process, with an emphasis on their Reactor System. he Eco Logic process employees a high temperature reactor filled with hydrogen gas as the means to destr...

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  18. Constraining the Multi-Phase Gas Content of Galaxies in the Local Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, David; Kannappan, S. J.; Wei, L. H.; Baker, A. J.; Haynes, M. P.; Giovanelli, R.; Heitsch, F.; RESOLVE Team; ALFALFA Team

    2010-01-01

    The RESOLVE (REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE) Survey is a census of gas, stars, and dark matter in 1500 galaxies down to dwarf-scale baryonic masses of 109 Msun, occupying a range of cluster, group, and filament environments in the local cosmic web. We discuss strategies to estimate the gas mass in HI, H2, and warmer phases. RESOLVE falls largely within the footprint of the ongoing ALFALFA survey, allowing us to acquire accurate HI data for much of the sample. Any missing HI masses will be estimated from color and environment data, based on trends calibrated using the ALFALFA data set. Initially, our constraints on the molecular gas component will be largely indirect, based on either AKARI FIR data or a new technique presented here that links CO-derived H2/HI ratios to stellar-mass normalized color gradients. We discuss additional strategies under development to better measure molecular gas and constrain the mass in warmer phases. In particular, we describe observational constraints on the nature of additional gas that is detected dynamically in a sample of very blue, gas-dominated galaxies, possibly representing a warm-hot phase or a low-metallicity molecular component. Obtaining a full gas census for the RESOLVE survey will allow us to model gas phase transitions and star formation, specifically examining how baryonic mass component ratios and conversion timescales depend on galaxy mass and environment.

  19. Seeding approach to crystal nucleation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Jorge R; Vega, Carlos; Valeriani, Chantal; Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-01-21

    We present a study of homogeneous crystal nucleation from metastable fluids via the seeding technique for four different systems: mW water, Tosi-Fumi NaCl, Lennard-Jones, and Hard Spheres. Combining simulations of spherical crystal seeds embedded in the metastable fluid with classical nucleation theory, we are able to successfully describe the nucleation rate for all systems in a wide range of metastability. The crystal-fluid interfacial free energy extrapolated to coexistence conditions is also in good agreement with direct calculations of such parameter. Our results show that seeding is a powerful technique to investigate crystal nucleation. PMID:26801035

  20. Seeding approach to crystal nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Jorge R.; Vega, Carlos; Valeriani, Chantal; Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of homogeneous crystal nucleation from metastable fluids via the seeding technique for four different systems: mW water, Tosi-Fumi NaCl, Lennard-Jones, and Hard Spheres. Combining simulations of spherical crystal seeds embedded in the metastable fluid with classical nucleation theory, we are able to successfully describe the nucleation rate for all systems in a wide range of metastability. The crystal-fluid interfacial free energy extrapolated to coexistence conditions is also in good agreement with direct calculations of such parameter. Our results show that seeding is a powerful technique to investigate crystal nucleation.

  1. A numerical study of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpadi, A. K.

    1992-07-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and a combustion model made up of an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. Results of the application of the two-phase model to a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor are reported.

  2. Comparison of Gas and Adsorbed Phase X-ray Photoemission Spectra of Oxidized Organics on Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-12-01

    Most uptake studies of small chain organics on ice surfaces at near ambient conditions have been performed using flow tube and other methods which monitor the disappearance of the gas phase. We will present results using synchrotron based, ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy which allows for the probing of the ice surface directly at near ambient conditions. C 1s XPS and C K-edge NEXAFS gas phase and adsorbed phase spectra will be compared for 2-propanol, acetone, and 1-propanal on ice at -45 C. Uptake experiments give rise to first order Langmuirian isotherms. Acetone and 2-propanol show little difference in the photoemission spectra between the gas phase and adsorbed phase, suggesting that adsorption occurs molecularly. However, adsorption of 1-propanal shows evidence of chemical transformation (oxidation) at the interface of ice. Further studies are underway to better understand this adsorption behavior.

  3. Phase transitions in a 3 dimensional lattice loop gas

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, Richard; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate, via Monte Carlo simulations, the phase structure of a system of closed, nonintersecting but otherwise noninteracting, loops in 3 Euclidean dimensions. The loops correspond to closed trajectories of massive particles and we find a phase transition as a function of their mass. We identify the order parameter as the average length of the loops at equilibrium. This order parameter exhibits a sharp increase as the mass is decreased through a critical value, the behavior seems to be a crossover transition. We believe that the model represents an effective description of the broken-symmetry sector of the 2+1 dimensional Abelian Higgs model, in the extreme strong coupling limit. The massive gauge bosons and the neutral scalars are decoupled, and the relevant low-lying excitations correspond to vortices and antivortices. The functional integral can be approximated by a sum over simple, closed vortex loop configurations. We present a novel fashion to generate nonintersecting closed loops, starting from a tetrahedral tessellation of three space. The two phases that we find admit the following interpretation: the usual Higgs phase and a novel phase which is heralded by the appearance of effectively infinitely long loops. We compute the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator and that of the Polyakov loop operator. The Wilson loop exhibits perimeter law behavior in both phases implying that the transition corresponds neither to the restoration of symmetry nor to confinement. The effective interaction between external charges is screened in both phases, however there is a dramatic increase in the polarization cloud in the novel phase as shown by the energy shift introduced by the Wilson loop.

  4. Bubble nucleation in polymer–CO2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofei; Cristancho, Diego E; Costeux, Stéphane; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2013-10-28

    We combine density-functional theory with the string method to calculate the minimum free energy path of bubble nucleation in two polymer–CO2 mixture systems, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)–CO2 and polystyrene (PS)–CO2. Nucleation is initiated by saturating the polymer liquid with high pressure CO2 and subsequently reducing the pressure to ambient condition. Below a critical temperature (Tc), we find that there is a discontinuous drop in the nucleation barrier as a function of increased initial CO2 pressure (P0), as a result of an underlying metastable transition from a CO2-rich-vapor phase to a CO2-rich-liquid phase. The nucleation barrier is generally higher for PS–CO2 than for PMMA–CO2 under the same temperature and pressure conditions, and both higher temperature and higher initial pressure are required to lower the nucleation barrier for PS–CO2 to experimentally relevant ranges. Classical nucleation theory completely fails to capture the structural features of the bubble nucleus and severely underestimates the nucleation barrier. PMID:26029777

  5. NANOMATERIAL SOLUTIONS FOR HOT COAL GAS CLEANUP - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a new coal gasification technique that efficiently uses the hot (900-1500°C) generated syngas to power both steam and gas turbines. Due to regulations, this syngas must be free of sulfur and purification is normally carried ...

  6. AN ADVANCED FLUE GAS MONITOR FOR SO2 - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an instrument for continuously monitoring SO2 levels in flue gas is proposed. The SO2 will be detected by means of an electrochemical sensor cell, which operates in a three-electrode potentiostatic mode. The proposed innovation is develop-ment of an advan...

  7. Gas phase dispersion in a small rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of nonideal flow of gas in a rotary kiln reactor. A rotating tube 0.165 m in diameter by 2.17 m long, with internal lifting flights, was operated at room temperature. Rotational speeds from 2.0 to 7.0 rpm, air flow rates from 0.351 to 4.178 m/sup 3//h, and solid contents of 0.0, 5.1, and 15.3% of tube volume were studied. Residence time distribution of the gas was measured by means of the pulse injection technique using a helium tracer. A model was developed based on dispersive flow that exchanges with a deadwater region. Two parameters, a dispersion number describing bulk gas flow and an interchange factor describing exchange between the flow region and the gas trapped in the solids bed, were sufficient to correlate the data, but these parameters are sensitive to experimental error. The model is applicable to analysis of other flow systems, such as packed beds.

  8. NANOMATERIAL SOLUTIONS FOR HOT COAL GAS CLEANUP - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a new coal gasification technique that efficiently uses the hot (900-1500C) generated syngas to power both steam and gas turbines. Due to regulations, this syngas must be free of sulfur and purification is normally carried ...

  9. Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

  10. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  11. In Situ Investigations into CaCO3 Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Michael Harold

    Classical theories of nucleation were developed over a hundred years ago starting with Gibbs. However, much remains unknown about the process of phase transition in aqueous electrolyte solutions due to the lack of experimental tools able to probe dynamic processes at the time and length scales of the phase transformation. In the calcium carbonate system, recent discovery of an amorphous phase, as well as the suggested existence of potential precursor states such as so-called 'pre-nucleation clusters' or dense liquid droplets, has called into question the utility of the classical framework in making accurate predictions of nucleation. Added to these questions are those regarding the effects that chemical templates have on nucleating calcium carbonate. Many organisms use complex organic matrices to form architecturally complex functional structures out of sea water at ambient temperatures. By contrast, laboratory methods to materials synthesis often require extreme conditions yet maintain at best a low level of control over the development of the resulting material. With the goal of tightly controlling formation of functional materials, scientists have looked to such biomineral systems for inspiration. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of functionalized alkanethiols have been found to act as idealized chemical templates for calcium carbonate nucleation, controlling the nucleating plane of the calcite phase for many surface functionalities. Yet there remain many open questions as to the fundamental mechanisms by which these templates achieve this control. In this dissertation many investigations of calcium carbonate nucleation are discussed, which examine the nucleation pathways of calcium carbonate and mechanisms of control by which alkanethiol surfaces direct the oriented formation of calcite. Traditional in situ microscopy techniques are used to make nucleation rate measurements of templated calcite nucleation on alkanethiol SAMs to test the applicability of the predictions of classical nucleation theory to this system. Low resolution microscopy techniques are further used to provide indirect evidence for the formation pathways of calcite on SAMs exhibiting different surface chemistries. The development of a platform for liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilizing a sealed liquid cell is described, and its utility in making novel observations of materials formation processes is demonstrated. Liquid phase TEM is further employed, using an open cell system which allows for mixing reagents, to directly observe formation pathways in the CaCO3 system.

  12. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Infrared absorption of the raw powders hematite and quartz (section S1), TEM investigation of the spatial distribution of the γ-Fe2O3 inclusions (section S2), particle size distributions of the Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S3), ζ-potentials of aqueous dispersions of all γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S4), silanization of Fe2O3@SiO2 composite nanopowders with [3-(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-propyl]trimethoxysilane (section S5), and animation composed of TEM micrographs of Fe2O3@SiO2 NPs recorded at incrementally altered tilt angles (``Rotating Fe2O3@SiO2 NP.avi''). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00845j

  13. Kinetics of nucleation with decreasing rate of growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurasov, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Extension of analytical description of the stage of nucleation to the case of the slow growth rates of the embryos growth has been constructed. The metastable phase consumption by the already formed embryos affects the nucleation rate which leads to the non-linear evolution. The power exponentials which are smaller than that for the diffusion growth are chosen as the model laws of the embryos growth. All main characteristics of the nucleation period including the form of the embryos sizes spectrum are found. Analytical description of nucleation in the closed systems as well as in the open systems with the metastable phase influx is presented. It is shown that the relative errors of this description are small.

  14. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition.This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185959

  15. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 ± 15 cm and 23 ± 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  16. A pressure cell for nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of gas phases

    SciTech Connect

    Minzer, M.; Bradley, J. A.; Musgrave, R.; Seidler, G. T.; Skilton, A.

    2008-08-15

    We report the design and performance of a gas-phase sample cell for measurements of momentum transfer (q) dependent nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS). NRIXS measurements from He gas at 2 MPa (20 bars) readily demonstrate dipole-allowed and dipole-forbidden final states for two-electron excitations. Direct comparison of gas-phase NRIXS measurements with the corresponding nonresonant electron energy loss spectroscopy results (EELS) will be a valuable method for characterizing systematic errors in either technique for studies that require absolute normalization of the double differential cross section.

  17. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  18. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  19. Liquid to solid nucleation via onion structure droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Kipton; Klein, W.

    2013-11-01

    We study homogeneous nucleation from a deeply quenched metastable liquid to a spatially modulated phase. We find, for a general class of density functional theories, that the universally favored nucleating droplet in dimensions d ? 3 is spherically symmetric with radial modulations resembling the layers of an onion. The existence of this droplet has important implications for systems with effective long-range interactions, and potentially applies to polymers, plasmas, and metals.

  20. Bridging the Gap between the Gas Phase and Solution Phase: Solvent Specific Photochemistry in 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Michael D; Baker, Lewis A; Quan, Wen-Dong; Young, Jamie D; Staniforth, Michael; Greenough, Simon E; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2015-12-17

    Eumelanin is a naturally synthesized ultraviolet light absorbing biomolecule, possessing both photoprotective and phototoxic properties. We infer insight into these properties of eumelanin using a bottom-up approach, by investigating an ultraviolet absorbing motif of eumelanin, 4-tert-butylcatechol. Utilizing a combination of femtosecond transient electronic absorption spectroscopy and time-resolved velocity map ion imaging, our results suggest an environmental-dependent relaxation pathway, following irradiation at 267 nm to populate the S1 ((1)??*) state. Gas-phase and nonpolar solution-phase measurements reveal that the S1 state decays primarily through coupling onto the S2 ((1)??*) state which is dissociative along the nonintramolecular hydrogen bonded "free" O-H bond. This process occurs in 4.9 0.6 ps in the gas-phase and 18 1 ps in the nonpolar cyclohexane solution. Comparative studies on the deuterated isotopologue of 4-tert-butylcatechol in both the gas- and solution-phase (cyclohexane) reveal kinetic isotope effects of ?19 and ?4, respectively, supportive of O-H dissociation along a barriered pathway, and potentially mediated by quantum tunneling. In contrast, in the polar solvent acetonitrile, the S1 state decays on a much longer time scale of 1.7 0.1 ns. We propose that the S1 decay is now multicomponent, driven by internal conversion, intersystem crossing, and fluorescence, as well as O-H dissociation. The attribution of conformer-driven excited state dynamics to explain how the S1 state decays in the gas- and nonpolar solution-phase versus the polar solution-phase, demonstrates the influence the environment can have on the ensuing excited state dynamics. PMID:26015078

  1. Surface nanobubbles nucleate microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-11

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability. PMID:24765973

  2. Acoustic waves in bubbly liquids for two kinds of gas bubbles with phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gafiyatov, R. N.

    2014-11-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in a mixture of liquid with vapor-gas bubbles is studied. The dispersed phase consists of two fractions of the bubbles differing on gas structure and radii (a two-fractional mixture). The phase transitions take place at each of the fractions. The volume content of the bubbles is the low (about 1%). The dispersion relation, unified for plane, cylindrical and spherical waves is obtained. It is shown that a presence of the second fraction in the structure of a disperse phase of the bubbles changes significantly a dispersion and a dissipation of acoustic waves.

  3. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of kinetically trapped conformations in the gas phase: the case of triply protonated bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the relation between the gas-phase structure of biological molecules and their solution-phase structure is important when attempting to use gas-phase techniques to address biologically relevant questions. Directly after electrospray ionization, molecules can be kinetically trapped in a state that retains some "memory" of its conformation in solution and is separated from the lowest-energy gas-phase structure by barriers on the potential energy surface. In order to identify and characterize kinetically trapped structures, we have explored the conformational space of triply protonated bradykinin in the gas phase by combining field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) with cold ion spectroscopy. We isolate three distinct conformational families and characterize them by recording their UV-photofragment spectra and vibrational spectra. Annealing of the initial conformational distribution produced by electrospray reveals that one of the conformational families is kinetically trapped, while two others are stable, gas-phase structures. We compare our results to previously published results obtained using drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and propose a correspondence between the conformational families separated by FAIMS and those by IMS. PMID:25940085

  5. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  6. Nucleation of Crystals in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-07-01

    Solution crystallization is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of the crystalline materials. Recently, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The most significant of these is the two-step mechanism of nucleation, according to which the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, nucleation kinetic dependencies with steady or receding parts at increasing supersaturation, the role of heterogeneous substrates for polymorph selection, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. More importantly, this mechanism provides powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters so that the volume occupied by the dense liquid shrinks or expands.

  7. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  8. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  9. Gas phase effect on characteristics of a precessing vortex in the axisymmetric hydrodynamic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, A. P.; Shtork, S. I.; Alekseenko, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The work deals with the experimental study of precessing vortex in the gas-liquid swirl flow. The data on flow visualization are presented, dependences of precession frequency and pressure drop on the gas flow rate are determined, and correlation between these characteristics, which undergo abrupt changes at low gas contents, is determined. The main effect determining the nature of evolution of the flow parameters relates to the fact that due to strong flow swirl, phase separation with formation of a hollow vortex with the gas core occurs.

  10. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  11. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  12. Geometry as a catalyst: how vapor cavities nucleate from defects.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Alberto; Chinappi, Mauro; Meloni, Simone; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The onset of cavitation is strongly enhanced by the presence of rough surfaces or impurities in the liquid. Despite decades of research, the way the geometry of these defects promote the nucleation of bubbles and its effect on the kinetics of the process remains largely unclear. We present here a comprehensive explanation of the catalytic action that roughness elements exert on the nucleation process for both pure vapor cavities and gas ones. This approach highlights that nucleation may follow nontrivial paths connected with a sharp decrease of the free energy barriers as compared to flat surfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of intermediate metastable states that break the nucleation process in multiple steps; these states correspond to what is commonly known as cavitation nuclei. A single dimensionless parameter, the nucleation number, is found to control this rich phenomenology. The devised theory allows one to quantify the effect of the geometry and hydrophobicity of surface asperities on nucleation. Within the same framework, it is possible to treat both vapor cavitation, which is relevant, e.g., for organic liquids, and gas-promoted cavitation, which is commonly encountered in water. The theory is shown to be valid from the nano- to the macroscale. PMID:24205896

  13. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  14. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  15. A photoemission electron microscope investigation of chemical vapor deposition diamond films and diamond nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1993-12-31

    CVD diamond nucleation is investigated using the hot filament technique. The stability of CVD diamond at elevated temperatures in vacuum, O{sub 2}, and atomic hydrogen environments are studied using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) combined with in-vacuo x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Dissolution, oxidation, and atomic hydrogen etching processes of CVD diamond are observed in real-time. Low field cold electron emission from CVD diamond films has been observed for the first time by PEEM. Nucleation density Mo substrates could be increased from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} by polishing. Heating the substrate to 870{degrees}C in vacuum prior to deposition, or above 1000{degrees}C at the beginning of deposition, reduced nucleation by more than 100-fold. Reduction in nucleation sites is attributed to annealing. Nucleation on Mo{sub 2}C substrates was found to be very poor (10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2}), which shows carbide alone does not promote nucleation. Carbide formation may remove nucleation sites. CVD diamond was found to dissolve into the Mo substrate in vacuum at about 1200{degrees}C. XPS showed formation of Mo{sub 2}C when the diamond dissolved. Diamond oxidation to gas phase products occurred directly at about 600{degrees}C, with no observable participation by the substrate. No detectable etching by atomic hydrogen at a pressure 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} torr was observed. Boron doped and `pure` CVD diamond films were found to emit electrons at room temperature under the action of the accelerating electric field of the PEEM (about 30 kV/cm) without photon excitation. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon was investigated with PEEM and by studying the emission current-vs-voltage characteristics of the CVD diamond films. Morphology and crystalline orientation were found to play only a minor role. Impurities in the CVD diamond structure lowers the potential barrier substantially; tunneling of electrons into the vacuum is facile.

  16. Nucleation of cubic boron nitride thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Davilla, C.; Bengu, E.; Marks, L. D.; Kirk, M. A.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-06-01

    High-energy electrons (300 keV to 1 MeV) in a transmission electron microscope have been used to cause ballistic atomic displacements in hexagonal boron nitride. The high-resolution imaging capabilities of the TEM have allowed us to study the effect of the atomic displacements on the crystal structure of the BN. We report the formation of nanoarches-fullerene structures consisting of half of a BN nanotube capping the ends of the planar BN graphitic sheets. To form a basis of comparison between the high-energy electron bombardment and the ion bombardment typically used for cubic BN film growth, TRIM calculations were also performed to simulate Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of hexagonal BN. A model is presented, indicating a process through which the nanoarches can serve as nucleation sites for the cubic phase of BN. The nucleation model is consistent with current experimental reports on the formation of cubic BN thin films.

  17. Nucleation and growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Zhang, Bei; Li, James C. M.

    2011-06-01

    Pure tin film of one micron thick was evaporated onto a silicon substrate with chromium and nickel underlayers. The tinned silicon disk was bent by applying a dead load at the center and supported below around the edge to apply biaxial compressive stresses to the tin layer. After 180 C vacuum annealing for 1,2,4,6, and 8 weeks, tin whiskers/hillocks grew. A quantitative method revealed that the overall growth rate decreased with time with a tendency for saturation. A review of the literature showed in general, tin whisker growth has a nucleation period, a growth period and a period of saturation, very similar to recrystallization or phase transformation. In fact we found our data fit Avrami equation very well. This equation shows that the nucleation period was the first week.

  18. Venting of a Separate CO2-Rich Gas Phase from Submarine Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J.; Lilley, M.; Butterfield, D.; Evans, L.; Embley, R.; Massoth, G.; Christenson, B.; Nakamura, K.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-12-01

    Although CO2 is typically the most abundant gas dissolved in submarine hydrothermal fluids, it rarely appears as a completely separate phase. Among mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, a significant discharge of pure CO2 has been found at only one site: the Magic Mountain vent field on the Explorer Ridge, northeast Pacific. In contrast to MOR systems, recent studies of submarine volcanoes on the Mariana and Kermadec Arcs have found several sites that, in addition to discharging hot vent fluid, are also venting a separate CO2-rich phase either in the form of gas bubbles or liquid CO2 droplets. One of the most impressive is the Champagne vent site on NW Eifuku in the northern Mariana Arc. This relatively small vent field is discharging cold droplets of liquid CO2 at an estimated rate of 23 moles CO2/sec, about 0.1% or the global MOR carbon flux (see Lupton et al., 2006). Three other Mariana Arc submarine volcanoes, NW Rota-1, Nikko, and Daikoku, all have vent fields discharging CO2 in the form of gas bubbles. At Nikko and Daikoku the CO2 gas is bubbling up through pools of liquid sulfur. In addition, Pisces dives on the Kermadec Arc in 2005 found venting of CO-rich gas bubbles at Giggenbach volcano and Volcano-1. Based on this limited data set, it appears that a separate CO2-rich gas phase is a relatively common occurrence on volcanic arcs and almost non-existent on mid-ocean ridges. This difference is probably due to the supply of subducted marine carbonates and organic matter incorporated into the melting process along volcanic arcs, although the shallower depth of submarine arc volcanoes also favors formation of a separate gas phase. At each of the 6 volcanoes considered here, the separate gas phase is also accompanied by venting of hot hydrothermal fluid. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the vent fluid is not in equilibrium with the gas phase, suggesting that the two phases separated at depth in the system. One possibility is that the gas phase results from direct CO2 degassing from a magma chamber, while the hot vent fluid originates from seawater circulating through the volcanic edifice. These findings indicate that carbon fluxes from submarine arcs may be higher than previously estimated. Detailed experiments to estimate carbon fluxes at submarine arc volcanoes would help to resolve this question.

  19. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore W; Ladino, Luis A; Alpert, Peter A; Breckels, Mark N; Brooks, Ian M; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Huffman, J Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P; Mason, Ryan H; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A; Nájera, Juan J; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F; Wong, Jenny P S; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Aller, Josephine Y; Bertram, Allan K; Knopf, Daniel A; Murray, Benjamin J

    2015-09-10

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26354482

  20. Factors controlling the ice nucleating abilities of ?-pinene SOA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Zhou, S.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-07-01

    The ice nucleation abilities of fresh, water-soluble, internally mixed, and photochemically oxidized ?-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles were investigated at cirrus cloud temperatures in a continuous flow diffusion chamber. SOA sampled from a flow tube (SOA-fresh-FT) mimicked freshly generated particles, while the water-soluble organic compound fraction from a FT and smog chamber (SOA-WSOC-FT, SOA-WSOC-SC) mimicked cloud-processed particles. SOA-fresh-FT, SOA-WSOC-FT, and SOA-WSOC-SC particles were not highly active at nucleating ice between 233 K and 213 K, with activation onsets (i.e., 0.1% of particles forming ice) at or slightly above the theoretical homogeneous freezing line. A significant increase in the O/C of SOA-WSOC-SC via aqueous phase OH oxidation did not modify the ice nucleation abilities, indicating that the detailed composition of the particles is not of paramount importance to their ice nucleating abilities. Instead, precooling the SOA-WSOC-FT and SOA-WSOC-SC particles to 233 K dropped their ice nucleation onsets by up to 20% relative humidity with respect to ice, with lower temperatures likely driving the particles to be more viscous and solid-like. However, it is possible that preactivation contributed to the reduction of the ice nucleation onsets. Particles composed of both SOA-WSOC and ammonium sulfate (AS) were significantly less active in the deposition nucleation mode than pure, solid AS particles.

  1. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c)< 1 cm/s and v(sub f)> 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  2. Novel characterization of the aerosol and gas-phase composition of aerosolized jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Raphael T; Martin, Sheppard A; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2010-04-01

    Few robust methods are available to characterize the composition of aerosolized complex hydrocarbon mixtures. The difficulty in separating the droplets from their surrounding vapors and preserving their content is challenging, more so with fuels, which contain hydrocarbons ranging from very low to very high volatility. Presented here is a novel method that uses commercially available absorbent tubes to measure a series of hydrocarbons in the vapor and droplets from aerosolized jet fuels. Aerosol composition and concentrations were calculated from the differential between measured total (aerosol and gas-phase) and measured gas-phase concentrations. Total samples were collected directly, whereas gas-phase only samples were collected behind a glass fiber filter to remove droplets. All samples were collected for 1 min at 400 ml min(-1) and quantified using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This method was validated for the quantification of the vapor and droplet content from 4-h aerosolized jet fuel exposure to JP-8 and S-8 at total concentrations ranging from 200 to 1000 mg/m(3). Paired samples (gas-phase only and total) were collected every approximately 40 min. Calibrations were performed with neat fuel to calculate total concentration and also with a series of authentic standards to calculate specific compound concentrations. Accuracy was good when compared to an online GC-FID (gas chromatography-flame ionization detection) technique. Variability was 15% or less for total concentrations, the sum of all gas-phase compounds, and for most specific compound concentrations in both phases. Although validated for jet fuels, this method can be adapted to other hydrocarbon-based mixtures. PMID:20218763

  3. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR) measurement of liquid-phase ROS.

  4. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Drath, D.B.; Shorey, J.M.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke.

  5. Gas-Phase Oxidation Products From the Photooxidation of Fifteen Biogenic Terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ng, N. L.; Kroll, J. H.; Varutbangkul, V.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Biogenic emissions of terpene compounds influence atmospheric chemistry through the formation of tropospheric ozone and the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We conducted photooxidation experiments at the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility to examine the gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from isoprene, eight monoterpenes, four sesquiterpenes, and three oxygenated C10 terpenes. Terpenes were reacted with OH in the presence of NOx, with hydrocarbon to NOx ratios consistent with ratios typically observed in the ambient forested environments. The real-time formation of gas-phase oxidation products was monitored using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), which identified compounds by their mass to charge ratio and showed multi-step oxidation pathways from these reactions. The photooxidation of terpenes resulted in the formation of numerous gas-phase oxidation products that were not observed from our previous ozonolysis experiments, as well as the formation of gas-phase organic nitrogen compounds. These gas-phase oxidation products can contribute to tropospheric chemistry through further oxidation reactions in the atmosphere, or may influence the biosphere through the deposition of organic nitrogen compounds downwind. Possible reaction mechanisms and products from the photooxidation of these terpene compounds will be presented, and the relevance of these laboratory experiments to recent observations of rapid within-canopy chemistry will be discussed.

  6. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin

    Clusters, defined as "a number of similar things that occur together" in Webster's dictionary, has different meanings depending on the given subject. To physicists and chemists, the word cluster means "a group of atoms or molecules formed by interactions ranging from very weak van der Waals interactions to strong ionic bonds." Unlike molecules, which are made by nature and are stable under ambient conditions, clusters discovered in a laboratory are often metastable. Molecules have specific stoichiometry, whereas the cluster's composition can usually be altered atom by atom. Thus, clusters can be taken as intrinsically "artificial molecules" with considerably more tunabilities in their properties. Research into the relative stability and instability of clusters has in recent years become a very active research area, especially following the study by Khanna and Castleman that first suggested that by varying size and composition, clusters can expand the periodic table to the 3 rd-dimension; that is, clusters can mimic the chemistry of atoms and may, therefore, be used as the building blocks of new materials. The discovery of Met-Cars has drawn worldwide interests and has been actively investigated by researchers from a variety of fields, including physics, chemistry and material science. However, the unsuccessful search for a solvent capable of isolating Met-Cars has impeded progress in characterizing the material in the condensed state and, hence, limited its potential applications as a novel nanoscale material. An alternative method involving the deposition of mass-gated species and the subsequent structural investigation via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been employed. With particularly interesting results, soft-landed deposits of zirconium Met-Cars were found to form a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure with a lattice parameter ˜ 15A. The production of Met-Cars is conducted with the direct laser vaporization (DLV) of metal/graphite composite pellets. After being mass gated in a reflectron equipped time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) and deposited onto TEM grids, the resultant specimens can be loaded onto high-resolution TEM investigation via electron diffraction. In conclusion, soft-landing of mass selected clusters has been shown to be a successful approach to obtain structural information on Zr-Met-Car cluster-assembled materials collected from the gas phase. TEM images indicate the richness of the morphologies associated with these cluster crystals. However, passivation methods are expected to be examined further to overcome the limited stabilities of these novel clusters. From this initial study, it's shown the promising opportunity to study other Met-Cars species and more cluster-based materials. Experimental results of reactions run with a solvothermal synthesis method obtained while searching for new Zr-C cluster assembled materials, are reported. One unexpected product in single crystal form was isolated and tentatively identified by X-ray diffraction to be [Zr6i O(OH)O12·2(Bu)4], with space group P2 1/n and lattice parameters of a = 12.44 A, b = 22.06 A, c = 18.40 A, alpha = 90°, beta = 105°, gamma = 90°, V = 4875 A3 and R 1 = 3.15% for the total observed data (I ≥ 2 sigma I) and oR2 = 2.82%. This novel hexanuclear Zr(IV)-oxo-hydroxide cluster anion may be the first member in polyoxometalates class with metal atoms from the IVB group and having Oh symmetry. Alternatively, it may be the first member in {[(Zr6Z)X 12]X6}m- class with halides replaced by oxo- and hydroxyl groups and with an increased oxidation state of Zr. It is predicted to bear application potentials directed by both families. This work could suggest a direction in which the preparation of Zr-C cluster-assembled materials in a liquid environment may be eventually fulfilled. 1,3-Bis(diethylphosphino)propane (depp) protected small gold clusters are studied via multiple techniques, including Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS), Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (Uv-Vis), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) for solution phase and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for the condensed phase. In particular, undeca-, dodeca- and trideca-gold clusters protected by depp and halogen ligands, i.e. [Au11-13(depp) 4Cl2-4]+, are found to be all predominant and persist in solution for months, while they gradually and spontaneously grow into a monomial trideca-gold clusters series. The unique preferred ligand combination, depp along with Cl, is discussed in terms of the ligand-core interaction and the closed-shell electronic configurations of the Au n (n = 11-13) cores, which enables them to serve as building units for larger cluster-assembled nanoparticles and form Self-Assembled Arrays (SAAs), as discovered by TEM measurements. Such spontaneous-growth behavior and the resultant SAAs observations are correlated by icosahedra-close-packing modes of clusters, following "magic numbers" rules. ˜7 shells of such cluster packing are proposed to be in the SAAs.

  7. Ice Nucleation Activity in Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Thomas L.

    1988-01-01

    A newly discovered form of biological ice nucleus associated with lichens is described. Ice nucleation spectra of a variety of lichens from the southwestern United States were measured by the drop-freezing method. Several epilithic lichen samples of the genera Rhizoplaca, Xanthoparmelia, and Xanthoria had nuclei active at temperatures as warm as −2.3°C and had densities of 2.3 × 106 to more than 1 × 108 nuclei g−1 at −5°C (2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than any plants infected with ice nucleation-active bacteria). Most lichens tested had nucleation activity above −8°C. Lichen substrates (rocks, plants, and soil) showed negligible activity above −8°C. Ice nucleation-active bacteria were not isolated from the lichens, and activity was not destroyed by heat (70°C) or sonication, indicating that lichen-associated ice nuclei are nonbacterial in origin and differ chemically from previously described biological ice nuclei. An axenic culture of the lichen fungus Rhizoplaca chrysoleuca showed detectable ice nucleation activity at −1.9°C and an ice nucleation density of 4.5 × 106 nuclei g−1 at −5°C. It is hypothesized that these lichens, which are both frost tolerant and dependent on atmospheric moisture, derive benefit in the form of increased moisture deposition as a result of ice nucleation. PMID:16347678

  8. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the observed SOA formation. During the early stage of the SOA formation the wall deposited particles and walls themselves serve as a SOA sink from the air to the walls. However, at the end of smog chamber experiments the semi-volatile SOA material may start to evaporate from the chamber walls. With these three model applications, we demonstrate that several poorly quantified processes, i.e. mass transport limitations within the particle phase, oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation, organic salt formation, and chamber wall effects can have substantial influence on the SOA formation, lifetime, chemical and physical particle properties, and their evolution. In order to constrain the uncertainties related to these processes, future experiments are needed where as many of the influential variables as possible are varied. ADCHAM can be a valuable model tool in the design and analysis of such experiments.

  9. Climate impacts of ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, X.; Barahona, D.; Lohmann, U.; Chen, C.

    2012-10-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm-2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 ± 0.10 Wm-2 (1σ uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of -1.6 Wm-2.

  10. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  11. Nucleation theory beyond the deterministic limit. I. The nucleation stage.

    PubMed

    Dubrovskii, V G; Nazarenko, M V

    2010-03-21

    This work addresses theory of nucleation and condensation based on the continuous Fokker-Plank type kinetic equation for the distribution of supercritical embryos over sizes beyond the deterministic limit, i.e., keeping the second derivative with respect to size. The first part of the work treats the nucleation stage. It is shown that the size spectrum should be generally obtained by the convolution of the initial distribution with the Gaussian-like Green function with spreading dispersion. It is then demonstrated that the fluctuation-induced effects can be safely neglected at the nucleation stage, where the spectrum broadening due to the nonlinear boundary condition is much larger than the fluctuational one. The crossover between the known triangular and double exponential distributions under different conditions of material influx into the system is demonstrated. Some examples of size distributions at the nucleation stage in different regimes of material influx are also presented. PMID:20331305

  12. Profiling of gas turbine blade using phase shifting Talbot interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakher, Chandra; Mehta, D. S.; Mirza, Saba; Singh, Priti

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we present phase shifting Talbot interferometry for the measurement of surface topography of the gas turbine blades. Interferograms of the different steps are recorded and displayed on the computer monitor using digital techniques. Presence of the harmonic components in the phase map due to the Ronchi gratings are removed by using Fourier filtering. The variation of the surface height at the different points of the objects is obtained by generating the phase map. The results obtained by phase shifting Talbot interferometric techniques are in good agreements with that of the measured by the manually controlled co- ordinate measuring machine. The critical analysis of results alongwith error analysis is presented.

  13. Test plan for phase II of the Retained Gas Sampler system

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-06-19

    The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is being developed to permit characterization of the gas phase component of waste tank core samples. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted which have affirmed the proof-of-principle for separating the gas phase materials from waste tank material in a quantitative manner. However, experiments conducted thus far have dealt only with representative materials and simulated hardware mock-ups. This test plan deals with the operation and testing of actual devices in the hot cell environment. This test plan coves all aspects of the RGS system including: sampler load-in, extrusion, gas extraction, quantitative separation, sample collection, and quantitative analysis. Sample material used in this test plan will be waste tank simulants and will not be radioactive. The work environment, however, will be an operating hot cell facility and will have radioactive contaminated surfaces. Operation of the system will therefore require an official radiation work permit (RWP).

  14. Nucleation dynamics of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Bosman, Michel; Mokkapati, Venkata R S S; Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2014-04-01

    The origin of the condensation of water begins at the nanoscale, a length-scale that is challenging to probe for liquids. In this work we directly image heterogeneous nucleation of water nanodroplets by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Using gold nanoparticles bound to a flat surface as heterogeneous nucleation sites, we observe nucleation and growth of water nanodroplets. The growth of nanodroplet radii follows the power law: R(t)~(t-t 0) β , where β~0.2-0.3. PMID:24667092

  15. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  16. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  17. Shape and area fluctuation effects on nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestipino, Santi; Laio, Alessandro; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-03-01

    In standard nucleation theory, the nucleation process is characterized by computing ΔΩ(V), the reversible work required to form a cluster of volume V of the stable phase inside the metastable mother phase. However, other quantities besides the volume could play a role in the free energy of cluster formation, and this will in turn affect the nucleation barrier and the shape of the nucleus. Here we exploit our recently introduced mesoscopic theory of nucleation to compute the free energy cost of a nearly spherical cluster of volume V and a fluctuating surface area A, whereby the maximum of ΔΩ(V) is replaced by a saddle point in ΔΩ(V, A). Compared to the simpler theory based on volume only, the barrier height of ΔΩ(V, A) at the transition state is systematically larger by a few kBT. More importantly, we show that, depending on the physical situation, the most probable shape of the nucleus may be highly non-spherical, even when the surface tension and stiffness of the model are isotropic. Interestingly, these shape fluctuations do not influence or modify the standard Classical Nucleation Theory manner of extracting the interface tension from the logarithm of the nucleation rate near coexistence.

  18. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Stationary Phases in Microfabricated Gas-Chromatography Columns.

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Douglas; Sillerud, Colin Halliday

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to integrate Sandia's microfabricated gas-chromatography ( GC) columns with a stationary phase material that is capable of retaining high-volatility chemicals and permanent gases. The successful integration of such a material with GCs would dramatically expand the repertoire of detectable compounds for Sandia's various microanalysis systems. One such promising class of candidate materials is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this report we detail our methods for controlled deposition of HKUST-1 MOF stationary phases within GC columns. We demonstrate: the chromatographic separation of natural gas; a method for determining MOF film thickness from chromatography alone; and the first-reported GC x GC separation of natural gas -- in general -- let alone for two disparate MOF stationary phases. In addition we determine the fundamental thermodynamic constant for mass sorption, the partition coefficient, for HKUST-1 and several light hydrocarbons and select toxic industrial chemicals.

  19. Gas phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal yields from the oxidation of isoprene and first generation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melissa; Loza, Christine; Yee, Lindsay; Chan, Arthur; Crounse, John; Wennberg, Paul; Seinfeld, John; Keutsch, Frank

    2010-05-01

    α-dicarbonyls such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal are of increasing interest due to their importance in atmospheric processes and their ability to partition from the gas to aerosol phase. Isoprene oxidation is a major source of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in the atmosphere. However, the reaction pathways for these compounds are not well known, nor are the yields. Incorporation of the formation rates and