Science.gov

Sample records for gas poor transition

  1. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  2. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  3. Biographies of Exclusion: Poor Work and Poor Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shildrick, Tracy; MacDonald, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The usefulness of the concept of transition has been hotly contested in Anglophone youth studies over the past decade. A variety of criticisms have been ranged against it, including that it: presumes the continuing predominance of linear, obvious, mainstream pathways to adulthood; excludes wider youth questions in focusing narrowly on educational…

  4. UNVEILING THE MASK ON THE ULIRG-TO-QSO TRANSITION OBJECT [H89]1821+643 AT z = 0.3: A GAS-POOR/GAS-RICH GALAXY MERGER AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR CO-BASED DYNAMICAL MASS ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, M.; Wagg, J.; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Feain, I. J.

    2011-08-20

    We report the detection of the {sup 12}CO J = 1-0 emission line in [H89]1821+643, one of the most optically luminous quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the local universe, and a template ULIRG-to-QSO transition object, located in a rich, cool-core cluster at z = 0.297. The CO emission is likely to be extended, highly asymmetric with respect to the center of the host elliptical where the QSO resides, and correspond with a molecular gas mass of {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. The dynamical mass enclosed by the CO emission-line region could amount to {approx}1.7 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} (80% of the total mass of the elliptical host). The bulk of the CO emission is located at {approx}9 kpc southeast from the nuclei position, close to a faint optical structure, suggesting that the CO emission could either represent a gas-rich companion galaxy merging with the elliptical host or a tail-like structure reminiscent of a previous interaction. We argue that the first scenario is more likely given the large masses implied by the CO source, which would imply a highly asymmetric elliptical host. The close alignment between the CO emission's major axis and the radio plume suggests a possible role in the excitation of the ambient gas reservoir by the latter. The stacking technique was used to search for CO emission and 3-mm continuum emission from galaxies in the surrounding cluster. However, no detection was found toward individual galaxies or the stacked ensemble of galaxies, with a 3{sigma} limit of <1.1 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} for the molecular gas.

  5. DUST-TO-GAS RATIO IN THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY I Zw 18

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Fisher, David B.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Gordon, Karl D.; Roman-Duval, Julia; Donaldson, Jessica; Melendez, Marcio; Cannon, John M.

    2012-06-20

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy I Zw 18 is one of the most metal-poor systems known in the local universe (12+log(O/H) = 7.17). In this work we study I Zw 18 using data from Spitzer, Herschel Space Telescope, and IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our data set includes the most sensitive maps of I Zw 18, to date, in both the far-infrared and the CO J = 1 {yields} 0 transition. We use dust emission models to derive a dust mass upper limit of only M{sub dust} {<=} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} (3{sigma} limit). This upper limit is driven by the non-detection at 160 {mu}m, and it is a factor of 4-10 times smaller than previous estimates (depending on the model used). We also estimate an upper limit to the total dust-to-gas mass ratio of M{sub Dust}/M{sub gas} {<=} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. If a linear correlation between the dust-to-gas mass ratio and metallicity (measured as O/H) were to hold, we would expect a ratio of 3.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. We also show that the infrared spectral energy distribution is similar to that of starbursting systems.

  6. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line. PMID:27575170

  7. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line.

  8. Gas Poor Galaxies in MKW/AWM Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. A.

    1995-03-01

    Follow-up observations were made of the neutral hydrogen content of 129 galaxies near the cores of MKW 4, MKW 8, MKW 11, AWM 4, and AWM 5. The neutral hydrogen content of these galaxies appears to be lower than that of galaxies of similar type in the field or in loose groups and are more consistent with those of galaxies in the richer Abell clusters. Of the 14 galaxies that appear to be spirals in MKW 4, only one was detected above a sensitivity limit of ~ 10(5) Msun /Mpc(2) . The low detection rate of galaxies in MKW 4 suggest that its core is truly deficient in neutral hydrogen gas.

  9. Extremely metal-poor gas at a redshift of 7.

    PubMed

    Simcoe, Robert A; Sullivan, Peter W; Cooksey, Kathy L; Kao, Melodie M; Matejek, Michael S; Burgasser, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    In typical astrophysical environments, the abundance of heavy elements ranges from 0.001 to 2 times the solar value. Lower abundances have been seen in selected stars in the Milky Way's halo and in two quasar absorption systems at redshift z = 3 (ref. 4). These are widely interpreted as relics from the early Universe, when all gas possessed a primordial chemistry. Before now there have been no direct abundance measurements from the first billion years after the Big Bang, when the earliest stars began synthesizing elements. Here we report observations of hydrogen and heavy-element absorption in a spectrum of a quasar at z =  7.04, when the Universe was just 772 million years old (5.6 per cent of its present age). We detect a large column of neutral hydrogen but no corresponding metals (defined as elements heavier than helium), limiting the chemical abundance to less than 1/10,000 times the solar level if the gas is in a gravitationally bound proto-galaxy, or to less than 1/1,000 times the solar value if it is diffuse and unbound. If the absorption is truly intergalactic, it would imply that the Universe was neither ionized by starlight nor chemically enriched in this neighbourhood at z ≈ 7. If it is gravitationally bound, the inferred abundance is too low to promote efficient cooling, and the system would be a viable site to form the predicted but as yet unobserved massive population III stars. PMID:23222611

  10. The geodynamic province of transitional crust adjacent to magma-poor continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J.; Tucholke, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Two types of 'transitional crust' have been documented along magma-poor rifted margins. One consists of apparently sub-continental mantle that has been exhumed and serpentinized in a regime of brittle deformation during late stages of rifting. A second is highly thinned continental crust, which in some cases is known to have been supported near sea level until very late in the rift history and thus is interpreted to reflect depth-dependent extension. In both cases it is typically assumed that formation of oceanic crust occurs shortly after the breakup of brittle continental crust and thus that the transitional crust has relatively limited width. We here examine two representative cases of transitional crust, one in the Newfoundland-Iberia rift (exhumed mantle) and one off the Angola-Gabon margin (highly thinned continental crust). Considering the geological and geophysical evidence, we propose that depth-dependent extension (riftward flow of weak lower/middle continental crust and/or upper mantle) may be a common phenomenon on magma-poor margins and that this can result in a much broader zone of transitional crust than has hitherto been assumed. Transitional crust in this extended zone may consist of sub-continental mantle, lower to middle continental crust, or some combination thereof, depending on the strength profile of the pre-rift continental lithosphere. Transitional crust ceases to be emplaced (i.e., final 'breakup' occurs) only when emplacement of heat and melt from the rising asthenosphere becomes dominant over lateral flow of the weak lower lithosphere. This model implies a two-stage breakup: first the rupture of the brittle upper crust and second, the eventual emplacement of oceanic crust. Well-defined magnetic anomalies can form in transitional crust consisting of highly serpentinized, exhumed mantle, and they therefore are not diagnostic of oceanic crust. Where present in transitional crust, these anomalies can be helpful in interpreting the rifting

  11. Superfluid Transition in a Chiron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G F

    2007-12-10

    Low temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of LSCO suggest that the superconducting transition is associated with the disappearance of a vortex liquid. In this note we wish to draw attention to the fact that spin-orbit-like interactions in a poorly conducting layered material can lead to a new type of quantum ground state with spin polarized soliton-like charge carriers as the important quantum degree of freedom. In 2-dimensions these solitons are vortex-like, while in 3-dimensional systems they are monopole-like. In either case there is a natural mechanism for the pairing of spin up and spin down solitons, and we find that at low temperatures there is a cross-over transition as a function of carrier density between a state where the solitons are free and a condensate state where the spin up and spin down solitons in neighboring layers are paired.

  12. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  13. CAUSES OF POOR SEALANT PERFORMANCE IN SOIL-GAS- RESISTANT FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses causes of poor sealant performance in soil-gas-resistant foundations. ealants for radon-resistant foundation construction must seal the gap between concrete sections. odern sealants have such low permeability that seal performance depends only on the permeabil...

  14. Energy level transitions of gas in a 2D nanopore

    SciTech Connect

    Grinyaev, Yurii V.; Chertova, Nadezhda V.; Psakhie, Sergei G.

    2015-10-27

    An analytical study of gas behavior in a 2D nanopore was performed. It is shown that the temperature dependence of gas energy can be stepwise due to transitions from one size-quantized subband to another. Taking into account quantum size effects results in energy level transitions governed by the nanopore size, temperature and gas density. This effect leads to an abrupt change of gas heat capacity in the nanopore at the above varying system parameters.

  15. Gas-rich and gas-poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second-order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109 M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few × 107 M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z = 10 is ˜10 per cent for objects with M ˜ 107 M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas-dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  16. Gas-rich and gas poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few× 107M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z=10 is ˜10% for objects with M ˜ 107M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  17. Phase transitions in a gas of anyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, R.; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.; Richer, J.

    2010-10-01

    We continue our numerical Monte Carlo simulation of a gas of closed loops on a 3 dimensional lattice, however, now in the presence of a topological term added to the action which corresponds to the total linking number between the loops. We compute the linking number using a novel approach employing certain notions from knot theory. Adding the topological term converts the particles into anyons. Interpreting the model as an effective theory that describes the 2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the asymptotic strong-coupling regime, the topological linking number simply corresponds to the addition to the action of the Chern-Simons term. The system continues to exhibit a phase transition as a function of the vortex mass as it becomes small. We find the following new results. The Chern-Simons term has no effect on the Wilson loop. On the other hand, it does effect the ’t Hooft loop of a given configuration, adding the linking number of the ’t Hooft loop with all of the dynamical vortex loops. We find the unexpected result that both the Wilson loop and the ’t Hooft loop exhibit a perimeter law even though there are no massless particles in the theory, in both phases of the theory. It should be noted that our method suffers from numerical instabilities if the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term is too large; thus, we have restricted our results to small values of this parameter. Furthermore, interpreting the lattice loop gas as an effective theory describing the Abelian Higgs model is only known to be true in the infinite coupling limit; for strong but finite coupling this correspondence is only a conjecture, the validity of which is beyond the scope of this article.

  18. Phase transitions in a gas of anyons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, R.; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.; Richer, J.

    2010-10-01

    We continue our numerical Monte Carlo simulation of a gas of closed loops on a 3 dimensional lattice, however, now in the presence of a topological term added to the action which corresponds to the total linking number between the loops. We compute the linking number using a novel approach employing certain notions from knot theory. Adding the topological term converts the particles into anyons. Interpreting the model as an effective theory that describes the 2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the asymptotic strong-coupling regime, the topological linking number simply corresponds to the addition to the action of the Chern-Simons term. The system continues to exhibit a phase transition as a function of the vortex mass as it becomes small. We find the following new results. The Chern-Simons term has no effect on the Wilson loop. On the other hand, it does effect the 't Hooft loop of a given configuration, adding the linking number of the 't Hooft loop with all of the dynamical vortex loops. We find the unexpected result that both the Wilson loop and the 't Hooft loop exhibit a perimeter law even though there are no massless particles in the theory, in both phases of the theory. It should be noted that our method suffers from numerical instabilities if the coefficient of the Chern-Simons term is too large; thus, we have restricted our results to small values of this parameter. Furthermore, interpreting the lattice loop gas as an effective theory describing the Abelian Higgs model is only known to be true in the infinite coupling limit; for strong but finite coupling this correspondence is only a conjecture, the validity of which is beyond the scope of this article.

  19. HI content and X-ray gas pressure in Morgan poor clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1997-05-01

    We have analyzed archival ROSAT PSPC observations of the poor clusters, MKW 4, AWM 4, and AWM 5. Assuming an isothermal gas model, we find extended emission that is smooth, centrally peaked, and reasonably symmetric with X-ray temperatures in the range of 2-4 keV. These findings are consistent with previous observations of the clusters. Surface brightness emission extracted from the X-ray images is fit to a model that is used to obtain density and pressure profiles of the hot intra cluster gas in each cluster. In the direction of these poor clusters, we have observed in the 21-cm line more than 70 galaxies. The neutral hydrogen content of the spiral galaxies is investigated as a function of their location within these clusters. We examine, in particular, the neutral hydrogen content of the spiral members as a function of the local density and pressure of the hot intra cluster medium.

  20. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  1. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  2. Seismic Illumination Analysis in Poor Oil & Gas Field Data by Using Focal Beam Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, A. H. Abdul; Ghosh, D. P.; Harith, Z. Z. Tuan

    2014-03-01

    The area underneath shallow gas cloud is an area where the image of subsurface data is generally poor. This distorted image underneath gas zones usually contains precious information of hydrocarbon accumulation. Previously, we analyse the factors contribute to poor subsurface seismic image underneath the gas cloud model and use focal beam technique to understand subsurface illumination information. Encourage by model-based success, we shift our focus to data-based application by applying the focal beam technique into a real field data. The results from this field were analyse in term of resolution function and amplitude versus ray parameter (AVP) imprint for different reflector depth, followed by acquisition analysis on the surface level. For this purpose, a velocity data of a field located in Malay Basin was built before applying the focal beam calculation. We will demonstrate that by using focal beam analysis for this field, we will able to obtain good imaging particularly for target reflector at 2000ms, 4000ms and 6000ms depth, provided the full 3D acquisition geometry was used during focal beam application.

  3. Demonstration and evaluation of gas turbine transit buses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program was designed to demonstrate and evaluate the operation of gas turbine engines in transit coaches in revenue service compared with diesel powered coaches. The main objective of the program was to accelerate development and commercialization of automotive gas turbines. The benefits from the installation of this engine in a transit coach were expected to be reduced weight, cleaner exhaust emissions, lower noise levels, reduced engine vibration and maintenance requirements, improved reliability and vehicle performance, greater engine braking capability, and superior cold weather starting. Four RTS-II advanced design transit coaches were converted to gas turbine power using engines and transmissions. Development, acceptance, performance and systems tests were performed on the coaches prior to the revenue service demonstration.

  4. Imaging the Elusive H-poor Gas in the High adf Planetary Nebula NGC 6778

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Monteiro, Hektor; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    We present the first direct image of the high-metallicity gas component in a planetary nebula (NGC 6778), taken with the OSIRIS Blue Tunable Filter centered on the O ii λ4649+50 Å optical recombination lines (ORLs) at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We show that the emission of these faint O ii ORLs is concentrated in the central parts of the planetary nebula and is not spatially coincident either with emission coming from the bright [O iii] λ5007 Å collisionally excited line (CEL) or the bright Hα recombination line. From monochromatic emission line maps taken with VIMOS at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, we find that the spatial distribution of the emission from the auroral [O iii] λ4363 line resembles that of the O ii ORLs but differs from nebular [O iii] λ5007 CEL distribution, implying a temperature gradient inside the planetary nebula. The centrally peaked distribution of the O ii emission and the differences with the [O iii] and H i emission profiles are consistent with the presence of an H-poor gas whose origin may be linked to the binarity of the central star. However, determination of the spatial distribution of the ORLs and CELs in other PNe and a comparison of their dynamics are needed to further constrain the geometry and ejection mechanism of the metal-rich (H-poor) component and hence, understand the origin of the abundance discrepancy problem in PNe.

  5. Gas flow through rough microchannels in the transition flow regime.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zilong; Chen, Yongping; Shao, Chenxi

    2016-01-01

    A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model of Couette flow is developed to investigate the rarified gas flow through microchannels with roughness characterized by fractal geometry, especially to elucidate the coupled effects of roughness and rarefaction on microscale gas flow in the transition flow regime. The results indicate that the surface roughness effect on gas flow behavior becomes more significant in rarefied gas flow with the increase of Knudsen number. We find the gas flow behavior in the transition flow regime is more sensitive to roughness height than that in the slip flow regime. In particular, the influence of fractal dimension on rarefied gas flow behavior is less significant than roughness height. PMID:26871175

  6. Deflagration to detonation transition in combustible gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.; Panfilov, I.I.

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a computational investigation of the process of deflagration to detonation transition in a combustible gas mixture. The type of combustion (i.e., deflagration or detonation) supported by a two-step reaction scheme is studied as a function of the activation energies. It is shown that both a deflagration to detonation transition and a deflagration wave that lags behind a leading shock are possible. Two types of deflagration to detonation transitions are found theoretically: initiation of detonation from the flame zone and initiation of detonation along a contact discontinuity in the compressed gas near the primary shock wave.

  7. Long-term tillage and drainage influences on greenhouse gas fluxes from a poorly-drained soil of central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive tillage practices and poorly-drained soils of Midwestern USA are the prime reasons for greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes from agriculture. The naturally poorly-drained soils prevalent in this region require subsurface drainage for improved aeration and improved crop productivity. Soil surface GH...

  8. Simulating extremely metal-poor gas and DLA metal content at redshift z ≃ 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Umberto; Ciardi, Benedetta; Müller, Volker

    2013-10-01

    We present the first theoretical study of metals in damped-Lyα (DLA) systems at redshift z ≃ 7. The features of cold, primordial gas are studied by means of N-body, hydro, chemistry simulations, including atomic and molecular non-equilibrium chemistry, cooling, star formation for Population III and Population II-I regimes, stellar evolution, cosmic metal spreading according to proper yields (for He, C, O, Si, Fe, Mg, S, etc.) and lifetimes and feedback effects. Theoretical expectations are then compared to recently available constraints from DLA observations. We find that DLA galaxies at z ≃ 7 account for ˜10 per cent of the whole galaxy population and for most of the metal-poor galaxies at these epochs. About 7 per cent of these DLA galaxies contain purely pristine material and ˜34 per cent of them consist of very weakly polluted gas, being, therefore, suitable candidates as Population III sites. The remaining ˜59 per cent are enriched above ˜10-4 Z⊙. Additionally, DLA candidates appear to have: gas masses ≲ 2 × 108 M⊙; very low star formation rate, ˜ 10- 3 - 10- 2 M⊙ yr- 1 (significantly weaker than late-time counterparts); mean molecular fractions covering a fairly wide range, xmol ˜ 10- 3-10- 6; typical metallicities Z ≲ 10-3 Z⊙ and H I column densities N_{H I}≳ 3× 10^{20} cm^{-2} (in agreement with recent observations). They present no or weak correlations between their gas mass and Z, N_{H I}, or xmol; a moderate correlation between xmol and Z, linked to the ongoing molecular-driven star formation and metal pollution processes; a mild anticorrelation between N_{H I} and xmol, due to H depletion into molecules; and a chemical content that is subject to environmental dependences.

  9. Gas-flow experiments in the transition region

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J. )

    1994-07-01

    A special gas-flow facility was designed and constructed for the purpose of accurately measuring UF[sub 6] gas flow through a variety of gas-flow restrictions. The facility was used to measure the gas flow through 15 different orifices and 20 short tubes over a nominal pressure range from 0.002 to 100 Torr. The intent of the experiments was to confirm a new theoretical approach to gas flow through short tubes in the transition range between laminar viscous flow and molecular flow. The theoretical approach previously discussed [Santeler, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A [bold 4], 338, 348 (1986)] (1986) became a part of the basis for several computer programs used for calculating gas flow in vacuum systems. A number of interesting results in turbulent flow were observed during the experiments and are discussed in the paper. The results of the experiments confirmed the proposed model and were used to evaluate specific parameters of the proposed equations.

  10. Shape transitions in bistable carbon nanotubes coupled to encapsulated gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Mockensturm, Eric; Cole, Milton; Crespi, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Large-diameter single-wall carbon nanotubes are bistable (i.e. can have inflated or collapsed cross-sections) and can be used to design nano-electromechanical systems such as engines, generators, and heat pumps. The underlying physical mechanism for these devices is the sensitivity of the tube's equilibrium shape to external stimuli such as temperature and applied voltage. Fixing one end in the inflated state and the other in the collapsed state creates a mobile transition region separating these states. Gas encapsulated inside the tube provides an additional means to control the tube shape by coupling its thermodynamic parameters to the equilibrium tube configuration. Depending on the conditions, the encapsulated gas can remain vapor or condense layer-by-layer on the inner wall surface. We analyze such a system with lattice-gas model and molecular dynamics simulations. Changing the gas temperature or number of gas atoms changes the relative fraction of collapsed and inflated regions, while external forces that change the tube shape also affect the phase of the encapsulated gas. Surprisingly, squashing an inflated tube that has gas condensed on its inner surface decreases the surface area available to the wetting layer, so that gas atoms are forced back into the vapor phase: a paradoxical effect where compression induces a transition from condensed to vapor phases.

  11. No tillage and liming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from poorly drained agricultural soils in Mediterranean regions.

    PubMed

    García-Marco, Sonia; Abalos, Diego; Espejo, Rafael; Vallejo, Antonio; Mariscal-Sancho, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    No tillage (NT) has been associated to increased N2O emission from poorly drained agricultural soils. This is the case for soils with a low permeable Bt horizon, which generates a perched water layer after water addition (via rainfall or irrigation) over a long period of time. Moreover, these soils often have problems of acidity and require liming application to sustain crop productivity; changes in soil pH have large implications for the production and consumption of soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Here, we assessed in a split-plot design the individual and interactive effects of tillage practices (conventional tillage (CT) vs. NT) and liming (Ca-amendment vs. not-amendment) on N2O and CH4 emissions from poorly drained acidic soils, over a field experiment with a rainfed triticale crop. Soil mineral N concentrations, pH, temperature, moisture, water soluble organic carbon, GHG fluxes and denitrification capacity were measured during the experiment. Tillage increased N2O emissions by 68% compared to NT and generally led to higher CH4 emissions; both effects were due to the higher soil moisture content under CT plots. Under CT, liming reduced N2O emissions by 61% whereas no effect was observed under NT. Under both CT and NT, CH4 oxidation was enhanced after liming application due to decreased Al(3+) toxicity. Based on our results, NT should be promoted as a means to improve soil physical properties and concurrently reduce N2O and CH4 emissions. Raising the soil pH via liming has positive effects on crop yield; here we show that it may also serve to mitigate CH4 emissions and, under CT, abate N2O emissions. PMID:27235901

  12. DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH COMPANION TO THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY DDO 68

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Alfvin, Erik D.; Johnson, Megan; Koribalski, Baerbel; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Bailin, Jeremy; Ford, H. Alyson; Girardi, Léo; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.; Van Sistine, Angela; Dolphin, Andrew; Elson, E. C.; Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Warren, Steven R.

    2014-05-20

    We present H I spectral-line imaging of the extremely metal-poor galaxy DDO 68. This system has a nebular oxygen abundance of only ∼3% Z {sub ☉}, making it one of the most metal-deficient galaxies known in the local volume. Surprisingly, DDO 68 is a relatively massive and luminous galaxy for its metal content, making it a significant outlier in the mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity relationships. The origin of such a low oxygen abundance in DDO 68 presents a challenge for models of the chemical evolution of galaxies. One possible solution to this problem is the infall of pristine neutral gas, potentially initiated during a gravitational interaction. Using archival H I spectral-line imaging obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we have discovered a previously unknown companion of DDO 68. This low-mass (M{sub H} {sub I} = 2.8 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}), recently star-forming (SFR{sub FUV} = 1.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, SFR{sub Hα} < 7 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) companion has the same systemic velocity as DDO 68 (V {sub sys} = 506 km s{sup –1}; D = 12.74 ± 0.27 Mpc) and is located at a projected distance of ∼42 kpc. New H I maps obtained with the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope provide evidence that DDO 68 and this companion are gravitationally interacting at the present time. Low surface brightness H I gas forms a bridge between these objects.

  13. A gas-poor planetesimal capture model for the formation of giant planet satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Mosqueira, Ignacio

    2006-04-01

    Assuming that an unknown mechanism (e.g., gas turbulence) removes most of the subnebula gas disk in a timescale shorter than that for satellite formation, we develop a model for the formation of regular (and possibly at least some of the irregular) satellites around giant planets in a gas-poor environment. In this model, which follows along the lines of the work of Safronov et al. [1986. Satellites. Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 89-116], heliocentric planetesimals collide within the planet's Hill sphere and generate a circumplanetary disk of prograde and retrograde satellitesimals extending as far out as ˜R/2. At first, the net angular momentum of this proto-satellite swarm is small, and collisions among satellitesimals leads to loss of mass from the outer disk, and delivers mass to the inner disk (where regular satellites form) in a timescale ≲10 years. This mass loss may be offset by continued collisional capture of sufficiently small <1 km interlopers resulting from the disruption of planetesimals in the feeding zone of the giant planet. As the planet's feeding zone is cleared in a timescale ≲10 years, enough angular momentum may be delivered to the proto-satellite swarm to account for the angular momentum of the regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. This feeding timescale is also roughly consistent with the independent constraint that the Galilean satellites formed in a timescale of 10-10 years, which may be long enough to accommodate Callisto's partially differentiated state [Anderson et al., 1998. Science 280, 1573; Anderson et al., 2001. Icarus 153, 157-161]. In turn, this formation timescale can be used to provide plausible constraints on the surface density of solids in the satellitesimal disk (excluding satellite embryos ˜1 gcm for satellitesimals of size ˜1 km), which yields a total disk mass smaller than the mass of the regular satellites, and means that the satellites must form in several ˜10 collisional cycles. However, much more

  14. Phase Transition of Methane Gas Hydrate and Response of Marine Gas Hydrate Systems to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2003-12-01

    Gas hydrates, which contain mostly methane as the gas component in marine sediment, are stable under relatively high pressure and low temperature conditions such as those found along continental margins and permafrost regions. Its stability is mostly controlled by in-situ pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid. Environmentally introduced changes in pressure and temperature can affect the stability of gas hydrate in marine sediment. While certain changes may enhance the process of gas hydrate formation, we are much more interested in the resultant dissociation processes, which may contribute to sub-marine slope instability, seafloor sediment failure, formation of mud volcanoes and pock marks, potential vulnerability of engineering structures, and the risk to drilling and production. We have been developing models to quantify phase transition processes of marine gas hydrates and to investigate the response of marine gas hydrate systems to environmental changes. Methane gas hydrate system is considered as a three-component (water, methane, salt) four-phase (liquid, gas, hydrate, halite) system. Pressure, temperature and salinity of pore fluid constrain the stability of gas hydrate and affect phase transition processes via their effects on methane solubility and fluid density and enthalpy. Compared to the great quantity of studies on its stability in the literature, in-depth research on phase transition of gas hydrate is surprisingly much less. A method, which employs pressure, enthalpy, salinity and methane content as independent variables, is developed to calculate phase transition processes of the three-component four-phase system. Temperature, an intensive thermodynamic parameter, is found not sufficient in describing phase transition of gas hydrate. The extensive thermodynamic parameter enthalpy, on the other hand, is found to be sufficient both in calculation of the phase transition processes and in modeling marine gas hydrate systems. Processes

  15. From magma-poor Ocean Continent Transitions to steady state oceanic spreading: the balance between tectonic and magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Morgane; Manatschal, Gianreto; Autin, Julia; Decarlis, Alessandro; Sauter, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of magma-poor rifted margins is linked to the development of a transition zone whose basement is neither clearly continental nor oceanic. The development of this Ocean-Continent Transition (OCT) is generally associated to the exhumation of serpentinized mantle along one or several detachment faults. That model is supported by numerous observations (IODP wells, dredges, fossil margins) and by numerical modelling. However, if the initiation of detachment faults in a magma-poor setting tends to be better understood by numerous studies in various area, the transition with the first steady state oceanic crust and the associated processes remain enigmatic and poorly studied. Indeed, this latest stage of evolution appears to be extremely gradual and involves strong interactions between tectonic processes and magmatism. Contrary to the proximal part of the exhumed domain where we can observe magmatic activity linked to the exhumation process (exhumation of gabbros, small amount of basalts above the exhumed mantle), in the most distal part the magmatic system appears to be independent and more active. In particular, we can observe large amounts of extrusive material above a previously exhumed and faulted basement (e.g. Alps, Australia-Antarctica margins). It seems that some faults can play the role of feeder systems for the magma in this area. Magmatic underplating is also important, as suggested by basement uplift and anomalously thick crust (e.g. East Indian margin). It results that the transition with the first steady state oceanic crust is marked by the presence of a hybrid basement, composed by exhumed mantle and magmatic material, whose formation is linked to several tectonic and magmatic events. One could argue that this basement is not clearly different from an oceanic basement. However, we consider that true, steady state oceanic crust only exists, if the entire rock association forming the crust is created during a single event, at a localized

  16. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  17. WASP-36b: A NEW TRANSITING PLANET AROUND A METAL-POOR G-DWARF, AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO ANALYSES BASED ON A SINGLE TRANSIT LIGHT CURVE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, J.; Collier Cameron, A.; Gillon, M.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Queloz, D.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Street, R. A.

    2012-04-15

    We report the discovery, from WASP and CORALIE, of a transiting exoplanet in a 1.54 day orbit. The host star, WASP-36, is a magnitude V = 12.7, metal-poor G2 dwarf (T{sub eff} = 5959 {+-} 134 K), with [Fe/H] =-0.26 {+-} 0.10. We determine the planet to have mass and radius, respectively, 2.30 {+-} 0.07 and 1.28 {+-} 0.03 times that of Jupiter. We have eight partial or complete transit light curves, from four different observatories, which allow us to investigate the potential effects on the fitted system parameters of using only a single light curve. We find that the solutions obtained by analyzing each of these light curves independently are consistent with our global fit to all the data, despite the apparent presence of correlated noise in at least two of the light curves.

  18. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  19. Soft band X/K luminosity ratios for gas-poor early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdán, Á.; Gilfanov, M.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We aim to place upper limits on the combined X-ray emission from the population of steady nuclear-burning white dwarfs in galaxies. In the framework of the single-degenerate scenario, these systems, known as supersoft sources, are believed to be likely progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Methods: From the Chandra archive, we selected normal early-type galaxies with the point source detection sensitivity better than 1037 erg s-1 in order to minimize the contribution of unresolved low-mass X-ray binaries. The galaxies, contaminated by emission from ionized ISM, were identified based on the analysis of radial surface brightness profiles and energy spectra. The sample was complemented by the bulge of M 31 and the data for the solar neighborhood. To cover a broad range of ages, we also included NGC 3377 and NGC 3585 which represent the young end of the age distribution for elliptical galaxies. Our final sample includes eight gas-poor galaxies for which we determine LX/LK ratios in the 0.3-0.7 keV energy band. This choice of the energy band was optimized to detect soft emission from thermonuclear-burning on the surface of an accreting white dwarf. In computing the LX we included both unresolved emission and soft resolved sources with the color temperature of kTbb ≤ 200 eV. Results: We find that the X/K luminosity ratios are in a rather narrow range of (1.7-3.2) × 1027 erg s-1 LK,⊙. The data show no obvious trends with mass, age, or metallicity of the host galaxy, although a weak anti-correlation with the Galactic NH appears to exist. It is much flatter than predicted for a blackbody emission spectrum with temperature of ~ 50-75 eV, suggesting that sources with such soft spectra contribute significantly less than a half to the observed X/K ratios. However, the correlation of the X/K ratios with NH has a significant scatter and in the strict statistical sense cannot be adequately described by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody components with

  20. Natural Gas Regulation in Transition: The Effects of Geopolitics and Prerequisites for Change in Transition Economies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Meredydd

    2009-01-01

    Natural gas has become a major geopolitical concern in relations among transition countries and other European states. Transition economies have embarked on very different paths in using and regulating natural gas. Countries to the East, like Russia, by and large have undertaken few market-oriented reforms of their natural gas sectors. The new European Union member states have undertaken much broader reforms. These differences often lead to tension. Two factors seem particularly important in understanding when countries may embark on natural gas reforms. The first is energy efficiency, since low energy efficiency can make energy reforms socially and economically difficult. The second is corruption: vested interested and a captive state can play powerful roles in inhibiting reform. The article looks at the arguments behind each of these potential prerequisites for reform, and also examines comparative data on energy intensity and corruption. Interestingly, the countries with the lowest energy intensity and the lowest levels of corruption (and the fastest improvements in these areas) also undertook the most extensive natural gas reforms. The article concludes with a few brief examples of the cost with the status quo.

  1. CHARACTERIZING TRANSITION TEMPERATURE GAS IN THE GALACTIC CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Wakker, Bart P.; Savage, Blair D.; Fox, Andrew J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Shapiro, Paul R. E-mail: savage@astro.wisc.edu E-mail: benjamir@uww.edu

    2012-04-20

    We present a study of the properties of the transition temperature (T {approx} 10{sup 5} K) gas in the Milky Way corona, based on the measurements of O VI, N V, C IV, Si IV, and Fe III absorption lines seen in the far-ultraviolet spectra of 58 sight lines to extragalactic targets, obtained with the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. In many sight lines the Galactic absorption profiles show multiple components, which are analyzed separately. We find that the highly ionized atoms are distributed irregularly in a layer with a scale height of about 3 kpc, which rotates along with the gas in the disk, without an obvious gradient in the rotation velocity away from the Galactic plane. Within this layer the gas has randomly oriented velocities with a dispersion of 40-60 km s{sup -1}. On average the integrated column densities are log N(O VI) = 14.3, log N(N V) = 13.5, log N(C IV) = 14.2, log N(Si IV) = 13.6, and log N(Fe III) = 14.2, with a dispersion of just 0.2 dex in each case. In sight lines around the Galactic center and Galactic north pole, all column densities are enhanced by a factor {approx}2, while at intermediate latitudes in the southern sky there is a deficit in N(O VI) of about a factor of two, but no deficit for the other ions. We compare the column densities and ionic ratios to a series of theoretical predictions: collisional ionization equilibrium, shock ionization, conductive interfaces, turbulent mixing, thick disk supernovae, static non-equilibrium ionization (NIE) radiative cooling, and an NIE radiative cooling model in which the gas flows through the cooling zone. None of these models can fully reproduce the data, but it is clear that NIE radiative cooling is important in generating the transition temperature gas.

  2. Growth rate and transition to turbulence of a gas curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobieff, P.; Rightley, P.; Benjamin, R.

    1997-09-01

    The authors conduct shock-tube experiments to investigate Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a narrow curtain of heavy gas (SF{sub 6}) embedded in lighter gas (air). Initial perturbations of the curtain can be varied, producing different flow patterns in the subsequent evolution of the curtain. Multiple-exposure video flow visualization provides images of the growth of the instability and its transition to turbulence, making it possible to extract quantitative information such as the width of the perturbed curtain. They demonstrate that the width of the curtain with initial perturbation on the downstream side is non-monotonic. As the initial perturbation undergoes phase inversion, the width of the curtain actually decreases before beginning to grow as the RM instability evolves.

  3. Metallicity inhomogeneities in local star-forming galaxies as a sign of recent metal-poor gas accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: jma20@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We measure the oxygen metallicity of the ionized gas along the major axis of seven dwarf star-forming galaxies. Two of them, SDSSJ1647+21 and SDSSJ2238+14, show ≅0.5 dex metallicity decrements in inner regions with enhanced star formation activity. This behavior is similar to the metallicity drop observed in a number of local tadpole galaxies by Sánchez Almeida et al., and was interpreted as showing early stages of assembling in disk galaxies, with the star formation sustained by external metal-poor gas accretion. The agreement with tadpoles has several implications. (1) It proves that galaxies other than the local tadpoles present the same unusual metallicity pattern. (2) Our metallicity inhomogeneities were inferred using the direct method, thus discarding systematic errors usually attributed to other methods. (3) Taken together with the tadpole data, our findings suggest a threshold around one-tenth the solar value for the metallicity drops to show up. Although galaxies with clear metallicity drops are rare, the physical mechanism responsible for them may sustain a significant part of the star formation activity in the local universe. We argue that the star formation dependence of the mass-metallicity relationship, as well as other general properties followed by most local disk galaxies, is naturally interpreted as side effects of pristine gas infall. Alternatives to the metal-poor gas accretion are examined as well.

  4. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets. PMID:27078333

  5. The X-ray emitting gas in poor clusters with central dominant galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, G. A.; Cioffi, D. F.; Canizares, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The 12 clusters detected in the present study by the Einstein Observatory's X-ray imaging proportional counter show X-ray emission centered on the dominant galaxy in all cases. Comparison of the deduced distribution of binding mass with the light distribution of the central galaxies of four clusters indicates that the mass/luminosity ratio rises to over 200 solar masses/solar luminosity in the galaxy halos. These halos must therefore, like the clusters themselves, posses dark matter. The X-ray data clearly show that the dominant galaxies sit at the bottoms of the poor cluster gravitational potential wells, suggesting a similar origin for dominant galaxies in poor and rich clusters, perhaps through the merger and cannibalism of cluster galaxies. It is the luminosity of the distended cD envelope that reflects the relative wealth of the cluster environment.

  6. Is atomic carbon a good tracer of molecular gas in metal-poor galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of molecular hydrogen (H2) in metal-rich galaxies, but is known to become ineffective in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. Atomic carbon has been suggested as a superior tracer of H2 in these metal-poor systems, but its suitability remains unproven. To help us to assess how well atomic carbon traces H2 at low metallicity, we have performed a series of numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds that cover a wide range of different metallicities. Our simulations demonstrate that in star-forming clouds, the conversion factor between [C I] emission and H2 mass, XCI, scales approximately as XCI ∝ Z-1. We recover a similar scaling for the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, but find that at this point in the evolution of the clouds, XCO is consistently smaller than XCI, by a factor of a few or more. We have also examined how XCI and XCO evolve with time. We find that XCI does not vary strongly with time, demonstrating that atomic carbon remains a good tracer of H2 in metal-poor systems even at times significantly before the onset of star formation. On the other hand, XCO varies very strongly with time in metal-poor clouds, showing that CO does not trace H2 well in starless clouds at low metallicity.

  7. The Evolution of Inner Disk Gas in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, K.; France, K.; Alexander, R. D.; McJunkin, M.; Schneider, P. C.

    2015-10-01

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H2) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed Hi-Lyman α-pumped H2 disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H2 emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H2 FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner and outer disk emission boundaries (rin and rout), describing where the bulk of the observed H2 emission arises in each disk, and we examine correlations between these and several observational disk evolution indicators, such as n13-31, rin, CO, and the mass accretion rate. We find strong, positive correlations between the H2 radial distributions and the slope of the dust spectral energy distribution, implying the behavior of the molecular disk atmosphere changes as the inner dust clears in evolving PPDs. Overall, we find that H2 inner radii are ˜4 times larger in transition systems, while the bulk of the H2 emission originates inside the dust gap radius for all transitional sources.

  8. Very metal-poor galaxies: ionized gas kinematics in nine objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. V.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2010-07-01

    The study of ionized gas morphology and kinematics in nine extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies with the scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer on the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) 6-m telescope is presented. Some of these very rare objects (with currently known range of O/H of 7.12 < 12 + log(O/H) < 7.65, or ) are believed to be the best proxies of `young' low-mass galaxies in the high-redshift Universe. One of the main goals of this study is to look for possible evidence of star formation (SF) activity induced by external perturbations. Recent results from HI mapping of a small subsample of XMD star-forming galaxies provided confident evidence for the important role of interaction-induced SF. Our observations provide complementary or new information that the great majority of the studied XMD dwarfs have strongly disturbed gas morphology and kinematics or the presence of detached components. We approximate the observed velocity fields by simple models of a rotating tilted thin disc, which allows us the robust detection of non-circular gas motions. These data, in turn, indicate the important role of current/recent interactions and mergers in the observed enhanced SF. As a by-product of our observations, we obtained data for two Low Surface Brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies: Anon J012544+075957 that is a companion of the merger system UGC 993, and SAO 0822+3545 which shows off-centre, asymmetric, low star formation rate star-forming regions, likely induced by the interaction with the companion XMD dwarf HS 0822+3542. Based on observations obtained with the Special Astrophysical Observatory RAS 6-m telescope. E-mail: moisav@gmail.com (AVM); sap@sao.ru (SAP); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK)

  9. Actin‐like 6A predicts poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes metastasis and epithelial‐mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuai; Chang, Rui‐Min; Yang, Ming‐Yang; Lei, Xiong; Liu, Xiao; Gao, Wen‐Bin; Xiao, Jing‐Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide because of metastasis. Epithelial‐mesenchymal transition (EMT) is widely considered to be crucial to the invasion‐metastasis cascade during cancer progression. Actin‐like 6A (ACTL6A) is initially verified important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In this study, we find that ACTL6A plays an essential role in metastasis and EMT of HCC. ACTL6A expression is up‐regulated in HCC cells and tissues. A high level of ACTL6A in HCCs is correlated with aggressive clinicopathological features and is an independent poor prognostic factor for overall and disease‐free survival of HCC patients. Ectopic expression of ACTL6A markedly promotes HCC cells migration, invasion, as well as EMT in vitro and promotes tumor growth and metastasis in the mouse xenograft model. Opposite results are observed when ACTL6A is knocked down. Mechanistically, ACTL6A promotes metastasis and EMT through activating Notch signaling. ACTL6A knockdown has the equal blockage effect as the Notch signaling inhibitor, N‐[N‐(3,5‐difluorophenacetyl)‐L‐alanyl]‐S‐phenylglycine t‐butylester, in HCC cells. Further studies indicate that ACTL6A might manipulate SRY (sex determining region Y)‐box 2 (SOX2) expression and then activate Notch1 signaling. Conclusions: ACTL6A promotes metastasis and EMT by SOX2/Notch1 signaling, indicating a prognostic biomarker candidate and a potential therapeutic target for HCC. (Hepatology 2016;63:1256–1271) PMID:26698646

  10. Overexpression of SPARC correlates with poor prognosis in patients with cervical carcinoma and regulates cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    SHI, DEHUAN; JIANG, KAN; FU, YING; FANG, RUI; LIU, XI; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is associated with the progression of numerous types of cancer. However, the role of SPARC in the progression of cervical cancer has not yet been adequately elucidated. In the current study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were employed to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression of SPARC in normal cervical tissue, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. In addition, three epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers (E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin) were detected by immunohistochemistry in the same specimens, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was conducted to detect the serum levels of SPARC in patients with cervical neoplasia. In highly invasive subclones of human cervical carcinoma cells, HeLa-1 and SiHa-1, lentiviral transfections were performed and RT-qPCR and western blot were used to investigate the effects of downregulated EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 on the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin. The results revealed that, in cervical carcinoma tissue, SPARC expression was significantly upregulated in a manner that positively correlated with N-cadherin and vimentin expression, and negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression. SPARC overexpression and high serum levels were significantly associated with the progression of cervical cancer and adverse prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Downregulation of SPARC can markedly reduce the expression of N-cadherin and vimentin and increase the expression of E-cadherin. Thus, overexpression of SPARC is significantly associated with poor prognostic clinicopathological characteristics in cervical carcinoma, and may be important in EMT. The results of the current study suggest that SPARC may be a potential therapeutic option for individuals diagnosed with cervical carcinoma. PMID:27123099

  11. h-Prune is associated with poor prognosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in patients with colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Arihiro, Koji; Kikuchi, Akira; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-08-15

    The prognosis of patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) remains low despite advances in chemotherapy and surgery. The expression of h-prune (human homolog of Drosophila prune protein; HGNC13420), an exopolyphosphatase, is correlated with progression and aggressiveness in several cancers and promotes migration and invasion. We investigated the role of h-prune in CRLM. To investigate the role of h-prune, immunohistochemical analysis for h-prune was performed in 87 surgically resected specimens of CRLM obtained between 2001 and 2009 at the Hiroshima University Hospital. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive staining for h-prune in 24 (28%) cases. The overall survival rate was significantly lower in h-prune-positive cases than in h-prune-negative cases (p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that h-prune positivity was the only independent factor related to poor overall survival of patients after curative hepatectomy of CRLM. In vitro and in vivo, h-prune-knocked-down and h-prune-overexpressing cells were analyzed. In vitro, h-prune was associated with increased cell motility and upregulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. In a mouse model, h-prune was associated with invasion of the tumor and distant metastases. In summary, h-prune expression is a useful marker to identify high-risk patients for resectable colorectal liver metastasis. h-Prune expression is necessary for cancer cell motility and EMT and is associated with liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer cells. h-Prune could be a new prognostic marker and molecular target for CRLM. PMID:27037526

  12. ALFALFA Discovery of the Most Metal-poor Gas-rich Galaxy Known: AGC 198691

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, Alec S.; Salzer, John J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Cannon, John M.; Gordon, Alex J. R.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Janowiecki, Steven; Rhode, Katherine L.; Pogge, Richard W.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Aver, Erik

    2016-05-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the nearby dwarf galaxy AGC 198691. This object is part of the Survey of H i in Extremely Low-Mass Dwarfs project, which is a multi-wavelength study of galaxies with H i masses in the range of 106–107.2 M ⊙, discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We have obtained spectra of the lone H ii region in AGC 198691 with the new high-throughput KPNO Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Mayall 4 m, as well as with the Blue Channel spectrograph on the MMT 6.5 m telescope. These observations enable the measurement of the temperature-sensitive [O iii]λ4363 line and hence the determination of a “direct” oxygen abundance for AGC 198691. We find this system to be an extremely metal-deficient (XMD) system with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H) = 7.02 ± 0.03, making AGC 198691 the lowest-abundance star-forming galaxy known in the local universe. Two of the five lowest-abundance galaxies known have been discovered by the ALFALFA blind H i survey; this high yield of XMD galaxies represents a paradigm shift in the search for extremely metal-poor galaxies.

  13. Specific, trace gas induced phase transition in copper(II)oxide for highly selective gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, J.; Wöllenstein, J.; Palzer, S.

    2014-08-01

    Here, we present results on the investigation of the percolation phase transition in copper(II)oxide (CuO) and show how it may be used to determine trace gas concentrations. This approach provides a highly selective sensing mechanism for the detection of hydrogen sulfide even in oxygen depleted atmospheres. In real-world applications, this scenario is encountered in biogas plants and natural gas facilities, where reliable H2S sensing and filtering are important because of the destructive effects H2S has on machinery. As opposed to gas detection via standard metal-oxide reaction routes, the percolation dynamics are demonstrated to be independent of the surface morphology in accordance with the universality of phase transitions. The sensing behavior of ink-jet printed CuO layers was tested for a large set of parameters including layer temperature, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and oxygen concentration, as well as the sensitivity towards other gas species. The electrical percolation of the sensing layer is heralded by a dramatic drop in the overall resistivity of the CuO layer for temperatures below 200 °C. The observed percolation phenomena in this temperature regime are unique to H2S even in comparison with related volatile thio-compounds making the sensing mechanism highly selective. At elevated temperatures above 300 °C, the phase transition does not occur. This enables two distinct operational modes which are tunable via the sensor temperature and also allows for resetting the sensing layer after an electrical breakthrough.

  14. Safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Shaaban, S.H.; Zuzovsky, M.; Anigstein, R.

    1989-01-01

    A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicles traveling on various tunnels and bridges in New York City. The study considered those hazards arising from the release of fuel from CNG vehicles ranging in size from a passenger sedan to a full size 53 passenger bus. The approach used was to compare the fuel hazard of CNG vehicles to the fuel hazard of gasoline vehicles. The risk was assessed by estimating the frequency of occurrence and the severity of the hazard. The methodology was a combination of analyzing accident data, performing a diffusion analysis of the gas released in the tunnel and determining the consequences of ignition. Diffusion analysis was performed using the TEMPEST code for various accident scenarios resulting in CNG release inside the Holland Tunnel. The study concluded that the overall hazard of CNG vehicles transiting a ventilated tunnel is less than the hazard from a comparable gasoline fueled vehicle. 134 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  16. Comparison of the optical responses of O-poor and O-rich thermochromic VOX films during semiconductor-to-metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhenfei; Wu, Zhiming; Wang, Tao; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Weizhi; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2012-09-01

    O-poor and O-rich thermochromic vanadium oxide (VOX) nanostructured thin films were prepared by applying reactive direct current magnetron sputtering and post-annealing in oxygen ambient. UV-visible spectrophotometer and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to investigate the optical properties of films. It was found that, when the O-poor VOX thin film underwent semiconductor-to-metal transition, the values of optical conductivity and extinction coefficient in the visible region increased due to the existence of occupied band-gap states. This noticeable feature, however, was not observed for the O-rich film, which showed a similar optical behavior with the stoichiometric crystalline VO2 films reported in the literatures. Moreover, the O-poor VOX film exhibits consistent variations of transmission values in the visible/near-infrared region when it undergoes semiconductor-to-metal transition.

  17. A Gas-poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Disk Size and Formation Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2003-05-01

    Mosqueira and Estrada (2003a) argue that following giant planet accretion a largely quiescent circumplanetary disk may form with most of the mass inside a radius located outside, but perhaps close to, the centrifugal radius rc = RH/48, where the specific angular momentum of the collapsing giant planet gaseous envelope achieves centrifugal balance, and extending as far as the irregular satellites at RH/5 due to the high specific angular momentum of parcels of gas accreted from distances several times RH during the final stages of planetary growth (Lubow et al. 1999). Provided that allowances are made for the capture of Triton from heliocentric orbit, this picture fits well with the primordial satellite systems of all four giant planets. Because strong gas turbulence would smooth out the gas surface density of the disk, this description can only apply if the turbulence subsides as planetary accretion ceases. Although the viability of a hydrodynamic shear instability in Keplerian disks that can sustain significant post-accretion turbulence and drive evolution of the gas disk is in serious doubt (see Mosqueira et al. this conference), the possibility has not yet been totally ruled out. This leads us to consider gas-poor scenarios that might produce a close-in regular satellite system. To this end, we re-examine the ideas of Safronov et al. (1986) to see whether a gas-free (or nearly gas-free) model can be made consistent with the extent of the regular satellites of the giant planets. In this model, planetesimals containing most of the mass of solids (Mizuno et al. 1978; Weidenschilling 1997) that are de-coupled from the gas and whose dynamics must be followed independently are collisionally captured and form a swarm of circumplanetary objects lasting for perhaps ˜ 106 years. While such a swarm might occupy a significant fraction of the Hill radius of the planet, the small net angular momentum of the swarm might lead to the formation of close-in prograde satellites as

  18. Stuck in Unhealthy Places: How Entering, Exiting, and Remaining in Poor and Nonpoor Neighborhoods Is Associated with Obesity during the Transition to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Adam M

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents from poor versus nonpoor neighborhoods are more likely to become obese during the transition to adulthood. It is unclear whether this pertains to all adolescents from poor neighborhoods or only those who remain in disadvantaged settings. Further, it is unknown how neighborhood poverty entries and exits are associated with obesity. Using census and interview data from 12,164 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health participants, I find that those who consistently live in poor neighborhoods are more likely to become or remain obese by adulthood than those who never live in poor neighborhoods. Exiting severe neighborhood poverty curtails this risk, while entering and remaining in neighborhood poverty in adulthood increases it. These patterns are more pronounced for young women and robust to adjustments for health behaviors and selection bias. Findings support accumulation of risks and social mobility perspectives and highlight how previous and current neighborhood contexts are relevant for health. PMID:26957132

  19. An optical transmission spectrum of the transiting hot Jupiter in the metal-poor WASP-98 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giordano, M.; Mollière, P.; Southworth, J.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.

    2016-09-01

    The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multiband photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98 b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g', r', i', z'), using the telescope-defocusing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, [Fe/H] = -0.49 ± 0.10, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.19. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multiband light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98 b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z' compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r' and z' bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6σ and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98 b, of unknown chemical nature.

  20. An optical transmission spectrum of the transiting hot Jupiter in the metal-poor WASP-98 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giordano, M.; Mollière, P.; Southworth, J.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.

    2016-06-01

    The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multi-band photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98 b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g', r', i', z'), using the telescope-defocussing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, [Fe/H] = -0.49 ± 0.10, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.19. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multi-band light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98 b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z' compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r' and z' bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6σ and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98 b, of unknown chemical nature.

  1. WASP-80b: a gas giant transiting a cool dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a planet transiting the star WASP-80 (1SWASP J201240.26-020838.2; 2MASS J20124017-0208391; TYC 5165-481-1; BPM 80815; V = 11.9, K = 8.4). Our analysis shows this is a 0.55 ± 0.04 Mjup, 0.95 ± 0.03 Rjup gas giant on a circular 3.07 day orbit around a star with a spectral type between K7V and M0V. This system produces one of the largest transit depths so far reported, making it a worthwhile target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a large discrepancy between the vsini⋆ inferred from stellar line broadening and the observed amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. This can be understood either by an orbital plane nearly perpendicular to the stellar spin or by an additional, unaccounted for source of broadening. Using WASP-South photometric observations, from Sutherland (South Africa), confirmed with the 60 cm TRAPPIST robotic telescope, EulerCam, and the CORALIE spectrograph on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope, and HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m (Prog ID 089.C-0151), all three located at La Silla Observatory, Chile.Radial velocity and photometric data are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A80

  2. Cooling air recycling for gas turbine transition duct end frame and related method

    DOEpatents

    Cromer, Robert Harold; Bechtel, William Theodore; Sutcu, Maz

    2002-01-01

    A method of cooling a transition duct end frame in a gas turbine includes the steps of a) directing cooling air into the end frame from a region external of the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve; and b) redirecting the cooling air from the end frame into the annulus between the transition duct and the impingement cooling sleeve.

  3. WASP-37b: A 1.8 M{sub J} EXOPLANET TRANSITING A METAL-POOR STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E. K.; Faedi, F.; Barros, S. C. C.; Pollacco, D.; Todd, I.; McCormac, J.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; Miller, G. R. M.; Hebb, L.; Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Butters, O. W.; Hebrard, G.; Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Street, R. A.; Skillen, I.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Bento, J.

    2011-01-15

    We report on the discovery of WASP-37b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting an m{sub v} = 12.7 G2-type dwarf, with a period of 3.577469 {+-} 0.000011 d, transit epoch T{sub 0} = 2455338.6188 {+-} 0.0006 (HJD; dates throughout the paper are given in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)), and a transit duration 0.1304{sup +0.0018}{sub -0.0017} d. The planetary companion has a mass M{sub p} = 1.80 {+-} 0.17 M{sub J} and radius R{sub p} = 1.16{sup +0.07}{sub -0.06} R{sub J}, yielding a mean density of 1.15{sup +0.12}{sub -0.15} {rho}{sub J}. From a spectral analysis, we find that the host star has M{sub *} = 0.925 {+-} 0.120 M{sub sun}, R{sub *} = 1.003 {+-} 0.053 R{sub sun}, T{sub eff} = 5800 {+-} 150 K, and [Fe/H] = -0.40 {+-} 0.12. WASP-37 is therefore one of the lowest metallicity stars to host a transiting planet.

  4. Preventing Poor Mental Health and School Dropout of Mexican American Adolescents Following the Transition to Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Nancy A.; Dumka, Larry E.; Deardorff, Julianna; Carter, Sara Jacobs; McCray, Adam

    2004-01-01

    This study provided an initial test of the Bridges to High School Program, an intervention designed to prevent school disengagement and negative mental health trajectories during the transition to junior high school. The intervention included an adolescent coping skills intervention, a parenting skills intervention, and a family strengthening…

  5. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - I. Gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Baruteau, Clément

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by lopsided structures observed in some massive transition discs, we have carried out 2D numerical simulations to study vortex structure in massive discs, including the effects of disc self-gravity and the indirect force which is due to the displacement of the central star from the barycentre of the system by the lopsided structure. When only the indirect force is included, we confirm the finding by Mittal & Chiang that the vortex becomes stronger and can be more than two pressure scale heights wide, as long as the disc-to-star mass ratio is ≳1 per cent. Such wide vortices can excite strong density waves in the disc and therefore migrate inwards rapidly. However, when disc self-gravity is also considered in simulations, self-gravity plays a more prominent role on the vortex structure. We confirm that when the disc Toomre Q parameter is smaller than π/(2h), where h is the disc's aspect ratio, the vortices are significantly weakened and their inward migration slows down dramatically. Most importantly, when the disc is massive enough (e.g. Q ˜ 3), we find that the lopsided gas structure orbits around the star at a speed significantly slower than the local Keplerian speed. This sub-Keplerian pattern speed can lead to the concentration of dust particles at a radius beyond the lopsided gas structure (as shown in Paper II). Overall, disc self-gravity regulates the vortex structure in massive discs and the radial shift between the gas and dust distributions in vortices within massive discs may be probed by future observations.

  6. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  7. Discontinuous phase transition in a dimer lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2012-05-01

    I study a dimer model on the square lattice with nearest neighbor exclusion as the only interaction. Detailed simulations using tomographic entropic sampling show that as the chemical potential is varied, there is a strongly discontinuous phase transition, at which the particle density jumps by about 18% of its maximum value, 1/4. The transition is accompanied by the onset of orientational order, to an arrangement corresponding to the {1/2, 0, 1/2} structure identified by Phares et al. [Physica B 409, 1096 (2011)] in a dimer model with finite repulsion at fixed density. Using finite-size scaling and Binder's cumulant, the expected scaling behavior at a discontinuous transition is verified in detail. The discontinuous transition can be understood qualitatively given that the model possesses eight equivalent maximum-density configurations, so that its coarse-grained description corresponds to that of the q = 8 Potts model.

  8. 75 FR 18942 - FY 2010 Discretionary Sustainability Funding Opportunity; Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program and Clean Fuels Grant Program, Augmented... clean energy sources that will both enhance the environment through improved air quality and curb our... funds in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 for the Transit Investments for Greenhouse Gas and Energy...

  9. Upregulation of H19 indicates a poor prognosis in gallbladder carcinoma and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shou-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Di; Weng, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Di; Quan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The imprinted oncofetal long non-coding RNA H19 has been reported to be involved in many kinds of human cancers. However, whether lncRNA H19 implicate in oncogenesis and cancer progression in gallbladder cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, compared with adjacent normal tissues, the level of H19 was significantly upregulated in gallbladder cancer tissues and was positively associated with lymphatic metastasis and tumor size. The overall survival is shorter in those who had higher H19 expression among GBC patients. In vitro, both TGF-β1 and IL-6 treatment induced upregulation of H19, downregulated the protein level of E-cadherin while increased Vimentin, indicating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in GBC. The overexpression of H19 in GBC cells enhanced tumor invasion and promoted EMT by upregulated transcription factor Twist1. On the contrary, Loss of function studies indicated that H19 interference in GBC suppressed tumor cell invasion and promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) via suppressing Twist expression. In vivo, the volume of the tumors in H19-inteference group was significantly decreased compared to those in the control group of nude mice. Both western-blot and immunohistochemistry confirmed that a MET phenotype existed in the H19 interference group when compared to control group. These results defined H19 as a novel prognostic factor for GBC, and indicated that it might play important regulatory roles in the EMT process. PMID:27186437

  10. Upregulation of H19 indicates a poor prognosis in gallbladder carcinoma and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shou-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Di; Weng, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Di; Quan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The imprinted oncofetal long non-coding RNA H19 has been reported to be involved in many kinds of human cancers. However, whether lncRNA H19 implicate in oncogenesis and cancer progression in gallbladder cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, compared with adjacent normal tissues, the level of H19 was significantly upregulated in gallbladder cancer tissues and was positively associated with lymphatic metastasis and tumor size. The overall survival is shorter in those who had higher H19 expression among GBC patients. In vitro, both TGF-β1 and IL-6 treatment induced upregulation of H19, downregulated the protein level of E-cadherin while increased Vimentin, indicating an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in GBC. The overexpression of H19 in GBC cells enhanced tumor invasion and promoted EMT by upregulated transcription factor Twist1. On the contrary, Loss of function studies indicated that H19 interference in GBC suppressed tumor cell invasion and promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) via suppressing Twist expression. In vivo, the volume of the tumors in H19-inteference group was significantly decreased compared to those in the control group of nude mice. Both western-blot and immunohistochemistry confirmed that a MET phenotype existed in the H19 interference group when compared to control group. These results defined H19 as a novel prognostic factor for GBC, and indicated that it might play important regulatory roles in the EMT process. PMID:27073719

  11. Transition in Hypersonic Flows Including High-temperature Gas Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stemmer, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Hypersonic transition poses a special challenge for direct numerical simulations. Comparable data from Wind-tunnel tests or free-flight testing are not available or not accurate enough for comparison. The wind-tunnel testing does not allow for the exact match to the free-flight conditions at such high Mach-numbers. Flat-plate boundary-layer transition at high Mach-numbers is investigated in this work. A simulation case was chosen where chemical non-equilibrium plays an important role but ionization can be neglected. The chosen case at an altitude of H=50Km lies close to one point on the descent path of the Space Shuttle. The failure of the Space Shuttle has shown that an improved vehicle for space transportation is imperative in the close future. Transition research for an improved space-transportation vehicle is crucial in order to estimate the heat load during re-entry.

  12. Effect of impurities on the transition temperature of a dilute dipolar trapped Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavari, H.; Afsaneh, E.

    2013-01-01

    By using a two-fluid model the effect of impurities on the transition temperature of a dipolar trapped Bose gas is investigated. By treating Gaussian spatial correlation for impurities from the interaction modified spectra of the system, the formula for the shift of the transition temperature is derived. The shift of the transition temperature contains essentially three contributions due to contact, dipole-dipole, and impurity interactions. Applying our results to dipolar Bose gases shows that the shift of the transition temperature due to impurities could be measured for an isotropic trap (dipole-dipole contribution is zero) and the Feshbach resonance technique (contact potential contribution is negligible).

  13. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  14. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    PubMed

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials. PMID:27049950

  15. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  16. Toward the renewables - A natural gas/solar energy transition strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. A.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The inevitability of an energy transition from today's non-renewable fossil base toward a renewable energy base is considered from the viewpoint of the need for a national transition strategy. Then, one such strategy is offered. Its technological building blocks are described in terms of both energy use and energy supply. The strategy itself is then sketched at four points in its implementation; (1) initiation, (2) early transition, (3) late transition, and (4) completion. The transition is assumed to evolve from a heavily natural gas-dependent energy economy. It then proceeds through its transition toward a balanced, hybrid energy system consisting of both centralized and dispersed energy supply technologies supplying hydrogen and electricity from solar energy. Related institutional, environmental and economic factors are examined briefly.

  17. Resonance transition 795-nm Rubidium laser using 3He buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S S; Soules, T F; Page, R H; Mitchell, S C; Kanz, V K; Beach, R J

    2007-08-02

    We report the first demonstration of a 795-nm Rubidium resonance transition laser using a buffer gas consisting of pure {sup 3}He. This follows our recent demonstration of a hydrocarbon-free 795-nm Rubidium resonance laser which used naturally-occurring He as the buffer gas. Using He gas that is isotopically enriched with {sup 3}He yields enhanced mixing of the Rb fine-structure levels. This enables efficient lasing at reduced He buffer gas pressure, improving thermal management in high average power Rb lasers and enhancing the power scaling potential of such systems.

  18. Comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) used by transit agencies in Texas. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lede, N.W.

    1997-09-01

    This study is a detailed comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG). The study provides data on two alternative fuels used by transit agencies in Texas. First, we examine the `state-of-the- art` in alternative fuels to established a framework for the study. Efforts were made to examine selected characteristics of two types of natural gas demonstrations in terms of the following properties: energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, operations, maintenance, reliability, safety costs, and fuel availability. Where feasible, two alternative fuels were compared with conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Environmental considerations relative to fuel distribution and use are analyzed, with a focus on examining flammability an other safety-related issues. The objectives of the study included: (1) assess the state-of-the-art and document relevant findings pertaining to alternative fuels; (2) analyze and synthesize existing databases on two natural gas alternatives: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG): and (3) compare two alterative fuels used by transit properties in Texas, and address selected aspects of alternative fuels such as energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, safety, costs, maintenance and operations, environmental and related issues.

  19. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Kotarba, M.J.; Wieclaw, D.; Piestrzynski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977–984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  20. Evaluating transition-metal catalysis in gas generation from the Permian Kupferschiefer by hydrous pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Kotarba, M. J.; Więcław, D.; Piestrzyński, A.

    2008-08-01

    Transition metals in source rocks have been advocated as catalysts in determining extent, composition, and timing of natural gas generation (Mango, F. D. (1996) Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas. Org. Geochem.24, 977-984). This controversial hypothesis may have important implications concerning gas generation in unconventional shale-gas accumulations. Although experiments have been conducted to test the metal-catalysis hypothesis, their approach and results remain equivocal in evaluating natural assemblages of transition metals and organic matter in shale. The Permian Kupferschiefer of Poland offers an excellent opportunity to test the hypothesis with immature to marginally mature shale rich in both transition metals and organic matter. Twelve subsurface samples containing similar Type-II kerogen with different amounts and types of transition metals were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis at 330° and 355 °C for 72 h. The gases generated in these experiments were quantitatively collected and analyzed for molecular composition and stable isotopes. Expelled immiscible oils, reacted waters, and spent rock were also quantitatively collected. The results show that transition metals have no effect on methane yields or enrichment. δ 13C values of generated methane, ethane, propane and butanes show no systematic changes with increasing transition metals. The potential for transition metals to enhance gas generation and oil cracking was examined by looking at the ratio of the generated hydrocarbon gases to generated expelled immiscible oil (i.e., GOR), which showed no systematic change with increasing transition metals. Assuming maximum yields at 355 °C for 72 h and first-order reaction rates, pseudo-rate constants for methane generation at 330 °C were calculated. These rate constants showed no increase with increasing transition metals. The lack of a significant catalytic effect of transition metals on the extent, composition, and timing of

  1. Transition and Damping of Collective Modes in a Trapped Fermi Gas between BCS and Unitary Limits near the Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hang; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhou, Li; Ma, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the transition and damping of low-energy collective modes in a trapped unitary Fermi gas by solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation in a scaled form, which is combined with both the T-matrix fluctuation theory in normal phase and the mean-field theory in order phase. In order to connect the microscopic and kinetic descriptions of many-body Feshbach scattering, we adopt a phenomenological two-fluid physical approach, and derive the coupling constants in the order phase. By solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov steady-state equation in a variational form, we calculate two viscous relaxation rates with the collision probabilities of fermion’s scattering including fermions in the normal fluid and fermion pairs in the superfluid. Additionally, by considering the pairing and depairing of fermions, we get results of the frequency and damping of collective modes versus temperature and s-wave scattering length. Our theoretical results are in a remarkable agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the sharp transition between collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviour and strong damping between BCS and unitary limits near the phase transition. The sharp transition originates from the maximum of viscous relaxation rate caused by fermion-fermion pair collision at the phase transition point when the fermion depair, while the strong damping due to the fast varying of the frequency of collective modes from BCS limit to unitary limit. PMID:26522094

  2. Transition and Damping of Collective Modes in a Trapped Fermi Gas between BCS and Unitary Limits near the Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hang; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhou, Li; Ma, Yongli

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the transition and damping of low-energy collective modes in a trapped unitary Fermi gas by solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation in a scaled form, which is combined with both the T-matrix fluctuation theory in normal phase and the mean-field theory in order phase. In order to connect the microscopic and kinetic descriptions of many-body Feshbach scattering, we adopt a phenomenological two-fluid physical approach, and derive the coupling constants in the order phase. By solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov steady-state equation in a variational form, we calculate two viscous relaxation rates with the collision probabilities of fermion’s scattering including fermions in the normal fluid and fermion pairs in the superfluid. Additionally, by considering the pairing and depairing of fermions, we get results of the frequency and damping of collective modes versus temperature and s-wave scattering length. Our theoretical results are in a remarkable agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the sharp transition between collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviour and strong damping between BCS and unitary limits near the phase transition. The sharp transition originates from the maximum of viscous relaxation rate caused by fermion-fermion pair collision at the phase transition point when the fermion depair, while the strong damping due to the fast varying of the frequency of collective modes from BCS limit to unitary limit.

  3. Transition and Damping of Collective Modes in a Trapped Fermi Gas between BCS and Unitary Limits near the Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hang; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhou, Li; Ma, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the transition and damping of low-energy collective modes in a trapped unitary Fermi gas by solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation in a scaled form, which is combined with both the T-matrix fluctuation theory in normal phase and the mean-field theory in order phase. In order to connect the microscopic and kinetic descriptions of many-body Feshbach scattering, we adopt a phenomenological two-fluid physical approach, and derive the coupling constants in the order phase. By solving the Boltzmann-Vlasov steady-state equation in a variational form, we calculate two viscous relaxation rates with the collision probabilities of fermion's scattering including fermions in the normal fluid and fermion pairs in the superfluid. Additionally, by considering the pairing and depairing of fermions, we get results of the frequency and damping of collective modes versus temperature and s-wave scattering length. Our theoretical results are in a remarkable agreement with the experimental data, particularly for the sharp transition between collisionless and hydrodynamic behaviour and strong damping between BCS and unitary limits near the phase transition. The sharp transition originates from the maximum of viscous relaxation rate caused by fermion-fermion pair collision at the phase transition point when the fermion depair, while the strong damping due to the fast varying of the frequency of collective modes from BCS limit to unitary limit. PMID:26522094

  4. Phase transitions in a 3 dimensional lattice loop gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Richard; Nebia-Rahal, F.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate, via Monte Carlo simulations, the phase structure of a system of closed, nonintersecting but otherwise noninteracting, loops in 3 Euclidean dimensions. The loops correspond to closed trajectories of massive particles and we find a phase transition as a function of their mass. We identify the order parameter as the average length of the loops at equilibrium. This order parameter exhibits a sharp increase as the mass is decreased through a critical value, the behavior seems to be a crossover transition. We believe that the model represents an effective description of the broken-symmetry sector of the 2+1 dimensional Abelian Higgs model, in the extreme strong coupling limit. The massive gauge bosons and the neutral scalars are decoupled, and the relevant low-lying excitations correspond to vortices and antivortices. The functional integral can be approximated by a sum over simple, closed vortex loop configurations. We present a novel fashion to generate nonintersecting closed loops, starting from a tetrahedral tessellation of three space. The two phases that we find admit the following interpretation: the usual Higgs phase and a novel phase which is heralded by the appearance of effectively infinitely long loops. We compute the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator and that of the Polyakov loop operator. The Wilson loop exhibits perimeter law behavior in both phases implying that the transition corresponds neither to the restoration of symmetry nor to confinement. The effective interaction between external charges is screened in both phases, however there is a dramatic increase in the polarization cloud in the novel phase as shown by the energy shift introduced by the Wilson loop.

  5. The Transit Transmission Spectrum of a Cold Gas Giant Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Veyette, Mark J.

    2015-12-01

    We use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1-5 μm transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption from methane, ethane, acetylene, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and possibly carbon monoxide, with peak-to-peak features of up to 90 parts-per-million despite the presence of ammonia clouds. We also find that atmospheric refraction, as opposed to clouds or haze, determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn’s transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce a large absorption feature near 3.4 μm, likely caused by gaseous ethane and a C-H stretching mode of an unknown aliphatic hydrocarbon. This large feature is located in one of the Spitzer Space Telescope bandpasses and could alter interpretations of transmission spectra if not properly modeled. The large signal in Saturn’s transmission spectrum suggests that transmission spectroscopy of cold, long-period gaseous exoplanets should be possible with current and future observatories. Motivated by these results, we briefly consider the feasibility of using a survey to search for and characterize cold exoplanets that are analogous to Jupiter and Saturn utilizing a target-of-opportunity approach.

  6. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-12-01

    The permeation of rare-gas atoms through deeply supercooled metastable liquid methanol films is used to probe the diffusivity. The technique allows for measurement of supercooled liquid mobility at temperatures near the glass transition. The temperature dependence of the diffusivity is well described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. These new measurements and the temperature dependent kinetic parameters obtained from their analysis provide clear evidence that methanol is a fragile liquid near the glass transition.

  7. Using rare gas permeation to probe methanol diffusion near the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Jesper; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2009-12-11

    The permeation of rare-gas atoms through deeply supercooled metastable liquid methanol films is used to probe the diffusivity. The technique allows for measurement of supercooled liquid mobility at temperatures near the glass transition. The temperature dependence of the diffusivity is well described by a Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation. These new measurements and the temperature dependent kinetic parameters obtained from their analysis provide clear evidence that methanol is a fragile liquid near the glass transition. PMID:20366212

  8. Reactive Gas Environment Induced Structural Modification of Noble-Transition Metal Alloy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V.; Yang, L.; Yin, J.; Loukrakpam, R.; Shan, S.; Wanjala, B.; Luo, J.; Chapman, K. W.; Zhong, C. J.

    2012-09-01

    Noble-transition metal (noble=Pt,Au; transition=Co,Ni,Cu) alloy particles with sizes of about 5 nm have been studied by in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction while subjected to oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) gas atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The different gas atmospheres do not affect substantially the random alloy, face-centered-cubic structure type of the particles but do affect the way the metal atoms pack together. In an O2 atmosphere, atoms get extra separated from each other, whereas, in an H2 atmosphere, they come closer together. The effect is substantial, amounting to 0.1 Å difference in the first neighbor atomic distances, and concurs with a dramatic change of the particle catalytic properties. It is argued that such reactive gas induced “expansion shrinking” is a common phenomenon that may be employed for the engineering of “smart” nanoparticles responding advantageously to envisaged gas environments.

  9. Comparison of fluctuating potentials and donor-acceptor pair transitions in a Cu-poor Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} based solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, J. P.; Sousa, R. A.; Sousa, M. G.; Cunha, A. F. da; Leitão, J. P.; Fernandes, P. A.; Salomé, P. M. P.; González, J. C.

    2014-10-20

    The structure of the electronic energy levels of a single phase Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} film, as confirmed by Raman Scattering and x-ray diffraction, is investigated through a dependence on the excitation power of the photoluminescence (PL). The behavior of the observed asymmetric band, with a peak energy at ∼1.22 eV, is compared with two theoretical models: (i) fluctuating potentials and (ii) donor-acceptor pair transitions. It is shown that the radiative recombination channels in the Cu-poor film are strongly influenced by tail states in the bandgap as a consequence of a heavy doping and compensation levels. The contribution of the PL for the evaluation of secondary phases is also highlighted.

  10. Tradeoffs between costs and greenhouse gas emissions in the design of urban transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Julia B.; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2013-12-01

    Recent investments in the transit sector to address greenhouse gas emissions have concentrated on purchasing efficient replacement vehicles and inducing mode shift from the private automobile. There has been little focus on the potential of network and operational improvements, such as changes in headways, route spacing, and stop spacing, to reduce transit emissions. Most models of transit system design consider user and agency cost while ignoring emissions and the potential environmental benefit of operational improvements. We use a model to evaluate the user and agency costs as well as greenhouse gas benefit of design and operational improvements to transit systems. We examine how the operational characteristics of urban transit systems affect both costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The research identifies the Pareto frontier for designing an idealized transit network. Modes considered include bus, bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT), and metro (heavy) rail, with cost and emissions parameters appropriate for the United States. Passenger demand follows a many-to-many travel pattern with uniformly distributed origins and destinations. The approaches described could be used to optimize the network design of existing bus service or help to select a mode and design attributes for a new transit system. The results show that BRT provides the lowest cost but not the lowest emissions for our large city scenarios. Bus and LRT systems have low costs and the lowest emissions for our small city scenarios. Relatively large reductions in emissions from the cost-optimal system can be achieved with only minor increases in user travel time.

  11. HAT-P-12b: A LOW-DENSITY SUB-SATURN MASS PLANET TRANSITING A METAL-POOR K DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Torres, G.; Noyes, R. W.; Pal, A.; Latham, D. W.; Sipocz, B.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Sasselov, D. D.; Kovacs, Gabor; Stefanik, R. P.; Fernandez, J. M.; Kovacs, Geza; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Butler, R. P.; Lazar, J.; Papp, I.

    2009-11-20

    We report on the discovery of HAT-P-12b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the moderately bright V approx 12.8 K4 dwarf GSC 03033 - 00706, with a period P = 3.2130598 +- 0.0000021 d, transit epoch T{sub c} = 2454419.19556 +- 0.00020 (BJD), and transit duration 0.0974 +- 0.0006 d. The host star has a mass of 0.73 +- 0.02 M{sub sun}, radius of 0.70{sup +0.02}{sub -0.01} R{sub sun}, effective temperature 4650 +- 60 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.29 +- 0.05. We find a slight correlation between the observed spectral line bisector spans and the radial velocity, so we consider, and rule out, various blend configurations including a blend with a background eclipsing binary, and hierarchical triple systems where the eclipsing body is a star or a planet. We conclude that a model consisting of a single star with a transiting planet best fits the observations, and show that a likely explanation for the apparent correlation is contamination from scattered moonlight. Based on this model, the planetary companion has a mass of 0.211 +- 0.012 M{sub J} and radius of 0.959{sup +0.029}{sub -0.021} R{sub J} yielding a mean density of 0.295 +- 0.025 g cm{sup -3}. Comparing these observations with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-12b is consistent with a approx1-4.5 Gyr, mildly irradiated, H/He-dominated planet with a core mass M{sub C} approx< 10 M {sub +}. HAT-P-12b is thus the least massive H/He-dominated gas giant planet found to date. This record was previously held by Saturn.

  12. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  13. METAL-POOR, COOL GAS IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF A z = 2.4 STAR-FORMING GALAXY: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION?

    SciTech Connect

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-10-20

    In our current galaxy formation paradigm, high-redshift galaxies are predominantly fueled by accretion of cool, metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. Hydrodynamical simulations predict that this material should be observable in absorption against background sightlines within a galaxy's virial radius, as optically thick Lyman limit systems (LLSs) with low metallicities. Here we report the discovery of exactly such a strong metal-poor absorber at an impact parameter R = 58 kpc from a star-forming galaxy at z = 2.44. Besides strong neutral hydrogen (N{sub H{sup 0}}=10{sup 19.50±0.16} cm{sup -2}) we detect neutral deuterium and oxygen, allowing a precise measurement of the metallicity: log{sub 10}(Z/Z {sub ☉}) = –2.0 ± 0.17, or (7-15) × 10{sup –3} solar. Furthermore, the narrow deuterium linewidth requires a cool temperature <20,000 K. Given the striking similarities between this system and the predictions of simulations, we argue that it represents the direct detection of a high-redshift cold-accretion stream. The low-metallicity gas cloud is a single component of an absorption system exhibiting a complex velocity, ionization, and enrichment structure. Two other components have metallicities >0.1 solar, 10 times larger than the metal-poor component. We conclude that the photoionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) of this galaxy is highly inhomogeneous: the majority of the gas is in a cool, metal-poor and predominantly neutral phase, but the majority of the metals are in a highly ionized phase exhibiting weak neutral hydrogen absorption but strong metal absorption. If such inhomogeneity is common, then high-resolution spectra and detailed ionization modeling are critical to accurately appraise the distribution of metals in the high-redshift CGM.

  14. Numerical study of the unitary Fermi gas across the superfluid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulko, Olga; Wingate, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    We present results from Monte Carlo calculations investigating the properties of the homogeneous, spin-balanced unitary Fermi gas in three dimensions. The temperature is varied across the superfluid transition allowing us to determine the temperature dependence of the chemical potential, the energy per particle, and the contact density. Numerical artifacts due to finite volume and discretization are systematically studied, estimated, and reduced.

  15. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Progress report, [1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.

    1993-08-01

    A new hypothesis is introduced for the generation of petroleum and natural gas. The transition metals, activated under the reducing conditions of diagenesis, are proposed as catalysts in the generation of light hydrocarbons. The objective of this proposal is to test that hypothesis. Transition metals (Ni, V, Ti, Co, Fe), in kerogen, porphyrins, and as pure compounds, will be tested under catagenic conditions for catalytic activity in the conversion of normal paraffins and hydrogen into light hydrocarbons. If the hypothesis is correct, kerogenous transition metals should become catalytically active under the reducing conditions of diagenesis and catalyze the conversion of paraffins into the light hydrocarbons seen in petroleum. Moreover, the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons generated catalytically should be similar in molecular and isotopic compositions to natural gas.

  16. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  17. Transition state for the gas-phase reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2008-06-19

    Density functional theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transition states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F 5, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structures and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the structure of the product complex was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF 4, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF 6 with water. PMID:18500792

  18. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process: The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  19. Line-profile tomography of exoplanet transits - II. A gas-giant planet transiting a rapidly rotating A5 star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.; Guenther, E.; Smalley, B.; McDonald, I.; Hebb, L.; Andersen, J.; Augusteijn, Th.; Barros, S. C. C.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Fossey, S. J.; Hartmann, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pollacco, D.; Skillen, I.; Telting, J.; Waldmann, I. P.; West, R. G.

    2010-09-01

    Most of our knowledge of extrasolar planets rests on precise radial-velocity measurements, either for direct detection or for confirmation of the planetary origin of photometric transit signals. This has limited our exploration of the parameter space of exoplanet hosts to solar- and later-type, sharp-lined stars. Here we extend the realm of stars with known planetary companions to include hot, fast-rotating stars. Planet-like transits have previously been reported in the light curve obtained by the SuperWASP survey of the A5 star HD15082 (WASP-33 V = 8.3, v sini = 86 km s-1). Here we report further photometry and time-series spectroscopy through three separate transits, which we use to confirm the existence of a gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.22d in orbit around HD15082. From the photometry and the properties of the planet signal travelling through the spectral line profiles during the transit, we directly derive the size of the planet, the inclination and obliquity of its orbital plane and its retrograde orbital motion relative to the spin of the star. This kind of analysis opens the way to studying the formation of planets around a whole new class of young, early-type stars, hence under different physical conditions and generally in an earlier stage of formation than in sharp-lined late-type stars. The reflex orbital motion of the star caused by the transiting planet is small, yielding an upper mass limit of 4.1MJupiter on the planet. We also find evidence of a third body of substellar mass in the system, which may explain the unusual orbit of the transiting planet. In HD 15082, the stellar line profiles also show evidence of non-radial pulsations, clearly distinct from the planetary transit signal. This raises the intriguing possibility that tides raised by the close-in planet may excite or amplify the pulsations in such stars. Based on observations at Tautenburg Observatory, McDonald Observatory and the Nordic Optical Telescope. E-mail: acc4@st-and.ac.uk

  20. Neuropilin-1 Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition by Stimulating Nuclear Factor-Kappa B and Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Weiming; Song, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xueming; Ma, Lu; Zhu, Jiang; He, Mengying; Wang, Zilu; Wu, Yunong

    2014-01-01

    Background The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in carcinogenesis, invasion, and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In our previous studies, we found that neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is overexpressed in tongue squamous cell carcinoma and that this overexpression is associated with cell migration and invasion. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) plays an essential role both in the induction and the maintenance of EMT and tumor metastasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that NRP1 induces EMT, and that NRP1-induced migration and invasion may be an important mechanism for promoting invasion and metastasis of OSCC through NF-κB activation. Methods/Results The variations in gene and protein expression and the changes in the biological behavior of OSCC cell lines transfected with a vector encoding NRP1, or the corresponding vector control, were evaluated. NRP1 overexpression promoted EMT and was associated with enhanced invasive and metastatic properties. Furthermore, the induction of EMT promoted the acquisition of some cancer stem cell (CSC)-like characteristics in OSCC cells. We addressed whether selective inhibition of NF-κB suppresses the NRP1-mediated EMT by treating cells with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate ammonium (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analysis of NRP1 in OSCC tissue samples further supported a key mediator role for NRP1 in tumor progression, lymph node metastasis, and indicated that NRP1 is a predictor for poor prognosis in OSCC patients. Conclusion Our results indicate that NRP1 may regulate the EMT process in OSCC cell lines through NF-κB activation, and that higher NRP1 expression levels are associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in OSCC patients. Further investigation of the role of NRP1 in tumorigenesis may help identify novel targets for the prevention and therapy of oral cancers. PMID:24999732

  1. KELT-6b: A P ∼ 7.9 day hot Saturn transiting a metal-poor star with a long-period companion

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Siverd, Robert J.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T {sub eff} = 6102 ± 43 K, log g{sub ⋆}=4.07{sub −0.07}{sup +0.04}, and [Fe/H] = –0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M {sub *} = 1.09 ± 0.04 M {sub ☉} and radius R{sub ⋆}=1.58{sub −0.09}{sup +0.16} R{sub ⊙}. The planetary companion has mass M{sub P} = 0.43 ± 0.05 M {sub Jup}, radius R{sub P}=1.19{sub −0.08}{sup +0.13} R{sub Jup}, surface gravity log g{sub P}=2.86{sub −0.08}{sup +0.06}, and density ρ{sub P}=0.31{sub −0.08}{sup +0.07} g cm{sup −3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22{sub −0.10}{sup +0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T {sub c}(BJD{sub TDB}) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ∼4)-7). KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ∼0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images.

  2. KELT-6b: A P ~ 7.9 Day Hot Saturn Transiting a Metal-poor Star with a Long-period Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Street, Rachel A.; Cargile, Phillip; Mack, Claude E.; Oberst, Thomas E.; Avril, Ryan L.; Mellon, Samuel N.; McLeod, Kim K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Mao, Qingqing; Richert, Alexander J. W.; DePoy, Darren L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Pogge, Richard W.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T eff = 6102 ± 43 K, log g_\\star =4.07_{-0.07}^{+0.04}, and [Fe/H] = -0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M sstarf = 1.09 ± 0.04 M ⊙ and radius R_\\star =1.58_{-0.09}^{+0.16} \\,R_\\odot. The planetary companion has mass MP = 0.43 ± 0.05 M Jup, radius R_{P}=1.19_{-0.08}^{+0.13} \\,R_Jup, surface gravity log g_{P}=2.86_{-0.08}^{+0.06}, and density \\rho _{P}=0.31_{-0.08}^{+0.07}\\,g\\,cm^{-3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22_{-0.10}^{+0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T c(BJDTDB) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ~4}-7}. KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ~0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images. KELT is a joint project of The Ohio State University, Vanderbilt University, and Lehigh University.

  3. Phase transition to Bose-Einstein condensation for a bosonic gas confined in a combined trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Baolong; Xiong Hongwei; Tan Xinzhou; Wang Bing; Cao Lijuan

    2010-11-15

    We present a study of phase transition to macroscopic superfluidity for an ultracold bosonic gas confined in a combined trap formed by a one-dimensional optical lattice and a harmonic potential, focusing on the critical temperature of this system and the interference patterns of the Bose gas released from the combined trap. Based on a semiclassical energy spectrum, we develop an analytic approximation for the critical temperature T{sub c}, and compare the analytic results with that obtained by numerical computations. For finite temperatures below T{sub c}, we calculate the interference patterns for both the normal gas and the superfluid gas. The total interference pattern shows a feature of 'peak on a peak'. As a comparison, we also present the experimentally observed interference patterns of {sup 87}Rb atoms released from a one-dimensional optical lattice system in accord with our theoretical model. Our observations are consistent with the theoretical results.

  4. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  5. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-03-29

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell-cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  6. High tumor-associated macrophages infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and may contribute to the phenomenon of epithelial–mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Jun-Hai; Liu, Xu; Wang, Ji-Zhao; Qu, Hang-Ying; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Duan, Xiao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) contribute to the progression and poor prognosis of carcinoma through multiple mechanisms. Both inflammation and changing of epithelium have a close relationship with tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. However, the relevance between EMT and TAMs is still unclear in gastric cancer and needs more scientific research. This study is designed to explore the relationship between EMT and TAMs in gastric cancer. Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of EMT-related proteins and TAM markers in cancer tissues and normal gastric tissues. Results High levels of EMT and TAMs infiltration are related to aggressive features and independent prognostic factors in gastric cancer, respectively. In addition, expression of the two indicators is associated with expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Infiltration of TAMs is also associated with EMT-related marker in gastric cancer. Conclusion Our results suggest that high levels of EMT and TAMs infiltration are related to aggressive features and independent prognostic factors in gastric cancer, respectively. A correlation was found between EMT- and TAM-related indicators, which may be associated with TGF-β signaling pathway. The level of TAMs infiltration plays an important role in gastric cancer, the markers of which can be used as prognostic indicators. PMID:27418840

  7. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiang-Ji; Wu, Ze-Huan; Ba, Yao-Shuai; Lu, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Peng; Ba, De-Chun

    2015-09-01

    This paper carries out numerical simulation for pressure driven microscale gas flows in transition flow regime. The relaxation time of LBM model was modified with the application of near wall effective mean free path combined with a combination of Bounce-back and Specular Reflection (BSR) boundary condition. The results in this paper are more close to those of DSCM and IP-DSCM compared with the results obtained by other LBM models. The calculation results show that in transition regime, with the increase of Knudsen number, the dimensionless slip velocity at the wall significantly increases, but the maximum linear deviation of nonlinear pressure distribution gradually decreases.

  9. Lattice-gas models of phase separation: interfaces, phase transitions, and multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, D.H. ); Zaleski, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Momentum-conserving lattice gases are simple, discrete, microscopic models of fluids. This review describes their hydrodynamics, with particular attention given to the derivation of macroscopic constitutive equations from microscopic dynamics. Lattice-gas models of phase separation receive special emphasis. The current understanding of phase transitions in these momentum-conserving models is reviewed; included in this discussion is a summary of the dynamical properties of interfaces. Because the phase-separation models are microscopically time irreversible, interesting questions are raised about their relationship to real fluid mixtures. Simulation of certain complex-fluid problems, such as multiphase flow through porous media and the interaction of phase transitions with hydrodynamics, is illustrated.

  10. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W....

  11. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W....

  12. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W....

  13. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W....

  14. 33 CFR 165.1709 - Security Zones: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Liquefied Natural Gas Tanker Transits and Operations at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, Cook Inlet, AK. (a... navigable waters within a 1000-yard radius of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tankers during their inbound... Natural Gas tankers while they are moored at Phillips Petroleum LNG Pier, 60°40′43″ N and 151°24′10″ W....

  15. Investigation of a New Monte Carlo Method for the Transitional Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; Day, Chr.

    2011-05-20

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC) is well developed for rarefied gas flow in transition flow regime when 0.0110, the gas flow is free molecular and can be simulated by the Test Particle Monte Carlo method (TPMC) without any problem even for a complex 3D vacuum system. In this paper we will investigate the approach to extend the TPMC to the transition flow regime by considering the collision between gas molecules as an interaction between a probe molecule and the gas background. Recently this collision mechanism has been implemented into ProVac3D, a new TPMC simulation program developed by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The preliminary simulation result shows a correct nonlinear increasing of the gas flow. However, there is still a quantitative discrepancy with the experimental data, which means further improvement is needed.

  16. Hydrodynamic Modes in a Trapped Bose Gas above the Bose-Einstein Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, A.; Wu, W.; Stringari, S.

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the collective modes of a trapped Bose gas in the hydrodynamic regime where atomic collisions ensure local thermal equilibrium for the distribution function. Starting from the conservation laws, in the linearized limit we derive a closed equation for the velocity fluctuations in a trapped Bose gas above the Bose-Einstein transition temperature. Explicit solutions for a parabolic trap are given. We find that the surface modes above the transition have the same dispersion relation as the one recently obtained by Stringari for the oscillations of the condensate at T=0 within the Thomas-Fermi approximation. Results are also given for the monopole {open_quotes}breathing{close_quote}{close_quote} mode as well as for the m=0 excitations which result from the coupling of the monopole and quadrupole modes in an anisotropic parabolic well. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, Brent; Southworth, Frank; Meyer, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types of public transit service, and their usefulness in helping a transit agency to reduce its carbon footprint through informed vehicle and fuel procurement decisions. Available calculators fall into two categories: registry/inventory based calculators most suitable for standardized voluntary reporting, carbon trading, and regulatory compliance; and multi-modal life cycle analysis calculators that seek comprehensive coverage of all direct and indirect emissions. Despite significant progress in calculator development, no single calculator as yet contains all of the information needed by transit agencies to develop a truly comprehensive, life cycle analysis-based accounting of the emissions produced by its vehicle fleet operations, and for a wide range of vehicle/fuel technology options.

  18. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  19. Gas-liquid type phase transition in semiivietals at low temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Shoichi; Fukami, Takeshi; Mori, Masatoshi; Inoue, Tomnio

    1982-07-01

    Remarkable anomalies have been found in the temperature and frequency dependences of the attenuation coefficient of sound waves in bismuth, antimony and pyrolytic graphite at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The result for bismuth in particular is app]arently similar to those observed in second-order phase transition phenomena. On the basis of the Nakajima-Yoshioka-Kuramoto theory of the gas-liquid type phase transition in the electron-hole system, these anomalies are fairly well explained in terms of the fluctuation effect above the phase transition temperature, provided that the electron-hole correlation interaction is assumed to be sensitively dependent on the state of the overlapping of the electron and hole Landau levels.

  20. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ratios of light hydrocarbons remain virtually invariant over the course of petroleum generation, indicating steady-state catalysis rather than thermal cracking as the central feature to the mechanism of petroleum generation. Although the evidence for catalytic intervention is now compelling, the nature of the catalytic agent, its mode of activation and action are not clear. I propose that the transition metals, activated in the lipophilic domains of kerogen, are the catalytic agents in the conversion of normal paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas. The process proceeds through specific catalytic steps involving 3-, 5-, and 6-carbon ring-closures and the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds in the key steps. This hypothesis is analyzed in the context of published literature on catalysis by Ni, V, Ti, Co, and related transition metals. Activated under anaerobic conditions, these metals express extraordinary catalytic activity in each of the postulated steps. Moreover, metal-catalysis provides a reasonable kinetic pathway through which hydrogen and normal paraffins may combine to form a methane-enriched natural gas. Given the anaerobic conditions of diagenesis and a kerogenous source of hydrogen, it is concluded that the transition metals, under catagenic conditions, are potentially active catalysts in the conversion of hydrogen and paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas.

  1. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Certain ratios of light hydrocarbons remain virtually invariant over the course of petroleum generation, indicating steady-state catalysis rather than thermal cracking as the central feature to the mechanism of petroleum generation. Although the evidence for catalytic intervention is now compelling, the nature of the catalytic agent, its mode of activation and action are not clear. The author proposes that the transition metals, activated in the lipophilic domains of kerogen, are the catalytic agents in the conversion of normal paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas. The process proceeds through specific catalytic steps involving 3-, 5-, and 6-carbon ring-closures and the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds in the key steps. This hypothesis is analyzed in the context of published literature on catalysis by Ni, V, Ti, Co, and related transition metals. Activated under anaerobic conditions, these metals express extraordinary catalytic activity in each of the postulated steps. Moreover, metal-catalysis provides a reasonable kinetic pathway through which hydrogen and normal paraffins may combine to form a methane-enriched a natural gas. Given the anaerobic conditions of diagenesis and a kerogenous source of hydrogen, it is concluded that the transition metals, under catagenic conditions, are potentially active catalysts in the conversion of hydrogen and paraffins into light hydrocarbons and natural gas.

  2. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.

    2015-11-03

    The Roaring Fork Transit Authority (RFTA) and its VelociRFTA Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) program are unique in many ways. For example, VelociRFTA was the first rural BRT system in the United States and the operational environment of the VelociRFTA BRT is one of the most severe in the country, with extreme winter temperatures and altitudes close to 8,000 feet. RFTA viewed high altitude operation as the most challenging characteristic when it began considering the use of natural gas. RFTA is the second-largest public transit system in Colorado behind Denver's Regional Transportation District (RTD), and it is one of the largest rural public transit systems in the country. In 2013, RFTA accepted delivery of 22 new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses that went into service after completion of maintenance and refueling facilities earlier that year. This paper examines the lessons learned from RFTA's experience of investigating--and ultimately choosing--CNG for their new BRT program and focuses on the unique environment of RFTA's BRT application; the decision process to include CNG fueling in the project; unforeseen difficulties encountered in the operation of CNG buses; public perception; cost comparison to competing fuels; and considerations for indoor fueling facilities and project funding.

  3. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service. A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, George

    2015-11-01

    The Roaring Fork Transit Authority (RFTA) and its VelociRFTA Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) program are unique in many ways. For example, VelociRFTA was the first rural BRT system in the United States and the operational environment of the VelociRFTA BRT is one of the most severe in the country, with extreme winter temperatures and altitudes close to 8,000 feet. RFTA viewed high altitude operation as the most challenging characteristic when it began considering the use of natural gas. RFTA is the second-largest public transit system in Colorado behind Denver's Regional Transportation District (RTD), and it is one of the largest rural public transit systems in the country. In 2013, RFTA accepted delivery of 22 new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses that went into service after completion of maintenance and refueling facilities earlier that year. This paper examines the lessons learned from RFTA's experience of investigating--and ultimately choosing--CNG for their new BRT program and focuses on the unique environment of RFTA's BRT application; the decision process to include CNG fueling in the project; unforeseen difficulties encountered in the operation of CNG buses; public perception; cost comparison to competing fuels; and considerations for indoor fueling facilities and project funding.

  4. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2014-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d = 6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q = J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the ‘every day thermodynamics’ of simple substances. For q = 0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0 < q ≪ 1 we find an analogue of a ‘solid/liquid’ phase transition. Furthermore, for q ∈ (0.00905, 0.0985) the system displays the presence of a large/intermediate/small black hole phase transition with two critical and one triple (or tricritical) points. This behavior is reminiscent of the solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q > 0.0985 we observe the ‘standard liquid/gas behavior’ of the Van der Waals fluid.

  5. Effects of wood ash fertilization on forest floor greenhouse gas emissions and tree growth in nutrient poor drained peatland forests.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, M; Sikström, U; Nilsson, M; Klemedtsson, L

    2010-09-15

    Wood ash (3.1, 3.3 or 6.6 tonnes dry weight ha(-1)) was used to fertilize two drained and forested peatland sites in southern Sweden. The sites were chosen to represent the Swedish peatlands that are most suitable for ash fertilization, with respect to stand growth response. The fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) from the forest floor, measured using opaque static chambers, were monitored at both sites during 2004 and 2005 and at one of the sites during the period 1 October 2007-1 October 2008. No significant (p>0.05) changes in forest floor greenhouse gas exchange were detected. The annual emissions of CO(2) from the sites varied between 6.4 and 15.4 tonnes ha(-1), while the CH(4) fluxes varied between 1.9 and 12.5 kg ha(-1). The emissions of N(2)O were negligible. Ash fertilization increased soil pH at a depth of 0-0.05 m by up to 0.9 units (p<0.01) at one site, 5 years after application, and by 0.4 units (p<0.05) at the other site, 4 years after application. Over the first 5 years after fertilization, the mean annual tree stand basal area increment was significantly larger (p<0.05) at the highest ash dose plots compared with control plots (0.64 m(2) ha(-1) year(-1) and 0.52 m(2) ha(-1) year(-1), respectively). The stand biomass, which was calculated using tree biomass functions, was not significantly affected by the ash treatment. The groundwater levels during the 2008 growing season were lower in the high ash dose plots than in the corresponding control plots (p<0.05), indicating increased evapotranspiration as a result of increased tree growth. The larger basal area increment and the lowered groundwater levels in the high ash dose plots suggest that fertilization promoted tree growth, while not affecting greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:20667583

  6. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype Is Associated with Clinicopathological Factors That Indicate Aggressive Biological Behavior and Poor Clinical Outcomes in Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kang, Su Hwan; Lee, Soo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancer tissue may display a wide spectrum of expression phenotypes of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in breast cancer. Methods We evaluated the expression pattern of the EMT-related proteins E-cadherin and fibronectin in samples from 1,495 patients with invasive breast carcinoma (IBC) on tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in IBC. EMT phenotypes were divided into complete type (E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-positive), incomplete type (hybrid type, E-cadherinpositive/fibronectin-positive; null type, E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-negative), and wild-type (E-cadherin-positive/fibronectin-negative). We analyzed the correlation of EMT phenotype with clinicopathological factors and patient survival. Results Loss of E-cadherin was observed in 302 patients (20.2%), and fibronectin was expressed in the cancer cells of 354 patients (23.7%). In total, 64 (4.3%), 290 (19.4%), 238 (15.9%), and 903 (60.4%) samples were categorized as complete, hybrid, null, and wild-type, respectively. The complete EMT phenotype exhibited significant associations with young age (p=0.017), advanced pT (p<0.001) and pN (p<0.001) stages, higher histological grade (p<0.001), lymphovascular invasion (p<0.001), and triple negativity (p<0.001). Patients with complete and hybrid EMT phenotypes had poorer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than those with the wild-type phenotype (OS, p=0.001; DFS, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the hybrid EMT phenotype was an independent prognostic factor for DFS in patients with IBC (p=0.032). Conclusion EMT phenotypes exhibited significant associations with clinicopathological factors indicating aggressive biologic behavior and poor outcome in patients with IBC. PMID:26472976

  7. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  8. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  9. A Gas-poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Constraints on the Planetesimal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2004-11-01

    Given our presently inadequate understanding of the turbulent state of the solar nebula and planetary nebulae, there are two sensible approaches to satellite formation that avoid over-reliance on specific choices for essentially free parameters. The first one postulates turbulence decay. If so, Keplerian disks must eventually pass through quiescent phases, so that the survival of satellites (and planets) ultimately hinges on gap-opening. In this scenario, the criterion for gap-opening itself sets the value for the gas surface density of the satellite disk (Mosqueira and Estrada 2003b). The second approach assumes that steady turbulence is sufficiently strong to cause the evolution of the gas disk on a shorter timescale than that for satellite formation. This approach uses the turbulence of the subnebula to remove gas from the disk but not to fine-tune the conditions of the subnebular environment. In this case, the gas surface density is left unspecified, though the presence of some gas may help to explain the observations. Satellite formation is then understood in terms of planetesimal dynamics that are largely uncoupled from the gas (somewhat analogous to the case of the terrestrial planets). We will discuss a gas-poor model with the following features: First, collisions between planetesimals in the vicinity of the giant planet leads to the formation of a protosatellite swarm of prograde and retrograde objects extending as far as ˜ RH/2 (Ruskol 1975, Safronov et al. 1986). Second, this circumplanetary swarm has a small net specific angular momentum which results in the formation of close-in, prograde satellites. Third, close to the planet, hypervelocity impacts can ultimately lead to a variety of outcomes (i.e., Jovian-like versus Saturnian-like satellite systems). Fourth, satellitesimal collisional removal from the outer disk is balanced by planetesimal collisional capture. Excluding satellite embryos, at any given time this disk mass is less than the mass of

  10. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  11. Quantifying the Gas Inside Dust Cavities in Transitional Disks: Implications for Young Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, E. F.; van der Marel, N.; Bruderer, S.; Pinilla, P.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observations of a small sample of transitional disks with large dust cavities observed in Cycle 0 and 1 are summarized. The gas and dust surface density structures are inferred from the continuum and 12CO, 13CO and C18O line data using the DALI physical-chemical code. Thanks to its ability to self-shield, CO can survive inside dust cavities in spite of being exposed to intense UV radiation and can thus be used as a probe of the gas structure. Modeling of the existing data shows that gas is present inside the dust cavities in all cases, but at a reduced level compared with the gas surface density profile of the outer disk. The gas density decrease inside the dust cavity radius by factors of up to 104 suggests clearing by one or more planetary-mass companions. The accompanying pressure bumps naturally lead to trapping of the mm-sized dust grains observed in the ALMA images.

  12. Physical understanding of gas-liquid annular flow and its transition to dispersed droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Parmod; Das, Arup Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2016-07-01

    Transformation from annular to droplet flow is investigated for co-current, upward gas-liquid flow through a cylindrical tube using grid based volume of fluid framework. Three transitional routes, namely, orificing, rolling, and undercutting are observed for flow transformation at different range of relative velocities between the fluids. Physics behind these three exclusive phenomena is described using circulation patterns of gaseous phase in the vicinity of a liquid film which subsequently sheds drop leading towards transition. Orifice amplitude is found to grow exponentially towards the core whereas it propagates in axial direction in a parabolic path. Efforts have been made to fit the sinusoidal profile of wave structure with the numerical interface contour at early stages of orificing. Domination of gas inertia over liquid flow has been studied in detail at the later stages to understand the asymmetric shape of orifice, leading towards lamella formation and droplet generation. Away from comparative velocities, circulations in the dominant phase dislodge the drop by forming either a ligament (rolling) or a bag (undercut) like protrusion in liquid. Study of velocity patterns in the plane of droplet dislodge reveals the underlying physics behind the disintegration and its dynamics at the later stages. Using numerical phase distributions, rejoining of dislodged droplet with liquid film as post-rolling consequences has been also proposed. A flow pattern map showing the transitional boundaries based on the physical mechanism is constructed for air-water combination.

  13. Adsorption of gas molecules on transition metal embedded graphene: a search for high-performance graphene-based catalysts and gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Miao; Lu, Yun-Hao; Cai, Yong-Qing; Zhang, Chun; Feng, Yuan-Ping

    2011-09-01

    We report an investigation on the adsorption of small gas molecules (O2, CO, NO2 and NH3) on pristine and various transition metal embedded graphene samples using a first-principles approach based on density-functional theory (DFT). The most stable adsorption geometry, energy, charge transfer, and magnetic moment of these molecules on graphene embedded with different transition metal elements are thoroughly discussed. Our calculations found that embedded transition metal elements in general can significantly enhance the interactions between gas molecules and graphene, and for applications of graphene-based catalysis, Ti and Au may be the best choices among all transition metal elements. We also expect a detailed analysis of the electronic structures and magnetic properties of these systems to shed light on future applications of graphene-based gas sensing and spintronics.

  14. Simulation of the transition radiation detection conditions in the ATLAS TRT detector filled with argon and krypton gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, A. S.; Maevskiy, A. S.

    2015-12-15

    Performance of the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) at the ATLAS experiment with argon and krypton gas mixtures was simulated. The efficiency of transition radiation registration, which is necessary for electron identification, was estimated along with the electron identification capabilities under such conditions.

  15. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  16. A Gas-poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Prediction for the Composition of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2004-12-01

    Given our presently inadequate understanding of the turbulent state of the solar nebula and planetary nebulae, there are two sensible approaches to satellite formation that avoid over-reliance on specific choices for essentially free parameters. The first one postulates turbulence decay. If so, Keplerian disks must eventually pass through quiescent phases, so that the survival of satellites (and planets) ultimately hinges on gap-opening. In this scenario, the criterion for gap-opening itself sets the value for the gas surface density of the satellite disk (Mosqueira and Estrada 2003b). The second approach assumes that steady turbulence is sufficiently strong to cause the evolution of the gas disk on a shorter timescale than that for satellite formation. This approach uses the turbulence of the subnebula to remove gas from the disk but not to fine-tune the conditions of the subnebular environment. In this case, the gas surface density is left unspecified, though the presence of some gas may help to explain the observations. Satellite formation is then understood in terms of planetesimal dynamics that are largely uncoupled from the gas (somewhat analogous to the case of the terrestrial planets). We will discuss a gas-poor model with the following features: First, collisions between planetesimals in the vicinity of the giant planet leads to the formation of a protosatellite swarm of prograde and retrograde objects extending as far as ˜ RH/2 (Ruskol 1975, Safronov et al. 1986). Second, this circumplanetary swarm has a small net specific angular momentum which results in the formation of close-in, prograde satellites. Third, close to the planet, hypervelocity impacts can ultimately lead to a variety of outcomes (i.e., Jovian-like versus Saturnian-like satellite systems). Fourth, satellitesimal collisional removal from the outer disk is balanced by planetesimal collisional capture. Excluding satellite embryos, at any given time this disk mass is less than the mass of

  17. Poor weaning transition average daily gain in pigs is not correlated with pathological or immunological markers of enteric disease during a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus outbreak.

    PubMed

    Jones, C K; Madson, D M; Main, R G; Gabler, N K; Patience, J F

    2014-06-01

    Previous research suggests that enteric disease and poor gut health interact to decrease pig performance. Our objective was to determine if light birth weight pigs or those from the bottom 10th percentile of transition ADG (tADG) have a higher incidence of pathogen presence or enteric lesions than heavier or faster-growing contemporaries. A total of 1,500 pigs were weighed at birth and divided into 5 birth weight (BRW) categories: <1, 1 to 1.25, 1.26 to 1.5, 1.51 to 1.75, and >1.76 kg. At weaning, 1,054 random pigs were moved to a commercial wean-to-finish barn. Pigs were weighed individually at 0 and 3 wk postweaning. Transition ADG was calculated as the ADG between wk 0 and 3 postweaning. One pig from each of the 10th, 30th, and 70th percentiles of tADG was used to create 1 set of 3 pigs with the same litter size and from the same parity sow. Forty pigs from each of the 3 tADG percentiles were matched for sex, litter size, and sow parity but not BRW to create 20 matched sets of 60 pigs. This allowed for the main effects of BRW and tADG to be studied as a 5 × 3 factorial design. At 3 and 22 wk postweaning, pigs were euthanized for organ system tissue evaluation. Lung, lymph node, and digesta were analyzed for presence of pathogens and for severity of microscopic lesions (0 = not present, 1 = present, with slight erosion, 2 = present, with moderate erosion, and 3 = present and severe erosion). Data were analyzed using PROC GENMOD and GLIMMIX, where pig served as the experimental unit. The fixed effects were BRW and tADG and the random effects were pen and set. There were no BRW × tADG interactions (P = 0.16). There was no correlation (P = 0.12) between tADG and pathogen presence at either 3 or 22 wk postweaning. Incidence and severity of microscopic lesions in the large intestine at 3 wk postweaning decreased linearly with increasing tADG (P = 0.01). Lesion incidence and severity were also affected (P < 0.04) by tADG at 22 wk postweaning, with greater stomach

  18. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  19. Thermal phase transitions in a honeycomb lattice gas with three-body interactions.

    PubMed

    Lohöfer, Maximilian; Bonnes, Lars; Wessel, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    We study the thermal phase transitions in a classical (hard-core) lattice gas model with nearest-neighbor three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice, based on parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations. This system realizes incompressible low-temperature phases at fractional fillings of 9/16, 5/8, and 3/4 that were identified in a previous study of a related quantum model. In particular, both the 9/16 and the 5/8 phase exhibit an extensive ground-state degeneracy reflecting the frustrated nature of the three-body interactions on the honeycomb lattice. The thermal melting of the 9/16 phase is found to be a first-order, discontinuous phase transition. On the other hand, from the thermodynamic behavior we obtain indications for a four-states Potts-model thermal transition out of the 5/8 phase. We find that this thermal Potts-model transition relates to the selection of one out of four extensive sectors within the low-energy manifold of the 5/8 phase, which we obtain via an exact mapping of the ground-state manifold to a hard-core dimer model on an embedded honeycomb superlattice. PMID:24329242

  20. Multiple phase transitions in extended hard-core lattice gas models in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R

    2014-07-01

    We study the k-NN hard-core lattice gas model in which the first k next-nearest-neighbor sites of a particle are excluded from occupation by other particles on a two-dimensional square lattice. This model is the lattice version of the hard-disk system with increasing k corresponding to decreasing lattice spacing. While the hard-disk system is known to undergo a two-step freezing process with increasing density, the lattice model has been known to show only one transition. Here, based on Monte Carlo simulations and high-density expansions of the free energy and density, we argue that for k = 4,10,11,14,⋯, the lattice model undergoes multiple transitions with increasing density. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm the same for k = 4,...,11. This, in turn, resolves an existing puzzle as to why the 4-NN model has a continuous transition against the expectation of a first-order transition. PMID:25122264

  1. Influence of spin polarizability on liquid gas phase transition in the nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Z.; Bigdeli, M.; Bordbar, G. H.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the liquid gas phase transition for the spin polarized nuclear matter. Applying the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method, and using two microscopic potentials, AV18 and UV14+TNI, we calculate the free energy, equation of state (EOS), order parameter, entropy, heat capacity and compressibility to derive the critical properties of spin polarized nuclear matter. Our results indicate that for the spin polarized nuclear matter, the second-order phase transition takes place at lower temperatures with respect to the unpolarized one. It is also shown that the critical temperature of our spin polarized nuclear matter with a specific value of spin polarization parameter is in good agreement with the experimental result.

  2. Glass transition in the quenched and annealed version of the frustrated lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Annalisa; de Candia, Antonio; Coniglio, Antonio

    2000-12-01

    In this paper we study the three-dimensional frustrated lattice gas model in the annealed version, where the disorder is allowed to evolve in time with a suitable kinetic constraint. Although the model does not exhibit any thermodynamic transition it shows a diverging peak at some characteristic time in the dynamical nonlinear susceptibility, similar to the results on the p-spin model in mean field and the Lennard-Jones mixture recently found by Donati et al. (e-print cond-mat/9905433). Comparing these results to those obtained in the model with quenched interactions, we conclude that the critical behavior of the dynamical susceptibility is reminiscent of the thermodynamic transition present in the quenched model, and signaled by the divergence of the static nonlinear susceptibility, suggesting therefore a similar mechanism also in supercooled glass-forming liquids.

  3. Quantum criticality of a Bose gas in an optical lattice near the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, A.; Dupuis, N.

    2012-01-01

    We derive the equation of state of bosons in an optical lattice in the framework of the Bose-Hubbard model. Near the density-driven Mott transition, the expression of the pressure P(μ,T) versus chemical potential and temperature is similar to that of a dilute Bose gas but with renormalized mass m* and scattering length a*. Here m* is the mass of the elementary excitations at the quantum critical point governing the transition from the superfluid phase to the Mott-insulating phase, while a* is related to their effective interaction at low energy. We use a nonperturbative renormalization-group approach to compute these parameters as a function of the ratio t/U between hopping amplitude and on-site repulsion.

  4. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  5. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  6. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  7. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas.... Deepwater port means any facility or structure meeting the definition of deepwater port in 33 CFR...

  8. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas.... Deepwater port means any facility or structure meeting the definition of deepwater port in 33 CFR...

  9. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas.... Deepwater port means any facility or structure meeting the definition of deepwater port in 33 CFR...

  10. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas.... Deepwater port means any facility or structure meeting the definition of deepwater port in 33 CFR...

  11. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas.... Deepwater port means any facility or structure meeting the definition of deepwater port in 33 CFR...

  12. Phase transitions and damage spreading in a nonequilibrium lattice gas model with mixed dynamic rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Saracco, Gustavo P.; Bab, Marisa A.

    2016-02-01

    Phase transitions and damage spreading for a lattice gas model with mixed driven lattice gas (DLG)-Glauber dynamics are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. In order to control the number of sites updated according to the nonconservative Glauber dynamics, a parameter pɛ [ 0 , 1 ] is defined. In this way, for p = 0 the system corresponds to the DLG model with biased Kawasaki conservative dynamics, while for p = 1 it corresponds to the Ising model with Glauber dynamics. The results obtained show that the introduction of nonconservative dynamics dramatically affects the behavior of the DLG model, leading to the existence of Ising-like phase transitions from fully occupied to disordered states. The short-time dynamics results suggest that this transition is second order for values of p = 0.1 and p > 0.6 and first order for 0.1 < p ≤ 0.6. On the other hand, damage always spreads within the investigated temperature range and reaches a saturation value Dsat that depends on the system size, the temperature, and p. The value of Dsat in the thermodynamic limit is estimated by performing a finite-size analysis. For p < 0.6 the results show a change in the behavior of Dsat with temperature, similar to those reported for the pure (p = 0) DLG model. However, for p ≥ 0.6 the data remind us of the Ising (p = 1) curves. In each case, a damage temperature TD(p) can be defined as the value where either Dsat reaches a maximum or it becomes nonzero. This temperature is, within error bars, similar to the reported values of the temperatures that characterize the mentioned phase transitions.

  13. Molecular-scale remnants of the liquid-gas transition in supercritical polar fluids.

    PubMed

    Sokhan, V P; Jones, A; Cipcigan, F S; Crain, J; Martyna, G J

    2015-09-11

    An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of nonpercolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend farther, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquidlike and gaslike state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models, suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase. PMID:26406855

  14. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  15. Molecular-Scale Remnants of the Liquid-Gas Transition in Supercritical Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, V. P.; Jones, A.; Cipcigan, F. S.; Crain, J.; Martyna, G. J.

    2015-09-01

    An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of nonpercolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend farther, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquidlike and gaslike state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models, suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase.

  16. Quantum Phase Transition Between a Luttinger Liquid and a Gas of Cold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Law, K. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2008-08-29

    We consider cold polar molecules confined in a helical optical lattice similar to those used in holographic microfabrication. An external electric field polarizes molecules along the axis of the helix. The large-distance intermolecular dipolar interaction is attractive but the short-scale interaction is repulsive due to geometric constraints and thus prevents collapse. The interaction strength depends on the electric field. We show that a zero-temperature second-order liquid-gas transition occurs at a critical field. It can be observed under experimentally accessible conditions.

  17. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  18. Application of four dimensional matrix for thermal analysis of Slovak transit gas pipeline by program FENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széplaky, Dávid; Varga, Augustín

    2016-06-01

    The contribution describes the principle of the FENIX program operation, which was designed to determine the temperature field of the transit pipeline for the transportation of natural gas. The program itself consists of several modules which are reciprocally linked. The basis of the program is the elementary balance method by means of which the unsteady heat transfer is assigned in several layers in different directions. The first step was to assess both the pressure and temperature of the natural gas mode, the second step is to determine the heat transfer through the walls of the pipes, and the last one is to determine the distribution of the temperature field in the surroundings of the pipeline.

  19. Jet-gas interactions and hotspots in FR I/II transition sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Diana; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Sources with intermediate FR I/II morphologies, and with powers in the decade straddling the FR I/II boundary, provide an opportunity to understand triggers responsible for the different workings of the two classes. Illustrated by deep Chandra observations of several sources, this presentation will show evidence that the physics changes within the transition range, and the work done in driving shocks can exceed that in evacuating the cavities common in FR I sources. Hotspots can be absent, seen only on one side (jet-side or counter-jet-side), or both, in which case X-ray/radio correspondence can be very different on the two sides. Evidence will be shown for radio-emitting plasma running along boundaries between gas of different temperature, apparently lubricating the gas flows and inhibiting heat transfer.

  20. Hydrodynamics during the Deconfinement Phase Transition from a Hadronic Gas to a Colorless QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Ladrem, M.; Zaki-Al-Full, Z.; Herbadji, S.

    2011-10-27

    The collective flow of hot and dense matter (partonic plasma and hadronic gas) created in an ultra relativistic heavy ion collision can be usually described by hydrodynamics if only the thermalization is achieved and if it can be locally maintained during the subsequent expansion. It requires knowledge of the equation of state, which gives a relation between pressure P, energy density {epsilon}, entropy density s and sound velocityc{sub s}, but no detailed knowledge of the microscopic dynamics. After the study of these hydrodynamical collective observables in a previous work, we investigate in the present work some correlations between them outshining some relevant features of the equation of state and the hydrodynamical expansion of the system undergoing a deconfinement phase transition from hadronic gas to colorless quark gluon plasma. We also investigate the finite volume effect on the collective dynamical evolution of the system.

  1. Interfacial Friction in Gas-Liquid Annular Flow: Analogies to Full and Transition Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.C.; Beus, S.G.; Fore, L.B.

    1999-03-01

    New film thickness and pressure gradient data were obtained in a 5.08 by 101.6 mm duct for nitrogen and water in annular flow. Pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and temperatures of 38 and 93 C were used to vary the gas density and liquid viscosity. These data are used to compute interfacial shear stresses and interfacial friction factors for comparison with several accepted literature correlations. These comparisons are reasonable for small values of the relative film thickness. However, the new data cover conditions not approached by the data used to construct those correlations. By combining the current data with the results of two other comprehensive modern experimental studies, a new correlation for the interfacial friction factor has been developed. This correlation adds elements of transition roughness to Wallis' fully-rough analogy to better predict interfacial friction factors over a wide range of gas Reynolds numbers and liquid film thicknesses.

  2. Surface and Column Aerosol Impacts of the United States' Natural Gas Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper quantifies the air pollution and climate impacts of the natural gas transition over the past decade in the United States. We integrate satellite and ground measurements with chemical transport modeling to understand the impact of of the large-scale shift from coal to natural gas on the quantity and chemical composition of column aerosol and surface particulate matter. We leverage the natural experiment of individual units that changed technologies (a sharp discontinuity) as well as state-level changes from old plants being taken offline and new ones being brought online (a soft discontinuity) and connect technology changes to emissions changes to detected aerosol / particulate matter changes. We use this methodology to estimate the size of the 'sulfate' mask due to coal consumption in the United States and understand more fully the climate implications of energy technology changes.

  3. Hydrodynamics during the Deconfinement Phase Transition from a Hadronic Gas to a Colorless QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladrem, M.; Zaki-Al-Full, Z.; Herbadji, S.

    2011-10-01

    The collective flow of hot and dense matter (partonic plasma and hadronic gas) created in an ultra relativistic heavy ion collision can be usually described by hydrodynamics if only the thermalization is achieved and if it can be locally maintained during the subsequent expansion. It requires knowledge of the equation of state, which gives a relation between pressure P, energy density ɛ, entropy density s and sound velocitycs, but no detailed knowledge of the microscopic dynamics. After the study of these hydrodynamical collective observables in a previous work, we investigate in the present work some correlations between them outshining some relevant features of the equation of state and the hydrodynamical expansion of the system undergoing a deconfinement phase transition from hadronic gas to colorless quark gluon plasma. We also investigate the finite volume effect on the collective dynamical evolution of the system.

  4. Two-dimensional imaging of gas-to-particle transition in flames by laser-induced nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyang; Li, Shuiqing; Ren, Yihua; Yao, Qiang; Law, Chung K.

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of gas/particle phase transition of metal oxides in their native high-temperature flow conditions, using laser-driven localized nanoplasmas, was obtained by utilizing the gap between the excitation energies of the gas and particle phases such that only the Ti atoms in the particle phase were selectively excited without detectable Bremsstrahlung background. These in situ images of the particle phase Ti distribution allow the quantitative visualization of the transition of the gas precursors to the nanoparticle phase across the flame sheet as well as diffusion of the particle concentration in the post-flame zone.

  5. Two-dimensional imaging of gas-to-particle transition in flames by laser-induced nanoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiyang; Li, Shuiqing Ren, Yihua; Yao, Qiang; Law, Chung K.

    2014-01-13

    Two-dimensional imaging of gas/particle phase transition of metal oxides in their native high-temperature flow conditions, using laser-driven localized nanoplasmas, was obtained by utilizing the gap between the excitation energies of the gas and particle phases such that only the Ti atoms in the particle phase were selectively excited without detectable Bremsstrahlung background. These in situ images of the particle phase Ti distribution allow the quantitative visualization of the transition of the gas precursors to the nanoparticle phase across the flame sheet as well as diffusion of the particle concentration in the post-flame zone.

  6. An experimental trace gas investigation of fluid transport and mixing in a circular-to-rectangular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Hingst, W. R.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    An ethylene trace gas technique was used to map out fluid transport and mixing within a circular-to-rectangular transition duct. Ethylene gas was injected at several points in a cross stream plane upstream of the transition duct. Ethylene concentration contours were determined at several cross stream measurement planes spaced axially within the duct. The flow involved a uniform inlet flow at a Mach number level of 0.5. Statistical analyses were used to quantitatively interpret the trace gas results. Also, trace gas data were considered along with aerodynamic and surface flow visualization results to ascertain transition duct flow phenomena. Convection of wall boundary layer fluid by vortices produced regions of high total pressure loss in the duct. The physical extent of these high loss regions is governed by turbulent diffusion.

  7. An experimental trace gas investigation of fluid transport and mixing in a circular-to-rectangular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Hingst, W. R.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    An ethylene trace gas technique was used to map out fluid transport and mixing within a circular to rectangular transition duct. Ethylene gas was injected at several points in a cross stream plane upstream of the transition duct. Ethylene concentration contours were determined at several cross stream measurement planes spaced axially within the duct. The flow involved a uniform inlet flow at a Mach number level of 0.5. Statistical analyses were used to quantitatively interpret the trace gas results. Also, trace gas data were considered along with aerodynamic and surface flow visualization results to ascertain transition duct flow phenomena. Convection of wall boundary layer fluid by vortices produced regions of high total pressure loss in the duct. The physical extent of these high loss regions is governed by turbulent diffusion.

  8. Observation of 2D Ising criticality of liquid-gas transition by the flowgram method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolinsky, Max; Kuklov, Anatoly

    We study the critical properties of the transition in 2D liquid-gas system with the square-well potential interaction by Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. Due to lack of the underlying Ising symmetry, the analysis cannot be done reliably by the standard methods applicable to lattice systems. In contrast, the analysis based on the flowgram method allowed us to find the critical point to significantly higher (and controllable) accuracy than in previous studies by other authors. Simulations were performed in a progression of sizes L up to size L = 84 , with the particle numbers varying over 3 orders of magnitude and the subcritical behavior not extending beyond L = 10 - 15 . The finite size scaling analysis of the critical exponents and their ratio, μ and γ / ν , gives values consistent with the 2D Ising universality class within 1-2% of errors. Our result essentially closes proposals that the nature of the liquid-gas transition might be different from the Ising model in systems with short-range interactions. This work was supported by the NSF Grant PHY1314469.

  9. Realization of a multipath ultrasonic gas flowmeter based on transit-time technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Weihua; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-01-01

    A microcomputer-based ultrasonic gas flowmeter with transit-time method is presented. Modules of the flowmeter are designed systematically, including the acoustic path arrangement, ultrasound emission and reception module, transit-time measurement module, the software and so on. Four 200 kHz transducers forming two acoustic paths are used to send and receive ultrasound simultaneously. The synchronization of the transducers can eliminate the influence caused by the inherent switch time in simple chord flowmeter. The distribution of the acoustic paths on the mechanical apparatus follows the Tailored integration, which could reduce the inherent error by 2-3% compared with the Gaussian integration commonly used in the ultrasonic flowmeter now. This work also develops timing modules to determine the flight time of the acoustic signal. The timing mechanism is different from the traditional method. The timing circuit here adopts high capability chip TDC-GP2, with the typical resolution of 50 ps. The software of Labview is used to receive data from the circuit and calculate the gas flow value. Finally, the two paths flowmeter has been calibrated and validated on the test facilities for air flow in Shaanxi Institute of Measurement & Testing. PMID:23809902

  10. IMPROVED log(gf) VALUES FOR LINES OF Ti I AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937 (ACCURATE TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ti I)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Guzman, A.; Wood, M. P.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J. E-mail: adrianaguzman2014@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2013-04-01

    New atomic transition probability measurements for 948 lines of Ti I are reported. Branching fractions from Fourier transform spectra and from spectra recorded using a 3 m echelle spectrometer are combined with published radiative lifetimes from laser-induced fluorescence measurements to determine these transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found in comparisons to the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The new Ti I data are applied to re-determine the Ti abundance in the photospheres of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 using many lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential to explore possible non-local thermal equilibrium effects. The variation of relative Ti/Fe abundance with metallicity in metal-poor stars observed in earlier studies is supported in this study.

  11. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-28

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  12. Contact line motion in confined liquid-gas systems: Slip versus phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2010-11-01

    In two-phase flows, the interface intervening between the two fluid phases intersects the solid wall at the contact line. A classical problem in continuum fluid mechanics is the incompatibility between the moving contact line and the no-slip boundary condition, as the latter leads to a nonintegrable stress singularity. Recently, various diffuse-interface models have been proposed to explain the contact line motion using mechanisms missing from the sharp-interface treatments in fluid mechanics. In one-component two-phase (liquid-gas) systems, the contact line can move through the mass transport across the interface while in two-component (binary) fluids, the contact line can move through diffusive transport across the interface. While these mechanisms alone suffice to remove the stress singularity, the role of fluid slip at solid surface needs to be taken into account as well. In this paper, we apply the diffuse-interface modeling to the study of contact line motion in one-component liquid-gas systems, with the fluid slip fully taken into account. The dynamic van der Waals theory has been presented for one-component fluids, capable of describing the two-phase hydrodynamics involving the liquid-gas transition [A. Onuki, Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)]. This theory assumes the local equilibrium condition at the solid surface for density and also the no-slip boundary condition for velocity. We use its hydrodynamic equations to describe the continuum hydrodynamics in the bulk region and derive the more general boundary conditions by introducing additional dissipative processes at the fluid-solid interface. The positive definiteness of entropy production rate is the guiding principle of our derivation. Numerical simulations based on a finite-difference algorithm have been carried out to investigate the dynamic effects of the newly derived boundary conditions, showing that the contact line can move through both phase transition and slip, with their relative contributions

  13. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - II. Dust concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, Clément; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large dust grains in massive lopsided transition discs via 2D hydrodynamical simulations including both gas and dust. Our simulations adopt a ring-like gas density profile that becomes unstable against the Rossby-wave instability and forms a large crescent-shaped vortex. When gas self-gravity is discarded, but the indirect force from the displacement of the star by the vortex is included, we confirm that dust grains with stopping times of order the orbital time, which should be typically a few centimetres in size, are trapped ahead of the vortex in the azimuthal direction, while the smallest and largest grains concentrate towards the vortex centre. We obtain maximum shift angles of about 25°. Gas self-gravity accentuates the concentration differences between small and large grains. At low to moderate disc masses, the larger the grains, the farther they are trapped ahead of the vortex. Shift angles up to 90° are reached for 10 cm-sized grains, and we show that such large offsets can produce a double-peaked continuum emission observable at mm/cm wavelengths. This behaviour comes about because the large grains undergo horseshoe U-turns relative to the vortex due to the vortex's gravity. At large disc masses, since the vortex's pattern frequency becomes increasingly slower than Keplerian, small grains concentrate slightly beyond the vortex and large grains form generally non-axisymmetric ring-like structures around the vortex's radial location. Gas self-gravity therefore imparts distinct trapping locations for small and large dust grains, which may be probed by current and future observations.

  14. Microphase formation at a 2D solid-gas phase transition.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Adam W; Bsaibes, Thomas S; Schlossman, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    Density modulated micro-separated phases (microphases) occur at 2D liquid interfaces in the form of alternating regions of high and low density domains. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images demonstrate the existence of microphases in cluster, stripe, and mosaic morphologies at the buried interface between hexane and water with fluoro-alkanol surfactant dissolved in the bulk hexane. At high temperature, the surfactant assembles at the interface in a 2D gaseous state. As the system is cooled additional surfactants condense onto the interface, which undergoes a 2D gas-solid phase transition. Microphase structure is observed within a few degrees of this transition in the form of clusters and labyrinthine stripes. Microphases have been observed previously in a number of other systems; nevertheless, we demonstrate that adsorption transitions at the liquid-liquid interface provide a convenient way to observe a full sequence of temperature-dependent 2D phases, from gas to cluster to stripe to mosaic to inverted stripe phases, as well as coexistence between some of these microphases. Cracking and fracture of the clusters reveal that they are a solid microphase. Theories of microphases often predict a single length scale for cluster and stripe phases as a result of the competition between an attractive and a repulsive interaction. Our observation that two characteristic length scales are required to describe clusters whose diameter is much larger than the stripe period, combined with the solid nature of the clusters, suggests that a long-range elastic interaction is relevant. These results complement earlier X-ray measurements on the same system. PMID:25088351

  15. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  16. Gas6 induces cancer cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition through upregulation of MAPK and Slug

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Mira; Kim, Semi

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cancer cell migration. •Gas6 treatment and subsequent Axl activation induce cell migration and EMT via upregulation of Slug. •Slug expression mediated by Gas6 is mainly through c-Jun and ATF-2 in an ERK1/2 and JNK-dependent manner. •The Gas6/Axl-Slug axis may be exploited as a target for anti-cancer metastasis therapy. -- Abstract: Binding of Gas6 to Axl (Gas6/Axl axis) alters cellular functions, including migration, invasion, proliferation, and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cell migration remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that Gas6 induced the activation of JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in cancer cells expressing Axl, resulting in the phosphorylation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors c-Jun and ATF-2, and induction of Slug. Depletion of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA attenuated the Gas6-induced expression of Slug. Slug expression was required for cell migration and E-cadherin reduction/vimentin induction induced by Gas6. These results suggest that Gas6 induced cell migration via Slug upregulation in JNK- and ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms. These data provide an important insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating Gas6-induced cell migration.

  17. Gas exchange pattern transitions in the workers of the harvester termite.

    PubMed

    Inder, Isabelle M; Duncan, Frances D

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary genesis and the current adaptive significance of the use of the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) for respiration by insects is the subject of intense debate. Years of research have resulted in several leading hypotheses, one of which is the emergent-property hypothesis. This hypothesis states that DGC is an emergent property or consequence of interactions between the O2 and CO2 set points that regulate spiracular function, i.e. opening and closing. Workers of the harvester termite, Hodotermes mossambicus were selected as a model to test this hypothesis. The respiratory patterns of major workers, investigated using flow-through respirometry, were obtained at 100% relative humidity (RH) under varying temperature to evaluate the assumptions of the emergent-property hypothesis. Metabolic rate, measured as VCO2 increased significantly after 15 °C. As VCO2 increased in response to increasing temperature and activity, the gas exchange pattern displayed by workers transitioned to a continuous gas exchange. A true DGC, defined as showing all three phases and a coefficient of variation value close to 2, was not expressed under the experimental conditions. The conclusion drawn from this study of termite workers is that changes in respiratory patterns are most likely an emergent property of the insects' nervous and respiratory system. PMID:25770978

  18. Gas content of transitional disks: a VLT/X-Shooter study of accretion and winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.; Rosotti, G.; Benisty, M.; Ercolano, B.; Ricci, L.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Transitional disks are thought to be a late evolutionary stage of protoplanetary disks whose inner regions have been depleted of dust. The mechanism responsible for this depletion is still under debate. To constrain the various models it is mandatory to have a good understanding of the properties of the gas content in the inner part of the disk. Aims: Using X-Shooter broad band - UV to near-infrared - medium-resolution spectroscopy, we derive the stellar, accretion, and wind properties of a sample of 22 transitional disks. The analysis of these properties allows us to place strong constraints on the gas content in a region very close to the star (≲0.2 AU) that is not accessible with any other observational technique. Methods: We fitted the spectra with a self-consistent procedure to simultaneously derive spectral type, extinction, and accretion properties of the targets. From the continuum excess at near-infrared wavelength we distinguished whether our targets have dust free inner holes. By analyzing forbidden emission lines, we derived the wind properties of the targets. We then compared our findings with results for classical T Tauri stars. Results: The accretion rates and wind properties of 80% of the transitional disks in our sample, which is strongly biased toward stongly accreting objects, are comparable to those of classical T Tauri stars. Thus, there are (at least) some transitional disks with accretion properties compatible with those of classical T Tauri stars, irrespective of the size of the dust inner hole. Only in two cases are the mass accretion rates much lower, while the wind properties remain similar. We detected no strong trend of the mass accretion rates with the size of the dust-depleted cavity or with the presence of a dusty optically thick disk very close to the star. These results suggest that, close to the central star, there is a gas-rich inner disk with a density similar to that of classical T Tauri star disks. Conclusions: The

  19. Asymptotic behavior of apparent generalized oscillator strengths for optically forbidden transitions in rare-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T. Y.; Suzuki, H.; Ohtani, S.; Takayanagi, T.; Okada, K.

    2007-03-15

    Apparent generalized oscillator strengths (apparent GOS's) have been measured for three types of optically forbidden transitions in rare-gas atoms as functions of the squared momentum transfer K{sup 2} at small K{sup 2} range ({<=}0.4 a.u.). The apparent GOS's were deduced from the differential cross sections for excitation, which were measured by means of the electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Electron impact energies were 100, 300, and 500 eV, and the scattering angles were from 0.8 degree sign to 10 degree sign . In the case where the first Born approximation does not hold, the apparent GOS as a function of K{sup 2} (the apparent GOS function) shows characteristic dependence on the electron collision energy according to the character of the transition. In the present observation, for the np{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}np{sup 5}(n+1)p{sup '}[1/2]{sub 0} transitions, the specific behavior has been observed in the apparent GOS functions characteristic of that for the {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}S{sub 0} type transition, in which the term symbols of the initial and the final states do not change. For the np{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}np{sup 5}(n+1)p[5/2]{sub 2,3}; [3/2]{sub 1,2} transitions, a certain new type of deviations from the first Born approximation, which is interpreted to be characteristic of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}D{sub 2} type transition, have been observed in the apparent GOS functions with some modifications depending on respective atomic species. For the 5p{sup 6} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}5p{sup 5}5d [7/2]{sub 3}; [5/2]{sub 3} transitions in Xe, it is observed that the apparent GOS curves have no impact energy dependence for impact energies from 100 eV to 500 eV, which suggests that the first Born approximation is valid for such low impact energies and the curves agree with the Bethe-GOS. It is found that the GOS's varies in proportional to K{sup 4} at small K{sup 2} region ({<=}0.1 a.u.), which suggests that the octupole moment is

  20. Polaron-molecule transitions in a two-dimensional Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Meera M.

    2011-05-15

    We address the problem of a single 'spin-down' impurity atom interacting attractively with a spin-up Fermi gas in two dimensions (2D). We consider the case where the mass of the impurity is greater than or equal to the mass of a spin-up fermion. Using a variational approach, we resolve the questions raised by previous studies and show that there is, in fact, a transition between polaron and molecule (dimer) ground states in 2D. For the molecule state, we use a variational wave function with a single particle-hole excitation on the Fermi sea and we find that its energy matches that of the exact solution in the limit of infinite impurity mass. Thus, we expect the variational approach to provide a reliable tool for investigating 2D systems.

  1. Structural and technological changes of greenhouse gas emissions during the transition period in Polish industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasierb, Slawomir; Niedziela, Karol; Wojtulewicz, Jerzy

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed the patterns of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Polish industry arising during the transition from a centrally planned economy to a market economy. A method of analyzing industry energy use and GHG emissions is discussed. Using this method, the impact of changes in industrial production value, the share of specific industry branches in the total industrial production, energy intensity, and the mix of the energy carriers in the 1989 1993 period has been analyzed. The last year of the analyzed period shows favorable trends in efficiency and signs of production structure shift to a less energy-intensive one. Economic reform implemented after 1989, which released energy carriers' prices from government control, had important effects on the industrial sector. Energy efficiency and emission intensity trends of 1992 1994 were favorable; if they continue, production will return to 1989 levels with much lower energy consumption and significantly decreased GHG emissions.

  2. Gas-phase electronic transitions of C₁₇H₁₂N⁺ at 15 K.

    PubMed

    Hardy, F-X; Rice, C A; Gause, O; Maier, J P

    2015-03-01

    The electronic spectrum of C17H12N(+), phenanthrene with a side chain, was measured in the gas phase at a vibrational and rotational temperature of ∼15 K in an ion trap using a resonant multiphoton dissociation technique. The C17H12N(+) structure was produced in a chemical ionization source and identified by a comparison with theoretical calculations of stable structures and excitation energies. The (3), (2), (1) (1)A ← X (1)A electronic transitions of this nitrogen-containing aromatic species with 30 atoms have origin band maxima at 23,586 ± 1 cm(-1), 16,120 ± 50 cm(-1), and 14,519 ± 30 cm(-1). Distinct vibrational structure in the (3) (1)A state is observed, and assignments are made. Astronomical aspects are considered. PMID:25264926

  3. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Wang; Xiaodong Sun; Benjamin Doup; Haihua Zhao

    2012-12-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As twophase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminator s are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Body Dissatisfaction, Living Away from Parents, and Poor Social Adjustment Predict Binge Eating Symptoms in Young Women Making the Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Erin T.; Galambos, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    The current study explored how body dissatisfaction and challenges associated with the transition to university predicted symptoms of binge eating. Participants were 101 female full-time first-year university students (M=18.3 years of age; SD=0.50) who completed a background questionnaire and a web-based daily checklist assessing binge eating.…

  5. Education and Change in Rich, Poor and National Minority Areas in China: Two Decades of Transition. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith M.; Lu, Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study traces education and change over two decades in three areas, Tongzhou on the periphery of Beijing chosen as one of the richest 300 counties in 1990; Ansai in Yan'an which was one of the poorest 300 counties and a famous base for the 8th Route Army at the end of the Long March, and Zhaojue a poor Yi national minority area in the…

  6. Phase transition dynamics of liquid phase precipitation from a supersaturated gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Pines, V; Zlatkowski, M; Chait, A

    2004-11-01

    This work presents a self-consistent description of phase transition dynamics of disperse liquid phase precipitating from a supersaturated gas mixture. The unified approach integrates the macroscale transport phenomena of cloud dynamics with the essential microphysical kinetic processes of droplet condensation, evaporation, and droplet collisions simultaneously taking place in stochastic population of liquid droplets. A complete set of governing equations with well-defined dissipative fluxes and kinetic rates is derived for phase transition dynamics from nucleation to postnucleation to coarsening stages. The local thermodynamics of precipitating system, which is considered as ternary mixture of disperse liquid phase and water vapor with dry air, is redefined to explicitly include on equal basis both the vapor content and liquid content into the fundamental thermodynamic relations and equation of state. The molecular kinetic flux regularization method for growth of submicron droplets is reexamined to include, among others, significant contribution of vapor molecular energy flux into total heat flux, resulting in new expressions for the droplet temperature, growth rate, and effective diffusion coefficients. The local kinetic rates are determined on the basis of microscale kinetic equation for the droplet distribution function. This is in contrast to commonly used semiempirical parametrization schemes for kinetic rates with adjustable parameters, wherein the probabilistic aspects of microphysical processes are not rigorously addressed. Stochastic diffusion interactions among droplets competing for the available water vapor and modifications in the kinetic equation for droplets growing in stochastic population with direct long-range diffusion interactions amongst them are discussed and formulated as well. PMID:15527359

  7. Mean-field dynamics of the superfluid-insulator phase transition in a gas of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2005-04-01

    A large-scale dynamical simulation of the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition in a gas of ultracold atoms placed in an optical lattice is performed using the time-dependent Gutzwiller mean-field approach. This approximate treatment allows us to take into account most of the details of the recent experiment [Greiner , Nature (London) 415, 39 (2002)] where by changing the depth of the lattice potential an adiabatic transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator state has been reported. Our simulations reveal a significant excitation of the system with a transition to insulator in restricted regions of the trap only.

  8. Reentrant Phenomenon in the Quantum Phase Transitions of a Gas of Bosons Trapped in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.; Schmidt, S.; Pelster, A.

    2004-10-01

    We calculate the location of the quantum phase transitions of a Bose gas trapped in an optical lattice as a function of effective scattering length aeff and temperature T. Knowledge of recent high-loop results on the shift of the critical temperature at weak couplings is used to locate a nose in the phase diagram above the free Bose-Einstein critical temperature T(0)c, thus predicting the existence of a reentrant transition above T(0)c, where a condensate should form when increasing aeff. At zero temperature, the transition to the normal phase produces the experimentally observed Mott insulator.

  9. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensi, F.; Pellerin, S.; Castillon, Q.; Boutaghane, A.; Dzierzega, K.; Zielinska, S.; Pellerin, N.; Briand, F.

    2013-06-01

    The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition of the shielding gas. In particular, addition of CO2 increases the threshold current for the transition from unstable globular to more stable spray transfer mode. We report on the diagnostics—using optical emission spectroscopy—of a GMAW plasma in pure argon and in mixtures of argon, CO2 and N2 while operated in spray and globular transfer modes. The spatially resolved plasma parameters are obtained by applying the Abel transformation to laterally integrated emission data. The Stark widths of some iron lines are used to determine both electron density and temperature, and line intensities yield relative contents of neutral and ionized iron to argon. Our experimental results indicate a temperature drop on the arc axis in the case of spray arc transfer. This drop reduces with addition of N2 and disappears in globular transfer mode when CO2 is added. Despite the temperature increase, the electron density decreases with CO2 concentration. The highest concentration of iron is observed in the plasma column upper part (close to the anode) and for GMAW with CO2. Our results are compared with recently published works where the effect of non-homogeneous metal vapour concentration has been taken into account.

  10. Dynamics of a driven quantum gas: Non-hermiticity, pseudo-spectra and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Kulkarni, Manas; Tureci, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    System of an optically driven quantum gas coupled to a single mode of a leaky cavity offers a unique platform to study open quantum systems. This system displays two exceptional points and a quantum critical point when the drive strength (equivalently, the light-matter coupling) is tuned. Here, we study the non-normal properties of this system especially near these special points. Adapting the rich mathematics behind the theory of pseudo-spectra, we characterize the open quantum phase transitions in this system by studying the fluctuations. Our method offers a novel way to understand physics near criticality beyond the traditional approach of arriving at a phase diagram using the semi-classical solutions arising from a mean field approach. We further show that the quench dynamics of a driven dissipative quantum gas displays a non-Markovian dynamics featuring substantial transient amplification of the photon flux near the critical point. We also investigate the non-Hermitian physics behind two-operator products thereby shining light on higher order quantum correlations in an open quantum system.

  11. Transition from gas to plasma kinetic equilibria in gravitating axisymmetric structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2014-04-15

    The problem of the transition from gas to plasma in gravitating axisymmetric structures is addressed under the assumption of having initial and final states realized by kinetic Maxwellian-like equilibria. In astrophysics, the theory applies to accretion-disc scenarios around compact objects. A formulation based on non-relativistic kinetic theory for collisionless systems is adopted. Equilibrium solutions for the kinetic distribution functions describing the initial neutral matter and the resulting plasma state are constructed in terms of single-particle invariants and expressed by generalized Maxwellian distributions. The final plasma configuration is related to the initial gas distribution by the introduction of appropriate functional constraints. Qualitative aspects of the solution are investigated and physical properties of the system are pointed out. In particular, the admitted functional dependences of the fluid fields carried by the corresponding equilibrium distributions are determined. Then, the plasma is proved to violate the condition of quasi-neutrality, implying a net charge separation between ions and electrons. This result is shown to be independent of the precise realization of the plasma distribution function, while a physical mechanism able to support a non-neutral equilibrium state is proposed.

  12. Radio Continuum Variability and Molecular Gas Reservoirs in the Type-Transitioning Seyfert Galaxy Mrk 590

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Jun Yi; Vestergaard, Marianne; Casasola, Viviana; Peterson, Bradley M.

    2015-08-01

    Sometime between 2006 and 2012, the broad Hβ emission line of Mrk 590, once classified as a bona-fide Seyfert 1 galaxy, has completely disappeared! The optical-UV continuum emission has decreased to the point where it can be fully accounted for by stellar population models of the host galaxy. As such, Mrk 590 would now be classified as a Seyfert 1.9 or 2 galaxy, which goes against the prevailing scheme of AGN classification and unification where the presence of broad emission lines depends only on source orientation. Similar decreases in X-ray and radio continuum fluxes show that the central engine of Mrk 590 may be turning off or transitioning into a radiatively inefficient mode of accretion. We discuss the origin of the compact, unresolved radio emission in Mrk 590 and the physics of its variability in relation to the variability observed at other wavelengths, based on archival radio data and new VLBI observations. We also present recent ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) spectral line and sub-mm continuum emission; these provide the strongest limits to date on the molecular gas mass in the central ~100 pc, plus reveal the gas distribution and kinematics in the central kpc, to determine if this intriguing AGN is indeed running out of fuel.

  13. Critical dynamics of the jamming transition in one-dimensional nonequilibrium lattice-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyanka; Jain, Kavita

    2016-04-01

    We consider several one-dimensional driven lattice-gas models that show a phase transition in the stationary state between a high-density fluid phase in which the typical length of a hole cluster is of order unity and a low-density jammed phase where a hole cluster of macroscopic length forms in front of a particle. Using a hydrodynamic equation for an interface growth model obtained from the driven lattice-gas models of interest here, we find that in the fluid phase, the roughness exponent and the dynamic exponent that, respectively, characterize the scaling of the saturation width and the relaxation time of the interface with the system size are given by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang exponents. However, at the critical point, we show analytically that when the equal-time density-density correlation function decays slower than inverse distance, the roughness exponent varies continuously with a parameter in the hop rates, but it is one-half otherwise. Using these results and numerical simulations for the density-density autocorrelation function, we further find that the dynamic exponent z =3 /2 in all cases.

  14. Unregulated emissions from compressed natural gas (CNG) transit buses configured with and without oxidation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Robert A; Kado, Norman Y; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Ayala, Alberto; Kobayashi, Reiko

    2006-01-01

    The unregulated emissions from two in-use heavy-duty transit buses fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and equipped with oxidation catalyst (OxiCat) control were evaluated. We tested emissions from a transit bus powered by a 2001 Cummins Westport C Gas Plus 8.3-L engine (CWest), which meets the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) 2002 optional NOx standard (2.0 g/bhp-hr). In California, this engine is certified only with an OxiCat, so our study did not include emissions testing without it. We also tested a 2000 New Flyer 40-passenger low-floor bus powered by a Detroit Diesel series 50G engine (DDCs50G) that is currently certified in California without an OxiCat. The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) offers a "low-emission" package for this bus that includes an OxiCat for transit bus applications, thus, this configuration was also tested in this study. Previously, we reported that formaldehyde and other volatile organic emissions detected in the exhaust of the DDCs50G bus equipped with an OxiCat were significantly reduced relative to the same DDCs50G bus without OxiCat. In this paper, we examine othertoxic unregulated emissions of significance. The specific mutagenic activity of emission sample extracts was examined using the microsuspension assay. The total mutagenic activity of emissions (activity per mile) from the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus was generally lower than that from the DDC bus without the OxiCat. The CWest bus emission samples had mutagenic activity that was comparable to that of the OxiCat-equipped DDC bus. In general, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions were lower forthe OxiCat-equipped buses, with greater reductions observed for the volatile and semivolatile PAH emissions. Elemental carbon (EC) was detected in the exhaust from the all three bus configurations, and we found that the total carbon (TC) composition of particulate matter (PM) emissions was primarily organic carbon (OC). The amount of carbon emissions far exceeded the

  15. Study on gas kinetic unified algorithm for flows from rarefied transition to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Han-Xin

    2004-01-01

    The modified BGK equation adapted to various flow regimes can be presented by the aid of the basic characteristics on molecular movement and collision approaching to equilibrium. The discrete velocity ordinate method is developed and applied to the velocity distribution function to remove its continuous dependency on the velocity space, and then the velocity distribution function equation is cast into hyperbolic conservation law form with nonlinear source terms. Based on the unsteady time-splitting method and the non-oscillatory, containing no free parameters, and dissipative (NND) scheme, the gas kinetic finite difference second-order scheme is constructed for the computation of the discrete velocity distribution functions. The mathematical model on the interaction of molecules with solid surface is studied and used in the numerical method. Four types of numerical quadrature rules, such as the modified Gauss-Hermite formula, the composite Newton-Cotes integration method, the Gauss-Legendre numerical quadrature rule, and the Golden Section number-theoretic integral method, are developed and applied to the discretized velocity space to evaluate the macroscopic flow parameters at each point in the physical space. As a result, a unified simplified gas kinetic algorithm is established for the flows from rarefied transition to continuum regime. Based on analyzing the inner parallel degree of the unified algorithm, the parallel strategy adapted to the gas kinetic numerical algorithm is studied, and then the HPF parallel processing software for the unified algorithm is developed. To test the present method, the one-dimensional shock-tube problems, the flows past two-dimensional circular cylinder, and the flows around three-dimensional sphere and spacecraft shape with various Knudsen numbers are simulated. The computational results are found in high resolution of the flow fields and good agreement with the theoretical, DSMC, N-S, and experimental results.

  16. Central metabolism in Mycobacterium smegmatis during the transition from O2-rich to O2-poor conditions as studied by isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinjie J; Shui, Wenqing; Myers, Samuel; Feng, Xueyang; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Keasling, Jay D

    2009-08-01

    Isotopomer-assisted metabolite analysis was used to investigate the central metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis and its transition from normal growth to a non-replicating state under a hypoxic environment. Tween 80 significantly promoted aerobic growth by improving O(2) transfer, while only small amount was degraded and metabolized via the TCA cycle for biomass synthesis. As the bacillus encountered hypoxic stress, isotopomer analysis suggested: (1) isocitrate lyase activity increased, which further induced glyoxylate pathway and glycine dehydrogenase for replenishing NAD(+); (2) the relative amount of acetyl-CoA entering the TCA cycle was doubled, whereas little entered the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. PMID:19357814

  17. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a cooling system for the transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-12-08

    A cooling system is provided for a transition (420) of a gas turbine engine (410). The cooling system includes a cowling (460) configured to receive an air flow (111) from an outlet of a compressor section of the gas turbine engine (410). The cowling (460) is positioned adjacent to a region of the transition (420) to cool the transition region upon circulation of the air flow within the cowling (460). The cooling system further includes a manifold (121) to directly couple the air flow (111) from the compressor section outlet to an inlet (462) of the cowling (460). The cowling (460) is configured to circulate the air flow (111) within an interior space (426) of the cowling (460) that extends radially outward from an inner diameter (423) of the cowling to an outer diameter (424) of the cowling at an outer surface.

  18. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Final report, September 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1997-01-21

    This project originated on the premise that natural gas could be formed catalytically in the earth rather than thermally as commonly believed. The intention was to test this hypothetical view and to explore generally the role of sedimentary metals in the generation of light hydrocarbons (C1 - C9). We showed the metalliferous source rocks are indeed catalytic in the generation of natural gas. Various metal compounds in the pure state show the same levels of catalytic activity as sedimentary rocks and the products are identical. Nickel is particularly active among the early transition metals and is projected to remain catalytically robust at all stages of catagenesis. Nickel oxide promotes the formation of n-alkanes in addition to natural gas (NG), demonstrating the full scope of the hypothetical catalytic process. The composition of catalytic gas duplicates the entire range of natural gas, from so-called wet gas to dry gas (60 to 95+ wt % methane), while gas generated thermally is consistently depleted in methane (10 to 60 wt % methane). These results support the view that metal catalysis is a major pathway through which natural gas is formed in the earth.

  19. Thermodynamics of a Bose gas near the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rançon, A.; Dupuis, N.

    2012-10-01

    We study the thermodynamics near the generic (density-driven) superfluid-Mott-insulator transition in the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model using the nonperturbative renormalization-group approach. At low energy, the physics is controlled by the Gaussian fixed point and becomes universal. Thermodynamic quantities can then be expressed in terms of the universal scaling functions of the dilute Bose gas universality class while the microscopic physics enters only via two nonuniversal parameters, namely, the effective mass m* and the “scattering length” a* of the elementary excitations at the quantum critical point between the superfluid and Mott-insulating phases. A notable exception is the condensate density in the superfluid phase which is proportional to the quasiparticle weight Zqp of the elementary excitations. The universal regime is defined by m*a*2T≪1 and m*a*2|δμ|≪1 or, equivalently, |n¯-n¯c|a*3≪1, where δμ=μ-μc is the chemical potential shift from the quantum critical point (μ=μc,T=0) and n¯-n¯c the doping with respect to the commensurate density n¯c of the T=0 Mott insulator. We compute Zqp, m*, and a* and find that they vary strongly with both the ratio t/U between hopping amplitude and onsite repulsion and the value of the (commensurate) density n¯c. Finally, we discuss the experimental observation of universality and the measurement of Zqp, m*, and a* in a cold-atomic gas in an optical lattice.

  20. Long non-coding RNA ATB promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in human prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Song; Yi, Xiao-Ming; Tang, Chao-Peng; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be critical mediators in various tumors associated with cancer progression. Long non-coding RNA activated by TGF-β (lncRNA-ATB) is a stimulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the biological role and clinical significance of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study was designed to explore the expression of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer patients and the role of lncRNA-ATB in prostate cancer cells. We showed that lncRNA-ATB expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissues in patients with prostate cancer in comparison with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Further analysis indicted that high lncRNA-ATB expression may be an independent prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival in prostate cancer patients. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB promoted, and knockdown of lncRNA-ATB inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells via regulations of cell cycle regulatory protein expression levels. In addition, lncRNA-ATB stimulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with ZEB1 and ZNF217 expression levels via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results indicated that lncRNA-ATB may be considered as a new predictor in the clinical prognosis of patients with prostate cancer. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB exerts mitogenic and EMT effects of prostate cancer via activation of ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. PMID:27176634

  1. Long non-coding RNA ATB promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in human prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    XU, SONG; YI, XIAO-MING; TANG, CHAO-PENG; GE, JING-PING; ZHANG, ZHENG-YU; ZHOU, WEN-QUAN

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be critical mediators in various tumors associated with cancer progression. Long non-coding RNA activated by TGF-β (lncRNA-ATB) is a stimulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the biological role and clinical significance of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study was designed to explore the expression of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer patients and the role of lncRNA-ATB in prostate cancer cells. We showed that lncRNA-ATB expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissues in patients with prostate cancer in comparison with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Further analysis indicted that high lncRNA-ATB expression may be an independent prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival in prostate cancer patients. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB promoted, and knockdown of lncRNA-ATB inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells via regulations of cell cycle regulatory protein expression levels. In addition, lncRNA-ATB stimulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with ZEB1 and ZNF217 expression levels via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results indicated that lncRNA-ATB may be considered as a new predictor in the clinical prognosis of patients with prostate cancer. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB exerts mitogenic and EMT effects of prostate cancer via activation of ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. PMID:27176634

  2. Noble-transition metal nanoparticle breathing in a reactive gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Shan, Shiyao; Chupas, Peter; Yin, Jun; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2013-08-21

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis is used to obtain fundamental insight into the effect of the reactive gas environment on the atomic-scale structure of metallic particles less than 10 nm in size. To substantiate our recent discovery we investigate a wide range of noble-transition metal nanoparticles and confirm that they expand and contract radially when treated in oxidizing (O2) and reducing (H2) atmospheres, respectively. The results are confirmed by supplementary XAFS experiments. Using computer simulations guided by the experimental diffraction data we quantify the effect in terms of both relative lattice strain and absolute atomic displacements. In particular, we show that the effect leads to a small percent of extra surface strain corresponding to several tenths of Ångström displacements of the atoms at the outmost layer of the particles. The effect then gradually decays to zero within 4 atomic layers inside the particles. We also show that, reminiscent of a breathing type structural transformation, the effect is reproducible and reversible. We argue that because of its significance and widespread occurrence the effect should be taken into account in nanoparticle research. PMID:23828235

  3. Transitional regimes of natural convection in a differentially heated cubical cavity under the effects of wall and molecular gas radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.; Xin, S.

    2014-02-15

    The transition to unsteadiness and the dynamics of weakly turbulent natural convection, coupled to wall or gas radiation in a differentially heated cubical cavity with adiabatic lateral walls, are studied numerically. The working fluid is air with small contents of water vapor and carbon dioxide whose infrared spectral radiative properties are modelled by the absorption distribution function model. A pseudo spectral Chebyshev collocation method is used to solve the flow field equations and is coupled to a direct ray tracing method for radiation transport. Flow structures are identified by means of either the proper orthogonal decomposition or the dynamic mode decomposition methods. We first retrieve the classical mechanism of transition to unsteadiness without radiation, characterized by counter-rotating streamwise-oriented vortices generated at the exit of the vertical boundary layers. Wall radiation through a transparent medium leads to a homogenization of lateral wall temperatures and the resulting transition mechanism is similar to that obtained with perfectly conducting lateral walls. The transition is due to an unstable stratification upstream the vertical boundary layers and is characterized by periodically oscillating transverse rolls of axis perpendicular to the main flow. When molecular gas radiation is accounted for, no periodic solution is found and the transition to unsteadiness displays complex structures with chimneys-like rolls whose axes are again parallel to the main flow. The origin of this instability is probably due to centrifugal forces, as suggested previously for the case without radiation. Above the transition to unsteadiness, at Ra = 3 × 10{sup 8}, it is shown that both wall and gas radiation significantly intensify turbulent fluctuations, decrease the thermal stratification in the core of the cavity, and increase the global circulation.

  4. Generation of widely tunable intense far-infrared radiation pulses by stimulated Raman transitions in methylfluoride gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, P.T.; Sessler, F.; Werling, U.; Renk, K.F. )

    1989-12-18

    We report on the generation of widely tunable intense far-infrared radiation pulses by stimulated Raman transitions in methylfluoride gas. Using a tunable high-pressure CO{sub 2} laser we achieved, by {ital P}-branch tuning of stimulated Raman transitions in {sup 12}CH{sub 3}F and {sup 13}CH{sub 3}F gases, tunable generation of radiation in a series of intervals in the spectral range from 37 to 72 cm{sup {minus}1} covering 20% of this range. Possibilities of further extension of the tuning regions are also discussed.

  5. Overexpression of CIP2A in clear cell renal cell carcinoma promotes cellular epithelial-mesenchymal transition and is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qizhen; Wang, Qifei; Zeng, Guang; Li, Quanlin; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Kenan

    2015-11-01

    Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a newly characterized oncoprotein involved in a variety of malignant tumors. However, its expression pattern and biological functions in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) remain unclear. In the present study, our findings demonstrated that expressions of CIP2A mRNA and protein in ccRCC tissues and cell lines were significantly higher than those in paired normal renal tissues or normal renal tubular epithelial cells (P<0.05). High CIP2A level was closely correlated with T stage (P=0.001), tumor size (P=0.009), lymph node metastasis (P=0.014), vascular invasion (P=0.018) and high Snail expression (P<0.001). Additionally, ccRCC patients with high CIP2A expression had significantly shorter overall survival (OS, P<0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS, P<0.001) when compared with patients with the low expression of CIP2A. On Cox multivariate analysis, CIP2A overexpression was an independent and significant prognostic factor for OS (P=0.010) and DFS (P=0.004). Furthermore, knockdown of the CIP2A expression significantly reduced ccRCC cell invasion, with decreased Snail and Vimentin expression, and increased E-cadherin expression. Taken together, our data identified CIP2A as a critical oncoprotein involved in cell invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), which could serve as a therapeutic target in ccRCC. PMID:26327467

  6. Development, Application, and Transition of Aerosol and Trace Gas Products Derived from Next-Generation Satellite Observations to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Naeger, Aaron; Zavodsky, Bradley; McGrath, Kevin; LaFontaine, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a history of successfully transitioning unique observations and research capabilities to the operational weather community to improve short-term forecasts. SPoRTstrives to bridge the gap between research and operations by maintaining interactive partnerships with end users to develop products that match specific forecast challenges, provide training, and assess the products in the operational environment. This presentation focuses on recent product development, application, and transition of aerosol and trace gas products to operations for specific forecasting applications. Recent activities relating to the SPoRT ozone products, aerosol optical depth composite product, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol index products are discussed.

  7. A model for the relative intensities among ion pair → valence transitions in the heavier halogens and rare gas halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewsbury, Philip; Lawley, Kenneth

    1990-03-01

    The separated atom or ( JAMAJBMB) coupling scheme is applied to the electronic structure of both ion pair and valence states of the heavier halogens and rare gas halides. Relative transition moments from low vibrational levels of selected ion pair states to all the valence states and the resulting radiative lifetimes are derived. σ↔σ electron transfer between atomic orbitals is assumed for parallel transitions. Russell-Saunders coupling is used for the atomic or ionic basis functions in the reference model. Departures from the model arising from partial jj coupling in the halogen positive ions and from intramolecular electrostatic effects each produce characteristic changes in the relative intensities of the various fluorescent systems from a given ion pair state. The effect of J and MJ state mixing between asymptotically degenerate valence states is discussed and ion pair → valence transition intensities are shown to be a sensitive function of this mixing.

  8. IMPROVED LABORATORY TRANSITION PROBABILITIES FOR Ce II, APPLICATION TO THE CERIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUN AND FIVE r-PROCESS-RICH, METAL-POOR STARS, AND RARE EARTH LAB DATA SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.; Ivans, I. I. E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu E-mail: cowan@nhn.ou.edu

    2009-05-15

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to {+-}5% using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 43 even-parity and 15 odd-parity levels of Ce II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 921 lines of Ce II. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Ce abundance, log {epsilon} = 1.61 {+-} 0.01 ({sigma} = 0.06 from 45 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoritic abundance, log {epsilon} = 1.61 {+-} 0.02. Revised Ce abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars BD+17{sup 0}3248, CS 22892-052, CS 31082-001, HD 115444, and HD 221170. Between 26 and 40 lines were used for determining the Ce abundance in these five stars, yielding a small statistical uncertainty of {+-}0.01 dex similar to the solar result. The relative abundances in the metal-poor stars of Ce and Eu, a nearly pure r-process element in the Sun, matches r-process-only model predictions for solar system material. This consistent match with small scatter over a wide range of stellar metallicities lends support to these predictions of elemental fractions. A companion paper includes an interpretation of these new precision abundance results for Ce as well as new abundance results and interpretation for Pr, Dy, and Tm.

  9. Generation, Detection and characterization of Gas-Phase Transition Metal containing Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, Timothy

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this project was to generate, detect, and characterize small, gas-phase, metal containing molecules. In addition to being relevant to high temperature chemical environments (e.g. plasmas and combustion), gas-phase experiments on metal containing molecules serve as the most direct link to a molecular-level theoretical model for catalysis. Catalysis (i.e. the addition of a small about of recoverable material to control the rate and direction of a chemical reaction) is critical to the petroleum and pharmaceutical industries as well as environmental remediation. Currently, the majority of catalytic materials are based on very expensive metals such as platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir,) rhenium (Re), and rhodium (Rh). For example, the catalyst used for converting linear hydrocarbon molecules (e.g. hexane) to cyclic molecules (e.g. cyclohexane) is a mixture of Pt and Re suspended on alumina. It enables straight chain alkanes to be converted into branched-chain alkanes, cyclohexanes and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used, amongst other things, to enhance the octane number of petrol. A second example is the heterogeneous catalysis used in automobile exhaust systems to: a) decrease nitrogen oxide; b) reduce carbon monoxide; and c) oxidize unburned hydrocarbons. The exhaust is vented through a high-surface area chamber lined with Pt, Pd, and Rh. For example, the carbon monoxide is catalytically converted to carbon dioxide by reaction with oxygen. The research results from this work have been published in readily accessible journals1-28. The ground and excited electronic state properties of small metal containing molecules that we determine were: a) electronic state distributions and lifetimes, b) vibrational frequencies, c) bond lengths and angles, d) hyperfine interactions, e) permanent electric dipole moments, mel, and f) magnetic dipoles, μm. In general terms, μel, gives insight into the charge distribution and mm into

  10. Phase transition from poor to diverse ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Shimada, Takashi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    A mathematical model of ecoevolution is studied. The model treats ecosystems as large dimensional dynamical systems. The preying interaction term between species have the scale invariant form of x i λ xj1-λ. In addition, simple rules for addition and elimination of species are included. This model is called the "scale-invariant" model. The model makes it possible to construct ecosystems with thousands of species with a totally random invasion process, although it is not impossible when the interaction terms are the quadratic form of xixj like Lotka-Volterra equation. We studied the relation between the number of species and the interspecies interactions. As a result, it is shown the model can describe both simple ecosystems and diverse ecosystems, because this model has two phases. In one phase, the number of species remains in finite range. In the other phase, the number of species grows without limit.

  11. Direct detection of Rydberg-Rydberg millimeter-wave transitions in a buffer gas cooled molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Grimes, David D.; Barnum, Timothy J.; Patterson, David; Coy, Stephen L.; Klein, Ethan; Muenter, John S.; Field, Robert W.

    2015-11-01

    Millimeter-wave transitions between molecular Rydberg states (n ∼ 35) of barium monofluoride are directly detected via Free Induction Decay (FID). Two powerful technologies are used in combination: Chirped-Pulse millimeter-Wave (CPmmW) spectroscopy and a buffer gas cooled molecular beam photoablation source. Hundreds of Rydberg-Rydberg transitions are recorded in 1 h with >10:1 signal:noise ratio and ∼150 kHz resolution. This high resolution, high spectral velocity experiment promises new strategies for rapid measurements of structural and dynamical information, such as the electric structure (multipole moments and polarizabilities) of the molecular ion-core and the strengths and mechanisms of resonances between Rydberg electron and ion-core motions. Direct measurements of Rydberg-Rydberg transitions with kilo-Debye dipole moments support efficient and definitive spectral analysis techniques, such as the Stark demolition and polarization diagnostics, which enable semi-automatic assignments of core-nonpenetrating Rydberg states. In addition, extremely strong radiation-mediated collective effects (superradiance) in a dense Rydberg gas of barium atoms are observed.

  12. Poor Americans: How the Poor White Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilisuk, Marc; Pilisuk, Phyllis

    Contents of this book include the following essays which originally appeared in "Transaction" magazine: (1) "Poor Americans: an introduction," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (2) "How the white poor live," Marc Pilisuk and Phyllis Pilisuk; (3) "The culture of poverty," Oscar Lewis; (4) "Life in Appalachia--the case of Hugh McCaslin," Robert…

  13. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF EPDM ELASTOMER AND ON THE CONDUCTIVITY OF POLYANILINE

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E; Marie Kane, M

    2008-12-12

    Four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer were exposed to tritium gas initially at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for between three and four months in closed containers. Material properties that were characterized include density, volume, mass, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. EPDM samples released significant amounts of gas when exposed to tritium, and the glass transition temperature increased by about 3 C. during the exposure. Effects of ultraviolet and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of polyaniline films are also documented as complementary results to planned tritium exposures. Future work will determine the effects of tritium gas exposure on the electrical conductivity of polyaniline films, to demonstrate whether such films can be used as a sensor to detect tritium. Surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma rays and ultraviolet light. The results of the gamma and UV experiments will be correlated with the tritium exposure results.

  14. Mobility of Supercooled liquid Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Benzene near their Glass Transition Temperatures Investigated using Inert Gas Permeation

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the mobility of supercooled liquid toluene, ethylbenzene, and benzene near their respective glass transition temperatures (Tg). The permeation rate of Ar, Kr, and Xe through the supercooled liquid created when initially amorphous overlayers heated above their glass transition temperature is used to determine the diffusivity. Amorphous benzene crystallizes at temperatures well below its Tg and as a result the inert gas underlayer remains trapped until the onset of benzene desorption. In contrast, for toluene and ethylbenzene the onset of inert gas permeation is observed at temperatues near Tg. The inert gas desorption peak temperature as a function of the heating rate and overlayer thickness is used to quantify the diffusivity of supercooled liquid toluene and ethylbenzene from 115 K to 135 K. In this temperature range, diffusivities are found to vary across five orders of magnitude (~10-14 to 10-9 cm2/s). These data are compared to viscosity measurements and used to determine the low temperature fractional Stokes-Einstein exponent. Efforts to determine the diffusivity of a mixture of benzene and ethylbenzene are detailed, and the effect of mixing these materials on benzene crystallization is explored using infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Optically pumped gas laser using electronic transitions in the NaRb molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslin, V.M.; Yakushev, O.F.

    1983-12-01

    Laser superradiance was achieved for the first time as a result of an electronic transition in a diatomic heteronuclear molecule as a result of direct optical pumping. This superradiance was observed in the region of 670 nm due to a transition to the ground state X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +/ of the intermetallic alkali molecule NaRb pumped by radiation from a pulsed copper vapor laser (lambda = 510.6 nm).

  16. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Inertial Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of buoyancy on transition from laminar to turbulent flow are presented for momentum-dominated helium jet injected into ambient air. The buoyancy was varied in a 2.2-sec drop tower facility without affecting the remaining operating parameters. The jet flow in Earth gravity and microgravity was visualized using the rainbow schlieren deflectometry apparatus. Results show significant changes in the flow structure and transition behavior in the absence of buoyancy.

  17. Dynamical instability of a spin spiral in an interacting Fermi gas as a probe of the Stoner transition

    SciTech Connect

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2010-10-15

    We propose an experiment to probe ferromagnetic phenomena in an ultracold Fermi gas, while alleviating the sensitivity to three-body loss and competing many-body instabilities. The system is initialized in a small pitch spin spiral, which becomes unstable in the presence of repulsive interactions. To linear order the exponentially growing collective modes exhibit critical slowing down close to the Stoner transition point. Also, to this order, the dynamics are identical on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic sides of the transition. However, we show that scattering off the exponentially growing modes qualitatively alters the collective mode structure. The critical slowing down is eliminated and in its place a new unstable branch develops at large wave vectors. Furthermore, long-wavelength instabilities are quenched on the paramagnetic side of the transition. We study the experimental observation of the instabilities, specifically addressing the trapping geometry and how phase-contrast imaging will reveal the emerging domain structure. These probes of the dynamical phenomena could allow experiments to detect the transition point and distinguish between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic regimes.

  18. Ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray source: saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Charles K.; Boyer, Keith

    2004-02-17

    An apparatus and method for the generation of ultrabright multikilovolt x-rays from saturated amplification on noble gas transition arrays from hollow atom states is described. Conditions for x-ray amplification in this spectral region combine the production of cold, high-Z matter, with the direct, selective multiphoton excitation of hollow atoms from clusters using ultraviolet radiation and a nonlinear mode of confined, self-channeled propagation in plasmas. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of saturated amplification on several transition arrays of the hollow atom Xe(L) spectrum (.lambda..about.2.9 .ANG.). An estimate of the peak brightness achieved is .about.10.sup.29 .gamma..multidot.s.sup.-1.multidot.mm.sup.-2.multidot.mr.sup.-2 (0.1% Bandwidth).sup.-1, that is .about.10.sup.5 -fold higher than presently available synchotron technology.

  19. Numerical modeling of transition to turbulence in low-pressure axial gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flitan, Horia Constantin

    2002-09-01

    Experimental data from modern turbofan engines indicate that the low-pressure turbine stages experience a significant drop in efficiency as the aircraft reaches its cruise conditions at high altitude. Under these circumstances, the low Reynolds number flow allows the apparition of a boundary layer which is no longer turbulent but transitional in nature. A further decrease in velocity may lead to the separation of the highly unstable laminar portion accompanied by a dramatic growth in aerodynamic losses. The methods for numerically simulating the transitional flows occurring over turbine blades were reviewed. Two large categories were identified as suitable for numerical implementation into a fully-implicit, finite-difference, Navier-Stokes code. The first involved a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model corrected for attached flow transition with an intermittency factor distribution. The general expression of Solomon, Walker and Gostelow was added to the code, in parallel with the zero-pressure gradient form of Narasimha, used for reference. In both cases transition inception is detected with the Abu-Ghannam Shaw correlation. Whenever laminar separation takes place, Robert's correlation for short bubble transition is activated. The second category comprised the two-equation, low Reynolds number turbulence models of Chien and Launder-Sharma. They have a certain ability to predict bypass transition and seem to better comprehend the physics of wake-induced transition. For the approximate factorization solution algorithm, the implicit part of the Launder-Sharma system was expressed in an original form. Also, the Kato-Launder correction was added to be used as an option. Numerical investigations of attached flow bypass transition and separated flow short bubble transitions were performed on two cascade geometries. The Abu-Ghannam Shaw criterion proved to be inaccurate for curved surfaces. The Solomon, Walker Gostelow distribution did not perform better than Narasimha

  20. Comment on "Dynamic transition of supercritical hydrogen: Defining the boundary between interior and atmosphere in gas giants"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryk, Taras

    2015-03-01

    Trachenko et al. [Phys. Rev. E 89, 032126 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.032126] have argued for the existence of a "Frenkel line" in fluid hydrogen that separates "rigid" and "nonrigid" regimes in a supercritical region. On that basis, they proposed a criterion for locating the boundary between the interior and the atmosphere for gas giants. This Comment shows that the two methods they use to locate the transition between the rigid and nonrigid states are both questionable, which casts doubt on the claims in the paper.

  1. Absorbing phase transition in a conserved lattice gas model with next-nearest-neighbor hopping in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2015-12-01

    The absorbing phase transition of the modified conserved lattice gas (m-CLG) model was investigated in one dimension. The m-CLG model was modified from the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model in such a way that each active particle hops to one of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor empty sites. The order parameter exponent, the dynamic exponent, and the correlation length exponent were estimated from the power-law behavior and finite-size scaling of the active particle densities. The exponents were found to differ considerably from those of the ordinary CLG model and were also distinct from those of the Manna model, suggesting that next-nearest-neighbor hopping is a relevant factor that alters the critical behavior in the one-dimensional CLG model. PMID:26764627

  2. Comparison of the dust and gas radial structure in the transition disk [PZ99] J160421.7-213028

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ke; Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2014-08-10

    We present ALMA observations of the 880 μm continuum and CO J = 3-2 line emission from the transition disk around [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, a solar mass star in the Upper Scorpius OB association. Analysis of the continuum data indicates that 80% of the dust mass is concentrated in an annulus extending between 79 and 114 AU in radius. Dust is robustly detected inside the annulus, at a mass surface density 100 times lower than that at 80 AU. The CO emission in the inner disk also shows a significantly decreased mass surface density, but we infer a cavity radius of only 31 AU for the gas. The large separation of the dust and gas cavity edges, as well as the high radial concentration of millimeter-sized dust grains, is qualitatively consistent with the predictions of pressure trap models that include hydrodynamical disk-planet interactions and dust coagulation/fragmentation processes.

  3. Gas-phase chemistry of transition-metal ions with alkanes: do initial electrostatic interaction control final product distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, D.J.; Allison, J.

    1987-09-24

    There are features of the dynamics of gas-phase ion/molecule reactions that make them unique when compared to neutral/neutral reactions and solution processes. Exceedingly rich and complex chemistry can be observed in gas-phase systems in which a reactant is charged, due, in part, to the relatively long lifetime of the ion/molecule complex that is initially formed. Here possible correlations between final reaction products and geometry-specific complexes that are initially formed are discussed. The chemistry under study is that for univalent first-row transition-metal ions with n-butane, in which cleavage of C-H and C-C bonds is observed for some metals.

  4. A Gas-Poor Planetesimal Feeding Model for the Formation of Giant Planet Satellite Systems: Consequences for the Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2005-01-01

    Given our presently inadequate understanding of the turbulent state of the solar and planetary nebulae, we believe the way to make progress in satellite formation is to consider two end member models that avoid over-reliance on specific choices of the turbulence (alpha), which is essentially a free parameter. The first end member model postulates turbulence decay once giant planet accretion ends. If so, Keplerian disks must eventually pass through the quiescent phases, so that the survival of satellites (and planets) ultimately hinges on gap-opening. In this scenario, the criterion for gap-opening itself sets the value for the gas surface density of the satellite disk.

  5. Unintended greenhouse gas consequences of lowering level of service in urban transit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Julia B.; Cheng, Han; Madanat, Samer; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-12-01

    Public transit is often touted as a ‘green’ transportation option and a way for users to reduce their environmental footprint by avoiding automobile emissions, but that may not be the case when systems run well below passenger capacity. In previous work, we explored an approach to optimizing the design and operations of transit systems for both costs and emissions, using continuum approximation models and assuming fixed demand. In this letter, we expand upon our previous work to explore how the level of service for users impacts emissions. We incorporate travel time elasticities into the optimization to account for demand shifts from transit to cars, resulting from increases in transit travel time. We find that emissions reductions are moderated, but not eliminated, for relatively inelastic users. We consider two scenarios: the first is where only the agency faces an emissions budget; the second is where the entire city faces an emissions budget. In the latter scenario, the emissions reductions resulting from reductions in transit level of service are mitigated as users switch to automobile.

  6. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas on Cavity Dynamics and Sheet to Cloud Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ganesh, Harish; Ceccio, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Partial cavitation occurs in numerous industrial and naval applications. Cavities on lifting surfaces, in cryogenic rocket motors or in fuel injectors can damage equipment and in general be detrimental to the system performance, especially as partial cavities can undergo auto-oscillation causing large pressure pulsations, unsteady loading of machinery and generate significant noise. In the current experiments incipient, intermittent cloud shedding and fully shedding cavities forming in the separated flow region downstream of a wedge were investigated. The Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter was of the order of one million. Gas was injected directly into the cavitation region downstream of the wedge's apex or into the recirculating region such that with the same amount of injected gas less ended up in the shear layer. The cavity dynamics were studied with and without gas injection. The hypothesis to be tested were that i) relatively miniscule amounts of gas introduced into the shear layer at the cavity interface can reduce vapor production and ii) gas introduced into the separated region can dampen the auto oscillations. The authors also examined whether the presence of gas can switch the shedding mechanism from one dominated by condensation shock to one dominantly by re-entrant jet. The work was supported by ONR Grant Number N00014-11-1-0449.

  7. Zipper-interacting protein kinase promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion and metastasis through AKT and NF-kB signaling and is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deng, Zhijuan; Wang, Zhu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Longjuan; Su, Qiao; Lai, Yingrong; Li, Bin; Luo, Zexing; Chen, Xu; Chen, Yu; Huang, Xiaohui; Ma, Jieyi; Wang, Wenjian; Bi, Jiong; Guan, Xinyuan

    2015-04-10

    Zipper-interacting Protein Kinase (ZIPK) belongs to the death-associated protein kinase family. ZIPK has been characterized as a tumor suppressor in various tumors, including gastric cancer. On the other hand, ZIPK also promotes cell survival. In this study, both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that ZIPK promoted cell growth, proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor formation and metastasis in nude mice. ZIPK induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with increasing expression of β-catenin, mesenchymal markers, Snail and Slug, and with decreasing expression of E-cadherin. Furthermore, ZIPK activated the AKT/IκB/NF-κB pathway, which can promote EMT and metastasis. Additionally, ZIPK expression was detected in human primary gastric cancer and their matched metastatic lymph node samples by immunohistochemistry. Increased expression of ZIPK in lymph node metastases was significantly associated with stage VI and abdominal organ invasion. Survival analysis revealed that patients with increased ZIPK expression in metastatic lymph nodes had poor disease-specific survival. Taken together, our study reveals that ZIPK is a pro-oncogenic factor, which promotes cancer metastasis. PMID:25831050

  8. Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large N{sub c} in the van der Waals approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Mishustin, Igor

    2010-11-15

    We examine the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at a large number of colors (N{sub c}) within the framework of the van der Waals (VdW) We argue that the VdW equation is appropriate for describing internucleon forces, and discuss how each parameter scales with N{sub c}. We demonstrate that N{sub c}=3 (our world) is not large with respect to the other dimensionless scale relevant to baryonic matter, the number of neighbors in a dense system N{sub N}. Consequently, we show that the liquid-gas phase transition looks dramatically different at N{sub c{yields}{infinity}} with respect to our world: The critical-point temperature becomes of the order of {Lambda}{sub QCD} rather than below it. The critical-point density becomes of the order of the baryonic density, rather than an order of magnitude below it. These are precisely the characteristics usually associated with the ''quarkyonic phase.'' We therefore conjecture that quarkyonic matter is simply the large-N{sub c} limit of the nuclear liquid, and the interplay between N{sub c} and N{sub N} is the reason that the nuclear liquid in our world is so different from quarkyonic matter. We conclude by suggesting ways in which our conjecture can be tested in future lattice measurements.

  9. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  10. Schlieren Measurements of Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helium jets discharged into air was studied using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry technique. In particular, the effects of buoyancy on jet oscillations and flow transition length were considered. Experiments to simulate microgravity were conducted in the 2.2s drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet Reynolds numbers varied from 800 to1200 and the jet Richardson numbers ranged between 0.01 and 0.004. Schlieren images revealed substantial variations in the flow structure during the drop. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the data obtained in Earth gravity experiments revealed the existence of a discrete oscillating frequency in the transition region, which matched the frequency in the upstream laminar regime. In microgravity, the transition occurred farther downstream indicating laminarization of the jet in the absence of buoyancy. The amplitude of jet oscillations was reduced by up to an order of magnitude in microgravity. Results suggest that jet oscillations were buoyancy induced and that the brief microgravity period may not be sufficient for the oscillations to completely subside.

  11. Sterilizing the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Sheila M.

    1977-01-01

    Suggests that freedom for the middle classes may mean vulnerability for the poor. The enthusiasm for sterilization may be so intense as to deprive the poor of their right not to be sterilized. (Author/AM)

  12. First and second sound in a two-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose gas across the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia-Ji Hu, Hui

    2014-12-15

    We theoretically investigate first and second sound of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic Bose gas in harmonic traps by solving Landau’s two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. For an isotropic trap, we find that first and second sound modes become degenerate at certain temperatures and exhibit typical avoided crossings in mode frequencies. At these temperatures, second sound has significant density fluctuation due to its hybridization with first sound and has a divergent mode frequency towards the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless (BKT) transition. For a highly anisotropic trap, we derive the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations and discuss the sound-wave propagation along the weakly confined direction. Due to the universal jump of the superfluid density inherent to the BKT transition, we show that the first sound velocity exhibits a kink across the transition. These predictions might be readily examined in current experimental setups for 2D dilute Bose gases with a sufficiently large number of atoms, where the finite-size effect due to harmonic traps is relatively weak.

  13. Nature of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic critical point: An analogy with the liquid-gas transition

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M.A.; Agayan, V.A.; Collings, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The analogy with the liquid-gas critical point is analyzed to clarify the nature of the pretransitional behavior of physical properties in the vicinity of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic transition in chiral liquid crystalline systems. The analogy is unusual: temperature serves as the ordering field and entropy plays the role of the order parameter. Both mean field and parametric equations of state are formulated in terms of scaling fields. The scaling fields are linear combinations of the physical fields, which are temperature and chirality. It is shown that mixing of the physical field variables naturally leads to a strong asymmetry with respect to the transition temperature in the behavior of the physical properties that cannot be described by simple power laws. While the mean field theory gives a good description of the experimental data, the scaling theory, if one incorporates mixing of the field variables, gives even better agreement with the experimental data, placing this transition in the same universality class as the three-dimensional Ising model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Percolation transition in the gas-induced conductance of nanograin metal oxide films with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dräger, Julia; Russ, Stefanie; Sauerwald, Tilman; Kohl, Claus-Dieter; Bunde, Armin

    2013-06-01

    We use Monte-Carlo Simulations to study the conductance switching generated by gas-induced electron trapping/-releasing in films of sintered metal oxide nanoparticles by using a site-bond percolation model. We explore the possibilities of gas sensors based on these mechanisms. In our study, we model films of different thicknesses where the conductance values of the grains (sites) and of the contacts (bonds) between these grains depend on the surface density Nr of adsorbed gas molecules from the ambient atmosphere. Below a critical density Nr=Nr ,c, the system is insulating due to the interruption of current flow, either through the connecting bonds or through the grain interior. This leads to two competing critical gas covering thresholds Nr,c(bond) and Nr,c(site), respectively, that separate the insulating from the conducting phase. For Nr,c(site)>Nr,c(bond), the characteristic curve of monodisperse sensors shows a noticeable jump from zero to a finite conductance at Nr=Nr,c(site), while for polydisperse sensors site percolation effects modify the jump into a steep increase of the characteristic curve and thus lead to an enhanced sensitivity. For Nr,c(site)

  15. Water and greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with a transition to a low carbon transportation system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transportation fuels are heavily dominated by the use of petroleum, but concerns over oil depletion, energy security, and greenhouse gas emissions from petroleum combustion are driving the search for alternatives. As we look to shift away from petroleum-based transportation fuels...

  16. Properties of the most metal-poor gas-rich LSB dwarf galaxies SDSS J0015+0104 and J2354-0005 residing in the Eridanus void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Martin, J.-M.; Lyamina, Y. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2013-07-01

    SDSS J0015+0104 is the lowest metallicity low surface brightness dwarf (LSBD) galaxy known. The oxygen abundance in its H II region SDSS J001520.70+010436.9 (at ˜1.5 kpc from the galaxy centre) is 12+log (O/H) = 7.07 (Guseva et al.). This galaxy, at the distance of 28.4 Mpc, appears to reside deeply in the volume devoid of luminous massive galaxies, known as the Eridanus void. SDSS J235437.29-000501.6 is another Eridanus void LSBD galaxy, with parameter 12+log (O/H) = 7.36 (also Guseva et al.). We present the results of their H I observations with the Nançay Radio Telescope revealing their high ratios of M(H I)/LB ˜ 2.3. Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey images, we derived for both galaxies their radial surface brightness profiles and the main photometric parameters. Their colours and total magnitudes are used to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and ages. The related gas mass fractions, fg ˜ 0.98 and ˜0.97, and the extremely low metallicities (much lower than for their more typical counterparts with the same luminosity) indicate their unevolved status. We compare these Eridanus void LSBDs with several extreme LSBD galaxies residing in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. Based on the combination of all their unusual properties, the two discussed LSBD galaxies are similar to the unusual LSBDs residing in the closer void. This finding presents additional evidence for the existence in voids of a sizeable fraction of low-mass unevolved galaxies. Their dedicated search might result in the substantial increase of the number of such objects in the local Universe and in the advancement of understanding their nature.

  17. Changes in time-use and drug use by young adults in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina, after the political transitions of 2001-2002: Results of a survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In some countries, "Big Events" like crises and transitions have been followed by large increases in drug use, drug injection and HIV/AIDS. Argentina experienced an economic crisis and political transition in 2001/2002 that affected how people use their time. This paper studies how time use changes between years 2001 and 2004, subsequent to these events, were associated with drug consumption in poor neighbourhoods of Greater Buenos Aires. Methods In 2003-2004, 68 current injecting drug users (IDUs) and 235 young non-IDUs, aged 21-35, who lived in impoverished drug-impacted neighbourhoods in Greater Buenos Aires, were asked about time use then and in 2001. Data on weekly hours spent working or looking for work, doing housework/childcare, consuming drugs, being with friends, and hanging out in the neighbourhood, were studied in relation to time spent using drugs. Field observations and focus groups were also conducted. Results After 2001, among both IDUs and non-IDUs, mean weekly time spent working declined significantly (especially among IDUs); time spent looking for work increased, and time spent with friends and hanging out in the neighbourhood decreased. We found no increase in injecting or non-injecting drug consumption after 2001. Subjects most affected by the way the crises led to decreased work time and/or to increased time looking for work--and by the associated increase in time spent in one's neighbourhood--were most likely to increase their time using drugs. Conclusions Time use methods are useful to study changes in drug use and their relationships to every day life activities. In these previously-drug-impacted neighbourhoods, the Argentinean crisis did not lead to an increase in drug use, which somewhat contradicts our initial expectations. Nevertheless, those for whom the crises led to decreased work time, increased time looking for work, and increased time spent in indoor or outdoor neighbourhood environments, were likely to spend more time

  18. The transition from silicon to gas detection media in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollacco, Emanuel C.

    2016-06-01

    Emerging radioactive beams and multi petawatt laser facilities are sturdily transforming our base concepts in instruments in nuclear physics. The changes are fuelled by studies of nuclei close to the drip-line or exotic reactions. This physics demands high luminosity, wide phase space cover with good resolution in energy, time, position and sampled waveform. By judiciously modifying the micro-world of the particle or space physics instruments (Double Sided Strip Si Detectors, Micro-Pattern Gas Amplifiers, microelectronics), we are on the path to initiate dream experiments. In the following a brief status in the domain is reported for selected instruments that highlight the present trends with silicon and the growing shift towards gas media for charged particle detection.

  19. Is there evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.S.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The multifragmentation of gold nuclei at 1 GeV/nucleon has been studied using reverse kinematics. The moments of the resulting charged fragment distribution have been analyzed using methods borrowed from percolation theory. These moments provide clear evidence for critical behavior occurring in a system of about 200 nucleons. The critical exponents extracted from the data are close to those of liquid-gas systems.

  20. a Measurement of the Optical Oscillator Strengths of Noble Gas Resonance Transitions in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligtenberg, Robert Coenraad Gerard

    We report the results of an accurate measurement of optical oscillator strengths of the prominent resonance lines of He, Ne, Ar and Kr in the vacuum ultraviolet. To measure the oscillator strength of a resonance line we make use of the absorption of the resonance radiation as it passes through the gas to a detector. The transmission of this radiation through a layer of gas of finite thickness is measured as a function of the number density of the gas. The transmission function is fitted to this data to obtain the absorption oscillator strength. The accuracy of the present measurements ranges from 2.5% to 4% and is reflected in the uncertainties presented below. The results are for He I (58.4 nm) 0.2683 +/- 0.0075 (2.8%), He I (53.7 nm) 0.0717 +/- 0.0024 (3.4%), Ne I (74.4 nm) 0.01017 +/- 0.00030 (2.9%), Ne I (73.6 nm) 0.1369 +/- 0.0035 (2.6%), Ar I (106.7 nm) 0.0616 +/- 0.0021 (3.4%), Ar I (104.8 nm) 0.2297 +/- 0.0093 (4.0%), Kr I (123.6 nm) 0.1751 +/- 0.0049 (2.8%) and Kr I (116.5 nm) 0.1496 +/- 0.0038 (2.5%).

  1. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  2. Regulation of COX-2 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α is associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients post TACE surgery

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, MINGSHENG; WANG, LONG; CHEN, JUNWEI; BAI, MINGJUN; ZHOU, CHUREN; LIU, SUJUAN; LIN, QU

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is not entirely clear whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is involved in the regulation of COX-2 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and whether these events affect the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). In this report the relationship between HIF-1α and COX-2 protein expression, EMT in tumor specimens from HCC patients after TACE surgery and the clinical significance of HIF-1α and COX-2 expression were analyzed using statistical approaches. HepG2 cells treated with CoCl2 was employed as a hypoxia cell model in vitro to study hypoxia-induced HIF-1α, COX-2 expression, and EMT alteration. The results showed that HIF-1α and COX-2 protein expression increased in HCC tissues after TACE surgery. Moreover, there was positive correlation between upregulation of HIF-1α and COX-2. Elevated expression of HIF-1α increased both Snail and Vimentin protein expression, while it reduced E-cadherin protein expression. It was further verified that hypoxia enhanced protein expression of HIF-1α and COX-2 in HepG2 cells treated with CoCl2. Upregulation of HIF-1α and COX-2, together with EMT alteration resulted in increased migration and invasion of HepG2 cells under hypoxia. In conclusion, TACE surgery results in aggravated hypoxia status, leading to increased HIF-1α protein expression in HCC tissue. To adapt to hypoxic environment, HIF-1α stimulates COX-2 protein expression and promotes EMT process in hepatocellular cancer cells, which enhances HCC invasion and metastasis, and might contribute to poor prognosis in HCC patients post TACE treatment. PMID:26984380

  3. Induced Interactions and the Superfluid Transition Temperature in a Three-Component Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Martikainen, J.-P.; Kinnunen, J. J.; Toermae, P.; Pethick, C. J.

    2009-12-31

    We study many-body contributions to the effective interaction between fermions in a three-component Fermi mixture. We find that effective interactions induced by the third component can lead to a phase diagram different from that predicted if interactions with the third component are neglected. As a result, in a confining potential a superfluid shell structure can arise even for equal populations of the components. We also find a critical temperature for the BCS transition in a {sup 6}Li mixture which can deviate strongly from the one in a weakly interacting two-component system.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Molecular interactions in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael A.

    2008-11-14

    Transition metal-molecular complexes produced in a molecular beam are mass-selected and studied with infrared laser photodissociation spectroscopy. Metal complexes with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, water, acetylene or benzene are studied for a variety of metals. The number and intensity of infrared active bands are compared to the predictions of density functional theory calculations to derive structures, spin states and coordination numbers in these systems. These studied provide new insights into subtle details of metal-molecular interactions important in heterogeneous catalysis, metal-ligand bonding and metal ion solvation.

  5. Exact Calculation of Hydrodynamical Response Functions during the Deconfinement Phase Transition from a Hadronic Gas to a Colorless QGP

    SciTech Connect

    Ladrem, M.; Zaki-Al-Full, Z.

    2011-05-23

    In our previous work we have performed an exact calculation using the colorless partition function of the QGP by probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature. If the system formed in an ultra relativistic heavy ion collision reaches a state of local thermodynamic equilibrium and if it can be locally maintained during the subsequent expansion, the further evolution of the QGP and Hadronic Gas can be described conveniently by Relativistic Hydrodynamics. It requires knowledge of the equation of state, which gives a relation between pressure P, energy density {epsilon}, entropy density s and sound velocity c{sub s}. Precisely, in the present work we have performed the study of these hydrodynamical response functions, outshining the physics of the evolution of the system undergoing a deconfinement phase transition, when the colorless condition is taken into account.

  6. Research on Instabilities and Transition in Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers, with Emphasis on Gas-Turbine-Blade Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Olef S.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute instability of (Gortler vortices on the severely curved concave pressure side of a gas-turbine blade is the main thrust of the third-year work under this grant. For the most part, the Gortler vortices have been investigated in an incompressible boundary layer over thin-wing sections or artificial inserts on an otherwise flat plate. The cascade of modern aircraft engines operate in the high subsonic Mach number regime with velocity fields strongly affected by centrifugal forces maintained by the large curvature of profiles. Unsteady spiral-type vortices developing in these environments provoke the absolute instability in the streamwise direction of the boundary layer leading to earlier transition. An effort undertaken after the meeting in Shalimar (May 29-31, 2002) show that the heat transfer coefficient is even more susceptible to enhancing oscillations in the upstream moving wave packets than the pressure.

  7. Exact Calculation of Hydrodynamical Response Functions during the Deconfinement Phase Transition from a Hadronic Gas to a Colorless QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladrem, M.; Zaki-Al-Full, Z.

    2011-05-01

    In our previous work we have performed an exact calculation using the colorless partition function of the QGP by probing the behavior of some useful thermodynamic response functions on the whole range of temperature. If the system formed in an ultra relativistic heavy ion collision reaches a state of local thermodynamic equilibrium and if it can be locally maintained during the subsequent expansion, the further evolution of the QGP and Hadronic Gas can be described conveniently by Relativistic Hydrodynamics. It requires knowledge of the equation of state, which gives a relation between pressure P, energy density ɛ, entropy density s and sound velocity cs. Precisely, in the present work we have performed the study of these hydrodynamical response functions, outshining the physics of the evolution of the system undergoing a deconfinement phase transition, when the colorless condition is taken into account.

  8. The Ionized Gas in Nearby Galaxies as Traced by the [N II] 122 and 205 μm Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A.; Smith, J. D.; Draine, B.; Pellegrini, E.; Wolfire, M.; Croxall, K.; de Looze, I.; Calzetti, D.; Kennicutt, R.; Crocker, A.; Armus, L.; van der Werf, P.; Sandstrom, K.; Galametz, M.; Brandl, B.; Groves, B.; Rigopoulou, D.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A.; Boquien, M.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Beirao, P.

    2016-08-01

    The [N ii] 122 and 205 μm transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ˜1 kpc, with observations of both [N ii] far-infrared lines. We measure [N ii] 122/205 line ratios in the ˜0.6–6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities of n e ˜ 1–300 cm‑3, with a median value of n e = 30 cm‑3. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as high as a factor of ˜50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that n e increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star-formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR). As the intensity of the [N ii] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the SFR. We derive relations between the [N ii] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [N ii] surface brightness and ΣSFR can be understood as a property of the n e distribution. For regions with n e close to or higher than the [N ii] line critical densities, the low-density limit [N ii]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR because the [N ii] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [N ii] emission, SFR, and n e by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.

  9. Critical speeding-up in the magnetoelectric response of spin-ice near its monopole liquid-gas transition.

    PubMed

    Grams, Christoph P; Valldor, Martin; Garst, Markus; Hemberger, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Competing interactions in the so-called spin-ice compounds stabilize a frustrated ground state with finite zero-point entropy and, interestingly, emergent magnetic monopole excitations. The properties of these monopoles are at the focus of recent research with particular emphasis on their quantum dynamics. It is predicted that each monopole also possesses an electric dipole moment, which allows to investigate their dynamics via the dielectric function ε(ν). Here we report on broadband spectroscopic measurements of ε(ν) in Dy2Ti2O7 down to temperatures of 200 mK with a specific focus on the critical end point present for a magnetic field along the crystallographic [111] direction. Clear critical signatures are revealed in the dielectric response when, similarly as in the liquid-gas transition, the density of monopoles changes in a critical manner. The dielectric relaxation time τ exhibits a critical speeding-up with a significant enhancement of 1/τ as the temperature is lowered towards the critical temperature. Besides demonstrating the magnetoelectric character of the emergent monopole excitations, our results corroborate the unique critical dynamics near the monopole condensation transition. PMID:25188290

  10. Quantum phase transitions and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless temperature in a two-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devreese, Jeroen P. A.; Tempere, Jacques; Sá de Melo, Carlos A. R.

    2015-10-01

    We study the effect of spin-orbit coupling on both the zero-temperature and nonzero-temperature behavior of a two-dimensional Fermi gas. We include a generic combination of Rashba and Dresselhaus terms into the system Hamiltonian, which allows us to study both the experimentally relevant equal-Rashba-Dresselhaus (ERD) limit and the Rashba-only (RO) limit. At zero temperature, we derive the phase diagram as a function of the two-body binding energy and Zeeman field. In the ERD case, this phase diagram reveals several topologically distinct uniform superfluid phases, classified according to the nodal structure of the quasiparticle excitation energies. Furthermore, we use a momentum-dependent SU(2) rotation to transform the system into a generalized helicity basis, revealing that spin-orbit coupling induces a triplet pairing component of the order parameter. At nonzero temperature, we study the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition by including phase fluctuations of the order parameter up to second order. We show that the superfluid density becomes anisotropic due to the presence of spin-orbit coupling (except in the RO case). This leads both to elliptic vortices and antivortices, and to anisotropic sound velocities. The latter prove to be sensitive to quantum phase transitions between topologically distinct phases. We show further that at a fixed nonzero Zeeman field, the BKT critical temperature is increased by the presence of ERD spin-orbit coupling. Subsequently, we demonstrate that the Clogston limit becomes infinite: TBKT remains nonzero at all finite values of the Zeeman field. We conclude by extending the quantum phase transition lines to nonzero temperature, using the nodal structure of the quasiparticle spectrum, thus connecting the BKT critical temperature with the zero-temperature results.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation Of Gravitational Effects In Transitional And Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaberi, Farhad A.; Givi, Peyman

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the spatial and the compositional structures of transitional and turbulent hydrocarbon diffusion flames are studies via large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of round and planar jets. The subgrid-scale (SGS) closures in LES are based on the filtered mass density function (FMDF) methodology. The FMDF represents the joint probability density function (PDF) of the SGS scalars, and is obtained by solving its transport equation. The fundamental advantage of LES/FMDF is that it accounts for the effects of chemical reaction and buoyancy exactly. The methodology is employed for capturing some of the fundamental influences of gravity in equilibrium flames via realistic chemical kinetic schemes. Some preliminary investigation of the gravity effects in non-equilibrium flames is also conducted, but with idealized chemical kinetics models.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Gravitational Effects on Transitional and Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Jaberi, Farhad A.

    2001-01-01

    The basic objective of this work is to assess the influence of gravity on "the compositional and the spatial structures" of transitional and turbulent diffusion flames via large eddy simulation (LES), and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The DNS is conducted for appraisal of the various closures employed in LES, and to study the effect of buoyancy on the small scale flow features. The LES is based on our "filtered mass density function"' (FMDF) model. The novelty of the methodology is that it allows for reliable simulations with inclusion of "realistic physics." It also allows for detailed analysis of the unsteady large scale flow evolution and compositional flame structure which is not usually possible via Reynolds averaged simulations.

  13. Origins of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in gas-phase combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Oran, Elaine S.; Gamezo, Vadim N.

    2007-01-15

    This paper summarizes a 10-year theoretical and numerical effort to understand the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). To simulate DDT from first principles, it is necessary to resolve the relevant scales ranging from the size of the system to the flame thickness, a range that can cover up to 12 orders of magnitude in real systems. This computational challenge resulted in the development of numerical algorithms for solving coupled partial and ordinary differential equations and a new method for adaptive mesh refinement to deal with multiscale phenomena. Insight into how, when, and where DDT occurs was obtained by analyzing a series of multidimensional numerical simulations of laboratory experiments designed to create a turbulent flame through a series of shock-flame interactions. The simulations showed that these interactions are important for creating the conditions in which DDT can occur. Flames enhance the strength of shocks passing through a turbulent flame brush and generate new shocks. In turn, shock interactions with flames create and drive the turbulence in flames. The turbulent flame itself does not undergo a transition, but it creates conditions in nearby unreacted material that lead to ignition centers, or 'hot spots,' which can then produce a detonation through the Zeldovich gradient mechanism involving gradients of reactivity. Obstacles and boundary layers, through their interactions with shocks and flames, help to create environments in which hot spots can develop. Other scenarios producing reactivity gradients that can lead to detonations include flame-flame interactions, turbulent mixing of hot products with reactant gases, and direct shock ignition. Major unresolved questions concern the properties of nonequilibrium, shock-driven turbulence, stochastic properties of ignition events, and the possibility of unconfined DDT. (author)

  14. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  15. MULTI-TRANSITION STUDY OF M51'S MOLECULAR GAS SPIRAL ARMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schinnerer, E.; Weiss, A.; Aalto, S.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2010-08-20

    Two selected regions in the molecular gas spiral arms in M51 were mapped with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) mm-interferometer in the {sup 12}CO(2-1), {sup 13}CO(1-0), C{sup 18}O(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) emission lines. The CO data have been combined with the {sup 12}CO(1-0) data from Aalto et al. covering the central 3.5 kpc to study the physical properties of the molecular gas. All CO data cubes were short spacing corrected using IRAM 30 m ({sup 12}CO(1-0): NRO 45 m) single-dish data. A large velocity gradient analysis finds that the giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are similar to Galactic GMCs when studied at 180 pc (120 pc) resolution with an average kinetic temperature of T{sub kin} = 20(16) K and H{sub 2} density of n(H{sub 2}) = 120(240) cm{sup -3} when assuming virialized clouds (a constant velocity gradient dv/dr). The associated conversion factor between H{sub 2} mass and CO luminosity is close to the Galactic value for most regions analyzed. Our findings suggest that the GMC population in the spiral arms of M51 is similar to those of the Milky Way and therefore the strong star formation occurring in the spiral arms has no strong impact on the molecular gas in the spiral arms. Extinction inferred from the derived H{sub 2} column density is very high (A{sub V} about 15-30 mag), about a factor of 5-10 higher than the average value derived toward H II regions. Thus, a significant fraction of the ongoing star formation could be hidden inside the dust lanes of the spiral arms. A comparison of MIPS 24 {mu}m and H{alpha} data, however, suggests that this is not the case and most of the GMCs studied here are not (yet) forming stars. We also present low (4.''5) resolution OVRO maps of the HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission at the location of the brightest {sup 12}CO(1-0) peak.

  16. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  17. Inference in `poor` languages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    1996-10-01

    Languages with a solvable implication problem but without complete and consistent systems of inference rules (`poor` languages) are considered. The problem of existence of finite complete and consistent inference rule system for a ``poor`` language is stated independently of the language or rules syntax. Several properties of the problem arc proved. An application of results to the language of join dependencies is given.

  18. Effects of Buoyancy on Laminar, Transitional, and Turbulent Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Stocker, Dennis P.; Vaughan, David F.; Zhou, Liming; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    Gas jet diffusion flames have been a subject of research for many years. However, a better understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena occurring in these flames is still needed, and, while the effects of gravity on the burning process have been observed, the basic mechanisms responsible for these changes have yet to be determined. The fundamental mechanisms that control the combustion process are in general coupled and quite complicated. These include mixing, radiation, kinetics, soot formation and disposition, inertia, diffusion, and viscous effects. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling a fire, laboratory-scale laminar and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been extensively studied, which have provided important information in relation to the physico-chemical processes occurring in flames. However, turbulent flames are not fully understood and their understanding requires more fundamental studies of laminar diffusion flames in which the interplay of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics is more tractable. But even this basic, relatively simple flame is not completely characterized in relation to soot formation, radiation, diffusion, and kinetics. Therefore, gaining an understanding of laminar flames is essential to the understanding of turbulent flames, and particularly fires, in which the same basic phenomena occur. In order to improve and verify the theoretical models essential to the interpretation of data, the complexity and degree of coupling of the controlling mechanisms must be reduced. If gravity is isolated, the complication of buoyancy-induced convection would be removed from the problem. In addition, buoyant convection in normal gravity masks the effects of other controlling parameters on the flame. Therefore, the combination of normal-gravity and microgravity data would provide the information, both theoretical and experimental, to improve our understanding of diffusion flames in general, and the effects of gravity on the

  19. Downregulation of BRAF activated non-coding RNA is associated with poor prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer and promotes metastasis by affecting epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes, such as differentiation, proliferation and metastasis. These lncRNAs are found to be dysregulated in a variety of cancers. BRAF activated non-coding RNA (BANCR) is a 693-bp transcript on chromosome 9 with a potential functional role in melanoma cell migration. The clinical significance of BANCR, and its’ molecular mechanisms controlling cancer cell migration and metastasis are unclear. Methods Expression of BANCR was analyzed in 113 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and seven NSCLC cell lines using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Gain and loss of function approaches were used to investigate the biological role of BANCR in NSCLC cells. The effects of BANCR on cell viability were evaluated by MTT and colony formation assays. Apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry. Nude mice were used to examine the effects of BANCR on tumor cell metastasis in vivo. Protein levels of BANCR targets were determined by western blotting and fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results BANCR expression was significantly decreased in 113 NSCLC tumor tissues compared with normal tissues. Additionally, reduced BANCR expression was associated with larger tumor size, advanced pathological stage, metastasis distance, and shorter overall survival of NSCLC patients. Reduced BANCR expression was found to be an independent prognostic factor for NSCLC. Histone deacetylation was involved in the downregulation of BANCR in NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of BANCR impaired cell viability and invasion, leading to the inhibition of metastasis in vitro and in vivo. However, knockdown of BANCR expression promoted cell migration and invasion in vitro. Overexpression of BANCR was found to play a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the regulation of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and Vimentin expression

  20. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    Global energy markets and climate change in the twenty first century depend, to an extraordinary extent, on China. China is now, or will soon be, the world's largest energy consumer. Since 2007, China has been the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Despite its large and rapidly expanding influence on global energy markets and the global atmosphere, on a per capita basis energy consumption and GHG emissions in China are low relative to developed countries. The Chinese economy, and with it energy use and GHG emissions, are expected to grow vigorously for at least the next two decades, raising a question of critical historical significance: How can China's economic growth imperative be meaningfully reconciled with its goals of greater energy security and a lower carbon economy? Most scholars, governments, and practitioners have looked to technology---energy efficiency, nuclear power, carbon capture and storage---for answers to this question. Alternatively, this study seeks to root China's future energy and emissions trajectory in the political economy of its multiple transitions, from a centrally planned to a market economy and from an agrarian to a post-industrial society. The study draws on five case studies, each a dedicated chapter, which are organized around three perspectives on energy and GHG emissions: the macroeconomy; electricity supply and demand; and nitrogen fertilizer production and use. Chapters 2 and 3 examine how growth and structural change in China's macroeconomy have shaped energy demand, finding that most of the dramatic growth in the country's energy use over the 2000s was driven by an acceleration of its investment-dominated, energy-intensive growth model, rather than from structural change. Chapters 4 and 5 examine efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the share of renewable generation in the electric power sector, concluding that China's power system lacks the flexibility in generation, pricing, and demand to

  1. Gas slug rise in open versus plugged basaltic conduits: the transition from Strombolian to sustained volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, Ed; Mathias, Simon; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Lane, Steve; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2010-05-01

    -film that encircles the slug increases. Since this film is supported viscously by the conduit walls, it does not contribute to the magma-static pressure at the base of the conduit which, therefore, decreases, causing fresh magma to flow upwards. Fresh magma entering the base of the conduit may cause a new slug to form, either through decompression and exsolution, or by tapping a gas-rich layer at an asperity, or at the chamber roof. In either case, scenario 1 (plugged vent) will lead to periodic, Strombolian eruption, whilst scenario 2 (open vent) will lead to sustained eruption at higher discharge rate. A noteworthy feature of the model is that the conduit is recharged with fresh magma following slug rise, even if no magma is erupted at the surface. We apply our model to the case of Stromboli, and compare model output with monitoring observations. We find that the most important parameters controlling eruption style and vigour are magma viscosity, mass of gas in the slug, and the ratio of slug radius to conduit radius. Our findings potentially impact the dangerous transition from 'touristic' Strombolian activity to more-hazardous paroxysmal activity.

  2. Poorly controlled gout: who is doing poorly?

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Faith Li-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Gout, an inflammatory arthritis caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals, is commonly seen in primary care and specialist clinics. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in gout due to advances in therapies and the understanding of pathophysiology, with new guidelines being published by international bodies. However, there is still a gap between the goals of treatment and actual day-to-day practice. Barriers that result in poorly controlled gout include patient factors such as lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and nonadherence to treatment, as well as physician factors such as knowledge gaps, inadequate use of allopurinol and lack of ownership of the disease. The medical profession needs to do more to bridge the gap through physician and patient education, identification of treatment targets with appropriate use of drugs, and dissemination of guidelines. PMID:27549096

  3. Poorly controlled gout: who is doing poorly?

    PubMed

    Chia, Faith Li-Ann

    2016-08-01

    Gout, an inflammatory arthritis caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals, is commonly seen in primary care and specialist clinics. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in gout due to advances in therapies and the understanding of pathophysiology, with new guidelines being published by international bodies. However, there is still a gap between the goals of treatment and actual day-to-day practice. Barriers that result in poorly controlled gout include patient factors such as lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and nonadherence to treatment, as well as physician factors such as knowledge gaps, inadequate use of allopurinol and lack of ownership of the disease. The medical profession needs to do more to bridge the gap through physician and patient education, identification of treatment targets with appropriate use of drugs, and dissemination of guidelines. PMID:27549096

  4. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    PubMed

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1). PMID:25028031

  5. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  6. The Transition from Diffuse to Dense Gas in Herschel Dust Emission Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul

    Dense cores in dark clouds are the sites where young stars form. These regions manifest as relatively small (<0.1pc) pockets of cold and dense gas. If we wish to understand the star formation process, we have to understand the physical conditions in dense cores. This has been a main aim of star formation research in the past decade. Today, we do indeed possess a good knowledge of the density and velocity structure of cores, as well as their chemical evolution and physical lifetime. However, we do not understand well how dense cores form out of the diffuse gas clouds surrounding them. It is crucial that we constrain the relationship between dense cores and their environment: if we only understand dense cores, we may be able to understand how individual stars form --- but we would not know how the star forming dense cores themselves come into existence. We therefore propose to obtain data sets that reveal both dense cores and the clouds containing them in the same map. Based on these maps, we will study how dense cores form out of their natal clouds. Since cores form stars, this knowledge is crucial for the development of a complete theoretical and observational understanding of the formation of stars and their planets, as envisioned in NASA's Strategic Science Plan. Fortunately, existing archival data allow to derive exactly the sort of maps we need for our analysis. Here, we describe a program that exclusively builds on PACS and SPIRE dust emission imaging data from the NASA-supported Herschel mission. The degree-sized wide-field Herschel maps of the nearby (<260pc) Polaris Flare and Aquila Rift clouds are ideal for our work. They permit to resolve dense cores (<0.1pc), while the maps also reveal large-scale cloud structure (5pc and larger). We will generate column density maps from these dust emission maps and then run a tree-based hierarchical multi-scale structure analysis on them. Only this procedure permits to exploit the full potential of the maps: we will

  7. Constraining the Evolution of Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broming, Emma J.; Fuse, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    There currently exists no method by which to quantify the evolutionary state of poor clusters (PCs). Research by Broming & Fuse (2010) demonstrated that the evolution of Hickson compact groups (HCGs) are constrained by the correlation between the X-ray luminosities of point sources and diffuse gas. The current investigation adopts an analogous approach to understanding PCs. Plionis et al. (2009) proposed a theory to define the evolution of poor clusters. The theory asserts that cannibalism of galaxies causes a cluster to become more spherical, develop increased velocity dispersion and increased X-ray temperature and gas luminosity. Data used to quantify the evolution of the poor clusters were compiled across multiple wavelengths. The sample includes 162 objects from the WBL catalogue (White et al. 1999), 30 poor clusters in the Chandra X-ray Observatory archive, and 15 Abell poor clusters observed with BAX (Sadat et al. 2004). Preliminary results indicate that the cluster velocity dispersion and X-ray gas and point source luminosities can be used to highlight a weak correlation. An evolutionary trend was observed for multiple correlations detailed herein. The current study is a continuation of the work by Broming & Fuse examining point sources and their properties to determine the evolutionary stage of compact groups, poor clusters, and their proposed remnants, isolated ellipticals and fossil groups. Preliminary data suggests that compact groups and their high-mass counterpart, poor clusters, evolve along tracks identified in the X-ray gas - X-ray point source relation. While compact groups likely evolve into isolated elliptical galaxies, fossil groups display properties that suggest they are the remains of fully coalesced poor clusters.

  8. Understanding the amorphous-to-microcrystalline silicon transition in SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornstetter, Jean-Christophe; Bruneau, Bastien; Bulkin, Pavel; Johnson, Erik V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2014-06-01

    We report on the growth of microcrystalline silicon films from the dissociation of SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures. For this growth chemistry, the formation of HF molecules provides a clear signature of the amorphous to microcrystalline growth transition. Depositing films from silicon tetrafluoride requires the removal of F produced by SiF4 dissociation, and this removal is promoted by the addition of H2 which strongly reacts with F to form HF molecules. At low H2 flow rates, the films grow amorphous as all the available hydrogen is consumed to form HF. Above a critical flow rate, corresponding to the full removal of F, microcrystalline films are produced as there is an excess of atomic hydrogen in the plasma. A simple yet accurate phenomenological model is proposed to explain the SiF4/H2 plasma chemistry in accordance with experimental data. This model provides some rules of thumb to achieve high deposition rates for microcrystalline silicon, namely, that increased RF power must be balanced by an increased H2 flow rate.

  9. High-temperature superfluidity of the two-component Bose gas in a transition metal dichalcogenide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The high-temperature superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) layers is predicted. We study Bose-Einstein condensation in the two-component system of dipolar A and B excitons. The effective mass, energy spectrum of the collective excitations, the sound velocity, and critical temperature are obtained for different TMDC materials. It is shown that in the Bogoliubov approximation, the sound velocity in the two-component dilute exciton Bose gas is always larger than in any one-component exciton system. The difference between the sound velocities for two-component and one-component dilute gases is caused by the fact that the sound velocity for a two-component system depends on the reduced mass of A and B excitons, which is always smaller than the individual mass of A or B exciton. Due to this fact, the critical temperature Tc for superfluidity for the two-component exciton system in a TMDC bilayer is about one order of magnitude higher than Tc in any one-component exciton system. We propose to observe the superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel TMDC layers, which causes two opposite superconducting currents in each TMDC layer.

  10. Poor school performance.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil; Kulkarni, Madhuri

    2005-11-01

    Education is one of the most important aspects of human resource development. Poor school performance not only results in the child having a low self-esteem, but also causes significant stress to the parents. There are many reasons for children to under perform at school, such as, medical problems, below average intelligence, specific learning disability, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, emotional problems, poor socio-cultural home environment, psychiatric disorders and even environmental causes. The information provided by the parents, classroom teacher and school counselor about the child's academic difficulties guides the pediatrician to form an initial diagnosis. However, a multidisciplinary evaluation by an ophthalmologist, otolaryngologist, counselor, clinical psychologist, special educator, and child psychiatrist is usually necessary before making the final diagnosis. It is important to find the reason(s) for a child's poor school performance and come up with a treatment plan early so that the child can perform up to full potential. PMID:16391452

  11. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2015-01-01

    Children described as "poor comprehenders" (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this…

  12. THE HIGHLY DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF THE INNERMOST DUST AND GAS IN THE TRANSITION DISK VARIABLE LRLL 31

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, K. M.; Rieke, G.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Balog, Z.; Herbst, W.; Megeath, S. T.; Kun, M.

    2011-05-10

    We describe extensive synoptic multi-wavelength observations of the transition disk LRLL 31 in the young cluster IC 348. We combined 4 epochs of IRS spectra, 9 epochs of MIPS photometry, 7 epochs of cold-mission IRAC photometry, and 36 epochs of warm-mission IRAC photometry along with multi-epoch near-infrared spectra, optical spectra, and polarimetry to explore the nature of the rapid variability of this object. We find that the inner disk, as traced by the 2-5 {mu}m excess, stays at the dust sublimation radius while the strength of the excess changes by a factor of eight on weekly timescales, and the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m photometry show a drop of 0.35 mag in 1 week followed by a slow 0.5 mag increase over the next 3 weeks. The accretion rate, as measured by Pa{beta} and Br{gamma} emission lines, varies by a factor of five with evidence for a correlation between the accretion rate and the infrared excess. While the gas and dust in the inner disk are fluctuating, the central star stays relatively static. Our observations allow us to put constraints on the physical mechanism responsible for the variability. The variable accretion, and wind, are unlikely to be causes of the variability, but are both effects of the same physical process that disturbs the disk. The lack of periodicity in our infrared monitoring indicates that it is unlikely that there is a companion within {approx}0.4 AU that is perturbing the disk. The most likely explanation is either a companion beyond {approx}0.4 AU or a dynamic interface between the stellar magnetic field and the disk leading to a variable scale height and/or warping of the inner disk.

  13. Reaction mechanism of the reverse water-gas shift reaction using first-row middle transition metal catalysts L'M (M = Fe, Mn, Co): a computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Cundari, Thomas R; Wilson, Angela K

    2011-09-19

    The mechanism of the reverse water-gas shift reaction (CO(2) + H(2) → CO + H(2)O) was investigated using the 3d transition metal complexes L'M (M = Fe, Mn, and Co, L' = parent β-diketiminate). The thermodynamics and reaction barriers of the elementary reaction pathways were studied with the B3LYP density functional and two different basis sets: 6-311+G(d) and aug-cc-pVTZ. Plausible reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products were modeled, with different conformers and multiplicities for each identified. Different reaction pathways and side reactions were also considered. Reaction Gibbs free energies and activation energies for all steps were determined for each transition metal. Calculations indicate that the most desirable mechanism involves mostly monometallic complexes. Among the three catalysts modeled, the Mn complex shows the most favorable catalytic properties. Considering the individual reaction barriers, the Fe complex shows the lowest barrier for activation of CO(2). PMID:21838224

  14. The influence of the gas-distributing grid diameter on the transition velocity and hydrodynamics of the bottom layer in circulating fluidized bed installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuponogov, V. G.; Baskakov, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    The dependences of dimensionless fluidization velocities separating bubble, transition, and fast fluidization regimes on the properties of dispersed material for particles belonging to groups B and D (according to D. Geldart's classification) are presented. Correspondence between the considered dependences and experimental data obtained by different researchers and their correlation with critical fluidization velocities and particle terminal velocities are shown. The hydrodynamic mechanisms governing the saturation of fluidized bed with bubbles on reaching the transition fluidization velocity in installations having different sizes are considered. Factors due to which a bottom bubble layer disappears in narrow installations and is retained on large-diameter grids in an intense channel forming mode are explained. Experimental data are presented from which it is seen that the bubble layer hydrodynamics depends on the gas-distributing grid diameter and that this diameter has an insignificant influence on the fluidization velocity during the transition from a bubble to fast fluidization regime.

  15. A computer program for two-dimensional and axisymmetric nonreacting perfect gas and equilibrium chemically reacting laminar, transitional and-or turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program is described in detail for laminar, transitional, and/or turbulent boundary-layer flows of non-reacting (perfect gas) and reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium. An implicit finite difference scheme was developed for both two dimensional and axisymmetric flows over bodies, and in rocket nozzles and hypervelocity wind tunnel nozzles. The program, program subroutines, variables, and input and output data are described. Also included is the output from a sample calculation of fully developed turbulent, perfect gas flow over a flat plate. Input data coding forms and a FORTRAN source listing of the program are included. A method is discussed for obtaining thermodynamic and transport property data which are required to perform boundary-layer calculations for reacting gases in chemical equilibrium.

  16. Two-Equation Low-Reynolds-Number Turbulence Modeling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows Characteristic of Gas Turbine Blades. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Rodney C.; Patankar, Suhas V.

    1988-01-01

    The use of low Reynolds number (LRN) forms of the k-epsilon turbulence model in predicting transitional boundary layer flow characteristic of gas turbine blades is developed. The research presented consists of: (1) an evaluation of two existing models; (2) the development of a modification to current LRN models; and (3) the extensive testing of the proposed model against experimental data. The prediction characteristics and capabilities of the Jones-Launder (1972) and Lam-Bremhorst (1981) LRN k-epsilon models are evaluated with respect to the prediction of transition on flat plates. Next, the mechanism by which the models simulate transition is considered and the need for additional constraints is discussed. Finally, the transition predictions of a new model are compared with a wide range of different experiments, including transitional flows with free-stream turbulence under conditions of flat plate constant velocity, flat plate constant acceleration, flat plate but strongly variable acceleration, and flow around turbine blade test cascades. In general, calculational procedure yields good agreement with most of the experiments.

  17. CONNECTING TRANSITIONS IN GALAXY PROPERTIES TO REFUELING

    SciTech Connect

    Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Weinberg-Wolf, Jennifer; Wei, Lisa H.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Pisano, D. J.; Baker, Andrew J.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Laine, Seppo; Jogee, Shardha; Lepore, Natasha; Hough, Loren E.

    2013-11-01

    We relate transitions in galaxy structure and gas content to refueling, here defined to include both the external gas accretion and the internal gas processing needed to renew reservoirs for star formation. We analyze two z = 0 data sets: a high-quality ∼200 galaxy sample (the Nearby Field Galaxy Survey, data release herein) and a volume-limited ∼3000 galaxy sample with reprocessed archival data. Both reach down to baryonic masses ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} and span void-to-cluster environments. Two mass-dependent transitions are evident: (1) below the 'gas-richness threshold' scale (V ∼ 125 km s{sup –1}), gas-dominated quasi-bulgeless Sd-Im galaxies become numerically dominant; while (2) above the 'bimodality' scale (V ∼ 200 km s{sup –1}), gas-starved E/S0s become the norm. Notwithstanding these transitions, galaxy mass (or V as its proxy) is a poor predictor of gas-to-stellar mass ratio M{sub gas}/M{sub *}. Instead, M{sub gas}/M{sub *} correlates well with the ratio of a galaxy's stellar mass formed in the last Gyr to its preexisting stellar mass, such that the two ratios have numerically similar values. This striking correspondence between past-averaged star formation and current gas richness implies routine refueling of star-forming galaxies on Gyr timescales. We argue that this refueling underlies the tight M{sub gas}/M{sub *} versus color correlations often used to measure 'photometric gas fractions'. Furthermore, the threshold and bimodality scale transitions reflect mass-dependent demographic shifts between three refueling regimes—accretion-dominated, processing-dominated, and quenched. In this picture, gas-dominated dwarfs are explained not by inefficient star formation but by overwhelming gas accretion, which fuels stellar mass doubling in ∼<1 Gyr. Moreover, moderately gas-rich bulged disks such as the Milky Way are transitional, becoming abundant only in the narrow range between the threshold and bimodality scales.

  18. A GAS GIANT CIRCUMBINARY PLANET TRANSITING THE F STAR PRIMARY OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR KIC 4862625 AND THE INDEPENDENT DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TWO TRANSITING PLANETS IN THE KEPLER-47 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, V. B.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Hinse, T. C.; Hebrard, G.; Diaz, R. F.; Deleuil, M.

    2013-06-10

    We report the discovery of a transiting, gas giant circumbinary planet orbiting the eclipsing binary KIC 4862625 and describe our independent discovery of the two transiting planets orbiting Kepler-47. We describe a simple and semi-automated procedure for identifying individual transits in light curves and present our follow-up measurements of the two circumbinary systems. For the KIC 4862625 system, the 0.52 {+-} 0.018 R{sub Jupiter} radius planet revolves every {approx}138 days and occults the 1.47 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun }, 1.7 {+-} 0.06 R{sub Sun} F8 IV primary star producing aperiodic transits of variable durations commensurate with the configuration of the eclipsing binary star. Our best-fit model indicates the orbit has a semi-major axis of 0.64 AU and is slightly eccentric, e = 0.1. For the Kepler-47 system, we confirm the results of Orosz et al. Modulations in the radial velocity of KIC 4862625A are measured both spectroscopically and photometrically, i.e., via Doppler boosting, and produce similar results.

  19. Poor ovarian reserve.

    PubMed

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  20. Poor ovarian reserve

    PubMed Central

    Jirge, Padma Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Poor ovarian reserve (POR) is an important limiting factor for the success of any treatment modality for infertility. It indicates a reduction in quantity and quality of oocytes in women of reproductive age group. It may be age related as seen in advanced years of reproductive life or may occur in young women due to diverse etiological factors. Evaluating ovarian reserve and individualizing the therapeutic strategies are very important for optimizing the success rate. Majority or women with POR need to undergo in vitro fertilization to achieve pregnancy. However, pregnancy rate remains low despite a plethora of interventions and is associated with high pregnancy loss. Early detection and active management are essential to minimize the need for egg donation in these women. PMID:27382229

  1. Fission-fragment excited xenon/rare gas mixtures. I. Laser parameters of the 1. 73 [mu]m xenon transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N. )

    1993-04-15

    Laser parameters for the 1.73 [mu]m (5[ital d][3/2][sub 1][minus]6[ital p][5/2][sub 2]) xenon transition in fission-fragment excited Ar/Xe, He/Ar/Xe, Ne/Ar/Xe, and He/Ne/Ar/Xe gas mixtures are presented. Using a cw F center laser, time resolved small signal gain was probed as a function of total pressure, xenon concentration, pump power, He/Ne/Ar buffer ratio and impurity concentration. Small signal gains of up to 2%/cm were observed for pump rates of 30 W/cm[sup 3]. Addition of helium and/or neon to the argon buffer increased the width of the time resolved laser gain pulse and reduced the absorption observed under some experimental conditions. Experimentally determined gain scaling laws for several gas mixtures are presented. The measured small signal gain was coupled with the results of laser cavity measurements to calculate the saturation intensity for several gas mixtures. The addition of helium or neon increases the saturation intensity for several gas mixtures. Laser cavity measurements as well as the gain [times] saturation intensity product indicate that the 1.73 [mu]m power efficiency is approximately 2% for several gas mixtures.

  2. Momentum Distribution of Cooper Pairs and Strong-Coupling Effects in a Two-Dimensional Fermi Gas Near the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Inotani, D.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate strong-coupling properties of a two-dimensional ultracold Fermi gas in the normal state. Including pairing fluctuations within the framework of a T-matrix approximation, we calculate the distribution function n({\\varvec{Q}}) of Cooper pairs in terms of the center of mass momentum {\\varvec{Q}}. In the strong-coupling regime, n({\\varvec{Q}}=0) is shown to exhibit a remarkable increase with decreasing the temperature in the low temperature region, which agrees well with the recent experiment on a two-dimensional ^6Li Fermi gas (Ries et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:230401, 2015). Our result indicates that the observed remarkable increase of the number of Cooper pairs with zero center of mass momentum can be explained without assuming the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition, when one properly includes pairing fluctuations that are enhanced by the low-dimensionality of the system. Since the BKT transition is a crucial topic in two-dimensional Fermi systems, our results would be useful for the study toward the realization of this quasi-long-range order in an ultracold Fermi gas.

  3. The Elum Project: A Network of UK Sites to Understand Land-Use Transitions to Bioenergy and Their Implications for Greenhouse Gas Balance and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Z. M.; Alberti, G.; Bottoms, E.; Rowe, R.; Parmar, K.; Marshall, R.; Elias, D.; Smith, P.; Dondini, M.; Pogson, M.; Richards, M.; Finch, J.; Ineson, P.; Keane, B.; Perks, M.; Wilkinson, M.; Yamulki, S.; Donnison, I.; Farrar, K.; Massey, A.; McCalmont, J.; Drewer, J.; Sohi, S.; McNamara, N.; Taylor, G.

    2014-12-01

    Rising anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions coupled with an increasing need to address energy security are resulting in the development of cleaner, more sustainable alternatives to traditional fossil fuel sources. Bioenergy crops have been proposed to be able to mitigate the effects of climate change as well as provide increased energy security. The aim of this project is to assess the impact of land conversion to second generation non-food bioenergy crops on GHG balance for several land use transitions, including from arable, grassland and forest. A network of 6 sites was established across the UK to assess the processes underpinning GHG balance and to provide input data to a model being used to assess the sustainability of different land use transitions. Monthly analysis of soil GHGs shows that carbon dioxide contributes most to the global warming potential of these bioenergy crops, irrespective of transition. Nitrous oxide emissions were low for all crops except arable cropping and methane emissions were very low for all sites. Nearly all sites have shown a significant decrease in CO2 flux from the control land use. Eddy flux approaches, coupled with soil assessments show that for the transition from grassland to SRC willow there is a significant reduction in GHG emissions from soil and a negative net ecosystem exchange due to increased GPP and ecosystem respiration. These results suggest for this land use transition to bioenergy in a UK specific context, there may be a net benefit for ecosystem GHG exchange of transition to bioenergy Finally we are developing a meta-modelling tool to allow land use managers to make location-specific, informed decisions about land use change to bioenergy. This work is based on the Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project, which was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). This project is co-ordinated by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (www.elum.ac.uk).

  4. Constraining the structure of the transition disk HD 135344B (SAO 206462) by simultaneous modeling of multiwavelength gas and dust observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, A.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W. F.; Benisty, M.; Ménard, F.; Grady, C.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; Olofsson, J.; Roberge, A.; Brittain, S.; Duchêne, G.; Meeus, G.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Dent, B.; Le Bouquin, J. B.; Berger, J. P.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Constraining the gas and dust disk structure of transition disks, particularly in the inner dust cavity, is a crucial step toward understanding the link between them and planet formation. HD 135344B is an accreting (pre-)transition disk that displays the CO 4.7 μm emission extending tens of AU inside its 30 AU dust cavity. Aims: We constrain HD 135344B's disk structure from multi-instrument gas and dust observations. Methods: We used the dust radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermochemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk structure from the simultaneous modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED), VLT/CRIRES CO P(10) 4.75 μm, Herschel/PACS [O i] 63 μm, Spitzer/IRS, and JCMT 12CO J = 3-2 spectra, VLTI/PIONIER H-band visibilities, and constraints from (sub-)mm continuum interferometry and near-IR imaging. Results: We found a disk model able to describe the current gas and dust observations simultaneously. This disk has the following structure. (1) To simultaneously reproduce the SED, the near-IR interferometry data, and the CO ro-vibrational emission, refractory grains (we suggest carbon) are present inside the silicate sublimation radius (0.08 gas, the surface density of the gas inside the cavity must increase with radius to fit the CO ro-vibrational line profile, a small gap of a few AU in the gas distribution is compatible with current data, and a large gap of tens of AU in the gas does not appear likely. (4) The gas-to-dust ratio inside the cavity is >100 to account for the 870 μm continuum upper limit and the CO P(10) line flux. (5) The gas-to-dust ratio in the outer disk (30 gas and dust mass should be located in the midplane, and a significant fraction of the dust should be in large grains. Conclusions: Simultaneous modeling of the gas and

  5. Constraining the Structure of the Transition Disk HD 135344B (SAO 206462) by Simultaneous Modeling of Multiwavelength Gas and Dust Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmona, A.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W. F.; Benisty, M.; Menard, F.; Grady, C.; Kamp, I.; Woitke, P.; Olofsson, J.; Roberge, A.; Brittain, S.; Duchene, G.; Meeus, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Dent, B.; Le Bouquin, J. E.; Berger, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Constraining the gas and dust disk structure of transition disks, particularly in the inner dust cavity, is a crucial step toward understanding the link between them and planet formation. HD 135344B is an accreting (pre-)transition disk that displays the CO 4.7 micrometer emission extending tens of AU inside its 30 AU dust cavity. Aims: We constrain HD 135344B's disk structure from multi-instrument gas and dust observations. Methods: We used the dust radiative transfer code MCFOST and the thermochemical code ProDiMo to derive the disk structure from the simultaneous modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED), VLT/CRIRES CO P(10) 4.75 Micrometers, Herschel/PACS [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers, Spitzer/IRS, and JCMT CO-12 J = 3-2 spectra, VLTI/PIONIER H-band visibilities, and constraints from (sub-)mm continuum interferometry and near-IR imaging. Results: We found a disk model able to describe the current gas and dust observations simultaneously. This disk has the following structure. (1) To simultaneously reproduce the SED, the near-IR interferometry data, and the CO ro-vibrational emission, refractory grains (we suggest carbon) are present inside the silicate sublimation radius (0.08 is less than R less than 0.2 AU). (2) The dust cavity (R is less than 30 AU) is filled with gas, the surface density of the gas inside the cavity must increase with radius to fit the CO ro-vibrational line profile, a small gap of a few AU in the gas distribution is compatible with current data, and a large gap of tens of AU in the gas does not appear likely. (4) The gas-to-dust ratio inside the cavity is >100 to account for the 870 Micrometers continuum upper limit and the CO P(10) line flux. (5) The gas-to-dust ratio in the outer disk (30 is less than R less than 200 AU) is less than 10 to simultaneously describe the [O(sub I)] 63 Micrometers line flux and the CO P(10) line profile. (6) In the outer disk, most of the gas and dust mass should be located in the midplane, and

  6. Morphosyntax in Poor Comprehenders

    PubMed Central

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; Catts, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Children described as poor comprehenders (PCs) have reading comprehension difficulties in spite of adequate word reading abilities. PCs are known to display weakness with semantics and higher-level aspects of oral language, but less is known about their grammatical skills, especially with regard to morphosyntax. The purpose of this study was to examine morphosyntax in fourth grade PCs and typically developing readers (TDs), using three experimental tasks involving finiteness marking. Participants also completed standardized, norm-referenced assessments of phonological memory, vocabulary, and broader language skills. PCs displayed weakness relative to TDs on all three morphosyntax tasks and on every other assessment of oral language except phonological memory, as indexed by nonword repetition. These findings help to clarify the linguistic profile of PCs, suggesting that their language weaknesses include grammatical weaknesses that cannot be fully explained by semantic factors. Because finiteness markers are usually mastered prior to formal schooling in typical development, we call for future studies to examine whether assessments of morphosyntax could be used for the early identification of children at risk for future reading comprehension difficulty.

  7. Ultrafine PM emissions from natural gas, oxidation-catalyst diesel, and particle-trap diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Ayala, Alberto

    2002-12-01

    This paper addresses how current technologies effective for reducing PM emissions of heavy-duty engines may affect the physical characteristics of the particles emitted. Three in-use transit bus configurations were compared in terms of submicron particle size distributions using simultaneous SMPS measurements under two dilution conditions, a minidiluter and the legislated constant volume sampler (CVS). The compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled and diesel particulate filter (DPF)-equipped diesel configurations are two "green" alternatives to conventional diesel engines. The CNG bus in this study did not have an oxidation catalyst whereas the diesel configurations (with and without particulate filter) employed catalysts. The DPF was a continuously regenerating trap (CRT). Particle size distributions were collected between 6 and 237 nm using 2-minute SMPS scans during idle and 55 mph steady-state cruise operation. Average particle size distributions collected during idle operation of the diesel baseline bus operating on ultralow sulfur fuel showed evidence for nanoparticle growth under CVS dilution conditions relative to the minidiluter. The CRT effectively reduced both accumulation and nuclei mode concentrations by factors of 10-100 except under CVS dilution conditions where nuclei mode concentrations were measured during 55 mph steady-state cruise that exceeded baseline diesel concentrations. The CVS data suggest some variability in trap performance. The CNG bus had accumulation mode concentrations 10-100x lower than the diesel baseline but often displayed large nuclei modes, especially under CVS dilution conditions. Partly this may be explained by the lack of an oxidation catalyst on the CNG, but differences between the minidiluter and CVS size distributions suggest that dilution ratio, temperature-related wall interactions, and differences in tunnel background between the diluters contributed to creating nanoparticle concentrations that sometimes exceeded diesel

  8. Extreme high temperature redox kinetics in ceria: exploration of the transition from gas-phase to material-kinetic limitations.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ho-Il; Davenport, Timothy C; Gopal, Chirranjeevi Balaji; Haile, Sossina M

    2016-08-01

    The redox kinetics of undoped ceria (CeO2-δ) are investigated by the electrical conductivity relaxation method in the oxygen partial pressure range of -4.3 ≤ log(pO2/atm) ≤ -2.0 at 1400 °C. It is demonstrated that extremely large gas flow rates, relative to the mass of the oxide, are required in order to overcome gas phase limitations and access the material kinetic properties. Using these high flow rate conditions, the surface reaction rate constant kchem is found to obey the correlation log(kchem/cm s(-1)) = (0.84 ± 0.02) × log(pO2/atm) - (0.99 ± 0.05) and increases with oxygen partial pressure. This increase contrasts the known behavior of the dominant defect species, oxygen vacancies and free electrons, which decrease in concentration with increasing oxygen partial pressure. For the sample geometries employed, diffusion was too fast to be detected. At low gas flow rates, the relaxation process becomes limited by the capacity of the sweep gas to supply/remove oxygen to/from the oxide. An analytical expression is derived for the relaxation in the gas-phase limited regime, and the result reveals an exponential decay profile, identical in form to that known for a surface reaction limited process. Thus, measurements under varied gas flow rates are required to differentiate between surface reaction limited and gas flow limited behavior. PMID:27425414

  9. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  10. Fission-fragment excited xenon/rare gas mixtures. II. Small signal gain of the 2. 03 [mu]m xenon transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.; Hays, G.N. )

    1993-04-15

    The results of small signal gain measurements of the 2.03 [mu]m (5[ital d][3/2][sub 1][minus]6[ital p][3/2][sub 1]) xenon transition in fission-fragment excited Ar/Xe, He/Ar/Xe, Ne/Ar/Xe, and He/Ne/Ar/Xe gas mixtures is presented. Time resolved small signal gain was probed using a cw He/Xe discharge laser as a function of total pressure, xenon concentration, pump power, He/Ne/Ar buffer ratio, and impurity concentration. Small signal gains of up to 6%/cm were observed for pump rates of 15 W/cm[sup 3]. Addition of helium and/or neon to the argon buffer increased the width of the laser gain and reduced the absorption observed under some experimental conditions. Experimentally determined gain scaling laws for several gas mixtures are presented.

  11. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  12. Consequences of Growing Up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

    The consequences and correlates of growing up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…

  13. Transition from parabolic to ring-shaped valence band maximum in few-layer GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2014-12-01

    By performing first-principles electronic structure calculations in frames of density functional theory we study the dependence of the valence band shape on the thickness of few-layer III-VI crystals (GaS, GaSe, and InSe). We estimate the critical thickness of transition from the bulklike parabolic to the ring-shaped valence band. Direct supercell calculations show that the ring-shaped extremum of the valence band appears in β -GaS and β -GaSe at a thickness below 6 tetralayers (˜4.6 nm ) and 8 tetralayers (˜6.4 nm ), respectively. Zone-folding calculations estimate the β -InSe critical thickness to be equal to 28 tetralayers (˜24.0 nm ). The origin of the ring-shaped valence band maximum can be understood in terms of k.p theory, which provides a link between the curvature of the energy bands and the distance between them. We explain the dependence of the band shape on the thickness, as well as the transition between two types of extremes, by the k -dependent orbital composition of the topmost valence band. We show that in the vicinity of critical thickness the effective mass of holes in III-VI compounds depends strongly on the number of tetralayers.

  14. Urban University Access and Affordability: The Implications of the Relationship between Gas Prices and Suburban Transit Ridership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginski, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    Many college campuses across the country have implemented U-Pass transit programs to mitigate transportation costs for students. However, urban university U-pass programs fall short for suburban students who cannot get to the urban metro area without connecting public transportation. As urban universities rely on suburbs as feeder communities,…

  15. In-vehicle measurement of ultrafine particles on compressed natural gas, conventional diesel, and oxidation-catalyst diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Davyda; Jones, Steven; Lalor, Melinda

    2007-02-01

    Many metropolitan transit authorities are considering upgrading transit bus fleets to decrease ambient criteria pollutant levels. Advancements in engine and fuel technology have lead to a generation of lower-emission buses in a variety of fuel types. Dynamometer tests show substantial reductions in particulate mass emissions for younger buses (<10 years) over older models, but particle number reduction has not been verified in the research. Recent studies suggest that particle number is a more important factor than particle mass in determining health effects. In-vehicle particle number concentration measurements on conventional diesel, oxidation-catalyst diesel and compressed natural gas transit buses are compared to estimate relative in-vehicle particulate exposures. Two primary consistencies are observed from the data: the CNG buses have average particle count concentrations near the average concentrations for the oxidation-catalyst diesel buses, and the conventional diesel buses have average particle count concentrations approximately three to four times greater than the CNG buses. Particle number concentrations are also noticeably affected by bus idling behavior and ventilation options, such as, window position and air conditioning. PMID:17219245

  16. Slow Mass Transport and Statistical Evolution of an Atomic Gas across the Superfluid-Mott-Insulator Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Hung Chenlung; Zhang Xibo; Gemelke, Nathan; Chin Cheng

    2010-04-23

    We study transport dynamics of ultracold cesium atoms in a two-dimensional optical lattice across the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition based on in situ imaging. Inducing the phase transition with a lattice ramping routine expected to be locally adiabatic, we observe a global mass redistribution which requires a very long time to equilibrate, more than 100 times longer than the microscopic time scales for on-site interaction and tunneling. When the sample enters the Mott-insulator regime, mass transport significantly slows down. By employing fast recombination loss pulses to analyze the occupancy distribution, we observe similarly slow-evolving dynamics, and a lower effective temperature at the center of the sample.

  17. Superfluid phase transition and effects of mass imbalance in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of an ultracold Fermi gas: A self-consistent T-matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, Ryo; Ohashi, Yoji

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a two-component Fermi gas with mass imbalance (m↑ ≠m↓ , where mσ is an atomic mass in the σ-component) in the BCS-BEC crossover region. Including pairing fluctuations within a self-consistent T-matrix theory, we examine how the superfluid instability is affected by the presence of mass imbalance. We determine the superfluid region in the phase diagram of a Fermi gas in terms of the temperature, the strength of a pairing interaction, and the ratio of mass imbalance. The superfluid phase transition is shown to always occur even when m↑ ≠m↓ .[2] This behavior of Tc is quite different from the previous result in an extended T-matrix theory,[3] where Tc vanishes at a certain value of m↑ /m↓ > 0 in the BCS regime. Since Fermi condensates with mass imbalance have been discussed in various systems, such as a cold Fermi gas, an exciton(polariton) condensate, as well as color superconductivity, our results would be useful for further understandings of these novel Fermi superfluids. R.H. was supported by Graduate School Doctoral Student Aid Program, Keio University.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Draper, Robert

    2012-01-17

    A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

  19. Forgotten Americans: The "Working Poor."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, Tom

    1984-01-01

    The working poor are employable people who have found low-paying jobs and barely scrape out a living. By removing many forms of federal aid, the Reagan administration has locked the working poor into poverty. In saving a few dollars today, we are penalizing the next generation. (CS)

  20. Testing the universality of the many-body metal-insulator transition by time evolution of a disordered one-dimensional ultracold fermionic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Masaki; García-García, Antonio M.

    2012-03-01

    It is now possible to study experimentally the combined effect of disorder and interactions in cold atom physics. Motivated by these developments we investigate the dynamics around the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in a one-dimensional Fermi gas with short-range interactions in a quasiperiodic potential by the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group technique. By tuning disorder and interactions we study the MIT from the weakly to the strongly interacting limit. The MIT is not universal as time evolution, well described by a process of anomalous diffusion, depends qualitatively on the interaction strength. By using scaling ideas we relate the parameter that controls the diffusion process with the critical exponent that describes the divergence of the localization length. In the limit of strong interactions theoretical arguments suggest that the motion at the MIT tends to ballistic and critical exponents approach mean-field predictions.

  1. Structural variability in transition metal oxide clusters: gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of V3O(6-8)+.

    PubMed

    Asmis, Knut R; Wende, Torsten; Brümmer, Mathias; Gause, Oliver; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Stanca-Kaposta, E Cristina; Döbler, Jens; Niedziela, Andrzej; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-07-14

    We present gas phase vibrational spectra of the trinuclear vanadium oxide cations V(3)O(6)(+)·He(1-4), V(3)O(7)(+)·Ar(0,1), and V(3)O(8)(+)·Ar(0,2) between 350 and 1200 cm(-1). Cluster structures are assigned based on a comparison of the experimental and simulated IR spectra. The latter are derived from B3LYP/TZVP calculations on energetically low-lying isomers identified in a rigorous search of the respective configurational space, using higher level calculations when necessary. V(3)O(7)(+) has a cage-like structure of C(3v) symmetry. Removal or addition of an O-atom results in a substantial increase in the number of energetically low-lying structural isomers. V(3)O(8)(+) also exhibits the cage motif, but with an O(2) unit replacing one of the vanadyl oxygen atoms. A chain isomer is found to be most stable for V(3)O(6)(+). The binding of the rare gas atoms to V(3)O(6-8)(+) clusters is found to be strong, up to 55 kJ/mol for Ar, and markedly isomer-dependent, resulting in two interesting effects. First, for V(3)O(7)(+)·Ar and V(3)O(8)(+)·Ar an energetic reordering of the isomers compared to the bare ion is observed, making the ring motif the most stable one. Second, different isomers bind different number of rare gas atoms. We demonstrate how both effects can be exploited to isolate and assign the contributions from multiple isomers to the vibrational spectrum. The present results exemplify the structural variability of vanadium oxide clusters, in particular, the sensitivity of their structure on small perturbations in their environment. PMID:22499393

  2. On the Structure of the Two-Dimensional Spatially Periodic Inner Transition Layers in a Gas-Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, A.Ya.

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the structure of the spatially periodic inner boundary layers in the plasma of a positive glow-discharge column produced in a long cylindrical tube with an electropositive gas inside. Asymptotic methods, namely, the method of boundary functions, are used to analyze the initial mathematical model. We consider the formation of contrast burst-type structures. We have found all principal terms of the boundary-layer asymptotics of the solution. The results obtained are compared with the available probe measurements of basic physical parameters of ionization waves (strata) in neon at low pressures.

  3. Atomic-to-Molecular Gas Transition in Nearby Galaxies: What can we learn from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed comparison of molecular and atomic gas distributions in 18 nearby galaxies at sub-kpc or kpc scales, based on the CO J = 1 - 0 data from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) and the HI 21cm data in the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) archive. The observation spatial coverage extends to a quarter of the optical radius for each galaxy. The average molecular and atomic gas column density sensitivities are ~8M⊙/pc2 and ~3M⊙/pc2 at the comparison resolution. A metallicity dependence of the HI saturation limit was possibly detected in the galaxy sample ( 8.1<12+Log(O/H)<9.0 ). We used the CO and HI pixel-by-pixel comparison results to test models of the atomic-to-molecular transition and CO formation at different metallicities. An acceptable agreement was found at the limited spatial resolutions and sensitivities of the observational datasets.

  4. Development of novel low-temperature selective hydrogen gas sensors made of palladium/oxide or nitride capped Magnesium-transition metal hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu Ming

    Palladium capped Mg-based transition metal alloy film (Pd/Mg-TM) is a potentially useful hydrogen gas (H2) sensing material, which can operate at low temperature for detection of H2 leakage in an environment to ensure safe use and storage of the gas. The Pd layer catalytically dissociates hydrogen molecules, and the hydrogen atoms produced can enter (hydridation) or be detached (dehydridation) from the alloy layer. These processes are reversible, such that the film is switchable between a metal state and a hydride state, giving rise to substantial changes in its optical transmittance/reflectance and electrical resistivity. Unlike a conventional metal-oxide (MOx) H2 sensor, hydridation of an Mg-TM film is associated with relatively low enthalpy, and hence can perform at temperature much lower than the operation temperature of an MOx sensor (typically around 500°C or above). As such, an Mg-TM based sensor does not experience undesired annealing effect during operation, and hence is much more stable and durable. Furthermore, the detection selectivity of a Pd/Mg-TM film versus other reducing gases is superior to most conventional MOx-type hydrogen sensors. In this project, we systematically investigated the H2 sensing properties of Pd/Mg-TM films.

  5. Experimental observation of the transition between gas-phase and aqueous solution structures for acetylcholine, nicotine, and muscarine ions.

    PubMed

    Seydou, Mahamadou; Grégoire, Gilles; Liquier, Jean; Lemaire, J; Schermann, Jean Pierre; Desfrançois, Charles

    2008-03-26

    Structural information on acetylcholine and its two agonists, nicotine, and muscarine has been obtained from the interpretation of infrared spectra recorded in the gas-phase or in low pH aqueous solutions. Simulated IR spectra have been obtained using explicit water molecules or a polarization continuum model. The conformational space of the very flexible acetylcholine ions is modified by the presence of the solvent. Distances between its pharmacophoric groups cover a lower range in hydrated species than in isolated species. A clear signature of the shift of protonation site in nicotine ions is provided by the striking change of their infrared spectrum induced by hydration. On the contrary, structures of muscarine ions are only slightly influenced by the presence of water. PMID:18311975

  6. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  7. Role of single-point mutations and deletions on transition temperatures in ideal proteinogenic heteropolymer chains in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Quiroz, L

    2016-07-01

    A coarse-grained statistical mechanics-based model for ideal heteropolymer proteinogenic chains of non-interacting residues is presented in terms of the size K of the chain and the set of helical propensities [Formula: see text] associated with each residue j along the chain. For this model, we provide an algorithm to compute the degeneracy tensor [Formula: see text] associated with energy level [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is the number of residues with a native contact in a given conformation. From these results, we calculate the equilibrium partition function [Formula: see text] and characteristic temperature [Formula: see text] at which a transition from a low to a high entropy states is observed. The formalism is applied to analyze the effect on characteristic temperatures [Formula: see text] of single-point mutations and deletions of specific amino acids [Formula: see text] along the chain. Two probe systems are considered. First, we address the case of a random heteropolymer of size K and given helical propensities [Formula: see text] on a conformational phase space. Second, we focus our attention to a particular set of neuropentapeptides, [Met-5] and [Leu-5] enkephalins whose thermodynamic stability is a key feature on their coupling to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] receptors and the triggering of biochemical responses. PMID:26818963

  8. Poor smokers, poor quitters, and cigarette tax regressivity.

    PubMed

    Remler, Dahlia K

    2004-02-01

    The traditional view that excise taxes are regressive has been challenged. I document the history of the term regressive tax, show that traditional definitions have always found cigarette taxes to be regressive, and illustrate the implications of the greater price responsiveness observed among the poor. I explain the different definitions of tax burden: accounting, welfare-based willingness to pay, and welfare-based time inconsistent. Progressivity (equity across income groups) is sensitive to the way in which tax burden is assessed. Analysis of horizontal equity (fairness within a given income group) shows that cigarette taxes heavily burden poor smokers who do not quit, no matter how tax burden is assessed. PMID:14759931

  9. Are Poor Chinese Text Comprehenders Also Poor in Written Composition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-01-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and…

  10. The management of poor performance

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, John F

    2007-01-01

    Identification of poor performance is in an integral part of government policy. The suggested approach for the identification of such problems, advocated by the General Medical Council, is that of appraisal. However, traditionally, there has been a reluctance to deal with poor performers, as all doctors have made mistakes and are usually only too ready to forgive and be non‐critical of colleagues. The problems are widespread, and 6% of the senior hospital workforce in any 5‐year period may have problems. PMID:17308213

  11. Bilingual Education: The Problem of Ambiguity and Poor Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Griselda

    This paper examines the ambiguity in defining terms within the field of bilingual education, noting problems with poor professional development available to teachers selected to participate in bilingual education programs. The first section discusses terminology within bilingual education programs, focusing on the following: transitional bilingual…

  12. Prospects for the Working Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    1970-01-01

    Based on a chapter entitled "Barriers to Employment of the Disadvantaged by Martin Deutsch and S. M. Miller in "Manpower Report of the President, 1968. Discusses the Nixon proposals for remediating poverty in relation to the socioeconomic factors operating to maintain the condition of being poor while working. (JM)

  13. Poor Memory: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Malcolm L.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a case study of a person who had a cardiac arrest with some right-sided brain damage. Describes the effects of poor memory on cognition, personality, and interpersonal relationships based on personal observations during memory impairment. Highlights the course of rehabilitation over a two-year period. (PAS)

  14. Landau levels and spin splitting in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well near the critical width for the topological phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, M.; Bruene, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.; Stier, A. V.; McCombe, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report a detailed low-temperature study of the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas in a 6.1-nm-wide HgTe quantum well with H g0.3C d0.7Te barriers by terahertz magnetophotoconductivity and magnetotransmission combined with magnetotransport measurements (Rx x and Rx y) in magnetic fields up to 10 T. This well width, close to that at the topological phase transition, corresponds to conventional band ordering, and we probe the "bulk" quasi-2D Landau-level (LL) spectrum of the conduction band at high energies (≈135 -160 meV ) above the Dirac point. The calculated separations between adjacent LLs of the same spin based on published parameters for this structure are in fair agreement with the measured cyclotron resonance energies. However, the very large spin splittings observed (Espin>Ecyclotron) require a significantly larger g -parameter ge for electrons. Tilted field coincidence experiments are consistent with the large spin splitting showing coincidences at 3/2 and twice the cyclotron energy. This large value of ge also leads to interesting crossings of the calculated LLs, and we find direct evidence of these crossings in the Rx x measurements at lower electron densities (Fermi energies) produced by negative gate bias.

  15. Are poor Chinese text comprehenders also poor in written composition?

    PubMed

    Guan, Connie Qun; Ye, Feifei; Meng, Wanjin; Leong, Che Kan

    2013-10-01

    We studied the performance in three genres of Chinese written composition (narration, exposition, and argumentation) of 158 grade 4, 5, and 6 poor Chinese text comprehenders compared with 156 good Chinese text comprehenders. We examined text comprehension and written composition relationship. Verbal working memory (verbal span working memory and operation span working memory) and different levels of linguistic tasks-morphological sensitivity (morphological compounding and morphological chain), sentence processing (syntax construction and syntax integrity), and text comprehension (narrative and expository texts)-were used to predict separately narrative, expository, and argumentation written compositions in these students. Grade for grade, the good text comprehenders outperformed the poor text comprehenders in all tasks, except for morphological chain. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses showed differential contribution of the tasks to different genres of writing. In particular, text comprehension made unique contribution to argumentation writing in the poor text comprehenders. Future studies should ask students to read and write parallel passages in the same genre for better comparison and incorporate both instructional and motivational variables. PMID:23666849

  16. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement of 83 new redshifts from galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan et al (1975) and Albert et al (1977) has been followed by an estimation of cluster masses through the application of both the virial theorem and the projected mas method. For each system, these two estimates are consistent. For the two clusters with highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are about 700 km/sec, while for the five other clusters, the dispersions are of the order of less than about 370 km/sec. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of each system.

  17. Heavy water reactions with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: gas phase room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ping; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2007-09-01

    Reactions of heavy water, D(2)O, have been measured with 46 atomic metal cations at room temperature in a helium bath gas at 0.35 Torr using an inductively coupled plasma/selected ion flow tube tandem mass spectrometer. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and were allowed to decay radiatively and thermalize by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction. Rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions of fourth-row atomic cations from K+ to Se+, of fifth-row atomic cations from Rb+ to Te+ (excluding Tc+), and of sixth-row atomic cations from Cs+ to Bi+. Primary reaction channels were observed leading to O-atom transfer, OD transfer, and D2O addition. O-Atom transfer occurs almost exclusively (>or=90%) in the reactions with most early transition-metal cations (Sc+, Ti+, V+, Y+, Zr+, Nb+, Mo+, Hf+, Ta+, and W+) and to a minor extent (10%) with one main-group cation (As+). OD transfer is observed to occur only with three cations (Sr+, Ba+, and La+). Other cations, including most late transition and main-group cations, were observed to react with D2O exclusively and slowly by D2O addition or not at all. O-Atom transfer proceeds with rate coefficients in the range of 8.1 x 10(-13) (As+) to 9.5 x 10(-10) (Y+) cm3 molecule(-1)(s-1) and with efficiencies below 0.1 and even below 0.01 for the fourth-row atomic cations V+ (0.0032) and As+ (0.0036). These low efficiencies can be understood in terms of the change in spin required to proceed from the reactant to the product potential energy surfaces. Higher order reactions are also measured. The primary products, NbO+, TaO+, MoO+, and WO+, are observed to react further with D(2)O by O-atom transfer, and ZrO+ and HfO+ react further through OD group abstraction. Up to five D(2)O molecules were observed to add sequentially to selected M+ and MO+ as well as MO2+ cations and four to MO(2)D+. Equilibrium measurements for sequential D(2)O addition to M+ are also reported

  18. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    PubMed

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  19. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  20. Theoretical studies on the catalysis of the reverse water-gas shift reaction using first-row transition metal beta-diketiminato complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Munjanja, Lloyd; Cundari, Thomas R; Wilson, Angela K

    2010-06-01

    The reverse water-gas shift reaction CO(2) + H(2) --> H(2)O + CO has been investigated using a set of homogeneous catalyst models L'M(I) (L' = beta-diketiminate, C(3)N(2)H(5)(-); M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn). The thermodynamics of prototypical reaction pathways were simulated at two levels of theory: B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ. The modeled catalytic reaction has been considered in the following steps: coordination of CO(2) by the catalyst to generate a carbon dioxide complex, L'M(CO(2)); scission of L'M(CO(2)) to yield L'M(CO) and L'M(O); L'M(O) hydrogenation to form L'M(H(2)O). The final products, H(2)O and CO, were obtained from the dissociation of L'M(H(2)O) and L'M(CO). All of the reactants, intermediates, and products were modeled, where different possible conformers and multiplicities were identified and considered as potential minima. The reaction enthalpy DeltaH, of all steps for each catalyst as a function of transition metal have been determined. The Mn and Fe catalysts show more thermodynamically accessible pathways than the other catalyst models studied. The overall reaction enthalpy has been determined not only by B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ but also via a more rigorous ab initio electron-correlation-based approach, the correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA). PMID:20462216

  1. Livestock services and the poor.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, V; Redmond, E

    2004-04-01

    This paper reviews the economic framework for the delivery of livestock services to the poor. It is argued that the demand for livestock products is likely to increase rapidly and the ability of the poor to participate in the opportunities presented by this growth is linked critically to the availability of good service support, both on the input and output side. Governments therefore have a responsibility to supply the necessary public goods (including the institutions and legal frameworks), and the market infrastructure for facilitating the emergence of efficient markets for livestock services. The paper further argues that the dynamics of public policy in developing countries are much more complex than the simple application of economic logic. It is the larger political economy that often dictates policy choices. It is therefore important to integrate political economy and governance issues into the economic debate on livestock service delivery. The paper also reviews the context in which the markets for livestock services will need to function. Different countries are facing very different sets of issues, and the identification of possible interventions in livestock service markets would require careful field research and analysis. In this context, the paper suggests the elements of a research agenda for the next few years. PMID:15080541

  2. Seven poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Huchra, J. P.; Latham, D. W.; Davis, R. J.

    1984-08-01

    The authors have measured 83 new redshifts for galaxies in the region of seven of the poor clusters of galaxies identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White and Albert, White, and Morgan. For three systems (MKW 1s, AWM 1, and AWM 7) complete redshift samples were obtained for galaxies brighter than mB(0) = 15.7 within 1° of the D or cD galaxy. The authors estimate masses for the clusters by applying both the virial theorem and the projected mass method. For the two clusters with the highest X-ray luminosities, the line-of-sight velocity dispersions are ≡700 km s-1, and mass-to-light ratios M/LB(0) ⪆ 400 M_sun;/L_sun;. For the five other clusters the velocity dispersions are ⪉370 km s-1, and four of the five have mass-to-light ratios ⪉250 M_sun;/L_sun;. The D or cD galaxy in each poor cluster is at the kinematic center of the system.

  3. Child Health: Reaching the Poor

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Adam; Bustreo, Flavia; Bryce, Jennifer; Claeson, Mariam

    2004-01-01

    In most countries, rates of mortality and malnutrition among children continue to decline, but large inequalities between poor and better-off children exist, both between and within countries. These inequalities, which appear to be widening, call into question the strategies for child mortality reduction relied upon to date. We review (1) what is known about the causes of socioeconomic inequalities in child health and where programs aimed at reducing inequalities may be most effectively focused and (2) what is known about the success of actual programs in narrowing these inequalities. We end with lessons learned: the need for better evidence, but most of all for a new approach to improving the health of all children that is evidence based, broad, and multifaceted. PMID:15117689

  4. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets. PMID:12227146

  5. Transition Planning for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geenen, Sarah J.; Powers, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    The study evaluated the IEPs/Individualized Transition Plans of 45 students who were in special education and foster care, and compared them to the plans of 45 students who were in special education only. Results indicate that the transition plans of foster youth with disabilities were poor in quality, both in absolute terms and in comparison to…

  6. Gas-phase reactions of carbon dioxide with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations: room-temperature kinetics and periodicities in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2006-02-01

    The chemistry of carbon dioxide has been surveyed systematically with 46 atomic cations at room temperature using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. The atomic cations were produced at ca. 5500 K in an ICP source and allowed to cool radiatively and to thermalize by collisions with Ar and He atoms prior to reaction downstream in a flow tube in helium buffer gas at 0.35 +/- 0.01 Torr and 295 +/- 2 K. Rate coefficients and products were measured for the reactions of first-row atomic ions from K(+) to Se(+), of second-row atomic ions from Rb(+) to Te(+) (excluding Tc(+)), and of third-row atomic ions from Cs(+) to Bi(+). CO(2) was found to react in a bimolecular fashion by O atom transfer only with 9 early transition-metal cations: the group 3 cations Sc(+), Y(+), and La(+), the group 4 cations Ti(+), Zr(+), and Hf(+), the group 5 cations Nb(+) and Ta(+), and the group 6 cation W(+). Electron spin conservation was observed to control the kinetics of O atom transfer. Addition of CO(2) was observed for the remaining 37 cations. While the rate of addition was not measurable some insight was obtained into the standard free energy change, DeltaG(o), for CO(2) ligation from equilibrium constant measurements. A periodic variation in DeltaG(o) was observed for first row cations that is consistent with previous calculations of bond energies D(0)(M(+)-CO(2)). The observed trends in D(0) and DeltaG(o) are expected from the variation in electrostatic attraction between M(+) and CO(2) which follows the trend in atomic-ion size and the trend in repulsion between the orbitals of the atomic cations and the occupied orbitals of CO(2). Higher-order CO(2) cluster ions with up to four CO(2) ligands also were observed for 24 of the atomic cations while MO(2)(+) dioxide formation by sequential O atom transfer was seen only with Hf(+), Nb(+), Ta(+), and W(+). PMID:16435784

  7. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  8. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  9. Star Formation in the Zw1400 + 09 Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, Alyssa

    2015-04-01

    Galaxies in dense clusters are known to have less gas and star formation, likely due to environmental interactions within the clusters. Less is known about the properties of galaxies in lower density poor clusters and group environments. In this project, star formation properties of galaxies in the Zwicky 1400 + 09 (NRGb282, NGC 5416) poor cluster were found by reducing and analyzing narrowband H-alpha and broadband R images taken with the WIYN 0.9m MOSAIC camera at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Surface photometry and total star formation rates and extents are presented for a sample of galaxies within the cluster. This work is supported by NSF AST-0725267 and AST-1211005 and is a part of an Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team study of the star forming and gas properties of 16 nearby groups of galaxies. ALFALFA Consortium.

  10. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH TRANSITION METAL CONTENT AND FLUE GAS HCL/SO2 RATIO ON MERCURY SPECIATION IN WASTE COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO2):HCI ratio on heterogeneous Hg0 oxidation. The addition of SO2 to moist flue gas at high SO2:HCI ratios (4:1 to 10:1) caused a decrease in oxidation of Hg0 relative to flur gas without SO2. This is attrib...

  11. Toward ab initio extremely metal poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Extremely metal poor stars have been the focus of much recent attention owing to the expectation that their chemical abundances can shed light on the metal and dust yields of the earliest supernovae. We present our most realistic simulation to date of the astrophysical pathway to the first metal enriched stars. We simulate the radiative and supernova hydrodynamic feedback of a 60 M⊙ Population III star starting from cosmological initial conditions realizing Gaussian density fluctuations. We follow the gravitational hydrodynamics of the supernova remnant at high spatial resolution through its freely-expanding, adiabatic, and radiative phases, until gas, now metal-enriched, has resumed runaway gravitational collapse. Our findings are surprising: while the Population III progenitor exploded with a low energy of 1051 erg and injected an ample metal mass of 6 M⊙, the first cloud to collapse after the supernova explosion is a dense surviving primordial cloud on which the supernova blast wave deposited metals only superficially, in a thin, unresolved layer. The first metal-enriched stars can form at a very low metallicity, of only 2 - 5 × 10-4 Z⊙, and can inherit the parent cloud's highly elliptical, radially extended orbit in the dark matter gravitational potential.

  12. Transport Properties of 2D-Electron Gas in a InGaAs/GaAs DQW in a Vicinity of Low Magnetic-Field-Induced Insulator-Quantum Hall Liquid Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapov, Yu. G.; Yakunin, M. V.; Gudina, S. V.; Harus, G. I.; Neverov, V. N.; Shelushinina, N. G.; Podgornyh, S. M.; Uskova, E. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2007-04-01

    The resistivity ρ of low mobility dilute 2D-elecron gas in a InGaAs/GaAs double quantum well (DQW) exhibits the monotonic "insulating-like" temperature dependence (dρ/dT < 0) at T = 1.8-70K in zero magnetic field. This temperature interval corresponds to a ballistic regime (kBTτ/ℏ > 0.1) for our samples. We observed the coexistence of both the quantum Hall (QH) effect for the filling factors v = 2, 4 and the low magnetic field insulator — QH liquid (with v = 10) transition.

  13. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  14. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  15. Constraining the volatile fraction of planets from transit observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The determination of the abundance of volatiles in extrasolar planets is very important as it can provide constraints on transport in protoplanetary disks and on the formation location of planets. However, constraining the internal structure of low-mass planets from transit measurements is known to be a degenerate problem. Aims: Using planetary structure and evolution models, we show how observations of transiting planets can be used to constrain their internal composition, in particular the amount of volatiles in the planetary interior, and consequently the amount of gas (defined in this paper to be only H and He) that the planet harbors. We first explore planets that are located close enough to their star to have lost their gas envelope. We then concentrate on planets at larger distances and show that the observation of transiting planets at different evolutionary ages can provide statistical information on their internal composition, in particular on their volatile fraction. Methods: We computed the evolution of low-mass planets (super-Earths to Neptune-like) for different fractions of volatiles and gas. We used a four-layer model (core, silicate mantle, icy mantle, and gas envelope) and computed the internal structure of planets for different luminosities. With this internal structure model, we computed the internal and gravitational energy of planets, which was then used to derive the time evolution of the planet. Since the total energy of a planet depends on its heat capacity and density distribution and therefore on its composition, planets with different ice fractions have different evolution tracks. Results: We show for low-mass gas-poor planets that are located close to their central star that assuming evaporation has efficiently removed the entire gas envelope, it is possible to constrain the volatile fraction of close-in transiting planets. We illustrate this method on the example of 55 Cnc e and show that under the assumption of the absence of

  16. Do Middle-Class Students Perceive Poor Women and Poor Men Differently?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzarelli, Catherine; Tagler, Michael J.; Wilkinson, Anna V.

    2002-01-01

    Examined college students' attitudes and stereotypes regarding poor women, attributions for their poverty, and whether those thoughts and feelings differed from those about poor men. Attitudes and stereotypes were significantly more positive regarding poor women than poor men. Participants endorsed internal attributions for both women's and men's…

  17. Transformation of acidic poorly water soluble drugs into ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Balk, Anja; Wiest, Johannes; Widmer, Toni; Galli, Bruno; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz

    2015-08-01

    Poor water solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is a major challenge in drug development impairing bioavailability and therapeutic benefit. This study is addressing the possibility to tailor pharmaceutical and physical properties of APIs by transforming these into tetrabutylphosphonium (TBP) salts, including the generation of ionic liquids (IL). Therefore, poorly water soluble acidic APIs (Diclofenac, Ibuprofen, Ketoprofen, Naproxen, Sulfadiazine, Sulfamethoxazole, and Tolbutamide) were converted into TBP ILs or low melting salts and compared to the corresponding sodium salts. Free acids and TBP salts were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, DSC and XRPD, DVS and dissolution rate measurements, release profiles, and saturation concentration measurements. TBP salts had lower melting points and glass transition temperatures and dissolution rates were improved up to a factor of 1000 as compared to the corresponding free acid. An increase in dissolution rates was at the expense of increased hygroscopicity. In conclusion, the creation of TBP ionic liquids or solid salts from APIs is a valuable concept addressing dissolution and solubility challenges of poorly water soluble acidic compounds. The data suggested that tailor-made counterions may substantially expand the formulation scientist's armamentarium to meet challenges of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:25976317

  18. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study on Leadership: Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (Presentation); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, A.

    2015-03-01

    The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) represents a series of unique successes in alternative fuel deployment by pushing the envelope with innovative solutions. In the last year, RFTA demonstrated the ability to utilize compressed natural gas buses at a range of altitudes, across long distances, in extreme weather conditions and in a modern indoor fueling and maintenance facility - allwhile saving money and providing high-quality customer service. This case study will highlight how the leadership of organizations and communities that are implementing advances in natural gas vehicle technology is paving the way for broader participation.

  19. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  20. Abundance analysis of extremely metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T.; Hansen, C. J.; Christlieb, N.; Andersen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The outer atmosphere of the first generations of low-mass (M < 0.8 M⊙) stars retain to a great extent the original chemical composition of the interstellar medium (ISM) at the time and place of their birth. The composition of this pristine gas represents the nucleosynthesis of the very first massive stars, that produced and ejected the first heavy elements into the early ISM. Thus a detailed abundance analysis of low-mass, metal-poor stars can help us track these gasses and provide insight into the formation processes that took place in the very early stages of our Galaxy. Preliminary result of a 25-star homogeneously analysed sample of metal- poor candidates from the Hamburg/ESO survey is presented. The main focus is on the most metal-poor stars of the sample; stars with [Fe/H] < -4. The abundance pattern of these ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars is used to extract key information of the earliest ongoing formation processes (ranging from hydrostatic burning to neutron-capture processes).

  1. Poor Rural Children Attract Close Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Growing up poor in isolated rural areas and small towns is qualitatively different from growing up poor in the city. Yet most of what experts know about the effects of poverty on children's development comes from studies conducted in big cities. Now, an ambitious project run by universities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina is putting what some…

  2. Extent of Malnourishment among the Rural Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shotland, Jeffrey

    1989-01-01

    Uses national survey data to demonstrate that, compared to the rural or U.S. non-poor, the rural poor consumed less of eight of nine key nutrients; and disparities were greatest for vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium, and for the youngest (two-five years) age group studied. (SV)

  3. Colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas frequently exhibit BRAF mutations and are associated with poor overall survival.

    PubMed

    Olevian, Dane C; Nikiforova, Marina N; Chiosea, Simon; Sun, Weijing; Bahary, Nathan; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Pai, Reetesh K

    2016-03-01

    The molecular alterations in colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma remain incompletely characterized, particularly with respect to mutations in BRAF and KRAS. We analyzed 32 colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas and 40 colorectal poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinomas for mutations in KRAS and BRAF and for DNA mismatch repair protein abnormalities to correlate histopathology with molecular alterations and survival. Compared with poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma frequently harbored BRAF mutations (59% versus 5%; P < .001) and less frequently demonstrated KRAS codon 12 or 13 mutations (17% versus 43%; P = .03). BRAF mutations were identified in both pure poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (60%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with a signet ring cell adenocarcinoma component (82%). Most (93%) poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas demonstrated proficient DNA mismatch repair by either microsatellite instability polymerase chain reaction or DNA mismatch repair immunohistochemistry. Patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma had a significantly worse overall survival compared with patients with poorly differentiated conventional adenocarcinoma (P < .001). There was no significant difference in overall survival between patients with pure poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and patients with both poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and adenocarcinoma components (P = .5). In conclusion, colorectal poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas frequently harbor BRAF mutations and are associated with poor overall survival. PMID:26826419

  4. Time estimation in good and poor sleepers.

    PubMed

    Fichten, Catherine S; Creti, Laura; Amsel, Rhonda; Bailes, Sally; Libman, Eva

    2005-12-01

    Time estimation was examined in 148 older good and poor sleepers in analogue and naturalistic sleep settings. On analogue tasks, both "empty" time and time listening to an audiobook were overestimated by both good and poor sleepers. There were no differences between groups. "Empty" time was experienced as "dragging." In the sleep setting, most poor sleepers underestimated nocturnal sleep and overestimated awake times related to their own sleep problem: sleep onset vs. sleep maintenance insomnia. Good sleepers did the opposite. Severity of sleep problem and size of time estimation errors were unrelated. Greater night-to-night wake time variability was experienced by poor than by good sleepers. Psychological adjustment was unrelated to time estimations and to magnification or minimization of sleep problems. The results suggest that for poor sleepers who magnify their sleep problem, self-monitoring can be of benefit by demonstrating that the sleep problem is not as severe as believed. PMID:16320096

  5. Low-frequency radio observations of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; White, R. A.

    1981-06-01

    Observations have been made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory of 16 poor clusters of galaxies at 34.3 MHz. Four of the poor clusters were detected at flux densities greater than 20 Jy. The spectra of the four detected clusters are all rather steep. Two of the detected clusters, AWM 4 and AWM 5, are also known to be X-ray sources. The possibility that the X-ray-emitting gas is heated by Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the radio emission is investigated, and it is found that the observed X-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the electron energy spectrum extends to very low energies (gamma approximately 1-10). Collective plasma effects may increase the heating efficiency and eliminate the need to extrapolate the electron energy spectrum to such low values.

  6. Low-frequency radio observations of poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; White, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Observations have been made at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory of 16 poor clusters of galaxies at 34.3 MHz. Four of the poor clusters were detected at flux densities greater than 20 Jy. The spectra of the four detected clusters are all rather steep. Two of the detected clusters, AWM 4 and AWM 5, are also known to be X-ray sources. The possibility that the X-ray-emitting gas is heated by Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the radio emission is investigated, and it is found that the observed X-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the electron energy spectrum extends to very low energies (gamma approximately 1-10). Collective plasma effects may increase the heating efficiency and eliminate the need to extrapolate the electron energy spectrum to such low values.

  7. Generation, detection and characterization of gas-phase transition metal aggregates and compounds. Final technical report, September 15, 1991--July 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, T.C.

    1994-11-12

    The goal of this research project has been to identify and characterize small gas-phase metal containing molecules and relate these properties to proposed reaction mechanisms. Of particular emphasis has been the elucidation of the mechanism for activation of C-H, N-H, S-H, and C-C bonds in CH{sub 4}, HCCH, H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} by platinum, titanium, molybdenum, and niobium.

  8. The Impact of the Use of Energy Sources on the Quality of Life of Poor Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, John

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the energy literature has been dominated by a theory of transition. The theory of transition is based on the notion that households gradually ascend an "energy ladder", which begins with traditional biomass fuels (firewood and charcoal), moves through modern commercial fuels (kerosene and liquid petroleum gas (LPG)) and…

  9. Scaling Relations of Galaxy Groups and PoorClusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming

    Galaxy groups and poor clusters are ideal systems to study baryonic physics, which is important for both using clusters for precision cosmology and understanding galaxy formation and evolution. Over the last decade, our understanding of the ICM properties of galaxy groups and poor clusters has greatly improved. However, there are still many unresolved problems. We propose to study the X-ray scaling relations of galaxy groups and poor clusters with XMM data in the archive. The study of a large sample is important to address significant systematic uncertainties. The rich XMM archive on low-mass systems is of great value, as they are selected by the cluster, galaxy, and AGN panels with different effective selection functions. Our sample includes about 100 groups and poor clusters with sufficient XMM data. The state-of-the-art method to model the local X-ray background will be applied, which is key for deriving X-ray gas properties at low surface brightness. The important scaling relations including M-T, M-Y_X, f_gas-T, entropy-M, L-T, L-Y_X, L-M and abundance-M will be derived. The scatter of in these relations will also be examined, as well as their connection to other group properties. This project represents a significant improvement over previous work. The final results will greatly improve our understanding of baryon physics in clusters and groups, especially when combined with the active efforts in simulation and analytic theory which are currently ongoing.

  10. Coyote series data report LLNL/NWC 1981 LNG spill tests dispersion, vapor burn, and rapid-phase-transition. Volume 1. [7 experiments with liquefied natural gas, 2 with liquid methane, and one with liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldwire, H.C. Jr.; Rodean, H.C.; Cederwall, R.T.; Kansa, E.J.; Koopman, R.P.; McClure, J.W.; McRae, T.G.; Morris, L.K.; Kamppinen, L.; Kiefer, R.D.

    1983-10-01

    The Coyote series of liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill experiments was performed at the Naval Weapons Center (NWC), China Lake, California, during the summer and fall of 1981. These tests were a joint effort of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the NWC and were sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute. There were ten Coyote experiments, five primarily for the study of vapor dispersion and burning vapor clouds, and five for investigating the occurrence of rapid-phase-transition (RPT) explosions. Each of the last four of the five RPT tests consisted of a series of three spills. Seven experiments were with LNG, two were with liquid methane (LCH/sub 4/), and one was with liquid nitrogen (LN/sub 2/). Three arrays of instrumentation were deployed. An array of RPT diagnostic instruments was concentrated at the spill pond and was operated during all of the tests, vapor burn as well as RPT. The wind-field array was operated during the last nine experiments to define the wind direction and speed in the area upwind and downwind of the spill pond. The gas-dispersion array was deployed mostly downwind of the spill pond to measure gas concentration, humidity, temperature, ground heat flux, infrared (IR) radiation, and flame-front passage during three of the vapor dispersion and burn experiments (Coyotes 3, 5, and 6). High-speed color motion pictures were taken during every test, and IR imagery (side and overhead) was obtained during some vapor-burn experiments. Data was obtained by radiometers during Coyotes 3, 6, and 7. This report presents a comprehensive selection of the data obtained. It does not include any data analysis except that required to determine the test conditions and the reliability of the data. Data analysis is to be reported in other publications. 19 references, 76 figures, 13 tables.

  11. [Current options to manage clopidogrel poor responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Fileti, Luca; Campo, Gianluca; Valgimigli, Marco; Marchesini, Jlenia; Ferrari, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + clopidogrel) is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). More than 40 million patients worldwide receive clopidogrel, but about 20% of them are nonresponders or poor responders. Many studies using different techniques, platelet agonists and definitions have shown that patients who are poor responders to clopidogrel have an increased risk of death, reinfarction and stent thrombosis. The mechanisms leading to poor responsiveness are not fully elucidated and are likely multifactorial: genetic factors, accelerated platelet turnover, up-regulation of the P2Y12 pathways, high baseline platelet reactivity, poor compliance, underdosing and drug-drug interactions. The management of these patients is very difficult, but evidence does exist showing that a strategy of higher maintenance dose or switch to different thienopyridines (e.g. ticlopidine or prasugrel) or use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors during PCI may be helpful to overcome poor responsiveness and improve the long-term clinical outcome. This review describes the impact of poor responsiveness to clopidogrel on clinical outcomes, the mechanisms leading to poor effect, and the different assays to assess it. Finally, current and future options for its management are discussed. PMID:21355335

  12. On transit time instability in liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabitz, G.; Meier, G.

    1982-01-01

    A basic transit time instability in flows with disturbances of speed is found. It was shown that the mass distribution is established by and large by the described transit time effects. These transit time effects may also be involved for gas jets.

  13. Dynamics of the poor clusters MKW 4 and AWM 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malumuth, E. M.; Kriss, G. A.

    1986-09-01

    The authors have obtained redshifts and CCD photometry of nearly complete samples of galaxies within 1 Mpc of the centers of the Morgan poor clusters MKW 4 and AWM 4. These data are used to study the luminosity functions and the mass distributions of the clusters. For MKW 4 the authors have obtained a sufficient number of galaxy velocities (32) to construct a dynamical model for the cluster. Using the derived potential, they match the observed X-ray surface brightness profile if they allow for a weak cooling flow in the hot gas and if they take the mass distribution of the central galaxy into account. For AWM 4 no well-constrained models of the mass distribution could be obtained, but the best fitting models also give good agreement with X-ray data if a weak cooling flow in the hot gas is assumed.

  14. Mass-metallicity relation from z = 5 to the present: evidence for a transition in the mode of galaxy growth at z = 2.6 due to the end of sustained primordial gas infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, P.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Ledoux, C.; Nilsson, K. K.

    2013-04-01

    We analyse the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity relation in a sample of 110 Damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) spanning the redshift range z = 0.11-5.06 and find that the zero-point of the correlation changes significantly with redshift. The evolution is such that the zero-point is constant at the early phases of galaxy growth (i.e. no evolution) but then features a sharp break at z = 2.6 ± 0.2 with a rapid incline towards lower redshifts such that damped absorbers of identical masses are more metal rich at later times than earlier. The slope of this mass-metallicity correlation evolution is 0.35 ± 0.07 dex per unit redshift. We compare this result to similar studies of the redshift evolution of emission selected galaxy samples and find a remarkable agreement with the slope of the evolution of galaxies of stellar mass log(M*/M⊙) ≈ 8.5. This allows us to form an observational tie between damped absorbers and galaxies seen in emission. We use results from simulations to infer the virial mass of the dark matter halo of a typical DLA galaxy and find a ratio (Mvir/M*) ≈ 30. We compare our results to those of several other studies that have reported strong transition-like events at redshifts around z = 2.5-2.6 and argue that all those observations can be understood as the consequence of a transition from a situation where galaxies were fed more unprocessed infalling gas than they could easily consume to one where they suddenly become infall starved and turn to mainly processing, or re-processing, of previously acquired gas.

  15. Interaction of perovskite-like compounds based on transition-metal oxides with gas phase at T = 200-400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzeva, N. A.; Bobylev, I. B.; Naumov, S. V.; Romanov, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the chemical composition of some perovskite-like cuprates, manganites, and cobaltite on their reactivity for oxygen and water vapor that are present in the annealing atmosphere, at 200-400°C has been studied. The partial substitution and alloying of LnBa2Cu3O y compounds lead to the increase in their stability with respect to aggressive components of gas phase (H2O, CO2). It was found that only compounds with structures characterized by several kinds of oxygen vacancies can absorb oxygen and water from the annealing atmosphere.

  16. Rare-gas clusters in intense VUV, XUV and soft x-ray pulses: signatures of the transition from nanoplasma-driven cluster expansion to Coulomb explosion in ion and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeiter, Mathias; Fennel, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the wavelength-dependent ionization, heating, and expansion dynamics of medium-sized rare-gas clusters (Ar923) under intense femtosecond short-wavelength free-electron laser pulses by quasi-classical molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of the interaction dynamics for pulses with planckω=20, 38 and 90 eV photon energy at fixed total excitation energy indicates a smooth transition from plasma-driven cluster expansion, where predominantly surface ions are expelled by hydrodynamic forces, to quasi-electrostatic behavior with almost pure Coulomb explosion. Corresponding signatures in the time-dependent cluster dynamics, as well as in the final ion and electron spectra, corroborate that this transition is linked to a crossover in the electron emission processes. The resulting signatures in the electron spectra are shown to be even more reliable for identifying the cluster expansion mechanisms than ion energy spectra. It is shown that the prevailing ionization mechanism and the dominant expansion process can be roughly estimated by a simple frustration parameter.

  17. Effect of valence subband dispersion on near-band-gap transitions in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum wells containing a two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, A.; Preezant, Yulia; Cohen, E.; Ashkinadze, B. M.; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    2008-04-01

    The reflection (R) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of several GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs modulation-doped quantum wells (MDQWs) were studied at T=2K . The n doping was either on one side of the quantun well (width of 25nm ) or symmetrically on both sides (width of 20nm ), and the resulting two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density was in the range of ne=(0.7-2.0)×1011cm-2 . The reflection spectra of the two-side MDQW’s show sharp but weak lines (ΔR<0.02) , which are attributed to e1-hh1 and e1-lh1 interband transitions at in-plane wave vectors k∥=kF . These spectra were analyzed by calculating the dispersion of the lowest conduction and top valence subbands and the contribution of the 2DEG interband transitions to the MDQW optical susceptibility. The reflection spectral shape was then calculated as a function of ne and of the layer widths. This model explains the observed differences between the intensity and line shape of the one-side and two-side MDQW’s. The PL spectral shape of all the MDQW’s shows a marked dependence on laser excitation intensity. It was calculated by using the e1 and hh1 dispersion curves and assuming that the interband transitions are k∥ conserving. The observed PL spectral dependence on laser excitation intensity was analyzed by assuming that the effective temperature of the photoexcited holes increases with excitation intensity in the range of Th=4-15K , while the 2DEG temperature remains unchanged and equal to that of the lattice.

  18. How School Taught Me I Was Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author recounts how school taught him that he was poor. For him, third grade was the year in which he learned in school that he was poor. The author's story reminds everyone that all children do not experience school in the same way. Their social class (in the case described in this article), as well as their race, gender,…

  19. Computer simulation of supersonic rarefied gas flow in the transition region, about a spherical probe; a Monte Carlo approach with application to rocket-borne ion probe experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, B. E.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1971-01-01

    This report describes a Monte Carlo simulation of transition flow around a sphere. Conditions for the simulation correspond to neutral monatomic molecules at two altitudes (70 and 75 km) in the D region of the ionosphere. Results are presented in the form of density contours, velocity vector plots and density, velocity and temperature profiles for the two altitudes. Contours and density profiles are related to independent Monte Carlo and experimental studies, and drag coefficients are calculated and compared with available experimental data. The small computer used is a PDP-15 with 16 K of core, and a typical run for 75 km requires five iterations, each taking five hours. The results are recorded on DECTAPE to be printed when required, and the program provides error estimates for any flow field parameter.

  20. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe. PMID:25318522

  1. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-01

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no `metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  2. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  3. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-08-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  4. Why so many children are poor.

    PubMed

    Betson, D M; Michael, R T

    1997-01-01

    According to the official U.S. measure of poverty, in 1995 the child poverty rate in this country was nearly 21%, compared with an adult poverty rate of 11%. This article explores why, according to the official measure, there are so many poor children. Working from the premise that children are poor because they live with poor adults, the reasons for adult poverty are reviewed. Both economic forces and demographic trends have contributed to growing inequality of earnings among workers. That inequality coupled with stagnating real earnings has increased poverty. In addition, education, age, and race affect an individual's earning capacity; the article examines the likelihood that an individual will earn enough to keep his or her family out of poverty, given the individual's educational attainment, age, and race. The reasons for the large difference between the child and adult poverty rates are explored, using a decomposition of the poverty population to show how demographic characteristics such as higher fertility rates among poor families and the higher prevalence of single-parent families among the poor lead to substantially higher poverty rates for children than for adults. Finally, the article examines the validity of the official poverty measure and reviews how an alternative measure proposed by a National Research Council panel would address the official measure's shortcomings. If the panel's proposed measure were adopted, it would change the statistical face of poor children. It would, for example, show an increase in the proportion of poor children who live in families with two parents and a corresponding decrease in the proportion in families with only one parent, and it would show an increase in the proportion of children who live in families with at least one full-time employed adult and a corresponding decrease in the proportion in families with no adult employed full time. PMID:9299835

  5. AWM 4: a sharp look at the core of a poor cluster stirred by AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The central regions of galaxy clusters, frequently occupied by massive elliptical galaxies with strong radio sources interacting with dense, X-ray emitting gas, are among the most interesting and physically active regions in the Universe. We here propose a deep observation of AWM 4, a poor cluster of relaxed appearance without a cooling core but with strong evidence of AGN-driven heating and gas mixing. In this unusual object we will examine the interaction between cluster gas and radio source at high resolution, measure the properties of the gas and constrain the energy budget of the radio source, and clarify the nature of the observed abundance irregularities.

  6. Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager Observations of Metal-poor Damped Lyα Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penprase, Bryan E.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Toro-Martinez, Irene; Beeler, Daniel J.

    2010-09-01

    We present the first results from a survey of SDSS quasars selected for strong H I damped Lyα (DLA) absorption with corresponding low equivalent width absorption from strong low-ion transitions (e.g., C II λ1334 and Si II λ1260). These metal-poor DLA candidates were selected from the SDSS fifth release quasar spectroscopic database, and comprise a large new sample for probing low-metallicity galaxies. Medium-resolution echellette spectra from the Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager spectrograph for an initial sample of 35 systems were obtained to explore the metal-poor tail of the DLA distribution and to investigate the nucleosynthetic patterns at these metallicities. We have estimated saturation corrections for the moderately underresolved spectra, and systems with very narrow Doppler parameters (b <= 5 km s-1) will likely have underestimated abundances. For those systems with Doppler parameters b > 5 km s-1, we have measured low-metallicity DLA gas with [X/H] <-2.4 for at least one of C, O, Si, or Fe. Assuming non-saturated components, we estimate that several DLA systems have [X/H] <-2.8, including five DLA systems with both low equivalent widths and low metallicity in transitions of both C II and O I. All of the measured DLA metallicities, however, exceed or are consistent with a metallicity of at least 1/1000 of solar, regardless of the effects of saturation in our spectra. Our results indicate that the metal-poor tail of galaxies at z ~ 3 drops exponentially at [X/H] lsim-3. If the distribution of metallicity is Gaussian, the probability of identifying interstellar medium gas with lower abundance is extremely small, and our results suggest that DLA systems with [X/H] < -4.0 are extremely rare, and could comprise only 8 × 10-7 of DLA systems. The relative abundances of species within these low-metallicity DLA systems are compared with stellar nucleosynthesis models, and are consistent with stars having masses of 30 M sun < M * < 100 M sun. The observed

  7. Photometric Properties of Galaxies in Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T.

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using optical photometry. We select these poor clusters as luminous, extended X-ray sources identified with poor galaxy systems in the EMSS catalogue of clusters of galaxies. The clusters are at moderate redshifts (0.08poor clusters, but steeper than the field LF in the R-band. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts.

  8. Mass spectrometric determination of O2 gas exchange during a dark-to-light transition in higher-plant cells : Evidence for two individual O2-uptake components.

    PubMed

    Avelange, M H; Rébeillé, F

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of O2 and CO2 by photoautotrophic cells of Euphorbia characias L. was measured using a mass-spectrometry technique. During a dark-tolight transition the O2 uptake rate was little affected whereas CO2 efflux was decreased by 40%. In order to differentiate eventual superimposed O2-uptake processes, the kinetics of O2 exchange resulting from brief illuminations were measured with a highly sensitive device. When the cells were exposed to a saturating light for short periods, the rate of O2 uptake passed through a series of transients: there was first a stimulation occurring 2-3 s after the appearance of O2 from water-splitting, followed 30 s later by an inhibition. These two transients were reduced 80% by 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)1, 1-dimethylurea (DCMU), indicating that they relied on the linear transport of electrons in the chloroplasts. The first transient (stimulation of an O2 uptake) was little affected by mitochondrial inhibitors such as antimycin A and oligomycin or the uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but was increased in presence of KCN. When spaced flashes (2 us duration; 100-ms intervals) were used instead of continuous light, this transient was almost suppressed indicating that it was dependent on the saturation of some component of the chloroplastic chain. The second transient (inhibition of O2 uptake) was present when spaced flashes were used instead of continuous light. It was markedly decreased by addition of CCCP and mitochondrial inhibitors (antimycin A, oligomycin, KCN) which strongly indicates that it relied on mitochondrial respiration. It is concluded from these experiments that illumination of the cells resulted in an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, but the resulting inhibition of O2 uptake was hidden by the appearance of an O2-uptake process of extramitochondrial origin, presumably located in the chloroplast. PMID:24193615

  9. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  10. Resilient Parenting: Overcoming Poor Parental Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Wendy J.; Combs-Orme, Terri

    2007-01-01

    This study identified groups of mothers with varying patterns of adaptive functioning and bonds with their own parents. These patterns were related to mothers' parenting of their own children to understand how some mothers avoid repeating the cycle of poor parenting. Data from 210 new mothers were analyzed before hospital discharge about bonding…

  11. Planning Behaviour in Good and Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahapatra, Shamita

    2016-01-01

    A group of 50 good readers and a group of 50 poor readers of Grade 5 matched for age and intelligence and selected on the basis of their proficiency in reading comprehension were tested for their competence in word reading and the process of planning at three different levels, namely, perceptual, memory and conceptual in order to study the…

  12. Runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2012-01-01

    More recently, research on enhancing the situational awareness of pilots, especially in poor visibility flight conditions, gains more and more interests. Since pilots may not be able to spot the runway clearly in poor visibility conditions, such as fog, smoke, haze or dim lighting conditions, aviation landing problem can occur due to the (unexpected) presence of objects on the runway. Complicated and trivial instruments, switches, bottoms, plus sudden happenings are enough for the pilots to take care of during landing approach. Therefore, an automatic hazard detection approach that combines non-linear Multi-scale Retinex (MSR) image enhancement, edge detection with basic edge pattern analysis, and image analysis is investigated. The effect of applying the enhancement method is to make the image of the runway almost independent from the poor atmospheric conditions. The following smart edge detection process extracts edge information, which can also reduce the storing space, the comparison and retrieval time, and the effect of sensor noise. After analyzing the features existing in the edge differences occurring in the runway area by digital image processing techniques, the existing potential hazard will be localized and labeled. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective in runway hazard detection in poor visibility conditions.

  13. From Many Lands. Voices of the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayan, Deepa, Ed.; Petesch, Patti, Ed.

    This book, the last volume in a three-part series, draws on a large-scale worldwide poverty study to present the views, experiences, and aspirations of poor people in 14 selected countries. In each country, interviews and discussion groups were held in 8-15 rural and urban communities that reflected the most prevalent poverty groups and the…

  14. Who Are The Poor In Puerto Rico?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Barry B.; de Cintron, Celia F.

    Dichotomous poverty is defined by taking an arbitrary standard of consumption capability as a dividing line between rich and poor. An investigation into dichotomous poverty below the 2000 dollar level will be worthwhile, since, in 1953, the Planning Board announced as a goal the attempt to lift all families above this margin. In 1953, 78 percent…

  15. University Students with Poor Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the nature of the working memory and general cognitive ability deficits experienced by university students with a specific reading comprehension deficit. A total of 32 university students with poor reading comprehension but average word-reading skills and 60 age-word-matched controls with no comprehension…

  16. The Other Poor: Rural Poverty and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Books, Sue

    1997-01-01

    This paper argues that rural poverty remains relatively invisible because, although shameful, it is profitable, and the rural poor pose little threat to their suburban neighbors. This is illustrated via interrogation concerning a rural poultry plant fire. The paper examines implications of this case for foundations scholars and educational…

  17. Choosing among Alternative Programs for Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet M.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests four criteria (efficiency, return on investment, incentives, and equity) for evaluating and comparing public programs for poor children, and provides an overview of information available on eight large federal programs using these criteria. Positive effects of some programs are noted, and policy recommendations the evidence supports are…

  18. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  19. Getting to Know L2 Poor Comprehenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoghi, Masoud; Mustapha, Ramlee; Maasum, Tengku Nor Rizan BT Tengku Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    Among the plethora of studies conducted thus far to explore the factors affecting EFL reading effectiveness, scant attention seems to be paid to the why of poor reading comprehension of most EFL learners. In this regard, the present article capitalized on qualitative research on a small scale, for the purpose of addressing the not-so-often debated…

  20. Katharine Drexel: Learning to Love the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Although born into privilege, Katharine Drexel was blessed with parents, siblings, friends, and spiritual guides who kept her rooted in a deep, Eucharistic faith. Responding to the needs of the poor was a responsibility of the rich, and Katharine learned this value at the hands of her parents at an early age. With the good counsel of popes and…

  1. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  2. Photometric Properties of Poor Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    We study several statistical properties of galaxies in four poor clusters of galaxies using multi-color optical photometry obtained at the Vainu Bappu Telescope, India. The clusters, selected from the EMSS Catalog, are at moderate redshifts (0.08 < z < 0.25), of equivalent Abell richness R=0, and appear to be dynamically young. The early-type galaxy populations are clearly evolved, as traced by the tightness of the color-magnitude relations and the accordance of the latter with those of the Virgo cluster. The blue galaxy fractions are similar to those of R=0 clusters and higher than those of richer clusters at similar redshifts. The composite luminosity functions (LFs) in B, V, and R bands are flat at the faint end, similar to the V-band LF derived by Yamagata & Maehara for other (MKW/AWM) poor clusters but steeper than the R-band field LF derived by Lin et al. In terms of the statistical properties of their member galaxies, poor clusters appear to be lower-mass extensions of their rich counterparts. The brightest galaxies of three of these poor clusters appear to be luminous ellipticals with no incontrovertible signatures of a halo. It is likely that they were formed from multiple mergers early in the history of the clusters.

  3. Promoting Upward Mobility for the Working Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupured, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The working poor are typically defined by researchers as individuals who work at least part of the year and earn less than a given percentage of the federal poverty level. This definition tends to understate the problem. In 1997, 15.8 million employed parents had incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. The federal Earned Income Tax…

  4. Barely Getting By: Wisconsin's Working Poor Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center on Wisconsin Strategy.

    Noting that 182,000 of Wisconsin's children are living below the poverty line, this report documents factors affecting the working poor of Wisconsin, combining labor market and wage data with profiles of families and their children from communities throughout the state. The report documents the surge in poverty-wage jobs in Wisconsin over the past…

  5. Residential Mobility among the Rural Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchen, Janet M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of short-distance residential moves in poor rural New York counties was much greater than nationally, driven by scarce affordable housing and changes in personal and household situations. Higher frequency movement was associated with younger age, fewer children, and weaker social support networks. Discusses impacts of high mobility…

  6. Uncertainty in particle number modal analysis during transient operation of compressed natural gas, diesel, and trap-equipped diesel transit buses.

    PubMed

    Holmén, Britt A; Qu, Yingge

    2004-04-15

    The relationships between transient vehicle operation and ultrafine particle emissions are not well-known, especially for low-emission alternative bus technologies such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel buses equipped with particulate filters/traps (TRAP). In this study, real-time particle number concentrations measured on a nominal 5 s average basis using an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) for these two bus technologies are compared to that of a baseline catalyst-equipped diesel bus operated on ultralow sulfur fuel (BASE) using dynamometer testing. Particle emissions were consistently 2 orders of magnitude lower for the CNG and TRAP compared to BASE on all driving cycles. Time-resolved total particle numbers were examined in terms of sampling factors identified as affecting the ability of ELPI to quantify the particulate matter number emissions for low-emitting vehicles such as CNG and TRAP as a function of vehicle driving mode. Key factors were instrument sensitivity and dilution ratio, alignment of particle and vehicle operating data, sampling train background particles, and cycle-to-cycle variability due to vehicle, engine, after-treatment, or driver behavior. In-cycle variability on the central business district (CBD) cycle was highest for the TRAP configuration, but this could not be attributed to the ELPI sensitivity issues observed for TRAP-IDLE measurements. Elevated TRAP emissions coincided with low exhaust temperature, suggesting on-road real-world particulate filter performance can be evaluated by monitoring exhaust temperature. Nonunique particle emission maps indicate that measures other than vehicle speed and acceleration are necessary to model disaggregated real-time particle emissions. Further testing on a wide variety of test cycles is needed to evaluate the relative importance of the time history of vehicle operation and the hysteresis of the sampling train/dilution tunnel on ultrafine particle emissions. Future studies should

  7. Parenting Efficacy and the Early School Adjustment of Poor and Near-Poor Black Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Aurora P.; Choi, Jeong-Kyun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study investigates whether maternal educational attainment, maternal employment status, and family income affect African American children's behavioral and cognitive functioning over time through their impacts on mothers' psychological functioning and parenting efficacy in a sample of 100 poor and near-poor single…

  8. Differences in Nutrient Adequacy among Poor and Non-Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John T.; Martin, Katie S.

    This study compared the proportion of 1- to 5-year-olds in poor and non-poor households whose intakes of key nutrients were inadequate. Data were obtained from the 1986 United States Department of Agriculture Nationwide Food Consumption Survey and Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals. An intake below 70 percent of the Recommended Daily…

  9. Longitudinal stability and predictors of poor oral comprehenders and poor decoders.

    PubMed

    Elwér, Sa; Keenan, Janice M; Olson, Richard K; Byrne, Brian; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Two groups of fourth-grade children were selected from a population sample (N=926) to be either poor oral comprehenders (poor oral comprehension but normal word decoding) or poor decoders (poor decoding but normal oral comprehension). By examining both groups in the same study with varied cognitive and literacy predictors, and examining them both retrospectively and prospectively, we could assess how distinctive and stable the predictors of each deficit are. Predictors were assessed retrospectively at preschool and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. Group effects were significant at all test occasions, including those for preschool vocabulary (worse in poor oral comprehenders) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) (worse in poor decoders). Preschool RAN and vocabulary prospectively predicted Grade 4 group membership (77-79% correct classification) within the selected samples. Reselection in preschool of "at-risk" poor decoder and poor oral comprehender subgroups based on these variables led to significant but relatively weak prediction of subtype membership at Grade 4. Implications of the predictive stability of our results for identification and intervention of these important subgroups are discussed. PMID:23528975

  10. Longitudinal Stability and Predictors of Poor Oral Comprehenders and Poor Decoders

    PubMed Central

    Elwér, Åsa; Keenan, Janice M.; Olson, Richard K.; Byrne, Brian; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Two groups of 4th grade children were selected from a population sample (N= 926) to either be Poor Oral Comprehenders (poor oral comprehension but normal word decoding), or Poor Decoders (poor decoding but normal oral comprehension). By examining both groups in the same study with varied cognitive and literacy predictors, and examining them both retrospectively and prospectively, we could assess how distinctive and stable the predictors of each deficit are. Predictors were assessed retrospectively at preschool, at the end of kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd grades. Group effects were significant at all test occasions, including those for preschool vocabulary (worse in poor oral comprehenders) and rapid naming (RAN) (worse in poor decoders). Preschool RAN and Vocabulary prospectively predicted grade 4 group membership (77–79% correct classification) within the selected samples. Reselection in preschool of at-risk poor decoder and poor oral comprehender subgroups based on these variables led to significant but relatively weak prediction of subtype membership at grade 4. Implications of the predictive stability of our results for identification and intervention of these important subgroups are discussed. PMID:23528975

  11. Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don L.; Queloz, Didier; Rauer, Heike; Watson, Christopher A.; West, Richard G.; Chazelas, Bruno; Louden, Tom M.; Bannister, Nigel; Bento, Joao; Burleigh, Matthew; Cabrera, Juan; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Genolet, Ludovic; Goad, Michael; Grange, Andrew; Jordán, Andrés; Lawrie, Katherine; McCormac, James; Neveu, Marion; Walker, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) is a new ground-based survey for transiting exoplanets. Our primary goal is to find the first statistically-significant sample of Neptunes and super-Earths that are bright enough for radial velocity confirmation. By measuring precise masses and radii we will constrain the bulk composition and internal structure of planets that span the transition between the gas giants and terrestrial planets. Our brightest exoplanets will also be suitable for atmospheric characterisation with large facilities such as the VLT, JWST and the E-ELT. NGTS construction began in June 2013, and the survey is due to commence in 2014.

  12. Gel transitions in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenholtz, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1999-12-01

    The idealized mode-coupling theory (MCT) is applied to colloidal systems interacting via short-range attractive interactions of Yukawa form. At low temperatures, MCT predicts a slowing down of the local dynamics and ergodicity-breaking transitions. The non-ergodicity transitions share many features with the colloidal gel transition, and are proposed to be the source of gelation in colloidal systems. Previous calculations of the phase diagram are complemented with additional data for shorter ranges of the attractive interaction, showing that the path of the non-ergodicity transition line is then unimpeded by the gas-liquid critical curve at low temperatures. Particular attention is given to the critical non-ergodicity parameters; this is motivated by recent experimental measurements. An asymptotic model is developed, valid for dilute systems of spheres interacting via strong short-range attractions, and is shown to capture all aspects of the low-temperature MCT non-ergodicity transitions.

  13. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  14. Phase transition in the Jarzynski estimator of free energy differences.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Alberto; Silbey, Robert; Oppenheim, Irwin

    2012-05-01

    The transition between a regime in which thermodynamic relations apply only to ensembles of small systems coupled to a large environment and a regime in which they can be used to characterize individual macroscopic systems is analyzed in terms of the change in behavior of the Jarzynski estimator of equilibrium free energy differences from nonequilibrium work measurements. Given a fixed number of measurements, the Jarzynski estimator is unbiased for sufficiently small systems. In these systems the directionality of time is poorly defined and the configurations that dominate the empirical average, but which are in fact typical of the reverse process, are sufficiently well sampled. As the system size increases the arrow of time becomes better defined. The dominant atypical fluctuations become rare and eventually cannot be sampled with the limited resources that are available. Asymptotically, only typical work values are measured. The Jarzynski estimator becomes maximally biased and approaches the exponential of minus the average work, which is the result that is expected from standard macroscopic thermodynamics. In the proper scaling limit, this regime change has been recently described in terms of a phase transition in variants of the random energy model. In this paper this correspondence is further demonstrated in two examples of physical interest: the sudden compression of an ideal gas and adiabatic quasistatic volume changes in a dilute real gas. PMID:23004704

  15. Phase transition in the Jarzynski estimator of free energy differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Alberto; Silbey, Robert; Oppenheim, Irwin

    2012-05-01

    The transition between a regime in which thermodynamic relations apply only to ensembles of small systems coupled to a large environment and a regime in which they can be used to characterize individual macroscopic systems is analyzed in terms of the change in behavior of the Jarzynski estimator of equilibrium free energy differences from nonequilibrium work measurements. Given a fixed number of measurements, the Jarzynski estimator is unbiased for sufficiently small systems. In these systems the directionality of time is poorly defined and the configurations that dominate the empirical average, but which are in fact typical of the reverse process, are sufficiently well sampled. As the system size increases the arrow of time becomes better defined. The dominant atypical fluctuations become rare and eventually cannot be sampled with the limited resources that are available. Asymptotically, only typical work values are measured. The Jarzynski estimator becomes maximally biased and approaches the exponential of minus the average work, which is the result that is expected from standard macroscopic thermodynamics. In the proper scaling limit, this regime change has been recently described in terms of a phase transition in variants of the random energy model. In this paper this correspondence is further demonstrated in two examples of physical interest: the sudden compression of an ideal gas and adiabatic quasistatic volume changes in a dilute real gas.

  16. Molybdenum Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    2012-08-01

    Peterson (2011) has analyzed HST spectra near 2000Å of five metal-poor turnoff stars with mild enhancements of heavy r-process elements. Two stars, HD 94028 and HD 160617, are unique in showing an extreme overabundance of the light trans-ironic element molybdenum (Z = 42), but less extreme enhancements of Zr (Z = 40) and Ru (Z = 44). Of several nucleosynthesis scenarios that can produce nuclei in this mass range in the oldest stars, a high-entropy wind (HEW) acting in a core-collapse supernova seems uniquely capable of a high overproduction confined to a narrow mass range. That this unusual elemental distribution is achieved only under very limited physical conditions suggests that very few individual nucleosynthesis events were responsible for the synthesis of the light trans-ironic elements in these stars, even though both are only moderately metal-poor.

  17. MOLECULAR GAS IN YOUNG DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kiss, Cs.; Juhasz, A.; Kospal, A.; Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Henning, Th.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-10-10

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old ({approx}>8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordial origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesimals can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk of HD21997.

  18. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  19. Going Global, for Rich and Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay; Mathews, Linda

    2012-01-01

    International Baccalaureate (IB) programs are turning up in a diverse mix of school districts, an attempt to add rigor and depth. For rich and for poor, for big schools and small ones, IB has become a way to add rigor and depth to public school curricula. But each school district has adapted IB for its own needs. Some use it in all schools for all…

  20. [Skin problems associated with poor living conditions].

    PubMed

    Moretti, Francesco; Dory, Élodie; Favrat, Bernard; Winterton, Nina; Berger, Jérôme; Bodenmann, Patrick

    2015-11-25

    People living in poor conditions are at high risk of developing different medical diseases of which dermatological diseases are very common. We present 4 clinical cases of skin diseases, which are the most prevalent amongst the majority of socially and economically vulnerable patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are of paramount importance, in order to avoid their spread in close- knit communities where these patients often live. PMID:26742355

  1. The origin of the most iron-poor star

    SciTech Connect

    Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Limongi, M.; Omukai, K.; Nozawa, T.; Chieffi, A.

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the origin of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars starting from the recently discovered [Fe/H] < -7.1 star SMSS J031300. We show that the elemental abundances observed on the surface of SMSS J031300 can be well fit by the yields of faint, metal-free, supernovae (SNe). Using properly calibrated faint SN explosion models, we study, for the first time, the formation of dust grains in such carbon-rich, iron-poor SN ejecta. Calculations are performed assuming both unmixed and uniformly mixed ejecta and taking into account the partial destruction by the SN reverse shock. We find that, due to the paucity of refractory elements beside carbon, amorphous carbon is the only grain species to form, with carbon condensation efficiencies that range between (0.15 and 0.84), resulting in dust yields in the range (0.025-2.25) M {sub ☉}. We follow the collapse and fragmentation of a star-forming cloud enriched by the products of these faint SN explosions and we explore the role played by fine structure line cooling and dust cooling. We show that even if grain growth during the collapse has a minor effect of the dust-to-gas ratio, due to C depletion into CO molecules at an early stage of the collapse, the formation of CEMP low-mass stars, such as SMSS J031300, could be triggered by dust cooling and fragmentation. A comparison between model predictions and observations of a sample of C-normal and C-rich metal-poor stars supports the idea that a single common pathway may be responsible for the formation of the first low-mass stars.

  2. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  3. The landless poor--India's growing problem.

    PubMed

    Baidya, K N

    1985-01-01

    The bulk of poverty in India is found among those with no land or insufficient land with which to feed themselves. This predicament is a result of both population growth and the failure of the government to create sufficient employment opportunities in rural areas. India's inheritance custom, which calls for a sharing of property among a deceased's heirs, has fragmented farms into ever smaller holdings. The sharecropping system has created obstacles against participation of the rural masses in the development effort. The failure of agrarian reform efforts in India is attributed to the resistance of the powerful land-owning interests, supported by small landowners. Industrialization has not provided employment for the many rural unemployed who drift to the cities. It is not the lack of agricultural investment per se that is the source of the problem of the landless poor. Rather, social and political issues are involved. Large farms tend to obtain whatever aid is available for rural development. The increased use of electrification and mechanization has reduced the amount of employment available for landless workers. Half of India's arable land remains in the hands of 7% of the big land-holders. Thus, the gap between the haves and the have-nots has actually increased as a result of agricultural development. Food production has increased, but the ability of the poor masses to purchase food has decreased. As long as they are weak economically, the poor are likely to remain weak politically. Thus, there is a need for both economic and political reform. Resources must be massively diverted for the benefit of the rural sector, and power must be developed within democratic organizations at the rural level. The consequences of such change may be unacceptable to the elite classes who control the state apparatus and have the power to eradicate poverty and reduce inequality, however. PMID:12266988

  4. Poor mental health status and aggression are associated with poor driving behavior among male traffic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Nasrin; Farnia, Vahid; Delavar, Ali; Esmaeili, Alirez; Dortaj, Fariborz; Farrokhi, Noorali; Karami, Majid; Shakeri, Jalal; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background In Iran, traffic accidents and deaths from traffic accidents are among the highest in the world, and generally driver behavior rather than either technical failures or environmental conditions are responsible for traffic accidents. In the present study, we explored the extent to which aggressive traits, health status, and sociodemographic variables explain driving behavior among Iranian male traffic offenders. Method A total of 443 male driving offenders (mean age: M =31.40 years, standard deviation =9.56) from Kermanshah (Iran) took part in the study. Participants completed a questionnaire booklet covering sociodemographic variables, traits of aggression, health status, and driving behavior. Results Poor health status, such as symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and social dysfunction, and also higher levels of trait aggression explained poor driving behavior. Multiple regressions indicated that poor health status, but not aggression, independently predicted poor driving behavior. Conclusion Results suggest that health status concerns are associated with poor driving behavior. Prevention and intervention might therefore focus on drivers reporting poor mental health status. PMID:26316753

  5. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  6. Nuclear binding near a quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dean

    2016-03-01

    I review recent ab initio results by the Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory Collaboration showing that nature lies close to a quantum phase transition between an alpha-particle gas and nuclear liquid. I discuss the control parameter of this transition and the implications for clustering in nuclei and improving ab initio nuclear structure calculations.

  7. Effect of adduct formation with molecular nitrogen on the measured collisional cross sections of transition metal-1,10-phenanthroline complexes in traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry: N2 is not always an "inert" buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Nicole J; Weiske, Thomas; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The number of separations and analyses of molecular species using traveling wave ion-mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) is increasing, including those extending the technique to analytes containing metal atoms. A critical aspect of such applications of TWIMS-MS is the validity of the collisional cross sections (CCSs) measured and whether they can be accurately calibrated against other ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques. Many metal containing species have potential reactivity toward molecular nitrogen, which is present in high concentration in the typical Synapt-G2 TWIMS cell. Here, we analyze the effect of nitrogen on the drift time of a series of cationic 1,10-phenanthroline complexes of the late transition metals, [(phen)M](+), (M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, and Hg) in order to understand potential deviations from expected drift time behaviors. These metal complexes were chosen for their metal open-coordination site and lack of rotameric species. The target species were generated via electrospray ionization (ESI), analyzed using TWIMS in N2 drift gas, and the observed drift time trends compared. Theoretically derived CCSs for all species (via both the projection approximation and trajectory method) were also compared. The results show that, indeed, for metal containing species in this size regime, reaction with molecular nitrogen has a dramatic effect on measured drift times and must not be ignored when comparing and interpreting TWIMS arrival time distributions. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are employed to analyze the periodic differences due to the metal's interaction with nitrogen (and background water) in detail. PMID:26378338

  8. [Humanitarian transition].

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François; Troit, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    In two centuries, modern humanitarian action has experienced several fractures often linked to crises. Although its professionalism and intervention force remain indisputable, it faces, since the 2000s, a new context that limits its ability to act and confronts it with new dilemmas, even though it must deal with needs for aid of unprecedented scale. These difficulties reveal a humanitarian transition period that was not anticipated. This transition period reflects the change from a dominant paradigm of North-South solidarity of Western origin to a much more complex model. This article provides a summary of the current mutations that are dominated by the States' assertion of sovereignty. Among the possible solutions, it argues for an ethical approach and a better integration of the research carried out in the Global South, prerequisites for building a true partnership and placing the victims at the heart of the operations which involve them. PMID:26936180

  9. DETERMINING INTERSTELLAR CARBON ABUNDANCES FROM STRONG-LINE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, U. J.; Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S.; Murthy, J.

    2011-01-15

    Carbon is arguably the most important element in the interstellar medium, yet its abundance in gas and dust is poorly understood due to a paucity of data. We explore the possibility of substantially increasing our knowledge of interstellar carbon by applying and assessing a new method for determining the column density of the dominant ion of interstellar carbon in diffuse neutral lines of sight. The method relies on profile fitting of the strong transition of C II at 1334 A in spectra continuum normalized with stellar models. We apply our method to six sight lines for which the carbon abundance has previously been determined with a weak intersystem absorption transition. Our strong-line method consistently shows a significantly lower gas-phase C abundance than the measurements from the weak lines. This result implies that more carbon could reside in dust than was previously thought. This has implications for dust models, which often suffer from a lack of sufficient carbon to plausibly explain extinction. There is no immediately clear explanation for the difference found between the strong- and weak-line C II determinations, but there are indications that the results from the method presented here have advantages over the weak-line column densities. If this is the case, then the reported oscillator strength for the C II transition at 2325 A may be too small. Our findings further suggest that damping wings modeled with a single absorption component may not produce accurate abundances. This problem could affect a large number of H I abundances determined through absorption line analysis that are reported in the literature.

  10. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice. PMID:26975959

  11. Direct multiangle solution for poorly stratified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Wold, Cyle; Petkov, Alexander; Hao, Wei Min

    2012-09-01

    The direct multiangle solution is considered, which allows improving the scanning lidar-data-inversion accuracy when the requirement of the horizontally stratified atmosphere is poorly met. The signal measured at zenith or close to zenith is used as a core source for extracting optical characteristics of the atmospheric aerosol loading. The multiangle signals are used as auxiliary data to extract the vertical transmittance profile from the zenith signal. Details of the retrieval methodology are considered that eliminate, or at least soften, some specific ambiguities in the multiangle measurements in horizontally heterogeneous atmospheres. Simulated and experimental elastic lidar data are presented that illustrate the essentials of the data-processing technique. Finally, the prospects of the utilization of high-spectral-resolution lidar in the multiangle mode are discussed. PMID:22945162

  12. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  13. Improved Yttrium and Zirconium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, Renata; Biemont, E.; Cowan, J. J.; Sneden, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present new abundances of the lighter n-capture elements, Yttrium (Z=39) and Zirconium (Z=40) in the very metal poor, r-process rich stars BD+17 3248 and HD 221170. Very accurate abundances were obtained by use of the new transition probabilities for Y II published by Biémont et al. 2011, and Zr II by Malcheva et al. 2006, and by expanding the number of transitions employed for each element. For example, in BD+17 3248, we find log ɛπσιλον=-0.03 +/- 0.03 (σιγμα=0.15, from 23 lines) for Y II. As for Zr II, log ɛπσιλον = 0.65 +/- 0.03 (σɛγμα = 0.1, from 13 lines). The resulting abundance ratio is log ɛπσιλον [Y/Zr] = -0.68 +/- 0.05. The results for HD 221170 are in accord with those of BD+17 3248. The quantity of lines used to form the abundance means has increased significantly since the original studies of these stars, resulting in more trustworthy abundances. These observed abundance ratios are in agreement with an r-process-only value predicted from stellar models, but is under-abundant compared to an empirical model derived from direct analyses of meteoritic material. This ambiguity should stimulate further nucleosynthetic analysis to explain this abundance ratio. We would like to extend our gratitude to NSF grant AST-0908978 and the University of Texas Astronomy Department Rex G. Baker, Jr. Endowment for their financial support in this project.

  14. Poor-data and data-poor species stock assessment using a Bayesian hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yan; Cortés, Enric; Andrews, Kate; Guo, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Appropriate inference for stocks or species with low-quality data (poor data) or limited data (data poor) is extremely important. Hierarchical Bayesian methods are especially applicable to small-area, small-sample-size estimation problems because they allow poor-data species to borrow strength from species with good-quality data. We used a hammerhead shark complex as an example to investigate the advantages of using hierarchical Bayesian models in assessing the status of poor-data and data-poor exploited species. The hammerhead shark complex (Sphyrna spp.) along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States is composed of three species: the scalloped hammerhead (S. lewini), the great hammerhead (S. mokarran), and the smooth hammerhead (S. zygaena) sharks. The scalloped hammerhead comprises 70-80% of the catch and has catch and relative abundance data of good quality, whereas great and smooth hammerheads have relative abundance indices that are both limited and of low quality presumably because of low stock density and limited sampling. Four hierarchical Bayesian state-space surplus production models were developed to simulate variability in population growth rates, carrying capacity, and catchability of the species. The results from the hierarchical Bayesian models were considerably more robust than those of the nonhierarchical models. The hierarchical Bayesian approach represents an intermediate strategy between traditional models that assume different population parameters for each species and those that assume all species share identical parameters. Use of the hierarchical Bayesian approach is suggested for future hammerhead shark stock assessments and for modeling fish complexes with species-specific data, because the poor-data species can borrow strength from the species with good data, making the estimation more stable and robust. PMID:22073653

  15. GIS diagnostics: thermal imaging systems used for poor contact detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avital, Doron; Brandenbursky, V.; Farber, A.

    2004-04-01

    The reliability of GIS is very high but any failure that occurs can cause extensive damage result and the repair times are considerably long. The consequential losses to system security and economically can be high, especially if the nominal GIS voltage is 420 kV and above. In view of these circumstances, increasing attention is being given to diagnostic techniques for in-service maintenance undertaken to improve the reliability and availability of GIS. Recently considerable progress has been made in diagnostic techniques and they are now used successfully during the service life of the equipment. These diagnostic techniques in general focus on the GIS insulation system and are based on partial discharge (PD) measurements in GIS. There are three main methods for in-service PD detection in GIS: - the chemical method that rely on the detection of cracked gas caused by PD, the acoustic method designed to detect the acoustic emission excited by PD, and, the electrical method which is based on detection of electrical resonance at ultra high frequencies (UHF) up to 1.5 GHz caused by PD excitation in GIS chambers (UHF method). These three dielectric diagnostic methods cannot be used for the detection of poor current carrying contacts in GIS. This problem does not always produce partial discharges and at early stages it does not cause gas cracking. An interesting solution to use two techniques - the current unbalance alarm scheme and partial discharge monitoring was advised by A. Salinas from South California Edison Co. Unfortunately this way is complicated and very expensive. The investigations performed in Japan on standing alone SF6 breaker showed that joule heating of the contact accompanied by released power of 1600 Watt produce temperature difference on the enclosure up to 7 degrees centigrade that could be detected by infra-red Thermal Imaging System. According to CIGRE Joint Working Group 33/23.12 Report, 11% of all GIS failures are due to poor current carrying

  16. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  17. Deep Imaging of Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding whether the most metal-poor and actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe such as I Zw 18 contain evolved stars. We propose to help settle this issue by obtaining deep ACS/HRC U, narrow-V, I, and H-alpha images of nine nearby {z < 0.01} extremely metal-poor {12 + O/H < 7.65} galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects are only marginally resolved from the ground and appear uniformly blue, strongly motivating HST imaging. The continuum images will establish: 1.} If underlying populations of evolved stars are present, by revealing the objects' colors on scales 10 pc, and 2.} The presence of any faint tidal features, dust lanes, and globular or super star clusters, all of which constrain the objects' evolutionary states. The H-alpha images, in combination with ground-based echelle spectroscopy, will reveal 1.} Whether the objects are producing "superwinds" that are depleting them of their metals; ground-based images of some of them indeed show large halos of ionized gas, and 2.} The correspondence of their nebular and stellar emission on scales of a few parsecs, which is important for understanding the "feedback" process by which supernovae and stellar winds regulate star formation. One of the sample objects, CGCG 269-049, lies only 2 Mpc away, allowing the detection of individual red giant stars in it if any are present. We have recently obtained Spitzer images and spectra of this galaxy to determine its dust content and star formation history, which will complement the proposed HST observations. [NOTE: THIS PROPOSAL WAS REDUCED TO FIVE ORBITS, AND ONLY ONE OF THE ORIGINAL TARGETS, CGCG 269-049, AFTER THE PHASE I REVIEW

  18. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  19. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results. PMID:23485321

  20. The Affordable Housing Crisis: Residential Mobility of Poor Families and School Mobility of Poor Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Sheila

    2003-01-01

    Helping poor families increase their residential stability can have direct bearing on school stability and student academic achievement. Discusses the role of housing in child and family wellbeing; residential mobility and school performance; residential mobility and housing problems; housing affordability; (federal housing policy); homeownership;…

  1. Kinematics of AWM and MKW Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranyi, Daniel M.; Geller, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured 1365 redshifts to a limiting magnitude of R~15.5 in 15 AWM/MKW clusters and have collected another 203 from the literature in MKW 4s, MKW 2, and MKW 2s. In AWM 7 we have extended the redshift sample to R~18 in the cluster center. We have identified 704 cluster members in 17 clusters; 201 are newly identified. We summarize the kinematics and distributions of the cluster galaxies and provide an initial discussion of substructure, mass and luminosity segregation, spectral segregation, velocity-dispersion profiles, and the relation of the central galaxy to global cluster properties. We compute optical mass estimates, which we compare with X-ray mass determinations from the literature. The clusters are in a variety of dynamical states, reflected in the three classes of behavior of the velocity-dispersion profile in the core: rising, falling, or flat/ambiguous. The velocity dispersion of the emission-line galaxy population significantly exceeds that of the absorption-line galaxies in almost all of the clusters, and the presence of emission-line galaxies at small projected radii suggests continuing infall of galaxies onto the clusters. The presence of a cD galaxy does not constrain the global cluster properties; these clusters are similar to other poor clusters that contain no cD. We use the similarity of the velocity-dispersion profiles at small radii and the cD-like galaxies' internal velocity dispersions to argue that cD formation is a local phenomenon. Our sample establishes an empirical observational baseline of poor clusters for comparison with simulations of similar systems. Observations reported in this paper were obtained at the Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution; at the Whipple Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and Harvard University; and at the WIYN Observatory, a joint facility of the University of

  2. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  3. Rich and Poor Cities in Europe. An Urban Scaling Approach to Mapping the European Economic Transition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the urban science make broad use of the notion of scaling. We focus here on the important scaling relationship between the gross metropolitan product (GMP) of a city and its population (pop). It has been demonstrated that GMP ∝ Y Ypopβ with β always greater than 1 and close to 1.2. This fundamental finding highlights a universal rule that holds across countries and cultures and might explain the very nature of cities. However, in an increasingly connected world, the hypothesis that the economy of a city solely depends on its population might be questionable. Using data for 248 cities in the European Union between 2005 and 2010, we found a double GMP/pop scaling regime. For West EU cities, β = 1 over the whole the period, while for post-communist cities β > 1 and increases from ∼1.2 to ∼1.4. The evolution of the scaling exponent describes the convergence of post-communist European cities to open and liberal economies. We propose a simple model of economic convergence in which, under stable political conditions, a linear GMP/pop scaling is expected for all cities. The results suggest that the GMP/pop super-linear scaling represents a phase of economic growth rather than a steady, universal urban feature. The results also suggest that relationships between cities are embedded in their political and economic context and cannot be neglected in explanations of cities, urbanization and urban economics. PMID:27551719

  4. Rich and Poor Cities in Europe. An Urban Scaling Approach to Mapping the European Economic Transition.

    PubMed

    Strano, Emanuele; Sood, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the urban science make broad use of the notion of scaling. We focus here on the important scaling relationship between the gross metropolitan product (GMP) of a city and its population (pop). It has been demonstrated that GMP ∝ Y Ypopβ with β always greater than 1 and close to 1.2. This fundamental finding highlights a universal rule that holds across countries and cultures and might explain the very nature of cities. However, in an increasingly connected world, the hypothesis that the economy of a city solely depends on its population might be questionable. Using data for 248 cities in the European Union between 2005 and 2010, we found a double GMP/pop scaling regime. For West EU cities, β = 1 over the whole the period, while for post-communist cities β > 1 and increases from ∼1.2 to ∼1.4. The evolution of the scaling exponent describes the convergence of post-communist European cities to open and liberal economies. We propose a simple model of economic convergence in which, under stable political conditions, a linear GMP/pop scaling is expected for all cities. The results suggest that the GMP/pop super-linear scaling represents a phase of economic growth rather than a steady, universal urban feature. The results also suggest that relationships between cities are embedded in their political and economic context and cannot be neglected in explanations of cities, urbanization and urban economics. PMID:27551719

  5. The Kennicutt-Schmidt Relation in Extremely Metal-Poor Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, M. E.; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Amorín, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation between the gas mass and star formation rate (SFR) describes the star formation regulation in disk galaxies. It is a function of gas metallicity, but the low-metallicity regime of the KS diagram is poorly sampled. We have analyzed data for a representative set of extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs), as well as auxiliary data, and compared these to empirical and theoretical predictions. The majority of the XMPs possess high specific SFRs, similar to high-redshift star-forming galaxies. On the KS plot, the XMP H i data occupy the same region as dwarfs and extend the relation for low surface brightness galaxies. Considering the H i gas alone, a considerable fraction of the XMPs already fall off the KS law. Significant quantities of “dark” H2 mass (i.e., not traced by CO) would imply that XMPs possess low star formation efficiencies (SFEgas). Low SFEgas in XMPs may be the result of the metal-poor nature of the H i gas. Alternatively, the H i reservoir may be largely inert, the star formation being dominated by cosmological accretion. Time lags between gas accretion and star formation may also reduce the apparent SFEgas, as may galaxy winds, which can expel most of the gas into the intergalactic medium. Hence, on global scales, XMPs could be H i-dominated, high-specific-SFR (≳10-10 yr-1), low-SFEgas (≲10-9 yr-1) systems, in which the total H i mass is likely not a good predictor of the total H2 mass, nor of the SFR.

  6. Stability and Occurrence Rate Constraints on the Planetary Sculpting Hypothesis for “Transitional Disks“

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Dawson, Rebekah

    2016-07-01

    Transitional disks, protoplanetary disks with deep and wide central gaps, may be the result of planetary sculpting. By comparing numerical planet-opening-gap models with observed gaps, we find systems of 3–6 giant planets are needed in order to open gaps with the observed depths and widths. We explore the dynamical stability of such multi-planet systems using N-body simulations that incorporate prescriptions for gas effects. We find they can be stable over a typical disk lifetime, with the help of eccentricity damping from the residual gap gas that facilitates planets locking into mean motion resonances. However, in order to account for the occurrence rate of transitional disks, the planet sculpting scenario demands gap-opening-friendly disk conditions, in particular, a disk viscosity α ≲ 0.001. In addition, the demography of giant planets at ˜3–30 au separations, poorly constrained by current data, has to largely follow occurrence rates extrapolated outward from radial velocity surveys, not the lower occurrence rates extrapolated inward from direct imaging surveys. Even with the most optimistic occurrence rates, transitional disks cannot be a common phase that most gas disks experience at the end of their life, as popularly assumed, simply because there are not enough planets to open these gaps. Finally, as consequences of demanding almost all giant planets at large separations participate in transitional disk sculpting, the majority of such planets must form early and end up in a chain of mean motion resonances at the end of disk lifetime.

  7. Stability and Occurrence Rate Constraints on the Planetary Sculpting Hypothesis for “Transitional Disks“

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Dawson, Rebekah

    2016-07-01

    Transitional disks, protoplanetary disks with deep and wide central gaps, may be the result of planetary sculpting. By comparing numerical planet-opening-gap models with observed gaps, we find systems of 3–6 giant planets are needed in order to open gaps with the observed depths and widths. We explore the dynamical stability of such multi-planet systems using N-body simulations that incorporate prescriptions for gas effects. We find they can be stable over a typical disk lifetime, with the help of eccentricity damping from the residual gap gas that facilitates planets locking into mean motion resonances. However, in order to account for the occurrence rate of transitional disks, the planet sculpting scenario demands gap-opening-friendly disk conditions, in particular, a disk viscosity α ≲ 0.001. In addition, the demography of giant planets at ∼3–30 au separations, poorly constrained by current data, has to largely follow occurrence rates extrapolated outward from radial velocity surveys, not the lower occurrence rates extrapolated inward from direct imaging surveys. Even with the most optimistic occurrence rates, transitional disks cannot be a common phase that most gas disks experience at the end of their life, as popularly assumed, simply because there are not enough planets to open these gaps. Finally, as consequences of demanding almost all giant planets at large separations participate in transitional disk sculpting, the majority of such planets must form early and end up in a chain of mean motion resonances at the end of disk lifetime.

  8. Rapid Arctic Transitions in Relation to Infrastructure and Climate Change: Comparison of the Permafrost and Geoecological Conditions in the Bovanenkovo Gas Field, Russia and the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Raynolds, M. K.; Kumpula, T.; Shur, Y.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Kofinas, G.; Leibman, M. O.; Matyshak, G. V.; Epstein, H. E.; Buchhorn, M.; Wirth, L.; Forbes, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the Arctic are undergoing rapid permafrost and ecosystem transitions resulting from a combination of industrial development and climate change as summer sea ice retreats and abundant Arctic natural resources become more accessible for extraction. The Bovanenkovo Gas Field (BGF) in Russia and the Prudhoe Bay Oilfield (PBO) in Alaska are among the oldest and most extensive industrial complexes in the Arctic, situated in areas with extensive ice-rich permafrost. Ongoing studies of cumulative effects in both regions are part of the Northern Eurasia Earth-Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) and NASA's Land-Cover Land-Use Change (LCLUC) research. Comparative analysis is focused on changes occurring due to different climate, permafrost, land-use, and disturbance regimes in the BGF and PBO and along bioclimate transects that contain both fields. Documentation of the changes in relationship to the different geoecological and social-economic conditions will help inform management approaches to minimize the effects of future activities. We compare the area of disturbance in the two fields and some of the key differences in the permafrost conditions. Detailed remote sensing and geoecological mapping in both areas reveal major differences in permafrost conditions that have implications for total ecological function. At BGF, highly erodible sands and the presence of massive tabular ground ice near the surface contributes to landslides and thermo-denudation of slopes. At PBO, ice-wedge degradation is the most noticeable change, where thermokarst is expanding rapidly along ice-wedges adjacent to roads and in areas away from roads. Between 1990 and 2001, coincident with strong atmospheric warming during the 1990s, natural thermokarst resulted in conversion of low-centered ice-wedge polygons to high-centered polygons, more active lakeshore erosion and increased landscape and habitat heterogeneity. These geoecololgical changes have local and regional consequences to

  9. GAS EMISSIONS IN PLANCK COLD DUST CLUMPS-A SURVEY OF THE J = 1-0 TRANSITIONS OF {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, AND C{sup 18}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuefang; Liu Tie; Meng, Fanyi; Li Di; Qin Shengli; Ju Binggang

    2012-09-01

    A survey toward 674 Planck cold clumps of the Early Cold Core Catalogue (ECC) in the J = 1-0 transitions of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O has been carried out using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. Six hundred seventy-three clumps were detected with {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO emission, and 68% of the sample has C{sup 18}O emission. Additional velocity components were also identified. A close consistency of the three line peak velocities was revealed for the first time. Kinematic distances are given for all the velocity components, and half of the clumps are located within 0.5 and 1.5 kpc. Excitation temperatures range from 4 to 27 K, slightly larger than those of T{sub d} . Line width analysis shows that the majority of ECC clumps are low-mass clumps. Column densities N{sub H{sub 2}} span from 10{sup 20} to 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} with an average value of (4.4 {+-} 3.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. N{sub H{sub 2}} cumulative fraction distribution deviates from the lognormal distribution, which is attributed to optical depth. The average abundance ratio of the {sup 13}CO to C{sup 18}O in these clumps is 7.0 {+-} 3.8, higher than the terrestrial value. Dust and gas are well coupled in 95% of the clumps. Blue profile asymmetry, red profile asymmetry, and total line asymmetry were found in less than 10% of the clumps, generally indicating that star formation is not yet developed. Ten clumps were mapped. Twelve velocity components and 22 cores were obtained. Their morphologies include extended diffuse, dense, isolated, cometary, and filament, of which the last is the majority. Twenty cores are starless, and only seven cores seem to be in a gravitationally bound state. Planck cold clumps are the most quiescent among the samples of weak red IRAS, infrared dark clouds, UC H II candidates, extended green objects, and methanol maser sources, suggesting that Planck cold clumps have expanded the horizon of cold

  10. India Ink Incorporated Multifunctional Phase-transition Nanodroplets for Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Dual-modality Imaging and Photoacoustic Effect Based Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jia; Liu, Chengbo; Gong, Yuping; Su, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Zhigang; wang, Dong; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Fenfen; Li, Pan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo applications of gas-core microbubbles have been limited by gas diffusion, rapid body clearance, and poor vascular permeability. To overcome these limitations, using a modified three-step emulsion process, we have developed a first-of-its-kind India ink incorporated optically-triggerable phase-transition perfluorocarbon nanodroplets (INDs) that can provide not only three types of contrast mechanisms—conventional/thermoelastic photoacoustic, phase-transition/nonlinear photoacoustic, and ultrasound imaging contrasts, but also a new avenue for photoacoustic effect mediated tumor therapy. Upon pulsed laser illumination above a relatively low energy threshold, liquid-gas phase transition of the INDs has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, offering excellent contrasts for photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging. With further increased laser energy, the nanodroplets have been shown to be capable of destructing cancer cells in vivo, presumably due to the photoacoustic effect induced shock-wave generation from the carbon particles of the incorporated India ink. The demonstrated results suggest that the developed multifunctional phase-transition nanodroplets have a great potential for many theranostic biomedical applications, including photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality molecular imaging and targeted, localized cancer therapy. PMID:25161702

  11. Prucalopride. In chronic constipation: poorly documented risks.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    Constipation is a frequent complaint, especially in women and the elderly. It is sometimes drug-induced, and is only occasionally secondary to a functional or organic disorder. The risks associated with constipation are often overestimated. Prucalopride, a 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonist, chemically related to some neuroleptics, has been authorised in the European Union for symptomatic treatment of chronic constipation in women dissatisfied with laxatives. A combined analysis of 3 randomised double-blind trials in a total of 1999 patients (87.9% women) complaining of chronic constipation showed that about 36% of women considered it effective at a dose of 2 or 4 mg/day, versus 18% of women receiving placebo. Normal bowel movements resumed in respectively 23.6% and 24.7% of patients taking 2 and 4 mg/day prucalopride, versus 11.3% of patients on placebo (p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 doses of prucalopride. Palpitations were more frequent in patients treated with prucalopride. The incidence of ischaemic cardiovascular events was 0.2% with prucalopride versus 0.1% with placebo. Increases in heart rate and blood pressure were observed in pigs and dogs treated with prucalopride. Prucalopride seems to increase prolactin levels. Tumours of the liver and thyroid were observed in rats. Prucalopride also carries a risk of poorly defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Prucalopride may reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Miscarriages were reported in clinical trials. Prucalopride should not be taken during pregnancy. In addition, all women of child-bearing age should use effective contraception while taking prucalopride. In practice, prucalopride should be avoided. It is better to focus on lifestyle and behavioural changes, and rational use of laxatives. PMID:21648173

  12. Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-puffs in Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-02-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1-4R⊕, 2-20M⊕) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earths formed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many (in one case up to 9) orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can still robustly emerge after ˜0.1-1 Myr with percent-by-weight atmospheres. Super-Earth cores are naturally bred in gas-poor environments where gas dynamical friction has weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to gravitationally stir one another and merge. So little gas is present at the time of core assembly that cores hardly migrate by disk torques: formation of super-Earths can be in situ. The basic picture—that close-in super-Earths form in a gas-poor (but not gas-empty) inner disk, fed continuously by gas that bleeds inward from a more massive outer disk—recalls the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short-period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4-10R⊕, 2-6M⊕). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ˜1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths, which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content. We close by confronting observations and itemizing remaining questions.

  13. Searching for dust around hyper metal poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Venn, Kim A.; Divell, Mike; Starkenburg, Else; Puzia, Thomas H.; Côté, Stephanie; Lambert, David L.

    2014-08-20

    We examine the mid-infrared fluxes and spectral energy distributions for stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] <–5, and other metal-poor stars, to eliminate the possibility that their low metallicities are related to the depletion of elements onto dust grains in the formation of a debris disk. Six out of seven stars examined here show no mid-IR excesses. These non-detections rule out many types of circumstellar disks, e.g., a warm debris disk (T ≤ 290 K), or debris disks with inner radii ≤1 AU, such as those associated with the chemically peculiar post-asymptotic giant branch spectroscopic binaries and RV Tau variables. However, we cannot rule out cooler debris disks, nor those with lower flux ratios to their host stars due to, e.g., a smaller disk mass, a larger inner disk radius, an absence of small grains, or even a multicomponent structure, as often found with the chemically peculiar Lambda Bootis stars. The only exception is HE0107-5240, for which a small mid-IR excess near 10 μm is detected at the 2σ level; if the excess is real and associated with this star, it may indicate the presence of (recent) dust-gas winnowing or a binary system.

  14. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  15. Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Poor Attention Is More Than Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Childhood absence epilepsy Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio, ... of this article is prohibited. Childhood absence epilepsy: Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio ...

  16. Very Early Language Skills of Fifth-Grade Poor Comprehenders

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Laura; Mashburn, Andrew; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the theory that future poor comprehenders would show modest but pervasive deficits in both language comprehension and production during early childhood as compared with future poor decoders and typical readers. Using an existing database (NICHD ECCRN), fifth-grade students were identified as having poor comprehension skills (n = 516), poor decoding skills (n = 511) or typical reading skills (n = 535) based on standardized assessments of word recognition and reading comprehension. Language comprehension and production during the toddler and preschool years were retrospectively compared across these subgroups. Compared with future typical readers and poor decoders, poor comprehenders had the lowest abilities on language assessments at 15, 24, 36 and 54 months. For nearly all contrasts, the difference between poor comprehenders and the other groups of readers exceeded .5 standard deviation in magnitude, indicating that the early language skills of poor comprehenders exhibit appreciable lags. PMID:25620819

  17. Is public housing the cause of poor health or a safety net for the unhealthy poor?

    PubMed

    Ruel, Erin; Oakley, Deirdre; Wilson, G Elton; Maddox, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Research has shown that public housing residents have the worst health of any population in the USA. However, it is unclear what the cause of that poor health is among this population. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association between public housing and health conditions: specifically, we ask if residents entered public housing already ill or if public housing may cause the poor health of its residents. The data used for this study come from the GSU Urban Health Initiative, which is a prospective, mixed-methods study of seven public housing communities earmarked for demolition and relocation (N = 385). We used the pre-relocation, baseline survey. We found that, while health was not the main reason residents gave for entering public housing, the majority of public housing residents entered public housing already ill. Substandard housing conditions, long tenure in public housing, and having had a worse living situation prior to public housing were not associated with an increased risk of a health condition diagnosed after entry into public housing. Our findings suggest that public housing may have provided a safety net for the very unhealthy poor. PMID:20585883

  18. Relative transition probabilities of cobalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roig, R. A.; Miller, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results of determinations of neutral-cobalt transition probabilities measured relative to Co I 4150.43 A and Co II 4145.15 A, using a gas-driven shock tube as the spectroscopic light source. Results are presented for 139 Co I lines in the range from 3940 to 6640 A and 11 Co II lines in the range from 3840 to 4730 A, which are estimated to have reliabilities ranging from 8 to 50%.

  19. Parietal function in good and poor readers

    PubMed Central

    Laycock, Robin; Crewther, Sheila G; Kiely, Patricia M; Crewther, David P

    2006-01-01

    Background While there are many psychophysical reports of impaired magnocellular pathway function in developmental dyslexia (DD), few have investigated parietal function, the major projection of this pathway, in good and poor readers closely matched for nonverbal intelligence. In view of new feedforward-feedback theories of visual processing, impaired magnocellular function raises the question of whether all visually-driven functions or only those associated with parietal cortex functions are equally impaired and if so, whether parietal performance is more closely related to general ability levels than reading ability. Methods Reading accuracy and performance on psychophysical tasks purported to selectively activate parietal cortex such as motion sensitivity, attentional tracking, and spatial localization was compared in 17 children with DD, 16 younger reading-age matched (RA) control children, and 46 good readers of similar chronological-age (CA) divided into CA-HighIQ and a CA-LowIQ matched to DD group nonverbal IQ. Results In the age-matched groups no significant differences were found between DD and CA controls on any of the tasks relating to parietal function, although performance of the DD group and their nonverbal IQ scores was always lower. As expected, CA and RA group comparisons indicated purported parietal functioning improves with age. No difference in performance was seen on any of the parietally driven tasks between the DD and age-nonverbal IQ matched groups, whereas performance differentiated the DD group from the age-matched, higher nonverbal IQ group on several such tasks. An unexpected statistical difference in performance between lower reading age (DD and RA children) and all higher reading age (CA) children was seen on a test of chromatic sensitivity, whereas when high and low nonverbal IQ normal readers were compared performance was not different Conclusion The results indicate that performance on purported parietal functions improves with age

  20. THE COMPLEXITY THAT THE FIRST STARS BROUGHT TO THE UNIVERSE: FRAGILITY OF METAL-ENRICHED GAS IN A RADIATION FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Aykutalp, A.; Spaans, M. E-mail: spaans@astro.rug.nl

    2011-08-20

    The initial mass function (IMF) of the first (Population III) stars and Population II (Pop II) stars is poorly known due to a lack of observations of the period between recombination and reionization. In simulations of the formation of the first stars, it has been shown that, due to the limited ability of metal-free primordial gas to cool, the IMF of the first stars is a few orders of magnitude more massive than the current IMF. The transition from a high-mass IMF of the first stars to a lower-mass current IMF is thus important to understand. To study the underlying physics of this transition, we performed several simulations using the cosmological hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo for metallicities of 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -3}, 10{sup -2}, and 10{sup -1} Z{sub sun}. In our simulations, we include a star formation prescription that is derived from a metallicity-dependent multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM) structure, an external UV radiation field, and a mechanical feedback algorithm. We also implement cosmic ray heating, photoelectric heating, and gas-dust heating/cooling, and follow the metal enrichment of the ISM. It is found that the interplay between metallicity and UV radiation leads to the coexistence of Pop III and Pop II star formation in non-zero-metallicity (Z/Z{sub sun} {>=} 10{sup -2}) gas. A cold (T < 100 K) and dense ({rho} > 10{sup -22} g cm{sup -3}) gas phase is fragile to ambient UV radiation. In a metal-poor (Z/Z{sub sun} {<=} 10{sup -3}) gas, the cold and dense gas phase does not form in the presence of a radiation field of F{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup -5}-10{sup -4} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Therefore, metallicity by itself is not a good indicator of the Pop III-Pop II transition. Metal-rich (Z/Z{sub sun} {>=} 10{sup -2}) gas dynamically evolves two to three orders of magnitude faster than metal-poor gas (Z/Z{sub sun} {<=} 10{sup -3}). The simulations including supernova explosions show that pre-enrichment of the halo does not affect

  1. Very Early Language Skills of Fifth-Grade Poor Comprehenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Laura; Mashburn, Andrew; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the theory that future poor comprehenders would show modest but pervasive deficits in both language comprehension and production during early childhood as compared with future poor decoders and typical readers. Using an existing database (NICHD ECCRN), fifth-grade students were identified as having poor comprehension skills…

  2. Laboring for Less: Working but Poor in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Isaac

    Most of the nonmetropolitan poor live in a household with at least one worker. In 1987, 70% of nonmetro poor family heads who were not ill, disabled, or retired worked for at least part of the year, and 24% worked full time, year-round. The employed proportion of the poor was significantly larger in nonmetro than metro areas. Despite a lengthy…

  3. Orthographic Processing and Visual Sequential Memory in Unexpectedly Poor Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Malone, Aisling M.; Redenbach, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Does unexpectedly poor spelling in adults result from inferior visual sequential memory? In one experiment, unexpectedly poor spellers performed significantly worse than better spellers in the immediate reproduction of sequences of visual symbols, but in a second experiment, the effect was not replicated. Poor spellers were also no worse at the…

  4. Using Story to Help Student Understanding of Gas Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Rick; Stinner, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Students tend to have a poor understanding of the concept of gas pressure. Usually, gas pressure is taught in terms of the various formulaic gas laws. The development of the concept of gas pressure according to the early Greeks did not include the concept of a vacuum. It was not for another 2000 years that Torricelli proposed that a vacuum can…

  5. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  6. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  7. School-to-Work Transition: Alternatives for Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton L.; Rojewski, Jay W.

    Schools do a very poor job of preparing noncollege-bound youth to make the transition from high school to employment and adult life. A lack of formalized transition systems compounds the problems that many noncollege-bound youth encounter as they try to obtain meaningful, career-sustaining employment in primary labor markets. Various instructional…

  8. Hybrid Electric Transit Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1997-01-01

    A government, industry, and university cooperative is developing an advanced hybrid electric city transit bus. Goals of this effort include doubling the fuel economy compared to current buses and reducing emissions to one-tenth of current EPA standards. Unique aspects of the vehicle's power system include the use of ultra-capacitors as an energy storage system, and a planned natural gas fueled turbogenerator developed from a small jet engine. Power from both the generator and energy storage system is provided to a variable speed electric motor attached to the rear axle. At over 15000 kg gross weight, this is the largest vehicle of its kind ever built using ultra-capacitor energy storage. This paper describes the overall power system architecture, the evolution of the control strategy, and its performance over industry standard drive cycles.

  9. The chemical imprint of silicate dust on the most metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Bromm, Volker E-mail: afrebel@mit.edu

    2014-02-20

    We investigate the impact of dust-induced gas fragmentation on the formation of the first low-mass, metal-poor stars (<1 M {sub ☉}) in the early universe. Previous work has shown the existence of a critical dust-to-gas ratio, below which dust thermal cooling cannot cause gas fragmentation. Assuming that the first dust is silicon-based, we compute critical dust-to-gas ratios and associated critical silicon abundances ([Si/H]{sub crit}). At the density and temperature associated with protostellar disks, we find that a standard Milky Way grain size distribution gives [Si/H]{sub crit} = –4.5 ± 0.1, while smaller grain sizes created in a supernova reverse shock give [Si/H]{sub crit} = –5.3 ± 0.1. Other environments are not dense enough to be influenced by dust cooling. We test the silicate dust cooling theory by comparing to silicon abundances observed in the most iron-poor stars ([Fe/H] < -4.0). Several stars have silicon abundances low enough to rule out dust-induced gas fragmentation with a standard grain size distribution. Moreover, two of these stars have such low silicon abundances that even dust with a shocked grain size distribution cannot explain their formation. Adding small amounts of carbon dust does not significantly change these conclusions. Additionally, we find that these stars exhibit either high carbon with low silicon abundances or the reverse. A silicate dust scenario thus suggests that the earliest low-mass star formation in the most metal-poor regime may have proceeded through two distinct cooling pathways: fine-structure line cooling and dust cooling. This naturally explains both the carbon-rich and carbon-normal stars at extremely low [Fe/H].

  10. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of slow transit functional constipation is based upon diagnostic testing of patients with idiopathic constipation who responded poorly to conservative measures such as fiber supplements, fluids, and stimulant laxatives. These tests include barium enema or colonoscopy, colonic transit of radio-opaque markers, anorectal manometry, and expulsion of a water-filled balloon. Plain abdominal films can identify megacolon, which can be further characterized by barium or gastrografin studies. Colonic transit of radio-opaque markers identifies patients with slow transit with stasis of markers in the proximal colon. However, anorectal function should be characterized to exclude outlet dysfunction, which may coexist with colonic inertia. Because slow colonic transit is defined by studies during which patients consume a high-fiber diet, fiber supplements are generally not effective, nor are osmotic laxatives that consist of unabsorbed sugars. Stimulant laxatives are considered first-line therapy, although studies often show a diminished colonic motor response to such agents. There is no evidence to suggest that chronic use of such laxatives is harmful if they are used two to three times per week. Polyethylene glycol with or without electrolytes may be useful in a minority of patients, often combined with misoprostol. I prefer to start with misoprostol 200 mg every other morning and increase to tolerance or efficacy. I see no advantage in prescribing misoprostol on a TID or QID basis or even daily because it increases cramping unnecessarily. This drug is not acceptable in young women who wish to become pregnant. An alternative may be colchicine, which is reported to be effective when given as 0.6 mg TID. Long-term efficacy has not been studied. Finally, biofeedback is a risk-free approach that has been reported as effective in approximately 60% of patients with slow transit constipation in the absence of outlet dysfunction. Although difficult to understand

  11. Formaldehyde in Absorption: Tracing Molecular Gas in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs) have been long-classified as the red, ellipsoidal branch of the classic Hubble tuning fork diagram of galactic structure. In part with this classification, ETGs are thought to be molecular and atomic gas-poor with little to no recent star formation. However, recent efforts have questioned this ingrained classification. Most notably, the ATLAS3D survey of 260 ETGs within ~40 Mpc found 22% contain CO, a common tracer for molecular gas. The presence of cold molecular gas also implies the possibility for current star formation within these galaxies. Simulations do not accurately predict the recent observations and further studies are necessary to understand the mechanisms of ETGs.CO traces molecular gas starting at densities of ~102 cm-3, which makes it a good tracer of bulk molecular gas, but does little to constrain the possible locations of star formation within the cores of dense molecular gas clouds. Formaldehyde (H2CO) traces molecular gas on the order of ~104 cm-3, providing a further constraint on the location of star-forming gas, while being simple enough to possibly be abundant in gas-poor ETGs. In cold molecular clouds at or above ~104 cm-3 densities, the structure of formaldehyde enables a phenomenon in which rotational transitions have excitation temperatures driven below the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), ~2.7 K. Because the CMB radiates isotropically, formaldehyde can be observed in absorption, independent of distance, as a tracer of moderately-dense molecular clouds and star formation.This novel observation technique of formaldehyde was incorporated for observations of twelve CO-detected ETGs from the ATLAS3D sample, including NGC 4710 and PGC 8815, to investigate the presence of cold molecular gas, and possible star formation, in ETGs. We present images from the Very Large Array, used in its C-array configuration, of the J = 11,0 - 11,1 transition of formaldehyde towards these sources. We report our

  12. Understanding topological phase transition in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Duk-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), such as M X2 with M =(Mo ,W ) and X =(S ,Se ,Te ) , the physical origin of their topological nature is still poorly understood. In the conventional view of topological phase transition (TPT), the nontrivial topology of electron bands in TMDs is caused by the band inversion between metal d - and chalcogen p -orbital bands where the former is pulled down below the latter. Here, we show that, in TMDs, the TPT is entirely different from the conventional speculation. In particular, M S2 and M S e2 exhibits the opposite behavior of TPT such that the chalcogen p -orbital band moves down below the metal d -orbital band. More interestingly, in M T e2 , the band inversion occurs between the metal d -orbital bands. Our findings cast doubts on the common view of TPT and provide clear guidelines for understanding the topological nature in new topological materials to be discovered.

  13. Redshift and Optical Properties for S Statistically Complete Sample of Poor Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, Michael J.; Loken, Chris; Burns, Jack O.; Hill, John M.; White, Richard A.

    1996-08-01

    From the poor cluster catalog of White et al. (1996), we define a sample of 71 optically-selected poor galaxy clusters. The surface-density enhancement we require for our clusters falls between that of the loose associations of Turner & Gott [AJ, 91,204(1976)] and the Hickson compact groups [Hickson, ApJ, 255, 382(1982)]. We review the selection biases and determine the statistical completeness of the sample. For this sample, we report new velocity measurements made with the ARC 3.5-m Dual-Imaging spectrograph and the 2.3-m Steward Observatory MX fiber spectrograph. Combining our own measurements with those from the literature, we examine the velocity distributions, velocity dispersions, and ID velocity substructure for our poor cluster sample, and compare our results to other poor cluster samples. We find that approximately half of the sample may have significant ID velocity substructure. The optical morphology, large-scale environment, and velocity field of many of these clusters are indicative of young, dynamically evolving systems. In future papers, we will use this sample to derive the poor cluster x-ray luminosity function and gas mass function, and will examine the optical/x-ray properties of the clusters in more detail.

  14. Long non‑coding RNA‑GAS5 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder transitional cell carcinoma via regulation of chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qifeng; Wang, Ning; Qi, Juan; Gu, Zhengqin; Shen, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in diverse biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether lncRNA‑growth arrest‑specific (GAS)5 regulated bladder cancer progression via regulation of chemokine (C‑C) ligand (CCL)1 expression. The viability of BLX bladder cancer cells was detected using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V‑propidium iodide double‑staining. The expression levels of specific genes and proteins were analyzed by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. In addition, cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNAs or recombinant GAS5 in order to silence or overexpress GAS5, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of GAS5 expression promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of GAS5 suppressed cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 resulted in an increased percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, and a decreased percentage of cells in G1 phase. In addition, the present study performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs in bladder cancer cells and detected that CCL1 overexpression resulted in an upregulation of GAS5, which may improve the ability of cells to regulate a stress response in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 expression increased the mRNA and protein expression of CCL1 in bladder cancer cells. Gain‑of‑function and loss‑of‑function studies demonstrated that GAS5 was able to inhibit bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study demonstrated that GAS5 was able to suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least partially, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study may provide a basis for developing novel

  15. Long non-coding RNA-GAS5 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder transitional cell carcinoma via regulation of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    CAO, QIFENG; WANG, NING; QI, JUAN; GU, ZHENGQIN; SHEN, HAIBO

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in diverse biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, cell growth and tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether lncRNA-growth arrest-specific (GAS)5 regulated bladder cancer progression via regulation of chemokine (C-C) ligand (CCL)1 expression. The viability of BLX bladder cancer cells was detected using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining. The expression levels of specific genes and proteins were analyzed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. In addition, cells were transfected with small interfering (si)RNAs or recombinant GAS5 in order to silence or overexpress GAS5, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of GAS5 expression promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of GAS5 suppressed cell proliferation. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 resulted in an increased percentage of cells in S and G2 phase, and a decreased percentage of cells in G1 phase. In addition, the present study performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs in bladder cancer cells and detected that CCL1 overexpression resulted in an upregulation of GAS5, which may improve the ability of cells to regulate a stress response in vitro. Furthermore, knockdown of GAS5 expression increased the mRNA and protein expression of CCL1 in bladder cancer cells. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies demonstrated that GAS5 was able to inhibit bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study demonstrated that GAS5 was able to suppress bladder cancer cell proliferation, at least partially, by suppressing the expression of CCL1. The results of the present study may provide a basis for developing novel effective treatment

  16. Role of stranded gas in increasing global gas supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    This report synthesizes the findings of three regional studies in order to evaluate, at the global scale, the contribution that stranded gas resources can make to global natural gas supplies. Stranded gas, as defined for this study, is natural gas in discovered conventional gas and oil fields that is currently not commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. The regional studies evaluated the cost of bringing the large volumes of undeveloped gas in stranded gas fields to selected markets. In particular, stranded gas fields of selected Atlantic Basin countries, north Africa, Russia, and central Asia are screened to determine whether the volumes are sufficient to meet Europe’s increasing demand for gas imports. Stranded gas fields in Russia, central Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia are also screened to estimate development, production, and transport costs and corresponding gas volumes that could be supplied to Asian markets in China, India, Japan, and South Korea. The data and cost analysis presented here suggest that for the European market and the markets examined in Asia, the development of stranded gas provides a way to meet projected gas import demands for the 2020-to-2040 period. Although this is a reconnaissance-type appraisal, it is based on volumes of gas that are associated with individual identified fields. Individual field data were carefully examined. Some fields were not evaluated because current technology was insufficient or it appeared the gas was likely to be held off the export market. Most of the evaluated stranded gas can be produced and delivered to markets at costs comparable to historical prices. Moreover, the associated volumes of gas are sufficient to provide an interim supply while additional technologies are developed to unlock gas diffused in shale and hydrates or while countries transition to making a greater use of renewable energy sources.

  17. Breeding Super-Earths and Birthing Super-Puffs in Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    The riddle posed by super-Earths (1--4 Earth radii, 2--20 Earth masses) is that they are not Jupiters: their core masses are large enough to trigger runaway gas accretion, yet somehow super-Earths accreted atmospheres that weigh only a few percent of their total mass. We show that this puzzle is solved if super-Earthsformed late, as the last vestiges of their parent gas disks were about to clear. This scenario would seem to present fine-tuning problems, but we show that there are none. Ambient gas densities can span many orders of magnitude, and super-Earths can robustly emerge with percent-by-weight atmospheres after ~0.1--1 Myr. We propose that 1) close-in super-Earths form in situ, because their cores necessarily coagulate in gas-poor environments—gas dynamical friction must be weakened sufficiently to allow constituent protocores to cross orbits and merge; 2) super- Earths acquire their atmospheres from ambient wisps of gas that are supplied from a diffusing outer disk. The formation environment is reminiscent of the largely evacuated but still accreting inner cavities of transitional protoplanetary disks. We also 3) address the inverse problem presented by super-puffs: an uncommon class of short- period planets seemingly too voluminous for their small masses (4--10 Earth radii, 2--6 Earth masses). Super-puffs most easily acquire their thick atmospheres as dust-free, rapidly cooling worlds outside ~1 AU where nebular gas is colder, less dense, and therefore less opaque. Unlike super-Earths which can form in situ, super-puffs probably migrated in to their current orbits; they are expected to form the outer links of mean-motion resonant chains, and to exhibit greater water content.

  18. Star formation sustained by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulations predict that metal-poor gas accretion from the cosmic web fuels the formation of disk galaxies. This paper discusses how cosmic gas accretion controls star formation, and summarizes the physical properties expected for the cosmic gas accreted by galaxies. The paper also collects observational evidence for gas accretion sustaining star formation. It reviews evidence inferred from neutral and ionized hydrogen, as well as from stars. A number of properties characterizing large samples of star-forming galaxies can be explained by metal-poor gas accretion, in particular, the relationship among stellar mass, metallicity, and star-formation rate (the so-called fundamental metallicity relationship). They are put forward and analyzed. Theory predicts gas accretion to be particularly important at high redshift, so indications based on distant objects are reviewed, including the global star-formation history of the universe, and the gas around galaxies as inferred from absorption features in the spectra of background sources.

  19. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 8±6%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices. PMID:26148643

  20. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  1. Heavy-elements in metal-poor stars: an UV perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Barbuy, B.

    2014-11-01

    The site(s) of the r-process(es) is(are) not completely defined, and several models have been proposed. Observed abundances are the best clues to bring some light to this field, especially the study of the extremely metal-poor (EMP) Galactic halo stars. Many elements can be measured using ground-based facilities already available, but the ultraviolet window also presents a rich opportunity in terms of chemical abundances of heavy elements. In fact, for some elements only the UV transitions are strong enough to be useful. Focusing on the project of the Cassegrain U-Band Brazilian Spectrograph (CUBES), we discuss the science case for heavy elements in metal-poor stars, describing the useful lines of trans-Fe elements present in the UV region. Lines in the far UV are also discussed.

  2. Influence of poor health on exit from paid employment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Rogier M; Robroek, Suzan J W; Brouwer, Sandra; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to provide a systematic literature review on associations between poor health and exit from paid employment through disability pension, unemployment and early retirement, and to estimate the magnitude of these associations using meta-analyses. Medline and Embase databases were searched for longitudinal studies on the relationship between health measures and exit from paid employment. Random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled effects. In total, 29 studies were included. Self-perceived poor health was a risk factor for transition into disability pension (relative risk (RR) 3.61; 95% CI 2.44 to 5.35), unemployment (RR 1.44; 95% CI 1.26 to 1.65) and early retirement (RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.17 to 1.38). Workers with mental health problems had an increased likelihood for transition into disability pension (RR 1.80; 95% CI 1.41 to 2.31) or unemployment (RR 1.61; 95% CI 1.29 to 2.01). Chronic disease was a risk factor for transition into disability pension (RR 2.11; 95% CI 1.90 to 2.33) or unemployment (RR 1.31; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.50), but not for early retirement. This meta-analysis showed that poor health, particularly self-perceived health, is a risk factor for exit from paid employment through disability pension, unemployment and, to a lesser extent, early retirement. To increase sustained employability it should be considered to implement workplace interventions that promote good health. PMID:24169931

  3. Detailed Abundances of Two Very Metal-poor Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[α/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] Lt -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] ~ -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF TWO VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[{alpha}/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] << -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] {approx} -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo.

  5. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  6. Saturn as a Transiting Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Veyette, Mark J.

    2015-11-01

    Previous investigations of exoplanet atmospheres have not targeted those resembling the gas giant planets in our solar system. These types of exoplanets are too cold to be directly imaged or observed in emission, and their low transit probabilities and frequencies make characterization via transmission spectroscopy a challenging endeavor. However, studies of cold giant exoplanets would be highly valuable to our understanding of planet formation and migration and could place the gas giant members of our own solar system in a greater context. Here, we use solar occultations observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard the Cassini Spacecraft to extract the 1 to 5 μm transmission spectrum of Saturn, as if it were a transiting exoplanet. We detect absorption features from several molecules despite the presence of ammonia clouds. Self-consistent exoplanet atmosphere models show good agreement with Saturn's transmission spectrum but fail to reproduce the largest feature in the spectrum. We also find that atmospheric refraction determines the minimum altitude that could be probed during mid-transit of a Saturn-twin exoplanet around a Sun-like star. These results suggest that transmission spectroscopy of cold, long-period gaseous exoplanets should be possible with current and future observatories.

  7. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  8. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/L(sub B(0)) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  9. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-03-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/LB(0) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  10. PRIMORDIAL r-PROCESS DISPERSION IN METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2011-05-01

    Heavy elements, those produced by neutron-capture reactions, have traditionally shown no star-to-star dispersion in all but a handful of metal-poor globular clusters (GCs). Recent detections of low [Pb/Eu] ratios or upper limits in several metal-poor GCs indicate that the heavy elements in these GCs were produced exclusively by an r-process. Re-examining GC heavy element abundances from the literature, we find unmistakable correlations between the [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] ratios in four metal-poor GCs (M5, M15, M92, and NGC 3201), only two of which were known previously. This indicates that the total r-process abundances vary from star to star (by factors of 2-6) relative to Fe within each GC. We also identify potential dispersion in two other GCs (M3 and M13). Several GCs (M12, M80, and NGC 6752) show no evidence of r-process dispersion. The r-process dispersion is not correlated with the well-known light element dispersion, indicating that it was present in the gas throughout the duration of star formation. The observations available at present suggest that star-to-star r-process dispersion within metal-poor GCs may be a common but not ubiquitous phenomenon that is neither predicted by nor accounted for in current models of GC formation and evolution.

  11. Are families poor because they are large or are they large because they are poor?

    PubMed

    Pernia, E M

    1982-01-01

    In the Philippines time allocation studies suggest that children cost considerable amounts of time and energy on the part of the mother and other siblings in addition to direct financial outlays which figure prominently. Yet, these costs seem to be compensated for by economic and noneconomic benefits. The time costs of children are moderated to the extent that mother's time has a low opportunity cost, given lack of marketable skills or sheer absence of employment opportunities. It is at the expense of investment in human capital (in terms of education and health) that economic benefits from child labor are forthcoming. As neither unemployment of the mother nor child labor is desirable, it would seem that economic benefits from children are expensive. The child's mental and physical development tends to be impaired due to deficient health, nutrition, and education inputs because family resources and parental care have to be spread so thinly among the many competing demands of the large family. Mother's health is negatively affected by frequent and closely spaced pregnancies, and she is effectively prevented from actual or potential participation in development. It is to these less immediate and not directly observable disadvantages of a large family that parents must be sensitized so that they will realize the need to limit family size. From the social perspective, the population program may be viewed as a strategy for human resource development. The challenge to policymakers has become formidable. Due to rapidly increasing population, the need to telescope the reduction of income inequality and poverty has become urgent. Continuing population growth tends to nullify whatever advances are made toward the distributional objective. Population and development policy needs to be directed to the poor in rural areas in general and more specifically to the rural poor in the backward regions of the Visayas, Bicol, Bocos, and Northern Mindanao. Given the extreme poverty of

  12. Detection of extended X-ray emission surrounding cD galaxies in poor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kriss, G.A.; Canizares, C.R.; McClintock, J.E.; Feigelson, E.D.

    1980-01-15

    The imaging proportional counter on the Einstein Observatory has detected extended X-ray emission from MKW 3s and AWM 4, two poor clusters containing dominant galaxies. In each case the X-ray emission is centered on the D or cD galaxy, but in MKW 3s it is symmetric (core radius 2'.5) while in AWM 4 it is not (extended 1' in NW-SE direction). The 0.25--3 keV luminosities, 10/sup 44/ ergs s/sup -1/ for MKW 3s and 10/sup 43/ ergs s/sup -1/ for AWM 4, are typical of those observed for the richer Abell clusters. We have measured redshifts of three galaxies in MKW 3s to confirm the physical association of the group. The hot gas present in this cluster is dense enough to confine the relativistic particles in 3C 318.1. As in the rich clusters, the mass of X-ray emitting gas in these two clusters is comparable to the visual mass and is approx.10--20% of the virial mass. Our results suggest that poor clusters can collect enough gas to become detectable X-ray sources if they are relatively compact, which the presence of dominant galaxies indicates.

  13. Benefits of Computer-Presented Speed Training for Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irausquin, Rosemarie S.; Drent, Jeanine; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2005-01-01

    The effects of computer-presented automatization exercises in a group of 14 poor readers were assessed in comparison to a matched control group of 14 poor readers that received computer-presented exercises aimed at the use of context for word identification and comprehension. Training took place three sessions a week for 15 minutes per session and…

  14. Patterns of Risk: The Nutritional Status of the Rural Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shotland, Jeffrey; Loonin, Deanne

    Nutrition and health are underlying influences to education performance. This report is a collection and analysis of data on nutrition and the rural poor in the United States. It presents an empirical assessment of critical nutritional and social-service problems experienced by the rural poor population. The first section of the report uses data…

  15. Semantic Priming Effects in Normal versus Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assink, Egbert M. H.; Van Bergen, Floor; Van Teeseling, Heleen; Knuijt, Paul P. N. A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied sensitivity to semantic priming, as distinct from semantic judgment, in poor readers. Association strength (high vs. low semantic association) was manipulated factorially with semantic association type (categoric vs. thematic association). Participants were 11-year-old poor readers (n = 15) who were matched with a group of…

  16. RECREATION FOR THE RICH AND POOR, A CONTRAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KRAUS, RICHARD G.

    THE DIVERGENCE BETWEEN THE LEISURE ACTIVITIES OF AFFLUENT AND POOR AMERICANS IS DISCUSSED. PARADOXICALLY, THOSE WITH THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF FREE TIME--THE POOR--HAVE THE LEAST MONEY WITH WHICH TO ENRICH THEIR LEISURE TIME. WHILE IT IS TRUE THAT AN EXTRAORDINARY VARIETY OF LEISURE ACTIVITIES ARE NOW AVAILABLE, ONLY THE MIDDLE AND UPPER CLASSES CAN…

  17. Unexpectedly Poor Spelling and Phonological-Processing Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Quinn, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological skills of university students who were unexpectedly poor spellers relative to their word reading accuracy. Compared with good spellers, unexpectedly poor spellers showed no deficits in phonological memory, selection of appropriate graphemes for phonemes in word misspellings and nonword spellings, and…

  18. Prevalence and Nature of Late-Emerging Poor Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catts, Hugh W.; Compton, Donald; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Bridges, Mindy Sittner

    2012-01-01

    Some children demonstrate adequate or better reading achievement in early school grades but fall significantly behind their peers in later grades. These children are often referred to as late-emerging poor readers. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and heterogeneity of these poor readers. We also examined the early language and…

  19. Distinguishing between Poor/Dysfunctional Parenting and Child Emotional Maltreatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David A.; McIsaac, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper was intended to distinguish between poor parenting and child emotional maltreatment (CEM), to inform child welfare and public health policymakers of the need for differentiated responses. Methods: Scientific literature was integrated with current practice and assumptions relating to poor/dysfunctional parenting and child…

  20. Sustainable School Music for Poor, White, Rural Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Vincent C.

    2011-01-01

    "Poor white trash" is likely the most enduring and degrading in a long line of "stigmatypes"--"stigmatizing boundary terms that simultaneously denote and enact cultural and cognitive divides between in-groups and out-groups"--such as "redneck," "cracker," and "hillbilly." Some people apply these terms in reference to poor or working-class, usually…

  1. An Image Study on the Rich and Poor Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Recep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to project people's perceptions about the rich and poor. In this descriptive study, a questionnaire developed by the researcher and caricatures were used to collect data. The questionnaire composed of seven items including questions directed to adjectives related to the participants' perceptions about the rich and poor as…

  2. Rich Man, Poor Man: Developmental Differences in Attributions and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K.

    2012-01-01

    In an examination guided by cognitive developmental and attribution theory of how explanations of wealth and poverty and perceptions of rich and poor people change with age and are interrelated, 6-, 10-, and 14-year-olds (N = 88) were asked for their causal attributions and trait judgments concerning a rich man and a poor man. First graders, like…

  3. Poor Kids in a Rich Nation: Eating the Seed Corn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Patricia

    This paper examines the problem of having many poor children in the wealthy United States and the need to find answers to this problem. Despite much recent talk about "family values," the dominant U.S. ideology holds that family welfare is a private rather than a public responsibility. Poor children are seen as a special population that diverts…

  4. Mandated empowerment: handing antipoverty policy back to the poor?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit V; Duflo, Esther

    2008-01-01

    The current trend in antipoverty policy emphasizes mandated empowerment: the poor are being handed the responsibility for making things better for themselves, largely without being asked whether this is what they want. Beneficiary control is now being built into public service delivery, while microcredit and small business promotion are seen as better ways to help the poor. The clear presumption is that the poor are both able and happy to exercise these new powers. This essay uses two examples to raise questions about these strategies. The first example is about entrepreneurship among the poor. Using data from a number of countries, we argue that there is no evidence that the median poor entrepreneur is trying his best to expand his existing businesses, even if we take into account the many constraints he faces. While many poor people own businesses, this seems to be more a survival strategy than something they want to do. The second example comes from an evaluation of a program in India that aims to involve poor rural parents in improving local public schools. The data suggest that despite being informed that they now have both the right to intervene in the school and access to funds for that purpose, and despite being made aware of how little the children were learning, parents opt to not get involved. Both examples raise concerns about committing ourselves entirely to antipoverty strategies that rely on the poor doing a lot of the work. PMID:18579890

  5. Poor Women Are Still Shut Out of Mainstream Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saris, Renee N.; Johnston-Robledo, Ingrid

    2000-01-01

    Followed up a 1993 study which concluded that poor and minority women were essentially shut out of mainstream psychological research and theory. Analysis of PsycLit abstracts from 1991-97 investigated whether significant change had occurred and noted the inclusion of poor women in research on sexuality and reproductive health. Results suggest that…

  6. Pathologizing the Language and Culture of Poor Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt; Lucas, Krista

    2009-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of deficit discourses that implicate deficiencies in the language and culture of poor students as the cause of their academic failures. An influential study by Betty Hart and Todd Risley concludes that high levels of academic failure among poor children can be linked to the quantity and quality of language interactions…

  7. No Way Out: Working Poor Women in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Working Women, Washington, DC.

    This report examines the situation of the one-half of the nation's nine million working poor who are female. It begins by looking at just who the working poor are. Two areas of study are education levels and types of jobs. The discussion then shifts to minimum wage earners and their characteristics, the current status of the minimum wage, and the…

  8. Neutron-poor Nickel Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Russell, Sara; Elliott, Tim

    2012-10-01

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the 58Ni/61Ni internally normalized 60Ni/61Ni, 62Ni/61Ni, and 64Ni/61Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in ɛ60Ni58/61, ɛ62Ni58/61, and ɛ64Ni58/61 relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 ± 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on 58Ni. We also determined to high precision (~10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of ɛ62Ni58/61 and ɛ64Ni58/61. These analyses show that "absolute" ratios of 58Ni/61Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of 62Ni/61Ni and 64Ni/61Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor 58Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, 62Ni and 64Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other transition elements which invoked variable contributions of a neutron-rich component. We have examined different nucleosynthetic environments to determine the possible source of the anomalous material responsible for the isotopic variations observed in Ni and other transition elements within bulk samples. We find

  9. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim; Russell, Sara

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and other

  10. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  11. THE TERZAN 5 PUZZLE: DISCOVERY OF A THIRD, METAL-POOR COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Origlia, L.; Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.

    2013-12-10

    We report on the discovery of three metal-poor giant stars in Terzan 5, a complex stellar system in the Galactic bulge, known to have two populations at [Fe/H] = –0.25 and +0.3. For these three stars we present new echelle spectra obtained with NIRSPEC at Keck II, which confirm their radial velocity membership and provide an average [Fe/H] = –0.79 dex iron abundance and [α/Fe] = +0.36 dex enhancement. This new population extends the metallicity range of Terzan 5 to 0.5 dex more metal poor, and it has properties consistent with having formed from a gas polluted by core-collapse supernovae.

  12. Fine, nickel-poor Fe-Ni grains in the olivine of unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaldi, E. R.; Wasson, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    Nickel-poor Fe-Ni grains smaller than 2.0 microns are common inclusions in ordinary, unequilibrated chondrites' porphyritic chondrule olivine, where the olivine grains seem to be relicts that survived chondrule formation without melting. This 'dusty' metal, whose most common occurrence is in the core of olivine grains having clear, Fe-poor rims, appears to be the product of the in situ reduction of FeO from the host olivine, with H2 or carbonaceous matter being the most likely reductants. H2 may have been implanted by solar wind or solar flare irradiation, but this requires the dissipation of nebular gas before the end of the chondrule formation process. Carbonaceous matter may have been implanted by shock. The large relict olivine grains may be nebular condensates or fragments broken from earlier chondrule generations.

  13. Bond orientational order in liquids: Towards a unified description of water-like anomalies, liquid-liquid transition, glass transition, and crystallization: Bond orientational order in liquids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-10-01

    There are at least three fundamental states of matter, depending upon temperature and pressure: gas, liquid, and solid (crystal). These states are separated by first-order phase transitions between them. In both gas and liquid phases a complete translational and rotational symmetry exist, whereas in a solid phase both symmetries are broken. In intermediate phases between liquid and solid, which include liquid crystal and plastic crystal phases, only one of the two symmetries is preserved. Among the fundamental states of matter, the liquid state is the most poorly understood. We argue that it is crucial for a better understanding of liquids to recognize that a liquid generally has the tendency to have a local structural order and its presence is intrinsic and universal to any liquid. Such structural ordering is a consequence of many-body correlations, more specifically, bond angle correlations, which we believe are crucial for the description of the liquid state. We show that this physical picture may naturally explain difficult unsolved problems associated with the liquid state, such as anomalies of water-type liquids (water, Si, Ge, ...), liquid-liquid transition, liquid-glass transition, crystallization and quasicrystal formation, in a unified manner. In other words, we need a new order parameter representing a low local free-energy configuration, which is a bond orientational order parameter in many cases, in addition to a density order parameter for the physical description of these phenomena. Here we review our two-order-parameter model of liquid and consider how transient local structural ordering is linked to all of the above-mentioned phenomena. The relationship between these phenomena is also discussed. PMID:23104614

  14. Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Clampin, M.; Latham, D. W.; Seager, S.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Villasenor, J. S.; Winn, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In a two-year survey, TESS will monitor more than 500,000 stars for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. No ground-based survey can achieve this feat. A large fraction of TESS target stars will be 30-100 times brighter than those observed by Kepler satellite, and therefore TESS . planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. TESS will make it possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars. TESS will provide prime targets for observation with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future. TESS data will be released with minimal delay (no proprietary period), inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets. The TESS legacy will be a catalog of the very nearest and brightest main-sequence stars hosting transiting exoplanets, thus providing future observers with the most favorable targets for detailed investigations.

  15. Electronic transitions of yttrium monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biu Wa; Chan, Man-Chor; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2015-11-01

    The electronic transition spectrum of the yttrium monophosphide (YP) molecule in the near infrared region between 715 nm and 880 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The YP molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated yttrium atoms with PH3 gas seeded in argon. Eleven vibrational bands were analyzed and six electronic transitions have been identified, namely the [12.17] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.27] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.44] Ω = 3 - X3Π2, [13.46] Ω = 3 - X3Π2 and [13.40] Ω = 2 - X3Π2 transitions and a [13.69] Ω = 3 - a1Δ2 transition. Least squares fits of the measured rotational lines yielded molecular constants for the ground and excited states. The ground state has been determined to be a X3Π2 state and the bond length ro and vibrational separation, ΔG1/2, were determined to be 2.4413 Å and 390.77 cm-1 respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram has been used to aid the assignment of the observed electronic states. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the electronic spectrum of the YP molecule.

  16. Propagation mechanisms of guided streamers in plasma jets: the influence of electronegativity of the surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Norberg, Seth A.; Winter, Jörn; Johnsen, Eric; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K. D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications are often sustained in He with small amounts of, for example, O2 impurities and typically propagate into ambient air. The resulting poorly controlled generation of reactive species has motivated the use of gas shields to control the interaction of the plasma plume with the ambient gas. The use of different gases in the shield yields different behavior in the plasma plume. In this paper, we discuss results from experimental and computational investigations of He plasma jets having attaching and non-attaching gas shields. We found that negative ion formation in the He-air mixing region significantly affects the ionization wave dynamics and promotes the propagation of negative guided streamers through an electrostatic focusing mechanism. Results from standard and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy ratios of emission from states of N2 and He imply different electric fields in the plasma plume depending on the composition of the shielding gas. These effects are attributed to the conductivity in the transition region between the plasma plume and the shield gas, and the immobile charge represented by negative ions. The lower conductivity in the attaching mixtures enables more extended penetration of the electric field whereas the negative ions aid in focusing the electrons towards the axis.

  17. A Comparison of the Language Skills of ELLs and Monolinguals Who Are Poor Decoders, Poor Comprehenders, or Normal Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geva, Esther; Massey-Garrison, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this article is to examine how oral language abilities relate to reading profiles in English language learners (ELLs) and English as a first language (EL1) learners, and the extent of similarities and differences between ELLs and EL1s in three reading subgroups: normal readers, poor decoders, and poor comprehenders. The…

  18. Early Disparities in Mathematics Gains among Poor and Non-Poor Children: Examining the Role of Behavioral Engagement in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to investigate the relationship between poverty status, mathematics achievement gains, and behavioral engagement in learning over kindergarten. Data included information on 11,680 poor, low-income, and non-poor kindergartners from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). Results…

  19. Gas gangrene

    MedlinePlus

    Tissue infection - Clostridial; Gangrene - gas; Myonecrosis; Clostridial infection of tissues; Necrotizing soft tissue infection ... Gas gangrene is most often caused by bacteria called Clostridium perfringens. It also can be caused by ...

  20. Polymer brushes in explicit poor solvents studied using a new variant of the bond fluctuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Using a variant of the Bond Fluctuation Model which improves its parallel efficiency in particular running on graphic cards we perform large scale simulations of polymer brushes in poor explicit solvent. Grafting density, solvent quality, and chain length are varied. Different morphological structures in particular octopus micelles are observed for low grafting densities. We reconsider the theoretical model for octopus micelles proposed by Williams using scaling arguments with the relevant scaling variable being σ/σc, and with the characteristic grafting density given by σc ˜ N-4/3. We find that octopus micelles only grow laterally, but not in height and we propose an extension of the model by assuming a cylindrical shape instead of a spherical geometry for the micelle-core. We show that the scaling variable σ/σc can be applied to master plots for the averaged height of the brush, the size of the micelles, and the number of chains per micelle. The exponents in the corresponding power law relations for the grafting density and chain length are in agreement with the model for flat cylindrical micelles. We also investigate the surface roughness and find that polymer brushes in explicit poor solvent at grafting densities higher than the stretching transition are flat and surface rippling can only be observed close to the stretching transition.