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Sample records for gas phase nucleation

  1. Patterns of diamond nucleation from the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, E.; Polini, R.; Tomellini, M.

    1993-04-01

    On the basis of an analysis of experimental data on nucleation rates, patterns of the process of diamond nucleation from the gas phase on Si(100) substrates have been drawn. A kinetic scheme is proposed which is apparently able to describe the complex behavior of the system in the temperature range 750-1225 K, at (CH4/H2) ratios between 0.5 and 2 percent and at a total pressure of 100 mbar. The model postulates a distribution function of the nucleation centers over the heats of adsorption of active gaseous species and introduces a cutoff criterion based on the necessary condition that adjacent active sites coexist for times longer than the characteristic time of germ growth. Nucleation centers, active sites, germs, and nuclei have been defined by simple molecular models and their rates of transformation discussed, using available literature data.

  2. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  3. Numerical Analysis of an Impinging Jet Reactor for the CVD and Gas-Phase Nucleation of Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Stewart, Gregory D.; Collins, Joshua; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    We model a cold-wall atmospheric pressure impinging jet reactor to study the CVD and gas-phase nucleation of TiO2 from a titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP)/oxygen dilute source gas mixture in nitrogen. The mathematical model uses the computational code FIDAP and complements our recent asymptotic theory for high activation energy gas-phase reactions in thin chemically reacting sublayers. The numerical predictions highlight deviations from ideality in various regions inside the experimental reactor. Model predictions of deposition rates and the onset of gas-phase nucleation compare favorably with experiments. Although variable property effects on deposition rates are not significant (approximately 11 percent at 1000 K), the reduction rates due to Soret transport is substantial (approximately 75 percent at 1000 K).

  4. Studies of gas phase reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition of aluminum using dimethylethylamine alane as source percursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Andreas H.

    The work presented herein focuses on the use of plasma promoted chemical vapor deposition (PPCVD) of aluminum (Al) using dimethylethylamine alane (DMEAA) as source precursor to provide an integrated, low temperature alternative to currently employed Al deposition methods in ultra large sale integration ULSI multilevel metal wiring schemes. In this respect, key findings are reported and discussed from critical scientific and technical aspects of an research and development effort, which was successfully executed to identify a viable Al CVD deposition process. In this respect, advanced atomic scale analytical techniques were successfully employed to characterize the PPCVD deposition process at the molecular level, and document the dependence of film's structural and compositional properties on key process parameters. This led to the development and optimization of a PPCVD Al process for ULSI applications. In addition, gas phase quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was employed to study the gas phase evolution during TCVD and PPCVD in order to gain a thorough understanding of the potential chemical and physical reactions that could occur in the gas phase and derive corresponding optimized reaction pathways for both CVD processes. Key reaction mechanisms involved in thermal and plasma promoted CVD as a function of processing parameters were investigated, including the role of hydrogen plasma in providing an efficient pathway to aluminum nucleation and growth. The resulting reaction mechanisms were then employed to identify the most likely precursor decomposition pathways and explore relevant implications for thermal and plasma promoted CVD Al. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth of Al in both TCVD and PPCVD were thoroughly characterized. Time evolution studies were carried out employing a variety of relevant liners and seed layers under selected surface chemical states. The surface morphology of the resulting films were analyzed by means of scanning probe microscopy and the experimental findings were quantified and analyzed using novel concepts from the theories of fractals and dynamic scaling.

  5. Nucleation of bulk phases in the HCl/H2O system.

    PubMed

    Henson, Bryan F; Wilson, Kevin R; Robinson, Jeanne M; Nobel, Christopher A; Casson, Joanna L; Voss, Laura F; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2007-09-01

    We report experimental results on the low-temperature uptake of HCl on H(2)O ice (ice). HCl was deposited on the surface at greater than monolayer amounts at 85 K, and the ice substrate was heated. The temperature dependence of the HCl vapor pressure from this phase was measured from 110 to 150 K, with the nucleation of a bulk hydrate phase observed at 150 K. Measurements were conducted in a closed system by simultaneous application of gas phase mass spectrometry and surface spectroscopy to characterize vapor/solid equilibrium and the nucleation of bulk hydrate phases. Combining the nucleation data reported here with data we reported previously (180 to 200 K) and data from two other laboratories (165 and 170 K), the thermodynamic boundaries for the nucleation of both the metastable bulk solution and bulk hydrate phases subsequent to monolayer adsorption of HCl have been determined. The nucleation of the metastable bulk solution phase occurs promptly at monolayer coverage at the ice/liquid coexistence boundary on the binary bulk phase diagram. The nucleation of the bulk hexahydrate occurs from this metastable solution along a locus of points defining a state of constant solution free energy. This measured free energy is -51.2 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol. Finally, the temperature dependence of the HCl vapor pressure from the low-temperature phase is reported here for the first time and is consistent with that of the metastable solution predicted by this thermodynamic model of uptake, extending the range of validity of this model of adsorption followed by bulk solution and hydrate nucleation to a lower bound in temperature of 110 K. PMID:17691759

  6. Phase-field modeling of submonolayer growth with the modulated nucleation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Xing, H.; Chen, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Jin, K. X.

    2015-10-01

    In this letter, we perform the phase-field simulations to investigate nucleation regime of submonolayer growth via a quantified nucleation term. Results show that the nucleation related kinetic coefficients have changed the density of islands and critical sizes to modulate the nucleation regime. The scaling behavior of the island density can be agreed with the classical theory only when effects of modulations have been quantified. We expect to produce the quantitative descriptions of nucleation for submonolayer growth in phase-field models.

  7. Nucleation and growth studies of crystalline carbon phases at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Radhika C.

    Understanding the nucleation and early stage growth of crystals from the vapor phase is important for realizing large-area single-crystal quality films, controlled synthesis of nanocrystals, and the possible discovery of new phases of materials. Carbon provides the most interesting system because all its known crystalline phases (diamond, graphite and carbon nanotubes) are technologically important materials. Hence, this dissertation is focused on studying the nucleation and growth of carbon phases synthesized from the vapor phase. Nucleation experiments were performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor, and the resulting carbon nanocrystals were analyzed primarily using electron nanodiffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These studies led to the discovery of two new crystalline phases of sp 3 carbon other than diamond: face-centered and body-centered cubic carbon. Nanodiffraction results revealed possible hydrogen substitution into diamond-cubic lattices, indicating that these new phases probably act as intermediates in diamond nucleation. Nucleation experiments also led to the discovery of two new morphologies for sp2 carbon: nanocrystals of graphite and tapered, hollow 1-D structures termed here as "carbon nanopipettes". A Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm was developed to simulate the growth of individual diamond crystals from the vapor phase, starting with small clusters of carbon atoms (or seeds). Specifically, KMC simulations were used to distinguish the kinetic rules that give rise to a star-shaped decahedral morphology compared to decahedral crystals. KMC simulations revealed that slow adsorption on the {111} step-propagation sites compared to kink sites leads to star-decahedral crystals, and higher adsorption leads to decahedral crystals. Since the surfaces of the nanocrystals of graphite and nanopipettes were expected to be composed primarily of edge-plane sites, the electrochemical behavior of both these materials were investigated with compounds requiring chemisorption, specifically biologically important species. Both these materials exhibited a stable and reversible voltammetric behavior for dopamine (a neurotransmitter) similar to that of graphite edge planes. Furthermore, a simple bottom-up concept utilizing the tapered morphology of the nanopipettes was developed to assemble a nanoarray sensor for fast cyclic voltammetry. In summary, the main outcomes of this dissertation include: the discovery of new crystalline carbon phases, understanding kinetic faceting of multiply twinned diamond crystals and tapered morphologies of carbon nanotubes, and development of new electrode materials based on sp2 carbon nanocrystals for sensing biologically important analytes.

  8. Nucleation of the diamond phase in aluminium-solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Precipitation was studied from fcc solid solutions with silicon, germanium, copper and magnesium. Of all these elements only silicon and germanium form diamond cubic (DC) precipitates in fcc Al. Nucleation of the DC structure is enhanced if both types of atom are dissolved in the fcc lattice. This is interpreted as due to atomic size effects in the prenucleation stage. There are two modes of interference of fourth elements with nucleation of the DC phase in Al + Si, Ge. The formation of the DC phase is hardly affected if the atoms (for example, copper) are rejected from the (Si, Ge)-rich clusters. If additional types of atom are attracted by silicon and/or germanium, DC nuclei are replaced by intermetallic compounds (for example Mg2Si).

  9. Observing classical nucleation theory at work by monitoring phase transitions with molecular precision

    PubMed Central

    Sleutel, Mike; Lutsko, Jim; Van Driessche, Alexander E.S.; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Maes, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that many phase transitions do not follow nucleation pathways as envisaged by the classical nucleation theory. Many substances can traverse intermediate states before arriving at the stable phase. The apparent ubiquity of multi-step nucleation has made the inverse question relevant: does multistep nucleation always dominate single-step pathways? Here we provide an explicit example of the classical nucleation mechanism for a system known to exhibit the characteristics of multi-step nucleation. Molecular resolution atomic force microscopy imaging of the two-dimensional nucleation of the protein glucose isomerase demonstrates that the interior of subcritical clusters is in the same state as the crystalline bulk phase. Our data show that despite having all the characteristics typically associated with rich phase behaviour, glucose isomerase 2D crystals are formed classically. These observations illustrate the resurfacing importance of the classical nucleation theory by re-validating some of the key assumptions that have been recently questioned. PMID:25465441

  10. Heterogeneous Nucleation of the T1 Phase on Dispersoids in Al-Cu-Li Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivoulas, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    The major strengthening phase of modern Al-Cu-Li alloys, T1, is so far known to nucleate on a number of sites in the microstructure. However, its preferential nucleation on Al20Cu2Mn3 dispersoids has never been reported with strong evidence up to now. The present work suggests that such heterogeneous nucleation is possible and performs a comparison with the precipitates distributed homogeneously in the matrix. This phenomenon is shown to promote a particle decohesive fracture mode.

  11. Effects of Gas Diffusion on Nucleation of Gas-Supersaturated Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Liu, X.; Garrett, S.; Spears, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    Classical nucleation theory relates the rate at which embryo bubbles are formed to the reversible work required to grow a bubble of critical radius rc from random molecular activity, in the form: J ? exp4?? r_c^2/(3kT)\\. By setting J to a constant, this rate equation can be inverted to determine the conditions for rc under which nucleation takes place. In the case of liquids supersaturated with dissimilar gases, classical nucleation theory indicates almost no dependence on the species of dissolved gas whereas experiments indicate order-of-magnitude changes in conditions for nucleation. By modifying the nucleation rate equation to relate the formation of embryo bubbles of critical size to sufficiently energetic molecular activity for: i) carrying out the reversible work 4?? r_c^2/3; and ii) overcoming diffusive effects, which act to redissolve sub-critical-size bubbles; in the form J?exp(-W_rev-?_diff) /(kT) ; agreement with experiments is recovered.

  12. A Nucleation Theory for Gas-Supersaturated Liquids that Accounts for Gas Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, G. J.; Liu, X.

    2001-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory relates the rate at which embryo bubbles are formed to the reversible work required to grow a bubble of critical radius rc from random molecular activity, in the form: J ? exp-4?? r_c^2/(3kT). By setting J to a constant, this rate equation can be inverted to determine the conditions for rc under which nucleation takes place. In the case of liquids supersaturated with dissimilar gases, classical nucleation theory indicates almost no dependence on the species of dissolved gas whereas experiments indicate order-of-magnitude changes in conditions for nucleation. By modifying the nucleation rate equation to relate the formation of embryo bubbles of critical size to sufficiently energetic molecular activity for: i) carrying out the reversible work 4?? r_c^2/3; and ii) overcoming diffusive effects, which act to redissolve sub-critical-size bubbles; in the form: J?exp(-W_rev-Q_diff) /(kT) ; agreement with experiments is recovered.

  13. Heterogeneous nucleation of the primary phase in the rapid solidification of Al-4.5wt%Cu alloy droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitre, A.; Bogno, A.-A.; Bedel, M.; Reinhart, G.; Henein, H.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on rapid solidification of Al-Cu alloys. A heterogeneous nucleation/growth model coupled with a thermal model of a falling droplet through a stagnant gas was developed. The primary undercooling as well as the number of nucleation points was compared with Al-Cu alloy droplets produced by Impulse Atomization (IA). Based on experimental results from Neutron Diffraction, secondary (eutectic) phases were obtained. Then, primary and secondary undercoolings were estimated using the metastable extensions of solidus and liquidus lines calculated by Thermo-Calc. Moreover, Synchrotron X-ray microtomography has been performed on Al-4.5wt%Cu droplets. The undercoolings are in good agreement. Results also evidence the presence of one nucleation point and are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Correlated nucleation and self-accommodating kinetic pathway of ferroelectric phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie E.; Cheng, Tian-Le; Wang, Yu U.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of nucleation and growth of domains during ferroelectric phase transformation are investigated by using theoretical and computational approaches. It is shown that ferroelectric phase transformation exhibits some peculiar behaviors due to strong long-range dipole-dipole-like interactions involved in the system. Incorporation of electrostatic and elastostatic energies into the classical Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire theory effectively modifies the coefficients of the polynomial free energy function and introduces extra energy barrier for ferroelectric phase transformation. It is found that independent nucleation of ferroelectric phase in the context of classical nucleation theory is prohibited, because electrostatic interaction generates an insurmountable energy barrier to isolated nucleus. Phase field modeling and computer simulation reveals that, in order to circumvent such an energy barrier, ferroelectric nucleation exhibits strong spatial correlation and self-organization behaviors from the very beginning, and ferroelectric phase transformation proceeds via spatial and temporal evolution of self-accommodating domains that provide a low-energy kinetic pathway throughout the phase transformation process. Theoretical analysis of the critical wavelength of correlated nucleation agrees with the computer simulation. Heterogeneous nucleation as induced by externally applied local electric field and subsequent polarization evolution process is also simulated to further demonstrate such self-organized pattern formation behaviors.

  15. Multiscale approach to CO2 hydrate formation in aqueous solution: phase field theory and molecular dynamics. Nucleation and growth.

    PubMed

    Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gyula; Gránásy, László; Svandal, Atle; Buanes, Trygve; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Kvamme, Bjorn

    2006-06-21

    A phase field theory with model parameters evaluated from atomistic simulations/experiments is applied to predict the nucleation and growth rates of solid CO(2) hydrate in aqueous solutions under conditions typical to underwater natural gas hydrate reservoirs. It is shown that under practical conditions a homogeneous nucleation of the hydrate phase can be ruled out. The growth rate of CO(2) hydrate dendrites has been determined from phase field simulations as a function of composition while using a physical interface thickness (0.85+/-0.07 nm) evaluated from molecular dynamics simulations. The growth rate extrapolated to realistic supersaturations is about three orders of magnitude larger than the respective experimental observation. A possible origin of the discrepancy is discussed. It is suggested that a kinetic barrier reflecting the difficulties in building the complex crystal structure is the most probable source of the deviations. PMID:16821944

  16. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  17. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces.

  18. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  19. Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins via a disordered high-density state: Phenomenological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weichun; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-05-01

    Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins triggers numerous phenomena in laboratory, industry, and in healthy and sick organisms. Recent simulations and experiments with protein crystals suggest that the formation of an ordered crystalline nucleus is preceded by a disordered high-density cluster, akin to a droplet of high-density liquid that has been observed with some proteins; this mechanism allowed a qualitative explanation of recorded complex nucleation kinetics curves. Here, we present a simple phenomenological theory that takes into account intermediate high-density metastable states in the nucleation process. Nucleation rate data at varying temperature and protein concentration are reproduced with high fidelity using literature values of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the system. Our calculations show that the growth rate of the near-critical and supercritical ordered clusters within the dense intermediate is a major factor for the overall nucleation rate. This highlights the role of viscosity within the dense intermediate for the formation of the ordered nucleus. The model provides an understanding of the action of additives that delay or accelerate nucleation and presents a framework within which the nucleation of other ordered protein solid phases, e.g., the sickle cell hemoglobin polymers, can be analyzed.

  20. Role of Dynamic Nucleation at Moving Boundaries in Phase and Microstructure Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karma, Alain; Trivedi, Rohit

    1999-01-01

    Solidification microstructures that form under steady-state growth conditions (cells, dendrites, regular eutectics, etc.) are reasonably well understood in comparison to other, more complex microstructures, which form under intrinsically non-steady-state growth conditions due to the competition between the nucleation and growth of several phases. Some important practical examples in this latter class include microstructures forming in peritectic systems in highly undercooled droplets, and in strip cast stainless steels. Prediction of phase and microstructure selection in these systems has been traditionally based on (1) heterogeneous nucleation on a static interface, and (2) comparing the relative growth rate of different phase/microstructures under steady-state growth conditions. The formation of new phases, however, occurs via nucleation on, or ahead of, a moving boundary. In addition, the actual selection process is controlled by a complex interaction between the nucleation process and the growth competition between the nuclei and the pre-existing phase under non-steady-state conditions. As a result, it is often difficult to predict which microstructure will form and which phases will be selected under prescribed processing conditions. This research addresses this critical role of nucleation at moving boundaries in the selection of phases and solidification microstructures through quantitative experiments and numerical modeling in peritectic systems. In order to create a well characterized system in which to study this problem, we focus on the directional solidification of hypo- and hyper-peritectic alloys in the two-phase region, imposing a large enough ratio of temperature gradient/growth rate (G/V(sub p)) to suppress the morphological instability of both the parent (alpha) and peritectic (Beta) phases, i.e. each phase alone would grow as a planar front. Our combined experimental and theoretical results show that, already in this simplified case, the growth competition of these two phases leads to a rich variety of microstructures that depend sensitively upon the relative importance of nucleation, diffusion, and convection.

  1. Competition of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation on secondary organic aerosol particles: The role of particle phase state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Pöschl, Ulrich; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Recently, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles have been found to exhibit a highly viscous, amorphous state under atmospherically relevant conditions (Virtanen et al., 2010). Besides retardation of chemical reactions (Shiraiwa et al., 2011) and incomplete gas-to-particle partitioning of semi-volatile constituents (Vaden et al., 2011), these particles were found to suppress homogeneous ice nucleation (Murray et al., 2008), which normally takes place when a liquid particle reaches its respective homogeneous nucleation limit (Koop et al., 2000). In turn, glassy SOA particles may act themselves as heterogeneous ice nuclei as recent studies suggest (e.g. Murray et al., 2010, Wang et al., 2012). The predominant nucleation pathway for SOA particles is thus controlled by particle phase state. The phase state of SOA particles depends on several factors such as composition, temperature and relative humidity. In atmospheric updrafts, inducing a change in temperature and relative humidity, moisture- and temperature-induced phase transitions can occur (e.g. Shiraiwa et al., 2011). In fast updrafts, these particles may also deviate from humidification equilibrium, i.e. the agreement between ambient relative humidity and water activity inside the particle may not be established at any point in time. The extent of this temporal delay is governed by the updraft velocity, the particle size and the diffusivity of water inside the glassy organic particle matrix. Here we show how the delayed deliquescence of SOA particles can be quantified for SOA from a variety of precursors. A kinetic flux model (Shiraiwa et al., 2012) is applied and the predominant ice nucleation pathway is inferred from particle phase state at the respective homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation limits. To estimate diffusivities inside the organic particle matrix for the relevant range of temperature and humidity, we developed a novel method that relies on glass transition and hygroscopic growth data that are more easily available. The model simulations suggest upper temperature boundaries, below which heterogeneous ice nucleation of glassy aerosols may occur, depending on updraft velocities and particle size. We also show that the predominant ice nucleation pathway depends on precursor material and oxidation state. References Koop, T. et al. (2000) Nature 406, 611. Murray, B. J. (2008) Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 5423. Murray, B. J. et al. (2010) Nature Geosci. 3, 233. Shiraiwa, M. et al. (2011) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 108, 11003. Shiraiwa, M. et al. (2012) Atmos. Chem. Phys. 12, 2777. Virtanen, A. et al. (2010) Nature 467, 824. Vaden, T. D. et al. (2011) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 108, 2190. Wang, B. et al. (2012) J. Geophys. Res., 117, D16209.

  2. Ice nucleation by combustion ash particles at conditions relevant to mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umo, N. S.; Murray, B. J.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Jones, J. M.; Lea-Langton, A. R.; Malkin, T. L.; O'Sullivan, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Williams, A.

    2014-11-01

    Ice nucleating particles can modify cloud properties with implications for climate and the hydrological cycle; hence, it is important to understand which aerosol particle types nucleate ice and how efficiently they do so. It has been shown that aerosol particles such as natural dusts, volcanic ash, bacteria and pollen can act as ice nucleating particles, but the ice nucleating ability of combustion ashes has not been studied. Combustion ashes are major by-products released during the combustion of solid fuels and a significant amount of these ashes are emitted into the atmosphere either during combustion or via aerosolization of bottom ashes. Here, we show that combustion ashes (coal fly ash, wood bottom ash, domestic bottom ash, and coal bottom ash) nucleate ice in the immersion mode at conditions relevant to mixed-phase clouds. Hence, combustion ashes could play an important role in primary ice formation in mixed-phase clouds, especially in clouds that are formed near the emission source of these aerosol particles. In order to quantitatively assess the impact of combustion ashes on mixed-phase clouds, we propose that the atmospheric abundance of combustion ashes should be quantified since up to now they have mostly been classified together with mineral dust particles. Also, in reporting ice residue compositions, a distinction should be made between natural mineral dusts and combustion ashes in order to quantify the contribution of combustion ashes to atmospheric ice nucleation.

  3. Homogeneous Crystal Nucleation Near a Metastable Fluid-Fluid Phase Transition Sergey V. Buldyrev,2

    E-print Network

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    describes the crystallization mechanism near a metastable fluid-fluid phase separa- tion. We findHomogeneous Crystal Nucleation Near a Metastable Fluid-Fluid Phase Transition Limei Xu,1 Sergey V University, 500 West 185th Street, New York, New York 10033, USA 3 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  4. Free-energy landscape of nucleation with an intermediate metastable phase studied using capillarity approximation

    E-print Network

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2011-04-11

    Capillarity approximation is used to study the free-energy landscape of nucleation when an intermediate metastable phase exists. The critical nucleus that corresponds to the saddle point of the free-energy landscape as well as the whole free-energy landscape can be studied using this capillarity approximation, and various scenarios of nucleation and growth can be elucidated. In this study we consider a model in which a stable solid phase nucleates within a metastable vapor phase when an intermediate metastable liquid phase exists. We predict that a composite critical nucleus that consists of a solid core and a liquid wetting layer as well as pure liquid and pure solid critical nuclei can exist depending not only on the supersaturation of the liquid phase relative to that of the vapor phase but also on the wetting behavior of the liquid surrounding the solid. The existence of liquid critical nucleus indicates that the phase transformation from metastable vapor to stable solid occurs via the intermediate metastable liquid phase, which is quite similar to the scenario of nucleation observed in proteins and colloidal systems. By studying the minimum-free-energy path on the free-energy landscape, we can study the evolution of the composition of solid and liquid within nuclei not limited to the critical nucleus.

  5. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-06-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments

  6. Molecular dynamics study of phase transition and nucleation in supercooled clusters of potassium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-lei; You, Xiao-zeng; Zhu, Dun-ru; Zhou, Zhi-hua

    1999-12-01

    In a series of molecular dynamics (MD) runs on (KI) 108 clusters, the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential function is employed to study structural, energetic, and kinetic aspects of phase change and the homogeneous nucleation of KI clusters. Melting and freezing are reproducible when clusters are heated and cooled. The melted clusters are not spherical in shape no matter the starting cluster is cubic or spherical. Quenching a melted (KI) 108 cluster from 960 K in a bath with temperature range 200-400 K for a time period of 80 ps both nucleation and crystallization are observed. Nucleation rates exceeding 10 36 critical nuclei m -3 s -1 are determined at 200, 250, 300, 350, and 400 K. Results are interpreted in terms of the classical theory of nucleation of Turnbull and Fisher and of Buckle. Interfacial free energies of the liquid-solid phase derived from the nucleation rates are 7-10 mJ m -2. This quantity is ˜0.19 of the heat of transition per unit area from solid to liquid, or about two-thirds of the corresponding ratio which Turnbull proposed for freezing transition. The temperature dependence of ?sl( T) of (KI) 108 clusters can be expressed as ?sl( T)? T0.34.

  7. Control of protein crystal nucleation around the metastable liquidliquid phase boundary

    E-print Network

    Vekilov, Peter

    ) predict that, as the system approaches the critical point for L­L phase separation (Ccrit ,Tcrit solutions, we set out to study experimentally the nucleation kinetics around the L­L separation boundary. We­L separation in a broader range of conditions that may be closer to those in living organisms or to those

  8. Nucleation-growth processes and isothermal kinetics of phase transformations in the methylhydrazine monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, N.; Foulon, M.; Gors, C.; Ferriol, M.; Cohen-Adad, M. T.

    1997-07-01

    Phase transformations in the methylhydrazine monohydrate (CH 3NHNH 2 · H 2O) are investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range 110-300 K. On cooling a glass is formed by quenching the liquid. Depending on the heating rate, two solid phases (metastable and/or stable) with slow phase transformation kinetics are observed. The optimal temperature for nucleation and growth processes have been determined for the two solid phases. The nucleation rate is maximum in the glass transition region ( Tg ? 160 K) and the temperature growth regions are, respectively, estimated to be 188-202 K for the metastable solid phase and 212-228 K for the stable solid phase. The metastable and the stable solid phases, respectively, melt at 220 and 234 K. The kinetic character of phase transitions is revealed by complementary X-ray measurements at 200 K. A phenomenological model based on Avrami's law is proposed for a better understanding of the growth mechanisms for the two solid phases. On reheating, the glassy state transforms to a metastable liquid. Then, a partial transformation (48%) into the metastable solid phase from this liquid begins at about 188 K. It is followed by the growth of the stable solid phase from the undercooled liquid and the metastable solid phase. The solid-solid transformation seems to be governed by contacts with the stable solid grains.

  9. Random-Walk Monte Carlo Simulation of Intergranular Gas Bubble Nucleation in UO2 Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner; D.A. Andersson

    2012-11-01

    Using a random-walk particle algorithm, we investigate the clustering of fission gas atoms on grain bound- aries in oxide fuels. The computational algorithm implemented in this work considers a planar surface representing a grain boundary on which particles appear at a rate dictated by the Booth flux, migrate two dimensionally according to their grain boundary diffusivity, and coalesce by random encounters. Specifically, the intergranular bubble nucleation density is the key variable we investigate using a parametric study in which the temperature, grain boundary gas diffusivity, and grain boundary segregation energy are varied. The results reveal that the grain boundary bubble nucleation density can vary widely due to these three parameters, which may be an important factor in the observed variability in intergranular bubble percolation among grain boundaries in oxide fuel during fission gas release.

  10. First-Order Chiral Phase Transition in High-Energy Collisions: Can Nucleation Prevent Spinodal Decomposition?

    E-print Network

    O. Scavenius; A. Dumitru; E. S. Fraga; J. T. Lenaghan; A. D. Jackson

    2001-02-26

    We discuss homogeneous nucleation in a first-order chiral phase transition within an effective field theory approach to low-energy QCD. Exact decay rates and bubble profiles are obtained numerically and compared to analytic results obtained with the thin-wall approximation. The thin-wall approximation overestimates the nucleation rate for any degree of supercooling. The time scale for critical thermal fluctuations is calculated and compared to typical expansion times for high-energy hadronic or heavy-ion collisions. We find that significant supercooling is possible, and the relevant mechanism for phase conversion might be that of spinodal decomposition. Some potential experimental signatures of supercooling, such as an increase in the correlation length of the scalar condensate, are also discussed.

  11. Spinodal-assisted nucleation during symmetry-breaking phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Vega, Daniel A; Gómez, Leopoldo R

    2009-05-01

    The kinetics of spinodal-assisted crystallization in a region of the phase diagram where the dynamics is controlled by the critical slow down was studied by means of a Cahn-Hilliard model. The length-scale selectivity conducted by the spinodal process led to the formation of a filamentary network of density fluctuations that resemble the scarred states found in quantum-chaos systems. The present work reveals that the early structure of density fluctuations acts such as a precursor for crystallization and deeply affects the orientational and translational correlation between growing crystals. At deep quenches the network of fluctuations is deeply modified and the classical picture of spinodal decomposition is recovered. PMID:19518467

  12. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments PMID:26095898

  13. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  14. Phase behavior and crystal nucleation and growth in a system of short semi-flexible chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselaars, Bart; Quigley, David

    2014-03-01

    A system of semi-flexible short chains is simulated to study its phase behavior and ability to crystallize, by using a combination of molecular dynamics and other techniques. For calculating the free energy of the liquid phase a new method is introduced. It is very simple to implement in practice and leads to accurate computation of the melting curve. Furthermore we determine the rate of nucleation and crystal growth in this system via a combination of path-sampling and brute-force simulation techniques. By comparing these quantities, we infer the initial microstructure of the solid phase. Due to the strong anisotropy in the crystal growth rate grains no thicker than a single chain are common, even at moderate supercoolings. This work is supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

  15. Nanoscale Phase Stability Reversal During the Nucleation and Growth of Titanium Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummmer, D. R.; Heaney, P. J.; Kubicki, J. D.; Kent, P. R.; Post, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Fine-grained titanium oxide minerals are important in soils, where they affect a variety of geochemical processes. They are also industrially important as catalysts, pigments, food additives, and dielectrics. Recent research has indicated an apparent reversal of thermodynamic stability between TiO2 phases at the nanoscale thought to be caused by an increased contribution of surface energy to the total free energy. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments in which titanium oxides crystallize from aqueous TiCl4 solutions confirm that anatase, a metastable phase, is always the first phase to nucleate under our range of initial conditions. Rutile peaks are observed only minutes after the first appearance of anatase, after which anatase abundance slowly decreases while rutile continues to form. Whole pattern refinement of diffraction data reveals that lattice constants of both phases increase throughout the crystallization process. In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations and kinetic modeling indicate that anatase does not undergo a solid-state transformation to the rutile structure as once thought. Instead, anatase appears to re-dissolve and then feed the growth of already nucleated rutile nanocrystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to model 1, 2, and 3 nm particles of both mineral phases. The total surface energies calculated from these models did yield lower values for anatase than for rutile by 8-13 kJ/mol depending on particle size, indicating that surface free energy is sufficient to account for stability reversal. However, these whole-particle surface energies were much higher than the sum of energies of each particle's constituent crystallographic surfaces. We attribute the excess energy to defects associated with the edges and corners of nanoparticles, which are not present on a 2-D periodic surface. This previously unreported edge and corner energy may play a dominant role in the stability reversal of nanocrystalline titanium oxides, as well as other mineral systems susceptible to reversals in phase stability at the nanoscale.

  16. Report on the Implementation of Homogeneous Nucleation Scheme in MARMOT-based Phase Field Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-30

    In this report, we summarized our effort in developing mesoscale phase field models for predicting precipitation kinetics in alloys during thermal aging and/or under irradiation in nuclear reactors. The first part focused on developing a method to predict the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei such as the sizes and concentration profiles of critical nuclei, and nucleation barrier. These properties are crucial for quantitative simulations of precipitate evolution kinetics with phase field models. Fe-Cr alloy was chosen as a model alloy because it has valid thermodynamic and kinetic data as well as it is an important structural material in nuclear reactors. A constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method was developed to search for the energy minimum path during nucleation. With the method we are able to predict the concentration profiles of the critical nuclei of Cr-rich precipitates and nucleation energy barriers. Simulations showed that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nucleus strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The Cr concentration inside the critical nucleus is much smaller than the equilibrium concentration calculated by the equilibrium phase diagram. This implies that a non-classical nucleation theory should be used to deal with the nucleation of Cr precipitates in Fe-Cr alloys. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. A number of interesting phenomena were observed from the simulations: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrated that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei into phase field modeling in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation. In most alloys the matrix phase and precipitate phase have different concentrations as well as different crystal structures. For example, Cu precipitates in FeCu alloys have fcc crystal structure while the matrix Fe-Cu solid solution has bcc structure at low temperature. The WBM model and KimS model, where both concentrations and order parameters are chosen to describe the microstructures, are commonly used to model precipitations in such alloys. The WBM and KimS models have not been implemented into Marmot yet. In the second part of this report, we focused on implementing the WBM and KimS models into Marmot. The Fe-Cu alloys, which are important structure materials in nuclear reactors, was taken as the model alloys to test the models.

  17. Detached Melt Nucleation during Diffusion Brazing of a Technical Ni-based Superalloy: A Phase-Field Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Laux, B.; Piegert, S.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced solidification processes like welding, soldering, and brazing are often characterized by their specific solidification conditions. But they also may include different types of melting processes which themselves are strongly influenced by the initial microstructures and compositions of the applied materials and therefore are decisive for the final quality and mechanical properties of the joint. Such melting processes are often not well- understood because - compared to other fields of solidification science - relatively little research has been done on melting by now. Also, regarding microstructure simulation, melting has been strongly neglected in the past, although this process is substantially different from solidification due to the reversed diffusivities of the involved phases. In this paper we present phase-field simulations showing melting, solidification and precipitation of intermetallic phases during diffusion brazing of directionally solidified and heat-treated high-alloyed Ni- based gas turbine blade material using different boron containing braze alloys. Contrary to the common belief, melting of the base material is not always planar and can be further accompanied by detached nucleation and growth of a second liquid phase inside the base material leading to polycrystalline morphologies of the joint after solidification. These findings are consistent with results from brazed laboratory samples, which were characterized by EDX and optical microscopy, and can be explained in terms of specific alloy thermodynamics and inter-diffusion kinetics. Consequences of the gained new understanding for brazing of high- alloyed materials are discussed.

  18. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  19. Aerosol Inflluence on Ice Nucleation via the Immersion Mode in Mixed-Phase Arctic Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are commonly observed at high latitudes (e.g. Shupe et al., 2006; de Boer et al., 2009a). Herman and Goody (1976), as well as Curry et al. (1996) present summaries of Arctic cloud climatologies that show low altitude stratus frequencies of up to 70% during transitional seasons. In addition to their frequent occurrence, these clouds have significant impacts on the near-surface atmospheric radiative budget, with estimates of wintertime reductions in net surface cooling of 40-50 Wm-2 (Curry et al., 1996) due predominantly to liquid in the mixed-phase layer. Both observational and modeling studies (e.g. Harrington et al., 1999; Jiang et al., 2000; Shupe et al., 2008; Klein et al., 2008) show a strong connection between the amount of ice present and the lifetime of the liquid portion of the cloud layer. This is thought to occur via the Bergeron-Findeissen mechanism (Pruppacher and Klett, 1997) in which ice grows at the expense of liquid due to its lower saturation vapor pressure. Unfortunately, the mechanisms by which ice is nucleated within these mixed-phase layers are not yet fully understood, and therefore an accurate depiction of this process for mixed-phase stratiform clouds has not yet been characterized. The nucleation mechanisms that are active in a given environment are sensitive to aerosol properties. Insoluble particles are typically good nuclei for ice particle formation, while soluble particles are typically better at nucleating water droplets. Aerosol observations from the Arctic often show mixed aerosol particles that feature both soluble and insoluble mass (Leaitch et al., 1984). Soluble mass fractions for these particles have been shown to be high, with estimates of 60-80% and are often made up of sulfates (Zhou et al., 2001; Bigg and Leck, 2001). It is believed that a significant portion of this sulfate mass comes from dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the Arctic Ocean and subsequent atmospheric oxidation. Since these mixed particles may initially nucleate liquid droplets that then contain the remaining insoluble mass, immersion freezing has been theorized to contribute to ice nucleation in these clouds (de Boer et al., 2009b). In this work, we present a numerical study focusing on immersion freezing in mixed-phase stratiform clouds. We investigate the effects of aerosol properties such as soluble mass fraction, insoluble mass type and aerosol concentration on cloud liquid water fraction and lifetime. The high-resolution simulations used are based on the current GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS)/World Meteorological Organization (WMO) mixed-phase stratus model intercomparison (Morrison and Zuidema, 2008) and are completed using the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS, Tripoli, 1992) in combination with an advanced bin microphysical scheme (AMPS, Hashino and Tripoli, 2008). Immersion freezing is represented using a parameterization from Diehl and Wurzler (2004), which accounts for the freezing point depression due to the concentration of soluble mass within the water droplet.

  20. Surface area controlled heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Brian; Gorbunov, Boris; Rowles, Jonathan; Green, David

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of liquid from a gas phase on nanoparticles has been studied under various saturation ratios and nuclei size. The probability of liquid droplet nucleation, especially at a low degree of deviation from equilibrium, was measured for both atmospheric aerosol particles and engineered nanoparticles Cr2O3. The concept of a critical saturation ratio and the validity of the one-to-one relationship between the nuclei number and the number of droplets were examined. A transient zone between no nucleation and established nucleation termed the surface area controlled nucleation was observed. In this zone, the probability of stable phase formation is determined by the surface area of nuclei. There are two distinctive features of the surface area controlled nucleation: the nucleation probability is much less than 1 and is proportional to the surface area of nuclei. For condensation particle counters (CPCs) counting nanoparticles, these features mean that counts measured are proportional to the surface area of nanoparticles and, therefore, the CPCs counts can be calibrated to measure the surface area.

  1. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Krishnan, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The local atomic structures of undercooled liquid metals are presumed to be icosahedral; this order is incompatible with translational periodicity, constituting a barrier to the nucleation of the crystal phase. The extended atomic structure of the icosahedral quasicrystal (i-phase) is similar to that presumed in the undercooled liquid. Therefore, a comparison of the maximum undercooling in alloys that form the i-phase with those that form crystal phases provides a probe of the liquid structure.

  2. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-10-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (?) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of ? exhibits unique `two-step' dynamics, with a robust `plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation.

  3. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystal and Polytetrahedral-Phase Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, Anup K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, T. J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2003-01-01

    From extensive ground based work on the phase diagram and undercooling studies of Ti-Zr-Ni alloys, have clearly identified the composition of three different phases with progressively increasing polytetrahedral order such as, (Ti/Zr), the C14 Laves phase, and the i-phase, that nucleate directly from the undercooled liquid. The reduced undercooling decreases progressively with increasing polytetrahedral order in the solid, supporting Frank s hypothesis. A new facility for direct measurements of the structures and phase transitions in undercooled liquids (BESL) was developed and has provided direct proof of the primary nucleation of a metastable icosahedral phase in some Ti-Zr-Ni alloys. The first measurements of specific heat and viscosity in the undercooled liquid of this alloy system have been completed. Other than the importance of thermo-physical properties for modeling nucleation and growth processes in these materials, these studies have also revealed some interesting new results (such as a maximum of C(sup q, sub p) in the undercooled state). These ground-based results have clearly established the necessary background and the need for conducting benchmark nucleation experiments at the ISS on this alloy system.

  4. Inherent structures of phase-separating binary mixtures: Nucleation, spinodal decomposition, and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sarmistha; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-03-01

    An energy landscape view of phase separation and nonideality in binary mixtures is developed by exploring their potential energy landscape (PEL) as functions of temperature and composition. We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study a model that promotes structure breaking in the solute-solvent parent binary liquid, at low temperatures. The PEL of the system captures the potential energy distribution of the inherent structures (IS) of the system and is obtained by removing the kinetic energy (including that of intermolecular vibrations). The broader distribution of the inherent structure energy for structure breaking liquid than that of the structure making liquid demonstrates the larger role of entropy in stabilizing the parent liquid of the structure breaking type of binary mixtures. At high temperature, although the parent structure of the structure breaking binary mixture is homogenous, the corresponding inherent structure is found to be always phase separated, with a density pattern that exhibits marked correlation with the energy of its inherent structure. Over a broad range of intermediate inherent structure energy, bicontinuous phase separation prevails with interpenetrating stripes as signatures of spinodal decomposition. At low inherent structure energy, the structure is largely phase separated with one interface where as at high inherent structure energy we find nucleation type growth. Interestingly, at low temperature, the average inherent structure energy () exhibits a drop with temperature which signals the onset of crystallization in one of the phases while the other remains in the liquid state. The nonideal composition dependence of viscosity is anticorrelated with average inherent structure energy.

  5. Electroweak phase transition nucleation with the MSSM and electromagnetic field creation

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Johnson, Mikkel B.; Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2010-04-15

    Using EW-MSSM field theory, so the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) is first order, we derive the equations of motion (e.o.m.) for the gauge fields. With an isospin ansatz we derive e.o.m. for the electrically charged W fields uncoupled from all other fields. These and the lepton currents serve as the current for the Maxwell-like e.o.m. for the electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field arising during EWPT bubble nucleation without leptons is found. We then calculate the electron current contribution, which is seen to be quite large. This provides the basis for determining the magnetic field created by EWPT bubble collisions, which could seed galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge with capillary injection for gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Souvik; Liu, Tianqi; Bilici, Mihai; Cole, Jonathan; Huang, I.-Min; Staack, David; Mariotti, Davide; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2015-08-01

    We present an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor for gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis. Nickel nanoparticles are synthesized by homogenous nucleation from nickelocene vapor and characterized online by aerosol mobility measurements. The effects of residence time and precursor concentration on particle growth are studied. We find that narrower distributions of smaller particles are produced by decreasing the precursor concentration, in agreement with vapor nucleation theory, but larger particles and aggregates form at higher gas flow rates where the mean residence time should be reduced, suggesting a cooling effect that leads to enhanced particle nucleation. In comparison, incorporating a capillary gas injector to alter the velocity profile is found to significantly reduce particle size and agglomeration. These results suggest that capillary gas injection is a better approach to decreasing the mean residence time and narrowing the residence time distribution for nanoparticle growth by producing a sharp and narrow velocity profile.

  7. Kinetics of ion-induced nucleation in a vapor-gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Fisenko, Sergey P; Kane, David B; El-Shall, M Samy

    2005-09-01

    A general solution for the steady-state ion-induced nucleation kinetics has been derived, considering the differences between ion-induced nucleation and homogeneous nucleation. This solution includes a new effect for nucleation kinetics, the interaction of charged clusters with vapor molecules. Analytical expressions for the ion-induced nucleation rate have been obtained for the limiting cases of high and low thermodynamic barriers. The physical explanation of the so-called sign effect is proposed based on multipole expansion of an electric field of the cluster ion. This theory gives good agreement with experiments and is used to elucidate experimentally observed phenomena. PMID:16178615

  8. Experimental studies on nucleation, nanoparticle's formation and polymerization from the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsayed, Victor Maher

    This research is divided into three major parts. In part I, the critical supersaturations required for the homogeneous nucleation of 2,2,2-trifluorothanol (TFE) vapor have been measured over a temperature range (266-296 K) using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber (DCC). The measured supersaturations are in agreement with the predictions of both the classical and the scaled theory of nucleation. Moreover, the condensation of supersaturated TFE vapor on laser-vaporized magnesium nanoparticles has been studied under different experimental conditions, such as the supersaturation, the pressure and the electric field. In part II, the laser vaporization controlled condensation (LVCC) technique was used to prepare Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles in the vapor phase using designed targets of compressed Au and Ag micron-sized powder mixtures of selected composition. The results showed that the optical properties of these nanoparticles could be tuned depending on the alloy composition and the laser wavelength. Different intermetallic nanoparticles (FeAl and NiAl) from the vapor phase has also been prepared, using the same approach. In this work, the fraction of the charged particles generated during the laser vaporization process was used to prepare a new class of nanoparticle assemblies in the LVCC chamber under the influence of an electric field. The results showed that the electric field required to induce the formation of these nanoassemblies is material and field dependent. By coupling the LVCC chamber with the differential mobility analyzer, size-selected nanoparticles have been prepared in the vapor phase. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. In part III, new methods were developed to prepare nanoparticle-polymer composites from the vapor phase. In the first method, the LVCC method was used to prepare a carbonaceous cross-linked resin, with different nanoparticles (Ni, Pt and FeAl) embedded inside. In the second method, free radical-thermally initiated polymerization was used to polymerize a monomer vapor of styrene on the surfaces of activated Ni nanoparticles.

  9. Studies of Nucleation, Growth, Specific Heat, and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Croat, T. K.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Undercooling experiments and thermal physical property measurements of metallic alloys on the International Space Station (ISS) are planned. This recently-funded research focuses on fundamental issues of the formation and structure of highly-ordered non-crystallographic phases (quasicrystals) and related crystal phases (crystal approximants), and the connections between the atomic structures of these phases and those of liquids and glasses. It extends studies made previously by us of the composition dependence of crystal nucleation processes in silicate and metallic glasses, to the case of nucleation from the liquid phase. Motivating results from rf-levitation and drop-tube measurements of the undercooling of Ti/Zr-based liquids that form quasicrystals and crystal approximants are discussed. Preliminary measurements by electrostatic levitation (ESL) are presented.

  10. Formation of Large Chiral Domains in the B4 Phase by Nucleation and Chirality-Preserving Growth of Helical Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Glaser, M. A.; Maclennan, J. E.; Clark, N. A.; Korblova, E.; Walba, D. M.

    2010-03-01

    The growth of helical filaments in the B4 phase is investigated in mixtures of a bent-core mesogen (NOBOW) and a calamitic mesogen (8CB). Due to freezing point depression, the B4 phase forms directly from isotropic phase in the mixtures. This enables us to show, for the first time, that the left- and right- chiral domains are composed of left- and right- handed helical filaments respectively. The formation of a chiral domain can be described as a nucleation and growth process, starting from a nucleus of arbitrary chirality. Starting from such a nucleus, the local chirality is maintained by chirality-preserving growth of helical filaments. The formation of large chiral domains in the mixture is due to the low density of nucleation sites. A tree branching model of the B4 helical filament growth has been proposed which accounts for the observed local homochirality of the helical filaments and the local phase coherence between the helical filaments.

  11. Investigating relationships between the seismic "nucleation" phases and breakaway phases of recent Mw 8 earthquakes using global broadband seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the far field P wave velocity observations of large earthquakes frequently start with a small interval of weak motion, which was described as "fore-shock", "pre-shock", or seismic nucleation phase (SNP) by various researchers, e.g, Ellsworth and Beroza (1995). The energetic ground motion immediately following this interesting phase was named as "breakaway" phase. Recent global surveys indicate that for about 50% of Mw>7.5 earthquakes their SNP could be observed teleseismically and the distribution of the earthquakes with SNP appears to be correlated with the tectonic environment and focal mechanisms (Ji et al, 2010; Burkhart and Ji, 2011). Here, a multiple double-couple (MDC) algorithm is developed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the SNPs and "breakaway" phases of 22 Mw>8 earthquakes since 1990. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the average moment acceleration during the first 4 s of the 2011 Mw 9.1 Tohoku earthquake is only about 2% of that associating with subsequent "breakaway" rupture stage. As the rupture of moderate or large earthquakes often initiate at the vicinity of one of their high slip fault patches, i.e., asperities (Mai et al., 2005), this kind of big discrepancies might shed the light on the intrinsic differences between the asperity and the weak zone in its vicinity, as hypothesized by the asperity theory (e.g., Kanamori, 1981).

  12. Observing in space and time the ephemeral nucleation of liquid-to-crystal phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Liu, Haihua; Tang, Jau; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2015-01-01

    The phase transition of crystalline ordering is a general phenomenon, but its evolution in space and time requires microscopic probes for visualization. Here we report direct imaging of the transformation of amorphous titanium dioxide nanofilm, from the liquid state, passing through the nucleation step and finally to the ordered crystal phase. Single-pulse transient diffraction profiles at different times provide the structural transformation and the specific degree of crystallinity (?) in the evolution process. It is found that the temporal behaviour of ? exhibits unique ‘two-step' dynamics, with a robust ‘plateau' that extends over a microsecond; the rate constants vary by two orders of magnitude. Such behaviour reflects the presence of intermediate structure(s) that are the precursor of the ordered crystal state. Theoretically, we extend the well-known Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov equation, which describes the isothermal process with a stretched-exponential function, but here over the range of times covering the melt-to-crystal transformation. PMID:26478194

  13. Application of Phase-field Method in Predicting Gas Bubble Microstructure Evolution in Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Henager, Charles H.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-04-30

    Fission product accumulation and gas bubble microstructure evolution in nuclear fuels strongly affect thermo-mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity, gas release, volumetric swelling and cracking, and hence the fuel performance. In this paper, a general phase-field model is developed to predict gas bubble formation and evolution. Important materials processes and thermodynamic properties including the generation of gas atoms and vacancies, sinks for vacancies and gas atoms, the elastic interaction among defects, gas re-solution, and inhomogeneity of elasticity and diffusivity are accounted for in the model. The simulations demonstrate the potential application of the phase-field method in investigating 1) heterogeneous nucleation of gas bubbles at defects; 2) effect of elastic interaction, inhomogeneity of material properties, and gas re-solution on gas bubble microstructures; and 3) effective properties from the output of phase-field simulations such as distribution of defects, gas bubbles, and stress fields.

  14. Reduced sediment melting at 7.5-12 GPa: phase relations, geochemical signals and diamond nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, G. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Bulatov, V. K.; Höfer, H. E.; Gerdes, A.; Woodland, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    Melting of carbonated sediment in the presence of graphite or diamond was experimentally investigated at 7.5-12 GPa and 800-1600 °C in a multianvil apparatus. Two starting materials similar to GLOSS of Plank and Langmuir (Chem Geol 145:325-394, 1998) were prepared from oxides, carbonates, hydroxides and graphite. One mixture (Na-gloss) was identical in major element composition to GLOSS, and the other was poorer in Na and richer in K (K-gloss). Both starting mixtures contained ~6 wt% CO2 and 7 wt% H2O and were doped at a ~100 ppm level with a number of trace elements, including REE, LILE and HFSE. The near-solidus mineral assemblage contained a silica polymorph (coesite or stishovite), garnet, kyanite, clinopyroxene, carbonates (aragonite and magnesite-siderite solid solution), zircon, rutile, bearthite and hydrous phases (phengite and lawsonite at <9 GPa and the hydrous aluminosilicates topaz-OH and phase egg at >10 GPa). Hydrous phases disappear at ~900 °C, and carbonates persist up to 1000-1100 °C. At temperatures >1200 °C, the mineral assemblage consists of coesite or stishovite, kyanite and garnet. Clinopyroxene stability depends strongly on the Na content in the starting mixture; it remains in the Na-gloss composition up to 1600 °C at 12 GPa, but was not observed in K-gloss experiments above 1200 °C. The composition of melt or fluid changes gradually with increasing temperature from hydrous carbonate-rich (<10 wt% SiO2) at 800-1000 °C to volatile-rich silicate liquids (up to 40 wt% SiO2) at high temperatures. Trace elements were analyzed in melts and crystalline phases by LA ICP MS. The garnet-melt and clinopyroxene-melt partition coefficients are in general consistent with results from the literature for volatile-free systems and silicocarbonate melts derived by melting carbonated peridotites. Most trace elements are strongly incompatible in kyanite and silica polymorphs ( D < 0.01), except for V, Cr and Ni, which are slightly compatible in kyanite ( D > 1). Aragonite and Fe-Mg carbonate have very different REE partition coefficients ( D Mst-Sd/L ~ 0.01 and D Arg/L ~ 1). Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf are strongly incompatible in both carbonates. The bearthite/melt partition coefficients are very high for LREE (>10) and decrease to ~1 for HREE. All HFSE are strongly incompatible in bearthite. In contrast, Ta, Nb, Zr and Hf are moderately to strongly compatible in ZrSiO4 and TiO2 phases. Based on the obtained partition coefficients, the composition of a mobile phase derived by sediment melting in deep subduction zones was calculated. This phase is strongly enriched in incompatible elements and displays a pronounced negative Ta-Nb anomaly but no Zr-Hf anomaly. Although all experiments were conducted in the diamond stability field, only graphite was observed in low-temperature experiments. Spontaneous diamond nucleation and the complete transformation of graphite to diamond were observed at temperatures above 1200-1300 °C. We speculate that the observed character of graphite-diamond transformation is controlled by relationships between the kinetics of metastable graphite dissolution and diamond nucleation in a hydrous silicocarbonate melt that is oversaturated in C.

  15. Investigation of the Seismic Nucleation Phase of Large Earthquakes Using Broadband Teleseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Eryn Therese

    The dynamic motion of an earthquake begins abruptly, but is often initiated by a short interval of weak motion called the seismic nucleation phase (SNP). Ellsworth and Beroza [1995, 1996] concluded that the SNP was detectable in near-source records of 48 earthquakes with moment magnitude (Mw), ranging from 1.1 to 8.1. They found that the SNP accounted for approximately 0.5% of the total moment and 1/6 of the duration of the earthquake. Ji et al [2010] investigated the SNP of 19 earthquakes with Mw greater than 8.0 using teleseismic broadband data. This study concluded that roughly half of the earthquakes had detectable SNPs, inconsistent with the findings of Ellsworth and Beroza [1995]. Here 69 earthquakes of Mw 7.5-8.0 from 1994 to 2011 are further examined. The SNP is clearly detectable using teleseismic data in 32 events, with 35 events showing no nucleation phase, and 2 events had insufficient data to perform stacking, consistent with the previous analysis. Our study also reveals that the percentage of the SNP events is correlated with the focal mechanism and hypocenter depths. Strike-slip earthquakes are more likely to exhibit a clear SNP than normal or thrust earthquakes. Eleven of 14 strike-slip earthquakes (78.6%) have detectable NSPs. In contrast, only 16 of 40 (40%) thrust earthquakes have detectable SNPs. This percentage also became smaller for deep events (33% for events with hypocenter depth>250 km). To understand why certain thrust earthquakes have a visible SNP, we examined the sediment thickness, age, and angle of the subducting plate of all thrust earthquakes in the study. We found that thrust events with shallow (600 m) on the subducting plate tend to have clear SNPs. If the SNP can be better understood in the future, it may help seismologists better understand the rupture dynamics of large earthquakes. Potential applications of this work could attempt to predict the magnitude of an earthquake seconds before it begins by measuring the SNP, vastly improving earthquake Early Warning Systems for populated areas.

  16. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    SciTech Connect

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  17. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2015-10-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating clusters fluctuates, but the mean temperature remains below the temperature in the supersaturated gas until they reach the critical nucleation size. The critical nuclei have, however, a temperature equal to the supersaturated gas. The kinetics of homogeneous nucleation is not only caused by a grow or shrink by accretion or evaporation of monomers only but also by an exponentially declining change in cluster size per time step equal to the cluster distribution in the supersaturated gas.

  18. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2015-10-21

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating clusters fluctuates, but the mean temperature remains below the temperature in the supersaturated gas until they reach the critical nucleation size. The critical nuclei have, however, a temperature equal to the supersaturated gas. The kinetics of homogeneous nucleation is not only caused by a grow or shrink by accretion or evaporation of monomers only but also by an exponentially declining change in cluster size per time step equal to the cluster distribution in the supersaturated gas. PMID:26493920

  19. Effect of an alpha-phase nucleating agent on the crystallization kinetics of a propylene/ethylene random copolymer at largely different supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androsch, René; Monami, Andrea; Kucera, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of 0.1 wt% phosphate-ester based alpha-phase nucleating agent on the crystallization of a random propylene-based copolymer with 3.9 mol% ethylene has been investigated by fast scanning chip calorimetry (FSC). Main purpose of the work was the evaluation of the effect of the nucleating agent on the bimodal temperature dependence of the crystallization rate of propylene-based polymers caused by a change of the nucleation mechanism from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation on lowering the temperature to below about 60 °C. Presence of the nucleation agent in the copolymer of the present study accelerates crystallization only in the high-temperature range of predominant heterogeneous nucleation, but does not affect the crystallization rate in the low-temperature range of homogeneous nucleation. The observed decrease of the minimum crystallization half-time due to the addition of the nucleation agent, from 0.2 s in case of the unmodified copolymer to 0.04 s in case of the copolymer containing the nucleating agent, is paralleled by an increase of the critical cooling rate required to inhibit crystallization on continuous cooling to below the glass transition temperature from 102 to 103 K s-1. The study is completed by an analysis of the effect of addition of the nucleation agent on the spherulitic superstructure.

  20. Transient nucleation in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

  1. Effects of the cosmological expansion on the bubble nucleation rate for relativistic first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2008-09-15

    I calculate the first corrections to the dynamical preexponential factor of the bubble nucleation rate for a relativistic first-order phase transition in an expanding cosmological background by estimating the effects of the Hubble expansion rate on the critical bubbles of Langer's statistical theory of metastability. I also comment on possible applications and problems that arise when one considers the field theoretical extensions of these results (the Coleman-De Luccia and Hawking-Moss instantons and decay rates)

  2. Effects of the cosmological expansion on the bubble nucleation rate for relativistic first-order phase transitions

    E-print Network

    Dimitrios Metaxas

    2008-09-01

    I calculate the first corrections to the dynamical pre-exponential factor of the bubble nucleation rate for a relativistic first-order phase transition in an expanding cosmological background by estimating the effects of the Hubble expansion rate on the critical bubbles of Langer's statistical theory of metastability. I also comment on possible applications and problems that arise when one considers the field theoretical extensions of these results (the Coleman-De Luccia and Hawking-Moss instantons and decay rates).

  3. A model for phase change kinetics in polymer composites with significant fiber surface nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Benard, A.

    1998-09-18

    A model for the isothermal crystallization of fiber-reinforced polymers with significant nucleation on the fibers is presented. The model is based on exact and approximate expressions for the volume of intersection between a cylinder and a sphere located on the outside radius of the cylinder which allows to account for the effects of the fibers on the overall crystallization process. The crystallization process is divided into time frames according to the validity of the solutions for the volume of intersection. The evolution of the crystallinity is computed for both thermal and athermal nucleation processes. The accelerating effect of fiber-nucleated spherulites on the overall crystallization process is demonstrated with simple examples in which parameters such as the fiber volume fraction, the fiber radius, the nucleation density and an induction time are changed. Limitations of the current model are also discussed.

  4. Free-energy landscape and nucleation pathway of polymorphic minerals from solution in a Potts lattice-gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Omori, Toshiaki; Hukushima, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Metastable minerals commonly form during reactions between water and rock. The nucleation mechanism of polymorphic phases from solution are explored here using a two-dimensional Potts model. The model system is composed of a solvent and three polymorphic solid phases. The local state and position of the solid phase are updated by Metropolis dynamics. Below the critical temperature, a large cluster of the least stable solid phase initially forms in the solution before transitioning into more-stable phases following the Ostwald step rule. The free-energy landscape as a function of the modal abundance of each solid phase clearly reveals that before cluster formation, the least stable phase has an energetic advantage because of its low interfacial energy with the solution, and after cluster formation, phase transformation occurs along the valley of the free-energy landscape, which contains several minima for the regions of three phases. Our results indicate that the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfacial energy contribute to the formation of the complex free-energy landscape and nucleation pathways following the Ostwald step rule.

  5. Gas Phase Detection of Benzocyclopropenyl.

    PubMed

    Maity, Surajit; Steglich, Mathias; Maier, John P

    2015-11-01

    The gas phase detection of benzocyclopropenyl is reported. In this aromatic resonance stabilized radical, a large angular strain is present due to a three-membered ring annelated to a benzene. The resonant two-color two-photon ionization technique is used to record the D1((2)A2) ? D0((2)B1) electronic transition of this radical after the in situ synthesis in a discharge source. The spectrum features absorptions up to 3300 cm(-1) above the origin band at 19?305 cm(-1). Benzocyclopropenyl is possibly the major product of the bimolecular reaction of benzene and an atomic carbon at low temperatures. PMID:26463227

  6. Oxygen Gas Phase Abundance Revisited

    E-print Network

    M. K. André; C. M. Oliveira; J. C. Howk; R. Ferlet; J. -M. Désert; G. Hébrard; S. Lacour; A. Lecavelier des Étangs; A. Vidal-Madjar; H. W. Moos

    2003-03-26

    We present new measurements of the interstellar gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines towards 19 early-type galactic stars at an average distance of 2.6 kpc. We derive O {\\small I} column densities from {\\it HST}/STIS observations of the weak 1355 \\AA intersystem transition. We derive total hydrogen column densities [N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] using {\\it HST}/STIS observations of \\lya and {\\it FUSE} observations of molecular hydrogen. The molecular hydrogen content of these sight lines ranges from f(H$_2$) = 2N(H$_2$)/[N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] = 0.03 to 0.47. The average $$ of 6.3$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ mag$^{-1}$ with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance along these sight lines, which probe a wide range of galactic environments in the distant ISM, is 10$^6$ \\oh = $408 \\pm 13$ (1 $\\sigma$ in the mean). %$({\\rm O/H})_{gas} = 408 \\pm 14$(1 $\\sigma$). We see no evidence for decreasing gas-phase oxygen abundance with increasing molecular hydrogen fraction and the relative constancy of \\oh suggests that the component of dust containing the oxygen is not readily destroyed. We estimate that, if 60% of the dust grains are resilient against destruction by shocks, the distant interstellar total oxygen abundance can be reconciliated with the solar value derived from the most recent measurements %by Holweger and by Allende Prieto, Lambert & Asplund: of 10$^6$ \\oh$_\\odot$ = 517 $\\pm$ 58 (1 $\\sigma$). We note that the smaller oxygen abundances derived for the interstellar gas within 500 pc %by Meyer, Cardelli & Jura or from nearby B star surveys are consistent with a local elemental deficit.

  7. Effects of strain on phonon interactions and phase nucleation in several semiconductor and nano particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Robert E.

    Raman scattering is utilized to explore the effects of applied pressure and strain on anharmonic phonon interactions and nucleation of structural transitions in several bulk and nanoparticle semiconductor systems. The systems investigated are bulk ZnS and ZnSe in several isotopic compositions, InP/CdS core/shell nanoparticles exhibiting confined and surface optical Raman modes, and amorphous selenium films undergoing photo-induced crystallization. The anharmonic decay of long-wavelength optical modes into two-phonon acoustic combinations modes is studied in 64Zn32S, 64Zn34S, natZnatS bulk crystals by measuring the TO(Gamma) Raman line-shape as a function of applied hydrostatic pressure. The experiments are carried out at room temperature and 16K for pressures up to 150 kbars using diamond-anvil cells. The most striking effects occur in 68Zn32S where the TO(Gamma) peak narrows by a factor of 10 and increases in intensity at pressures for which the TO(Gamma) frequency has been tuned into a gap in the two-phonon density of states (DOS). In all the isotopic compositions, the observed phonon decay processes can be adequately explained by a second order perturbation treatment of the anharmonic coupling between TO(Gamma) and TA + LA combinations at various critical points, combined with an adiabatic bond-charge model for the phonon DOS and the known mode Gruneisen parameters. Bulk ZnSe crystals exhibit very different behavior. Here we find that anharmonic decay alone can not explain the excessive (˜ 60 cm-1 ) broadening in the TO(Gamma) Raman peak observed as the pressure approaches to within 50kbar of the ZB -> B1 phase transition (at P ˜ 137 kbar). Rather the broadening appears to arise from antecedent nucleation of structural changes within nanoscopic domains, with the mechanism for line-shape changes being mode mixing via localization and disorder instead of anharmonicity. To sort out these contributions, pressure experiments on natural ZnSe and on isotopically pure 68Zn76Se are compared. Again we use an appropriate bond-charge model to obtain the phonon DOS. It is concluded that the antecedent nucleation mechanism is much more important in ZnSe than in ZnS. In order to further investigate interactions of vibrational modes in spatially confined systems, pressure-Raman experiments are carried out on InP/CdS core/shell nanoparticles. This system differs from most other core/shell nanoparticles systems, in that the near degeneracy of the bulk InP TO(Gamma) and CdS LO(Gamma) phonons leads to possible cross-interface mode coupling. Different confined and surface (or interface) optical modes are studied as a function of pressure up 65 kbar at 373 and 230 K. The results are compared with the predictions of dielectric continuum theory using a phenomenological macroscopic approach (PMA) to include the pressure dependence. Three different pressure media are employed, and the effects on the surface modes of their different static dielectric constants are investigated. The pressure-shifts of the observed confined and surface modes are well accounted for without the need to include cross-interface coupling. We conclude that the conventional boundary condition, of vanishing phonon amplitude at the heterointerface, remains valid in the InP/CdS nanoparticle system, in spite of the near degeneracy of the bulk optical phonons. Photo-induced crystallization in amorphous selenium (a-Se) was also explored in this dissertation, as another example of a nanoscopic nucleation process influenced by strain, in this case internal strain. In order to observe photo-crystallization, the Raman spectra of commercial a-Se films used as targets in high-gain avalanche rushing photodetectors (HARP) cameras was studied at temperatures in the range 260 - 330 K. We find a rich temperature behavior that reflects the competition of changes in viscosity and strain, and defines four distinct regimes. These results are in qualitative accord with a theory by R.B.Stephens treating the effects of local strain on the secondary growth of crystalline nuclei in a-Se. W

  8. On the effect of pressure and carrier gas on homogeneous water nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, M. A. L. J.; Hrubý, J.; Smeulders, D. M. J.; van Dongen, M. E. H.

    2015-04-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of water droplets were measured at a nucleation temperature close to 240 K in a Pulse-Expansion Wave Tube (PEWT). Several measures were taken to improve the data obtained with the PEWT. For instance, the molar water vapor fraction was determined with three independent techniques. The resulting standard uncertainty of the supersaturation was within 1.8%. Results are given for water nucleation in helium at 100 kPa and at 1000 kPa and in nitrogen at 1000 kPa. Two trends were observed: (i) the values of the nucleation rate of water in helium at 1000 kPa are slightly but significantly higher (factor 3) than its values at 100 kPa and (ii) nucleation rates of water in nitrogen at 1000 kPa are clearly higher (factor 10) than in helium at the same pressure. It is argued that the explanation of the two observed trends is different. For case (i), it is the insufficient thermalization of the growing water clusters in helium at the lowest pressure that has a reducing effect on the nucleation rate, although a full quantitative agreement has not yet been reached. For case (ii), thermal effects being negligible, it is the pressure dependency of the surface tension, much stronger for nitrogen than for helium, that explains the trends observed, although also here a full quantitative agreement has not yet been achieved.

  9. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  10. Gas-phase magnetohydrodynamic disk accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdnyakov, G. A.

    2007-06-01

    A pulsed gas-phase magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) disk accelerator with a radial initial gas flow and radial electric current direction is described. Some working regime parameters and characteristics of the accelerated natural gas flow are reported. MHD accelerators of this type can be used for the investigation of chemical kinetics. Another promising application is related to the development of supersonic gas-phase endothermal chemical reactors with gasdynamic control.

  11. Analysis of gas-phase condensation of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gafner, S. L.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.

    2008-10-15

    Gas-phase condensation of 8000 nickel atoms is examined by molecular dynamics simulation with a tight-binding potential. A detailed study of the evolution of the system cooled at a constant rate from 1000 K to 77 K is presented. The results are used to identify four distinct stages of the evolution from a hot atomic gas to a few synthesized particles. An analysis of possible nanoparticle formation mechanisms suggests that cluster-cluster aggregation is the dominant one. The simulation shows that there two stages of cluster formation are of primary importance with regard to aggregation. At the first stage, spherical liquid clusters nucleate with uniform size distribution. The second stage is characterized by a distinct transition from uniform to bimodal size distribution due to aggregation of relatively large clusters. The particles obtained by gas-phase synthesis are analyzed by the CNA method [25]. It is found that most nanoparticles produced in the simulation have either icosahedral or mixed FCC/HCP structure.

  12. On Immersion Freezing as a Nucleation Mechanism in Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Tempei Hashino,Gregory J.Tripoli and Edwin W.Eloranta

    E-print Network

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    On Immersion Freezing as a Nucleation Mechanism in Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Tempei Hashino IN for activation. Immersion freezing is not included with this grouping, however, as it is unclear whether IN im IN concentrations. Here, we investigate the potential role of immersion freezing in Arctic mixed-phase stratus

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V??dV/dt, ?, and ?. The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for ? is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal. PMID:26254656

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V.

    2015-08-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation [N. V. Alekseechkin, Physica A 412, 186 (2014)] is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V, x, T)—equations for V ? ? d V / d t , x ? , and T ? . The work W(V, x, T) of the droplet formation is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also, the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for T ? is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsager's reciprocal relations and the linked-fluxes concept. As an example of ideal solution for demonstrative numerical calculations, the o-xylene-m-xylene system is employed. Both nonisothermal and enrichment effects are shown to exist; the mean steady-state overheat of droplets and their mean steady-state enrichment are calculated with the help of the 3D distribution function. Some qualitative peculiarities of the nucleation thermodynamics and kinetics in the water-sulfuric acid system are considered in the model of regular solution. It is shown that there is a small kinetic parameter in the theory due to the small amount of the acid in the vapor and, as a consequence, the nucleation process is isothermal.

  15. The physical chemistry of nucleation of sub-micrometer non-oxide ceramic powders via sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, A.

    1996-10-01

    Fine ceramic powders (< 500 nm) exhibit exceptional physical and mechanical properties in engineered structural ceramics. The production of fine powders, in particular the non-oxide ceramics, via a cheaper route than the organic solvent route has been rather elusive. This paper examines the physical chemistry of sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction for the nucleation of non-oxide ceramic phase. Well known vapor species eg SiO and BO in the production of technical ceramic powders (SiC, BN) are particularly discussed for understanding the nucleation process of SiC and BN ceramic phases respectively. The regimes of partial pressures and temperatures are particularly identified. The calculated nucleation rate as a function of the temperature is compared with the experimental results on powder morphology. The production of amorphous and nanocrystalline h-BN powders is discussed in the context of substrate structure and thermodynamic parameters.

  16. Ion-induced nucleation in polar one-component fluids Hikaru Kitamuraa

    E-print Network

    Ion-induced nucleation in polar one-component fluids Hikaru Kitamuraa and Akira Onuki Department; published online 27 September 2005 We present a Ginzburg-Landau theory of ion-induced nucleation in a gas phase of polar one-component fluids, where a liquid droplet grows with an ion at its center

  17. Quantification of gypsum crystal nucleation, growth, and breakage rates in a wet flue gas desulfurization pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, B.B.; Kiil, S.; Johnsson, J.E.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of nucleation, growth and breakage on the particle size distribution (PSD) of gypsum crystals produced by the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. The steady state PSD, obtained in a falling film wet FGD pilot plant during desulfurization of a 1000 ppm(V) SO{sub 2} gas stream, displayed a strong nonlinear behaviour (in a ln(n(l)) vs. I plot) at the lower end of the particle size range, compared to the well-known linear mixed suspension mixed product removal model. A transient population balance breakage model, fitted to experimental data, was able to model an increase in the fraction of small particles, but not to the extent observed experimentally. A three-parameter, size-dependent growth model, previously used for sodium sulphate decahydrate and potash alum, was able to describe the experimental data, indicating either size-dependent integration kinetics or growth rate dispersion.

  18. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  19. Nucleation Behavior of Oxygen-Acetylene Torch-Produced Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E.

    2003-01-01

    A mechanism is presented for the nucleation of diamond in the combustion flame environment. A series of six experiments and two associated simulations provide results from which the mechanism was derived. A substantial portion of the prior literature was reviewed and the data and conclusions from the previous experimenters were found to support the proposed mechanism. The nucleation mechanism builds on the work of previous researchers but presents an approach to nucleation in a detail and direction not fully presented heretofore. This work identifies the gas phase as the controlling environment for the initial formation steps leading to nucleation. The developed mechanism explains some of the difficulty which has been found in producing single crystal epitaxial films. An experiment which modified the initial gas phase precursor using methane and carbon monoxide is presented. Addition of methane into the precursor gases was found to be responsible for pillaring of the films. Atomic force microscopy surface roughness data provides a reasonable look at suppression of nucleation by carbon monoxide. Surface finish data was taken on crystals which were open to the nucleation environment and generally parallel to the substrate surface. The test surfaces were measured as an independent measure of the instantaneous nucleation environent. A gas flow and substrate experiment changed the conditions on the surface of the sample by increasing the gas flow rate while remaining on a consistent point of the atomic constituent diagram, and by changing the carbide potential of the substrate. Two tip modification experiments looked at the behavior of gas phase nucleation by modifying the shape and behavior of the flame plasma in which the diamond nucleation is suspected to occur. Diamond nucleation and growth was additionally examined using a high-velocity oxygen fuel gun and C3H6 as the fuel gas phase precursor with addition of carbon monoxide gas 01 addition of liquid toluene.

  20. Tetragonal Lysozyme Nucleation and Crystal Growth: The Role of the Solution Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Sumida, John; Maxwell, Daniel; Gorti, Sridhar

    2002-01-01

    Lysozyme, and most particularly the tetragonal form of the protein, has become the default standard protein for use in macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth studies. There is a substantial body of experimental evidence, from this and other laboratories, that strongly suggests this proteins crystal nucleation and growth is by addition of associated species that are preformed by standard reversible concentration-driven self association processes in the bulk solution. The evidence includes high resolution AFM studies of the surface packing and of growth unit size at incorporation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements of intermolecular distances in dilute solution, dialysis kinetics, and modeling of the growth rate data. We have developed a selfassociation model for the proteins crystal nucleation and growth. The model accounts for the obtained crystal symmetry, explains the observed surface structures, and shows the importance of the symmetry obtained by self-association in solution to the process as a whole. Further, it indicates that nucleation and crystal growth are not distinct mechanistically, but identical, with the primary difference being the probability that the particle will continue to grow or dissolve. This model also offers a possible mechanism for fluid flow effects on the growth process and how microgravity may affect it. While a single lysozyme molecule is relatively small (M.W. = 14,400), a structured octamer in the 4(sub 3) helix configuration (the proposed average sized growth unit) would have a M.W. = 115,000 and dimensions of 5.6 x 5.6 x 7.6 nm. Direct AFM measurements of growth unit incorporation indicate that units as wide as 11.2 nm and as long as 11.4 nm commonly attach to the crystal. These measurements were made at approximately saturation conditions, and they reflect the sizes of species that both added or desorbed from the crystal surface. The larger and less isotropic the associated species the more likely that it will be oriented to some degree in a flowing boundary layer, even at the low flow velocities measured about macromolecule crystals. Flow-driven effects resulting in misorientation upon addition to and incorporation into the crystal need only be a small fraction of a percentage to significantly affect the resulting crystal. One Earth, concentration gradient driven flow will maintain a high interfacial concentration, i.e., a high level (essentially that of the bulk solution) of solute association at the interface and higher growth rate. Higher growth rates mean an increased probability that misaligned growth units are trapped by subsequent growth layers before they can be desorbed and try again, or that the desorbing species will be smaller than the adsorbing species. In microgravity the extended diffusive boundary layer will lower the interfacial concentration. This results in a net dissociation of aggregated species that diffuse in from the bulk solution, i.e., smaller associated species, which are more likely able to make multiple attempts to correctly bind, yielding higher quality crystals.

  1. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  2. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of binary nucleation in ideal-gas mixtures

    E-print Network

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    The nonisothermal single-component theory of droplet nucleation (Alekseechkin, 2014) is extended to binary case; the droplet volume V, composition x, and temperature T are the variables of the theory. An approach based on macroscopic kinetics (in contrast to the standard microscopic model of nucleation operating with the probabilities of monomer attachment and detachment) is developed for the droplet evolution and results in the derived droplet motion equations in the space (V,x,T) - equations for V_dot, x_dot, and T_dot. The work W(V,x,T) of the droplet formation is calculated; it is obtained in the vicinity of the saddle point as a quadratic form with diagonal matrix. Also the problem of generalizing the single-component Kelvin equation for the equilibrium vapor pressure to binary case is solved; it is presented here as a problem of integrability of a Pfaffian equation. The equation for is shown to be the first law of thermodynamics for the droplet, which is a consequence of Onsagers reciprocal relations an...

  4. Bistability in Interstellar Gas-Phase Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Gai I. Boger; Amiel Sternberg

    2006-01-16

    We present an analysis of "bistability" in gas-phase chemical models of dark interstellar clouds. We identify the chemical mechanisms that allow high- and low-ionization solutions to the chemical rate-equations to coexist. We derive simple analytic scaling relations for the gas densities and ionization rates for which the chemistry becomes bistable. We explain why bistability is sensitive to the H3+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient, and why it is damped by gas-grain neutralization.

  5. Further Investigation into the Seismic Nucleation Phase of Large Earthquakes with a Focus on Strike-Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, E.; Ji, C.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic motion of an earthquake begins abruptly, but is often initiated by a small interval of weak motion called the seismic nucleation phase (SNP), first named by Ellsworth and Beroza (1995). In their study, Ellsworth and Beroza (1995, 1996) concluded that the SNP was detectable in near-source records of all of the 41 M 1 to M 8 earthquakes they investigated, with the SNP accounting for ~0.5% of the total moment and lasting ~1/6 of the total duration. Concentrating on large earthquakes, Ji et al (2010) investigated the SNP of 19 M 8.0 earthquakes since 1994 using a new approach applied to teleseismic broadband data. They found that ~50% of the earthquakes had a detectable SNP. Burkhart and Ji (2011) found that, in 68 M 7.5 to M 8.0 since 1994, the SNP is clearly detectable in 31 events, with 27 events showing no nucleation phase and 10 having too much noise or not enough stations to tell. After making modifications to the stacking code allowing for more specific station choice, these earthquakes have all been re-examined, and a consistent finding is that strike-slip earthquakes are more likely to exhibit a clear SNP than normal or thrust earthquakes. Continuing to investigate these events, this study finds further conclusive evidence that large shallow, continental, and strike-slip earthquakes show a clear SNP. We find that 11 of the 15 strike-slip earthquakes investigated show a clear SNP, with three having none (including the 2002 Mw 7.8 Denali Fault earthquake, which initiated as a thrust subevent), and one with not enough stations to perform stacking.

  6. MSE 3050, Phase Diagrams and Kinetics, Leonid Zhigilei Nucleation and growth kinetics

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    of a liquid phase undercooled below the melting temperature as a simple example of a phase transformation Zhigilei When a liquid is cooled below the melting temperature, there is a driving force for solidification = G T* Gv S Gv L Tm T * rr = * SL v r 2 G = Temperature of unstable equilibrium of a solid cluster

  7. Sublimating comets as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in the gas outflow from AGB stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, D. P.; Matese, John J.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A growing amount of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that most main sequence stars are surrounded by disks of cometary material. The dust production by comets in such disks is investigated when the central stars evolve up the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Once released, the dust is ablated and accelerated by the gas outflow and the fragments become the seeds necessary for condensation of the gas. The origin of the requisite seeds has presented a well known problem for classical nucleation theory. This model is consistent with the dust production observed in M giants and supergiants (which have increasing luminosities) and the fact that earlier supergiants and most WR stars (whose luminosities are unchanging) do not have significant dust clouds even though they have significant stellar winds. Another consequence of the model is that the spatial distribution of the dust does not, in general, coincide with that of the gas outflow, in contrast to the conventional condensation model. A further prediction is that the condensation radius is greater that that predicted by conventional theory which is in agreement with IR interferometry measurements of alpha-Ori.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of homogeneously nucleated hydrazine aerosols - Disordered and crystalline phases. [in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Clapp, M. L.; Miller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that aerosols generated at low temperatures and high condensation rate spontaneously form in a highly crystalline state. The resonant absorption bands in the IR spectra of these highly crystalline particles are much sharper than any reported previously in the bulk, and reveal details in the N-H vibrational bands that have not been previously observed. A disordered phase is also observed at somewhat higher temperatures. These results are consistent with this being a supercooled liquid. The fact that the spectra associated with these two aerosol phases are quite different is important to any future attempts at detecting hydrazine aerosols in planetary atmospheres by remote sensing techniques.

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of homogeneously nucleated hydrazine aerosols - Disordered and crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunder, T.; Clapp, M. L.; Miller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that aerosols generated at low temperatures and high condensation rate spontaneously form in a highly crystalline state. The resonant absorption bands in the IR spectra of these highly crystalline particles are much sharper than any reported previously in the bulk, and reveal details in the N-H vibrational bands that have not been previously observed. A disordered phase is also observed at somewhat higher temperatures. These results are consistent with this being a supercooled liquid. The fact that the spectra associated with these two aerosol phases are quite different is important to any future attempts at detecting hydrazine aerosols in planetary atmospheres by remote sensing techniques.

  10. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  11. Gas-Phase IR Spectroscopy of Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy of nucleobases in the gas phase reflects simultaneous advances in both experimental and computational techniques. Important properties, such as excited state dynamics, depend in subtle ways on structure variations, which can be followed by their infrared signatures. Isomer specific spectroscopy is a particularly powerful tool for studying the effects of nucleobase tautomeric form and base pair hydrogen-bonding patterns. PMID:25663555

  12. Polymorphic phase transition among the titania crystal structures using a solution-based approach: from precursor chemistry to nucleation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Girish; Rao, K. S. R. Koteswara

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystalline titania are a robust candidate for various functional applications owing to its non-toxicity, cheap availability, ease of preparation and exceptional photochemical as well as thermal stability. The uniqueness in each lattice structure of titania leads to multifaceted physico-chemical and opto-electronic properties, which yield different functionalities and thus influence their performances in various green energy applications. The high temperature treatment for crystallizing titania triggers inevitable particle growth and the destruction of delicate nanostructural features. Thus, the preparation of crystalline titania with tunable phase/particle size/morphology at low to moderate temperatures using a solution-based approach has paved the way for further exciting areas of research. In this focused review, titania synthesis from hydrothermal/solvothermal method, conventional sol-gel method and sol-gel-assisted method via ultrasonication, photoillumination and ILs, thermolysis and microemulsion routes are discussed. These wet chemical methods have broader visibility, since multiple reaction parameters, such as precursor chemistry, surfactants, chelating agents, solvents, mineralizer, pH of the solution, aging time, reaction temperature/time, inorganic electrolytes, can be easily manipulated to tune the final physical structure. This review sheds light on the stabilization/phase transformation pathways of titania polymorphs like anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) under a variety of reaction conditions. The driving force for crystallization arising from complex species in solution coupled with pH of the solution and ion species facilitating the orientation of octahedral resulting in a crystalline phase are reviewed in detail. In addition to titanium halide/alkoxide, the nucleation of titania from other precursors like peroxo and layered titanates are also discussed. The non-aqueous route and ball milling-induced titania transformation is briefly outlined; moreover, the lacunae in understanding the concepts and future prospects in this exciting field are suggested.

  13. Polymorphic phase transition among the titania crystal structures using a solution-based approach: from precursor chemistry to nucleation process.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Girish; Rao, K S R Koteswara

    2014-10-21

    Nanocrystalline titania are a robust candidate for various functional applications owing to its non-toxicity, cheap availability, ease of preparation and exceptional photochemical as well as thermal stability. The uniqueness in each lattice structure of titania leads to multifaceted physico-chemical and opto-electronic properties, which yield different functionalities and thus influence their performances in various green energy applications. The high temperature treatment for crystallizing titania triggers inevitable particle growth and the destruction of delicate nanostructural features. Thus, the preparation of crystalline titania with tunable phase/particle size/morphology at low to moderate temperatures using a solution-based approach has paved the way for further exciting areas of research. In this focused review, titania synthesis from hydrothermal/solvothermal method, conventional sol-gel method and sol-gel-assisted method via ultrasonication, photoillumination and ILs, thermolysis and microemulsion routes are discussed. These wet chemical methods have broader visibility, since multiple reaction parameters, such as precursor chemistry, surfactants, chelating agents, solvents, mineralizer, pH of the solution, aging time, reaction temperature/time, inorganic electrolytes, can be easily manipulated to tune the final physical structure. This review sheds light on the stabilization/phase transformation pathways of titania polymorphs like anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) under a variety of reaction conditions. The driving force for crystallization arising from complex species in solution coupled with pH of the solution and ion species facilitating the orientation of octahedral resulting in a crystalline phase are reviewed in detail. In addition to titanium halide/alkoxide, the nucleation of titania from other precursors like peroxo and layered titanates are also discussed. The non-aqueous route and ball milling-induced titania transformation is briefly outlined; moreover, the lacunae in understanding the concepts and future prospects in this exciting field are suggested. PMID:24969423

  14. Nucleation and growth of Ag islands on the (.sqroot.3 × .sqroot.3)R30° phase of Ag on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, A.; Unal, B.; Ho, K.-M.; Wang, C.-Z.; Evans, J. W.; Tringides, M. C.; Thiel, P. A.

    2011-06-06

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy to measure densities and characteristics of Ag islands that form on the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o}-Ag phase on Si(111), as a function of deposition temperature. Nucleation theory predicts that the logarithm of island density varies linearly with inverse deposition temperature. The data show two linear regimes. At 50-125 K, islands are relatively small, and island density decreases only slightly with increasing temperature. At 180-250 K, islands are larger and polycrystalline, and island density decreases strongly with increasing temperature. At 300 K, Ag atoms can travel for distances of the order of 1 {micro}m. Assuming that Ag diffusion occurs via thermally activated motion of single atoms between adjacent sites, the data can be explained as follows. At 50-125 K, the island density does not follow conventional Arrhenius scaling due to limited mobility and a consequent breakdown of the steady-state condition for the adatom density. At {approx} 115-125 K, a transition to conventional Arrhenius scaling with critical nucleus size (i = 1) begins, and at 180-250 K, i > 1 prevails. The transition points indicate a diffusion barrier of 0.20-0.23 eV and a pairwise Ag-Ag bond strength of 0.14 eV. These energy values lead to an estimate of i {approx} 3-4 in the regime 180-250 K, where island density varies strongly with temperature.

  15. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  16. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  17. Gas Phase Processes Affecting Galactic Evolution

    E-print Network

    Bruce G. Elmegreen

    2002-12-06

    Gas processes affecting star formation are reviewed with an emphasis on gravitational and magnetic instabilities as a source of turbulence. Gravitational instabilities are pervasive in a multi-phase medium, even for sub-threshold column densities, suggesting that only an ISM with a pure-warm phase can stop star formation. The instabilities generate turbulence, and this turbulence influences the structure and timing of star formation through its effect on the gas distribution and density. The final trigger for star formation is usually direct compression by another star or cluster. The star formation rate is apparently independent of the detailed mechanisms for star formation, and determined primarily by the total mass of gas in a dense form. If the density distribution function is a log-normal, as suggested by turbulence simulations, then this dense gas mass can be calculated and the star formation rate determined from first principles. The results suggest that only 10**(-4) of the ISM mass actively participates in the star formation process and that this fraction does so because its density is larger than 10**5 cm-3, at which point several key processes affecting dynamical equilibrium begin to break down.

  18. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  19. Gas-phase electron diffraction studies of unstable molecules 

    E-print Network

    Noble-Eddy, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) is the only viable technique for the accurate structural study of gas-phase molecules that contain more than ~10 atoms. Recent advances in Edinburgh have made it possible to study ...

  20. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results indicate that the substance is amphiphilic in character leading finally to micelle formation. Diehl, K., Quick, C., Matthias-Maser, S., Mitra, S. K., and Jaenicke, R.: The ice nucleation ability of pollen, part I, Atmos. Res., 58, 75-87, 2001. Diehl, K., Matthias-Maser, S., Jaenicke, R., and Mitra, S. K.: The ice nucleation ability of pollen, part II, Atmos. Res., 61, 125-133, 2002. Pummer, B., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S., Grothe, H.; Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen; Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 2541 - 2550, 2012.

  1. Dependence of nucleation rates on sulfuric acid vapor concentration in PoValley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Amar; Plaß-Dülmer, Christian; Elste, Thomas; Stange, Georg; Decesari, Stefano; Carbone, Claudio; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Laaksonen, Ari

    2010-05-01

    A field campaign was conducted at the polluted rural site, San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) in PoValley, Italy, from June 26th to July 12th 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI (European integrated project on aerosol, cloud, climate, and air interactions) project. The gas-phase sulfuric acid concentrations were measured for the first time at SPC station during this campaign. Here we examine the dependence of nucleation rate on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations in SPC. The apparent nucleation rate - i.e. formation rate of 3 nm particles - was directly determined from differential mobility particle sizer data. The nucleation rate at 1 nm (J1) was then calculated by accounting for the coagulation of the sub-3 nm clusters with large particles during their growth from 1 to 3 nm. The dependence of J1 on [H2SO4] was studied for each nucleation day individually and for all nucleation days as a whole. It is usually assumed that the dependence of nucleation rate on sulfuric acid concentration follows a simple power law model J1 = P [H2SO4]^n; where P is the prefactor containing chemical and physical information of the nucleation process, and n is the nucleation exponent. With the so called activation and kinetic nucleation mechanisms, n takes the values 1 and 2, respectively, and most field studies show n to fall between these two values. For the SPC data, the nucleation exponent was higher than 2 for both individual days and for all nucleation days as a whole. In the light of the obtained results we will discuss the nucleation mechanism, composition of the nucleation mode particles, and the role of other gases (such as ammonia and water vapor) in the formation of new particles in SPC in more detail.

  2. Gas-phase photolysis of tungsten hexachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullmer, R.

    1994-07-01

    The laser-induced decomposition of WCl6 in the gas-phase is investigated by means of absorption, Raman and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. With visible Ar+-laser radiation dissociation of WCl6 into WCl4 and Cl2 has been observed. Further decomposition can be achieved in the presence of H2 employing ultraviolet Ar+-laser radiation at 360 nm. A complete reduction to W requires even shorter wavelengths. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of model calculations. Implications on the Laser-induced Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) of W are discussed.

  3. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  4. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  5. Giddings Austin chalk enters deep lean-gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-12-25

    Deep lean gas is the latest phase in the growth of the Giddings field Austin chalk play. The first phase involved drilling vertical oil and gas wells. Next came the horizontal well boom in the shallower Austin chalk area, which is still continuing. And now this third phase places horizontal laterals in the Austen chalk at about 14,000--15,000 ft to produce lean gas. The article describes the producing wells and gas gathering.

  6. Nucleation in the presence of long-range interactions. [performed on ferroelectric barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P.

    1989-01-01

    Unlike droplet nucleation near a liquid-gas critical point, the decay of metastable phases in crystalline materials is strongly affected by the presence of long-range forces. Field quench experiments performed on the ferroelectric barium titanate indicate that nucleation in this material is markedly different from that observed in liquids. In this paper, a theory for nucleation at a first-order phase transition in which the mediating forces are long range is presented. It is found that the long-range force induces cooperative nucleation and growth processes, and that this feedback mechanism produces a well-defined delay time with a sharp onset in the transformation to the stable phase. Closed-form expressions for the characteristic onset time and width of the transition are developed, in good agreement with numerical and experimental results.

  7. Buckyball Nucleation of HiPco Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to enhance nucleation of single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) in the HiPco process, selectively producing 10,10 tubes, something which until now has not been thought possible. This is accomplished by injecting C60, or a derivative of C60, solubilized in supercritical CO2 together with a transition metal carboneal cocatalyst into the HiPco reactor. This is a variant on the supercritical disclosure. C60 has never been used to nucleate carbon nanotubes in the gas phase. C60 itself may not have adequate solubility in supercritical CO2. However, fluorinated C60, e.g., C60F36, is easy to make cheaply and should have much enhanced solubility.

  8. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  9. The VRT gas turbine combustor - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melconian, Jerry O.; Mongia, Hukam C.; Nguyen, Hung L.

    1992-01-01

    An innovative annular combustor configuration is being developed for aircraft and other gas turbine engines. This design has the potential of permitting higher turbine inlet temperatures by reducing the pattern factor and providing a major reduction in NO(x) emission. The design concept is based on a Variable Residence Time (VRT) technique which allows large fuel particles adequate time to completely burn in the circumferentially mixed primary zone. High durability of the combustor is achieved by dual-function use of the incoming air. In Phase I, the feasibility of the concept was demonstrated by water analogue tests and 3D computer modeling. The flow pattern within the combustor was as predicted. The VRT combustor uses only half the number of fuel nozzles of the conventional configuration. In Phase II, hardware was designed, procured, and tested under conditions simulating typical supersonic civil aircraft cruise conditions to the limits of the rig. The test results confirmed many of the superior performance predictions of the VRT concept. The Hastelloy X liner showed no signs of distress after nearly six hours of tests using JP5 fuel.

  10. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  11. Investigating the Microphysics of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds using Large Eddy Simulations: The Importance of Liquid-Dependent Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Gillian; Connolly, Paul J.; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Crosier, Jonathan; Lloyd, Gary; Bower, Keith N.

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to comprehend and accurately model the Arctic climate is currently hindered by a lack of observations of the atmospheric processes unique to this region. A significant source of uncertainty in such models may be found in our representation of aerosol-cloud interactions [1]: for example, there are unanswered questions concerning the relationship between the ice-nucleating Arctic aerosol and the unique cloud microphysics observed in this region [2]. In an effort to address this issue, the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign of 2013 was conducted in the vicinity of the Svalbard archipelago, carrying out in-situ airborne observations of the mixed-phase clouds in this region. This campaign was split into two segments - one in spring, the other in summer - with airborne- and surface-based measurement platforms utilised in each. During the spring campaign, a range of microphysics and remote-sensing instruments were active on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements' (FAAM) BAe146 aircraft to produce a detailed record of the observed Arctic atmosphere. These data were used to conduct a modelling investigation with a focus on ice nucleation: the Large Eddy Model (LEM) - a cloud-resolving model developed by the UK Met Office - was initialised from these observations and simulations were performed to allow the resultant cloud evolution, structure and microphysics to be examined. Models on various scales notoriously have issues with reproducing persistent, mixed-phase Arctic clouds [2,3] and, upon first inspection, the LEM was no different: the modelled cloud dissipated quickly, thus inaccurately replicating the long-lived, mixed-phase clouds observed. However, by considering the discrepancies between the model output and aircraft observations, the treatment of cloud microphysics within the LEM has been developed to improve the simulation of the observed clouds. A long-lived, mixed-phase cloud of similar microphysical properties to those observed is achieved, providing an indication that the realistic simulation of Arctic clouds is strongly dependent on the ice nucleus parameterisation used. References: [1] Curry, J. A. et al., 1996. Overview of Arctic Cloud and Radiation Characteristics. Journal of Climate, 9, 1731-1764. [2] Prenni, A. J. et al., 2007. Can Ice-Nucleating Aerosols Affect Arctic Seasonal Climate? Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 88, 541-550. [3] Morrison, H. et al., 2012. Resilience of persistent Arctic mixed-phase clouds. Nature Geoscience, 5, 11-17.

  12. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part II: Two-dimensional characterization and boundary kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    A companion paper presented the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients were a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation through the source term of the conservation law and of kinetics through an interfacial velocity field. This model overcomes an important shortcoming of existing phase-field models, namely that the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. In this paper, we present a number of numerical calculations - in one and two dimensions - that characterize our formulation. These calculations illustrate (i) highly-sensitive rate-dependent nucleation; (ii) independent prescription of the forward and backward nucleation stresses without changing the energy landscape; (iii) stick-slip interface kinetics; (iii) the competition between nucleation and kinetics in determining the final microstructural state; (iv) the effect of anisotropic kinetics; and (v) the effect of non-monotone kinetics. These calculations demonstrate the ability of this formulation to precisely prescribe complex nucleation and kinetics in a simple and transparent manner. We also extend our conservation statement to describe the kinetics of the junction lines between microstructural interfaces and boundaries. This enables us to prescribe an additional kinetic relation for the boundary, and we examine the interplay between the bulk kinetics and the junction kinetics.

  13. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION Gas-Phase Separations of Protease Digests

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Gas-Phase Separations of Protease Digests Stephen J. Valentine, Anne E University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA A mixture of peptides from a complete tryptic digest of ubiquitin has and identify peptides from a tryptic digest of ubiquitin. The mixture was electrosprayed into the gas phase

  15. A transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of annealing induced ?-phase nucleation, clustering, and interfacial dynamics in reactively sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. K. Nanda; Prasanna, S.; Subramanian, B.; Jayakumar, S.; Rao, G. Mohan

    2015-03-01

    Pure ?-Al2O3 exhibits a very high degree of thermodynamical stability among all metal oxides and forms an inert oxide scale in a range of structural alloys at high temperatures. We report that amorphous Al2O3 thin films sputter deposited over crystalline Si instead show a surprisingly active interface. On annealing, crystallization begins with nuclei of a phase closely resembling ?-Alumina forming almost randomly in an amorphous matrix, and with increasing frequency near the substrate/film interface. This nucleation is marked by the signature appearance of sharp (400) and (440) reflections and the formation of a diffuse diffraction halo with an outer maximal radius of ?0.23 nm enveloping the direct beam. The microstructure then evolves by a cluster-coalescence growth mechanism suggestive of swift nucleation and sluggish diffusional kinetics, while locally the Al ions redistribute slowly from chemisorbed and tetrahedral sites to higher anion coordinated sites. Chemical state plots constructed from XPS data and simple calculations of the diffraction patterns from hypothetically distorted lattices suggest that the true origins of the diffuse diffraction halo are probably related to a complex change in the electronic structure spurred by the a-? transformation rather than pure structural disorder. Concurrent to crystallization within the film, a substantially thick interfacial reaction zone also builds up at the film/substrate interface with the excess Al acting as a cationic source.

  16. Real-Time Characterization of Particle and Gas Phase Diesel Emissions - Understanding the Influence of a Diesel Particulate Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Sappok, A.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Jayne, J.; Wong, V.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel engine emissions constitute an important source of particulate black carbon (BC) and gas phase organics in the atmosphere. Particles composed of black carbon absorb incoming solar radiation having a net positive radiative forcing effect on the climate. Black carbon also has major air quality implications as BC particles from combustion sources are often coated with poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and are generally emitted in higher concentrations close to population centers. Regulations of diesel emissions target the mass of particulate matter (PM) and concentration of volatile gas phase organic compounds (VOC) produced. A third, potentially important component of diesel exhaust, is low volatility organic compounds (LVOC). Both the VOCs and LVOCs can lead to the formation of ultrafine particles (via homogeneous nucleation) and secondary organic aerosols (via oxidation). Recent development of mass spectrometric techniques to measure particulate black carbon and gas phase organics provide the opportunity to quantify and chemically characterize diesel emissions in real-time. Measurements of both the particulate and gas phase emissions from a medium-duty diesel engine will be presented. The experimental apparatus includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) integrated in the exhaust line, which is a requirement for all 2007 and newer on-road diesel engines in the U.S. Measurements taken over the regeneration cycle of the DPF provide insight into how this after-treatment technology influences the gas phase and particle phase composition of the emissions. Gas phase measurements were made with a newly developed Total Gas-Phase Organic (TGO) instrument. Particulate species were characterized with a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The combined utility of the TGO and SP-AMS instruments for emissions characterization studies will be demonstrated.

  17. Ice Nucleation by High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, W.

    2003-12-01

    Deep convection in the tropics is frequently associated with biomass burning. Recent work has suggested that the size of ice crystals in the anvils of tropical cumulonimbus clouds may be affected by biomass burning, though the mechanism for such an effect is uncertain (Sherwood, 2002). We will present results of an investigation of the role that high molecular weight organic compounds, known to be produced in biomass burning (Elias et al., 1999), may play in tropical cirrus anvils through heterogeneous nucleation of ice. In particular, we examine the mechanisms underlying heterogeneous nucleation of ice by films of long chain alcohols by studying the interaction of the alcohols and water/ice using temperature controlled, Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The mechanisms are interpreted in the context of recent criticisms of some aspects of classical nucleation theory (Seeley and Seidler, 2001; Oxtoby, 1998). References V. Elias, B. Simoneit, A. Pereira, J. Cabral, and J. Cardoso, Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Environ. Sci. Tecnol., 33, 2369-2376, 1999. D. Oxtoby, Nucleation of first-order phase transitions. Acc. Chem. Res., 31, 91-97, 1998. L. Seeley and G. Seidler, Preactivation in the nucleation of ice by Langmuir films of aliphatic alcohols. J. Chem. Phys., 114, 10464-10470, 2001. S. Sherwood, Aerosols and ice particle size in tropical cumulonimbus. J. Climate, 15, 1051-1063, 2002.

  18. Geographical and diurnal features of amine-enhanced boundary layer nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Laaksonen, A.; Korhonen, H.; Malila, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Mielonen, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kühn, T.; Arola, A.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-09-01

    Amines have recently been found to be an important ingredient in the nucleation and initial growth of atmospheric aerosols; however, global estimates of the spatial and temporal extent of amine-enhanced nucleation are currently missing. We utilize two recently published laboratory data sets of amine-sulfuric acid nucleation to evaluate the accuracy of previously published nucleation parameterizations and to produce a new amine-enhanced new particle formation (NPF) parameterization that better reproduces the laboratory observations at atmospherically relevant sulfuric acid concentrations. We implement and compare the amine-enhanced NPF parameterizations and a kinetic nucleation parameterization within the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ and find that the spatial features of amine-enhanced and kinetic NPF are clearly different. Amine-enhanced NPF is limited to areas near the source regions of amine due to its short gas phase residence time of 6.9 h, whereas kinetic nucleation (which depends only on sulfuric acid concentration) produces particles more uniformly across the globe due to long-range transport of SO2. The notably stronger land-sea contrast in amine-enhanced nucleation simulations is in line with relatively rare atmospheric observations of NPF over open oceans. However, when the uptake of gas phase amine molecules to aerosol particles is limited according to previously published estimates (0.2% of collisions leading to uptake), the amine-enhanced NPF parameterization predicts in some regions unrealistically high NPF rates (˜1000 cm-3 s-1) compared to typical observations. Our results indicate that amine-enhanced nucleation may be an important particle formation mechanism near amine source regions but also highlights the need for more tightly defined constraints on the spatial and temporal distribution of amine emissions, gas-to-particle partitioning mechanisms of amines, and condensation and coagulation sinks in global models.

  19. DNA-Assisted ?-phase Nucleation and Alignment of Molecular Dipoles in PVDF Film: A Realization of Self-Poled Bioinspired Flexible Polymer Nanogenerator for Portable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Tamang, Abiral; Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Garain, Samiran; Alam, Md Mehebub; Haeberle, Jörg; Henkel, Karsten; Schmeisser, Dieter; Mandal, Dipankar

    2015-08-01

    A flexible nanogenerator (NG) is fabricated with a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film, where deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the agent for the electroactive ?-phase nucleation. Denatured DNA is co-operating to align the molecular -CH2/-CF2 dipoles of PVDF causing piezoelectricity without electrical poling. The NG is capable of harvesting energy from a variety of easily accessible mechanical stress such as human touch, machine vibration, football juggling, and walking. The NG exhibits high piezoelectric energy conversion efficiency facilitating the instant turn-on of several green or blue light-emitting diodes. The generated energy can be used to charge capacitors providing a wide scope for the design of self-powered portable devices. PMID:26189605

  20. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  1. A dynamic phase-field model for structural transformations and twinning: Regularized interfaces with transparent prescription of complex kinetics and nucleation. Part I: Formulation and one-dimensional characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vaibhav; Dayal, Kaushik

    2015-12-01

    The motion of microstructural interfaces is important in modeling twinning and structural phase transformations. Continuum models fall into two classes: sharp-interface models, where interfaces are singular surfaces; and regularized-interface models, such as phase-field models, where interfaces are smeared out. The former are challenging for numerical solutions because the interfaces need to be explicitly tracked, but have the advantage that the kinetics of existing interfaces and the nucleation of new interfaces can be transparently and precisely prescribed. In contrast, phase-field models do not require explicit tracking of interfaces, thereby enabling relatively simple numerical calculations, but the specification of kinetics and nucleation is both restrictive and extremely opaque. This prevents straightforward calibration of phase-field models to experiment and/or molecular simulations, and breaks the multiscale hierarchy of passing information from atomic to continuum. Consequently, phase-field models cannot be confidently used in dynamic settings. This shortcoming of existing phase-field models motivates our work. We present the formulation of a phase-field model - i.e., a model with regularized interfaces that do not require explicit numerical tracking - that allows for easy and transparent prescription of complex interface kinetics and nucleation. The key ingredients are a re-parametrization of the energy density to clearly separate nucleation from kinetics; and an evolution law that comes from a conservation statement for interfaces. This enables clear prescription of nucleation - through the source term of the conservation law - and kinetics - through a distinct interfacial velocity field. A formal limit of the kinetic driving force recovers the classical continuum sharp-interface driving force, providing confidence in both the re-parametrized energy and the evolution statement. We present some 1D calculations characterizing the formulation; in a companion paper, we present more extensive 2D calculations.

  2. An in vitro study of a phase-shift nanoemulsion: a potential nucleation agent for bubble-enhanced HIFU tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Porter, Tyrone

    2010-11-01

    Phase-shift nanoemulsions have the potential to nucleate bubbles and enhance high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) cancer therapy. This emulsion consists of albumin-coated dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) droplets with a mean diameter of approximately 260 nm at 37°C. It is known that superheated perfluorocarbon droplets can be vaporized with microsecond long ultrasound pulses if the acoustic pressure exceeds a specific threshold. In addition, it is well documented that particles smaller than 400 nm can extravasate through leaky tumor vessels and accumulate in the tumor interstitial space. Thus, nanoemulsions may passively target solid tumors, thus localizing cavitation nuclei for bubble-enhanced HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, we investigate the acoustic droplet vaporization of a DDFP nanoemulsion in tissue-mimicking gels and demonstrate the ability to nucleate inertial cavitation (IC) and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. The nanoemulsion was dispersed throughout albumin-acrylamide gel phantoms and sonicated with microsecond-length HIFU pulses (f = 2 MHz). The pressure threshold needed to vaporize the nanoemulsion was measured as a function of degree of superheat, pulse length and nanoemulsion concentration. It was determined that the vaporization threshold was inversely proportional with degree of superheat and independent of pulse length and concentration within the range of values tested. It was also shown that the bubbles formed from vaporized nanoemulsions reduced the IC threshold in the gel phantoms. Finally, it was demonstrated that cavitation from vaporized nanoemulsions accelerated HIFU-mediated heating. The results from this study demonstrate that phase-shift nanoemulsions can be combined with HIFU to provide a high degree of spatial and temporal control of bubble-enhanced heating. PMID:20888685

  3. Ultrafast gas-phase electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Joseph Charles

    1998-03-01

    The temporal resolution of pump-probe, gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) has been extended to the picosecond time scale, a three order-of-magnitude improvement. With such resolution, GED can now be applied to structural studies of fundamental chemical dynamics, providing complementary information to conventional time-resolved spectroscopy techniques. This thesis gives a thorough theoretical and experimental treatment of ultrafast GED. Simulations of coherent chemical dynamics demonstrated that the evolution of molecular spatial coordinates can be determined with fs GED. Similarly, ps GED can reveal the structure of short-lived intermediates in kinetic processes, and the circular symmetries of GED patterns were predicted to break during ps rotational coherences. 620-nm output from an amplified femtosecond laser (2.5 mJ; 300 fs) was split into pump and probe arms and frequency-doubled. 95% of the laser intensity was focused onto a molecular beam. The remaining 5% was directed onto a back-illuminated 450-A silver cathode, where ultrafast electron pulses were created via the photoelectric effect and accelerated to 18 keV. Space-charge effects forced a compromise between electron number density and temporal resolution: streaking experiments revealed that the pulse duration increased by 1 ps for every 1,000 electrons. The electrons intersected the pump laser directly underneath the molecular beam orifice. Approximately 10% of the electrons scattered elastically from sample molecules within the interaction region, and the resulting diffraction pattern was recorded with a scintillator/fused fiber optic/image intensifier/charge- coupled device imaging system. Single-electron sensitivity across two-dimensions was necessary because of the extremely low electron flux, and the measured detective quantum efficiency of the imaging system was better than 0.5. Ground-state GED patterns of several molecules were recorded using ps electron pulses. Time zero for the pump-probe experiment was identified to within 1 ps using photoionization-induced lensing (PIL) of the unscattered electron beam. The first ultrafast GED investigation studied diiodomethane, and diffraction patterns were recorded at several time steps around time zero. The resulting structural transients showed that 10% of the CH2I2 dissociated into CH2I + I following excitation with the 310-nm pump laser. The estimated temporal resolution was 5 to 10 ps.

  4. Aerosol formation from the reaction of {alpha}pinene and ozone using a gas-phase kinetics-aerosol partitioning model

    SciTech Connect

    Kamens, R.; Jang, M.; Chien, C.J.; Leach, K.

    1999-05-01

    As a result of new aerosol compositional information, the authors have implemented an exploratory model for predicting aerosol yields from the reaction of {alpha}-pinene with ozone in the atmosphere. This new approach has the ability to embrace a range of different atmospheric chemical conditions, which bring about biogenic aerosol formation. A kinetic mechanism was used to describe the gas-phase reactions of {alpha}-pinene with ozone. This reaction scheme produces low vapor pressure reaction products that distribute between gas and particle phases. Some of the products have subcooled liquid vapor pressures which are low enough to initiate self-nucleation. More volatile products such as pinonic acid and pinonaldehyde will not self-nucleate but will partition onto existing particle surfaces. Partitioning was treated as an equilibrium between the rate of particle uptake and rate of particle loss of semivolatile terpene reaction products. Given estimated liquid vapor pressures and activation energies of desorption, it was possible to calculate gas-particle equilibrium constants with aerosol desorption rate constants at different temperatures. This permitted an estimate of the rate of absorption from the gas phase. Gas- and aerosol-phase reactions were linked together in one chemical mechanism, and a chemical kinetics solver was used to predict reactant and product concentrations over time. Aerosol formation from the model was then compared with aerosol production observed from outdoor chamber experiments.

  5. Equilibrium structures from gas-phase electron-diffraction data 

    E-print Network

    McCaffrey, Philip D

    2007-01-01

    For the past 75 years gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) has remained the most valuable technique for determining structures of small molecules, free from intermolecular interactions. Throughout this period many ...

  6. Fission and Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition

    E-print Network

    E. A. Cherepanov; V. A. Karnaukhov

    2007-03-30

    The temperature dependence of the liquid-drop fission barrier is considered, the critical temperature for the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter being a parameter. Experimental and calculated data on the fission probability are compared for highly excited $^{188}$Os. The calculations have been made in the framework of the statistical model. It is concluded that the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid--gas phase transition is higher than 16 MeV.

  7. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  8. Zipf's Law in the Liquid Gas Phase Transition of Nuclei

    E-print Network

    Y. G. Ma

    2000-11-03

    Zipf's law in the field of linguistics is tested in the nuclear disassembly within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model. It is found that the average cluster charge (or mass) of rank $n$ in the charge (or mass) list shows exactly inversely to its rank, i.e., there exists Zipf's law, at the phase transition temperature. This novel criterion shall be helpful to search the nuclear liquid gas phase transition experimentally and theoretically. In addition, the finite size scaling of the effective phase transition temperature at which the Zipf's law appears is studied for several systems with different mass and the critical exponents of $\

  9. Phase Transition and Fragment Production in the Lattice Gas Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulminelli, Francesca; Chomaz, Philippe

    The critical behavior of fragment production is studied within a Lattice Gas Model in the canonical ensemble. Finite size effects on the liquid-gas phase transition are analyzed by a direct calculation of the partition function, and it is shown that phase coexistence and phase transition are relevant concepts even for systems of a few tens of particles. Critical exponents are extracted from the behavior of the fragment production yield as a function of temperature by means of a finite size scaling. The result is that in a finite system well defined critical signals can be found at supercritical (Kertész line) as well as subcritical densities inside the coexistence zone.

  10. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W. (Dublin, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  11. Field driven ferromagnetic phase nucleation and propagation from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films

    SciTech Connect

    Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian M.; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-12-09

    We investigate the reversal process in antiferromagnetically coupled [Co/Pt]{sub X-1}/{l_brace}Co/Ru/[Co/Pt]{sub X-1}{r_brace}{sub 16} multilayer films by combining magnetometry and Magnetic soft X-ray Transmission Microscopy (MXTM). After out-of-plane demagnetization, a stable one dimensional ferromagnetic (FM) stripe domain phase (tiger-tail phase) for a thick stack sample (X=7 is obtained), while metastable sharp antiferromagnetic (AF) domain walls are observed in the remanent state for a thinner stack sample (X=6). When applying an external magnetic field the sharp domain walls of the thinner stack sample transform at a certain threshold field into the FM stripe domain wall phase. We present magnetic energy calculations that reveal the underlying energetics driving the overall reversal mechanisms.

  12. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  13. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamics and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model suited for detailed studies of aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1 × 1 km2) to regional scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM). The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others well suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The organic mass partitioning was either modeled with a 2-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) or with the traditional two-product model approach. In ADCHEM these models consider the diffusion limited and particle size dependent condensation and evaporation of 110 and 40 different organic compounds respectively. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 61 different species, using 130 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, aerosol dynamic processes, vertical and horizontal mixing, coupled or uncoupled condensation and the secondary organic aerosol formation. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results with little numerical diffusion when more than 50 size bins are used between 1.5 and 2500 nm, while the moving-center method is preferable when only a few size bins are selected. The particle number size distribution in the center of the urban plume from Malmö was mainly affected by dry deposition, coagulation and vertical dilution. The modeled PM2.5 mass was dominated by organic material, nitrate, sulfate and ammonium. If the condensation of HNO3 and NH3 was treated as a coupled process (pH independent) the model gave lower nitrate PM2.5 mass than if considering uncoupled condensation. Although the time of ageing from that SOA precursors are emitted until condensable products are formed is substantially different with the 2D-VBS and two product model, the models gave similar total organic mass concentrations.

  14. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  15. Simulation Approach for Microscale Noncontinuum Gas-Phase Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; Gallis, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    In microscale thermal actuators, gas-phase heat transfer from the heated beams to the adjacent unheated substrate is often the main energy-loss mechanism. Since the beam-substrate gap is comparable to the molecular mean free path, noncontinuum gas effects are important. A simulation approach is presented in which gas-phase heat transfer is described by Fourier's law in the bulk gas and by a wall boundary condition that equates the normal heat flux to the product of the gas-solid temperature difference and a heat transfer coefficient. The dimensionless parameters in this heat transfer coefficient are determined by comparison to Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for heat transfer from beams of rectangular cross section to the substrate at free-molecular to near-continuum gas pressures. This simulation approach produces reasonably accurate gas-phase heat-transfer results for wide ranges of beam geometries and gas pressures. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Evaluation of phase envelope on natural gas, condensate and gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promkotra, S.; Kangsadan, T.

    2015-03-01

    The experimentally gas hydrate are generated by condensate and natural gas. Natural gas and condensate samples are collected from a gas processing plant where is situated in the northeastern part of Thailand. Physical properties of the API gravity and density of condensate are presented in the range of 55-60° and 0.71-0.76 g/cm3. The chemical compositions of petroleum-field water are analyzed to evaluate the genesis of gas hydrate by experimental procedure. The hydrochemical compositions of petroleum-field waters are mostly the Na-Cl facies. This condition can estimate how the hydrate forms. Phase envelope of condensate is found only one phase which is liquid phase. The liquid fraction is 100% at 15°C and 101.327 kPa, with the critical pressure and temperature of 2,326 kPa and 611.5 K. However, natural gas can be separated in three phases which are vapor, liquid and solid phase with the pressure and temperature at 100 kPa and 274.2 K. The hydrate curves explicit both hydrate zone and nonhydrate zone. Phase envelope of gas hydrate from the phase diagram indicates the hydrate formation. The experimental results of hydrate form can correlate to the hydrate curve. Besides, the important factor of hydrate formation depends on impurity in the petroleum system.

  17. Fabrication and morphologies of large directly ordered L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles in gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaoqi; Wang Jianping

    2009-04-01

    Gas phase synthesis of large directly ordered L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles was studied. Simultaneous control of the chemical ordering and the size of the FePt nanoparticle was successfully achieved. It was found that the chemical ordering of the FePt nanoparticles was mainly influenced by the energy conditions (thermal environments at nucleation and growth regions), which could be adjusted by varying the process parameters including the sputtering current density, the Ar gas pressure, etc. The sizes of ordered FePt nanoparticles were more related to the Fe and Pt atoms' density at the initial stage (close to target surface). Multiply twinned structures were observed in L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles with 12 and 17 nm mean sizes, but were absent in L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles with 6 nm mean size, which caused the relatively low coercivity of large L1{sub 0} FePt nanoparticles.

  18. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; HELLER,EDWIN J.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; WONG,CHUNGNIN C.

    1999-09-16

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({micro}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  19. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  20. Irreversible loss of ice nucleation active sites in mineral dust particles caused by sulphuric acid condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Demott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Hartmann, S.; Clauss, T.; Stratmann, F.; Reitz, P.; Schneider, J.

    2010-07-01

    During the FROST-2 (FReezing Of duST) measurement campaign conducted at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), we investigated changes in the ice nucleation properties of 300 nm Arizona test dust mineral particles following thermochemical processing by varying amounts and combinations of exposure to sulphuric acid vapour, ammonia gas, water vapour, and heat. The processed aerosol's heterogeneous ice nucleation properties were determined in both the water subsaturated and supersaturated humidity regimes at -30 °C and -25 °C using Colorado State University's continuous flow diffusion chamber. The amount of sulphuric acid coating material was estimated by an aerosol mass spectrometer and from CCN-derived hygroscopicity measurements. The condensation of sulphuric acid decreased the dust particles' ice nucleation ability in proportion to the amount of sulphuric acid added. Heating the coated particles in a thermodenuder at 250 °C - intended to evaporate the sulphuric acid coating - reduced their freezing ability even further. We attribute this behaviour to accelerated acid digestion of ice active surface sites by heat. Exposing sulphuric acid coated dust to ammonia gas produced particles with similarly poor freezing potential; however a portion of their ice nucleation ability could be restored after heating in the thermodenuder. In no case did any combination of thermochemical treatments increase the ice nucleation ability of the coated mineral dust particles compared to unprocessed dust. These first measurements of the effect of identical chemical processing of dust particles on their ice nucleation ability in both water subsaturated and mixed-phase supersaturated cloud conditions revealed that ice nucleation was more sensitive to all coating treatments in the water subsaturated regime. The results clearly indicate irreversible impairment of ice nucleation activity in both regimes after condensation of concentrated sulphuric acid. This implies that the sulphuric acid coating caused permanent chemical and/or physical modification of the ice active surface sites; the possible dissolution of the coating during droplet activation did not restore all immersion/condensation-freezing ability.

  1. Irreversible loss of ice nucleation active sites in mineral dust particles caused by sulphuric acid condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Demott, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Wex, H.; Niedermeier, D.; Hartmann, S.; Clauss, T.; Stratmann, F.; Reitz, P.; Schneider, J.; Sierau, B.

    2010-12-01

    During the FROST-2 (FReezing Of duST) measurement campaign conducted at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), we investigated changes in the ice nucleation properties of 300 nm Arizona Test Dust mineral particles following thermochemical processing by varying amounts and combinations of exposure to sulphuric acid vapour, ammonia gas, water vapour, and heat. The processed particles' heterogeneous ice nucleation properties were determined in both the water subsaturated and supersaturated humidity regimes at -30 °C and -25 °C using Colorado State University's continuous flow diffusion chamber. The amount of sulphuric acid coating material was estimated by an aerosol mass spectrometer and from CCN-derived hygroscopicity measurements. The condensation of sulphuric acid decreased the dust particles' ice nucleation ability in proportion to the amount of sulphuric acid added. Heating the coated particles in a thermodenuder at 250 °C - intended to evaporate the sulphuric acid coating - reduced their freezing ability even further. We attribute this behaviour to accelerated acid digestion of ice active surface sites by heat. Exposing sulphuric acid coated dust to ammonia gas produced particles with similarly poor freezing potential; however a portion of their ice nucleation ability could be restored after heating in the thermodenuder. In no case did any combination of thermochemical treatments increase the ice nucleation ability of the coated mineral dust particles compared to unprocessed dust. These first measurements of the effect of identical chemical processing of dust particles on their ice nucleation ability under both water subsaturated and mixed-phase supersaturated cloud conditions revealed that ice nucleation was more sensitive to all coating treatments in the water subsaturated regime. The results clearly indicate irreversible impairment of ice nucleation activity in both regimes after condensation of concentrated sulphuric acid. This implies that the sulphuric acid coating caused permanent chemical and/or physical modification of the ice active surface sites; the possible dissolution of the coating during droplet activation did not restore all immersion/condensation-freezing ability.

  2. Capillary gas chromatography with two new moderately high temperature phases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatography test results are presented for two new moderately high-temperature phases of Dexsil 400-GC with free hydroxyl end groups (uncapped) and with end groups covered by trimethyl silyl groups (capped). The two Dexsil 400-GC phases were tested for their ability to resolve N-TFA-DL-(+)-2-butyl esters and n-butyl esters, as well as fatty acid methyl esters and hydrocarbon standards. Generally the more polar uncapped phase was superior to the capped phase in all separation comparisons, except for the hydrocarbons.

  3. The role of temperature in nucleation processes.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, J H; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S

    2011-02-01

    Heat and mass transfers are coupled processes, also in nucleation. In principle, a nucleating cluster would have a different temperature compared to the surrounding supersaturated old phase because of the heat release involved with attaching molecules to the cluster. In turn a difference in temperature across the cluster surface is a driving force for the mass transfer to and from the cluster. This coupling of forces in nonisothermal nucleation is described using mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamics, emphasizing measurable heat effects. An expression was obtained for the nonisothermal nucleation rate in a one-component system, in the case where a temperature difference exists between a cluster distribution and the condensed phase. The temperature is chosen as a function of the cluster size only, while the temperature of the condensed phase is held constant by a bath. The generally accepted expression for isothermal stationary nucleation is contained as a limiting case of the nonisothermal stationary nucleation rate. The equations for heat and mass transport were solved for stationary nucleation with the given cluster distribution and with the temperature controlled at the boundaries. A factor was defined for these conditions, determined by the heat conductivity of the surrounding phase and the phase transition enthalpy, to predict the deviation between isothermal and nonisothermal nucleation. For the stationary state described, the factor appears to give small deviations, even for primary nucleation of droplets in vapor, making the nonisothermal rate smaller than the isothermal one. The set of equations may lead to larger and different thermal effects under different boundary conditions, however. PMID:21303148

  4. Electrochemical Nucleation of Stable N2 Nanobubbles at Pt Nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianjin; Wiedenroth, Hilke S; German, Sean R; White, Henry S

    2015-09-23

    Exploring the nucleation of gas bubbles at interfaces is of fundamental interest. Herein, we report the nucleation of individual N2 nanobubbles at Pt nanodisk electrodes (6–90 nm) via the irreversible electrooxidation of hydrazine (N2H4 ? N2 + 4H(+) + 4e(–)). The nucleation and growth of a stable N2 nanobubble at the Pt electrode is indicated by a sudden drop in voltammetric current, a consequence of restricted mass transport of N2H4 to the electrode surface following the liquid-to-gas phase transition. The critical surface concentration of dissolved N2 required for nanobubble nucleation, CN2,critical(s), obtained from the faradaic current at the moment just prior to bubble formation, is measured to be ?0.11 M and is independent of the electrode radius and the bulk N2H4 concentration. Our results suggest that the size of stable gas bubble nuclei depends only on the local concentration of N2 near the electrode surface, consistent with previously reported studies of the electrogeneration of H2 nanobubbles. CN2,critical(s) is ?160 times larger than the N2 saturation concentration at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The residual current for N2H4 oxidation after formation of a stable N2 nanobubble at the electrode surface is proportional to the N2H4 concentration as well as the nanoelectrode radius, indicating that the dynamic equilibrium required for the existence of a stable N2 nanobubble is determined by N2H4 electrooxidation at the three phase contact line. PMID:26322525

  5. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  6. How Nanobubbles Nucleate at a Hydrophobic/Water Interface

    E-print Network

    Ing-Shouh Hwang; Chung-Kai Fang; Hsien-Chen Ko; Chih-Wen Yang; Yi-Hsien Lu

    2015-12-25

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  7. Exxon gains gas-phase patent, makes LLDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1995-04-26

    Exxon chemical says it has made linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) using metallocene catalysts at its world-scale gas-phase plant in Mont Belvieu, TX. Exxon also says it has received a broad US patent that covers the use of metallocenes in gas-phase reactors that use condensing mode technology and that it plans to license the know-how. The moves, say industry experts, greatly strengthen Exxon`s position in metallocenes, particularly in pushing metallocene-based PE into commodity markets. The use of gas-phase technology {open_quotes}had to happen{close_quotes} to allow metallocene polymers to compete as commodities, says David Highfield, v.p. at Catalyst Consultants (Spring House, PA). {open_quotes}It`s very important and very significant in widening the scope of [metallocene] technology.{close_quotes}

  8. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrehedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    By investigating the properties of quasicrystals and quasicrystal-forming liquid alloys, we may determine the role of ordering of the liquid phase in the formation of quasicrystals, leading to a better fundamental understanding of both the quasicrystal and the liquid. A quasicrystal is solid characterized by a symmetric but non-periodic arrangement of atoms, usually in the form of an icosahedron (12 atoms, 20 triangular faces). It is theorized that the short-range order in liquids takes this same form. The degree of ordering depends on the temperature of the liquid, and affects many of the liquid s properties, including specific heat, viscosity, and electrical resistivity. The MSFC role in this project includes solidification studies, phase diagram determination, and thermophysical property measurements on the liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys, all by electrostatic levitation (ESL). The viscosity of liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys is measured by the oscillating drop method, both in the stable and undercooled liquid state. The specific heat of solid, undercooled liquid, and stable liquid are measured by the radiative cooling rate of the droplets.

  9. Calculation of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.

    1995-10-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion a model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model, and a combustion model comprising an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. This two-phase model was applied to a real piece of combustion hardware in the form of a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor. For the purposes of comparison, calculations were also performed by treating the fuel as a single gaseous phase. The effect on the solution of two extreme situations of the fuel as a gas and initially as a liquid was examined. The distribution of the velocity field and the conserved scalar within the combustor, as well as the distribution of the temperature field in the reaction zone and in the exhaust, were all predicted with the combustor operating both at high-power and low-power (ground idle) conditions. The calculated exit gas temperature was compared with test rig measurements. Under both low and high-power conditions, the temperature appeared to show an improved agreement with the measured data when the calculations were performed with the spray model as compared to a single-phase calculation.

  10. Gas purification in the dense phase at the CATS terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, P.J.; Carnell, P.J.H.; Rhodes, E.F.

    1999-07-01

    The purification and transportation of natural gas at very high pressures can help to minimize the capital cost of pipelines and processing equipment. However, complex mixtures of hydrocarbons undergo unusual phase changes, such as retrograde condensation, as the temperature and pressure are altered. The Central Area Transmission System (CATS) is a joint venture of Amoci, BG, Amerada Hess, Phillips, Agip and Fina operated by Amoco on behalf of the owners. The design of the CATS terminal has provided an interesting processing challenge. The terminal receives a total of 1.6 Bscf/d of rich gas from a number of offshore fields. All are relatively sweet but the small amounts of H{sub 2}S and Hg are removed. Fixed bed technology was selected as the most economic purification process, while minimizing hydrocarbon loss and operator involvement. Conventionally, the raw gas would be split into the different hydrocarbon fractions and each would be processed separately. This would require the installation of a large number of reactors. A more elegant solution is to treat the gas on arrival at the terminal in the dense phase. This option raised questions around whether a fixed bed would be prone to fouling, could the pressure drop be kept low enough to avoid phase separation and would inadvertent wetting by condensation cause problems. Details are given of the test work carried out to prove the viability of using fixed bed technology for dense phase gas processing, the eventual design adopted and the performance over the first year of service.

  11. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sylwester, Alan P. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  12. Phase space analysis of some interacting Chaplygin gas models

    E-print Network

    M. Khurshudyan; R. Myrzakulov

    2015-09-08

    The goal of this paper is to discuss phase space analysis of some interacting Chaplygin gas models in General Relativity. Chaplygin gas is one of the fluids actively considered in modern cosmology due to the fact that it is a joint model of dark energy and dark matter. In this paper we have considered various forms of interaction term Q including linear and non linear sign changeable interactions. For each case late time attractors for the field equations are found.

  13. Effect of phase behavior on bypassing in enriched gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Bhogeswara, R.; Mohanty, K.K. )

    1994-05-01

    Enriched gas floods incorporate a complex interaction of heterogeneity, fingering, multiphase flow, and phase behavior. Experiments and simulations indicate that the optimum solvent enrichment in high-viscosity-ratio secondary gas floods can be below minimum miscibility enrichment (MME). The compositional path and resulting mobility profile in multidimensional multiple-contact miscible (MCM) or immiscible floods are different from their 1D counterparts for high-viscosity-ratio floods in heterogeneous media.

  14. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 ?s, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the hypergolic liquid propellant combination of MMH and RFNA or pure nitric acid. The first and most important effort focuses on furthering the understanding of condensed phase reactions between MMH and nitric acid. To accomplish this goal diluted MMH and nitric acid were studied in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. By tracking the generation or destruction of specific chemical species in the reacting fluid we can measure the reaction progress as a function of reactant concentration and temperature. This work provides the propulsion community with a quantitative global condensed phase reaction rate equation for MMH/nitric acid. The second effort focuses on improving understanding the recently proposed gas phase hypergolic reaction mechanisms using a streak camera based ultraviolet and visible spectrometer. The time resolution on the streak camera system allows for detailed investigation of the pre-ignition and early stage gas phase species present during the reaction between MMH and RFNA.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies of the Kinetics of Phase Changes in Clusters: Crystal Nucleation of (RbCl) 108 Clusters at 600, 550, and 500 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haishan; Huang, Jinfan

    2001-06-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations based on the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential function have been employed to study the crystal nucleation of (RbCl)108 clusters. When a completely melted (RbCl)108 cluster was cooled down at a cooling rate of 2.5×1011 K/s, nucleation and crystal growth into the NaCl-type structure crystal was observed at the temperature ?600 K. When a melted (RbCl)108 cluster was quenched from 900 K to a bath with a temperature from 600 to 500 K and kept in the bath for a time period up to ?720 ps, both nucleation and crystal growth into the NaCl-type crystals were observed. Nucleation rates of crystallization at 600, 550, and 500 K are estimated and the interfacial free energy of the liquid-solid boundary was derived from the nucleation rates using the classical nucleation theory. The diffuse interface thickness was also estimated. The possibility of the transition from NaCl-type to CsCl-type structure under high Laplace pressure is discussed.

  16. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  17. Tropospheric Measurements of Gas-Phase and Aerosol Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    .s.l. BI Bear Island 74.5 N 19.0 E bp Browning Pass, Ross Sea, Antarctica 74 36' S 163 56' E BS BeaufortTropospheric Measurements of Gas-Phase and Aerosol Chemistry in Polar Regions (Version from 2007 in polar boundary-layer ozone depletion" by Simpson et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2007, available at: http

  18. Multimaterial nanostructures Mimicking Electrodeposition in the Gas Phase

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Heiko O.

    , and Heiko O. Jacobs* An in situ gas-phase process that produces charged streams of Au, Si, TiO2, ZnO, and Ge applies is discussed and it is demonstrated that particles can be plated into pores vertically (minimum of pumpless operation and parallel nozzle-free deposition provides a scalable tool for printable flexible

  19. NEUTRAL PRODUCTS FROM GAS PHASE REARRANGEMENTS OF SIMPLE

    E-print Network

    Morton, Thomas Hellman

    NEUTRAL PRODUCTS FROM GAS PHASE REARRANGEMENTS OF SIMPLE CARBOCATIONS Thomas Hellman Morton OUTLINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 C. Distinguishing Transposition from Randomization . . . . . . . . . 221 D. Formation of Ion­Neutral Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. #12;ABSTRACT Analyzing the neutral products from ionic reactions

  20. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  1. Selected Examples of Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion chemistry is an area in mass spectrometry that has received much research interest since the mid fifties of the last century. Although the focus of mass spectrometric research has shifted the last twenty years largely to life science studies, including proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there are still several groups in the world active in gas-phase ion chemistry of both positive and negative ions, either unimolecularly and/or bimolecularly. In this tutorial lecture the formation and determination of tautomeric ion structures and intra-ionic catalyzed tautomerization in the gas phase will be discussed. In addition, an example of formation of different tautomeric structures in protic and aprotic solvents under electrospray ionization conditions will be given, as established by gas-phase infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy. This will be followed by presenting an example of time-resolved MS/MS which enables to identify the structure of an ion, generated at a particular molecular ion lifetime. At the end of the lecture the power of ion mobility will be shown in elucidating the mechanism of epimerization of bis-Tröger bases having chiral nitrogen centers. PMID:24349921

  2. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  3. Submission PDF Surfactants from the gas phase may enhance aerosol

    E-print Network

    Nenes, Athanasios

    , methylglyoxal and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon up- take-phase methylglyoxal and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically to the adsorption of methylglyoxal and acetaldehyde to the gas- aerosol interface, leading to surface tension

  4. Molecular dynamics of simulation of the nucleation, growth, inhibition and control of gas hydrates. Annual report, March 1992-June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, P.

    1993-06-01

    This is the second year of a three-year project using molecular simulation techniques tailored specifically for the determination of early-stage kinetics of natural gas hydrate crystal growth and dissolution. This year, extensive simulations of the kinetics of growth of a model system showed the appearance of magic numbers' in the growth rate versus cluster size. The feasibility of monitoring the kinetics of hydrate growth and dissolution has been demonstrated. A preliminary mechanism for hydrate dissolution has been proposed. A building block' for hydrate growth has been identified as a long-lived entity in the liquid; this single dodecahedron has also been seen by preliminary NMR studies. Inhibition studies have begun with biopolymers and will continue next year with studies of simple inhibitors, in concert with molecular spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements and the properties of critical clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wyslouzil, Barbara E.; Strey, Reinhard; Wölk, Judith; Wilemski, Gerald; Kim, Yoojeong

    2009-10-06

    By combining a range of experimental techniques, quantitative nucleation rate measurements can now be made over {approx} 20 orders of magnitude. These rates can be used to directly test the predictions of nucleation theories or scaling laws. They can also provide direct information regarding the properties of the critical clusters - the first fragments of the new phase that are in unstable equilibrium with the supersaturated mother phase. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of vapor phase nucleation with a special focus on integrating the results from supersonic nozzle and nucleation pulse chamber studies.

  6. Impact of nuclear irradiation on helium bubble nucleation at interfaces in liquid metals coupled to permeation through stainless steels

    E-print Network

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The impact of nucleating gas bubbles in the form of a dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope permeation at interfaces between liquid metals, like LLE, and structural materials, like stainless steel, has been studied. Liquid metal to structural material interfaces involving surfaces, may lower the nucleation barrier promoting bubble nucleation at active sites. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control at interfaces may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. He bubbles as a permeation barrier principle is analysed showing a significant impact on hydrogen isotope permeation, which may have a significant effect on liquid metal systems, e.g., tritium extraction systems. Liquid metals like LLE under nuclear irradiation in, e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles...

  7. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    E-print Network

    P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2005-01-27

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction $f_s$ between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  8. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  9. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ?Hads = -33 kJ mol(-1) and -36 kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  10. Insights into the gas phase oxidation of Ru(0001) on the mesoscopic scale using molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Goritzka, Jan C; Herd, Benjamin; Krause, Philipp P T; Falta, Jens; Flege, J Ingo; Over, Herbert

    2015-06-01

    We present an extensive mesoscale study of the initial gas phase oxidation of Ru(0001), employing in situ low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), micro low-energy electron diffraction (?-LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The initial oxidation was investigated in a temperature range of 500-800 K at a constant oxygen pressure of p(O2) = 4 × 10(-5) mbar. Depending to the preparation temperature a dramatic change of the growth morphology of the RuO2 film was observed. At lower temperature (580 K) the RuO2(110) film grows anisotropically oriented along the high symmetry directions of the Ru(0001) substrate. At higher temperature (680 K), new rotational domains of RuO2(110) begin to appear, which are slightly rotated by up to 20° with respect to the high symmetry direction. These rotated RuO2(110) domains grow along slightly rotated step edges and reveal an isotropic growth morphology. Both the growth speed and the nucleation rate differ from that of the oxide growth at lower temperature (580 K). PMID:25945505

  11. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND CARBONACEOUS SOLIDS IN GAS-PHASE CONDENSATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, C.; Huisken, F.; Henning, Th.; Mutschke, H.; Jansa, I. Llamas

    2009-05-01

    Carbonaceous grains represent a major component of cosmic dust. In order to understand their formation pathways, they have been prepared in the laboratory by gas-phase condensation reactions such as laser pyrolysis and laser ablation. Our studies demonstrate that the temperature in the condensation zone determines the formation pathway of carbonaceous particles. At temperatures lower than 1700 K, the condensation by-products are mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are also the precursors or building blocks for the condensing soot grains. The low-temperature condensates contain PAH mixtures that are mainly composed of volatile three to five ring systems. At condensation temperatures higher than 3500 K, fullerene-like carbon grains and fullerene compounds are formed. Fullerene fragments or complete fullerenes equip the nucleating particles. Fullerenes can be identified as soluble components. Consequently, condensation products in cool and hot astrophysical environments such as cool and hot asymptotic giant branch stars or Wolf-Rayet stars should be different and should have distinct spectral properties.

  12. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  13. Drag reduction in two-phase gas-liquid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, D.D.

    1987-02-01

    A considerable amount of drag reduction is observed in various flow regimes for two-phase gas-liquid flow of drag reducing fluids. Various attempts have been made to correlate the amount of drag reduction, but comparison with single phase flow of drag reducing fluids has not been done in a satisfactory manner. It is well known that single phase flow of drag reducing fluids exhibits a diameter effect. In order to account for this, a plot of percent drag reduction versus friction velocity, ..mu../sup */, in the absence of a polymer additive gives a simple method of estimating the amount of drag reduction for a given flow rate and pipe diameter. For two-phase flow no such comparison has been made.

  14. Phase diagram of a bulk 1d lattice Coulomb gas

    E-print Network

    V. Démery; R. Monsarrat; D. S. Dean; R. Podgornik

    2015-11-23

    The exact solution, via transfer matrix, of the simple one dimensional lattice Coulomb gas (1d LCG) model can reproduce peculiar features of ionic liquid capacitors, such as overscreening, layering, and camel- and bell-shaped capacitance curves. Using the same transfer matrix method, we now compute the bulk properties of the 1d LCG in the constant voltage ensemble. We unveil a phase diagram with rich structure exhibiting a low density disordered and high density ordered phases, separated by a first order phase transition at low temperature; the solid state at full packing can be ordered or not, depending on the temperature. This phase diagram, which is strikingly similar to its three dimensional counterpart, also sheds light on the behaviour of the confined system.

  15. Experiments on Nucleation in Different Flow Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    The vast majority of metallic engineering materials are solidified from the liquid phase. Understanding the solidification process is essential to control microstructure, which in turn, determines the properties of materials. The genesis of solidification is nucleation, where the first stable solid forms from the liquid phase. Nucleation kinetics determine the degree of undercooling and phase selection. As such, it is important to understand nucleation phenomena in order to control solidification or glass formation in metals and alloys. Early experiments in nucleation kinetics were accomplished by droplet dispersion methods [1-6]. Dilitometry was used by Turnbull and others, and more recently differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry have been used for kinetic studies. These techniques have enjoyed success; however, there are difficulties with these experiments. Since materials are dispersed in a medium, the character of the emulsion/metal interface affects the nucleation behavior. Statistics are derived from the large number of particles observed in a single experiment, but dispersions have a finite size distribution which adds to the uncertainty of the kinetic determinations. Even though temperature can be controlled quite well before the onset of nucleation, the release of the latent heat of fusion during nucleation of particles complicates the assumption of isothermality during these experiments. Containerless processing has enabled another approach to the study of nucleation kinetics [7]. With levitation techniques it is possible to undercool one sample to nucleation repeatedly in a controlled manner, such that the statistics of the nucleation process can be derived from multiple experiments on a single sample. The authors have fully developed the analysis of nucleation experiments on single samples following the suggestions of Skripov [8]. The advantage of these experiments is that the samples are directly observable. The nucleation temperature can be measured by noncontact optical pyrometry, the mass of the sample is known, and post processing analysis can be conducted on the sample. The disadvantages are that temperature measurement must have exceptionally high precision, and it is not possible to isolate specific heterogeneous sites as in droplet dispersions.

  16. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Gold- and Silica-Coated Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boies, Adam Meyer

    2011-12-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of separate core-shell materials are of interest for a variety of biomedical and industrial applications. By combining different materials at the nanoscale, particles can exhibit enhanced or multi-functional behavior such as plasmon resonance combined with superparamagnetism. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis processes are promising because they can continuously produce particles with high mass-yield rates. In this dissertation, new methods are investigated for producing gas-phase coatings of nanoparticles in an "assembly-line" fashion. Separate processes are developed to create coatings from silica and gold that can be used with a variety of core-particle chemistries. A photoinduced chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) method is used to produce silica coatings from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) on the surface of nanoparticles (diameter ˜5--70 nm). Tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) of the process demonstrates that particle coatings can be produced with controllable thicknesses (˜1--10 nm) by varying system parameters such as precursor flow rate. Electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy confirm that the photo-CVD films uniformly coat the particles and that the coatings are silica. In order to describe the coating process a chemical mechanism is proposed that includes gas-phase, surface and photochemical reactions. A chemical kinetics model of the mechanism indicates that photo-CVD coating proceeds primarily through the photodecomposition of TEOS which removes ethyl groups, thus creating activated TEOS species. The activated TEOS then adsorbs onto the surface of the particle where a series of subsequent reactions remove the remaining ethyl groups to produce a silica film with an open site for further attachment. The model results show good agreement with the experimentally measured coating trends, where increased TEOS flow increases coating thickness and increased nitrogen flow decreases coating thickness. Gold decoration of nanoparticles is accomplished by evaporation of solid gold in the presence of an aerosol flow. A hot-wire generation method is developed where gold particles are produced from a composite gold-platinum wire. Investigations of the hot-wire generator show that it can produce particles with a range of sizes and that more uniform, non-agglomerated particles are produced when using smaller diameter tubes where gas velocities across the wire are higher and recirculation zones are diminished. When gold is evaporated in the presence of silica nanoparticles, the silica aerosol is decorated by gold through either homogeneous gold nucleation and subsequent scavenging by the silica nanoparticles, or by heterogeneous nucleation on the silica surface in which the gold "balls up" due to the high surface tension of gold on silica. In both cases the resulting particles exhibit a plasmon absorbance resonance typical of gold nanoparticles (lambda˜550 nm). Finally, the silica coating and gold decoration processes are combined with a thermal plasma technique for synthesizing iron-oxide to produce tri-layer nanoparticles.

  17. Terahertz wave generation from gas plasma using a phase compensator with attosecond phase-control accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Jianming; Zhang, X.-C.

    2009-01-12

    We report the use of a precise phase compensator for the generation of intense terahertz waves from laser-induced gas plasma excited by a femtosecond pulse ({omega}) and its second harmonic (2{omega}) at both close contact and standoff distances. The attosecond accuracy phase-control capability of the device enables further optimization of the terahertz emission from gas plasma and elimination of the temporal walkoff between the {omega} and 2{omega} pulses traveling in dispersive media, resulting in intense terahertz generation at a distance of over 100 m by sending the optical beams far away and focusing them locally.

  18. Acoustic Instabilities Driven by Slip Between a Condensed Phase and the Gas Phase in Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCicco, M.; Buckmaster, J.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of gas turbine combustion chambers, this study describes how slip affects the response time of fuel sprays to pressure fluctuations in a gaseous flow field. Slip between the condensed and gas phases is shown to cause fuel vapor mass fraction fluctuations upstream of the reaction zone. A resulting oscillating heat release can drive the pressure fluctuations, depending on the phase difference between them. This generates an acoustic instability. With relevance to previous experimental results, differences are explored in the evaporation characteristics among three different fuel sprays (JP-4, JP-5, and D-2) in relation to their effect on the magnitude of the fuel vapor mass fraction perturbations.

  19. Gas phase hydroformylation of propylene and allyl alcohol with immobilized rhodium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Munck, N.A.D.

    1980-01-01

    Contents: Introduction--(Carbon monoxide as a chemical feedstock, hydroformylation of alkenes, immobilization of homogeneous catalysts, synthesis of 1,4-butanediol, and scope of this thesis); Gas phase hydroformylation of propylene with porous resin anchored rhodium complexes--(Methods of catalyst preparation and characterization); Gas phase hydroformylation of propylene with porous resin anchored rhodium complexes--(The catalytic performance); Gas phase hydroformylation of propylene with immobilized rhodium complex monolayer catalysts; Gas phase hydroformylation of allyl alcohol with supported liquid phase catalysts.

  20. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  1. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Yamina; Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 ?m/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10-9 m2/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  2. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  3. Evidence of Microporous Carbon Nanosheets Showing Fast Kinetics in both Gas Phase and Liquid Phase Environments.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Qiang; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-10-01

    Despite the great advantages of microporous carbons for applications in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices, direct experiment data and theoretical calculations on the relevance of properties and structures are quite limited. Herein, two model carbon materials are designed and synthesized, i.e., microporous carbon nanosheets (MCN) and microporous carbon spheres (MCS). They both have nearly same composition, surface chemistry, and specific surface area, known morphology, but distinguishable diffusion paths. Based on these two types of materials, a reliable relationship between the morphology with different diffusion paths and adsorption kinetics in both gas phase and liquid phase environments is established. When used for CO2 capture, MCN shows a high saturated CO2 capacity of 8.52 ?mol m(-2) and 18.4 mmol cm(-3) at 273 K and ambient pressure, and its calculated first-order rate constant is ?7.4 times higher than that of MCS. Moreover, MCN shows a quick and high uptake of Cr (VI) and a higher-rate performance for supercapacitors than MCS does. These results strongly confirm that MCN exhibits improved kinetics in gas phase separation, liquid phase enrichment, and energy storage devices due to its shorter diffusion paths and larger exposed geometrical area resulting from the nanosheet structure. PMID:26192395

  4. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY ANALYSIS OF THE INTERMEDIATE PHASES FORMED DURING THE NUCLEATION OF YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} FILM

    SciTech Connect

    WU,L.; ZHU,Y.; SLOVYOV,V.F.; WIESMANN,H.J.; SUENAGA,M.

    2001-08-05

    Recently, considerable efforts have been made in growing bi-axially aligned thick YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO) films on a flexible, textured metallic substrate for electrical power applications. The BaF{sub 2} post-deposition annealing process is one of the most promising methods. To understand the nucleation and growth mechanism of YBCO in this process, extended transmission electron microscopy analysis has been made. Here, we report on the evolution of Ba-Y oxy-fluoride which is pertinent to the epitaxial YBCO nucleation process on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrate.

  5. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas By Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Victor Roberts, Jr; Monica J. Wood

    2005-10-01

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. The study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As mentioned earlier, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. The study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly dependent on the liquid mass transfer coefficient.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer coefficient.

  8. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  9. Model of boron diffusion from gas phase in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, O. V.; Mokhov, E. N.

    2011-06-15

    Boron diffusion from the gas phase in silicon carbide is described on the basis of a two-component model. 'Shallow' boron, i.e., boron at silicon sites, is a slow component with a high surface concentration. Its diffusivity is proportional to the concentration of positively charged intrinsic point defects, which are presumably interstitial silicon atoms. 'Deep' boron, i.e., impurity-defect pairs of boron-carbon vacancy, is a fast component with lower surface concentration. The ratio between the surface concentrations of the components depends on the pressure of silicon or carbon vapors in the gas phase. The diffusion and interaction of components are described by the set of diffusion-reaction equations. The diffusion retardation observed on the concentration-profile tail is related to the capture of impurity-defect pairs and excess vacancies by traps of background impurities and defects.

  10. Gas-phase clustering of protonated amino acids with acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2010-03-01

    The gas-phase clustering reactions of protonated amino acids, AAH + (AA = Ala, Val, Ser, Phe, Pro, Gln, Lys and Arg) with acetonitrile were studied with a pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The bond energies of the AAH +·(CH 3CN) complexes range from 20 to 11 kcal/mol. While for AlaH +, ValH +, SerH +, PheH +, ProH + and GlnH +, the solvation free energies decrease linearly with increasing gas-phase basicity of AA, deviations from the correlation are observed for LysH + and ArgH +. The bonding free energies for AAH +·(CH 3CN) are compared with those for AAH +·(H 2O) and AAH +·(NH 3).

  11. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  12. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  13. Phase diagrams in the lattice restricted primitive model: From order-disorder to gas-liquid phase transition

    E-print Network

    Phase diagrams in the lattice restricted primitive model: From order-disorder to gas-liquid phase is very similar to that of the continuum RPM for high NN strength. Specifically, we have found both gas-liquid phase separation, with associated Ising critical point, and a first-order liquid-solid transition. We

  14. Zinc Nucleation and Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, B. Patrick; Nuth, J. A., III; Lilleleht, L. U.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report our experiences with zinc nucleation in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced by a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Nucleation is induced by cooling and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, at least partially crystalline zinc particles. Size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples of particles are also extracted for later analysis by SEM. The initially rapid increase in particle size is followed by a slower period of growth. We apply Scaled Nucleation Theory to our data and find that the derived critical temperature of zinc, the critical cluster size at nucleation, and the surface tension values are all in reasonably good agreement with their accepted literature values.

  15. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  16. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ? =0.23?? ? + 1.51; where H ? is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and ?? ? is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ?. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ??30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ?5 - 0.5 ?M (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  17. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  18. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOEpatents

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  19. The Vacuum Bubble Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo

    2009-07-10

    We study the nucleation of a vacuum bubble via the vacuum-to-vacuum tunneling transition in curved spacetime. We consider Coleman-de Luccia's semiclassical approximation at zero temperature in pure Einstein theory of gravity and the theory with nonminimal coupling. We discuss the dynamics of a nucleated vacuum bubble.

  20. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-01

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  1. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer coefficients for the CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system. For the CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system, the enhanced factor is not only dependent on the liquid mass transfer coefficients, but also the chemical reaction rates.

  3. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2014-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Conceptually, deposition nucleation is the only pathway that does not involve liquid water, but occurs by direct water vapor deposition onto a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact pore condensation and freezing (PCF) occurring in voids and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and host water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Homogeneous ice nucleation is expected to occur below 235 K when at least one pore is filled with water. Ice nucleation in pores may also happen in immersion mode but with a lower probability because it requires at least one active site in a water filled pore. Therefore a significant enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency is expected when temperature falls below 235 K. For a deposition nucleation process from water vapor no discontinuous change in ice nucleation efficiency should occur at T = 235 K because no liquid water is involved in this process. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T = 230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T = 210-230 K in pores with D = 2.5-3.5 nm. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters (Dp) of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with Dp = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with Dp = 3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHi > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Given the pore structure of clay minerals, PCF should be highly efficient for T < 235 K and may occur at T > 235 K in particles that exhibit active sites for immersion freezing within pores. Most ice nucleation studies on clay minerals and mineral dusts indeed show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K in accordance with PCF and are not explicable by the classical view of deposition nucleation. PCF is probably also the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism below water saturation for glassy, soot, and volcanic ash aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition onto a solid surface.

  4. Nucleation and stabilization of carbon-rich structures in interstellar media

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, N.; Král, P.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: pkral@uic.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the conditions under which carbon clusters of different sizes form and stabilize. We describe the approach to equilibrium by simulating tenuous carbon gas dynamics to long times. First, we use reactive molecular dynamics simulations to describe the nucleation of long chains, large clusters, and complex cage structures in carbon- and hydrogen-rich interstellar gas phases. We study how temperature, particle density, the presence of hydrogen, and carbon inflow affect the nucleation of molecular moieties with different characteristics, in accordance with astrophysical conditions. We extend the simulations to densities that are orders of magnitude lower than current laboratory densities, to temperatures that are relevant to circumstellar environments of planetary nebulae, and microsecond formation times. We correlate cluster size distributions from the simulations with thermodynamic equilibrium at low temperatures and gas densities, where entropy plays a significant role.

  5. Homogeneous nucleation of predominantly cubic ice confined in nanoporous alumina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhito; Duran, Hatice; Steinhart, Martin; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2015-03-11

    The nucleation mechanism of water can be precisely regulated by confinement within nanoporous alumina. We found a transition from heterogeneous nucleation of hexagonal ice (Ih) to homogeneous nucleation of predominantly cubic ice (Ic) with decreasing pore diameter. These results lead to a phase diagram of water under confinement. It contains a (stable) predominant Ic form, a form known to exist only in the upper atmosphere. Possible applications range from cryopreservation to construction materials like cement. PMID:25686014

  6. Nucleation Pathways of CO2 Condensation under Mesoporous Templated Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Byran, Matthew S.; Warren, Garfield T.; Sokol, Paul E.; Indiana University Team; NIST Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) are important elements in reducing greenhouse gas emission and combating global warming. The adsorption behavior of CO2 under mesoporous confinement at room temperature is particularly relevant. , Small Angle Scattering of X-ray (SAXS) and Neutron (SANS) were used to probe the adsorption process of CO2 under such mesoporous confinement MCM-41 and details of nucleation pathways were mapped out by fitting the scattering intensities with adsorption models. From both experiments, the nucleation of CO2 on the inner pore surface of MCM-41 is found to be a two-step process; high density liquid phase CO2 first forms uniform layers following the long range translational symmetry of the porous matrix, above one CO2 filling, determined by the pore size and temperature, capillary condensation initiates. The nucleation sites formed during capillary condensation start to separate the long range symmetry from the one at uniform layers. Finally, SAXS and SANS techniques are compared and they both showed their unique properties of probing the filling-dependent structures of adsorbed CO2 under such mesoporous system.

  7. Assembling gas-phase reaction mechanisms for high temperature inorganic systems based on quantum chemistry calculations

    E-print Network

    Swihart, Mark T.

    of atmospheric chemistry. The gas phase chemistry of many processes in high-temperature inorganic systems, from [1­6]. The gas phase chemistry of many processes in high- temperature inorganic systems, fromAssembling gas-phase reaction mechanisms for high temperature inorganic systems based on quantum

  8. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  9. DSMC Convergence for Microscale Gas-Phase Heat Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, D. J.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The convergence of Bird's Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is investigated for gas-phase heat conduction at typical microscale conditions. A hard-sphere gas is confined between two fully accommodating walls of unequal temperature. Simulations are performed for small system and local Knudsen numbers, so continuum flow exists outside the Knudsen layers. The ratio of the DSMC thermal conductivity to the Chapman-Enskog value in the central region is determined for over 200 combinations of time step, cell size, and number of computational molecules per cell. In the limit of vanishing error, this ratio approaches 1.000 to within the correlation uncertainty. In the limit of infinite computational molecules per cell, the difference from unity depends quadratically on time step and cell size as these quantities become small. The coefficients of these quadratic terms are in good agreement with Green-Kubo values found by Hadjiconstantinou, Garcia, and co-workers. These results demonstrate that DSMC can accurately simulate microscale gas-phase heat conduction. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  11. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  12. Dew nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Dew is the condensation of water vapor into liquid droplets on a substrate. It is characterized by an initial heterogeneous nucleation on a substrate and a further growth of droplets. The presence of a substrate that geometrically constrains the growth is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. As a matter of fact, growth dynamics are only dependent on substrate and drop dimensionality. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial order, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. Condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manifold. Examples can be found in medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses) and hydrology (production of drinkable water). To cite this article: D. Beysens, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  13. Spatial and vertical extent of nucleation events in the Midwestern USA: insights from the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTy) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Sørensen, L. L.; McGrath, J. G.; Hopke, P.; Petäjä, T.

    2011-02-01

    Measurements of aerosol particle physical and chemical properties, gas phase concentrations and meteorological parameters were made along a transect in southern Indiana during the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTy) experiment conducted in May 2008. These measurements indicate nucleation was observed at all three measurement sites on almost half of all sampling days. The intensity of the nucleation events, as measured by the increase in ?10 nm aerosol particle number concentrations of approximately 2×104 cm-3 over a layer of at least 300 m depth, is in good agreement with recent model results for the Midwestern USA derived using PMCAMx-UF. During the hour after termination of nucleation approximately half of the number concentration reduction is due to coagulation, while the remainder is due in equal parts to dry deposition and entrainment of relatively ultra-fine aerosol particle free troposphere air. Clear nucleation with continuous subsequent growth is only observed on days when the morning fractional cloud cover was less than 30%. It is associated with a clear transition from a strongly stratified atmosphere with low turbulence intensity and weak vertical velocities, to much a weaker vertical gradient of wind speed, increased turbulence intensity and stronger downwards vertical velocities, consistent with growth of the mixed layer and entrainment of air from the residual layer. Nucleation intensity is not very strongly determined by the prevailing condensational sink. However, there is a strong correlation between both a modified version of the Nucleation Parameter from Boy and Kulmala (2002) and ultrafine aerosol particle number concentrations, and mean morning H2SO4 concentrations and ultrafine aerosol particle number concentrations. Five A-class event days during NIFTy were characterized by values of the dimensionless nucleation parameter of Kuang et al. (2010) that are below 0.3, further indicating the applicability of their postulate that nucleation is favored by L? values below 0.7. Based on aerosol particle composition measurements it appears that aerosol particle formation and initial growth to approximately 30 nm diameter is dominated by ammonium and sulfate. Conservative estimates of the percent contribution of H2SO4 to aerosol particle growth (for sub-30 nm aerosol particles) on five A-class event days ranged from 23 to 85%.

  14. Spatial and vertical extent of nucleation events in the Midwestern USA: insights from the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTy) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Sørensen, L. L.; McGrath, J. G.; Hopke, P.; Petäjä, T.

    2010-10-01

    Measurements of aerosol particle physical and chemical properties, gas phase concentrations and meteorological parameters were made along a transect in Southern Indiana during the Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTy) experiment conducted in May 2008. These measurements indicate nucleation was observed at all three measurement sites on almost half of all sampling days. The intensity of the nucleation events, as measured by the increase in ?10 nm aerosol particle number concentrations of approximately 2×104 cm-3 over a layer of at least 300 m depth, is in good agreement with recent model results for the Midwestern USA derived using PMCAMx-UF. During the hour after termination of nucleation approximately half of the number concentration reduction is due to coagulation, while the remainder is due in equal parts to dry deposition and entrainment of relatively ultra-fine aerosol particle free troposphere air. Clear nucleation with continuous subsequent growth is only observed on days when the morning fractional cloud cover was less than 30%, and is associated with a clear transition from a strongly stratified atmosphere with low turbulence intensity and weak vertical velocities, to much a weaker vertical gradient of wind speed, increased turbulence intensity and stronger downwards vertical velocities, consistent with growth of the mixed layer and entrainment of air from the residual layer. Nucleation intensity is not very strongly determined by the prevailing condensational sink. However, there is a strong correlation between both a modified version of the Nucleation Parameter from Boy and Kulmala (2002) and ultrafine aerosol particle number concentrations, and mean morning H2SO4 concentrations and ultrafine aerosol particle number concentrations. Five A-class event days during NIFTy were characterized by values of the dimensionless nucleation parameter of Kuang et al. (2010) that are below 0.3, further indicating the applicability of their postulate that nucleation is favored by L? values below 0.7. Based on aerosol particle composition measurements it appears that aerosol particle formation and initial growth to approximately 30 nm diameter is dominated by ammonium and sulfate. Conservative estimates of the percent contribution of H2SO4 to aerosol particle growth (for sub-30 nm aerosol particles) on five A-class event days ranged from 23 to 85%.

  15. Ice nucleation terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  16. Observation of small gas-phase metal oxygen dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzreb, Klaus; Williams, Peter

    2006-02-01

    Novel small metal-oxygen dianions have been produced in the gas phase by sputtering of metallic targets with simultaneous oxygen flooding. These exotic species were observed in a mass spectrometer for ion flight times of >10 ?s. Both Cs + bombardment of an elemental Be metal surface and of a copper-based Cu(Be) alloy foil, with exposure of these sputtered surfaces to O 2 gas, produced the novel dianions of BeOn2- with n = 4, 6. Be3O42- at m/ z 45.5 and 46.5 was unambiguously identified by its isotopic abundance. In addition, CuBe2O42- at m/ z 72.5 and 73.5 was detected for O 2 flooding of Cs + sputtered Cu(Be).

  17. Phase transition or Maxwell's demon in Granular gas?

    E-print Network

    P. Jean; H. Bellenger; P. Burban; L. Ponson; P. Evesque

    2005-06-23

    Dynamics of vibro-fluidised granular gas is investigated experimentally using the transfer of grains from a compartment through a horizontal slit at a given height h . It is demonstrated that the transfer rate j varies linearly with the grain number N in the box when N remains small; however j(N) becomes strongly non linear as soon as the number n of layers is larger than 0.3; dj/dN becomes negative for n>0.4.It is found also that the maximum of j(N) increases slightly with the acceleration af_ of the vibration which excites the granular gas. Using dynamical system theory, dynamics equations are written, and a critical bifurcation is found, which explains the existence of a condensation and of a phase transition. This explains how the pseudo " Maxwell's demon" works in granular gases. This experiments contradicts recent modeling . Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

  18. Specific, trace gas induced phase transition in copper(II)oxide for highly selective gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Palzer, S.

    2014-08-01

    Here, we present results on the investigation of the percolation phase transition in copper(II)oxide (CuO) and show how it may be used to determine trace gas concentrations. This approach provides a highly selective sensing mechanism for the detection of hydrogen sulfide even in oxygen depleted atmospheres. In real-world applications, this scenario is encountered in biogas plants and natural gas facilities, where reliable H2S sensing and filtering are important because of the destructive effects H2S has on machinery. As opposed to gas detection via standard metal-oxide reaction routes, the percolation dynamics are demonstrated to be independent of the surface morphology in accordance with the universality of phase transitions. The sensing behavior of ink-jet printed CuO layers was tested for a large set of parameters including layer temperature, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and oxygen concentration, as well as the sensitivity towards other gas species. The electrical percolation of the sensing layer is heralded by a dramatic drop in the overall resistivity of the CuO layer for temperatures below 200 °C. The observed percolation phenomena in this temperature regime are unique to H2S even in comparison with related volatile thio-compounds making the sensing mechanism highly selective. At elevated temperatures above 300 °C, the phase transition does not occur. This enables two distinct operational modes which are tunable via the sensor temperature and also allows for resetting the sensing layer after an electrical breakthrough.

  19. Gas phase synthesis of two ensembles of silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; de Jong, M. M.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    Dusty plasmas provide a very favorable environment for the growth of silicon nanocrystals. For application of silicon nanocrystals in a solar cell, the fabrication of monodisperse silicon quantum dots has been challenging. We report a single step method to synthesize silicon (Si) nanoparticles in a custom designed dedicated plasma reactor. The nanoparticles produced in the gas phase belong to two different phases exhibiting different structural and optical properties. Particles made in the bulk of the plasma are aggregates of crystalline particles with a mean size of 100?nm. Particles made in locally enhanced plasma regions produced at holes present in the grounded electrode contain free-standing quantum sized particles with crystallites (with mean size of 2.95?nm) embedded within an amorphous matrix. We provide insight on different plasma processes leading to the formation of aggregates and free-standing particles. We hypothesize that the free standing particles are formed due to the excess energetic electrons present in locally enhanced discharges.

  20. Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagamadova, A. M.; Omaev, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    Gas-phase synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods on silicon and glass substrates has been studied. Using the proposed method, arrays of ZnO nanorods can be grown on these substrates without preliminary deposition of a thin ZnO sublayer and/or metal catalyst. The influence of the temperature regime, substrate arrangement, and growth time on the synthesis is considered. The shape, dimensions, and orientation of nanorods have been studied by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Luminescence spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns of oriented arrays of nanorods have been investigated.

  1. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation

    E-print Network

    Das-Gupta, S; Tsang, M B

    2000-01-01

    The equation of state of nuclear matter suggests that at suitable beam energies the disassembling hot system formed in heavy ion collisions will pass through a liquid-gas coexistence region. Searching for the signatures of the phase transition has been a very important focal point of experimental endeavours in heavy ion collisions, in the last fifteen years. Simultaneously theoretical models have been developed to provide information about the equation of state and reaction mechanisms consistent with the experimental observables. This article is a review of this endeavour.

  2. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation

    E-print Network

    S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjian; M. B. Tsang

    2000-10-23

    The equation of state of nuclear matter suggests that at suitable beam energies the disassembling hot system formed in heavy ion collisions will pass through a liquid-gas coexistence region. Searching for the signatures of the phase transition has been a very important focal point of experimental endeavours in heavy ion collisions, in the last fifteen years. Simultaneously theoretical models have been developed to provide information about the equation of state and reaction mechanisms consistent with the experimental observables. This article is a review of this endeavour.

  3. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  4. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  5. Comparing molecular photofragmentation dynamics in the gas and liquid phases.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephanie J; Murdock, Daniel; Zhang, Yuyuan; Oliver, Thomas A A; Grubb, Michael P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Greetham, Gregory M; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; Bradforth, Stephen E; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2013-05-14

    This article explores the extent to which insights gleaned from detailed studies of molecular photodissociations in the gas phase (i.e. under isolated molecule conditions) can inform our understanding of the corresponding photofragmentation processes in solution. Systems selected for comparison include a thiophenol (p-methylthiophenol), a thioanisole (p-methylthioanisole) and phenol, in vacuum and in cyclohexane solution. UV excitation in the gas phase results in RX-Y (X = O, S; Y = H, CH3) bond fission in all cases, but over timescales that vary by ~4 orders of magnitude - all of which behaviours can be rationalised on the basis of the relevant bound and dissociative excited state potential energy surfaces (PESs) accessed by UV photoexcitation, and of the conical intersections that facilitate radiationless transfer between these PESs. Time-resolved UV pump-broadband UV/visible probe and/or UV pump-broadband IR probe studies of the corresponding systems in cyclohexane solution reveal additional processes that are unique to the condensed phase. Thus, for example, the data clearly reveal evidence of (i) vibrational relaxation of the photoexcited molecules prior to their dissociation and of the radical fragments formed upon X-Y bond fission, and (ii) geminate recombination of the RX and Y products (leading to reformation of the ground state parent and/or isomeric adducts). Nonetheless, the data also show that, in each case, the characteristics (and the timescale) of the initial bond fission process that occurs under isolated molecule conditions are barely changed by the presence of a weakly interacting solvent like cyclohexane. These condensed phase studies are then extended to an ether analogue of phenol (allyl phenyl ether), wherein UV photo-induced RO-allyl bond fission constitutes the first step of a photo-Claisen rearrangement. PMID:23552482

  6. Dislocation nucleation: Diffusive origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju

    2015-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that nucleation of a first dislocation in a pristine crystal is associated with a diffusion-controlled process. Understanding this is critical for strain-engineered devices at ultrahigh stresses.

  7. Vapor liquid solid-hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) growth of ultra-long defect-free GaAs nanowires: Ab initio simulations supporting center nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    André, Yamina Lekhal, Kaddour; Hoggan, Philip; Avit, Geoffrey; Réda Ramdani, M.; Monier, Guillaume; Colas, David; Ajib, Rabih; Castelluci, Dominique; Gil, Evelyne; Cadiz, Fabian; Rowe, Alistair; Paget, Daniel; Petit, Elodie; Leroux, Christine; Trassoudaine, Agnès

    2014-05-21

    High aspect ratio, rod-like and single crystal phase GaAs nanowires (NWs) were grown by gold catalyst-assisted hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). High resolution transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed polytypism-free zinc blende (ZB) NWs over lengths of several tens of micrometers for a mean diameter of 50 nm. Micro-photoluminescence studies of individual NWs showed linewidths smaller than those reported elsewhere which is consistent with the crystalline quality of the NWs. HVPE makes use of chloride growth precursors GaCl of which high decomposition frequency after adsorption onto the liquid droplet catalysts, favors a direct and rapid introduction of the Ga atoms from the vapor phase into the droplets. High influxes of Ga and As species then yield high axial growth rate of more than 100 ?m/h. The diffusion of the Ga atoms in the liquid droplet towards the interface between the liquid and the solid nanowire was investigated by using density functional theory calculations. The diffusion coefficient of Ga atoms was estimated to be 3 × 10{sup ?9} m{sup 2}/s. The fast diffusion of Ga in the droplet favors nucleation at the liquid-solid line interface at the center of the NW. This is further evidence, provided by an alternative epitaxial method with respect to metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and molecular beam epitaxy, of the current assumption which states that this type of nucleation should always lead to the formation of the ZB cubic phase.

  8. AEROSOL NUCLEATION AND GROWTH DURING LAMINAR TUBE FLOW: MAXIMUM SATURATIONS AND NUCLEATION RATES. (R827354C008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approximate method of estimating the maximum saturation, the nucleation rate, and the total number nucleated per second during the laminar flow of a hot vapour–gas mixture along a tube with cold walls is described. The basis of the approach is that the temperature an...

  9. Assessing nucleation in cloud formation modelling for Brown Dwarf and Exoplanet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Graham; Helling, Christiane; Giles, Helen; Bromley, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Context. Substellar objects such as Brown Dwarfs and hot Jupiter exoplanets are cool enough that clouds can form in their atmospheres (Helling & Casewell 2014; A&ARv 22)). Unlike Earth, where cloud condensation nuclei are provided by the upward motion of sand or ash, in Brown Dwarf and hot Jupiters these condensation seeds form from the gas phase. This process proceeds in a stepwise chemical reaction of single monomer addition of a single nucleation species, referred to as homogeneous nucleation. The rate at which these seeds form is determined by the local thermodynamic conditions and the chemical composition of the local gas phase. Once the seed particles have formed, multiple materials are thermally stable and grow almost simultaneously by chemical surface reactions. This results in the growth of the condensation seeds to macroscopic particles of ?m size. At the same time, the gas phase becomes depleted. Once temperatures become too high for thermal stability of the cloud particle, it evaporates until its constituents return to the gas phase. Convection from deeper atmospheric layers provides element replenishment to upper, cooler layers allowing the cloud formation process to reach a stationary state (Woitke & Helling 2003; A&A 399). Aims. The most efficient nucleation is a 'winner takes all' process as the losing molecules will condense on the surface of the faster nucleating seed particle. We apply new molecular (TiO2)N-cluster and SiO vapour data to our cloud formation model in order to re-asses the question of the primary nucleation species. Methods. We apply density functional theory (B3LYP, 6-311G(d)) using the computational chemistry package GAUSSIAN 09 to derive updated thermodynamical data for (TiO2)N-clusters as input for our TiO2 seed formation model. We test both TiO2 and SiO as primary nucleates assuming a homogeneous nucleation process and by solving a system of dust moment equations and element conservation for a pre-scribed Brown Dwarf/hot Jupiter DRIFT-PHOENIX atmospheric model temperature-pressure structure. Results. We present updated Gibbs free energies for the new (TiO2)N-clusters. We discuss the effect of this new data on the resulting cloud structure and cloud properties like particle number density, grain sizes and grain composition. We find SiO to be the more efficient nucleation species. However, subsequent SiO condensation onto seed particle mantles result in element depletion, reducing the number density of gaseous SiO and reducing the efficiency of nucleation. Therefore, TiO2 remains therefore the primary nucleation species (Lee et al. 2014; arXiv:1410.6610).

  10. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional ? or ? unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond ? electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  11. Gas-phase reactivity of novel Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddin, N.G.; Eyler, J.R.; Richardson, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of soluble group 4 metallocene-based catalysts for the Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins has generated considerable interest in the field. In particular, the versatility of the Cp (cyclopentadienyl) ligand has made practical the development of a host of novel catalysts which can produce extremely regiospecific and stereospecific polymers. With further improvements in activity and stability, these catalysts are expected to make a major impact on the polymerization industry. Presently, catalyst design is driven by using the steric and electronic properties of the ligands to guide the monomer addition. However, since these ligands have considerable steric bulk, the choice of solvent will significantly affect their catalytic properties. Therefore, an understanding of the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts independent of a solvent is one of the first steps to building a better catalyst. The work in progress is a study of the reactivity of zircononene-based catalysts in the gas phase. The authors are in the process of studying the rates of reaction of a series of these compounds with H{sub 2} as well as with a number of olefins. In the gas phase, the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts is revealed and their chemistry can be studied in detail.

  12. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  13. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  14. Gas phase methylation of methyl acetoacetate. Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morizur, J.-P.; Martigny, I.; Taphanel, M.-H.; Tortajada, J.; Geribaldi, S.; Decouzon, M.

    1992-04-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and tandem mass spectrometry, complemented by semiempirical molecular orbital calculations, have been used to study gas phase methylation of methyl acetoacetate as a mixture of the keto form 1 and the enol form 2. The daughter ion spectra of the ion/molecule reaction products were compared with those of model ions generated by electron impact or chemical ionization, in order to determine the site(s) of nucleophilic reaction for the mixture. The data indicate that the site of attachment in the keto form 1 is the keto-carbonyl oxygen. For the enol form 2, no C-methylation occurs in the gas phase; the only product corresponds to O-alkylation. The results derived from D- and 13C-labelled precursors have been used to study the fragmentation mechanisms of model ions a, CH3C+ (OCH3)CH2CO2CH3; and b, CH3COCH2C+(OCH3)2. Experimental results indicate that an irreversible isomerization a --> b occurs under collisional conditions. Unimolecularly both a and b ions eliminate a neutral molecule of ketene but by different pathways. Calculations of charge distributions in 1 and 2 as well as the enthalpies of the neutral and the adduct ions are discussed.

  15. CHAOS II. Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2015-07-01

    We have observed NGC 5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs on the Large Binocular Telescope we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O iii] ?4363, [N ii] ?5755, [S iii] ?6312) and thus measure “direct” gas-phase abundances in 29 individual H ii regions. [O iii] ?4363 is only detected in two H ii regions, both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC 5194 and find excellent agreement ({{? }}[{log}({{O}}/{{H}})]? 0.05) for all but one region. We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC 5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (? ? 0.08 dex), most of which can be attributed to random error and not to intrinsic dispersion. The gas-phase abundance gradient is consistent with the gradients observed in other interacting galaxies, which tend to be shallower than gradients measured in isolated galaxies. The N/O ratio (< {log}({{N}}/{{O}})> =-0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10), relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretical models.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, S. M.; Hollingsworth, A. M.; Humbles, J.; Leblanc, C.; Potin, P.; McFiggans, G.

    2009-12-01

    Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s) by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I2 when first exposed to air. I2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv). A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently emitting kelp species and localised in time to shortly after these seaweeds are uncovered by a receding tide.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of molecular iodine emitted into the gas phase by seaweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, S. M.; Hollingsworth, A. M.; Humbles, J.; Leblanc, C.; Potin, P.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-07-01

    Time profiles of molecular iodine emissions from seven species of seaweed have been measured at high time resolution (7.5 s) by direct spectroscopic quantification of the gas phase I2 using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. Substantial differences were found between species, both in the amounts of I2 emitted when the plants were exposed to air and in the shapes of their emission time profiles. Two species of kelp, Laminaria digitata and Laminaria hyperborea, were found to be the most potent emitters, producing an intense burst of I2 when first exposed to air. I2 was also observed from Saccharina latissima and Ascophyllum nodosum but in lower amounts and with broader time profiles. I2 mixing ratios from two Fucus species and Dictyopteris membranacea were at or below the detection limit of the present instrument (25 pptv). A further set of experiments investigated the time dependence of I2 emissions and aerosol particle formation when fragments of L. digitata were exposed to desiccation in air, to ozone and to oligoguluronate stress factors. Particle formation occurred in all L. digitata stress experiments where ozone and light were present, subject to the I2 mixing ratios being above certain threshold amounts. Moreover, the particle number concentrations closely tracked variations in the I2 mixing ratios, confirming the results of previous studies that the condensable particle-forming gases derive from the photochemical oxidation of the plant's I2 emissions. This work also supports the theory that particle nucleation in the coastal atmosphere occurs in "hot-spot" regions of locally elevated concentrations of condensable gases: the greatest atmospheric concentrations of I2 and hence of condensable iodine oxides are likely to be above plants of the most efficiently emitting kelp species and localised in time to shortly after these seaweeds are uncovered by a receding tide.

  18. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  19. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6?h/d?×?50?d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  20. ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICULATE AND GAS PHASE CONTRIBUTIONS TO VASCULAR TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicular emissions (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 days, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein, 3-nitrotyrosine, and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  1. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  2. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  3. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOIs-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more there was sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics (ELVOCs) concentration and the HGF of particles of any size.

  4. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Rudich, Y.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Bones, D. L.; Reid, J. P.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Steimer, S. S.; Koop, T.; Peter, T.

    2015-09-01

    New measurements of water diffusion in aerosol particles produced from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material and from a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose) indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA droplets suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  5. Fragile-to-fragile Liquid Transition at Tg and Stable-Glass Phase Nucleation Rate Maximum at the Kauzmann Temperature TK

    E-print Network

    Robert Felix Tournier

    2015-02-23

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Dp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm *Dp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at temperatures smaller than Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atoms, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  6. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change ?p accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm×?p at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T?Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  7. Delayed luminescence of indole derivatives in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodola, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectral and kinetic characteristics of delayed luminescence of indole derivatives in the gas phase have been studied. The mechanism for delayed luminescence has been shown to depend on the disposition of the two lowest excited singlet ??*-states, 1La and 1Lb. For vapors of 3-methyl-and 2,3-dimethylindole having a small 1La-2Lb energy gap ?E (?E < 500 cm-1), prolonged light emissions with maxima at 525 and 540 nm, respectively, have been observed and interpreted as luminescence of free radicals formed due to dissociation of an N-H bond. For vapors of 5-methoxyindole having ?E ? 3700 cm-1, annihilation of delayed luminescence has been observed. The lifetimes for triplet states of 3-methyl-, 2,3-dimethyl-, and 5-methoxyindole at T = 373 K equal to 30, 26, and 65 µsec, respectively, were calculated from the kinetics of the delayed luminescence.

  8. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  9. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  10. Silicon nanowire-based devices for gas-phase sensing.

    PubMed

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J R; de Smet, Louis C P M

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  11. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  12. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  13. Optical properties of anthocyanins in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaochuan; Calzolari, Arrigo; Baroni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase optical properties of the six most common anthocyanins are studied using time-dependent density-functional theory. Different anthocyanins are classified into three groups, according to the number of low-frequency peaks displayed in the UV-vis spectrum. This behavior is analyzed in terms of one-electron transitions and interaction effects, the latter being rationalized using a suitable double-pole model. Moving from PBE to hybrid exchange-correlation functionals results in a hypsochromic shift of the optical gap. While the colors thus predicted do not quite match those observed in solution, thus highlighting the importance of solvation effects, adoption of hybrid functionals remarkably determines a greater chromatic uniformity of different molecules, in qualitative agreement with experimental evidence in acidic solutions.

  14. Structures of platinum oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kerpal, Christian; Harding, Dan J; Hermes, Alexander C; Meijer, Gerard; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-14

    The structures of small gas-phase Pt(n)O(2m)(+) (n = 1-6, m = 1, 2) cluster cations have been investigated in a combined infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) study. On the basis of the infrared spectra obtained, it is concluded that in most clusters oxygen is bound dissociatively, preferring 2-fold bridge binding motifs, sometimes combined with singly coordinated terminal binding. Comparison of the oxide cluster structures with those of bare cationic platinum clusters reported previously reveals major structural changes induced in the platinum core upon oxygen binding. For some cluster sizes the presence of the Ar messenger atom(s) is found to induce a significant change in the observed cluster structure. PMID:22894744

  15. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  16. Breakdown of a topological phase: Quantum phase transition in a loop gas model with tension

    E-print Network

    Simon Trebst; Philipp Werner; Matthias Troyer; Kirill Shtengel; Chetan Nayak

    2006-09-03

    We study the stability of topological order against local perturbations by considering the effect of a magnetic field on a spin model -- the toric code -- which is in a topological phase. The model can be mapped onto a quantum loop gas where the perturbation introduces a bare loop tension. When the loop tension is small, the topological order survives. When it is large, it drives a continuous quantum phase transition into a magnetic state. The transition can be understood as the condensation of `magnetic' vortices, leading to confinement of the elementary `charge' excitations. We also show how the topological order breaks down when the system is coupled to an Ohmic heat bath and discuss our results in the context of quantum computation applications.

  17. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  18. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kova?evi?, Danijela Bursa?; Kljusuri?, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zori?, Zoran; Dragovi?-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. PMID:26213024

  19. Gas phase hydrogen permeation in alpha titanium and carbon steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Shah, K. K.; Reeves, B. H.; Gadgeel, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and heats of Armco ingot iron and steels containing from 0.008-1.23 w/oC were annealed or normalized and machined into hollow cylinders. Coefficients of diffusion for alpha-Ti and alpha-Fe were determined by the lag-time technique. Steady state permeation experiments yield first power pressure dependence for alpha-Ti and Sievert's law square root dependence for Armco iron and carbon steels. As in the case of diffusion, permeation data confirm that alpha-titanium is subject to at least partial phase boundary reaction control while the steels are purely diffusion controlled. The permeation rate in steels also decreases as the carbon content increases. As a consequence of Sievert's law, the computed hydrogen solubility decreases as the carbon content increases. This decreases in explained in terms of hydrogen trapping at carbide interfaces. Oxidizing and nitriding the surfaces of alpha-titanium membranes result in a decrease in the permeation rate for such treatment on the gas inlet surfaces but resulted in a slight increase in the rate for such treatment on the gas outlet surfaces. This is explained in terms of a discontinuous TiH2 layer.

  20. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  1. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  2. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  3. Homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrates: unrealistic under realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Knott, Brandon C; Molinero, Valeria; Doherty, Michael F; Peters, Baron

    2012-12-01

    Methane hydrates are ice-like inclusion compounds with importance to the oil and natural gas industry, global climate change, and gas transportation and storage. The molecular mechanism by which these compounds form under conditions relevant to industry and nature remains mysterious. To understand the mechanism of methane hydrate nucleation from supersaturated aqueous solutions, we performed simulations at controlled and realistic supersaturation. We found that critical nuclei are extremely large and that homogeneous nucleation rates are extremely low. Our findings suggest that nucleation of methane hydrates under these realistic conditions cannot occur by a homogeneous mechanism. PMID:23148735

  4. Return to nucleate boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a collection of TMIN (temperature of return to nucleate boiling) correlations, evaluates them under several conditions, and compares them with a wide range of data. Purpose is to obtain the best one for use in a water reactor safety computer simulator known as TRAC-B. Return to nucleate boiling can occur in a reactor accident at either high or low pressure and flow rates. Most of the correlations yield unrealistic results under some conditions. A new correlation is proposed which overcomes many of the deficiencies.

  5. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range (0.505 to 0.575) and compared to classical nucleation rate calculations. The experimental nucleation rate density varies with volume fraction more slowly than expected theoretically. Gravity may influence nucleation because crystal nuclei are more dense than the surrounding fluid and may be gravitationally convected. The largest observed crystal size was near volume fraction 0.52. Near the freezing point, crystals should grow to large size because nuclei are sparse and there is plenty of room to grow without contacting other crystals. Near melting the opposite is true, with crystals growing into one another shortly after nucleation. The maximum crystal size seen near 0.52 volume fraction suggests that gravitational stresses are limiting crystal growth near freezing.

  6. Energetics of Selected Gas Phase Ion-Molecule Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Gary John Charles

    1990-01-01

    The energetics of the gas phase negative ion-molecule association reactions M + X^{-} = McdotX^ {-}, where M are substituted benzenes, quinones and ethylenes and X^{-} are the halide ions (F^{-} , Cl^{-}, Br ^{-} and I^{ -}), were determined by equilibrium measurements with the pulsed electron high pressure mass spectrometer (PHPMS). Evaluation of the equilibrium constants for the halide association (XA) reactions leads directly to absolute bond free energy determinations, -DeltaG _sp{XA}{circ}, in McdotX^{- }. Under conditions where halide association equilibria could not be measured directly, relative bond free energies, -DeltaDeltaG _sp{XA}{circ}, were obtained by measurements of the transfer equilibria McdotX^{-} + M^' = M + cdotM^'cdot X^{-}. Combining -DeltaDeltaG_sp {XA}{circ} values with directly determined -DeltaG _sp{XA}{circ} values leads to further absolute bond free energy determinations. The hydrogen bond free energies in the singly substituted phenol complexes YPhOHcdotBr ^{-}, combined with previous data for X^{-} = Cl ^{-} and I^{ -} from this laboratory, are used to examine the substituent effects on hydrogen bonding. The dominant contribution to YPhOHcdotBr ^{-} stabilization, where the extent of proton transfer from YPhOH to Br^{ -} is small, is due to the field effects of the substituents with pi delocalization playing only a small part. Thus, the correlation with the acidity of YPhOH, where pi delocalization is important, is not very close. Substituent effect analysis of experimentally determined bond free energies and quantum mechanical calculations are used to gain structural information on the complexes McdotX^{-} where M does not possess substituents with protic hydrogens. The results indicate the complexes M cdotX^{-} have a variety of structures, depending on X^ {-} and the nature of the substituents. The temperature dependence of the equilibrium constants for the gas phase reactions HO^ - + HOH = HO^-cdotHOH and CH_3O^- + HOCH_3 = CH_3O ^-cdotHOCH_3 was measured with the PHPMS. The enthalpy and entropy changes were obtained from van't Hoff plots of the equilibrium constants. The enthalpy changes were found to be in good agreement with experimentally determined values reported by Meot-Ner and Sieck and recent theoretical results. The agreement for the entropy changes is found not to be as good. The electron affinities of 20 cyclic diones, mostly substituted maleic and phthalic anhydrides and maleimides and phthalimides, were determined with the PHPMS by measuring gas phase electron transfer equilibria A^ {-} + B = A + B^{ -} involving these compounds and reference compounds whose electron affinities were determined previously. The effects of substituents on electron affinities are similar to those observed previously for other groups of organic compounds.

  7. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  8. Nucleation of gold nanoparticle superclusters from solution.

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Cingarapu, S; Klabunde, K J; Chakrabarti, A; Sorensen, C M

    2009-03-01

    Measurements of the solubility curve of a quasi-monodisperse gold nanoparticle solution are given. Temperature quenches from the one-phase to the two-phase regime yielded superclusters of the nanoparticle solid phase with sizes that depended on the quench depth. Classical nucleation theory was used to describe these sizes using a value of the surface tension for the nanoparticle solid phase of 0.042 erg/cm2. This value is consistent with molecule size scaling of the surface tension. In total these results show that suspensions of nanoparticles act like molecular solutions. PMID:19392530

  9. Study of methane hydrate nucleation by accelerated molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-03-01

    Recently clathrate hydrates have gained increasing attention due to their significance in energy, environment, safety, and gas transportation. The formation of such important compounds remains elusive, as a molecular level understanding of the nucleation mechanism is still missing. To gain such understanding, we combined forward flux sampling method with molecular dynamics, to simulate the nucleation process of methane hydrate. In particular, we have developed an effective order parameter that allows calculating hydrate nucleation rate explicitly for the first time. The order parameter is constructed based on the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water. Employing this approach, we conducted molecular simulation under different thermodynamics conditions. Ensembles of nucleation pathways, containing both crystalline and amorphous hydrate nuclei, were obtained and analyzed under different conditions. In particular, pressure was found to significantly affect hydrate nucleation rate and pathways. The work is supported by NSF under grant number CBET-1264438.

  10. Analysis of well test data from gas condensate reservoirs using single-phase dry gas methods: guidelines and examples 

    E-print Network

    Bonilla Kalil, Jose Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    -phase solution is much easier, we need not account for saturation with this approach. This thesis will provide example analyses and establish practical guidelines for the analysis and interpretation of well test data in gas condensate reservoirs, using the single...

  11. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-01

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900?°C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500?°C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions. PMID:26099988

  12. The Eco Logic gas-phase chemical reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Hallett, D.J.; Campbell, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    The ECO LOGIC Process is a patented gas-phase chemical reduction process suitable for the destruction of highly hazardous organic chemicals. This is a commercial-scale mobile system for on-site treatment. With the ECO LOGIC technology any combination of organic contaminants at any concentration can be treated with proven destruction and removal efficiencies (DRES) of at least 99.9999%. Unlike typical incineration systems ECO LOGIC employs a closed-loop destruction process with no uncontrolled emissions and through the use of a reducing atmosphere there is no opportunity for the incidental formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (dioxins) or dibenzofurans (furans). Organic contaminants are permanently destroyed, thus eliminating the need for off-site disposal of hazardous organic residuals. Outputs from the system can generally be recycled or reused on site. In the fall of 1992, ECO LOGIC completed a demonstration program in Bay City, Michigan, with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. An organochlorine fluid containing 26% polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as well as contaminated groundwater and soils were processed in separate streams. USEPA evaluation confirmed DREs of 99.9999%. Previously, in 1991, ECO LOGIC completed a field demonstration at Hamilton Harbour, Ontario, where audited results confirmed DREs of 99.9999% or better on polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) coal tar contaminated sediments.

  13. Visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations.

    PubMed

    Daly, Steven; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations has been studied experimentally by action-spectroscopy in a modified linear ion trap between 220 and 590 nm and by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Three bands are observed that can be assigned to the electronic transitions S0 ? S1, S0 ? S3, and S0 ? (S8,S9) according to the theoretical prediction. While the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the S3 and S8/S9 transitions, a large shift in the value of the calculated S1 transition energy is observed. A theoretical analysis of thermochromism, potential vibronic effects, and-qualitatively-electron correlation revealed it is mainly the latter that is responsible for the failure of TDDFT to accurately reproduce the S1 transition energy, and that a significant thermochromic shift is also present. Finally, we investigated the nature of the excited states by analyzing the excitations and discussed their different fragmentation behavior. We hypothesize that different contributions of local versus charge transfer excitations are responsible for 1-photon versus 2-photon fragmentation observed experimentally. PMID:25961329

  14. Gas-phase Chemistry of the Cyanate Ion, OCN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2015-10-01

    Cyanate (OCN-) is the only ion to date whose presence has been confirmed in the icy mantles that coat interstellar dust grains. Understanding the chemical behavior of cyanate at a fundamental level is therefore integral to the advancement of astrochemistry. We seek to unravel the chemistry of this intriguing anion through a combination of gas-phase experiments and theoretical explorations. Our approach is twofold: first, employing a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus, the reactions between OCN- and three of the most abundant atomic species in the interstellar medium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, are examined. Hydrogen atoms readily react by associative detachment, but the remarkable stability of OCN- does not give rise to an observable reaction with either nitrogen or oxygen atoms. To explain these results, the potential energy surfaces of several reactions are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Second, collision induced dissociation experiments involving deprotonated uracil, thymine, and cytosine in an ion trap mass spectrometer reveal an interesting connection between these pyrimidine nucleobase anions and OCN-. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and explore the possible role of OCN- as a biomolecule precursor.

  15. Aldehyde complexes with protonated peptides in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo; Ren, Jianhua; Parks, Joel H

    2011-09-29

    This Article presents a study of aldehyde complexes with peptide ions formed by bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. Desolvated ions generated by electrospray ionization are stored within a radio frequency (RF) ion trap and exposed to aldehyde vapor. Mass spectrometry measurements were performed on the resulting aldehyde complexes formed with single amino acids (LysH(+), HisH(+), and ArgH(+)) and polypeptides [Pro(n)-Lys+2H](2+) and [(Gly-Ser)(m)-Lys+2H](2+). These data identify several interesting and unexpected aspects of the aldehyde complex kinetics. It is observed that the formation of stable complexes requires the presence of water vapor. The formation kinetics of aldehyde-peptide complexes exhibits multiexponential time dependence that is modeled by interactions in the presence of structural heterogeneity. Aldehyde binding appears to involve a competition between conformers with unhindered access to protonation sites and conformers with intramolecular solvation of these sites. Proton transfer to the aldehyde ligand is responsible for the loss of the complexes. This is supported by proton affinity calculations and identified by reaction products exhibiting loss of protonation by the parent ion accompanied by the appearance of aldehyde cations. PMID:21834583

  16. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  17. Microwave spectrum and the gas phase structure of phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Lin, Wei; Oncer, Onur; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-11-01

    The microwave spectrum of phthalimide (PhI) was measured in the 4.8-9.5 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent and all unique single 13C substituted isotopologues. The rotational (MHz), centrifugal distortion (kHz), and quadrupole coupling constants (MHz) were determined for the parent to be A = 1745.6655(10), B = 1199.3309(6), C = 711.0864(3), DJ = 0.012(7), DJK = -0.05(9), 1.5?aa = 2.719(11), and 0.25(?bb - ?cc) = 1.236(3). Using the measured rotational constants of the isotopologues, a nonlinear least squares fit was performed to obtain the best fit gas phase structure. The inertial defect is ? = -0.175 amu Å2, indicating a planar structure for PhI. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVQZ provided rotational constants which are much closer to the experimental values compared to the MP2/6-311++G?? calculated values.

  18. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes-Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. his phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impur...

  20. OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2

    E-print Network

    Howk, Jay Christopher

    OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average magÀ1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Cationized Arginine in the Gas Phase: Direct Evidence for the Transition from

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Infrared Spectroscopy of Cationized Arginine in the Gas Phase: Direct Evidence for the Transition@cchem.berkeley.edu Abstract: The gas-phase structures of protonated and alkali metal cationized arginine (Arg) and arginine spectra, measured in the hydrogen-stretch region, provide compelling evidence that arginine changes from

  2. DETERMINATION OF GAS-PHASE DIMETHYL SULFATE AND MONOMETHYL HYDROGEN SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical techniques have been developed for the collection and determination of gas phase dimethyl sulfate and monomethyl sulfuric acid in the flue lines and plumes of power plants and in the ambient atmosphere. The techniques involve the collection of the gas phase species in ...

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  4. Pressure dependent phase stability transformations of GaS: A first principles study

    E-print Network

    Melnik, Roderick

    Pressure dependent phase stability transformations of GaS: A first principles study Bin Wen a principle calculations are used to determine the pressure dependent phase stability transformations for GaS polytypes at pressures up to 1000 GPa. Our results indicate that the relative stability sequence changes

  5. Volumes of Individual Amino Acid Residues in Gas-Phase Peptide Ions

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    Volumes of Individual Amino Acid Residues in Gas-Phase Peptide Ions Anne E. Counterman and David E calculations have been combined to extract average volumes of amino acid residues in gas-phase peptide ions [XxxnLys+H]+ (where Xxx is any amino acid except Lys, Arg, His, and Cys, and n ) 4 to 8). The results

  6. Protein Structure in Vacuo: Gas-Phase Conformations of BPTI and Cytochrome c

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    Protein Structure in Vacuo: Gas-Phase Conformations of BPTI and Cytochrome c Konstantin B. Shelimov of Chemistry, Northwestern UniVersity, 2145 Sheridan Road, EVanston, Illinois 60208 ReceiVed June 6, 1996X. Furthermore, gas-phase BPTI retains its compact structure when collisionally heated. These results

  7. Non-LTE dust nucleation in sub-saturated vapors

    E-print Network

    Davide Lazzati

    2007-11-09

    We use the kinetic theory of nucleation to explore the properties of dust nucleation in sub-saturated vapors. Due to radiation losses, the sub-critical clusters have a smaller temperature compared to their vapor. This alters the dynamical balance between attachment and detachment of monomers, allowing for stable nucleation of grains in vapors that are sub-saturated for their temperature. We find this effect particularly important at low densities and in the absence of a strong background radiation field. We find new conditions for stable nucleation in the n-T phase diagram. The nucleation in the non-LTE regions is likely to be at much slower rate than in the super-saturated vapors. We evaluate the nucleation rate, warning the reader that it does depend on poorly substantiated properties of the macro-molecules assumed in the computation. On the other hand, the conditions for nucleation depend only on the properties of the large stable grains and are more robust. We finally point out that this mechanism may be relevant in the early universe as an initial dust pollution mechanism, since once the interstellar medium is polluted with dust, mantle growth is likely to be dominant over non-LTE nucleation in the diffuse medium.

  8. Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

    2010-01-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

  9. Gas-phase production of single-walled carbon nanotubes from carbon monoxide: a review of the hipco process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    The latest process for producing large quantities of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to emerge from the Rice University, dubbed HiPco, is living up to its promise. The current production rates approach 450 mg/h (or 10 g/day), and nanotubes typically have no more than 7 mol % of iron impurities. Second-generation HiPco apparatus can run continuously for 7-10 days at a time. In the HiPco process nanotubes grow in high-pressure, high-temperature flowing CO on catalytic clusters of iron. Catalyst is formed in situ by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, which is delivered intact within a cold CO flow and then rapidly mixed with hot CO in the reaction zone. Upon heating, the Fe(CO)5 decomposes into atoms that condense into larger clusters. SWNTs nucleate and grow on these particles in the gas phase via CO disproportionation: CO + CO --> CO2 + C (SWNT), catalyzed by the Fe surface. The concentration of CO2 produced in this reaction is equal to that of carbon and can therefore serve as a useful real-time feedback parameter. It was used to study and optimize SWNT production as a function of temperature, pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration. The results of the parametric study are in agreement with current understanding of the nanotube formation mechanism.

  10. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  11. Nucleation in Synoptically Forced Cirrostratus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Starr, D. OC.; Reichardt, J.; DeMott, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Formation and evolution of cirrostratus in response to weak, uniform and constant synoptic forcing is simulated using a one-dimensional numerical model with explicit microphysics, in which the particle size distribution in each grid box is fully resolved. A series of tests of the model response to nucleation modes (homogeneous-freezing-only/heterogeneous nucleation) and heterogeneous nucleation parameters are performed. In the case studied here, nucleation is first activated in the prescribed moist layer. A continuous cloud-top nucleation zone with a depth depending on the vertical humidity gradient and one of the nucleation parameters is developed afterward. For the heterogeneous nucleation cases, intermittent nucleation zones in the mid-upper portion of the cloud form where the relative humidity is on the rise, because existent ice crystals do not uptake excess water vapor efficiently, and ice nuclei (IN) are available. Vertical resolution as fine as 1 m is required for realistic simulation of the homogeneous-freezing-only scenario, while the model resolution requirement is more relaxed in the cases where heterogeneous nucleation dominates. Bulk microphysical and optical properties are evaluated and compared. Ice particle number flux divergence, which is due to the vertical gradient of the gravity-induced particle sedimentation, is constantly and rapidly changing the local ice number concentration, even in the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is shallow, particle number concentration decreases rapidly as ice particles grow and sediment away from the nucleation zone. When the depth of the nucleation zone is large, a region of high ice number concentration can be sustained. The depth of nucleation zone is an important parameter to be considered in parametric treatments of ice cloud generation.

  12. Condensed-phase versus gas-phase ozonolysis of catechol: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Timothy J.; Medeiros, Nicholas; Hinrichs, Ryan Z.

    2012-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of volatile aromatic compounds contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), especially in urban environments. Aromatic SOA precursors typically require oxidation by hydroxyl radicals, although recent work suggests that ozonolysis of 1,2-benzenediols produces SOA in high yields. We employed attenuated total reflectance and transmission infrared spectroscopy to investigate the heterogeneous ozonolysis of catechol thin films. Formation of the dominant condensed-phase product muconic acid was highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) with few products detected below 40% RH and a maximum reactive uptake coefficient of ? = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-5 measured at 81.2% RH. We also performed quantum chemical calculations mapping out several reaction pathways for the homogeneous ozonolysis of gaseous catechol. 1,3-cycloaddition transition states were rate limiting with the most favorable activation energies at 45.4 and 47.1 kJ mol-1 [CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)] corresponding to addition across and adjacent to the diol Cdbnd C, respectively. Gas-phase rate constants, calculated using transition state theory, were six orders of magnitude slower than experimental values. In contrast, a calculated activation energy was lower for the ozonolysis of a catechol•H2O complex, which serves as a first-approximation for modeling the ozonolysis of condensed-phase catechol. These combined results suggests that homogeneous ozonolysis of catechol may not be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosols but that ozonolysis of surface-adsorbed catechol may contribute to SOA growth.

  13. Intermittent three-phase flow of oil, water and gas in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Naedler, M.; Mewes, D.

    1995-12-31

    Crude oil and natural gas from subsea reservoirs are exploited by conveying the mixture of oil, water and gas in underwater pipelines from wells to process facilities. The most common flow regime in these pipelines is the slug flow regime. If sufficient mixing takes place one liquid phase will be dispersed in the other phase, so that dispersions or emulsions are formed. Due to changing fluid properties and velocities of the phases the distribution of the phases changes resulting in phase inversion while the mixture is flowing downstream. In order to design multiphase transportation pipelines the knowledge of the effect of phase inversion on the characteristics of the intermittent three-phase flow of oil, water and gas is required. This paper presents experimental results for the effect of water cut and the effect of the entrance length on the characteristics of the multiphase flow in a horizontal pipeline of 48 m length and 59 mm inner diameter. The results obtained indicate that a water dominated and an oil dominated flow system can be distinguished in the pipeline flow of two immiscible liquids as well as in the aerated slug flow regime of oil, water and gas. The characteristics of the three-phase flow are of the magnitude of the characteristics of the two-phase flow of gas and the liquid phase dominating within the flow system. Equations are presented for predicting the dominating liquid phase.

  14. Laboratory Investigations of Titan Haze Formation: Characterization of Gas Phase and Particle Phase Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Sarah; Yoon, Heidi; Li, Rui; deGouw, Joost; Tolbert, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan’s atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, the discovery of very heavy ions, coupled with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation measurements that show haze absorption up to 1000 km altitude (Liang et al., 2007), indicates that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere. The energy environment of the thermosphere is significantly different from the stratosphere; in particular there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2, in the upper atmosphere. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan’s atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini (Vuitton et al., 2007). Additionally, measurements obtained by the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyzer (ACP) carried by Huygens to Titan’s surface may indicate that Titan’s aerosols contain significant amounts of nitrogen (Israël et al., 2005, 2006). The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan’s atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase products. These two techniques allow us to investigate the effect of energy source and initial CH4 concentration on the degree of nitrogen incorporation in both the gas and solid phase products.

  15. Concurrence of aqueous and gas phase contamination of groundwater in the Wattenberg oil and gas field of northern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Li, Huishu; Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of rapid development of unconventional oil and natural gas resources using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling on regional groundwater quality has received significant attention. Major concerns are methane or oil/gas related hydrocarbon (such as TPHs, BTEX including benzene, toluene, ethybenzene and xylene) leaks into the aquifer due to the failure of casing and/or stray gas migration. Previously, we investigated the relationship between oil and gas activity and dissolved methane concentration in a drinking water aquifer with the major finding being the presence of thermogenic methane contamination, but did not find detectable concentrations of TPHs or BTEX. To understand if aqueous and gas phases from the producing formation were transported concurrently to drinking water aquifers without the presence of oil/gas related hydrocarbons, the ionic composition of three water groups was studied: (1) uncontaminated deep confined aquifer, (2) suspected contaminated groundwater - deep confined aquifer containing thermogenic methane, and (3) produced water from nearby oil and gas wells that would represent aqueous phase contaminants. On the basis of quantitative and spatial analysis, we identified that the "thermogenic methane contaminated" groundwater did not have similarities to produced water in terms of ionic character (e.g. Cl/TDS ratio), but rather to the "uncontaminated" groundwater. The analysis indicates that aquifer wells with demonstrated gas phase contamination have not been contacted by an aqueous phase from oil and gas operations according to the methodology we use in this study and the current groundwater quality data from COGCC. However, the research does not prove conclusively that this the case. The results may provide insight on contamination mechanisms since improperly sealed well casing may result in stray gas but not aqueous phase transport. PMID:26519629

  16. Measurement of soil/dust arsenic by gas phase chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Maather F; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Idowu, Ademola D; Gill, Thomas E; Rojo, Lila; Barnes, Melanie; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-10-19

    A gas phase chemiluminescence (GPCL)-based method for trace measurement of arsenic has been recently described for the measurement of arsenic in water. The principle is based on the reduction of inorganic As to AsH(3) at a controlled pH (the choice of pH governs whether only As(III) or all inorganic As is converted) and the reaction of AsH(3) with O(3) to produce chemiluminescence (Idowu et al., Anal. Chem. 78 (2006) 7088-7097). The same general principle has also been used in postcolumn reaction detection of As, where As species are separated chromatographically, then converted into inorganic As by passing through a UV photochemical reactor followed by AsH(3) generation and CL reaction with ozone (Idowu and Dasgupta, Anal. Chem. 79 (2007) 9197-9204). In the present paper we describe the measurement of As in different soil and dust samples by serial extraction with water, citric acid, sulfuric acid and nitric acid. We also compare parallel measurements for total As by induction coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). As(V) was the only species found in our samples. Because of chloride interference of isobaric ArCl(+) ICP-MS analyses could only be carried out by standard addition; these results were highly correlated with direct GPCL and LC-GPCL results (r(2)=0.9935 and 1.0000, respectively). The limit of detection (LOD) in the extracts was 0.36 microg/L by direct GPCL compared to 0.1 microg/L by ICP-MS. In sulfuric acid-based extracts, the LC-GPCL method provided LODs inferior to those previously observed for water-based standards and were 2.6, 1.3, 6.7, and 6.4 microg/L for As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), respectively. PMID:18804648

  17. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1?:?10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 ? 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  18. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  19. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  20. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  1. Bubble nucleation in polymer–CO2 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofei; Cristancho, Diego E; Costeux, Stéphane; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2013-10-28

    We combine density-functional theory with the string method to calculate the minimum free energy path of bubble nucleation in two polymer–CO2 mixture systems, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)–CO2 and polystyrene (PS)–CO2. Nucleation is initiated by saturating the polymer liquid with high pressure CO2 and subsequently reducing the pressure to ambient condition. Below a critical temperature (Tc), we find that there is a discontinuous drop in the nucleation barrier as a function of increased initial CO2 pressure (P0), as a result of an underlying metastable transition from a CO2-rich-vapor phase to a CO2-rich-liquid phase. The nucleation barrier is generally higher for PS–CO2 than for PMMA–CO2 under the same temperature and pressure conditions, and both higher temperature and higher initial pressure are required to lower the nucleation barrier for PS–CO2 to experimentally relevant ranges. Classical nucleation theory completely fails to capture the structural features of the bubble nucleus and severely underestimates the nucleation barrier. PMID:26029777

  2. Nucleation of metals by strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, M.; Karpov, V. G.

    2012-04-01

    Recent work on phase transitions in chalcogenides (underlying phase change memory) led to a theory of symmetry-breaking field effects, predicting needle-shaped metallic nuclei and exponentially accelerated nucleation rates. Here, we predict that, in general, any insulator will eventually form metallic inclusions if immersed in a sufficient electric field. These phase transitions are driven, not simply enhanced, by an electric field. Hence, metals can be formed under conditions where they would be otherwise unexpected. This opens the venue of field induced materials synthesis. As a technologically important example, we consider the field driven synthesis of metallic hydrogen at normal pressure.

  3. The Vaguries of Pyroxene Nucleation and the Resulting Chondrule Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, G. E.; Le, L.

    2004-01-01

    Pyroxene is a major phase in chondrules, but often follows olivine in the crystallization sequence and depending on the melting temperature and time may not nucleate readily upon cooling. Dynamic crystallization experiments based on total or near total melting were used to study PO (porphyritic olivine) and PP (Porphyritic pyroxene) compositions as defined by. The experiments showed that pyroxene nucleated only at subliquidus temperatures in the PP melts and rarely in the PO melts. Porphyritic chondrules with phenocrysts of both olivine and pyroxene (POP chondrules) were not easily produced in the experiments. POP chondrules are common and it is important for deciphering their formation that we understand pyroxene nucleation properties of chondrule melts.

  4. A phenomenological theory of nonphotochemical laser induced nucleation.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Marco; Karpov, Victor G

    2012-10-21

    We present a theory of electric field driven phase transitions that occur via nucleation of needle-shaped, metallic particles. The predictions of this theory have much in common with the observations related to nonphotochemical laser induced nucleation (NPLIN). That connection is rather paradoxical because the final NPLIN products are dielectric crystals. By elaborating on the unique features of field induced transitions and the complexities of liquid systems, we discuss how our theory may provide some insight into the open question of the NPLIN mechanism. A qualitative description of the post nucleation stage and conjectures about the microscopic nature of the metallic particles in liquids are also provided. PMID:22955565

  5. Microgravity nucleation and particle coagulation experiments support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilleleht, L. U.; Ferguson, F. T.; Stephens, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Modifications to the nucleation apparatus suggested by our first microgravity flight campaign are complete. These included a complete 'repackaging' of the equipment into three racks along with an improved vapor spout shutter mechanism and additional thermocouples for gas temperature measurements. The 'repackaged' apparatus was used in two KC-135 campaigns: one during the week of June 3, 1991 consisting of two flights with Mg and two with Zn, and another series consisting of three flights with Zn during the week of September 23, 1991. Our effort then was focused on the analysis of these data, including further development of the mathematical models to generate the values of temperature and supersaturation at the observed points of nucleation. The efforts to apply Hale's Scaled Nucleation Theory to our experimental data have met with only limited success, most likely due to still inadequate temperature field determination. Work on the development of a preliminary particle collector system designed to capture particles from the region of nucleation and condensation, as well as from other parts of the chamber, are discussed.

  6. Kinetics of nucleation with decreasing rate of growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurasov, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Extension of analytical description of the stage of nucleation to the case of the slow growth rates of the embryos growth has been constructed. The metastable phase consumption by the already formed embryos affects the nucleation rate which leads to the non-linear evolution. The power exponentials which are smaller than that for the diffusion growth are chosen as the model laws of the embryos growth. All main characteristics of the nucleation period including the form of the embryos sizes spectrum are found. Analytical description of nucleation in the closed systems as well as in the open systems with the metastable phase influx is presented. It is shown that the relative errors of this description are small.

  7. Polymer crystal-melt interfaces and nucleation in polyethylene

    E-print Network

    Scott T. Milner

    2010-09-22

    Kinetic barriers cause polymers to crystallize incompletely, into nanoscale lamellae interleaved with amorphous regions. As a result, crystalline polymers are full of crystal-melt interfaces, which dominate their physical properties. The longstanding theoretical challenge to understand these interfaces has new relevance, because of accumulating evidence that polymer crystals often nucleate via a metastable, partially ordered "rotator" phase. To test this idea requires a theory of the bulk and interfacial free energies of the critical nucleus. We present a new approach to the crystal-melt interface, which represents the amorphous region as a grafted brush of loops in a self-consistent pressure field. We combine this theory with estimates of bulk free energy differences, to calculate nucleation barriers and rates via rotator versus crystal nuclei for polyethylene. We find rotator-phase nucleation is indeed favored throughout the temperature range where nucleation is observed. Our methods can be extended to other polymers.

  8. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be reconciled, and that is suitable for application in atmospheric modeling studies.

  9. On the ice nucleation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be reconciled, and that is suitable for application in atmospheric modeling studies.

  10. Nucleation rate analysis of methane hydrate from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C; Beckham, Gregg T; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates calculated by MFPT and SP methods are within 5%, and the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates. PMID:25876773

  11. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  12. Two- and three-phase mixing in a concentric draft tube gas-lift fermentor.

    PubMed

    Kennard, M; Janekeh, M

    1991-12-20

    Two- and three-phase mixing studies were carried out in a 44-L concentric draft tube gas-lift fermentor. It was proposed to use the fermentor for the production of solvents using immobilized bacteria. Bubble size, gas holdup, liquid velocities, circulation, and mixing times were determined for various superficial gas velocities in distilled water, starch, carboxymethyl cellulose, and ethanol solutions. The observed trends for two phase mixing were similar to other studies but the results were found to be more sensitive to liquid properties. This was possibly due to the large value of downcomer to riser area used in this study. Mixing in three phases highlighted the difficulty in predicting the effect of adding solids to the gas-liquid system. Results showed that the gas-lift fermentor was ideally suited to dealing with three phases but more work is necessary before accurate models can be developed to account for the effect of solids. PMID:18600726

  13. Substrate orientation effects on the nucleation and growth of the M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} phase Ti{sub 2}AlC

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D.; Guenette, Mathew C.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.; Persson, Per O. A.; Rosen, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    The M{sub n+1}AX{sub n} (MAX) phases are ternary compounds comprising alternating layers of a transition metal carbide or nitride and a third ''A-group'' element. The effect of substrate orientation on the growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC MAX phase films was investigated by studying pulsed cathodic arc deposited samples grown on sapphire cut along the (0001), (1010), and (1102) crystallographic planes. Characterization of these samples was by x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. On the (1010) substrate, tilted (1018) growth of Ti{sub 2}AlC was found, such that the TiC octahedra of the MAX phase structure have the same orientation as a spontaneously formed epitaxial TiC sublayer, preserving the typical TiC-Ti{sub 2}AlC epitaxial relationship and confirming the importance of this relationship in determining MAX phase film orientation. An additional component of Ti{sub 2}AlC with tilted fiber texture was observed in this sample; tilted fiber texture, or axiotaxy, has not previously been seen in MAX phase films.

  14. Transient nucleation in condensed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Greer, A. L.; Thompson, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    Using classical nucleation theory we consider transient nucleation occurring in a one-component, condensed system under isothermal conditions. We obtain an exact closed-form expression for the time dependent cluster populations. In addition, a more versatile approach is developed: a numerical simulation technique which models directly the reactions by which clusters are produced. This simulation demonstrates the evolution of cluster populations and nucleation rate in the transient regime. Results from the simulation are verified by comparison with exact analytical solutions for the steady state. Experimental methods for measuring transient nucleation are assessed, and it is demonstrated that the observed behavior depends on the method used. The effect of preexisting cluster distributions is studied. Previous analytical and numerical treatments of transient nucleation are compared to the solutions obtained from the simulation. The simple expressions of Kashchiev are shown to give good descriptions of the nucleation behavior.

  15. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important mechanism for the glaciation of mixed phase clouds and may also be relevant for cloud formation and dehydration at the cirrus cloud level. It is thought to proceed through different mechanisms, namely contact, condensation, immersion and deposition nucleation. Supposedly, deposition nucleation is the only pathway which does not involve liquid water but occurs by direct water vapor deposition on a surface. This study challenges this classical view by putting forward the hypothesis that what is called deposition nucleation is in fact homogeneous or immersion nucleation occurring in pores and cavities that may form between aggregated primary particles and fill with water at relative humidity RHw < 100% because of the inverse Kelvin effect. Evidence for this hypothesis of pore condensation and freezing (PCF) originates from a number of only loosely connected scientific areas. The prime example for PCF is ice nucleation in clay minerals and mineral dusts, for which the data base is best. Studies on freezing in confinement carried out on mesoporous silica materials such as SBA-15, SBA-16, MCM-41, zeolites and KIT have shown that homogeneous ice nucleation occurs abruptly at T=230-235 K in pores with diameters (D) of 3.5-4 nm or larger but only gradually at T=210-230 K in pores with D=2.5-3.5 nm. Melting temperatures in pores are depressed by an amount that can be described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Water adsorption isotherms of MCM-41 show that pores with D=3.5-4 nm fill with water at RHw = 56-60% in accordance with an inverse Kelvin effect. Water in such pores should freeze homogeneously for T < 235 K even before relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) reaches ice saturation. Ice crystal growth by water vapor deposition from the gas phase is therefore expected to set in as soon as RHw > 100%. Pores with D > 7.5 nm fill with water at RHi > 100% for T < 235 K and are likely to freeze homogeneously as soon as they are filled with water. Water in pores can freeze in immersion mode at T > 235 K if the pore walls contain an active site. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with T = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Many clay minerals and mineral dusts show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K. Such an increase is difficult to explain when ice nucleation is supposed to occur by a deposition mechanism, but evident when assuming freezing in pores, because for homogeneous ice nucleation only small pore volumes are needed, while heterogeneous ice nucleation requires larger pore structures to contain at least one active site for immersion nucleation. Together, these pieces of evidence strongly suggest that ice nucleation within pores should be the prevailing freezing mechanism of clay minerals for RHw below water saturation. Extending the analysis to other types of ice nuclei shows that freezing in pores and cracks is probably the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism for glassy and volcanic ash aerosols at RHw below water saturation. Freezing of water in carbon nanotubes might be of significance for ice nucleation by soot aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition on a solid surface. Inspection of ice nuclei with a close lattice match to ice, such as silver iodide or SnomaxTM, show that for high ice nucleation efficiency below water saturation the presence of impurities or cracks on the surface may be essential. Soluble impurities promote the formation of a liquid phase below water saturation in patches on the surface or as a complete surface layer that offers an environment for immersion freezing. If porous aerosol particles come in contact with semivolatile vapors, these will condense preferentially in pores before a coating on

  16. Homogeneous nucleation of magnesium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Klein, D H; Smith, M D; Driy, J A

    1967-08-01

    The rate of homogeneous nucleation of magnesium hydroxide has been determined as a function of solution concentration, using a quasi-homogeneous precipitation technique and electronic particle counting. The nucleation rate becomes measurable at super-saturations of about 4, and is dependent on the 33rd power of the product aMgaOH(2). The experimental results are consistent with nucleation theory. The nucleus-solution interfacial energy is calculated to be 115 erg/cm(2). PMID:18960187

  17. An investigation into the flow behavior of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in normal gravity with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.; Heist, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid behavior in normal gravity of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in an enclosed circular cylinder heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above was investigated. Flow visualization was used to obtain qualitative data on both systems. The use of thermochromatic liquid crystal particles as liquid phase flow tracers was evaluated as a possible means of simultaneously gathering both flow pattern and temperature gradient data for the two phase system. The results of the flow visualization experiments performed on both systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the behavior of such systems in a reduced gravity environment and aid in the verification of a numerical model of the system.

  18. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    E-print Network

    distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud NIN mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed. 1. Introduction Observations indicateA FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate

  19. Earthquake nucleation in intact or healed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Viesca, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are generated because faults lose strength with increasing slip and slip rate. Among the simplest representations of slip-dependent strength is the linear slip-weakening model, characterized by a linear drop to a residual friction. However, healed fault rocks often exhibit some slip strengthening before the onset of weakening. Here we investigate the effect of such a slip-hardening phase on the initial growth of a slip patch and on the nucleation of rupture instabilities. We assume a piecewise linear strength versus slip constitutive relation. We compute stress and slip distributions for in-plane or antiplane rupture configurations in response to an increasing, locally peaked (parabolic with curvature ?) stress profile. In contrast with the strictly linear slip-weakening case, our calculations show that the curvature of the loading profile and the level of background stress strongly influence the nucleation size. Even for small amounts of slip hardening, we find that the critical nucleation size scales with 1/?? for ??0, i.e., crack growth remains stable up to very large crack sizes for sufficiently smooth loading profiles. Likewise, when the background stress ?b is very close to the initial strength ?c, the critical crack size scales with 1/?(?c-?b). An eigenvalue analysis shows that the nucleation length increases as the proportion of the crack undergoing slip hardening increases, irrespective of the details of the loading profile. Overall, our results indicate that earthquake nucleation sizes can significantly increase due to slip hardening (e.g., in healed fault rocks), especially when the background loading is smooth.

  20. Factors controlling the ice nucleating abilities of ?-pinene SOA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Zhou, S.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-07-01

    The ice nucleation abilities of fresh, water-soluble, internally mixed, and photochemically oxidized ?-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles were investigated at cirrus cloud temperatures in a continuous flow diffusion chamber. SOA sampled from a flow tube (SOA-fresh-FT) mimicked freshly generated particles, while the water-soluble organic compound fraction from a FT and smog chamber (SOA-WSOC-FT, SOA-WSOC-SC) mimicked cloud-processed particles. SOA-fresh-FT, SOA-WSOC-FT, and SOA-WSOC-SC particles were not highly active at nucleating ice between 233 K and 213 K, with activation onsets (i.e., 0.1% of particles forming ice) at or slightly above the theoretical homogeneous freezing line. A significant increase in the O/C of SOA-WSOC-SC via aqueous phase OH oxidation did not modify the ice nucleation abilities, indicating that the detailed composition of the particles is not of paramount importance to their ice nucleating abilities. Instead, precooling the SOA-WSOC-FT and SOA-WSOC-SC particles to 233 K dropped their ice nucleation onsets by up to 20% relative humidity with respect to ice, with lower temperatures likely driving the particles to be more viscous and solid-like. However, it is possible that preactivation contributed to the reduction of the ice nucleation onsets. Particles composed of both SOA-WSOC and ammonium sulfate (AS) were significantly less active in the deposition nucleation mode than pure, solid AS particles.

  1. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore W; Ladino, Luis A; Alpert, Peter A; Breckels, Mark N; Brooks, Ian M; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Huffman, J Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P; Mason, Ryan H; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A; Nájera, Juan J; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F; Wong, Jenny P S; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Aller, Josephine Y; Bertram, Allan K; Knopf, Daniel A; Murray, Benjamin J

    2015-09-10

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26354482

  2. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, Mark N.; Brooks, Ian M.; Browse, Jo; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Huffman, J. Alex; Judd, Christopher; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Mason, Ryan H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, Lisa A.; Nájera, Juan J.; Polishchuk, Elena; Rae, Stuart; Schiller, Corinne L.; Si, Meng; Temprado, Jesús Vergara; Whale, Thomas F.; Wong, Jenny P. S.; Wurl, Oliver; Yakobi-Hancock, Jacqueline D.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-01

    The amount of ice present in clouds can affect cloud lifetime, precipitation and radiative properties. The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice-nucleating particles. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice. Sea-spray aerosol contains large amounts of organic material that is ejected into the atmosphere during bubble bursting at the organically enriched sea-air interface or sea surface microlayer. Here we show that organic material in the sea surface microlayer nucleates ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase cloud and high-altitude ice cloud formation. The ice-nucleating material is probably biogenic and less than approximately 0.2 micrometres in size. We find that exudates separated from cells of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana nucleate ice, and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates is a likely candidate for the observed ice-nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. Global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, in combination with our measurements, suggest that marine organic material may be an important source of ice-nucleating particles in remote marine environments such as the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Evolution of the Normal State of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas from a Pseudogap Phase to a Molecular Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Perali, A.; Palestini, F.; Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C.; Stewart, J. T.; Gaebler, J. P.; Drake, T. E.; Jin, D. S.

    2011-02-11

    Wave-vector resolved radio frequency spectroscopy data for an ultracold trapped Fermi gas are reported for several couplings at T{sub c}, and extensively analyzed in terms of a pairing-fluctuation theory. We map the evolution of a strongly interacting Fermi gas from the pseudogap phase into a fully gapped molecular Bose gas as a function of the interaction strength, which is marked by a rapid disappearance of a remnant Fermi surface in the single-particle dispersion. We also show that our theory of a pseudogap phase is consistent with a recent experimental observation as well as with quantum Monte Carlo data of thermodynamic quantities of a unitary Fermi gas above T{sub c}.

  4. J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1999, 239248 239 Formation of secondary ozonides in the gas phase low-temperature

    E-print Network

    Haas, Yehuda

    J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1999, 239­248 239 Formation of secondary ozonides in the gas phase, Accepted 26th November 1998 The gas-phase ozonation of a series of alkenes RCH CH2 (R = Et, Hex), trans for the conversion of trans- RHC CHR (R = Me, Et, Pri ) to trans-secondary ozonides in the gas phase is similar

  5. Gas-Phase Molecular Halogen Formation from NaCl and NaBr Aerosols: When Are Interface Reactions Important?

    E-print Network

    Dabdub, Donald

    Gas-Phase Molecular Halogen Formation from NaCl and NaBr Aerosols: When Are Interface Reactions at the surface of sea-salt particles have been suggested as an important source of photolyzable gas-phase halogen the influence of interface reactions on gas-phase molecular halogen production from pure NaCl and NaBr aerosols

  6. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DEPOSITION OF A COMPOUND THAT PARTITIONS BETWEEN GAS AND PARTICULATE PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    How will atmospheric deposition behave for a compound when it reversibly sorbs between gas and atmospheric particulate phases? Two factors influence the answer. What physical mechanisms occur in the sorption process? What are the concentration and composition of atmospheric par...

  8. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol

    PubMed Central

    Axson, Jessica L.; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O.; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, KP, for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, ?G°, obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20142510

  9. Gas-phase structures of molecules containing heavy p-block elements 

    E-print Network

    Wann, Derek A

    Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) is the method of choice for determining the structures of molecules containing between two and 100 atoms, free from intermolecular interaction. However, for many molecules it becomes ...

  10. Discontinuous Bubble Nucleation Due to a Metastable Condensation Transition in Polymer-CO2 Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofei; Cristancho, Diego E; Costeux, Stéphane; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2013-05-16

    We combine a newly developed density-functional theory with the string method to calculate the minimum free energy path of bubble nucleation in compressible polymer-CO2 mixtures. Nucleation is initiated by saturating the polymer liquid with high pressure CO2 and subsequently reducing the pressure to ambient condition. Below a critical temperature, we find that there is a discontinuous drop in the nucleation barrier with increased initial CO2 pressure, as a result of an underlying metastable transition from a CO2-rich-vapor phase to a CO2-rich-liquid phase. This phenomenon is different from previously proposed nucleation mechanisms involving metastable transitions. PMID:26282971

  11. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  12. Gas phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Cox, Tony; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion of gas molecules to the surface is the first step for all gas-surface reactions. Gas phase diffusion can influence and sometimes even limit the overall rates of these reactions. However, there is no database of the gas phase diffusion coefficients of atmospheric reactive trace gases. We have compiled and evaluated, for the first time, the diffusivities (pressure independent diffusion coefficients) of atmospheric inorganic (Tang et al., 2014) and organic reactive trace gases reported in the literature. The measured diffusivities are then compared with estimated values using a semi-empirical method developed by Fuller et al. (1966). The diffusivities estimated using Fuller's method are typically found to be in good agreement with the measured values within ±30%, and therefore Fuller's method can be used to estimate the diffusivities of trace gases for which experimental data are not available. The two experimental methods used in the atmospheric chemistry community to measure the gas phase diffusion coefficients are also discussed.

  13. Phenolic oxime copper complexes: a gas phase investigation 

    E-print Network

    Roach, Benjamin David

    2011-06-27

    This thesis explores the use of mass spectrometry to define the strengths, and understand solution phase speciation of phenolic oxime-based solvent extractants of the types used in the hydrometallurgical recovery of ...

  14. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  15. Isospin dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    W. L. Qian; Ru-Keng Su; Ping Wang

    2000-08-30

    By using the Furnstahl, Serot and Tang's model, the effect of density dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon-rho-meson (NN-rho) coupling on the liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated. A limit pressure p_lim has been found. We found that the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place if p>p_lim. The binodal surface for density dependent NN-rho coupling situation is addressed.

  16. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  17. Conformational preferences of flavone and isoflavone in the gas phase, aqueous solution and organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiki, Hamilton Mitsugu; Alemán, Carlos; Galembeck, Sérgio Emanuel

    1998-05-01

    Flavone and isoflavone are an important class of secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in nature. In this Letter we have determined the conformational preferences of each compound in the gas phase, aqueous solution and organic solution. Gas-phase calculations were performed using AM1, MNDO, HF/3-21G, HF/6-31G(d) and B3-LYP/6-31G(d) calculations. Besides solution calculations were performed using the MST solvation model.

  18. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  19. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  20. Phase transitions in a 3 dimensional lattice loop gas

    E-print Network

    Richard MacKenzie; F. Nebia-Rahal; M. B. Paranjape

    2010-07-20

    We investigate, via Monte Carlo simulations, the phase structure of a system of closed, nonintersecting but otherwise non-interacting, loops in 3 Euclidean dimensions. The loops correspond to closed trajectories of massive particles and we find a phase transition as a function of their mass. We identify the order parameter as the average length of the loops at equilibrium. This order parameter exhibits a sharp increase as the mass is decreased through a critical value, the behaviour seems to be a cross-over transition. We believe that the model represents an effective description of the broken-symmetry sector of the 2+1 dimensional abelian Higgs model, in the extreme strong coupling limit. The massive gauge bosons and the neutral scalars are decoupled, and the relevant low-lying excitations correspond to vortices and anti-vortices. The functional integral can be approximated by a sum over simple, closed vortex loop configurations. We present a novel fashion to generate non-intersecting closed loops, starting from a tetrahedral tessellation of three space. The two phases that we find admit the following interpretation: the usual Higgs phase and a novel phase which is heralded by the appearance of effectively infinitely long loops. We compute the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator and that of the Polyakov loop operator. The Wilson loop exhibits perimeter law behaviour in both phases implying that the transition corresponds neither to the restoration of symmetry nor to confinement. The effective interaction between external charges is screened in both phases, however there is a dramatic increase in the polarization cloud in the novel phase as shown by the energy shift introduced by the Wilson loop.

  1. Heat transfer in nucleate boiling of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunder, E.U.

    1983-10-01

    An equation for predicting heat transfer coefficients for nucleate boiling of mixtures is derived. This expression contains only one adjustable parameter and the liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient. If the adjustable parameter is put equal to unity, comparison with the most recent data for the SF/sub 6/-CF/sub 2/-Cl/sub 2/ system gives a mass transfer coefficient of 2 X 10/sup -4/ m/s, which is of the same order of magnitude as the value obtained in physical and chemical absorption and in fallingfilm vaporization. The new equation corresponds particularly well with the experimental observation that the heat transfer coefficient is less dependent on the heat flux density and the pressure for nucleate boiling of mixtures than in the case of the pure components.

  2. Hysteresis and nucleation in condensed matter

    E-print Network

    Yuri Mnyukh

    2011-03-11

    The physical origin of hysteresis in condensed matter had not been previously identified. The current "science of hysteresis" is useful, but limited by phenomenological modeling. This article fills the void by revealing the exclusive cause of the hysteresis in structural, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phase transitions, as well as upon magnetization in magnetic fields and polarization in electric fields. This exclusive cause is nucleation lags. The lags are inevitable due to the nucleation specifics, far from the classical "random fluctuation" model. A major assumption that spin orientation is determined by the orientation of its carrier explains why ferromagnetic transitions and magnetization in magnetic fields materialize by structural rearrangements at interfaces, as well as why magnetization by "rotation" is impossible. Formation of the structural and ferromagnetic hysteresis loops is considered in detail.

  3. Nucleation in hydrophobic cylindrical pores: a lattice model.

    PubMed

    Saugey, A; Bocquet, L; Barrat, J L

    2005-04-14

    We consider the nucleation process associated with capillary condensation of a vapor in a hydrophobic cylindrical pore (capillary evaporation). The liquid-vapor transition is described within the framework of a simple lattice model. The phase properties are characterized both at the mean-field level and with Monte Carlo simulations. The nucleation process for the liquid to vapor transition is then specifically considered. Using umbrella sampling techniques, we show that nucleation occurs through the condensation of an asymmetric vapor bubble at the pore surface. Even for highly confined systems, good agreement is found with macroscopic considerations based on classical nucleation theory. The results are discussed in the context of recent experimental work on the extrusion of water in hydrophobic pores. PMID:16851732

  4. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (?-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (?-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The ?-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple ?-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a ?-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to ?-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple ?-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (?-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (?-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The ?-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple ?-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a ?-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to ?-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple ?-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Infrared absorption of the raw powders hematite and quartz (section S1), TEM investigation of the spatial distribution of the ?-Fe2O3 inclusions (section S2), particle size distributions of the Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S3), ?-potentials of aqueous dispersions of all ?-Fe2O3@SiO2 nanopowder samples (section S4), silanization of Fe2O3@SiO2 composite nanopowders with [3-(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-propyl]trimethoxysilane (section S5), and animation composed of TEM micrographs of Fe2O3@SiO2 NPs recorded at incrementally altered tilt angles (``Rotating Fe2O3@SiO2 NP.avi''). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00845j

  5. Bulk nucleation and growth of inorganic nanowires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shashank

    The nanometer scale materials such as nanowires and nanotubes will be of particular interest as building blocks for designing novel sensors, catalysts, electronic, optical, and optoelectronic devices. However, in order to realize these applications, bulk amounts of nanowires and nanotubes need to be synthesized with precise control over the nanostructure characteristics. In addition, the structure-property relationships for one-dimensional structures are expected to be different than their bulk when their diameters are less than a characteristic Bohr exciton radius. This fundamental curiosity also necessitates bulk synthesis of nanostructures. The current bulk nanowire synthesis methods utilize either nanometer scale porous molds or nanometer scale transition metal clusters to template one-dimensional growth. All these techniques have inherent limitations in terms of control over the nanowire diameter distribution, composition, the growth direction, and the ability to generate abrupt interfaces within individual nanowires. In this dissertation, a new concept for bulk nucleation and growth of one-dimensional nanostructures is proposed and demonstrated for a variety of inorganic material systems. In this technique, multiple nanowires nucleate and grow from pools of low-melting metal melts when exposed to an activated gas phase containing the necessary precursors. This concept, hereby termed Low Melting Metals and Activated Gas phase (LMAG) mediated method, is specifically demonstrated for the synthesis of, (a) silicon nanowires grown using molten gallium and silane precursors; (b) silicon compound nanowires using solution of molten gallium and appropriate gas phase precursors, and (c) metal-oxide nanostructures grown using direct reaction of the respective metal melts and oxygen precursors. Nanowires resulted from the same molten gallium pool at high densities (>1011/cm2) and with narrow diameter distribution. The silicon nanowires synthesized using the LMAG technique were single crystalline, defect free, and contained a non uniform, extremely thin oxide sheath (<1.5 nm). The nanowire diameter could be varied from 3 to 100 nm, with lengths up to hundreds of microns. Unique tubular and paintbrush-like morphologies were obtained in gallium oxide (Ga2O3) nanostructures. Small gallium droplets (<100 nm size) allowed Ga2O3 nanowire growth parallel to the substrate, followed by 2-dimensional nanoweb formation. These experiments using small gallium droplets resulted in the growth of crystalline Ga2O3 nanotubes with outer diameters as small as 5 nm and inner diameters as small as 2.5 nm.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Stationary Phase in a Microfabricated Column for High-Performance Gas Chromatography

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Chromatography Takashi Nakai* , Jun Okawa, Shuji Takada, Masaki Shuzo* , Junichiro Shiomi, Jean-Jacques Delaunay a microfabricated gas chromatography (GC) column that uses a thin layer of high-quality single- walled carbon useful for high-performance micro-GC. Keywords: Carbon Nanotube, Stationary Phase, Gas Chromatography

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  8. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on particles composed of humic-like substances impacted by O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays important roles in cirrus and mixed-phase cloud formation, but the efficiency of organic particles to act as ice nuclei (IN) is still not well understood. Furthermore, the effect of particle oxidation by O3 on corresponding IN efficiencies has not yet been sufficiently assessed. We present heterogeneous ice nucleation on kaolinite, Suwannee River standard fulvic acid (SRFA), and leonardite standard humic acid particles as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), nucleation mode, and O3 exposure. Ice nucleation and water uptake were studied for Tp >203 K and RHice up to water saturation using a novel ice nucleation apparatus. This study shows that SRFA, leonardite, and corresponding O3-exposed particles can nucleate ice via different modes at relevant atmospheric conditions. These particles nucleated ice via deposition mode at Tp ? 231 K, and for higher Tp water was taken up or ice was nucleated via deposition or immersion mode. Oxidation of leonardite and SRFA particles by O3 led to a decrease in deposition nucleation efficiency and to water uptake at lower temperatures for the former and to an increase in the lowest temperature at which deposition nucleation was observed for the latter. Activated IN fractions and heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients (Jhet) were derived, and corresponding contact angles (?) were calculated. A parameterization of ? as a function of RHice is presented which allows derivation of Jhet for various deposition IN and corresponding ice crystal production rates for application in cloud-resolving models.

  9. Direct Imaging of the Spatial and Energy Distribution of Nucleation Centers in Ferroelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Rodriguez, Brian J; Choudhury, S; Baddorf, Arthur P; Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M.; Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.; Zhang, J; Chen, L. Q.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Macroscopic ferroelectric polarization switching, similar to other first order phase transitions, is controlled by nucleation centers. Despite 50 years of extensive theoretical and experimental effort, the microstructural origins of the Landauer paradox, i.e. the experimentally observed low values of coercive fields in ferroelectrics corresponding to implausibly large nucleation activation energies, are still a mystery. In this letter, we develop an approach to visualize the nucleation centers controlling polarization switching processes with nanometer resolution, determine their spatial and energy distribution, and correlate them to local microstructure. The random bond and random field components of the disorder potential are extracted from positive and negative nucleation biases. Observation of enhanced nucleation activity at the 90 domain wall boundaries and intersections combined with phase-field modeling identifies them as a class of nucleation centers that control switching in structural-defect free materials.

  10. Gas-phase mercury reduction to measure total mercury in the flue gas of a coal-fired boiler.

    PubMed

    Meischen, Sandra J; Van Pelt, Vincent J; Zarate, Eugene A; Stephens, Edward A

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous elemental and total (elemental + oxidized) mercury (Hg) in the flue gas from a coal-fired boiler was measured by a modified ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer. Challenges to Hg measurement were the spectral interferences from other flue gas components and that UV measures only elemental Hg. To eliminate interference from flue gas components, a cartridge filled with gold-coated sand removed elemental Hg from a flue gas sample. The Hg-free flue gas was the reference gas, eliminating the spectral interferences. To measure total Hg by UV, oxidized Hg underwent a gas-phase, thermal-reduction in a quartz cell heated to 750 degrees C. Simultaneously, hydrogen was added to flash react with the oxygen present forming water vapor and preventing Hg re-oxidation as it exits the cell. Hg concentration results are in parts per billion by volume Hg at the flue gas oxygen concentration. The modified Hg analyzer and the Ontario Hydro method concurrently measured Hg at a field test site. Measurements were made at a 700-MW steam turbine plant with scrubber units and selective catalytic reduction. The flue gas sampled downstream of the selective catalytic reduction contained 2100 ppm SO2 and 75 ppm NOx. Total Hg measured by the Hg analyzer was within 20% of the Ontario Hydro results. PMID:14871013

  11. Selective transport of amino acids into the gas phase: driving forces for amino acid solubilization in gas-phase reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Bennett, Andrew; Liu, Jianbo

    2011-01-28

    We report a study on encapsulation of various amino acids into gas-phase sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) reverse micelles, using electrospray ionization guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation of mass-selected reverse micellar ions with Xe was performed to probe structures of gas-phase micellar assemblies, identify solute-surfactant interactions, and determine preferential incorporation sites of amino acids. Integration into gas-phase reverse micelles depends upon amino acid hydrophobicity and charge state. For examples, glycine and protonated amino acids (such as protonated tryptophan) are encapsulated within the micellar core via electrostatic interactions; while neutral tryptophan is adsorbed in the surfactant layer. As verified using model polar hydrophobic compounds, the hydrophobic effect and solute-interface hydrogen-bonding do not provide sufficient driving force needed for interfacial solubilization of neutral tryptophan. Neutral tryptophan, with a zwitterionic structure, is intercalated at the micellar interface between surfactant molecules through complementary effects of electrostatic interactions between tryptophan backbone and AOT polar heads, and hydrophobic interactions between tryptophan side chain and AOT alkyl tails. Protonation of tryptophan could significantly improve its incorporation capacity into gas-phase reverse micelles, and displace its incorporation site from the micellar interfacial zone to the core; protonation of glycine, on the other hand, has little effect on its encapsulation capacity. Another interesting observation is that amino acids of different isoelectric points could be selectively encapsulated into, and transported by, reverse micelles from solution to the gas phase, based upon their competition for protonation and subsequent encapsulation within the micellar core. PMID:21140022

  12. Possible links between the liquid-gas and deconfinement-hadronization phase transitions

    E-print Network

    I. N. Mishustin

    2006-09-19

    It is commonly accepted that strongly interacting matter has several phase transitions in different domains of temperature and baryon density. In this contribution I discuss two most popular phase transitions which in principle can be accessed in nuclear collisions. One of them, the liquid-gas phase transition, is well established theoretically and studied experimentally in nuclear multifragmentation reactions at intermediate energies. The other one, the deconfinement-hadronization phase transition, is at the focus of present and future experimental studies with relativistic heavy-ion beams at SPS, RHIC and LHC. Pssible links between these two phase transitions are identified from the viewpoint of their manifestation in violent nuclear collisions.

  13. Two parametric flow measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, C.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    The importance and current development of two parametric measurement during two-phase flow are briefly reviewed in this paper. Gas-liquid two-phase two parametric metering experiments were conducted by using an oval gear meter and a sharp edged orifice mounted in series in a horizontal pipe. Compressed air and water were used as gas and liquid phases respectively. The correlations, which can be used to predict the total flow rate and volumetric quality of two-phase flow or volumetric flow rate of each phase, have also been proposed in this paper. Comparison of the calculated values of flow rate of each phase from the correlations with the test data showed that the root mean square fractional deviation for gas flow rate is 2.9 percent and for liquid flow rate 4.4 percent. The method proposed in this paper can be used to measure the gas and liquid flow rate in two-phase flow region without having to separate the phases.

  14. An attempt to characterize phase Q: Noble gas, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Floss, Christine

    An attempt to characterize phase Q: Noble gas, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy in residues prepared from the Allende meteorite Jun-ichi Matsuda a,*, Kazuhiko Morishita" as the origin of phase Q. TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) observations also show such a trace of ion

  15. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  16. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  17. Bridging the Gap between the Gas Phase and Solution Phase: Solvent Specific Photochemistry in 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Michael D; Baker, Lewis A; Quan, Wen-Dong; Young, Jamie D; Staniforth, Michael; Greenough, Simon E; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2015-12-17

    Eumelanin is a naturally synthesized ultraviolet light absorbing biomolecule, possessing both photoprotective and phototoxic properties. We infer insight into these properties of eumelanin using a bottom-up approach, by investigating an ultraviolet absorbing motif of eumelanin, 4-tert-butylcatechol. Utilizing a combination of femtosecond transient electronic absorption spectroscopy and time-resolved velocity map ion imaging, our results suggest an environmental-dependent relaxation pathway, following irradiation at 267 nm to populate the S1 ((1)??*) state. Gas-phase and nonpolar solution-phase measurements reveal that the S1 state decays primarily through coupling onto the S2 ((1)??*) state which is dissociative along the nonintramolecular hydrogen bonded "free" O-H bond. This process occurs in 4.9 ± 0.6 ps in the gas-phase and 18 ± 1 ps in the nonpolar cyclohexane solution. Comparative studies on the deuterated isotopologue of 4-tert-butylcatechol in both the gas- and solution-phase (cyclohexane) reveal kinetic isotope effects of ?19 and ?4, respectively, supportive of O-H dissociation along a barriered pathway, and potentially mediated by quantum tunneling. In contrast, in the polar solvent acetonitrile, the S1 state decays on a much longer time scale of 1.7 ± 0.1 ns. We propose that the S1 decay is now multicomponent, driven by internal conversion, intersystem crossing, and fluorescence, as well as O-H dissociation. The attribution of conformer-driven excited state dynamics to explain how the S1 state decays in the gas- and nonpolar solution-phase versus the polar solution-phase, demonstrates the influence the environment can have on the ensuing excited state dynamics. PMID:26015078

  18. Sustained Perchlorate Degradation in an Autotrophic, Gas-Phase,

    E-print Network

    an electron acceptor) and a gas mixture of hydrogen (5%) and carbon dioxide. The reactor was inoculated hydraulic loading rate of 0.45 cm/min, 38 ( 9% of the perchlorate was removed in the reactor at detention times of 1.1-1.3 min producing an average removal rate of perchlorate of 230 µg L-1 min-1. To study

  19. AN ADVANCED FLUE GAS MONITOR FOR SO2 - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an instrument for continuously monitoring SO2 levels in flue gas is proposed. The SO2 will be detected by means of an electrochemical sensor cell, which operates in a three-electrode potentiostatic mode. The proposed innovation is develop-ment of an advan...

  20. NANOMATERIAL SOLUTIONS FOR HOT COAL GAS CLEANUP - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a new coal gasification technique that efficiently uses the hot (900-1500°C) generated syngas to power both steam and gas turbines. Due to regulations, this syngas must be free of sulfur and purification is normally carried ...

  1. Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

  2. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  3. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  4. Liquid Gas Phase Transition for Asymmetric Nuclear Matter in the Zimanyi Moszkowski Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu-Ming; Qian, Wei-Liang; Su, Ru-Keng

    2004-07-01

    By using the improved Zimanyi-Moszkowski (ZM) model including the freedom of nucleons, sigma mesons, omega mesons and rho mesons, we investigate the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. It is found that the phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter in the improved ZM model with the isospin vector rho meson degree of freedom is well defined. The binodal surface, which is essential in the study of the phase transition process, is addressed.

  5. Molecular insights into clathrate hydrate nucleation at an ice-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Pirzadeh, Payman; Kusalik, Peter G

    2013-05-15

    Clathrate hydrates are specific cage-like structures formed by water molecules around a guest molecule. Despite the many studies that have been performed on clathrate hydrates, the actual molecular mechanism of both their homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation has yet to be fully clarified. Here, by means of molecular simulations, we demonstrate how the interface of hexagonal ice can facilitate the heterogeneous nucleation of methane clathrate hydrate from an aqueous methane solution. Our results indicate an initial accumulation of methane molecules, which promote induction of defective structures, particularly coupled 5-8 ring defects, at the ice surface. Structural fluctuations promoted by these defective motifs assist hydrate cage formation next to the interface. The cage-like structures formed then act as a sink for methane molecules in the solution and enhance the stability and growth of an amorphous nucleus, which can evolve into a hydrate crystal upon annealing. These results are illustrative of how a surface that is structurally incompatible can serve to facilitate heterogeneous nucleation of a new crystalline phase. They should also further our general understanding of the formation of gas hydrates and their critical roles in various industrial and environmental processes, including carbon capture and storage. PMID:23638636

  6. Gas Phase Electrodeposition: A Programmable Multimaterial Deposition Method for

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Heiko O.

    -phase deposition process produces charged silver, tungsten, and platinum and uses externally of nanostructures including multimaterial bridges, interconnects, or nanowire arrays with 20 nm positional accuracy. Photovoltaic cells from domains with long and dense nanowire arrays improve the relative power conversion

  7. Spectroscopic studies of kinetically trapped conformations in the gas phase: the case of triply protonated bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-09-30

    Understanding the relation between the gas-phase structure of biological molecules and their solution-phase structure is important when attempting to use gas-phase techniques to address biologically relevant questions. Directly after electrospray ionization, molecules can be kinetically trapped in a state that retains some "memory" of its conformation in solution and is separated from the lowest-energy gas-phase structure by barriers on the potential energy surface. In order to identify and characterize kinetically trapped structures, we have explored the conformational space of triply protonated bradykinin in the gas phase by combining field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) with cold ion spectroscopy. We isolate three distinct conformational families and characterize them by recording their UV-photofragment spectra and vibrational spectra. Annealing of the initial conformational distribution produced by electrospray reveals that one of the conformational families is kinetically trapped, while two others are stable, gas-phase structures. We compare our results to previously published results obtained using drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and propose a correspondence between the conformational families separated by FAIMS and those by IMS. PMID:25940085

  8. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  9. Gas distribution equipment in hydrogen service - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasionowski, W. J.; Huang, H. D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen permeability of three different types of commercially available natural gas polyethylene pipes was determined. Ring tensile tests were conducted on permeability-exposed and as-received samples. Hydrogen-methane leakage experiments were also performed. The results show no selective leakage of hydrogen via Poiseuille, turbulent, or orifice flow (through leaks) on the distribution of blends of hydrogen and methane. The data collected show that the polyethylene pipe is 4 to 6 times more permeable to hydrogen than to methane.

  10. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c)< 1 cm/s and v(sub f)> 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  11. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gettelman, Andrew; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, Ulrike; Chen, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models (GCMs) are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the Aerosol Indirect Effects (AIE) of cirrus clouds on climate. Simulations have a range of ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations, but many simulations have higher present-day ice crystal number concentrations than in-situ observations. These different states result from different parameterizations of ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. Black carbon aerosols have a small (0.06 Wm(exp-2) and not statistically significant AIE when included as ice nuclei, for nucleation efficiencies within the range of laboratory measurements. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur as a consequence of increasing anthropogenic sulfur emissions with different mechanisms important in different models. In one model this is due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction, and in the other due to increases in heterogeneous nucleation with coated dust. The magnitude of the effect is the same however. The resulting ice AIE does not seem strongly dependent on the balance between homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Regional effects can reach several Wm2. Indirect effects are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation and lower ice number concentration in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.27 +/- 0.10 Wm(exp-2) (1 sigma uncertainty). This represents a 20% offset of the simulated total shortwave AIE for ice and liquid clouds of 1.6 Wm(sup-2).

  12. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyir?-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  13. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 ± 15 cm and 23 ± 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  14. Homogeneous water nucleation in a laminar flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manka, Alexandra A.; Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Lihavainen, Heikki; Wölk, Judith; Strey, Reinhard

    2010-06-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of water at temperatures between 240 and 270 K were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at ambient pressure and helium as carrier gas. Being in the range of 102-106 cm-3 s-1, the experimental results extend the nucleation rate data from literature consistently and fill a pre-existing gap. Using the macroscopic vapor pressure, density, and surface tension for water we calculate the nucleation rates predicted by classic nucleation theory (CNT) and by the empirical correction function of CNT by Wölk and Strey [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11683 (2001)]. As in the case of other systems (e.g., alcohols), CNT predicts a stronger temperature dependence than experimentally observed, whereas the agreement with the empirical correction function is good for all data sets. Furthermore, the isothermal nucleation rate curves allow us to determine the experimental critical cluster sizes by use of the nucleation theorem. A comparison with the critical cluster sizes calculated by use of the Gibbs-Thomson equation is remarkably good for small cluster sizes, for bigger ones the Gibbs-Thomson equation overestimates the cluster sizes.

  15. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, J.; Aubry, J.-F.; Chauvet, D.; Boch, A.-L.; Fink, M.; Tanter, M.

    2011-11-01

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon.

  16. Connection of sulfuric acid to atmospheric nucleation in boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, T; Manninen, H E; Sihto, S L; Yli-Juuti, T; Mauldin, R L; Petäjä, T; Riipinen, I; Kerminen, V M; Kulmala, M

    2009-07-01

    Gas to particle conversion in the boundary layer occurs worldwide. Sulfuric acid is considered to be one of the key components in these new particle formation events. In this study we explore the connection between measured sulfuric acid and observed formation rate of both charged 2 nm as well as neutral clusters in a boreal forest environment A very short time delay of the order of ten minutes between these two parameters was detected. On average the event days were clearly associated with higher sulfuric acid concentrations and lower condensation sink (CS) values than the nonevent days. Although there was not a clear sharp boundary between the nucleation and no-nucleation days in sulfuric acid-CS plane, at our measurement site a typical threshold concentration of 3.10(5) molecules cm(-3) of sulfuric acid was needed to initiate the new particle formation. Two proposed nucleation mechanisms were tested. Our results are somewhat more in favor of activation type nucleation than of kinetic type nucleation, even though our data set is too limited to omit either of these two mechanisms. In line with earlier studies, the atmospheric nucleation seems to start from sizes very close to 2 nm. PMID:19673256

  17. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  18. Liquid-gas mixed phase in nuclear matter at finite temperature

    E-print Network

    Toshiki Maruyama; Toshitaka Tatsumi

    2010-09-07

    We explore the geometrical structure of Liquid-gas (LG) mixed phase which is relevant to nuclear matter in the crust region of compact stars or supernovae. To get the equation of state (EOS) of the system, the Maxwell construction is found to be applicable to symmetric nuclear matter, where protons and neutrons behave simultaneously. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium can be obtained by fully solving the Gibbs conditions since the components in the L and G phases are completely different. We also discuss the effects of surface and the Coulomb interaction on the mixed phase.

  19. Split of Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow at an Impacting Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Isamu; Daiguji, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hitoshi; Hihara, Eiji

    Phase separation of gas-liquid two-phase flow at an impacting tee was investigated experimentally and theoretically. It was found that the phase separation did not occur, if the outlet branches were symmetrical and pressure drops in these branches were identical. On the other hand, if the flow rates in the branches were different, phase separation was observed. Based on the principle of minimum energy dissipation, a thermodynamic model was derived. The results of the model were qualitatively in good agreement with the experimental behavior of impacting flows.

  20. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR) measurement of liquid-phase ROS.

  1. Dynamics of earthquake nucleation process represented by the Burridge-Knopoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yushi; Morimoto, Shouji; Kakui, Shingo; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of earthquake nucleation process is studied on the basis of the one-dimensional Burridge-Knopoff (BK) model obeying the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law. We investigate the properties of the model at each stage of the nucleation process, including the quasi-static initial phase, the unstable acceleration phase and the high-speed rupture phase or a mainshock. Two kinds of nucleation lengths L sc and L c are identified and investigated. The nucleation length L sc and the initial phase exist only for a weak frictional instability regime, while the nucleation length L c and the acceleration phase exist for both weak and strong instability regimes. Both L sc and L c are found to be determined by the model parameters, the frictional weakening parameter and the elastic stiffness parameter, hardly dependent on the size of an ensuing mainshock. The sliding velocity is extremely slow in the initial phase up to L sc , of order the pulling speed of the plate, while it reaches a detectable level at a certain stage of the acceleration phase. The continuum limits of the results are discussed. The continuum limit of the BK model lies in the weak frictional instability regime so that a mature homogeneous fault under the RSF law always accompanies the quasi-static nucleation process. Duration times of each stage of the nucleation process are examined. The relation to the elastic continuum model and implications to real seismicity are discussed.

  2. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  3. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank-Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  4. Abbreviated MOVPE nucleation of III-nitride light-emitting diodes on nano-patterned sapphire

    E-print Network

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Abbreviated MOVPE nucleation of III-nitride light-emitting diodes on nano-patterned sapphire Yik t Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) nucleation studies of GaN on planar sapphire and nano- patterned AGOG (Deposition of Aluminum, Growth of Oxide, and Grain growth) sapphire substrates were conducted. The use

  5. Migration of photoinitiators by gas phase into dry foods.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Paseiro-Cerrato, Rafael; Pastorelli, Sarah; Koivikko, Riitta; Simoneau, Catherine; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2009-11-11

    Photoinitiators are components widely used in UV-cured inks for printing food packaging. In the present study, the migration of seven photoinitiators through the vapor phase was investigated. To perform the migration test, an additive enriched polyethylene wax was used as a source to release photoinitiators. The method was applied to evaluate the migration of the photoinitiators into five selected dry foods (cake, bread, cereals, rice and pasta). The highest level of migration was found in the cake. Parameters affecting the migration process were evaluated, and high migration level was found to correlate with both the porosity and the fat content. In addition, the kinetics of migration of the photoinitiators from the additive enriched wax into the cake were studied under accelerated conditions. PMID:19839623

  6. Gas-phase chemiluminescence and chemi-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomena of chemiluminescence (or more broadly chemi-excitation) and chemi-ionization have major similarities from a fundamental kinetic and dynamic point of view. However, since the former has primarily been investigated using optical spectroscopic techniques and the latter largely by mass spectroscopic (and other gaseous electronic) methods, the two phenomena have apparently never, explicitly been discussed together in one volume. In addition to a number of review articles on each individual subject, several meetings and books have had chemiluminescence and bioluminescence as their theme and those have been dominated by condensed phase work. On the other hand, chemi-ionization is often discussed in the contest of gaseous electronics, plasma chemistry and combustion. It is the goal of this book to present a more unified understanding of the two phenomena.

  7. Molecular Gas in Violent Phases of Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Cluver, M. E.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.

    2010-06-01

    One of the most surprising results obtained with the Spitzer space telescope was the discovery of powerful mid-IR H2 line emission from a significant number of sources that are in active phases of galaxy evolution, in which star formation seems strongly suppressed. The underlying physics may be a key ingredient to describe the buildup of baryonic mass in galaxies and their evolution. We present here two multiwavelength studies of an interacting galaxy system, Stephan's Quintet, and an AGN host radio galaxy, 3C326, which suggest that the H2 line emission heralds the dissipation of kinetic energy in a multiphase medium. The results provide new insight on the energetics of galaxy formation.

  8. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  9. OMVPE growth and gas-phase reactions of AlGaN for UV emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Figiel, J.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Banas, M.A.; Bartram, M.E.; Biefeld, R.M.; Song, Y.K.; Nurmikko, A.V.

    1998-06-01

    Gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH3, are investigated by monitoring of the growth rate/incorporation efficiency of GaN and AlN using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is suggested that gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) reactions not only reduce the incorporation efficiency of TMA but also affect the incorporation behavior of TMGa. The observed phenomena can be explained by either a synergistic gas-phase scavenging effect or a surface site-blocking effect. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 354 nm (FWHM {approximately} 6 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  10. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin.

    PubMed

    Bugalhão, Joana N; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S

    2015-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  11. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-19

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm-2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm-2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  12. The warm molecular gas and dust of Seyfert galaxies: two different phases of accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezcua, M.; Prieto, M. A.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Tristram, K.; Neumayer, N.; Kotilainen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of warm molecular gas (1000-3000 K), traced by the near-IR H2 2.12 ?m line, has been imaged with a resolution <0.5 arcsec in the central 1 kpc of seven nearby Seyfert galaxies. We find that this gas is highly concentrated towards the central 100 pc and that its morphology is often symmetrical. Lanes of warm H2 gas are observed only in three cases (NGC 1068, NGC 1386 and Circinus) for which the morphology is much wider and extended than the dust filaments. We conclude that there is no one-to-one correlation between dust and warm gas. This indicates that, if the dust filaments and lanes of warm gas are radial streaming motions of fuelling material, they must represent two different phases of accretion: the dust filaments represent a colder phase than the gas close to the nucleus (within ˜100 pc). We predict that the morphology of the nuclear dust at these scales should resemble that of the cold molecular gas (e.g. CO at 10-40 K), as we show for CenA and NGC 1566 by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations, whereas the inner H2 gas traces a much warmer phase of material identified with warmer (40-500 K) molecular gas such as CO(6-5) or HCN (as shown by ALMA for NGC 1068 and NGC 1097). We also find that X-ray heating is the most likely dominant excitation mechanism of the H2 gas for most sources.

  13. Laboratory studies of cirrus clouds: the ins and outs of ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Baustian, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although cirrus clouds are ever-present in the upper troposphere, the precise mechanisms governing their formation are still uncertain. Recent field observations suggest that ice nucleation in the atmosphere is often more consistent with a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism than a homogeneous one. In the present work, we use optical microscopy coupled with Raman spectroscopy to examine ice nucleation on individual micron-sized particles. Because upper tropospheric particles as well as sub-visible cirrus residues are enhanced in both sulfates and organics, our focus is on complex particles containing these two species. Particles with well-defined structures were generated by nebulization of solutions containing ammonium sulfate and an organic. As the relative humidity was decreased, the aqueous particles underwent liquid-liquid phase separation forming an organic coating over ammonium sulfate. Lowering the relative humidity further resulted in ammonium sulfate efflorescence to a crystalline solid. Ice nucleation was then studied on the layered particles as a function of temperature and relative humidity. During particle formation and ice nucleation, Raman mapping was used to determine the particle structures. Depending on the organic composition and temperature, ice was sometimes observed to nucleate on the ammonium sulfate core within the particle and sometimes nucleated on the organic outer layer. The combination of Raman and optical microscopy allows visualization of the ice nucleation process for complex particles. These studies reveal that the mechanism of heterogeneous ice nucleation depends not just on particle size, but also on particle composition, phase and mixing state.

  14. Phase behavior and splitting analysis: An operational tool in gas transmission and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez A., F.F.; Infantini S., M.

    1998-12-31

    Most of the natural gas produced by Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA) is associated gas that flows from the gathering systems to the processing plants, before it arrives at the transmission systems. Even if the gas transmission occurs after the necessary processing of the gas has been completed, condensation still happens in the transmission, regulating stations and/or distribution systems. The quantity of condensate will not only depend on composition, pressure and temperature, but also on the unequal splitting phenomenon that takes place at tee junctions in a network system. The splitting phenomenon determines the liquid distribution at the junction. This situation is more drastic when the processing plant is partially or totally shut down in a maintenance program. This work shows how the gas transmission and distribution engineer has to use the phase behavior and splitting analysis as an operational tool, in order to predict and prevent the presence of liquid in the system. Using process simulators, the phase behavior analysis is conducted to determine the bubble and dew point curve and to perform flash calculations at any pressure and temperature. Then, the operational pressure-temperature profile is over-plotted on the phase envelope diagram in order to evaluate the condensation possibility into the gas pipeline. Afterwards, the pressure and temperature drops in regulating stations are incorporated in the phase envelope diagram and the two-phase gas condensate study is completed. Finally, considering the concepts of the splitting phenomenon and the knowledge that it can really happen, the presence of liquid in particular customers can be explained and solved. Operational experiences are included to evaluate the methodology and to present the effectiveness of the results.

  15. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  16. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  17. Gas-phase reactions in extraterrestrial environments: laboratory investigations by crossed molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated gas-phase reactions of N((2)D) with the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Titan by the crossed molecular beam technique. In all cases, molecular products containing a novel CN bond are formed, thus suggesting possible routes of formation of gas-phase nitriles in the atmosphere of Titan and primordial Earth. The same approach has been recently extended to the study of radical-radical reactions, such as the reaction of atomic oxygen with the CH(3) and C(3)H(5) radicals. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified. PMID:17131088

  18. A new tandem mass spectrometer for photofragment spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Svendsen, Annette; Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2010-07-15

    We present here the design of a new tandem mass spectrometer that combines an electrospray ion source with a cryogenically cooled ion trap for spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase ions. The ability to generate large ions in the gas phase without fragmentation, cool them to {approx}10 K in an ion trap, and perform photofragment spectroscopy opens up new possibilities for spectroscopic characterization of large biomolecular ions. The incorporation of an ion funnel, together with a number of small enhancements, significantly improves the sensitivity, signal stability, and ease of use compared with the previous instrument built in our laboratory.

  19. Pair Formation of Free Nucleobases and Mononucleosides in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Michael; Grotemeyer, Jürgen; Schlag, Edward W.

    1994-08-01

    The formation of neutral bimolecular clusters of unsubstituted nucleobases and mononucleosides in the gas phase has been studied by IR laser desorption of the neutral molecules into a supersonic beam expansion. The complementary nucleobase pairs adenine-thymine and cytosine-guanine of D N A have been found to be formed in preference to non complementary base pairs. Association constants for the formation of the dimers of free nucleobases and nucleosides in the gas phase are calculated from the experimental results. A strong influence due to side groups affecting the dimer formation of the nucleobases is shown.

  20. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the ? and ? anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  1. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  2. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  3. Multifragmentation and nuclear phase transitions (liquid-fog and liquid-gas)

    E-print Network

    V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simomenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

    2003-10-10

    Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition. The charge distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p(3.6 GeV) + Au and p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition Tc as a free parameter. The analysis presented here provides strong support for a value of Tc > 15 MeV.

  4. Isospin and momentum dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-print Network

    Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Hong-Ru Ma

    2007-11-12

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using different interactions with or without isospin and/or momentum dependence. The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy as well as the isospin and momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

  5. Plasma-produced phase-pure cuprous oxide nanowires for methane gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qijin; Yan, Wei; Randeniya, Lakshman; Zhang, Fengyan; Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-03-01

    Phase-selective synthesis of copper oxide nanowires is warranted by several applications, yet it remains challenging because of the narrow windows of the suitable temperature and precursor gas composition in thermal processes. Here, we report on the room-temperature synthesis of small-diameter, large-area, uniform, and phase-pure Cu2O nanowires by exposing copper films to a custom-designed low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density (typically, the electron number density is in the range of 1011-1013 cm-3) inductively coupled plasmas. The mechanism of the plasma-enabled phase selectivity is proposed. The gas sensors based on the synthesized Cu2O nanowires feature fast response and recovery for the low-temperature (˜140 °C) detection of methane gas in comparison with polycrystalline Cu2O thin film-based gas sensors. Specifically, at a methane concentration of 4%, the response and the recovery times of the Cu2O nanowire-based gas sensors are 125 and 147 s, respectively. The Cu2O nanowire-based gas sensors have a potential for applications in the environmental monitoring, chemical industry, mining industry, and several other emerging areas.

  6. Plasma-produced phase-pure cuprous oxide nanowires for methane gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Qijin Zhang, Fengyan; Yan, Wei; Randeniya, Lakshman; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-03-28

    Phase-selective synthesis of copper oxide nanowires is warranted by several applications, yet it remains challenging because of the narrow windows of the suitable temperature and precursor gas composition in thermal processes. Here, we report on the room-temperature synthesis of small-diameter, large-area, uniform, and phase-pure Cu{sub 2}O nanowires by exposing copper films to a custom-designed low-pressure, thermally non-equilibrium, high-density (typically, the electron number density is in the range of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?3}) inductively coupled plasmas. The mechanism of the plasma-enabled phase selectivity is proposed. The gas sensors based on the synthesized Cu{sub 2}O nanowires feature fast response and recovery for the low-temperature (?140?°C) detection of methane gas in comparison with polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}O thin film-based gas sensors. Specifically, at a methane concentration of 4%, the response and the recovery times of the Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors are 125 and 147?s, respectively. The Cu{sub 2}O nanowire-based gas sensors have a potential for applications in the environmental monitoring, chemical industry, mining industry, and several other emerging areas.

  7. A microcomputer-controlled gas phase microreactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.M.

    1983-08-01

    Although automated reactors are effective tools for studying a single type of reaction or optimizing catalyst performance, they may not be well suited for exploratory research. These reactors generally have several shortcomings. First, they may have limited versatility since they are usually designed with a single application in mind. Second, computer systems used for process control and data acquisition are often expensive and complex, so that once they are set up for a given application, it is quite difficult to adapt them for another. Because of these restrictions, experimental reactors are often operated manually, requiring a full-time operator to monitor operations and acquire data. This is a greater problem in laboratories where projects are often short-term, and the costs of setting up an automated reactor may outweigh the benefits of automation. For an automated reactor to be cost-effective in such an environment, both reactor hardware and control software must be versatile enough that they can be easily modified and adapted for different experiments. An automated gas-flow microreactor has been designed and constructed which is both inexpensive and flexible. The reactor is capable of performing three different types of experiments, 1) continuous reagent feed with analysis of the product stream, 2) pulsed-flow experiments, and 3) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reaction (TPR). Conversion of the reactor from one configuration to another requires less than one hour. Process control and data acquisition are performed using an Apple II Plus microcomputer (Apple Computer Corp., Cupertino, Calif.) and an ISAAC interface device (Cyborg Corp., Newton, Mass.).

  8. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lin

    Clusters, defined as "a number of similar things that occur together" in Webster's dictionary, has different meanings depending on the given subject. To physicists and chemists, the word cluster means "a group of atoms or molecules formed by interactions ranging from very weak van der Waals interactions to strong ionic bonds." Unlike molecules, which are made by nature and are stable under ambient conditions, clusters discovered in a laboratory are often metastable. Molecules have specific stoichiometry, whereas the cluster's composition can usually be altered atom by atom. Thus, clusters can be taken as intrinsically "artificial molecules" with considerably more tunabilities in their properties. Research into the relative stability and instability of clusters has in recent years become a very active research area, especially following the study by Khanna and Castleman that first suggested that by varying size and composition, clusters can expand the periodic table to the 3 rd-dimension; that is, clusters can mimic the chemistry of atoms and may, therefore, be used as the building blocks of new materials. The discovery of Met-Cars has drawn worldwide interests and has been actively investigated by researchers from a variety of fields, including physics, chemistry and material science. However, the unsuccessful search for a solvent capable of isolating Met-Cars has impeded progress in characterizing the material in the condensed state and, hence, limited its potential applications as a novel nanoscale material. An alternative method involving the deposition of mass-gated species and the subsequent structural investigation via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been employed. With particularly interesting results, soft-landed deposits of zirconium Met-Cars were found to form a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure with a lattice parameter ˜ 15A. The production of Met-Cars is conducted with the direct laser vaporization (DLV) of metal/graphite composite pellets. After being mass gated in a reflectron equipped time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) and deposited onto TEM grids, the resultant specimens can be loaded onto high-resolution TEM investigation via electron diffraction. In conclusion, soft-landing of mass selected clusters has been shown to be a successful approach to obtain structural information on Zr-Met-Car cluster-assembled materials collected from the gas phase. TEM images indicate the richness of the morphologies associated with these cluster crystals. However, passivation methods are expected to be examined further to overcome the limited stabilities of these novel clusters. From this initial study, it's shown the promising opportunity to study other Met-Cars species and more cluster-based materials. Experimental results of reactions run with a solvothermal synthesis method obtained while searching for new Zr-C cluster assembled materials, are reported. One unexpected product in single crystal form was isolated and tentatively identified by X-ray diffraction to be [Zr6i O(OH)O12·2(Bu)4], with space group P2 1/n and lattice parameters of a = 12.44 A, b = 22.06 A, c = 18.40 A, alpha = 90°, beta = 105°, gamma = 90°, V = 4875 A3 and R 1 = 3.15% for the total observed data (I ? 2 sigma I) and oR2 = 2.82%. This novel hexanuclear Zr(IV)-oxo-hydroxide cluster anion may be the first member in polyoxometalates class with metal atoms from the IVB group and having Oh symmetry. Alternatively, it may be the first member in {[(Zr6Z)X 12]X6}m- class with halides replaced by oxo- and hydroxyl groups and with an increased oxidation state of Zr. It is predicted to bear application potentials directed by both families. This work could suggest a direction in which the preparation of Zr-C cluster-assembled materials in a liquid environment may be eventually fulfilled. 1,3-Bis(diethylphosphino)propane (depp) protected small gold clusters are studied via multiple techniques, including Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS), Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (Uv-Vis), Nuclear

  9. Phase considerations in the gas/particle partitioning of organic amines in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, James F.

    2015-12-01

    Amines in the atmosphere are of interest because of their likely role in new particle formation, and because of anthropogenic emissions of amines at post-combustion carbon capture (PCCC) facilities. A conceptual framework for considering the partitioning of a monobasic amine (Am = unprotonated, "free-base form") from the gas phase to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is presented for cases when the PM may be composed of multiple liquid phases. Three types of liquid phases are considered as being individually or simultaneously possible for absorptive uptake of atmospheric amines: w) a mostly water phase; ?) a mostly (by mass) organic phase that has at least some polarity (e.g., predominantly secondary organic aerosol (SOA), may contain significant water on a mole fraction basis); and ?) a mostly organic phase that is less polar than an ? phase (e.g., predominantly primary organic aerosol (POA), containing little water). That one or more salts may contain the aminium ion AmH+ (formed by protonation of Am) is subject to the fact that the trace levels of individual amines in the atmosphere make formation of a pure solid such as AmHHSO4(s) exceedingly unlikely: when solid salts of AmH+ are indeed present, by far the most likely form is as a solid solution, e.g., (NH4+)1-y(AmH+)yHSO4(s)- where y << 1. Neglecting dissolution in solid salts, and considering only partitioning to liquid phases, the overall gas/particle partitioning constant is Kp,tot(m3?g-1) = cp,tot /cg = ??f?Kp,fb?/?fb?. The quantity cp,tot (?g ?g-1) is the total Am concentration (Am + AmH+) in the PM as summed over all phases using the index ? (= w, ?, ?); cg is the gas-phase concentration of Am; f? is the mass fraction of the total PM that is the ? phase; Kp,fb? is the gas/particle partitioning constant for the free-base (Am) form to the ? phase; and 0 < ?fb? < 1 is the fraction of the amine in the ? phase that is in the free-base form. To date, most treatments of the partitioning of amines to PM have only considered contributions to Kp,tot from absorption into a mostly water phase, according to the term fw Kp,fbw/?fbw. However, unless the PM contains little or no organic-phase material, the ? and/or ? terms are likely to also be relevant. The Am form of a low MW amine will in general have reasonable affinities for both ? and ? type phases, so in general Kp,fbw, Kp,fb?, and Kp,fb? will all be roughly similar in magnitude. And, with significant water uptake into an ? phase certain to occur at moderate to high RH values, solvation of ions will often be possible in an ? phase. This will assist protonation of Am to AmH+ (as is known to occur for nicotine in tobacco smoke PM). The overall result is that to a first approximation, ?fbw and ?fb? can be similar in magnitude, making Kp,fb?/?fb? likely to be generally comparable to Kp,fbw/?fbw. In a ? phase, ion solvation will not be as good, so that for acidic aerosol ?fb? will generally be closer to one than the other two ?fb values, making Kp,fb?/?fb? smaller than both Kp,fbw/?fbw and Kp,fb?/?fb?. Overall, modeling of amine behavior in the atmosphere should include consideration of partitioning into organic PM. Unfortunately, this will be more difficult than water-phase only modeling because prediction of ?fb values in multiphase PM will be greatly complicated by the needs to: 1) have estimated values of acidity constants in mostly organic phases of variable composition; and 2) allow distribution of chemicals over multiple liquid phases.

  10. Bubble nucleation and migration in a lead-iron hydr(oxide) core-shell nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kaiyang; Frolov, Timofey; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Junling; Asta, Mark; Zheng, Haimei

    2015-10-20

    Iron hydroxide is found in a wide range of contexts ranging from biominerals to steel corrosion, and it can transform to anhydrous oxide via releasing O2 gas and H2O. However, it is not well understood how gases transport through a crystal lattice. Here, we present in situ observation of the nucleation and migration of gas bubbles in iron (hydr)oxide using transmission electron microscopy. We create Pb-FeOOH model core-shell nanoparticles in a liquid cell. Under electron irradiation, iron hydroxide transforms to iron oxide, during which bubbles are generated, and they migrate through the shell to the nanoparticle surface. Geometric phase analysis of the shell lattice shows an inhomogeneous stain field at the bubbles. Our modeling suggests that the elastic interaction between the core and the bubble provides a driving force for bubble migration. PMID:26438864

  11. Sulfur doping of diamond films: Spectroscopic, electronic, and gas-phase studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherbridge, James R.; May, Paul W.; Fuge, Gareth M.; Robertson, Giles F.; Rosser, Keith N.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2002-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been used to grow sulfur doped diamond films on undoped Si and single crystal HPHT diamond as substrates, using a 1% CH4/H2 gas mixture with various levels of H2S addition (100-5000 ppm), using both microwave (MW) plasma enhanced CVD and hot filament (HF) CVD. The two deposition techniques yield very different results. HFCVD produces diamond films containing only trace amounts of S (as analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), the film crystallinity is virtually unaffected by gas phase H2S concentration, and the films remain highly resistive. In contrast, MWCVD produces diamond films with S incorporated at levels of up to 0.2%, and the amount of S incorporation is directly proportional to the H2S concentration in the gas phase. Secondary electron microscopy observations show that the crystal quality of these films reduces with increasing S incorporation. Four point probe measurements gave the room temperature resistivities of these S-doped and MW grown films as ˜200 ? cm, which makes them ˜3 times more conductive than undoped diamond grown under similar conditions. Molecular beam mass spectrometry has been used to measure simultaneously the concentrations of the dominant gas phase species present during growth, for H2S doping levels (1000-10 000 ppm in the gas phase) in 1% CH4/H2 mixtures, and for 1% CS2/H2 gas mixtures, for both MW and HF activation. CS2 and CS have both been detected in significant concentrations in all of the MW plasmas that yield S-doped diamond films, whereas CS was not detected in the gas phase during HF growth. This suggests that CS may be an important intermediary facilitating S incorporation into diamond. Furthermore, deposition of yellow S was observed on the cold chamber walls when using H2S concentrations >5000 ppm in the MW system, but very little S deposition was observed for the HF system under similar conditions. All of these results are rationalized by a model of the important gas phase chemical reactions, which recognizes the very different gas temperature profiles within the two different types of deposition reactor.

  12. A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas

    E-print Network

    Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

    2014-11-05

    We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

  13. An experimental study on gas carryunder in downflow from a two-phase mixture surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Masataka; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    1990-06-01

    In the natural circulation boiling water reactor (BWR) without a steam separator, the steam that is generated in the reactor core and then rises in the riser mainly passes through a two-phase mixture surface, but some steam is carried under into the downcomer along with the circulating liquid phase. The carryunder flow rate is an important factor for evaluation of the natural circulation flow rate and the feedwater subcooling. The study described in this paper clarifies the mechanism of two-phase separation in the downcomer and the gas carryunder characteristics for various flow conditions based on a small-scale air/water experiment.

  14. FIELD METHODS TO MEASURE CONTAMINANT REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS OF GAS-PHASE AIR FILTRATION EQUIPMENT - PHASE 1: SEARCH OF LITERATURE AND PRIOR ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, Phase 1 of a two-phase research project, gives results of a literature search into the
    effectiveness of in-field gas-phase air filtration equipment (GPAFE) test methods, including required instrumentation and costs. GPAFE has been used in heating, ventilation, and ...

  15. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated in the 1970's and carried out in an uninterrupted way over the course of the past three d

  16. Thermodynamics of ice nucleation in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Shui; Xu, Qinzhi; Mi, Jianguo

    2015-01-29

    We present a density functional theory approach to investigate the thermodynamics of ice nucleation in supercooled water. Within the theoretical framework, the free-energy functional is constructed by the direct correlation function of oxygen-oxygen of the equilibrium water, and the function is derived from the reference interaction site model in consideration of the interactions of hydrogen-hydrogen, hydrogen-oxygen, and oxygen-oxygen. The equilibrium properties, including vapor-liquid and liquid-solid phase equilibria, local structure of hexagonal ice crystal, and interfacial structure and tension of water-ice are calculated in advance to examine the basis for the theory. The predicted phase equilibria and the water-ice surface tension are in good agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the critical nucleus radius and free-energy barrier during ice nucleation are predicted. The critical radius is similar to the simulation value, suggesting that the current theoretical approach is suitable in describing the thermodynamic properties of ice crystallization. PMID:25546012

  17. Lattice model theory of the equation of state covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.; Chan, E. M.; Horiguchi, T.; Foreman, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The three stable states of matter and the corresponding phase transitions were obtained with a single model. Patterned after Lennard-Jones and Devonshires's theory, a simple cubic lattice model containing two fcc sublattices (alpha and beta) is adopted. The interatomic potential is taken to be the Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential. Employing the cluster variation method, the Weiss and the pair approximations on the lattice gas failed to give the correct phase diagrams. Hybrid approximations were devised to describe the lattice term in the free energy. A lattice vibration term corresponding to a free volume correction is included semi-phenomenologically. The combinations of the lattice part and the free volume part yield the three states and the proper phase diagrams. To determine the coexistence regions, the equalities of the pressure and Gibbs free energy per molecule of the coexisting phases were utilized. The ordered branch of the free energy gives rise to the solid phase while the disordered branch yields the gas and liquid phases. It is observed that the triple point and the critical point quantities, the phase diagrams and the coexistence regions plotted are in good agreement with the experimental values and graphs for argon.

  18. A generalized expression for lag-time in the gas-phase permeation of hollow tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. K.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hamaker, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized expression for the nonsteady-state parameter, lag-time, has been obtained from Fick's second law for gas-phase transport through hollow, cylindrical membranes. This generalized expression is simplified for three limiting cases of practical interest: (1) diffusion controlled transport, (2) phase boundary reaction control at the inlet surface, and (3) phase boundary reaction control at the outlet surface. In all three cases the lag-time expressions were found to be inversely proportional only to the diffusion coefficient and functionally dependent on the membrane radii. Finally, the lag-time expressions were applied to experimentally obtained lag-time data for alpha-phase titanium and alpha-phase iron.

  19. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on a space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Bruce; Wingo, Dennis; Bower, Mark; Amborski, Robert; Blount, Laura; Daniel, Alan; Hagood, Bob; Handley, James; Hediger, Donald; Jimmerson, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid which will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on the Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS-42. The design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost is presented.

  20. Gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over cobalt phosphide catalysts with different P contents.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, J A; Infantes-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Castellón, E; Jiménez-López, A

    2013-09-15

    The gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of chlorobenzene (CB) at atmospheric pressure was investigated over silica-supported cobalt and cobalt phosphide catalysts containing different P loading and a fixed amount of cobalt (5 wt.%). The effect of the initial P/Co molar ratio on the stoichiometry of the cobalt phosphide phase, the acidity and the hydrogen activation capability were discussed and these properties correlated with the catalytic activity. Catalytic results indicated that the cobalt phosphide phase is much more active than the monometallic cobalt one. The activity raised with the P content present in the sample due to the formation of the CoP phase instead of the Co?P one, which favored the formation of hydrogen spillover species, increased the amount of weak acid sites and the number of exposed superficial cobalt atoms probably related to a better dispersion of the active phase. All the catalysts gave rise benzene as the main reaction product. PMID:23747475

  1. Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Stephan

    Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase B. Roth, D-cooled ion trapping apparatus, we have investigated laser-induced chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba is to investigate chemical reactions between cold atomic and molecular ions trapped in radio-frequency traps

  2. Molecular orbital studies of titanium nitride chemical vapor deposition: gas phase b-elimination

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular orbital studies of titanium nitride chemical vapor deposition: gas phase b) of titanium nitride can be carried out using TiNR24 and NH3 (R Me or Et). Imido compounds are thought. Ó 2001 Pub- lished by Elsevier Science B.V. 1. Introduction It is well known that titanium nitride

  3. Molecular Orbital Studies of Titanium Nitride Chemical Vapor Deposition: Gas Phase Complex Formation,

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Orbital Studies of Titanium Nitride Chemical Vapor Deposition: Gas Phase Complex Received June 6, 2000 The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of titanium nitride can be carried out with TiCl4 Titanium nitride thin films have a variety of proper- ties, such as extreme hardness, high chemical

  4. Photosynthesis of a Combinatorial Peptide Library in the Gas Phase Sunyoung Lee,

    E-print Network

    Clemmer, David E.

    Photosynthesis of a Combinatorial Peptide Library in the Gas Phase Sunyoung Lee, Matthew S. Glover. The solutions were infused at a flow rate of 3.0 L min-1 using a syringe pump. A potential of 3.0 kV was applied

  5. Universal correlations of onedimensional interacting electrons in the gas phase F. Gohmann and V. E. Korepin

    E-print Network

    representation for the dynamical two­point Green functions was obtained in [5], and, subsequently Brook, NY 11794­3840, USA We consider dynamical correlation functions of short range interactingUniversal correlations of one­dimensional interacting electrons in the gas phase F. G¨ohmann and V

  6. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  7. ADVANCED OXIDATION AND REDUCTION PROCESSES IN THE GAS PHASE USING NON-THERMAL PLASMAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past several years interest in gas-phase pollution control has increased, arising from a larger body of regulations and greater respect for the environment. Advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs), historically used to treat recalcitrant water pollutants via hydroxyl-radica...

  8. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  9. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-P- 620 Hays**, M.D., Geron*, C.D., Linna**, K.J., Smith*, N.D., and Schauer, J.J. Speciation of Gas-Phase and Fine Particle Emissions from Burning of Foliar Fuels. Submitted to: Environmental Science & Technology EPA/600/J-02/234, http://pubs.acs.org/journals/esthag/...

  10. CONTROL OF UTILITY BOILER AND GAS TURBINE POLLUTANT EMISSIONS BY COMBUSTION MODIFICATION--PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of Phase II of a field study to assess the applicability of combustion modification (CM) techniques to control NOx and other pollutant emissions from utility boilers and gas turbines without causing deleterious side effects. Comprehensive, statistically d...

  11. CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION MODULES FOR EULERIAN ACID DEPOSITION MODELS. VOLUME 1. THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the review and evaluation of mechanistic and kinetic data for the gas-phase reactions that lead to the production of acidic substances in the environment. A master mechanism is designed that treats oxides, sulfur dioxide, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, t...

  12. Mechanism of quasi-phase-matching in a dual-gas multijet array

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiaowei; Chini, Michael; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Kun; Wu, Yi; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I; Chang, Zenghu

    2012-08-31

    Quasi-phase-matching in a dual gas (Ar-H2) multijet array has recently been demonstrated to be a promising way to enhance the yield of high-order harmonics (HH). Here, we investigate the HH produced individually from these two gases under identical...

  13. Conformational effects in sugar ions: spectroscopic investigations in the gas phase and in solution

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    Conformational effects in sugar ions: spectroscopic investigations in the gas phase and in solution of sugars with a positively charged substituent at their anomeric centre, C-1, which display in solution in an ionic sugar, per-acetylated a-D-glucopyranosyl pyridinium, which reversed the axial (and equatorial

  14. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  15. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - BAY CITY, MICHIGAN - APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document reviews the results of a 28 day demonstration program conducted by the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. co Logic International owners and operators of the process, provided their Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Reactor and a companion Thermal ...

  16. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - BAY CITY, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document reviews the results of a 28 day demonstration program conducted by the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. co Logic International owners and operators of the process, provided their Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Reactor and a companion Thermal ...

  17. A Model of Gas-Phase Transport During the Initial Stages of Sintering of Silicon Carbide

    E-print Network

    Matthewson, M. John

    A Model of Gas-Phase Transport During the Initial Stages of Sintering of Silicon Carbide Anil Kaza used as an additive to silicon carbide powder, is thought to facilitate densification during sintering pressureless sintering of silicon carbide (SiC) was first discovered by Prochazka in 1977,1 using boron

  18. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    E-print Network

    Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain surface and gas phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthetized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairy well the observations towards L1544. It also...

  19. GAS-PHASE OXIDATION PRODUCTS OF BIPHENYL AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory recently measured the gas-phase reaction rate constants of
    polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with the hydroxyl radical (OH) and concluded
    that OH reactions are the primary removal pathway of PCBs from the atmosphere.
    With the reaction system previousl...

  20. Field ionization kinetic and electron impact studies of gas phase transition states - The cyclic bromonium ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. M.; Giguere, R. J.; Falick, A. M.; Aberth, W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Cis- and trans-isomers of 4-t-butylcyclohexyl bromide were studied to determine the mechanism of cyclic bromonium ion formation. The field ionization kinetic and electron impact data indicate that the formation of the cyclic structure occurs simultaneously with loss of the neutral fragment. The data also show that little or no gas-phase cis-trans isomerization occurs.

  1. Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 10171025 Gas-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV) for application

    E-print Network

    Mench, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 160 (2006) 1017­1025 Gas-phase particle image velocimetry (PIV fields have been measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in representative geometries, including in operational cells. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Particle image velocimetry; PIV; Flow

  2. Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the photooxidation of 16 different terpenes

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Allen

    Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the photooxidation of 16 different terpenes products using PTR-MS. Several oxidation products were calibrated in the PTR-MS, including formaldehyde products were inferred from known fragmentation patterns, such as pinonaldehyde; and other products were

  3. Gas phase electronic spectrum of the nitrogen terminated nanowire NC16N

    E-print Network

    Maier, John Paul

    Gas phase electronic spectrum of the nitrogen terminated nanowire NC16N H. Ding, A.E. Boguslavskiy imply that a long carbon nanowire terminated with nitrogen will be semiconducting due to p of, for example, a 1D nanowire, may differ significantly from that of 3D materials and show strong

  4. Gas-phase synthesis and characterization of heteroleptic divalent germanium compounds by FVT/UV-PES

    E-print Network

    Leigh, William J.

    Gas-phase synthesis and characterization of heteroleptic divalent germanium compounds by FVT-coordinated germanium compounds UV photoelectron spectroscopy Ionization energies Quantum mechanical calculation Flash-amino, and thio-amino substitu- tion at germanium. The three compounds (4b, 5b and 6b) were prepared from

  5. Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the ozonolysis of ten different terpenes

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Allen

    Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the ozonolysis of ten different terpenes Anita-caryophyllene), and two oxygenated terpenes (methyl chavicol and linalool) were conducted individually in Teflon chambers with the PTR-MS, varied significantly between the different parent terpene compounds. The sum of measured

  6. Regular arrangement of nanoparticles from the gas phase on bacterial surface-protein layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queitsch, Ute; Mohn, Elias; Schäffel, Franziska; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Blüher, Anja; Mertig, Michael

    2007-03-01

    FePt nanoparticles from the gas phase are deposited onto the two-dimensional crystalline surface layer protein from the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The potential of this protein layer to facilitate the ordered spatial arrangement of the otherwise statistically distributed nanoparticles on the substrate is studied. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the particles positions to be directed by the regular protein template.

  7. CONTINUOUS STIRRED TANK REACTOR INVESTIGATION OF THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF HYDROXYL RADICALS AND TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used to study the gas phase reaction between HO and toluene. HO was generated by the in situ photolysis of nitrous acid. Flow reactor operation at steady state conditions with a residence time of 20 minutes allowed investigation of pri...

  8. Design of a Supercritical Fluid Expansion Source for Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Fullerenes

    E-print Network

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    Design of a Supercritical Fluid Expansion Source for Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Fullerenes of Illinois Bradley M. Gibson 20 February 2013 271 RAL 2:00 PM #12;I. Introduction The fullerenes, including C-poor and also presented data showing fullerene and PAH emission features together in other planetary nebulae

  9. Chemical reaction of metal-fullerene in gas phase (2) >Masamichi Konoa

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    f18-068 Chemical reaction of metal-fullerene in gas phase (2) ·>Masamichi Konoa , Syuhei Inoueb.of Tokyo Since the discovery of macroscopic generation and purification procedure of fullerenes and endohedral fullerenes, the geometric structure and the formation mechanism of them has been one of the most

  10. Chemical reaction of metal-fullerene in gas phase ^

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Chemical reaction of metal-fullerene in gas phase ·^Masamichi Kohno1 , Shuhei·" `··ZZOE±·S ,Q·D"OEfullerenes-ray diffraction study has proven (1) that some metal-fullerenes such as Sc@C82 and Sc2@C84 that were prepared

  11. Ozonation of coal vitrinites of different metamorphism degrees in gas and liquid phases

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Y.F. Patrakov

    2007-02-15

    The comparative analysis of the dynamics of accumulation of oxygen-containing groups in coals of different metamorphism degrees under their ozonation in the gas phase and in chloroform has been performed. The coals of the middle stage of metamorphism demonstrate the highest reactivity. The ozonation in chloroform proceeds with a higher intensity.

  12. Molecular Orbital Studies of Zinc Oxide Chemical Vapor Deposition: Gas-Phase Hydrolysis of Diethyl Zinc,

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Orbital Studies of Zinc Oxide Chemical Vapor Deposition: Gas-Phase Hydrolysis of Diethyl Zinc, Elimination Reactions, and Formation of Dimers and Tetramers Stanley M. Smith and H. Bernhard deposition of zinc oxide thin films can be carried out with diethyl zinc and water vapor. The present study

  13. # Title Authors Release of gas phase species from the photolysis of thin

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Poster # Title Authors 1 Release of gas phase species from the photolysis of thin water films.A., Greaves J., Finlayson-Pitts B.J. 11 WRF/CHEM simulation of ozone and precursors in the LA basin during.M., Paulson S.E. 13 Oxygen isotopic anomaly in secondary carbonates: evidence of anthropogenic pollution Chong

  14. Methylation of 2-Naphthol Using Dimethyl Carbonate under Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tundo, Pietro; Rosamilia, Anthony E.; Arico, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    This experiment investigates the methylation of 2-naphthol with dimethyl carbonate. The volatility of the substrates, products, and co-products allows the reaction to be performed using a continuous-flow gas-phase setup at ambient pressure. The reaction uses catalytic quantities of base, achieves high conversion, produces little waste, and…

  15. OH REACTION KINETICS OF GAS-PHASE A- AND G-HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANE AND HEXACHLOROBENZENE. (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of the hydroxyl
    radical (OH) with - and -hexachlorocyclohexane (-
    and Pairing in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas: Phases with broken-space symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakian, Armen; Muether, Herbert; Mur-Petit, Jordi; Polls, Artur

    2005-07-15

    We explore the phase diagram of a two-component ultracold atomic Fermi gas interacting with zero-range forces in the limit of weak coupling. We focus on the dependence of the pairing gap and the free energy on the variations in the number densities of the two species while the total density of the system is held fixed. As the density asymmetry is increased, the system exhibits a transition from a homogenous Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) phase to phases with spontaneously broken global space symmetries. One such realization is the deformed Fermi surface superfluidity (DFS) which exploits the possibility of deforming the Fermi surfaces of the species into ellipsoidal form at zero total momentum of Cooper pairs. The critical asymmetries at which the transition from DFS to the unpaired state occurs are larger than those for the BCS phase. In this precritical region the DFS phase lowers the pairing energy of the asymmetric BCS state. We compare quantitatively the DFS phase to another realization of superconducting phases with broken translational symmetry: the single-plane-wave Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell phase, which is characterized by a nonvanishing center-of-mass momentum of the Cooper pairs. The possibility of the detection of the DFS phase in the time-of-flight experiments is discussed and quantified for the case of {sup 6}Li atoms trapped in two different hyperfine states.

  16. Roaming-mediated ultrafast isomerization of geminal tri-bromides in the gas and liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S.; Butaeva, Evgeniia V.; Borin, Veniamin A.; Eyzips, Anna; Tarnovsky, Alexander N.

    2015-07-01

    ‘Roaming’ is a new and unusual class of reaction mechanism that has recently been discovered in unimolecular dissociation reactions of isolated molecules in the gas phase. It is characterized by frustrated bond cleavage, after which the two incipient fragments ‘roam’ on a flat region of the potential energy surface before reacting with one another. Here, we provide evidence that supports roaming in the liquid phase. We are now able to explain previous solution-phase experiments by comparing them with new ultrafast transient absorption data showing the photoisomerization of gas-phase CHBr3. We see that, upon S0-S1 excitation, gas-phase CHBr3 isomerizes within 100?fs into the BrHCBr-Br species, which is identical to what has been observed in solution. Similar sub-100 fs isomerization is now also observed for BBr3 and PBr3 in solution upon S1 excitation. Quantum chemical simulations of XBr3 (X?=?B, P or CH) suggest that photochemical reactivity in all three cases studied is governed by S1/S0 conical intersections and can best be described as occurring through roaming-mediated pathways.

  17. Phase diagram of a two-component Fermi gas with resonant interactions

    E-print Network

    Yong-il Shin; Christian H. Schunck; Andre Schirotzek; Wolfgang Ketterle

    2007-11-01

    The pairing of fermions is at the heart of superconductivity and superfluidity. The recent experimental realization of strongly interacting atomic Fermi gases has opened a new, controllable way to study novel forms of pairing and superfluidity. A major controversial issue has been the stability of superfluidity against an imbalance between the two spin components when the fermions interact resonantly. Here we present the phase diagram of a spin-polarized Fermi gas of $^6$Li atoms at unitarity, mapping out the superfluid phase versus temperature and density imbalance. Using tomographic techniques, we reveal spatial discontinuities in the spin polarization, the signature of a first-order superfluid-to-normal phase transition, which disappears at a tricritical point where the nature of the phase transition changes from first-order to second-order. At zero temperature, there is a quantum phase transition from a fully-paired superfluid to a partially-polarized normal gas. These observations and the implementation of an in situ ideal gas thermometer provide quantitative tests of theoretical calculations on the stability of resonant superfluidity.

  18. Shadow imaging in bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheimer, Marco; Häfeli, Richard; Wälchli, Carmen; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2015-09-01

    Shadow imaging is used for the investigation of bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in a porous structure. The porous structure is made of Somos WaterShed XC 11122, a clear epoxy resin used in rapid prototyping. Optical access is provided by using an aqueous solution of sodium iodide and zinc iodide having the same refractive index as the structure material (). Nitrogen is injected into the continuous phase at volumetric transport fractions in the range of resulting in a hold-up of . The obtained images of overlapping bubble shadows are processed to measure the bubble dimensions. Therefore, a new processing sequence is developed to determine bubble dimensions from overlapping bubble shadows by ellipse fitting. The accuracy of the bubble detection and sizing routine is assessed processing synthetic images. It is shown that the developed technique is suitable for volumetric two-phase flow measurements. Important global quantities such as gas hold-up and total interfacial area can be measured with only one camera. Operation parameters for gas-liquid two-phase flows are determined to improve mass and heat transfer between the phases.

  19. Impact of Gas-liquid Two-phase Flow on Fluid Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniwaki, Mitsuhiro; Shimomura, Nobuo

    In pipe lines such as those found in refrigeration cycle, a gas-liquid two-phase flow may occur because of a pressure change in the pipe. This flow causes noise. A vapor phase ratio in a fluid and the behavior of bubbles are related to the outbreak of noise. This experimental study investigated the fluid borne noise caused by gas-liquid two-phase flow passing through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. In the experiment, sound pressure was measured for two purposes: to see the influence of the air-water ratio on sound pressure and to see the change in sound pressure when a single bubble passed through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. The experiment showed that the fluid borne noise of gas-liquid two-phase flow grew louder than that of a liquid single-phase flow. As for the frequency distribution of the fluid borne noise, the sound pressure level was higher in the high frequency band. Furthermore, the fluid borne noise grew louder with increasing bubble diameter.

  1. Gas-Phase Oxidation, Particle Uptake, and Product Studies of Isoprene Epoxydiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, K. H.; Nguyen, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J.; Zhang, X.; Coggon, M.; Schwantes, R.; Bennett, N.; Stoltz, B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), discovered in 2009 as low-NOx atmospheric oxidation products of the ubiquitous biogenic precursor isoprene, are key intermediates in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic emissions. Recent studies carried out in the Caltech environmental chambers have elucidated the gas-phase OH oxidation rates and products, particle uptake rates, and particle-phase OH oxidation products of three isomers of IEPOX synthesized in-house. Gas-phase oxidation studies were conducted in 1 m3 chambers at both high- and low-NOx conditions, and were monitored by GC-FID, two types of chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), and GC-CIMS. Comparisons with previous studies on isoprene showed that the two ?-IEPOX isomers dominate over the ? isomers under atmospheric conditions, and the use of propene as an internal standard provided a robust estimate of OH oxidation rates between 0.99*10-11 and 1.67*10-11 cm3molec-1s-1 for the three isomers. Particle uptake and oxidation studies were conducted in 28 m3 chambers, and were monitored by GC-FID, CIMS, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). Particle uptake showed a strong dependence on humidity, with no uptake on dry seed, and was faster on ammonium sulfate seed than sodium chloride seed. Particle-phase oxidation gave similar products to gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals.

  2. (129) Xe and (131) Xe nuclear magnetic dipole moments from gas phase NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Makulski, W?odzimierz

    2015-04-01

    (3) He, (129) Xe and (131) Xe NMR measurements of resonance frequencies in the magnetic field B0=11.7586?T in different gas phase mixtures have been reported. Precise radiofrequency values were extrapolated to the zero gas pressure limit. These results combined with new quantum chemical values of helium and xenon nuclear magnetic shielding constants were used to determine new accurate nuclear magnetic moments of (129) Xe and (131) Xe in terms of that of the (3) He nucleus. They are as follows: ?((129) Xe)?=?-0.7779607(158)?N and ?((131) Xe)?=?+0.6918451(70)?N . By this means, the new 'helium method' for estimations of nuclear dipole moments was successfully tested. Gas phase NMR spectra demonstrate the weak intermolecular interactions observed on the (3) He and (129) Xe and (131) Xe shielding in the gaseous mixtures with Xe, CO2 and SF6 . PMID:25594841

  3. Rapid granular flows on a rough incline: phase diagram, gas transition, and effects of air drag

    E-print Network

    Tamas Borzsonyi; Robert E. Ecke

    2006-11-16

    We report experiments on the overall phase diagram of granular flows on an incline with emphasis on high inclination angles where the mean layer velocity approaches the terminal velocity of a single particle free falling in air. The granular flow was characterized by measurements of the surface velocity, the average layer height, and the mean density of the layer as functions of the hopper opening, the plane inclination angle and the downstream distance x of the flow. At high inclination angles the flow does not reach an x-invariant steady state over the length of the inclined plane. For low volume flow rates, a transition was detected between dense and very dilute (gas) flow regimes. We show using a vacuum flow channel that air did not qualitatively change the phase diagram and did not quantitatively modify mean flow velocities of the granular layer except for small changes in the very dilute gas-like phase.

  4. MOVPE GaN gas phase chemistry for reactor design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Safvi, S.A.; Thon, A.; Kuech, T.F.; Redwing, J.M.; Flynn, J.S.; Tischler, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The results of gas phase decomposition studies are used to construct a chemistry model which is compared to data obtained from an experimental MOVPE reactor. A flow tube reactor is used to study gas phase reactions between trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia at high temperatures, characteristic to the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN. Experiments were performed to determine the effect of the mixing of the Group III precursors and Group V precursors on the growth rate, growth uniformity and film properties. Growth rates are predicted for simple reaction mechanisms and compared to those obtained experimentally. Quantification of the loss of reacting species due to oligomerization is made based on experimentally observed growth rates. The model is used to obtain trends in growth rate and uniformity with the purpose of moving towards better operating conditions.

  5. Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    E-print Network

    Takuya Furuta; Akira Ono

    2006-02-23

    The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition of the system in ideal thermal equilibrium is studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The time evolution of a many-nucleon system confined in a container is solved for a long time to get a microcanonical ensemble of a given energy and volume. The temperature and the pressure are extracted from this ensemble and the caloric curves are constructed. The present work is the first time that a microscopic dynamical model which describes nuclear multifragmentation reactions well is directly applied to get the nuclear caloric curve. The obtained constant pressure caloric curves clearly show the characteristic feature of the liquid-gas phase transition, namely negative heat capacity (backbending), which is expected for the phase transition in finite systems.

  6. Computer code for gas-liquid two-phase vortex motions: GLVM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T. T.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program aimed at the phase separation between gas and liquid at zero gravity, induced by vortex motion, is developed. It utilizes an explicit solution method for a set of equations describing rotating gas-liquid flows. The vortex motion is established by a tangential fluid injection. A Lax-Wendroff two-step (McCormack's) numerical scheme is used. The program can be used to study the fluid dynamical behavior of the rotational two-phase fluids in a cylindrical tank. It provides a quick/easy sensitivity test on various parameters and thus provides the guidance for the design and use of actual physical systems for handling two-phase fluids.

  7. Gas-phase abundances of refractory elements in planetary nebulae - A hot-wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1980-08-01

    Planetary nebulae (PN) characteristically show large gas-phase depletions of some refractory elements, with Fe/H and Ca/H concentration ratios approximately equal to -1.5. In contrast, the gas-phase abundance of carbon is large, with a C/H concentration ratio greater than approximately +0.3. This pattern is difficult to understand in terms of grain formation and destruction during PN formation. However, these abundances are consistent with a model (Kwok, Purton, and FitzGerald, 1978) in which the PN shell consists of material expelled as a wind during the red-giant phase and subsequently compressed and accelerated by the impact of a hot stellar wind from the central star.

  8. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  9. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    E-print Network

    Natacha Altamirano; David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann; Zeinab Sherkatghanad

    2014-01-25

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d=6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q=J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the `every day thermodynamics' of simple substances. For q=0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0solid/liquid' phase transition. Furthermore, for 0.00905solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q>0.0985 we observe the `standard liquid/gas behavior' of the Van der Waals fluid.

  10. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  11. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  12. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-04-28

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

  13. Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for Highly Supercooled Cirrus Cloud Droplets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, Gregory C.

    1988-04-01

    A mixed-phase hydrometer growth model has been applied to determining the nucleation mode and rate responsible for the glaciation of a highly supercooled liquid cloud studied jointly by ground-based polarization lidar and aircraft in situ probes. The cloud droplets were detected at the base of an orographically induced cirrus cloud at temperatures between 34.3° and 37.3°C. The vertical distribution above cloud base of two independent data quantities, the aircraft-measured water and ice particle concentrations and the lidar linear depolarization ratio, have been compared to model predictions for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous drop-freezing. modes. It is concluded that, although activated ice nuclei may have contributed to the glaciation of the cloud, homogeneous nucleation was the dominant mode. Accordingly, a homogeneous nucleation rate 106 times greater than that predicted by classical theory, but 103 times less than laboratory measurements would suggest is found to be appropriate at the measured cloud temperatures.

  14. Eutectic nucleation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nafisi, S. Ghomashchi, R.; Vali, H.

    2008-10-15

    The nucleation mechanism of eutectic grains in hypoeutectic Al-Si foundry alloys has been investigated by examining deep etched specimens in high-resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and by using in-situ Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and microscopy. Both unmodified and Sr-modified alloys were studied to characterize the nucleation mechanism of eutectic silicon flakes and fibers. It is proposed that following nucleation of eutectic Al on the primary {alpha}-Al dendrites, fine Si particles form at the solidification front upon which the eutectic Si flakes and fibers could develop. The formation of small Si particles is attributed to Si enrichment of the remaining melt due to the formation of eutectic Al (aluminum spikes) at the eutectic temperature. A hypothesis is then proposed to explain the mechanism of eutectic grains formation with main emphasis on the eutectic Si phase.

  15. LSPRAY: Lagrangian Spray Solver for Applications With Parallel Computing and Unstructured Gas-Phase Flow Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Manthena S.

    1998-01-01

    Sprays occur in a wide variety of industrial and power applications and in the processing of materials. A liquid spray is a phase flow with a gas as the continuous phase and a liquid as the dispersed phase (in the form of droplets or ligaments). Interactions between the two phases, which are coupled through exchanges of mass, momentum, and energy, can occur in different ways at different times and locations involving various thermal, mass, and fluid dynamic factors. An understanding of the flow, combustion, and thermal properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray requires careful modeling of the rate-controlling processes associated with the spray's turbulent transport, mixing, chemical kinetics, evaporation, and spreading rates, as well as other phenomena. In an attempt to advance the state-of-the-art in multidimensional numerical methods, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center extended our previous work on sprays to unstructured grids and parallel computing. LSPRAY, which was developed by M.S. Raju of Nyma, Inc., is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo probability density function (PDF) solver. The LSPRAY solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral elements in the gas-phase solvers. It is used specifically for fuel sprays within gas turbine combustors, but it has many other uses. The spray model used in LSPRAY provided favorable results when applied to stratified-charge rotary combustion (Wankel) engines and several other confined and unconfined spray flames. The source code will be available with the National Combustion Code (NCC) as a complete package.

  16. Mechanism and behavior of nucleate boiling heat transfer to the alkalai liquid metals

    E-print Network

    Deane, Charles William

    1969-01-01

    A model of boiling heat transfer to the alkali liquid metals is postulated from an examination of the events and phases of the nucleate boiling cycle. The model includes the important effect of microlayer evaporation which ...

  17. Domain wall nucleation by impurity ions in KNbO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, S. G.; Dutta, H. S.; David, A. P.

    1988-11-01

    It has been shown theoretically as well as experimentally that microwalls with linear dimensions of the order of 10-6-10-8 m can be nucleated in KNbO3 single crystals under the influence of the electric dc fields applied externally at the sites of the impurity ions. The critical field for nucleation is found to be about 8×103 V m-1. Since such low fields already exist in crystals at the nonferroelectric to ferroelectric phase transition, the mechanism is expected to be operative at that time, and a photographic evidence of it is also obtained. A model has been developed to explain the nucleation. Employing thermodynamic considerations, expressions have been derived for the critical length of the domain wall nucleated, and the activation energy of nucleation, both for 60° and 90° walls. The photomicrographs obtained after applying the dc fields show microwalls nucleated at the impurity sites, with their linear dimensions of the order given by the theory. Many other aspects of the domain wall nucleation have been made clear by the photomicrographs. Particularly, it has been found that the microwalls move after nucleation to lie linearly to reduce the strain energy of the crystal. The microwalls are not pinned at the impurities, and extend themselves so that they meet each other end to end, producing a continuous wall. It is possible to distinquish these microwalls from the microwalls nucleated by the dislocation loops. The expression for the activation energy of nucleation is also verified experimentally. It is suggested that the mechanism of domain wall nucleation can occur in other ferroelectric crystals also, and shown that the memory of domain walls, commonly observed in ferroelectrics, can be readily attributed to the impurity ions present in the crystals, and the phenomenon of domain wall nucleation operative at their sites.

  18. Ultrasonic emissions during ice nucleation and propagation in plant xylem.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Guillaume; Pramsohler, Manuel; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Saudreau, Marc; Améglio, Thierry; Neuner, Gilbert; Mayr, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission analysis enables nondestructive monitoring of damage in dehydrating or freezing plant xylem. We studied acoustic emissions (AE) in freezing stems during ice nucleation and propagation, by combining acoustic and infrared thermography techniques and controlling the ice nucleation point. Ultrasonic activity in freezing samples of Picea abies showed two distinct phases: the first on ice nucleation and propagation (up to 50 AE s(-1) ; reversely proportional to the distance to ice nucleation point), and the second (up to 2.5 AE s(-1) ) after dissipation of the exothermal heat. Identical patterns were observed in other conifer and angiosperm species. The complex AE patterns are explained by the low water potential of ice at the ice-liquid interface, which induced numerous and strong signals. Ice propagation velocities were estimated via AE (during the first phase) and infrared thermography. Acoustic activity ceased before the second phase probably because the exothermal heating and the volume expansion of ice caused decreasing tensions. Results indicate cavitation events at the ice front leading to AE. Ultrasonic emission analysis enabled new insights into the complex process of xylem freezing and might be used to monitor ice propagation in natura. PMID:25756189

  19. Nucleation of the ? ? ? and ? ? ? transformations in unalloyed plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cost, J. R.; Johnson, K. A.

    1995-06-01

    Nucleation and growth of the ? ? ? and the ? ? ? allotropic transformations in unalloyed plutonium have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry for different-sized specimens cycled many times through the transformations. For the ? ? ? reaction the nucleation rate is very low and apparently random. In general, the smaller the specimen, the greater the difficulty for nucleation. The rate of growth of the alpha phase is found to increase with decreasing temperature. The growth rate is 1.6 mm/min at 30°C. For the reverse reaction, ? ? ?, the specimens transform simultaneously independent of size. Also, the reaction nucleates at a lower temperature but grows more slowly on the first cycle. These nucleation effects are considered to be primarily due to residual stresses caused by prior transformations. The value measured for the heat of the transformation, 13.6 ± 0.2 J/g, is lower than previously reported, and this is shown to be because the last 5 to 10% of the ? ? ? reaction requires up to 1000 min and occurs as a continuation of the reaction that is too slow to be measured by the calorimeter.

  20. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

    2001-01-18

    The objective of this five-year project (October 1997 - September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997 - 2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000 - 2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  1. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

    2001-01-10

    The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  2. Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

    1999-10-28

    The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

  3. Liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter with relativistic models

    E-print Network

    James R. Torres; Francesca Gulminelli; Débora P. Menezes

    2015-10-26

    Background: The advent of new dedicated experimental programs on hyperon physics is rapidly boosting the field, and the possibility of synthetizing multiple strange hypernuclei requires the addition of the strangeness degree of freedom to the models dedicated to nuclear structure and nuclear matter studies at low energy. Purpose: We want to settle the influence of strangeness on the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Because of the large uncertainties concerning the hyperon sector, we do not aim at a quantitative estimation of the phase diagram but rather at a qualitative description of the phenomenology, as model independent as possible. Method: We analyze the phase diagram of low density matter composed of neutrons, protons and $\\Lambda$ hyperons using a Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) model. We largely explore the parameter space to pin down generic features of the phase transition, and compare the results to ab-initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Results: We show that the liquid-gas phase transition is only slightly quenched by the addition of hyperons. Strangeness is seen to be an order parameter of the phase transition, meaning that dilute strange matter is expected to be unstable with respect to the formation of hyper-clusters. Conclusions: More quantitative results within the RMF model need improved functionals at low density, possibly fitted to ab-initio calculations of nuclear and $\\Lambda$ matter.

  4. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

  5. Nucleation and Growth of GaN on GaAs (001) Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Hafich, Michael J.; Heller, Edwin J.; Lee, Stephen R.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, Sergei; Sullivan, John P.

    1999-05-03

    The nucleation of GaN thin films on GaAs is investigated for growth at 620 "C. An rf plasma cell is used to generate chemically active nitrogen from N2. An arsenic flux is used in the first eight monolayer of nitride growth to enhance nucleation of the cubic phase. Subsequent growth does not require an As flux to preserve the cubic phase. The nucleation of smooth interfaces and GaN films with low stacking fault densities is dependent upon relative concentrations of active nitrogen species in the plasma and on the nitrogen to gallium flux ratio.

  6. Gas-phase study of the reactivity of optical coating materials with hydrocarbons by use of a

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Gas-phase study of the reactivity of optical coating materials with hydrocarbons by use with hydrocarbons is studied in the gas phase by use of mass spectroscopy of metal-oxide clusters. We report-layer materials with hydrocarbons. An increased understanding of these reactions could lead to the development

  7. Free-standing AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures by gas-phase etching of germanium

    E-print Network

    Free-standing AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures by gas-phase etching of germanium Garrett D. Cole,1,a Yu and selectively remove a sacrificial germanium Ge underlayer in a room temperature gas-phase etching procedure. We

  8. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  9. Gas-phase unsteadiness and its inuence on droplet vaporization in sub-and super-critical environments

    E-print Network

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    Gas-phase unsteadiness and its in¯uence on droplet vaporization in sub- and super quantitatively the in¯uence of gas-phase unsteadiness on the droplet vaporization process in sub- and super-critical environments. Two comprehensive models of high-pressure droplet vaporization, including a transient model

  10. Third-Order Gas-Liquid Phase Transition and the Nature of Andrews Critical Point

    E-print Network

    Tian Ma; Shouhong Wang

    2010-07-13

    The main objective of this article is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical-vapor transport (PVT) system. A dynamical model, consistent with the van der Waals equation near the Andrews critical point, is derived. With this model, we deduce two physical parameters, which interact exactly at the Andrews critical point, and which dictate the dynamic transition behavior near the Andrews critical point. In particular, it is shown that 1) the Andrews critical point is a switching point where the phase transition changes from the first order to the third order, 2) the gas-liquid co-existence curve can be extended beyond the Andrews critical point, and 3) the liquid-gas phase transition going beyond Andrews point is of the third order. This clearly explains why it is hard to observe the gas-liquid phase transition beyond the Andrews critical point. Furthermore, the analysis leads naturally the introduction of a general asymmetry principle of fluctuations and the preferred transition mechanism for a thermodynamic system.

  11. Shear viscosity of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid-gas phase transition

    E-print Network

    Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Yu-Gang Ma

    2013-09-26

    Within a relaxation time approach using free nucleon-nucleon cross sections modified by the in-medium nucleon masses that are determined from an isospin- and momentum-dependent effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, we investigate the specific shear viscosity ($\\eta/s$) of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid-gas phase transition. It is found that as the nucleonic matter is heated at fixed pressure or compressed at fixed temperature, its specific shear viscosity shows a valley shape in the temperature or density dependence, with the minimum located at the boundary of the phase transition. Moreover, the value of $\\eta/s$ drops suddenly at the first-order liquid-gas phase transition temperature, reaching as low as $4\\sim5$ times the KSS bound of $\\hbar/4\\pi$. However, it varies smoothly for the second-order liquid-gas phase transition. Effects of the isospin degree of freedom and the nuclear symmetry energy on the value of $\\eta/s$ are also discussed.

  12. Laboratory investigations of the alpha-pinene/ozone gas-phase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to provide more insight into terpene photooxidation or ozonolysis reaction mechanisms, a radiotracer technique was developed. This technique was applied to an investigation of the /sup 14/C-alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In the first phase of the research, the carbon distribution at the conclusion of the ozonolysis reaction was determined by separating carbon-14-labelled gaseous products from labelled aerosols, and counting each phase by liquid scintillation methods. The resulting carbon balance was 38% to 60% filtered aerosols, 6% to 20% gas phase compounds, and 11% to 29% products absorbed on the reaction chamber walls. Recoveries of the alpha-pinene carbon-14 ranging from 79% to 97% were achieved using this method. The alpha-pinene concentrations in these experiments were close to ambient (1 part per billion), yet the carbon balance was similar to that observed at much higher concentrations (>1 part per million). In the second phase of the alpha-pinene study, both gas and aerosol products of the ozonolysis reaction were collected on cartridges impregnated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, then analyzed by HPLC. In the final experiments, alpha-pinene aerosol was reacted with a silylating agent to improve the detection of organic acids and alcohols. The gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis of the silylated aerosol products showed evidence of dimer/polymer formation occurring in the ozonolysis reaction.

  13. A Chain of Modeling Tools For Gas and Aqueous Phase Chemstry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audiffren, N.; Djouad, R.; Sportisse, B.

    Atmospheric chemistry is characterized by the use of large set of chemical species and reactions. Handling with the set of data required for the definition of the model is a quite difficult task. We prsent in this short article a preprocessor for diphasic models (gas phase and aqueous phase in cloud droplets) named SPACK. The main interest of SPACK is the automatic generation of lumped species related to fast equilibria. We also developped a linear tangent model using the automatic differentiation tool named ODYSSEE in order to perform a sensitivity analysis of an atmospheric multi- phase mechanism based on RADM2 kinetic scheme.Local sensitivity coefficients are computed for two different scenarii. We focus in this study on the sensitivity of the ozone,NOx,HOx, system with respect to some aqueous phase reactions and we inves- tigate the influence of the reduction in the photolysis rates in the area below the cloud region.

  14. High-reliability gas turbine combined-cycle development program: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, F.H.; Lewis, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    Results are presented of Phase I of a multi-phase program leading to the development of a High Reliability Gas Turbine. The engine would be used for the base load, combined cycle application starting in the mid-1980's. The design, with primary emphasis on reliability, recognizes the need on the part of the electric utility user for high operating availability together with low maintenance cost to take full advantage of the capital cost and efficiency advantage offered by the combined cycle plant. Phase I was a conceptual design study of both the gas turbine itself and the full plant. Reliability for all component equipment was emphasized from the very outset. In the case of the gas turbine, high reliability was reflected in a concept that features ruggedness and simplicity. Ease of maintenance was provided through structural simplicity and modularization. Component designs for the gas turbine were selected on the basis of a review of past operational experience and an in-depth statistical reliability analysis. Design details were then determined using trade-off and parametric studies. Reliability in the auxiliary and balance of plant waste heat recovery equipment was provided by redundancy of critical components as well as the use of proven equipment. Careful attention was paid to developing a concept for a highly reliable control system that blends automatic operation with manual override for operator intervention. A condition monitoring system to provide alerts for incipient shut down conditions was also incorporated into the control design concept. The final gas turbine design is a 107 MW, single-shaft engine. Projected availability for the final engine installed in a combined cycle plant is 92%. This design will serve as a firm point of departure for the preliminary design to follow during the Phase II program.

  15. Ice Nucleation Properties of Oxidized Carbon Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in many fields, particularly atmospheric science, but is still poorly understood. All known inorganic ice nucleating particles are relatively large in size and tend to be hydrophilic. Hence it is not obvious that carbon nanomaterials should nucleate ice. However, in this paper we show that four different readily water-dispersible carbon nanomaterials are capable of nucleating ice. The tested materials were carboxylated graphene nanoflakes, graphene oxide, oxidized single walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The carboxylated graphene nanoflakes have a diameter of ?30 nm and are among the smallest entities observed so far to nucleate ice. Overall, carbon nanotubes were found to nucleate ice more efficiently than flat graphene species, and less oxidized materials nucleated ice more efficiently than more oxidized species. These well-defined carbon nanomaterials may pave the way to bridging the gap between experimental and computational studies of ice nucleation. PMID:26267196

  16. Risk Assessment Related to Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gas and Particle Phases near Industrial Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Noelia; Cuadras, Anna; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inhalation is one of the main means of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because of their ubiquitous presence in the atmosphere. However, most studies have considered only PAHs found in the particle phase and have omitted the contribution of the gas-phase PAHs to the risk. Objective: We estimated the lifetime lung cancer risk from PAH exposure by inhalation in people living next to the largest chemical site in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area. Methods: We determined 18 PAHs in the atmospheric gas and particle phase. We monitored the PAHs for 1 year in three locations near the chemical site in different seasons. We used toxic equivalence factors to calculate benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) equivalents (BaP-eq) for individual PAHs and applied the World Health Organization unit risk (UR) for BaP (UR = 8.7 × 10–5) to estimate lifetime cancer risks due to PAH exposures. Results: We observed some spatial and seasonal variability in PAH concentrations. The contribution of gas-phase PAHs to the total BaP-eq value was between 34% and 86%. The total estimated average lifetime lung cancer risk due to PAH exposure in the study area was 1.2 × 10–4. Conclusions: The estimated risk was higher than values recommended by the World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency but lower than the threshold value of 10–3 that is considered an indication of definite risk according to similar risk studies. The results also showed that risk may be underestimated if the contributions of gas-phase PAHs are not considered. PMID:21478082

  17. Nucleation of crystals that are mixed composites of all three polymorphs in the Gaussian core model.

    PubMed

    Mithen, J P; Callison, A J; Sear, R P

    2015-06-14

    We present results of computer simulations of homogeneous crystal nucleation in the Gaussian core model. In our simulations, we study the competition between the body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), and hexagonal-close-packed crystal phases. We find that the crystal nuclei that form from the metastable fluid phase are typically "mixed"; they do not consist of a single crystal polymorph. Furthermore, when the fcc phase is stable or fcc and bcc phases are equally stable, this mixed nature is found to persist far beyond the size at the top of the nucleation barrier, that is, far into what would be considered the growth (rather than nucleation) regime. In this region, the polymorph that forms is therefore selected long after nucleation. This has implications. When nucleation is slow, it will be the rate-limiting step for crystallization. Then, the step that determines the time scale for crystallisation is different from the step that controls which polymorph forms. This means that they can be independently controlled. Also between nucleation and polymorph selection, there is a growing phase that is clearly crystalline not fluid, but this phase cannot be assigned to any one polymorph. PMID:26071718

  18. Diesel nucleation mode particles: semivolatile or solid?

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Andrea; Maricq, M Matti

    2008-11-01

    Although the preponderance of current data points to semivolatile diesel nuclei particles composed of sulfuric acid and heavy hydrocarbons, the question remains as to what extent, if any, they contain solid cores. We present evidence here of a "solid" particle nucleation mode that accompanies normal soot emissions in the case of two modern light-duty diesel vehicles run with ultralow sulfur fuel. This mode is most prominent at idle, but also appears at speeds below approximately 30 mph, and is highly sensitive to the level of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The nuclei particles are examined for their volatility and electrical charge. In stark contrast to "conventional" nuclei particles, they remain nonvolatile to >400 degrees C and exhibit a bipolar charge with a Boltzmann temperature of 580 degrees C. Their nonvolatile nature rules out sulfate and heavy hydrocarbons as primary constituents, and their electrical charge requires formation in a high-temperature environment capable of generating bipolar ions. This suggests that "solid" nuclei particles form during combustion but remain distinct from soot particles, analogous to what has been found recently in flames. As concerns about potential emissions of nonvolatile nanoparticles have already surfaced, an important conclusion of this study is that diesel particulate filters remove the "solid" nucleation mode with an efficiency comparable to soot PMID:19031887

  19. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    PubMed

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1?:?49.5?:?49.5, formic acid?:?methanol?:?water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase measurements to be correlated to biomolecular structures in solution, low charge state ions should be analyzed. Further, to determine if different solution conditions give rise to ions of different structure, ions of similar charge state should be compared. Non-denatured protein ion densities are found to be in excellent agreement with non-denatured protein ion densities inferred from prior DMA and drift tube measurements made without charge reduction (all ions with densities in the 0.85-1.10 g cm(-3) range), showing that these ions are not strongly influenced by Coulombic stretching nor by analysis method. PMID:22073403

  20. Gas-phase chemistry in dense interstellar clouds including grain surface molecular depletion and desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We present time-dependent models of the chemical evolution of molecular clouds which include depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and desorption, as well as gas-phase interactions. We have included three mechanisms to remove species from the grain mantles: thermal evaporation, cosmic-ray-induced heating, and photodesorption. A wide range of parameter space has been explored to examine the abundance of species present both on the grain mantles and in the gas phase as a function of both position in the cloud (visual extinction) and of evolutionary state (time). The dominant mechanism that removes molecules from the grain mantles is cosmic-ray desorption. At times greater than the depletion timescale, the abundances of some simple species agree with abundances observed in the cold dark cloud TMC-1. Even though cosmic-ray desorption preserves the gas-phase chemistry at late times, molecules do show significant depletions from the gas phase. Examination of the dependence of depletion as a function of density shows that when the density increases from 10(exp 3)/cc to 10(exp 5)/cc several species including HCO(+), HCN, and CN show gas-phase abundance reductions of over an order of magnitude. The CO: H2O ratio in the grain mantles for our standard model is on the order of 10:1, in reasonable agreement with observations of nonpolar CO ice features in rho Ophiuchus and Serpens. We have also examined the interdependence of CO depletion with the space density of molecular hydrogen and binding energy to the grain surface. We find that the observed depletion of CO in Taurus in inconsistent with CO bonding in an H2O rich mantle, in agreement with observations. We suggest that if interstellar grains consist of an outer layer of CO ice, then the binding energies for many species to the grain mantle may be lower than commonly used, and a significant portion of molecular material may be maintained in the gas phase.