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Sample records for gas reservoir bluebell-altamont

  1. Open fracture prediction and detection at the Bluebell-Altamont field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Harthill, N.; Bates, C.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Production in the Bluebell-Altamont field is controlled by fracture permeability, and to date, intersecting open fractures has been a hit-or-miss process. By integrating knowledge of basin formation, structural history, and specific geophysical characteristics, we will show that the fractures in the producing region of the Uinta Basin occur systematically, and that the open fractures can be defined using reflection seismic AVO anomalies. The Uinta basin is markedly asymmetrical, reaching its deepest point of -20,000 feet bsl. The interpreted mechanism of basin formation is left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the basement along the Duschesne and South Flank fault systems, created by the indentation of the Colorado Plateau into the North American craton during the Laramide orogeny. Fracture directions in the sedimentary reservoir rocks predicted using this concept are N15[degrees]-50[degrees]W, which agree with core and joint analyses. Blackhawk Geosciences shot two orthogonal 3C reflection seismic lines, and a 9C VSP at the Bluebell-Altamont field under DOE Contract No. DE-RP21-91MC28135; the 9C VSP defined N35[degrees]W as the open fracture direction. Amplitudes at far offsets on the N70[degrees]E line were significantly greater than amplitudes on the N30[degrees]W line, which shows that the N70[degrees]E crosses open fractures at approximately right angles, while the N30[degrees]W line is approximately parallel to the open fractures. These AVO anomalies are consistent with the results of the 9C VSP, surface shear wave seismic anomalies, and geologic structural analysis.

  2. Open fracture prediction and detection at the Bluebell-Altamont field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Harthill, N.; Bates, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Production in the Bluebell-Altamont field is controlled by fracture permeability, and to date, intersecting open fractures has been a hit-or-miss process. By integrating knowledge of basin formation, structural history, and specific geophysical characteristics, we will show that the fractures in the producing region of the Uinta Basin occur systematically, and that the open fractures can be defined using reflection seismic AVO anomalies. The Uinta basin is markedly asymmetrical, reaching its deepest point of -20,000 feet bsl. The interpreted mechanism of basin formation is left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the basement along the Duschesne and South Flank fault systems, created by the indentation of the Colorado Plateau into the North American craton during the Laramide orogeny. Fracture directions in the sedimentary reservoir rocks predicted using this concept are N15{degrees}-50{degrees}W, which agree with core and joint analyses. Blackhawk Geosciences shot two orthogonal 3C reflection seismic lines, and a 9C VSP at the Bluebell-Altamont field under DOE Contract No. DE-RP21-91MC28135; the 9C VSP defined N35{degrees}W as the open fracture direction. Amplitudes at far offsets on the N70{degrees}E line were significantly greater than amplitudes on the N30{degrees}W line, which shows that the N70{degrees}E crosses open fractures at approximately right angles, while the N30{degrees}W line is approximately parallel to the open fractures. These AVO anomalies are consistent with the results of the 9C VSP, surface shear wave seismic anomalies, and geologic structural analysis.

  3. The study of a naturally fractured gas reservoir using seismic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.R.; Lynn, H.B.; Simon, M.

    1999-09-01

    The upper Green River Formation at the Bluebell-Altamont field, Utah is a tight gas sand reservoir where economic production can be sustained only in regions of high natural fracturing. In 1994, a demonstration seismic project was conducted at the field to show how exploration for, and the characterization of, naturally fractured gas reservoirs can be more effective through the integrated use of seismic techniques. Study of field exposures, well logs, and regional stress indicators prior to the seismic survey indicated a high degree of preferential orientation to the dominant fracture trend at the field. The seismic survey consisted of two crossing, nine-component surface seismic lines and a nine-component vertical seismic profile. The compression, and shear-wave surface seismic both recorded anisotropies that were related to the presence and azimuth of the natural fracturing. The surface seismic results were supported by results from the nine-component vertical seismic profile. This program demonstrates the potential offered by the use of integrated seismic and geological techniques for the analysis of both land and marine naturally fractured reservoirs; furthermore, it demonstrates the possibilities of reviewing existing databases containing compression-wave surface seismic data for fracture information.

  4. Geostatistics applied to gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Meunier, G.; Coulomb, C.; Laille, J.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The spatial distribution of many of the physical parameters connected with a gas reservoir is of primary interest to both engineers and geologists throughout the study, development, and operation of a field. It is therefore desirable for the distribution to be capable of statistical interpretation, to have a simple graphical representation, and to allow data to be entered from either two- or three-dimensional grids. To satisfy these needs while dealing with the geographical variables, new methods have been developed under the name geostatistics. This paper describes briefly the theory of geostatistics and its most recent improvements for the specific problem of subsurface description. The external-drift technique has been emphasized in particular, and in addition, four case studies related to gas reservoirs are presented.

  5. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

  6. Gas network model allows full reservoir coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Methnani, M.M.

    1998-02-23

    The gas-network flow model (Gasnet) developed for and added to an existing Qatar General Petroleum Corp. (OGPC) in-house reservoir simulator, allows improved modeling of the interaction among the reservoir, wells, and pipeline networks. Gasnet is a three-phase model that is modified to handle gas-condensate systems. The numerical solution is based on a control volume scheme that uses the concept of cells and junctions, whereby pressure and phase densities are defined in cells, while phase flows are defined at junction links. The model features common numerical equations for the reservoir, the well, and the pipeline components and an efficient state-variable solution method in which all primary variables including phase flows are solved directly. Both steady-state and transient flow events can be simulated with the same tool. Three test cases show how the model runs. One case simulates flow redistribution in a simple two-branch gas network. The second simulates a horizontal gas well in a waterflooded gas reservoir. The third involves an export gas pipeline coupled to a producing reservoir.

  7. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-04-08

    Natural gas reservoirs are obvious targets for carbon sequestration by direct carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection by virtue of their proven record of gas production and integrity against gas escape. Carbon sequestration in depleted natural gas reservoirs can be coupled with enhanced gas production by injecting CO{sub 2} into the reservoir as it is being produced, a process called Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). In this process, supercritical CO{sub 2} is injected deep in the reservoir while methane (CH{sub 4}) is produced at wells some distance away. The active injection of CO{sub 2} causes repressurization and CH{sub 4} displacement to allow the control and enhancement of gas recovery relative to water-drive or depletion-drive reservoir operations. Carbon dioxide undergoes a large change in density as CO{sub 2} gas passes through the critical pressure at temperatures near the critical temperature. This feature makes CO{sub 2} a potentially effective cushion gas for gas storage reservoirs. Thus at the end of the CSEGR process when the reservoir is filled with CO{sub 2}, additional benefit of the reservoir may be obtained through its operation as a natural gas storage reservoir. In this paper, we present discussion and simulation results from TOUGH2/EOS7C of gas mixture property prediction, gas injection, repressurization, migration, and mixing processes that occur in gas reservoirs under active CO{sub 2} injection.

  8. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1995-05-01

    Exploration strategies are needed to identify subtle basement features critical to locating fractured regions in advance of drilling in tight gas reservoirs. The Piceance Basin served as a demonstration site for an analysis utilizing aeromagnetic surveys, remote sensing, Landsat Thematic Mapper, and Side Looking Airborne Radar imagery for the basin and surrounding areas. Spatially detailed aeromagnetic maps were used to to interpret zones of basement structure.

  9. Monitoring gas reservoirs by seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Priolo, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to image spatial anomalies in the subsurface, without the need of recordings from seismic sources, such as earthquakes or explosions. Furthermore, the temporal variation of ambient seismic noise's can be used to infer temporal changes of the seismic velocities in the investigated medium. Such temporal variations can reflect changes of several physical properties/conditions in the medium. For example, they may be consequence of stress changes, variation of hydrogeological parameters, pore pressure and saturation changes due to fluid injection or extraction. Passive image interferometry allows to continuously monitor small temporal changes of seismic velocities in the subsurface, making it a suitable tool to monitor time-variant systems such as oil and gas reservoirs or volcanic environments. The technique does not require recordings from seismic sources in the classical sense, but is based on the processing of noise records. Moreover, it requires only data from one or two seismic stations, their locations constraining the sampled target area. Here we apply passive image interferometry to monitor a gas storage reservoir in northern Italy. The Collalto field (Northern Italy) is a depleted gas reservoir located at 1500 m depth, now used as a gas storage facility. The reservoir experience a significant temporal variation in the amount of stored gas: the injection phases mainly occur in the summer, while the extraction take place mostly in winter. In order to monitor induced seismicity related to gas storage operations, a seismic network (the Collalto Seismic Network) has been deployed in 2011. The Collalto Seismic Network is composed by 10 broadband stations, deployed within an area of about 20 km x 20 km, and provides high-quality continuous data since January 1st, 2012. In this work we present preliminary results from ambient noise interferometry using a two-months sample of continuous seismic data, i.e. from October 1st, 2012, to the November 30th, 2012, a time frame when gas extraction operations took place. This work has been funded by the German BMBF "Geothecnologien" project MINE (BMBF03G0737A).

  10. Shale Gas reservoirs characterization using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Aliouane, Leila

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a tentative of shale gas reservoirs characterization enhancement from well-logs data using neural network is established. The goal is to predict the Total Organic carbon (TOC) in boreholes where the TOC core rock or TOC well-log measurement does not exist. The Multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network with three layers is established. The MLP input layer is constituted with five neurons corresponding to the Bulk density, Neutron porosity, sonic P wave slowness and photoelectric absorption coefficient. The hidden layer is forms with nine neurons and the output layer is formed with one neuron corresponding to the TOC log. Application to two boreholes located in Barnett shale formation where a well A is used as a pilot and a well B is used for propagation shows clearly the efficiency of the neural network method to improve the shale gas reservoirs characterization. The established formalism plays a high important role in the shale gas plays economy and long term gas energy production.

  11. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  12. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

  13. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

  14. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  15. Mantle Reservoirs From a Noble Gas Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2007-12-01

    The noble gases provide unique insight into mantle structure and the origin of the different mantle reservoirs. Many OIBs, such as Hawaii and Iceland, have 3He/4He ratios that are a factor of 4 to 6 higher than the canonical MORB value of 81 RA. The high 3He/4He ratios in OIBs are conventionally viewed as evidence for the existence of a primitive mantle reservoir. Such a view, however, is frequently challenged on the grounds that noble gas abundances in OIBs are an order of magnitude lower than in MORBs, an observation that traditional models of magmatic degassing cannot explain. The apparent concentration paradox has been resolved by incorporating kinetic fractionation of the noble gases during magmatic degassing of the erupting magma and it can be shown that higher CO2 and H2O content of OIBs, compared to MORBs, leads to more extensive degassing of He in OIB magmas (Gonnermann and Mukhopadhyay, 2007). In contrast to Hawaii and Iceland, some ocean islands, such as the Cook-Austral Islands and Canary Islands (HIMU ocean islands) have 3He/4He ratios of 4-7 RA, lower than the MORB range. The low 3He/4He ratios are attributed to the addition of radiogenic 4He from recycled slabs. Surprisingly, recent high-precision neon isotopic measurements made at Harvard in olivine phenocrysts from the Cook-Austral Islands indicate that HIMU neon is less nucleogenic than the MORB source. The He and Ne systematics from the Cook-Austral's demonstrate that the noble gas signature of HIMU basalts cannot arise either from simple diffusive equilibration of a recycled slab with a MORB source, or result from mixing of melts that are derived from recycled slabs and the MORB mantle. The He-Ne systematics, however, can be quantitatively modeled as a mixture of recycled slab and a primitive mantle reservoir. The scenario is consistent with He-Os and He- Nd correlations seen in the Cook-Austral basalts. Thus, both low and high 3He/4He OIBs incorporate the same primitive mantle reservoir, although in varying proportions. The notion of a reservoir that is primitive in its volatile content and sampled at ocean islands is very much alive. In spite of whole mantle convection, it appears that part of the Earth's mantle has remained largely undegassed. While significant progress has been made with respect to understanding the geochemical implications of He and Ne isotopic composition measured in MORBs and OIBs, our knowledge of Xenon in the mantle remains poor. Since 129Xe and 136Xe have been produced by the now extinct nuclides, 129I and 244Pu respectively, Xe isotopic composition of the mantle can be used to test models of atmosphere formation and provide unique clues to the volatile history of the Earth's mantle. Some of the outstanding issues that still need to be resolved are whether the Earth's mantle has solar or chondritic heavy noble gases, whether OIBs and MORB have the same Xe isotopic composition, and what fraction of the 136Xe is from 244Pu vs. 238U fission. Addressing these issues will require not only high precision measurements but also innovative experimental techniques to reduce air contamination that is ubiquitous in mantle-derived samples. High precision Xe isotopic measurements made at Harvard indicates that Samoa (a high 3He/4He ocean island) and MORBs have exactly the same proportion of radiogenic 129Xe to 136Xe. Although this result needs to be verified from other OIBs, it suggests that a single mantle reservoir supplies the excess 129Xe and 136Xe to both the MORB and OIB mantle source. The primitive mantle reservoir is the most likely carrier of the xenon isotopic anomaly.

  16. De Wijk gas field: Reservoir mapping with amplitude anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruijn, B. )

    1993-09-01

    De Wijk field, discovered in 1949, is located in the northeastern part of Netherlands. The main gas accumulation is contained in cretaceous and Triassic sandstone reservoirs trapped in a broad salt-induced structure of around 80 km[sup 2] areal extent. The field contains gas in the tertiary, Chalk, Zechstein 2 Carbonate, and Carboniferous reservoirs as well. De Wijk field is unique in the Netherlands as most gas-producing reservoirs in the Cretaceous/Triassic are of no commercial interest. Post-depositional leaching has positively affected the reservoir properties of the Triassic formations subcropping below the Cretaceous unconformity. Optimum, interpretation of 3-D seismic data acquired in 1989 resulted in spectacular displays highlighting the uniqueness of the field. Most gas-bearing reservoirs are expressed on seismic by amplitude anomalies. Various attribute-measurement techniques show the effect of gas fill, leaching, and sand distribution in the various reservoirs.

  17. [Greenhouse gas emission from reservoir and its influence factors].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-jie; Zhao, Tong-qian; Zheng, Hua; Duan, Xiao-nan; Chen, Fa-lin; Ouyang, Zhi-yun; Wang, Xiao-ke

    2008-08-01

    Reservoirs are significant sources of emissions of the greenhouse gases. Discussing greenhouse gas emission from the reservoirs and its influence factors are propitious to evaluate emission of the greenhouse gas accurately, reduce gas emission under hydraulic engineering and hydropower development. This paper expatiates the mechanism of the greenhouse gas production, sums three approaches of the greenhouse gas emission, which are emissions from nature emission of the reservoirs, turbines and spillways and downstream of the dam, respectively. Effects of greenhouse gas emission were discussed from character of the reservoirs, climate, pH of the water, vegetation growing in the reservoirs and so on. Finally, it has analyzed the heterogeneity of the greenhouse gas emission as well as the root of the uncertainty and carried on the forecast with emphasis to the next research. PMID:18839604

  18. Mid-continent natural gas reservoirs and plays

    SciTech Connect

    Bebout, D.G. )

    1993-09-01

    Natural gas reservoirs of the mid-continent states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas (northern part) have produced 103 trillion cubic ft (tcf) of natural gas. Oklahoma has produced the most, having a cumulative production of 71 tcf. The major reservoirs (those that have produced more than 10 billion ft[sup 3]) have been identified and organized into 28 plays based on geologic age, lithology, and depositional environment. The Atlas of Major Midcontinent Gas Reservoirs, published in 1993, provides the documentation for these plays. This atlas was a collaborative effort of the Gas Research Institute; Bureau of Economic Geology. The University of Texas at Austin; Arkansas Geological Commission; Kansas Geological survey; and Oklahoma Geological Survey. Total cumulative production for 530 major reservoirs is 66 tcf associated and nonassociated gas. Oklahoma has the highest production with 39 tcf from 390 major reservoirs, followed by Kansas with 26 tcf from 105 major reservoirs. Most of the mid-continent production is from Pennsylvanian (46%) and Permian (41%) reservoirs; Mississippian reservoirs account for 10% production, and lower Paleozoic reservoirs, 3%. The largest play by far is the Wolfcampian Shallow Shelf Carbonate-Hugoton Embayment play with 25 tcf cumulative production, most of which is from the Hugoton and Panoma fields in Kansas and Guymon-Hugoton gas area in Oklahoma. A total of 53% of the mid-continent gas production is from dolostone and limestone reservoirs; 39% is from sandstone reservoirs. The remaining 8% is from chert conglomerate and granite-wash reservoirs. Geologically based plays established from the distribution of major gas reservoirs provide important support for the extension of productive trends, application of new resource technology to more efficient field development, and further exploration in the mid-continent region.

  19. Microseismic monitoring of the New Haven gas storage reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In a detailed microseismic evaluation of Michigan Consolidated Gas Co.'s New Haven, Mich., gas storage reservoir, Penn State developed microseismic field instrumentation for monitoring the reservoir, collected data for almost 4 years, and analyzed the information using a computer-based system designed specially for the field data. One of the study's important conclusions was that reservoir stability, as defined by the observed microseismic activity, seems to increase with rising storage pressures.

  20. Reservoir model for Hillsboro gas storage field management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, Emmanuel O.; Kemppainen, Curt; Morgan, Jim

    1995-01-01

    A 3-dimensional reservoir model is used to understand the behavior of the Hillsboro Gas Storage Field and to investigate the field's performance under various future development. Twenty-two years of the gas storage reservoir history, comprising the initial gas bubble development and seasonal gas injection and production cycles, are examined with a full-field, gas water, reservoir simulation model. The results suggest that the gas-water front is already in the vicinity of the west observation well that increasing the field's total gas-in-place volume would cause gas to migrate beyond the east, north and west observation well. They also suggest that storage enlargement through gas injection into the lower layers may not prevent gas migration. Moreover, the results suggest that the addition of strategically-located new wells would boost the simulated gas deliverabilities.

  1. Measuring Greenhouse Gas Emissions From China's Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Le; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiaoke

    2014-01-01

    Hydroelectricity has typically been regarded as a green energy source, but reservoirs created for its generation emit greenhouse gases (GHGs) just as natural lakes and rivers do. The role of reservoirs in GHG emissions has been overlooked. Substantial amounts of methane (CH4) are emitted from reservoir surfaces every year, which account for about 20% of the total CH4 emission from inland waters. GHG emissions (transferred into carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents) from some tropical reservoirs even exceed CO2 emissions from thermal power plants if the same amount of electricity is generated.

  2. 30 CFR 250.121 - What happens when the reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What happens when the reservoir contains both... reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected gas? If the reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected gas, when you produce gas from the reservoir you must use an...

  3. Cavity completion technique for coal gas reservoirs: Procedures. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.L.; McLennan, J.D.; Wyman, R.E.

    1995-11-27

    Operational procedures are outlined for using the Dynamic Openhole Cavity Completion technique (cavity completion) in applicable coal gas reservoirs. The history of this technique is summarized, as are requisite reservoir properties for successful cavitation. Different cavity completion techniques addressed include openhole cavitation without a liner and cavitation from a sidetracked wellbore.

  4. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

  5. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    During oil and gas production hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is significantly increased by injecting miscible CO2 gas in order to displace hydrocarbons towards producing wells. This process of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) might be used for the total CO2 storage after complete hydrocarbon reservoir depletion. This kind of potential storage sites was selected for detailed studies, including generalised development study to investigate the applicability of CO2 for storages. The study is focused on compositional modelling to predict the miscibility pressures. We consider depleted gas condensate field in Kazakhstan as important target for CO2 storage and EOR. This reservoir being depleted below the dew point leads to retrograde condensate formed in the pore system. CO2 injection in the depleted gas condensate reservoirs may allow enhanced gas recovery by reservoir pressurisation and liquid re-vaporisation. In addition a number of geological and petrophysical parameters should satisfy storage requirements. Studied carbonate gas condensate and oil field has strong seal, good petrophysical parameters and already proven successful containment CO2 and sour gas in high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions. The reservoir is isolated Lower Permian and Carboniferous carbonate platform covering an area of about 30 km. The reservoir contains a gas column about 1.5 km thick. Importantly, the strong massive sealing consists of the salt and shale seal. Sour gas that filled in the oil-saturated shale had an active role to form strong sealing. Two-stage hydrocarbon saturation of oil and later gas within the seal frame were accompanied by bitumen precipitation in shales forming a perfect additional seal. Field hydrocarbon production began three decades ago maintaining a strategy in full replacement of gas in order to maintain pressure of the reservoir above the dew point. This was partially due to the sour nature of the gas with CO2 content over 5%. Our models and calculations demonstrate that injection of produced and additional gas (CO2 and sour gases) is economically viable and ecologically safe. Gas injection monitoring using surface injection well head pressures and measured injected volumes demonstrates a highly effective gas injection process. Injection well head pressure response shows no increase, indicating absence of compartmentalization close to the near well bore gas injection region in reservoir. And injector pulse study shows interconnectivity across the injection region highlighting good quality reservoir across the potential CO2 injection zones. Preliminary CO2 storage potential was also estimated for this type of geological site.

  6. Some modern notions on oil and gas reservoir production regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, J.; Monash, E.A.

    1980-05-21

    The historic rhetoric of oil and gas reservoir production regulations has been burdened with misconceptions. One was that most reservoirs are rate insensitive. Another was that a reservoir's decline is primarily a function of reservoir mechaism rather than a choice unconstrained by the laws of physics. Relieved of old notions like these, we introduce some modern notions, the most basic being that production regulation should have the purpose of obtaining the highest value from production per irreversible diminution of thermodynamically available energy. The laws of thermodynamics determine the available energy. What then is value. Value may include contributions other than production per se and purely monetary economic outcomes.

  7. Feasibility studies of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J.D.; Howes, R.I.; Hawkyard, I.R.; Fishlock, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Preliminary results obtained from a program of experimental and theoretical studies examining the uncertainties of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs are reported. In spite of high trapped-gas saturations (35 to 39%), further aggravated by an unusual type of hysteresis, recoveries of gas and liquids can be increased over those obtained under natural depletion.

  8. US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-18

    For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

  9. Gas content of Gladys McCall reservoir brine

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1987-05-29

    On October 8, 1983, after the first full day of production from Sand No.8 in the Gladys McCall well, samples of separator gas and separator brine were collected for laboratory P-V-T (pressure, volume, temperature) studies. Recombination of amounts of these samples based upon measured rates at the time of sample collection, and at reservoir temperature (290 F), revealed a bubble point pressure of 9200 psia. This is substantially below the reported reservoir pressure of 12,783 psia. The gas content of the recombined fluids was 30.19 SCF of dry gas/STB of brine. In contrast, laboratory studies indicate that 35.84 SCF of pure methane would dissolve in each STB of 95,000 mg/L sodium chloride brine. These results indicate that the reservoir brine was not saturated with natural gas. By early April, 1987, production of roughly 25 million barrels of brine had reduced calculated flowing bottomhole pressure to about 6600 psia at a brine rate of 22,000 STB/D. If the skin factor(s) were as high as 20, flowing pressure drop across the skin would still be only about 500 psi. Thus, some portion of the reservoir volume was believed to have been drawn down to below the bubble point deduced from the laboratory recombination of separator samples. When the pressure in a geopressured geothermal reservoir is reduced to below the bubble point pressure for solution gas, gas is exsolved from the brine flowing through the pores in the reservoir rock. This exsolved gas is trapped in the reservoir until the fractional gas saturation of pore volume becomes large enough for gas flow to commence through a continuous gas-filled channel. At the same time, the gas/brine ratio becomes smaller and the chemistry of the remaining solution gas changes for the brine from which gas is exsolved. A careful search was made for the changes in gas/brine ratio or solution gas chemistry that would accompany pressure dropping below the bubble point pressure. Changes of about the same magnitude as the scatter in the data appear to have occurred in mid-1985 when calculated flowing bottomhole pressure was in the range of 9400 to 9700 psi. After the amount of brine flowing through the rock near to the wellbore has exsolved enough gas for onset of gas mobility through a continuous gas-filled channel, another test for whether the reservoir is below its bubble point becomes possible. This ''bubble test'' consists of suddenly increasing flow rate so that bottomhole pressure drops. Gas expansion then results in a small portion of the free gas from near the wellbore being produced in a short period of time. The resulting ''bubble'' of gas has a higher natural gas liquids content than gas produced before and after the transient. ''Bubble tests'' were performed in February 1986 and April 1987. Neither test liberated enough additional gas to provide a detectable change in produced gas/brine ratio. However, observed small transients in Ethane/Methane and Propane/Methane ratios indicate that some free gas was produced from the near wellbore region. These results suggest that the bubble point pressure must have been in the vicinity of the calculated 9500 psi flowing bottomhole pressure during the second of 1985. They conclude that: (1) Sand No.8 in the Gladys McCall well was not saturated with natural gas at the reported initial reservoir pressure of 12,873 psia; (2) flowing bottomhole pressure became less than the bubble point pressure during 1985; and (3) bubble point pressure was in the range of 9200 to 10,000 psi.

  10. Microbial Life in an Underground Gas Storage Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombach, Petra; van Almsick, Tobias; Richnow, Hans H.; Zenner, Matthias; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    While underground gas storage is technically well established for decades, the presence and activity of microorganisms in underground gas reservoirs have still hardly been explored today. Microbial life in underground gas reservoirs is controlled by moderate to high temperatures, elevated pressures, the availability of essential inorganic nutrients, and the availability of appropriate chemical energy sources. Microbial activity may affect the geochemical conditions and the gas composition in an underground reservoir by selective removal of anorganic and organic components from the stored gas and the formation water as well as by generation of metabolic products. From an economic point of view, microbial activities can lead to a loss of stored gas accompanied by a pressure decline in the reservoir, damage of technical equipment by biocorrosion, clogging processes through precipitates and biomass accumulation, and reservoir souring due to a deterioration of the gas quality. We present here results from molecular and cultivation-based methods to characterize microbial communities inhabiting a porous rock gas storage reservoir located in Southern Germany. Four reservoir water samples were obtained from three different geological horizons characterized by an ambient reservoir temperature of about 45 °C and an ambient reservoir pressure of about 92 bar at the time of sampling. A complementary water sample was taken at a water production well completed in a respective horizon but located outside the gas storage reservoir. Microbial community analysis by Illumina Sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes indicated the presence of phylogenetically diverse microbial communities of high compositional heterogeneity. In three out of four samples originating from the reservoir, the majority of bacterial sequences affiliated with members of the genera Eubacterium, Acetobacterium and Sporobacterium within Clostridiales, known for their fermenting capabilities. In contrast, bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were the most frequently encountered species in the sample from the water production well. Furthermore, bacterial sequences belonging to thermophiles within the family Thermotogaceae were found in all samples investigated. Archaeal community analysis revealed the dominance of methanogens clustering with members of Methanosarcinaceae, Methanomicrobiaceae and Methanobacteriaceae in three reservoir samples and the sample from the water production well. Cultivations of water samples under an atmosphere of storage gas blended by hydrogen as electron source at in situ-like conditions (45°C, 92 bar, p(H2) = 6 bar) revealed that hydrogen was quickly consumed in all laboratory microcosms with reservoir samples. Quantitative PCR analysis of the gene encoding for methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) along with reaction educt and product analyses suggested that methanogenesis was primarily responsible for hydrogen consumption during the experiments. While it is currently in question whether or not the laboratory data can be upscaled to actual reservoir conditions, they may allude to fermenting and thermophilic bacteria playing an important role for the investigated reservoir microbiology and also indicate potential stimulation of hydrogenotrophic methanogens if hydrogen would be introduced into the reservoir.

  11. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  13. Geotechnology for low-permeability gas reservoirs, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Harstad, H.; Lorenz, J.; Warpinski, N.; Boneau, T.; Holcomb, D.; Teufel, L.; Young, C.

    1995-06-01

    The permeability, and thus the economics, of tight reservoirs are largely dependent on natural fractures, and on the in situ stresses that both originated fractures and control subsequent fracture permeability. Natural fracture permeability ultimately determines the gas (or oil) producibility from the rock matrix. Therefore, it is desirable to be able to predict, both prior to drilling and during reservoir production, (1) the natural fracture characteristics, (2) the mechanical and transport properties of fractures and the surrounding rock matrix, and (3) the present in situ stress magnitudes and orientations. The combination of activities described in this report extends the earlier work to other Rocky Mountain gas reservoirs. Additionally, it extends the fracture characterizations to attempts of crosswell geophysical fracture detection using shear wave birefringence and to obtaining detailed quantitative models of natural fracture systems for use in improved numerical reservoir simulations. Finally, the project continues collaborative efforts to evaluate and advance cost-effective methods for in situ stress measurements on core.

  14. US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

    1989-02-01

    This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

  15. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions from future Amazonian hydroelectric reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faria, Felipe A. M.; Jaramillo, Paulina; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Barros, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    Brazil plans to meet the majority of its growing electricity demand with new hydropower plants located in the Amazon basin. However, large hydropower plants located in tropical forested regions may lead to significant carbon dioxide and methane emission. Currently, no predictive models exist to estimate the greenhouse gas emissions before the reservoir is built. This paper presents two different approaches to investigate the future carbon balance of eighteen new reservoirs in the Amazon. The first approach is based on a degradation model of flooded carbon stock, while the second approach is based on flux data measured in Amazonian rivers and reservoirs. The models rely on a Monte Carlo simulation framework to represent the balance of the greenhouse gases into the atmosphere that results when land and river are converted into a reservoir. Further, we investigate the role of the residence time/stratification in the carbon emissions estimate. Our results imply that two factors contribute to reducing overall emissions from these reservoirs: high energy densities reservoirs, i.e., the ratio between the installed capacity and flooded area, and vegetation clearing. While the models’ uncertainties are high, we show that a robust treatment of uncertainty can effectively indicate whether a reservoir in the Amazon will result in larger greenhouse gas emissions when compared to other electricity sources.

  16. Production forecasting for gas fields with multiple reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Meling, L.M.; Morkeseth, P.O.; Langeland, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new method to predict field performance for gas fields consisting of small reservoirs of point-bar origin was developed, implemented, and tested. Conventional geological and reservoir engineering modeling of this type of field is difficult and usually gives erroneous results. This paper describes the evaluation and use of exploration- and appraisal-well data as input for a stochastic geological model and the use of output from that model as input for a semianalytical reservoir performance model. The semianalytical model includes production constraints for well, platform, and field conditions. Example applications of the stochastic geological model and the semi-analytical model are also presented.

  17. A wellbore/reservoir simulator for testing gas wells in high-temperature reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, C.S.; Hasan, A.R.; Wang, X.; Jordan, D.L.

    1996-06-01

    Gas wells frequently exhibit changing storage during a transient test because of high fluid compressibility. Further complications may arise owing to heat exchange between the wellbore fluid and the formation, especially in high-temperature reservoirs. Thus, fluid temperature changes during a transient test, thereby complicating test interpretation when surface measurements must be used in a hostile downhole environment. This paper describes the application of a wellbore/reservoir simulator. this simulator can be run in two modes. In forward modeling, the wellhead pressure, temperature, and bottomhole pressure can be computed as a function of time, given reservoir parameters and well-completion details. In contrast, reverse simulation directly translates measured wellhead pressure (WHP) and temperature (WHT) to bottomhole pressure (BHP) for subsequent analysis. Two field examples obtained from a Gulf Coast gas field are used to illustrate the capabilities of the simulators. Good agreement is noted between the computed and measured BHP`s during both types of simulations.

  18. Measuring and managing reservoir greenhouse gas emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a 100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas...

  19. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, Martin J.; Orr, Jr., Franklin M.

    1999-12-20

    This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1998 - September 1998 under the third year of a three-year Department of Energy (DOE) grant on the ''Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. The research is divided into four main areas: (1) Pore scale modeling of three-phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three-phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator.

  20. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? (a... from each completion in an oil reservoir that is known to have an associated gas cap. (2) To...

  1. Velocities of fragments from bursting gas reservoirs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, D. E.; Price, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    A solution is obtained from a simplified approach for the problem of the motion of two fragments driven into a vacuum after rupture of a container filled with gas. Following rupture, the two container fragments are driven in opposite directions. From the separation developed between the moving fragments, the originally contained gas escapes to the vacuum, perpendicular to the direction of motion of the fragments, and with locally sonic velocity. The present solution removes two restrictions of an earlier similar approach: (1) the speed of the gas within the original volume (and consequently, by inference, that of the fragments) is small relative to the sonic escape velocity, and (2) the volume between the separating fragments while they are accelerating undergoes negligible change from the original volume.

  2. Noble Gas Tracing of Fluid Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, W. P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Robinson, D. G.; Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fluid transport mechanisms in a shale reservoir using natural noble gas tracers. Noble gas tracing is promising due to sensitivity of transport to: pore structure and sizes; phase partitioning between groundwater and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing and creation of surface area. A time-series of over thirty wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells with different oil-to-gas ratios, along with production data (i.e., flowrate and pressure). Tracer and production data sets can be combined to infer production flow regimes, to estimate reservoir transport parameters, and to improve forecasts of production decline. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-30

    In March, work continued on characterizing probabilities for determining natural fracturing associated with the GGRB for the Upper Cretaceous tight gas plays. Structural complexity, based on potential field data and remote sensing data was completed. A resource estimate for the Frontier and Mesa Verde play was also completed. Further, work was also conducted to determine threshold economics for the play based on limited current production in the plays in the Wamsutter Ridge area. These analyses culminated in a presentation at FETC on 24 March 1999 where quantified natural fracture domains, mapped on a partition basis, which establish ''sweet spot'' probability for natural fracturing, were reviewed. That presentation is reproduced here as Appendix 1. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1999--March 31, 1999 comprised five tasks: (1) Evaluation of the GGRB partitions for structural complexity that can be associated with natural fractures, (2) Continued resource analysis of the balance of the partitions to determine areas with higher relative gas richness, (3) Gas field studies, (4) Threshold resource economics to determine which partitions would be the most prospective, and (5) Examination of the area around the Table Rock 4H well.

  4. 30 CFR 250.121 - What happens when the reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens when the reservoir contains both... SHELF General Performance Standards 250.121 What happens when the reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected gas? If the reservoir contains both original gas in place and injected...

  5. 30 CFR 250.1157 - How do I receive approval to produce gas-cap gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gas from an oil reservoir with an associated gas cap? 250.1157 Section 250.1157 Mineral Resources... reservoir with an associated gas cap? (a) You must request and receive approval from the Regional Supervisor: (1) Before producing gas-cap gas from each completion in an oil reservoir that is known to have...

  6. Mechanistic Processes Controlling Gas Sorption in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Davidson, C. L.; Owen, T.; Hoyt, D.; Glezakou, V. A.; McGrail, B. P.; Thompson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of CO2 to stimulate natural gas production in previously fractured shale-dominated reservoirs where CO2 remains in place for long-term storage may be an attractive new strategy for reducing the cost of managing anthropogenic CO2. A preliminary analysis of capacities and potential revenues in US shale plays suggests nearly 390 tcf in additional gas recovery may be possible via CO2 driven enhanced gas recovery. However, reservoir transmissivity properties, optimum gas recovery rates, and ultimate fate of CO2 vary among reservoirs, potentially increasing operational costs and environmental risks. In this paper, we identify key mechanisms controlling the sorption of CH4 and CO2 onto phyllosilicates and processes occurring in mixed gas systems that have the potential of impacting fluid transfer and CO2 storage in shale dominated formations. Through a unique set of in situ experimental techniques coupled with molecular-level simulations, we identify structural transformations occurring to clay minerals, optimal CO2/CH4 gas exchange conditions, and distinguish between adsorbed and intercalated gases in a mixed gas system. For example, based on in situ measurements with magic angle spinning NMR, intercalation of CO2 within the montmorillonite structure occurs in CH4/CO2 gas mixtures containing low concentrations (<5 mol%) of CO2. A stable montmorillonite structure dominates during exposure to pure CH4 (90 bar), but expands upon titration of small fractions (1-3 mol%) of CO2. Density functional theory was used to quantify the difference in sorption behavior between CO2 and CH4 and indicates complex interactions occurring between hydrated cations, CH4, and CO2. The authors will discuss potential impacts of these experimental results on CO2-based hydrocarbon recovery processes.

  7. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  8. Earthquakes and depleted gas reservoirs: which comes first?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, M.; Donda, F.; Valensise, G.

    2014-12-01

    While scientists are paying increasing attention to the seismicity potentially induced by hydrocarbon exploitation, little is known about the reverse problem, i.e. the impact of active faulting and earthquakes on hydrocarbon reservoirs. The recent 2012 earthquakes in Emilia, Italy, raised concerns among the public for being possibly human-induced, but also shed light on the possible use of gas wells as a marker of the seismogenic potential of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Based on the analysis of over 400 borehole datasets from wells drilled along the Ferrara-Romagna Arc, a large oil and gas reserve in the southeastern Po Plain, we found that the 2012 earthquakes occurred within a cluster of sterile wells surrounded by productive ones. Since the geology of the productive and sterile areas is quite similar, we suggest that past earthquakes caused the loss of all natural gas from the potential reservoirs lying above their causative faults. Our findings have two important practical implications: (1) they may allow major seismogenic zones to be identified in areas of sparse seismicity, and (2) suggest that gas should be stored in exploited reservoirs rather than in sterile hydrocarbon traps or aquifers as this is likely to reduce the hazard of triggering significant earthquakes.

  9. Fluid and heat flow in gas-rich geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Blakeley, M.R.

    1983-07-01

    Numerical-simulation techniques are used to study the effects of noncondensible gases (CO/sub 2/) on geothermal reservoir behavior in the natural state and during exploitation. It is shown that the presence of CO/sub 2/ has large effects on the thermodynamic conditions of a reservoir in the natural state, especially on temperature distributions and phase compositions. The gas will expand two-phase zones and increase gas saturations to enable flow of CO/sub 2/ through the system. During exploitation, the early pressure drop is primarily due to degassing of the system. This process can cause a very rapid initial pressure drop, on the order of tens of bars, depending upon the initial partial pressure of CO/sub 2/. The following gas content from wells can provide information on in-place gas saturations and relative permeability curves that apply at a given geothermal resource. Site-specific studies are made for the gas-rich two-phase reservoir at the Ohaki geothermal field in New Zealand. A simple lumped-parameter model and a vertical column model are applied to the field data. The results obtained agree well with the natural thermodynamic state of the Ohaki field (pressure and temperature profiles) and a partial pressure of 15 to 25 bars is calculated in the primary reservoirs. The models also agree reasonably well with field data obtained during exploitation of the field. The treatment of thermophysical properties of H/sub 2/O-CO/sub 2/ mixtures for different phase compositions is summarized.

  10. Greenhouse Gas Evasion from Amazon Reservoirs and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Kemenes, A.; Rudorff, C.; Forsberg, B.; MacIntyre, S.

    2011-12-01

    Few studies of carbon dioxide or methane evasion from Amazon lakes or reservoirs span a full year and include multiple stations and local meteorological data. Based on measurements in Lake Curuai, a large floodplain lake in the lower Amazon basin, made at 71 to 74 stations during the four hydrological phases of inundation and draining, we illustrate the spatial patterns associated with proximity to the shore and to inflows. Carbon dioxide exchange with the atmosphere was calculated based on three gas exchange models. Values computed using equations based on wind and buoyancy flux averaged 85% higher than those based only on wind. Estimates using a surface renewal model depended upon the mixed layer depth. Carbon dioxide and methane concentrations and evasion to the atmosphere were sampled over a year from multiple stations in Balbina Reservoir and downstream in the Uatuma River. In addition, samples and evasion measurements were made during four periods in the Samuel, Tucurui and Curua-Una reservoirs and downstream rivers. Degassing can be important as water passes through hydroelectric turbines, and we developed a sampler designed to avoid losses during the collections near the depth of the turbines. For depths greater than 20 m, carbon dioxide and methane concentrations in water samples collected with new sampler averaged 34% and 116% higher than those collected with a standard sampler, respectively. Annual greenhouse gas emission from Balbina Reservoir plus downstream evasion, including the carbon dioxide equivalent of methane emissions, was estimated as 3 Tg C per year.

  11. Earthquakes and depleted gas reservoirs: which comes first?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, M.; Donda, F.; Valensise, G.

    2015-10-01

    While scientists are paying increasing attention to the seismicity potentially induced by hydrocarbon exploitation, so far, little is known about the reverse problem, i.e. the impact of active faulting and earthquakes on hydrocarbon reservoirs. The 20 and 29 May 2012 earthquakes in Emilia, northern Italy (Mw 6.1 and 6.0), raised concerns among the public for being possibly human-induced, but also shed light on the possible use of gas wells as a marker of the seismogenic potential of an active fold and thrust belt. We compared the location, depth and production history of 455 gas wells drilled along the Ferrara-Romagna arc, a large hydrocarbon reserve in the southeastern Po Plain (northern Italy), with the location of the inferred surface projection of the causative faults of the 2012 Emilia earthquakes and of two pre-instrumental damaging earthquakes. We found that these earthquake sources fall within a cluster of sterile wells, surrounded by productive wells at a few kilometres' distance. Since the geology of the productive and sterile areas is quite similar, we suggest that past earthquakes caused the loss of all natural gas from the potential reservoirs lying above their causative faults. To validate our hypothesis we performed two different statistical tests (binomial and Monte Carlo) on the relative distribution of productive and sterile wells, with respect to seismogenic faults. Our findings have important practical implications: (1) they may allow major seismogenic sources to be singled out within large active thrust systems; (2) they suggest that reservoirs hosted in smaller anticlines are more likely to be intact; and (3) they also suggest that in order to minimize the hazard of triggering significant earthquakes, all new gas storage facilities should use exploited reservoirs rather than sterile hydrocarbon traps or aquifers.

  12. Gas lift process for restoring flow in depleted geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.R.; Pye, S.D.; Probst, A.A.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method for increasing the production flow from a well penetrating a geothermal reservoir from a wellhead. The method consists of: (a) continuously injecting a sufficient amount of an inert, non-condensible lift gas into the well during the production of geothermal fluids therefrom to cause a substantial fraction, or to substantially increase a preexisting fraction, of steam in the produced fluids without having to significantly reduce the pressure of the produced fluid at the wellhead; and (b) recovering increased produced fluids and the lift gas from the well.

  13. PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin J. Blunt; Franklin M. Orr Jr

    2000-06-01

    This final report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1996--May 2000 under a three-year grant from the Department of Energy on the ''Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. The advances from the research include: new tools for streamline-based simulation including the effects of gravity, changing well conditions, and compositional displacements; analytical solutions to 1D compositional displacements which can speed-up gas injection simulation still further; and modeling and experiments that delineate the physics that is unique to three-phase flow.

  14. Incremental natural gas resources through infield reserve growth/secondary natural gas recovery. [Compartmented natural gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.J.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the Infield Growth/Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project have been: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities in reservoirs of conventional permeability cause reservoir compartmentalization and, hence, incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document practical, field-oriented examples of reserve growth from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas gulf coast basin and to use these gas reservoirs as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications of both tools and techniques to find secondary gas. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields. To transfer project results to natural gas producers, not just as field case studies, but as conceptual models of how heterogeneities determine natural gas flow and how to recognize the geologic and engineering clues that operators can use in a cost-effective manner to identify secondary gas. Accomplishments are presented for: reservoir characterization; integrated formation evaluation and engineering testing; compartmented reservoir simulator; and reservoir geophysics.

  15. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-19

    This DOE-funded research into seismic detection of natural fractures is one of six projects within the DOE`s Detection and Analysis of Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs Program, a multidisciplinary research initiative to develop technology for prediction, detection, and mapping of naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The demonstration of successful seismic techniques to locate subsurface zones of high fracture density and to guide drilling orientation for enhanced fracture permeability will enable better returns on investments in the development of the vast gas reserves held in tight formations beneath the Rocky Mountains. The seismic techniques used in this project were designed to capture the azimuthal anisotropy within the seismic response. This seismic anisotropy is the result of the symmetry in the rock fabric created by aligned fractures and/or unequal horizontal stresses. These results may be compared and related to other lines of evidence to provide cross-validation. The authors undertook investigations along the following lines: Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-wave seismic data; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in a nine-component (P- and S-sources, three-component receivers) vertical seismic profile; Characterization of the seismic anisotropy in three-dimensional, P-to-S converted wave seismic data (P-wave source, three-component receivers); and Description of geological and reservoir-engineering data that corroborate the anisotropy: natural fractures observed at the target level and at the surface, estimation of the maximum horizontal stress in situ, and examination of the flow characteristics of the reservoir.

  16. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.; Martin J. Blunt

    1998-04-30

    This report describes research into gas injection processes in four main areas: laboratory experiments to measure three-phase relative permeability; network modeling to predict three-phase relative permeability; benchmark simulations of gas injection and water flooding at the field scale; and the development of fast streamline techniques to study field-scale ow. The aim of the work is to achieve a comprehensive description of gas injection processes from the pore to the core to the reservoir scale. To this end, measurements of three-phase relative pemeability have been made and compared with predictions from pore scale modeling. At the field scale, streamline-based simulation has been extended to compositional displacements, providing a rapid method to predict oil recovery from gas injection.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of oil-leg potential in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lisk, M.; Krieger, F.W.; Eadington, P.J. ); O'Brien, G.W. )

    1996-01-01

    Oil bearing fluid inclusions in sandstone represent hidden oil shows. The frequency of quartz grains containing these inclusions (GOI number) reflects maximum palaeo-oil saturation irrespective of the present fluid phase. In this way fluid inclusion data can be used to both identify palaeo-oil columns and to map original oil water contacts (OWC) in wells where oil has been displaced by later gas charge. Studies conducted on gas fields from the North West Shelf of Australia have shown that substantial oil columns were once present. Moreover, detailed GOI mapping has been used to define the location of the original OWC in these reservoirs allowing the height of the palaeo-column to be determined and an estimate to be made of original oil in place (OOIP). At Oliver-1 in the Timor Sea the reservoir is presently filled to spill with a 164m gas, and 14.5m oil, column. GOI mapping has, however, delineated a 96m thick palaeo-oil column within the gas leg. This is almost seven times thicker than the present oil leg which suggests that perhaps 170-190 million barrels of oil were displaced from this structure. In the Pepper gas field in the Carnarvon Basin GOI mapping has demonstrated the presence of a gross palaeo-oil column between 15 and 30 m thick, suggesting that between about 50 and 70 million barrels of oil has been displaced. This is more oil than that reservoired in any of the surrounding oil discoveries, which emphasizes the importance, from an exploration standpoint, of defining these remigration pathways.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of oil-leg potential in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lisk, M.; Krieger, F.W.; Eadington, P.J.; O`Brien, G.W.

    1996-12-31

    Oil bearing fluid inclusions in sandstone represent hidden oil shows. The frequency of quartz grains containing these inclusions (GOI number) reflects maximum palaeo-oil saturation irrespective of the present fluid phase. In this way fluid inclusion data can be used to both identify palaeo-oil columns and to map original oil water contacts (OWC) in wells where oil has been displaced by later gas charge. Studies conducted on gas fields from the North West Shelf of Australia have shown that substantial oil columns were once present. Moreover, detailed GOI mapping has been used to define the location of the original OWC in these reservoirs allowing the height of the palaeo-column to be determined and an estimate to be made of original oil in place (OOIP). At Oliver-1 in the Timor Sea the reservoir is presently filled to spill with a 164m gas, and 14.5m oil, column. GOI mapping has, however, delineated a 96m thick palaeo-oil column within the gas leg. This is almost seven times thicker than the present oil leg which suggests that perhaps 170-190 million barrels of oil were displaced from this structure. In the Pepper gas field in the Carnarvon Basin GOI mapping has demonstrated the presence of a gross palaeo-oil column between 15 and 30 m thick, suggesting that between about 50 and 70 million barrels of oil has been displaced. This is more oil than that reservoired in any of the surrounding oil discoveries, which emphasizes the importance, from an exploration standpoint, of defining these remigration pathways.

  19. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, Michael J.; Orr, Franklin M.

    1999-05-26

    This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1996 - September 1997 under the first year of a three-year Department of Energy grant on the Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs. The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. The original proposal described research in four main areas; (1) Pore scale modeling of three phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator. Each stage of the research is planned to provide input and insight into the next stage, such that at the end we should have an integrated understanding of the key factors affecting field scale displacements.

  20. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, Martin J.; Orr, Franklin M.

    1999-05-17

    This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1997 - September 1998 under the second year of a three-year grant from the Department of Energy on the "Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs." The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulation. The original proposal described research in four areas: (1) Pore scale modeling of three phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator. Each state of the research is planned to provide input and insight into the next stage, such that at the end we should have an integrated understanding of the key factors affecting field scale displacements.

  1. Predicting gas, oil, and water intervals in Niger delta reservoirs using gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, D.K.; Hwang, R.J.; Purdy, R.K.

    1995-03-01

    Formation evaluation experts usually have little difficulty in interpreting wireline logs to assess the type of reservoir fluid (oil/gas/water) in sand-shale sequences. This assessment is usually accomplished by a combination neutron-density tool that detects low hydrogen and low electron densities typical of gas zones, and the repeat formation tester (RFT), which uses both the pressure gradient and sample acquisition techniques to evaluate reservoir fluid. In the Niger Delta, however, many of the sands exhibit a poor neutron-density response to gas, and RFT testing has been largely eliminated because poor hole conditions commonly result in stuck tools. Oil fingerprinting of residual hydrocarbons from sidewall core extracts can provide an independent means of identifying reservoir fluid type.

  2. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dilley, Lorie M.

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to create fluid models for the system. The hope is that the methodologies developed will allow bulk fluid inclusion gas analysis to be a useful tool for estimating relative temperatures, identifying the sources and origins of the geothermal fluids, and developing conceptual models that can be used to help target areas of enhanced permeability.

  3. Production Characteristics of Oceanic Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Johnson, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Oceanic natural gas hydrate (NGH) accumulations form when natural gas is trapped thermodynamically within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), which extends downward from the seafloor in open ocean depths greater than about 500 metres. As water depths increase, the thickness of the GHSZ thickens, but economic NGH deposits probably occur no deeper than 1 km below the seafloor. Natural gas (mostly methane) appears to emanate mostly from deeper sources and migrates into the GHSZ. The natural gas crystallizes as NGH when the pressure - temperature conditions within the GHSZ are reached and when the chemical condition of dissolved gas concentration in pore water is high enough to favor crystallization. Although NGH can form in both primary and secondary porosity, the principal economic target appears to be turbidite sands on deep continental margins. Because these are very similar to the hosts of more deeply buried conventional gas and oil deposits, industry knows how to explore for them. Recent improvements in a seismic geotechnical approach to NGH identification and valuation have been confirmed by drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico and allow for widespread exploration for NGH deposits to begin. NGH concentrations occur in the same semi-consolidated sediments in GHSZs worldwide. This provides for a narrow exploration window with low acoustic attenuation. These sediments present the same range of relatively easy drilling conditions and formation pressures that are only slightly greater than at the seafloor and are essentially equalized by water in wellbores. Expensive conventional drilling equipment is not required. NGH is the only hydrocarbon that is stable at its formation pressures and incapable of converting to gas without artificial stimulation. We suggest that specialized, NGH-specific drilling capability will offer opportunities for much less expensive drilling, more complex wellbore layouts that improve reservoir connectivity and in which gas-water separation can begin within the seafloor, and specialized production techniques. NGH is the only oceanic hydrocarbon deposit in which pressure can be controlled within the reservoir by balancing conversion and extraction. Oceanic NGH has a very low environmental risk, which also serves to distinguish it from other deepwater hydrocarbon deposits.

  4. Analysis of microseismic data from a natural gas storage reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.R. Jr.; Mowrey, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1975 detailed field studies have been underway by the Penn State Rock Mechanics Laboratory into the microseismic behavior of a pressurized underground natural gas storage reservoir located in Central Michigan. During this six-year study, supported by The American Gas Association, a suitable monitoring system was developed and subsequently optimized for maximum efficiency; detailed monitoring of the site was carried out over the period July 1975 to April 1979; and a computer-based data analysis system was developed for efficient and rapid analysis of microseismic field data. During 1980 the final analysis of the massive volume of collected field data was completed. An associated two-volume monograph is presently in preparation. The present paper will briefly review the overall project; however, the major emphasis will be restricted to the analysis of the associated microseismic data.

  5. Prediction of liquid hydrocarbon recovery from a gas condensate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Almarry, J.A.; Al-Saadoon, F.T.

    1985-03-01

    A compositional model consisting of material balance (M-B) equations and the Peng-Robinson (P-R) Equation of State (EOS), was developed starting with the work of Bergman, Tek, and Katz. The model simulates constant volume expansion (CVE) as obtained from experimental analyses of gas condensates. The contributions of this paper include the following: evaluation of the phase behavior and fluid properties for an arbitrary mixture of components, development of the material balance equations to compute depletion performance, investigation of P-R EOS as a tool for reproducing measured PVT data, and analysis of the effect of component property estimation on EOS predictions. The North Field Khaff reservoir, which is situated offshore northwest of the northern top of Qatar, and the specific K-4 reservoir description was used as the example in this work. Laboratory measurements for constant volume depletion and phase separations of a condensate fluid sample were obtained from well No. NWD 5 in the K-4 reservoir of the North Field in Qatar. This experimental data was used as a basis for comparing results from the proposed compositional model. The data analysis was carried out up to C/sub 20//sup +/ group hydrocarbons. The experimental data used for comparison with the calculated results were volume percent liquid (retrograde condensation), cumulative produced volume, molecular weight of heavy components (C/sub 7//sup +/) produced, and compressibility factor. In addition to the values calculated above constant composition expansion at different temperatures, a partial phase diagram for K-4 gas condensate, and viscosity were calculated by the model.

  6. Advanced reservoir management for independent oil and gas producers

    SciTech Connect

    Sgro, A.G.; Kendall, R.P.; Kindel, J.M.; Webster, R.B.; Whitney, E.M.

    1996-11-01

    There are more than fifty-two hundred oil and gas producers operating in the United States today. Many of these companies have instituted improved oil recovery programs in some form, but very few have had access to state-of-the-art modeling technologies routinely used by major producers to manage these projects. Since independent operators are playing an increasingly important role in the production of hydrocarbons in the United States, it is important to promote state-of-the-art management practices, including the planning and monitoring of improved oil recovery projects, within this community. This is one of the goals of the Strategic Technologies Council, a special interest group of independent oil and gas producers. Reservoir management technologies have the potential to increase oil recovery while simultaneously reducing production costs. These technologies were pioneered by major producers and are routinely used by them. Independent producers confront two problems adopting this approach: the high cost of acquiring these technologies and the high cost of using them even if they were available. Effective use of reservoir management tools requires, in general, the services of a professional (geoscientist or engineer) who is already familiar with the details of setting up, running, and interpreting computer models.

  7. Gas trapping and mobilization through water influx in natural gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Minghua

    2005-11-01

    Residual gas saturation is important in determining recovery from a gas reservoir, with water influx. This research addressed residual gas saturation, and other variables, resulting from imbibition tests in porous media, which included spontaneous and forced imbibition; co-current and counter-current imbibition; primary and secondary imbibition; water imbibition and oil imbibition. Several hundred water and oil imbibition experiments were performed on 47 core plugs, consisting of sandstone and carbonate samples. Concurrently, automated experimental rigs were developed, employing a balance in one case, and NMR in the other. The experimental techniques were critically evaluated with regard to repeatability and accuracy. The residual gas saturation, and gas saturation as a function of imbibition time, liquid distribution in different pore sizes, and relative wettability were investigated. A new Critical Capillary Number for gas-liquid system is postulated. A simple procedure was developed for determining wettability from imbibition data. Capillary pressure and relative permeability curves were extracted from the experimental data, and used in 1D and 3D numerical simulations of co-current and counter-current laboratory imbibition tests. The simulations showed the important role of gas compressibility and verified the residual gas saturation. Additionally, a gas reservoir with strong water influx was simulated, and methods for improving gas recovery were examined via many sensitivity studies. It is concluded that because of gas compressibility, residual gas saturation is important in low pressure systems, such as laboratory experiments, but is not important in a gas reservoir, unless the abandonment pressure is close to the initial pressure.

  8. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  9. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  10. Evaluating oil, gas opportunities in western Siberia; Reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, W. ); Krug, J.A. )

    1992-12-07

    In this article, the authors discuss how to use the subsurface data to describe hydrocarbon reservoirs and estimate the original oil in place (OOIP) in western Siberia. The methodology for describing a reservoir and estimating the OOIP in western Siberia is similar to the approach for most reservoirs: Establish stratigraphic correlations across the field; Construct structure maps on key horizons; Construct porosity isopach maps for significant reservoirs; Construct net pay maps; Determine reservoir parameters; and Calculate pore-volume estimates of OOIP.

  11. a Review of Hydropower Reservoir and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, L. P.; Dos Santos, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    Like most manmade projects, hydropower dams have multiple effects on the environment that have been studied in some depth over the past two decades. Among their most important effects are potential changes in water movement, flowing much slower than in the original river. This favors the appearance of phytoplankton as nutrients increase, with methanogenesis replacing oxidative water and generating anaerobic conditions. Although research during the late 1990s highlighted the problems caused by hydropower dams emitting greenhouse gases, crucial aspects of this issue still remain unresolved. Similar to natural water bodies, hydropower reservoirs have ample biota ranging from microorganisms to aquatic vertebrates. Microorganisms (bacteria) decompose organic matter producing biogenic gases under water. Some of these biogenic gases cause global warming, including methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide. The levels of GHG emissions from hydropower dams are a strategic matter of the utmost importance, and comparisons with other power generation options such as thermo-power are required. In order to draw up an accurate assessment of the net emissions caused by hydropower dams, significant improvements are needed in carbon budgets and studies of representative hydropower dams. To determine accurately the net emissions caused by hydro reservoir formation is required significant improvement of carbon budgets studies on different representatives' hydro reservoirs at tropical, boreal, arid, semi arid and temperate climate. Comparisons must be drawn with emissions by equivalent thermo power plants, calculated and characterized as generating the same amount of energy each year as the hydropower dams, burning different fuels and with varying technology efficiency levels for steam turbines as well as coal, fuel oil and natural gas turbines and combined cycle plants. This paper brings to the scientific community important aspects of the development of methods and techniques applied as well as identifying the main players and milestones to this subject.

  12. Unconventional gas sources. Executive summary. [Coal seams, Devonian shale, geopressured brines, tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The long lead time required for conversion from oil or gas to coal and for development of a synthetic fuel industry dictates that oil and gas must continue to supply the United States with the majority of its energy requirements over the near term. In the interim period, the nation must seek a resource that can be developed quickly, incrementally, and with as few environmental concerns as possible. One option which could potentially fit these requirements is to explore for, drill, and produce unconventional gas: Devonian Shale gas, coal seam gas, gas dissolved in geopressured brines, and gas from tight reservoirs. This report addresses the significance of these sources and the economic and technical conditions under which they could be developed.

  13. Gas atomized chemical reservoir ODS ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

    2010-06-27

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis was used to surface oxidize ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-16.0Cr-(0.1-0.2)Y-(0.1-0.5)(Ti or Hf) at.%) during the primary break-up and solidification of the molten alloy. This rapid surface reaction resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra thin (i.e., t < 100nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell. This metastable oxide phase was subsequently dissociated, and used as an oxygen reservoir for the formation of more thermodynamically favored Y-(Ti,Hf) nano-metric oxide precipitates during elevated temperature heat treatment of the as-consolidated powders. This oxygen exchange reaction promoted the formation of nano-metric oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The atomization processing parameters were adjusted to tailor the oxygen content in as-atomized powders. Microstructure phase analysis was completed using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.

  14. Modeling and optimizing a gas-water reservoir: Enhanced recovery with waterflooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.E.; Monash, E.A.; Waterman, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    Accepted practice dictates that waterflooding of gas reservoirs should commence, if ever, only when the reservoir pressure has declined to the minimum production pressure. Analytical proof of this hypothesis has yet to appear in the literature however. This paper considers a model for a gas-water reservoir with a variable production rate and enhanced recovery with waterflooding and, using an initial dynamic programming approach, confirms the above hypothesis. ?? 1979 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  16. Inflow performance relationships for solution-gas-drive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho-V, R.G.; Raghavan, R.

    1989-05-01

    In this theoretical study, a numerical model was used to examine the influence of pressure level and skin factor on the inflow performance relationships (IPR's) of wells producing under solution-gas-drive systems. Examination of the synthetic deliverability curves suggests that the exponent of the deliverability curve is a function of time and that the exponent is usually greater than unity. The implication of this observation to field data is discussed. The accuracy of procedures given in the literature to predict oilwell deliverabilities is also examined. It is shown that these methods can be used to predict future performance provided that the exponent of the deliverability curve is known and that extrapolations over large time ranges are avoided. If single-point tests are used to predict future performance (such tests assume that the exponent of the deliverability curve is constant), then errors in predictions will be minimized. Although relative permeability and fluid property data are required, the Muskat material-balance equation and the assumption that GOR is independent of distance can be used to predict future production rates. This method avoids problems associated with other methods in the literature and always yields reliable results. New methods to modify the IPR curve to incorporate changes in skin factor are presented. A new flow-efficiency definition based on the structure of the deliverability equations for solution-gas-drive reservoirs is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the currently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells.

  17. CO2 Utilization and Storage in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, T.; Glezakou, V.; Owen, T.; Miller, Q.; Loring, J.; Davidson, C.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Surging natural gas production from fractured shale reservoirs and the emerging concept of utilizing anthropogenic CO2 for secondary recovery and permanent storage is driving the need for understanding fundamental mechanisms controlling gas adsorption and desorption processes, mineral volume changes, and impacts to transmissivity properties. Early estimates indicate that between 10 and 30 gigatons of CO2 storage capacity may exist in the 24 shale gas plays included in current USGS assessments. However, the adsorption of gases (CO2, CH4, and SO2) is not well understood and appears unique for individual clay minerals. Using specialized experimental techniques developed at PNNL, pure clay minerals were examined at relevant pressures and temperatures during exposure to CH4, CO2, and mixtures of CO2-SO2. Adsorbed concentrations of methane displayed a linear behavior as a function of pressure as determined by a precision quartz crystal microbalance. Acid gases produced differently shaped adsorption isotherms, depending on temperature and pressure. In the instance of kaolinite, gaseous CO2 adsorbed linearly, but in the presence of supercritical CO2, surface condensation increased significantly to a peak value before desorbing with further increases in pressure. Similarly shaped CO2 adsorption isotherms derived from natural shale samples and coal samples have been reported in the literature. Adsorption steps, determined by density functional theory calculations, showed they were energetically favorable until the first CO2 layer formed, corresponding to a density of ~0.35 g/cm3. Interlayer cation content (Ca, Mg, or Na) of montmorillonites influenced adsorbed gas concentrations. Measurements by in situ x-ray diffraction demonstrate limited CO2 diffusion into the Na-montmorillonite interlayer spacing, with structural changes related to increased hydration. Volume changes were observed when Ca or Mg saturated montmorillonites in the 1W hydration state were exposed to supercritical CO2. Additional experiments were conducted with pressurized attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy technique that tracked clay hydration, gas adsorption, and water concentrations in the fluids during exposure to CO2 and CH4. These fundamental physico-chemical data are being collected into a database for parameterization of multiphase flow and reactive transport simulations of the CO2 injection, trapping, and secondary methane in fractured shales.

  18. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  19. Naturally fractured tight gas - gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, June 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, J.M.; Ortoleva, P.; Payne, D.; Sibo, W.

    1996-11-15

    This document contains the status report for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas-Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project for the contract period 9/30/93 to 3/31/97. Data from seismic surveys are analyzed for structural imaging of reflector units. The data were stacked using the new, improved statics and normal moveout velocities. The 3-D basin modeling effort is continuing with code development. The main activities of this quarter were analysis of fluid pressure data, improved sedimentary history, lithologic unit geometry reconstruction algorithm and computer module, and further improvement, verification, and debugging of the basin stress and multi-phase reaction transport module.

  20. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database), to increase our understanding of how geologic heterogeneity affects the recovery of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama, and to identify resources that are producible at moderate cost. This objective will be achieved through detailed geological, geostatistical, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on hydrocarbon production. The paper reports on the progress of several subtasks. The subjects discussed are: controls on reservoir heterogeneity in the Smackover; pore facies and Smackover reservoir heterogeneity; geological and petrophysical reservoir characterization; geologic flow modeling; and geostatistical modeling. Accomplishments this quarter are summarized and their significance to EOR research is discussed. 1 ref., 4 figs. (CK)

  1. AVO in North of Paria, Venezuela: Gas methane versus condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Regueiro, J.; Pena, A.

    1996-07-01

    The gas fields of North of Paria, offshore eastern Venezuela, present a unique opportunity for amplitude variations with offset (AVO) characterization of reservoirs containing different fluids: gas-condensate, gas (methane) and water (brine). AVO studies for two of the wells in the area, one with gas-condensate and the other with gas (methane) saturated reservoirs, show interesting results. Water sands and a fluid contact (condensate-water) are present in one of these wells, thus providing a control point on brine-saturated properties. The reservoirs in the second well consist of sands highly saturated with methane. Clear differences in AVO response exist between hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs and those containing brine. However, it is also interesting that subtle but noticeable differences can be interpreted between condensate-and methane-saturated sands. These differences are attributed to differences in both in-situ fluid density and compressibility, and rock frame properties.

  2. Shallow, low-permeability reservoirs of northern Great Plains - assessment of their natural gas resources.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, D.D.; Shurr, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Major resources of natural gas are entrapped in low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs at depths less than 1200m in the N.Great Plains. This shallow gas is the product of the immature stage of hydrocarbon generation and is referred to as biogenic gas. Prospective low-permeability, gas-bearing reservoirs range in age from late Early to Late Cretaceous. The following facies were identified and mapped: nonmarine rocks, coastal sandstones, shelf sandstones, siltstones, shales, and chalks. The most promising low-permeability reservoirs are developed in the shelf sandstone, siltstone, and chalk facies. Reservoirs within these facies are particularly attractive because they are enveloped by thick sequences of shale which serve as both a source and a seal for the gas.-from Author

  3. The urgency of assessing the greenhouse gas budgets of hydroelectric reservoirs in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2013-08-01

    Already the largest generator of hydroelectricity, China is accelerating dam construction to increase the share of hydroelectricity in its primary energy mix to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Here, we review the evidence on emissions of GHGs, particularly methane, from the Three Gorges Reservoir, and argue that although the hydroelectric reservoirs may release large amounts of methane, they contribute significantly to greenhouse gas reduction by substitution of thermal power generation in China. Nonetheless, more systematic monitoring and modelling studies on greenhouse gas emissions from representative reservoirs are necessary to better understand the climate impact of hydropower development in China.

  4. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report describes progress in the following five projects: (1) Geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin; (2) Regional stratigraphic studies, Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, southern Piceance Basin, Colorado; (3) Structurally controlled and aligned tight gas reservoir compartmentalization in the San Juan and Piceance Basins--Foundation for a new approach to exploration and resource assessments of continuous type deposits; (4) Delineation of Piceance Basin basement structures using multiple source data--Implications for fractured reservoir exploration; and (5) Gas and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado--Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin.

  5. GLOBAL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM RESERVOIRS: A MATTER OF METHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than a decade ago, St. Louis et al. demonstrated that, collectively, manmade reservoirs play an important role in the global balance of greenhouse gases (GHGs). To update and build upon this important seminal work, we compiled reservoir CO2, CH4, and N2O flux estimates from...

  6. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

    1996-12-31

    Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

  7. Synthetic Seismic Study for Hydraulic Fracture in Shale-Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.; Li, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies have been done regarding performance of hydraulically fractured horizontal wells in the Bakken Shale Play (Wiley et. al., 2004; Mille et. al., 2008; Tabatabaei et. al., 2009). It's of great interest that whether the invaded brine causes the gas shale layer to behave differently in seismic profile due to potentially important application on reservoir monitoring and management for gas shale reservoirs. Because gas shale formations are generally much thinner than their adjacent layers (usually less than 100 meters), it's usually difficult to pick the reflection wave response of gas shale layer from in-situ seismic profile. Therefore, we have designed a workflow to investigate the effects of hydraulic fracture in gas shale reservoir by using synthetic seismic survey on simplified subsurface model. The simplified model mainly consists of several horizontally homogeneous layers of sand and shale, whereas the hydraulic fracture occurs in the middle thin gas shale formation and causes brine invasion in part of it. The goal of the synthetic seismic investigation is to see how the response of the reflection wave from this layer behaves differently due to the hydraulic fracture. Due to the thickness and complex nature of shale reservoir, the greatest challenge would be to pick the seismic response of this formation from the background noise and to study the range of thickness and the depth of burial for this layer to be seismically detectable for the purpose of hydraulic fracture study. Seismic investigation is rarely used in the reservoir monitoring of gas shale reservoir due to seismic resolution limit. Thus, this study will help to explore potential seismic applications for gas shale reservoirs and improve understanding of seismic response of hydraulic fracture on unconventional reservoirs.

  8. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  9. GEOLOGIC ASPECTS OF TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe some geologic characteristics of tight gas reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs usually have an in-situ permeability to gas of 0. 1 md or less and can be classified into four general geologic and engineering categories: (1) marginal marine blanket, (2) lenticular, (3) chalk, and (4) marine blanket shallow. Microscopic study of pore/permeability relationships indicates the existence of two varieties of tight reservoirs. One variety is tight because of the fine grain size of the rock. The second variety is tight because the rock is relatively tightly cemented and the pores are poorly connected by small pore throats and capillaries.

  10. Transient pressure analysis of fractured well in bi-zonal gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Yong-hui; Hu, Shu-Yong; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2015-05-01

    For hydraulic fractured well, how to evaluate the properties of fracture and formation are always tough jobs and it is very complex to use the conventional method to do that, especially for partially penetrating fractured well. Although the source function is a very powerful tool to analyze the transient pressure for complex structure well, the corresponding reports on gas reservoir are rare. In this paper, the continuous point source functions in anisotropic reservoirs are derived on the basis of source function theory, Laplace transform method and Duhamel principle. Application of construction method, the continuous point source functions in bi-zonal gas reservoir with closed upper and lower boundaries are obtained. Sequentially, the physical models and transient pressure solutions are developed for fully and partially penetrating fractured vertical wells in this reservoir. Type curves of dimensionless pseudo-pressure and its derivative as function of dimensionless time are plotted as well by numerical inversion algorithm, and the flow periods and sensitive factors are also analyzed. The source functions and solutions of fractured well have both theoretical and practical application in well test interpretation for such gas reservoirs, especial for the well with stimulated reservoir volume around the well in unconventional gas reservoir by massive hydraulic fracturing which always can be described with the composite model.

  11. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  12. Visco-plastic properties of organic-rich shale gas reservoir rocks and its implication for stress variations within reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, H.; Zoback, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    We are studying the time-dependent deformational properties of shale gas reservoir rocks through laboratory creep experiments in a triaxial deformation apparatus under room temperature and room humidity conditions. Samples come from the Barnett shale (TX), Eagle Ford shale (TX), Haynesville shale (LA), and Fort St. John shale (Canada). The clay and carbonate content of these shales vary markedly, as well as the total organic content. To cover effective pressures both below and above in-situ conditions, confining pressures were between 10-60 MPa. In order to examine creep processes unrelated to pre-failure crack growth, differential stresses during creep were kept below 50% of the ultimate rock strength. Time dependent creep at constant differential stress increases with clay content (regardless of the carbonate content) and there is a pronounced increase in amount of creep at around 35-40% clay content. The amount of creep strain is relatively insensitive to both the confining pressure and differential pressure. More creep occurs in the bedding-perpendicular direction than the bedding-parallel direction, which correlates with the sample's elastic anisotropy. The constitutive law governing the time-dependent deformation of these rocks is visco-plastic, and creep strain is well-approximated by a power-law function of time within the time scales of the experiment (maximum of 2 weeks). Also an oven-dried sample exhibited much less creep, which suggests that the physical mechanism of the creep is likely a hydrolytically-assisted plastic deformation process. Interpretation of the results through visco-elastic theory shows that the power law exponents of these rocks, which reflects how rapid a rock creeps or relaxes stress, vary between 0.01-0.07. Based on these numbers, we can roughly calculate the visco-elastic accumulation of differential stresses within these reservoirs, by assuming a constant intraplate tectonic strain rate (10^-19 - 10^-17) and by considering the ages of these rocks (100-350 Ma). Results suggest that the current intra-reservoir contrast of differential stresses can become as high as tens of MPa. Such prediction is consistent with the occurence of drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITFs) observed in a vertical well from Barnett shale where DITFs appear and disappear corresponding to the intra-reservoir lithological variation. It is important to characterize such stress variations within a reservoir since production from shale gas reservoirs heavily relies on reservoir stimulation by hydraulic fracturing and in-situ stress is a major control on the outcomes of such operations.

  13. Natural gas plays in Jurassic reservoirs of southwestern Alabama and the Florida panhandle area

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ); Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Bearden, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Three Jurassic natural gas trends can be delineated in Alabama and the Florida panhandle area. They include a deep natural gas trend, a natural gas and condensate trend, and an oil and associated natural gas trend. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. Within these natural gas trends, at least eight distinct natural gas plays can be identified. These plays are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps and reservoirs. The deep natural gas trend includes the Mobile Bay area play, which is characterized by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Lower Mobile Bay fault system and Norphlet eolian sandstone reservoirs exhibiting primary and secondary porosity at depths exceeding 20,000 ft. The natural gas and condensate trend includes the Mississippi Interior Salt basin play, Mobile graben play, Wiggins arch flank play, and the Pollard fault system play. The Mississippi Interior Salt basin play is typified by salt anticlines associated with salt tectonism in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin and Smackover dolomitized peloidal and pelmoldic grainstone and packstone reservoirs at depths of approximately 16,000 ft. The Mobile graben play is exemplified by faulted salt anticlines associated with the Mobile graben and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Wiggins arch flank play is characterized by structural traps consisting of salt anticlines associated with stratigraphic thinning and Smackover dolostone reservoirs at depths of approximately 18,000 ft. The Pollard fault system play is typified by combination petroleum traps. The structural component is associated with the Pollard fault system and reservoirs at depths of approximately 15,000 ft. These reservoirs are dominantly Smackover dolomitized oomoldic and pelmoldic grainstones and packstones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones exhibiting primary and secondary porosity.

  14. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  15. Evaluation of in situ stress changes with gas depletion of coalbed methane reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Harpalani, Satya

    2014-08-01

    A sound knowledge of the stress path for coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is critical for a variety of applications, including dynamic formation stability evaluation, long-term gas production management, and carbon sequestration in coals. Although this problem has been extensively studied for traditional oil and gas reservoirs, it is somewhat unclear for CBM reservoirs. The difference between the stress paths followed in the two reservoir types is expected to be significant given the unique sorption-induced deformation phenomenon associated with gas production from coal. This results in an additional reservoir volumetric strain, which induces a rather "abnormal" loss of horizontal stress with depletion, leading to continuous changes in the subsurface formation stresses, both effective as well as total. It is suspected that stress changes within the reservoir triggers formation failure after significant depletion. This paper describes an experimental study, carried out to measure the horizontal stress under in situ depletion conditions. The results show that the horizontal stress decreases linearly with depletion under in situ conditions. The dynamic stress evolution is theoretically analyzed, based on modified poroelasticity associated with sorption-induced strain effect. Additionally, the failure tendency of the reservoir under in situ conditions is analyzed using the traditional Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The results indicate that depletion may lead to coal failure, particularly in deeper coalbeds and ones exhibiting large matrix shrinkage.

  16. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. These objectives will be achieved through detailed geological, engineering, and geostatistical characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on the completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data relevant to the Smackover reservoir in southwestern Alabama. Subtask 2 comprises the geological and engineering characterization of Smackover reservoir lithofacies. This has been accomplished through detailed examination and analysis of geophysical well logs, core material, well cuttings, and well-test data from wells penetrating Smackover reservoirs in southwestern Alabama. From these data, reservoir heterogeneities, such as lateral and vertical changes in lithology, porosity, permeability, and diagenetic overprint, have been recognized and used to produce maps, cross sections, graphs, and other graphic representations to aid in interpretation of the geologic parameters that affect these reservoirs. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities for Smackover reservoirs. This research has been based primarily on the evaluation of key geologic and engineering data from selected Smackover fields. 1 fig.

  17. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  18. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  19. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  20. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database) and to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama and to identify those resources that are producible at moderate cost. This objective will be achieved through detailed geological, geostatistical, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the State of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Geological research this quarter has focused on descriptions of core material and petrographic thin sections from reservoirs producing from the Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama, computer entry of pertinent data, and generation of maps and cross-sections.

  1. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  2. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  3. Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deep gas reservoir play, central and eastern Gulf coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancini, E.A.; Li, P.; Goddard, D.A.; Ramirez, V.O.; Talukdar, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deeply buried gas reservoir play in the central and eastern Gulf coastal plain of the United States has high potential for significant gas resources. Sequence-stratigraphic study, petroleum system analysis, and resource assessment were used to characterize this developing play and to identify areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior salt basins with potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs. These reservoir facies accumulated in Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Norphlet, Haynesville, Cotton Valley, and Hosston continental, coastal, and marine siliciclastic environments and Smackover and Sligo nearshore marine shelf, ramp, and reef carbonate environments. These Mesozoic strata are associated with transgressive and regressive systems tracts. In the North Louisiana salt basin, the estimate of secondary, nonassociated thermogenic gas generated from thermal cracking of oil to gas in the Upper Jurassic Smackover source rocks from depths below 3658 m (12,000 ft) is 4800 tcf of gas as determined using software applications. Assuming a gas expulsion, migration, and trapping efficiency of 2-3%, 96-144 tcf of gas is potentially available in this basin. With some 29 tcf of gas being produced from the North Louisiana salt basin, 67-115 tcf of in-place gas remains. Assuming a gas recovery factor of 65%, 44-75 tcf of gas is potentially recoverable. The expelled thermogenic gas migrated laterally and vertically from the southern part of this basin to the updip northern part into shallower reservoirs to depths of up to 610 m (2000 ft). Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  4. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  5. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

    2005-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

  6. Gas Flow Tightly Coupled to Elastoplastic Geomechanics for Tight- and Shale-Gas Reservoirs: Material Failure and Enhanced Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-12-01

    We investigate coupled flow and geomechanics in gas production from extremely low permeability reservoirs such as tight and shale gas reservoirs, using dynamic porosity and permeability during numerical simulation. In particular, we take the intrinsic permeability as a step function of the status of material failure, and the permeability is updated every time step. We consider gas reservoirs with the vertical and horizontal primary fractures, employing the single and dynamic double porosity (dual continuum) models. We modify the multiple porosity constitutive relations for modeling the double porous continua for flow and geomechanics. The numerical results indicate that production of gas causes redistribution of the effective stress fields, increasing the effective shear stress and resulting in plasticity. Shear failure occurs not only near the fracture tips but also away from the primary fractures, which indicates generation of secondary fractures. These secondary fractures increase the permeability significantly, and change the flow pattern, which in turn causes a change in distribution of geomechanical variables. From various numerical tests, we find that shear failure is enhanced by a large pressure drop at the production well, high Biot's coefficient, low frictional and dilation angles. Smaller spacing between the horizontal wells also contributes to faster secondary fracturing. When the dynamic double porosity model is used, we observe a faster evolution of the enhanced permeability areas than that obtained from the single porosity model, mainly due to a higher permeability of the fractures in the double porosity model. These complicated physics for stress sensitive reservoirs cannot properly be captured by the uncoupled or flow-only simulation, and thus tightly coupled flow and geomechanical models are highly recommended to accurately describe the reservoir behavior during gas production in tight and shale gas reservoirs and to smartly design production scenarios.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from an Agricultural Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolenski, R. L.; Beaulieu, J.; Townsend-Small, A.; Nietch, C.

    2012-12-01

    Reservoirs are being built at an increasing rate each year to provide humans with resources such as hydroelectric power and drinking water. These man-made systems have provided society with important services, but these have come at the cost of enhanced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Recent estimates suggest reservoirs are a globally significant source of GHG emissions, but these estimates are largely based on studies of oligotrophic boreal and tropical reservoirs. Reservoirs draining agricultural basins are common throughout much of the developed world and are subject to high nutrient loading rates from the watershed. Excess nutrient loading stimulates algae blooms and degrades water quality in these reservoirs, but surprisingly little is known about how nutrients and algal blooms affect GHG dynamics. To assess GHG dynamics in an agricultural reservoir we measured GHG emission rates, dissolved concentrations, and nutrient chemistry in William H. Harsha Lake, an agricultural reservoir located in southwestern Ohio (USA), on a monthly basis since October, 2011. Dissolved N2O was negatively related to nitrate (r2=.91, p<0.001) in October 2011, suggesting denitrification was an important source of N2O in the reservoir during fall turnover. Relationships between dissolved N2O and nitrate concentrations were inconsistent during the winter and spring, suggesting nitrate was not limited during these seasons. There was no consistent pattern in dissolved gas concentrations across the length of the reservoir, but concentrations were greater in hypolimnetic than eplimnetic waters during warmer months. The highest N2O and CH4 emissions occurred during lake turn over in the fall (CH4 flux= 4.76E+1 mg CH4 hr-1m-2, N2O flux= 9.24E+1 ?g N2O-N hr-1m-2, and CO2 flux = 8.62E+2 mg CO2 hr-1m-2), while the lowest emission rates were observed during the winter. We found no clear spatial pattern in GHG emission rates across the length of the reservoir. On an annual basis, we estimate the reservoir emits 1.52E+6 kg CH4-C/yr, equivalent to ~11,000 head of dairy cattle. On a per unit area basis, the reservoir was a hotspot of N2O emissions compared to the surrounding agricultural land; however, total annual N2O emissions from the reservoir (3.00E+3 kg N2O-N/yr) constitute only 1% of total watershed N2O emissions due to the much greater area of agricultural lands.

  8. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  9. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  10. Radon in unconventional natural gas from gulf coast geopressured-geothermal reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Radon-222 has been measured in natural gas produced from experimental geopressured-geothermal test wells. Comparison with published data suggests that while radon activity of this unconventional natural gas resource is higher than conventional gas produced in the gulf coast, it is within the range found for conventional gas produced throughout the U.S. A method of predicting the likely radon activity of this unconventional gas is described on the basis of the data presented, methane solubility, and known or assumed reservoir conditions of temperature, fluid pressure, and formation water salinity.

  11. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID:26726274

  12. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. ); Hawkins, C. )

    1996-01-01

    Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.

  13. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H.; Hawkins, C.

    1996-12-31

    Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.

  14. Western cretaceous coal seam project natural fractures in bituminous coal gas reservoirs. Topical report, January 1988-December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mavor, M.J.

    1991-11-26

    The paper discusses the issues of natural fracture (cleat) occurrence and geometry, and cleat permeability recognition, evaluation and prediction for bituminous coal gas reservoirs. The Darcy flow of gas and water in coal gas reservoirs takes place in cleat permeability avenues during depressurization. Cleat permeability is often the most important characteristic that influences coal gas project success or failure. Often the most important and difficult task associated with coal gas projects is to locate commercial permeability. An hypothesis on the genesis of cleats in bituminous coal gas reservoirs, which incorporates the results of coal gas research and the history of exploration success and failure in several coal basins, is suggested as a starting point in the search for commercial coal gas reservoirs. Coals with interbedded vitreous and non-vitreous lithotypes, and interbedded shale layers, are favored targets because of the greater possibility that these reservoirs are characterized by well developed cleat systems and commercial cleat permeability. The coals must also have sufficient net thickness and adequate reservoir pressure to contain significant gas in-place resources formed during active coalification. The operator should initially find high volatile A to low volatile bituminous rank coals at depths of less than approximately 1,525 meters. These coals are also often characterized by more favorable gas desorption and diffusion characteristics with respect to critical desorption pressure, particularly in areas where reservoir pressure has been maintained after active gas generation.

  15. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Christopher R; He, Lilin; Agamalian, Michael; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, Mark; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less than surface area estimates from SANS/USANS, which is due in part to limited accessibility of the gases to all pores. The similarity between N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-accessible surface area suggests an absence of microporosity in these samples, which is in agreement with SANS analysis. A core gamma ray profile run on the same core from which the core plug samples were taken correlates to profile permeability measurements run on the slabbed core. This correlation is related to clay content, which possibly controls the percentage of open porosity. Continued study of these effects will prove useful in log-core calibration efforts for tight gas.

  16. Distribution of sulfur deposition near a wellbore in a sour gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghong; Yang, Xuefeng; He, ShunLi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-02-01

    Elemental sulfur precipitates from sour gas when reservoir pressure and temperature decrease. Sulfur deposition in a formation may significantly reduce the inflow performance of sour gas wells. This paper develops a micro-mechanical migration model and experiments which describe the law of sulfur precipitation, plugging and distribution near a wellbore. Based on the analysis of the sulfur deposition law and micro-mechanical migration theory, elemental sulfur mechanical models in pores are presented. The critical velocity of sulfur is calculated and the rule of precipitated sulfur distribution near a wellbore is deduced. Reservoir cores and supersaturated sour gas are utilized to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in sulfur damage experiments, and the main influential factor is analysed. According to the models and experimental results, precipitated sulfur can decrease reservoir permeability. The liquid bridge force is the most important factor to affect reservoir permeability due to sulfur deposition. Precipitated sulfur cannot be carried away from pores if the liquid bridge force is considered; the critical velocity increases as the diameter of the sulfur particles increases, which may cause serious formation damage. Moreover, it can be seen from the results that the biggest volume of sulfur deposition does not occur at the bottom but near the bottom of a borehole. These results can be used to describe the profile of dynamic sulfur deposition and help a reservoir engineer to develop a plan for removing the sulfur near a wellbore.

  17. Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. ); Vidal, J.M. ); Sippel, M.A. ); Ballard, J.R. ); Coover, D.M. Jr. ); Bloxsom, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

  18. Improved procedures for collection and interpretation of coal-gas reservoir gas content and natural fracture geometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, T.J.; Close, J.C. )

    1993-08-01

    The validity of quantitative coal-gas reserve analyses depends upon the accuracy of formation evaluation data used as input parameters for reservoir simulation of fluid productivity. Coal-gas reservoir deliverability is strongly influenced by gas-in-place resources, natural fracture (cleat) permeability, and gas desorption and diffusion characteristics. Estimates of these parameters are predicted upon knowledge of coal core-gas content and cleat geometry. Ironically many accepted procedures for collecting and interpreting these data are still incomplete, and therefore coal-gas reserve analyses commonly are erroneous. Improved procedures for collecting and interpreting gas content and cleat geometry data are highlighted using eight Gas Research Institute Fruitland Formation (Upper Cretaceous) wells in the San Juan basin (Colorado and New Mexico). Fruitland gas content values, in places, have been underestimated by 30-85% (786 SCF ton vs. 122 to 557 SCF/ton, dry, mineral-matter-free basis), and therefore the corresponding gas-in-place resource estimates are commensurably conservative. Gas desorption measurements must be performed at reservoir temperature: dry, mineral-matter-free normalizations and canister headspace corrections must be performed correctly; and gas composition must be periodically quantified to correctly estimate the actual methane reserves and sorption time. Collection of cleat geometry data on whole cores is routinely biased because only the most apparent cleat systems are analyzed. Detailed macroscopic and X-ray radiograph data on cleat geometry for slabbed polished blocks should be collected as a function of bed thickness, lithology, and interconnectivity to further define core-scale cleat permeability and diffusion coefficient distributions.

  19. Induced seismicity in the gas reservoirs of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijpoel, D.; Goutbeek, F.; Sleeman, R.; Dost, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Netherlands contains a large number of natural gas fields of various sizes, including the Groningen field, the largest in Western Europe. Gas production started in 1960 and is expected to be continued for more than two decades ahead. In due course, more and more of the smaller fields will become depleted and potentially available for underground gas storage. A number of fields are already being used as buffer storage for natural gas. Plans for CO2 storage in other fields are reaching an advanced stage. Currently, most industrial activity in the gas fields is still related to gas extraction rather than storage. The monitoring and analysis of induced seismicity that is observed today will be crucial for the assessment of storage opportunities in the near future. Induced seismicity due to gas extraction was not observed or recognized until a first widely felt event of magnitude 3.2 (ML) in 1986, only after several decades of production. Since then a steady rate of seismicity is observed, distributed over several fields. The largest events (up to ML=3.5 so far) cause some none-structural damage and much concern to the public. The monitoring network currently consists of 11 shallow (200m) borehole sensors and a pool of 19 accelerometers. The regional location threshold is around ML=1. The induced seismic catalogue contains more than 550 events to date and is growing at a rate of 30-50 events annually. The current work is aimed at improving source location accuracy using 3D velocity models obtained from the gas industry and the association of events with specific fault planes. The observed seismicity pattern provides insight on the behaviour of (compartments of) the gas fields under changing stress conditions.

  20. Constant-pressure production in solution-gas-drive reservoirs; Transient flow

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, R.G. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper presents procedures to obtain reservoir parameters from constant-pressure drawdown data in solution-gas-drive reservoirs. A novel procedure to determine the mechanical skin factor is introduced. Examples, including a field case, illustrate the use of this procedure. An estimate of the drainage area can be obtained with the derivative of rate data. A theoretical basis for analyzing data by the pressure-squared, p{sup 2}, approach is presented; this procedure permits the approximate determination of sandface effective permeabilities in the transient flow period. For damaged wells, it is possible to obtain rough estimates of the size of the skin zone and the ratio of reservoir/skin-zone permeability when early transient data are available. The expression of the appropriate dimensionless rate in terms of physical properties for solution-gas-drive systems is presented. Finally, this paper presents a procedure to obtain an estimate of the change in sandface saturation during the transient flow period.

  1. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective is to determine methods for detection and mapping of naturally fractured systems for economic production of natural gas from fractured reservoirs. This report contains: 3D P-wave alternate processing; down hole 3C geophone analysis; fracture pattern analysis of the Fort Union and Wind River Basin; 3D-3C seismic processing; and technology transfer.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variations in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from an Agricultural Reservoir

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reservoirs are being built at an increasing rate each year to provide humans with resources such as hydroelectric power and drinking water. These man-made systems have provided society with important services, but these have come at the cost of enhanced greenhouse gas (GHG) emiss...

  3. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  4. Offshore Adriatic marginal gas fields: An approach to the technique of reservoir development

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, A.; Bolelli, V.; Piccoli, G.

    1986-01-01

    The application of accelerated gas blowdown and wire line techniques in reservoir development and exploitation is presented for an off-shore Adriatic marginal gas field. The approach discussed in this paper utilizes selective completion, very low reserves/production ratio, sequential production, Through Tubing Bridge Plug and Through Tubing Perforation techniques to avoid the use of costly workover rigs and to allow economically convenient exploitation of a structure which otherwise would have been abandoned.

  5. Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

  6. Characterizing Reservoir Properties Using Monitoring Gas Pressure Data after CO2-Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Hou, Z.; Lin, G.; Fang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluate the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties of permeability, porosity and entry pressure using CO2 monitoring data such as spatiotemporal distributions of gas pressure. The injection reservoir was set to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface so that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain five homogenous layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 pressure monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various monitoring locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  7. Using new reservoir characterization technologies on a giant old gas field (Hugoton Field, Kansas)

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.; Thompson, K. ); Prasad, K.; Boughton, S. )

    1996-01-01

    New technologies can profitably be applied to mature fields. Neural networks, geostalistics, new wireline logging tools, and 3-D visualization/computation have all added value to the characterization of Kansas Hugoton Field. This field was discovered in the 1920's; cumulative production has reached approximately 26 TCFG, and years of productive life remain. Despite this maturity, controls on gas distribution and water production have not been well understood. Once the geologic framework of the reservoir is understood, various technologies can be employed to solve problems of reservoir characterization, especially in a system as complex as the multilayer, mixed-lithology reservoir of the Permian Chase Group in Hugoton. Neural networks provided a better estimation of both porosity and permeability from logs when compared with core data than more conventional methods. Use of geostatistics resulted in more realistic porosity distributions than those from interpolation, by preserving heterogeneity and allowing constraint of imperfect log determinations by core data. Geostatistics also allows for quantification of uncertainty, which is shown by a range of possible pore volumes. 3-D visualization makes quick quality control of data possible, and promotes efforts to test sensitivities and cutoffs and to communicate results. Computation of reservoir parameters (e.g. water saturation) in 3-D alleviates the averaging problems attendant on such computations in 2-D. These techniques, plus new log measurements such as nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic pulsed induction, have aided our characterization of this reservoir and increased our understanding of and ability to manage, gas and water production.

  8. Using new reservoir characterization technologies on a giant old gas field (Hugoton Field, Kansas)

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.; Thompson, K.; Prasad, K.; Boughton, S.

    1996-12-31

    New technologies can profitably be applied to mature fields. Neural networks, geostalistics, new wireline logging tools, and 3-D visualization/computation have all added value to the characterization of Kansas Hugoton Field. This field was discovered in the 1920`s; cumulative production has reached approximately 26 TCFG, and years of productive life remain. Despite this maturity, controls on gas distribution and water production have not been well understood. Once the geologic framework of the reservoir is understood, various technologies can be employed to solve problems of reservoir characterization, especially in a system as complex as the multilayer, mixed-lithology reservoir of the Permian Chase Group in Hugoton. Neural networks provided a better estimation of both porosity and permeability from logs when compared with core data than more conventional methods. Use of geostatistics resulted in more realistic porosity distributions than those from interpolation, by preserving heterogeneity and allowing constraint of imperfect log determinations by core data. Geostatistics also allows for quantification of uncertainty, which is shown by a range of possible pore volumes. 3-D visualization makes quick quality control of data possible, and promotes efforts to test sensitivities and cutoffs and to communicate results. Computation of reservoir parameters (e.g. water saturation) in 3-D alleviates the averaging problems attendant on such computations in 2-D. These techniques, plus new log measurements such as nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic pulsed induction, have aided our characterization of this reservoir and increased our understanding of and ability to manage, gas and water production.

  9. Comparison of Gross Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Hydroelectric Reservoirs in Brazil with Thermopower Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerio, J. P.; Dos Santos, M. A.; Matvienko, B.; dos Santos, E.; Rocha, C. H.; Sikar, E.; Junior, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Widespread interest in human impacts on the Earth has prompted much questioning in fields of concern to the general public. One of these issues is the extent of the impacts on the environment caused by hydro-based power generation, once viewed as a clean energy source. From the early 1990s onwards, papers and studies have been challenging this assumption through claims that hydroelectric dams also emit greenhouse gases, generated by the decomposition of biomass flooded by filling these reservoirs. Like as other freshwater bodies, hydroelectric reservoirs produce gases underwater by biology decomposition of organic matter. Some of these biogenic gases are effective in terms of Global Warming. The decomposition is mainly due by anaerobically regime, emitting methane (CH4), nitrogen (N2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). This paper compare results obtained from gross greenhouse fluxes in Brazilian hydropower reservoirs with thermo power plants using different types of fuels and technology. Measurements were carried in the Manso, Serra da Mesa, Corumb, Itumbiara, Estreito, Furnas and Peixoto reservoirs, located in Cerrado biome and in Funil reservoir located at Atlantic forest biome with well defined climatologically regimes. Fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane in each of the reservoirs selected, whether through bubbles and/or diffusive exchange between water and atmosphere, were assessed by sampling. The intensity of emissions has a great variability and some environmental factors could be responsible for these variations. Factors that influence the emissions could be the water and air temperature, depth, wind velocity, sunlight, physical and chemical parameters of water, the composition of underwater biomass and the operational regime of the reservoir. Based in this calculations is possible to conclude that the large amount of hydro-power studied is better than thermopower source in terms of atmospheric greenhouse emissions. The comparisons between the reservoirs studied shown a large variation in the data on greenhouse gas emissions, which would suggest that more care, should be taken in the choice of future projects by the Brazilian electrical sector. The emission of CH4 by hydroelectric reservoirs is always unfavorable, since even if the carbon has originated with natural sources, it is part of a gas with higher GWP in the final calculation. Emissions of CO2 can be attributed in part to the natural carbon cycle between the atmosphere and the water of the reservoir. Another part could be attributed to the decomposition of organic material, caused by the hydroelectric dam.

  10. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, M.J.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    2001-03-26

    This report was an integrated study of the physics and chemistry affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involved theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. Specifically, advances were made on streamline-based simulation, analytical solutions to 1D compositional displacements, and modeling and experimental measures of three-phase flow.

  11. Gas Hydrate in the Arctic Ocean: A Submarine Terrestrial Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, E. B.; Buffett, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Gas hydrate is found in marine sediments on many continental slopes and on land beneath permafrost. An unusual deposit occurs below shallow water on continental shelves in the Arctic Ocean. These shelves are too shallow to create a permanent stability zone, given the present-day water depth and bottom-water temperature. Instead, this hydrate is a relic of the previous glacial periods, where the shelves were exposed to the much lower atmospheric temperature. As permafrost develops on the shelves, a shallow zone of hydrate stability is created. The subsequent rise in sea level at the end of the glacial period makes the hydrate deposit intrinsically unstable due to the encroachment of warm temperature from below and the relatively warmer seawater from above. Because these deposits have been warming for the last 10 kyrs, they provide a natural laboratory for studying the long-term response of gas hydrate to climate change. We attempt to model this transient feature of the Arctic with the aim of reproducing observations from sediment cores and quantifying the transfer of methane through the sediments and ocean. We model the volume fraction of gas hydrate, gas bubbles and ice (as well as salinity and methane concentration) as a function of depth over several glacial cycles. We account for both global changes in sea level and regional isostatic adjustments. The surface temperature of the seafloor switches between marine and terrestrial values, according to local sea level. Low air temperature at the sediment surface during glacial periods allows gas hydrate and free gas to accumulate within and below the permafrost layer. Our results show that hydrate and gas bubbles occupy a few percent of the pore volume within the permafrost. Small volumes of hydrate and bubble are also found below the permafrost layer. It appears that several glacial cycles are required to accumulate the hydrate observed today. The volume fraction of hydrate can also be increased by allowing a deep source of methane. A comparison with observations provides a constraint on this deep methane source.

  12. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on twomore » general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.« less

  13. Stress change and fault slip in produced gas reservoirs used for storage of natural gas and carbon-dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, Bogdan; Wassing, Brecht

    2013-04-01

    Gas extraction and subsequent storage of natural gas or CO2 in produced gas reservoirs will change the state of stress in a reservoir-seal system due to poro-mechanical, thermal and possibly chemical effects. Depletion- and injection-induced stresses can mechanically damage top- and side-seals, re-activate pre-existing sealing faults and create new fractures, allowing fluid migration out of the storage reservoir and causing induced seismicity. The first case study describes a field scale three-dimensional geomechanical numerical modelling of a depleted gas field in the Netherlands, which will be used for underground gas storage (UGS). The field experienced induced seismicity associated with gas production in the past and concerns were raised regarding the risk of future injection-related seismicity. The numerical modelling study aimed at investigating the potential of major faults for reactivation during UGS operations. The geomechanical model was calibrated to match the location and timing of the fault slip on the main central fault, which has most likely caused past seismic events during gas production. Simulation results showed that the part of the central fault most sensitive to slip during reservoir depletion is located at partial juxtaposition of the two main reservoir blocks across the central fault, which is in agreement with the seismological localization of the recorded seismic events. UGS operations with annual cycles of gas injection and production will largely have stabilizing effects on fault stability. The potential for fault slip on the central fault will therefore be low throughout annual operational cycles of this storage facility. The second case study describes a field scale two-dimensional geomechanical modelling of an offshore depleted gas field in the Netherlands, which is being considered for CO2 storage. The geomechanical modelling study aimed at investigating the mechanical impact of induced stress changes, resulting from past gas extraction and future CO2 injection, on the reservoir rock, top- and side-seals as well as faults. The study focused in particular on the potential for induced hydro-fracturing of the reservoir rock and top seals and re-activation of existing faults. In contrast to the first case study of UGS where good calibration data were available, in this case calibration data were largely missing as the field has not experienced (felt) induced seismicity during production period and subsidence of the seabed was not measured. Numerical simulations of CO2 injection into compartmentalized reservoir structures showed that the side seal and boundary faults at the edges of reservoir compartments represent weak spots where production-induced mechanical damage and fault re-activation will first occur. Possible permeability enhancement resulting from local seal damage and fault slip can provide initial pathways for CO2 penetration into the seal enhancing fluid-rock chemical interactions.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Subsurface Transport and Groundwater Impacts from Hydraulic Fracturing of Tight/Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. T.; Moridis, G. J.; Keen, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown tremendously over the last decade, and concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways that could connect the stimulated reservoir to shallower groundwater aquifers. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a deeper tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying groundwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, assuming that the formation of a connecting pathway has already occurred. We focus on two general transport scenarios: 1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and 2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. The simulations explore a range of permeabilities and geometries over time scales, and evaluate the mechanisms and factors that could lead to the escape of gas or reservoir fluid and the contamination of groundwater resources. We also examine the effects of overpressured reservoirs, and explore long-term transport processes as part of a continuing study. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Gas production from the reservoir via a horizontal well is likely to mitigate release through the reduction of available free gas and the lowering of reservoir pressure. We also find that fractured tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of large volumes of migrating gas, and incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  15. Mineral content prediction for unconventional oil and gas reservoirs based on logging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maojin, Tan; Youlong, Zou; Guoyue

    2012-09-01

    Coal bed methane and shale oil &gas are both important unconventional oil and gas resources, whose reservoirs are typical non-linear with complex and various mineral components, and the logging data interpretation model are difficult to establish for calculate the mineral contents, and the empirical formula cannot be constructed due to various mineral. The radial basis function (RBF) network analysis is a new method developed in recent years; the technique can generate smooth continuous function of several variables to approximate the unknown forward model. Firstly, the basic principles of the RBF is discussed including net construct and base function, and the network training is given in detail the adjacent clustering algorithm specific process. Multi-mineral content for coal bed methane and shale oil &gas, using the RBF interpolation method to achieve a number of well logging data to predict the mineral component contents; then, for coal-bed methane reservoir parameters prediction, the RBF method is used to realized some mineral contents calculation such as ash, volatile matter, carbon content, which achieves a mapping from various logging data to multimineral. To shale gas reservoirs, the RBF method can be used to predict the clay content, quartz content, feldspar content, carbonate content and pyrite content. Various tests in coalbed and gas shale show the method is effective and applicable for mineral component contents prediction

  16. Strategies to diagnose and control microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.A.; Derr, R.M.; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen sulfide production (souring) in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems is a safety and environmental problem that can lead to operational shutdown when local hydrogen sulfide standards are exceeded. Systems affected by microbial souring have historically been treated using biocides that target the general microbial community. However, requirements for more environmentally friendly solutions have led to treatment strategies in which sulfide production can be controlled with minimal impact to the system and environment. Some of these strategies are based on microbial and/or nutritional augmentation of the sour environment. Through research sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago, Illinois, methods have been developed for early detection of microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs, and a variety of mitigation strategies have been evaluated. The effectiveness of traditional biocide treatment in gas storage reservoirs was shown to depend heavily on the methods by which the chemical is applied. An innovative strategy using nitrate was tested and proved ideal for produced water and wastewater systems. Another strategy using elemental iodine was effective for sulfide control in evaporation ponds and is currently being tested in microbially sour natural gas storage wells.

  17. Wellbore stability in shale gas reservoirs, a case study of the Barnett Shale (USA).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Aliouane, Leila

    2015-04-01

    Wellbore stability in shale gas reservoirs is one of the major problems during the drilling phase; bad stability can induce the breakouts and drilling induced fractures. Wellbore stability requires the good knowledge of horizontal maximum and minimum stress, the overburden stress and the pore pressure. In this paper, we show a case study of the wellbore stability and how to estimate the mud weight in shale gas reservoir of the Barnett shale formation before drilling. The overburden stress is calculated from the seismic inversion, the minimum stress is calculated using the poro-elastic model, and however the pore pressure is calculated using the Eaton's model. Keywords: Wellbore stability, shale gas, maximum stress, minimum stress, overburden, mud weight, pore pressure.

  18. Geological characterization and 3D visualizations of the gas storage reservoir at Hillsboro field, Montgomery County, IL

    SciTech Connect

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Huff, B.G.

    1994-12-31

    Geological characterizations, modeling and 3-D computer-generated visualizations of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone at the Hillsboro Gas Storage field in Montgomery County, Illinois, are discussed. Petrophysical analyses reveal four distinct hydraulic flow units in six cored wells. Furthermore, four lithologies, identified by thin section petrography, are associated with the various hydraulic units. Fieldwide visualizations of 3-D distributions of petrophysically-derived attributes reservoir quality index (RQI) and flow zone indicator (FZI) -- show considerable vertical variability but lateral continuity. This finding explains why it is easier to expand the gas bubble laterally than vertically. Advantages of the 3-D reservoir description of Hillsboro Gas Storage field include (1) improved definition of the spatial porosity distribution which leads to better estimation of reservoir volumetrics; (2) improved definition of reservoir hydraulic flow zones; and (3) development of realistic reservoir model(s) for the simulation and management of the gas storage field.

  19. Biogeochemical and microbial analyses around gas wells and in the reservoir in a long-term used gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Dagmar; Krüger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    As part of a joint research project microbial communities in the area of the second largest natural gas field in Europe in the Altmark, Germany are analyzed. The Altmark gas field operated by GDF SUEZ E&P Germany GmbH is located at the southern edge of the Northeast German Basin. The reservoir horizons belong to the Permian Rotliegend formation (Saxon) and have an average depth of about 3300 m. CO2 will be injected to enhance the recovery of gas in this with conventional extraction methods nearly depleted gas field (Enhanced Gas Recovery - EGR, BMBF project CLEAN). Microbiological analyses are used to supplement a continuous gas monitoring program at the soil surface above the EGR-site. Microbial production and consumption of CH4 and CO2 are determined together with the carbon isotopic compositions to separate these indigenous biological activities from possibly upward migrating reservoir gases including CO2. The δ13C of CO2 collected in situ was similar to those in incubations, confirming a biological origin. Archaeal cell numbers were approximately one magnitude lower than bacterial cell numbers. In all samples the total number of detectable microorganisms was high in contrast to a generally low activity for CO2 and CH4 production and oxidation. For monitoring of the deep reservoir microbiological and isotopic analyses are used to investigate the microbial community before and after injection of CO2. The δ13C of CO2 and CH4 collected in situ in production waters indicate a thermogenic origin. High cell numbers for bacteria and archaea were detected in production waters from different wells. In contrast microbial activities for CO2 and CH4 production and oxidation were relatively low. So far microbial activities in reservoir fluids collected with in situ samplers at 3512m depth could not be determined in this hypersaline (salinity of 400 per mille) and hot (around 130° C) environment.

  20. Chemical stimulation of gas condensate reservoirs: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Viren

    Well productivity in gas condensate reservoirs is reduced by condensate banking when the bottom hole flowing pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. Several methods have been proposed to restore gas production rates after a decline due to condensate blocking. Gas injection, hydraulic fracturing, horizontal wells and methanol injection have been tried with limited success. These methods of well stimulation either offer only temporary productivity restoration or are applicable only in some situations. Wettability alteration of the rock in the near well bore region is an economic and efficient method for the enhancement of gas-well deliverability. Altering the wettability of porous media from strongly water-wet or oil-wet to intermediate-wet decreases the residual liquid saturations and results in an increase in the relative permeability to gas. Such treatments also increase the mobility and recovery of condensate from the reservoir. This study validates the above hypothesis and provides a simple and cost-efficient solution to the condensate blocking problem. Screening studies were carried out to identify the chemicals based on structure, solubility and reactivity at reservoir temperature and pressure. Experiments were performed to evaluate these chemicals to improve gas and condensate relative permeabilities. The improvement in relative permeability after chemical treatment was quantified by performing high pressure and high temperature coreflood experiments in Berea sandstone, Texas Cream limestone and reservoir cores using synthetic gas mixtures at reservoir conditions. Experiments were done at high flow rates and for long time periods to evaluate the durability of the treatment. Single well simulation studies were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the chemical treatment in the field. The experimental relative permeability data was modeled using a trapping number dependent relative permeability model and incorporated in the simulations. Effect of connate water saturation, drawdown pressure, skin, treatment radius and the timing of the treatment during the life of the reservoir were investigated using a compositional simulator. Spectroscopic studies using a scanning electron microscope, neutron magnetic resonance and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used to determine the structural and reactive chemistry of the chemicals used and to evaluate the extent of treatment on the rock surface. The study allows us to postulate and partly verify a detailed mechanism of interaction between the rock surface and the chemical.

  1. Norg underground gas storage - an integrated 3-D geological and geophysical reservoir modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Smith, S. ); Huis, R.; Copper, J.; Whyte, S. )

    1993-09-01

    The Netherlands have an extensive gas distribution infrastructure supplying 80 x 10[sup 9] m[sup 3] per annum to the domestic and European market. The capacity requirement exceeds 600 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d, of which 430 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d is provided by the giant Groningen gas field. The Groningen field will soon reach a pressure at which this capacity can no longer be met without considerable investments. It will also become difficult to maintain the market gas quality, because of the increasing supply from small fields with widely varying gas qualities. Underground Gas Storage (UGS) will satisfy both capacity and gas-quality requirements. This UGS must eventually store 4.5 x 10[sup 9] m[sup 3] with injection/production capacities of 36/80-100 x 10[sup 6] sm[sup 3]/d, making it one of the largest UGS projects in the world. These extremely high-capacity requirements demand both high-matrix permeability and good understanding of vertical and lateral reservoir continuity. Matrix permeability is predictable due to the close relationship with the lithofacies defined within the primary Rotliegende depositional model. Minor faults, identified on three-dimensional (3-D) seismic attribute maps, represent potential transmissibility impairment zones, compartmentalizing the reservoir. This was initially suggested by core fracture studies and confirmed by a subsequent field shut-in and pressure buildup test. Lithofacies and seismic structural data are integrated within a computerized reservoir geological modeling system known as [open quotes]Monarch[close quotes] to provide a highly detailed 3-D permeability model that is then tranformed into a model for dynamic reservoir simulation. The results confirm the required working volume for the UGS operation and provide a basis for the initial field development planning.

  2. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, Robert; Pruess, Karsten

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas.

  3. Some effects of non-condensible gas in geothermal reservoirs with steam-water counterflow

    SciTech Connect

    McKibbin, R.; Pruess, K.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for fluid and heat flow in two-phase geothermal reservoirs containing non-condensible gas (CO{sub 2}). Vertical profiles of temperature, pressures and phase saturations in steady-state conditions are obtained by numerically integrating the coupled ordinary differential equations describing conservation of water, CO{sub 2}, and energy. Solutions including binary diffusion effects in the gas phase are generated for cases with net mass throughflow as well as for balanced liquid-vapor counterflow. Calculated examples illustrate some fundamental characteristics of two-phase heat transmission systems with non-condensible gas. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quaterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This document contains the status report for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas-Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project for the contract period October 1 to December 31, 1996. Data from seismic surveys are analyzed for structural imaging of reflector units as part of a 3-D basin modeling effort. The goal of this task is to assess the effects of structural complexity and regional anisotropy on a seismic attribute taken to indicate local fracturing and/or gas concentrations. The main activities of this quarter included basin modeling, 3-D, 3-C processing, correlation matrix, dipole sonic logging, and technology transfer.

  5. Application of sterane epimerization to evaluation of Yoshii gas and condensate reservoir, Niigata basin, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Noriyuki )

    1990-10-01

    A practical method is used to assess maturation histories and paleotemperatures of mudstones. This method is based on 20R-C{sub 29} sterane epimerization and the apparent heating rate. A relationship among sterane epimerization, maximum burial temperature, and heating rate is determined assuming kinetic constants of sterane epimerization. This relationship is used to reconstruct the subsidence and thermal histories of mudstones and accumulated oils in the young Nishiyama/Chuo oil field (Tertiary-Quaternary). The estimated thickness of eroded sediments in the Haizume/Uonuma Formation, the uppermost rocks in the Nishiyama/Chuo oil field, indicate subsidence and heating rates of 2-4 km/m.y. and 80-160C/m.y., respectively, and uplift and cooling rates of 2-4 km/m.y. and 80-160C/m.y., respectively, during the late Quaternary. These rates suggest recent vigorous tectonism in the Niigata back-arc sedimentary basin. Based on geologic observations and maturation levels of crude oils, the oil generation threshold and primary migration stage correspond to degrees of sterane epimerization of 20S/(20S + 20R) = 0.20 to 0.35 and 20S/(20S + 20R) = 0.40 to 0.50, respectively. The anticlinal structure of Yoshi gas and condensate reservoir was formed prior to the late Pliocene. The thermal and subsidence histories of source rocks indicate that the accumulation of hydrocarbons in Yoshii reservoir rocks started in the Pleistocene. Further maturation of these reservoir rocks and the possible addition of gases from overmature source rocks during the late Quaternary resulted in formation of the Yoshii gas-condensate reservoir. Formation of anticlinal structure of Nishiyama reservoir began in the late Quaternary after the major stage of oil migration. Vigorous tectonism during the late Quaternary caused abrupt development of the anticline, allowing oil to accumulate to form Nishiyama reservoir.

  6. CO2 utilization and storage in shale gas reservoirs: Experimental results and economic impacts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Owen, Antionette Toni; Miller, Quin R. S.; Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    Natural gas is considered a cleaner and lower-emission fuel than coal, and its high abundance from advanced drilling techniques has positioned natural gas as a major alternative energy source for the U.S. However, each ton of CO2 emitted from any type of fossil fuel combustion will continue to increase global atmospheric concentrations. One unique approach to reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions involves coupling CO2 based enhanced gas recovery (EGR) operations in depleted shale gas reservoirs with long-term CO2 storage operations. In this paper, we report unique findings about the interactions between important shale minerals and sorbing gases (CH4 and CO2) andmore » associated economic consequences. Where enhanced condensation of CO2 followed by desorption on clay surface is observed under supercritical conditions, a linear sorption profile emerges for CH4. Volumetric changes to montmorillonites occur during exposure to CO2. Theory-based simulations identify interactions with interlayer cations as energetically favorable for CO2 intercalation. Thus, experimental evidence suggests CH4 does not occupy the interlayer and has only the propensity for surface adsorption. Mixed CH4:CO2 gas systems, where CH4 concentrations prevail, indicate preferential CO2 sorption as determined by in situ infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Collectively, these laboratory studies combined with a cost-based economic analysis provide a basis for identifying favorable CO2-EOR opportunities in previously fractured shale gas reservoirs approaching final stages of primary gas production. Moreover, utilization of site-specific laboratory measurements in reservoir simulators provides insight into optimum injection strategies for maximizing CH4/CO2 exchange rates to obtain peak natural gas production.« less

  7. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of Bhuban sandstones (Neogene), Titas Gas Field, Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminul Islam, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study deals with the diagenesis and reservoir quality of sandstones of the Bhuban Formation located at the Titas Gas Field of Bengal Basin. Petrographic study including XRD, CL, SEM and BSE image analysis and quantitative determination of reservoir properties were carried out for this study. The sandstones are fine to medium-grained, moderately well to well sorted subfeldspathic arenites with subordinate feldspathic and lithic arenites. The diagenetic processes include clay infiltration, compaction and cementation (quartz overgrowth, chlorite, kaolinite, calcite and minor amount of pyrite, dolomite and K-feldspar overgrowth). Quartz is the dominant pore occluding cement and generally occurred as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Pressure solution derived from grain contact is the main contributor of quartz overgrowths. Chlorite occurs as pore-lining and pore filling cement. In some cases, chlorite helps to retain porosity by preventing quartz overgrowth. In some restricted depth interval, pore-occlusion by calcite cement is very much intense. Kaolinite locally developed as vermiform and accelerated the minor porosity loss due to pore-occlusion. Kaolinite/chlorite enhances ineffective microporosity. Kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene or deeper Oligocene source rocks. The relation between diagenesis and reservoir quality is as follows: the initial porosity was decreased by compaction and cementation and then increased by leaching of the metastable grains and dissolution of cement. Good quality reservoir rocks were deposited in fluvial environment and hence quality of reservoir rocks is also environment selective. Porosity and permeability data exhibit good inverse correlation with cement. However, some data points indicate multiple controls on permeability. Reservoir quality is thus controlled by pore occluding cement, textural parameters (grain size, pore size and sorting) and depositional environment. The reservoir finally resumed partly its pre-cementation quality after development of secondary porosity.

  8. Facies, faults and potential sweet spots in a tight gas reservoir: Almond Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Martinsen, R.; Iverson, W.; Surdam, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Almond Formation is a major producer of gas in southwestern Wyoming. Although exploration generally is aimed at finding conventional reservoirs in upper Almond marine sandstones, the majority of Almond gas is contained in the underlying main Almond, a succession of dominantly non-marine, interbedded tight sandstones, siltstones, carbonaceous shales and coals. Production data indicate that some of the best gas wells completed in upper Almond sands show little production decline and have already produced more gas than calculations indicate they contain. This implies that these wells have somehow successfully tapped into the vast supply of gas contained in the main Almond. We believe that the more permeable reservoirs, in addition to providing {open_quotes}sweet spots{close_quotes} for exploration, also serve as lateral conduits capable of draining gas over a broad area from the main Almond. The {open_quotes}sweet spots{close_quotes} themselves do not need to be volumetrically large, only permeable and laterally continuous. Previously unrecognized marine sands, similar to those in the upper Almond, are favorably located in the middle of the main Almond succession and may provide additional lateral conduits. Studies also show that syndepositional faults significantly influenced deposition and may also be important in terms of fluid flow. At least some syndepositional faults are associated with anomalously high gas and/or water production within fields, and may be vertical conduits for fluid flow.

  9. Facies, faults and potential sweet spots in a tight gas reservoir: Almond Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Martinsen, R.; Iverson, W.; Surdam, R. )

    1996-01-01

    The Almond Formation is a major producer of gas in southwestern Wyoming. Although exploration generally is aimed at finding conventional reservoirs in upper Almond marine sandstones, the majority of Almond gas is contained in the underlying main Almond, a succession of dominantly non-marine, interbedded tight sandstones, siltstones, carbonaceous shales and coals. Production data indicate that some of the best gas wells completed in upper Almond sands show little production decline and have already produced more gas than calculations indicate they contain. This implies that these wells have somehow successfully tapped into the vast supply of gas contained in the main Almond. We believe that the more permeable reservoirs, in addition to providing [open quotes]sweet spots[close quotes] for exploration, also serve as lateral conduits capable of draining gas over a broad area from the main Almond. The [open quotes]sweet spots[close quotes] themselves do not need to be volumetrically large, only permeable and laterally continuous. Previously unrecognized marine sands, similar to those in the upper Almond, are favorably located in the middle of the main Almond succession and may provide additional lateral conduits. Studies also show that syndepositional faults significantly influenced deposition and may also be important in terms of fluid flow. At least some syndepositional faults are associated with anomalously high gas and/or water production within fields, and may be vertical conduits for fluid flow.

  10. Diagenesis of an 'overmature' gas reservoir: The Spiro sand of the Arkoma Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spotl, C.; Houseknecht, D.W.; Burns, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Spiro sand is a laterally extensive thin sandstone of earliest Atokan (Pennsylvanian) age that forms a major natural gas reservoir in the western Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma. Petrographic analysis reveals a variety of diagenetic alterations, the majority of which occurred during moderate to deep burial. Early diagenetic processes include calcite cementation and the formation of Fe-clay mineral peloids and coatings around quartz framework grains. These clays, which underwent transformation to well-crystallized chamosite [polytype Ib(?? = 90??)] on burial, are particularly abundant in medium-grained channel sandstones, whereas illitic clays are predominant in fine-grained interchannel sandstones. Subsequent to mechanical compaction, saddle ankerite precipitated in the reservoir at temperatures in excess of 70??C. Crude oil collected in favourable structural locations during and after ankeritization. Whereas hydrocarbons apparently halted inorganic diagenesis in oil-saturated zones, cementation continued in the underlying water-saturated zones. As reservoir temperatures increased further, hydrocarbons were cracked and a solid pyrobitumen residue remained in the reservoir. At temperatures exceeding ???140-150??C, non-syntaxial quartz cement, ferroan calcite and traces of dickite(?) locally reduced the reservoir quality. Local secondary porosity was created by carbonate cement dissolution. This alteration post-dated hydrocarbon emplacement and is probably related to late-stage infiltration of freshwater along 'leaky' faults. The study shows that the Spiro sandstone locally retained excellent porosities despite deep burial and thermal conditions that correspond to the zone of incipient very low grade metamorphism.

  11. Joule-Thomson Cooling Due to CO2 Injection into Natural GasReservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2006-04-21

    Depleted natural gas reservoirs are a promising target for Carbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery (CSEGR). The focus of this study is on evaluating the importance of Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 injection into depleted natural gas reservoirs. Joule-Thomson cooling is the adiabatic cooling that accompanies the expansion of a real gas. If Joule-Thomson cooling were extreme, injectivity and formation permeability could be altered by the freezing of residual water,formation of hydrates, and fracturing due to thermal stresses. The TOUGH2/EOS7C module for CO2-CH4-H2O mixtures is used as the simulation analysis tool. For verification of EOS7C, the classic Joule-Thomson expansion experiment is modeled for pure CO2 resulting in Joule-Thomson coefficients in agreement with standard references to within 5-7 percent. For demonstration purposes, CO2 injection at constant pressure and with a large pressure drop ({approx}50 bars) is presented in order to show that cooling by more than 20 C can occur by this effect. Two more-realistic constant-rate injection cases show that for typical systems in the Sacramento Valley, California, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is minimal. This simulation study shows that for constant-rate injections into high-permeability reservoirs, the Joule-Thomson cooling effect is not expected to create significant problems for CSEGR.

  12. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Hewett; Franklin M. Orr Jr.

    2000-12-31

    Gas injection in oil reservoirs offers huge potential for improved oil recovery. However, successful design of a gas injection process requires a detailed understanding of a variety of different significant processes, including the phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures and the approach to multi-contact miscibility in the reservoir, the flow of oil, water and gas underground, and the interaction of phase behavior reservoir heterogeneity and gravity on overall performance at the field scale. This project attempts to tackle all these issues using a combination of theoretical, numerical and laboratory studies of gas injection. The aim of this work is to develop a set of ultra-fast compositional simulation tools that can be used to make field-scale predictions of the performance of gas injection processes. To achieve the necessary accuracy, these tools must satisfy the fundamental physics and chemistry of the displacement from the pore to the reservoir scales. Thus this project focuses on four main research areas: (1) determination of the most appropriate methods of mapping multicomponent solutions to streamlines and streamtubes in 3D; (2) development of techniques for automatic generation of analytical solutions for one-dimensional flow along a streamline; (3) experimental investigations to improve the representation of physical mechanisms that govern displacement efficiency along a streamline; and (4) Theoretical and experimental investigations to establish the limitations of the streamline/streamtube approach. In this report they briefly review the status of the research effort in each area. They then give a more in depth discussion of the development of a CT scanning technique which can measure compositions in a two-phase, three-component system in-situ.

  13. Estimation of velocity structure around a natural gas reservoir at Yufutsu, Japan, by microtremor survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.; Tezuka, K.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic reflection survey has been commonly used for exploration and time-lapse monitoring of oil/gas resources. Seismic reflection images typically have reasonable reliability and resolution for commercial production. However, cost consideration sometimes avoids deployment of widely distributed array or repeating survey in cases of time lapse monitoring or exploration of small-scale reservoir. Hence, technologies to estimate structures and physical properties around the reservoir with limited cost would be effectively used. Microtremor survey method (MSM) has an ability to realize long-term monitoring of reservoir with low cost, because this technique has a passive nature and minimum numbers of the monitoring station is four. MSM has been mainly used for earthquake disaster prevention, because velocity structure of S-wave is directly estimated from velocity dispersion of the Rayleigh wave. The authors experimentally investigated feasibility of the MSM survey for exploration of oil/gas reservoir. The field measurement was carried out around natural gas reservoir at Yufutsu, Hokkaido, Japan. Four types of arrays with array radii of 30m, 100m, 300m and 600m are deployed in each area. Dispersion curves of the velocity of Rayleigh wave were estimated from observed microtremors, and S-wave velocity structures were estimated by an inverse analysis of the dispersion curves with genetic algorism (GA). The estimated velocity structures showed good consistency with one dimensional velocity structure by previous reflection surveys up to 4-5 km. We also found from the field experiment that a data of 40min is effective to estimate the velocity structure even the seismometers are deployed along roads with heavy traffic.

  14. Estimating Deliverability in Multi-Layered Gas Reservoirs Using Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Arfaj, Malik Khalid

    In this research, an artificial intelligence (AI) model has been created to estimate the production rate of each layer in a multi-layered gas reservoir using static properties such as those obtained from well logging, in addition to dynamic properties such as pressure. This approach will be helpful in several reservoir engineering applications, such as understanding layers' depletion, or targeting specific layers for workover. It could also be used for PLT analysis where the measured PLT values are compared to the expected values and a variance analysis could be performed. Data were collected from more than 100 wells in a certain reservoir spanning over four fields. They were combined in related input variables and fed to the AI model for learning purposes. To compare different AI methods, the data were fed to 5 methods, namely ANFIS, MLP, RBF, SVM, and GRNN, and results were optimized for each method. Between the tested AI methods, SVM and GRNN performed best as shown by a low mean absolute percentage error and a very high correlation coefficient. This research shows promising use for AI methods in estimating production rate from each layer in a multi-layered gas reservoir.

  15. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  16. Tight gas reservoir simulation: Modeling discrete irregular strata-bound fracture network flow, including dynamic recharge from the matrix

    SciTech Connect

    McKoy, M.L., Sams, W.N.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, has sponsored a project to simulate the behavior of tight, fractured, strata-bound gas reservoirs that arise from irregular discontinuous, or clustered networks of fractures. New FORTRAN codes have been developed to generate fracture networks, or simulate reservoir drainage/recharge, and to plot the fracture networks and reservoirs pressures. Ancillary codes assist with raw data analysis.

  17. Deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir: baseline characterization prior CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Shaheed, Mina; Vieth, Andrea; Krüger, Martin; Kock, Dagmar; Würdemann, Hilke

    2010-05-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of about 3500m, is characterised by high salinity fluid and temperatures up to 127° C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery) the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that the quantification of those microorganisms as well as the determination of microbial activity was not yet possible. Microbial monitoring methods have to be further developed to study microbial activities under these extreme conditions to access their influence on the EGR technique and on enhancing the long term safety of the process by fixation of carbon dioxide by precipitation of carbonates. We would like to thank GDF SUEZ for providing the data for the Rotliegend reservoir, sample material and enabling sampling campaigns. The CLEAN project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the frame of the Geotechnologien Program.

  18. FMS/FMI borehole imaging of carbonate gas reservoirs, Central Luconia Province, offshore Sarawak, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.; Van der Baan, D. )

    1994-07-01

    The Central Luconia Province, offshore Sarawak, is a significant gas province characterized by extensive development of late Miocene carbonate buildups. Some 200 carbonate structures have been seismically mapped of which 70 have been drilled. FMS/FMI borehole images were obtained from three appraisal wells drilled in the [open quotes]M[close quotes] cluster gas fields situated in the northwestern part of the province. The [open quotes]M[close quotes] cluster fields are currently part of an upstream gas development project to supply liquefied natural gas. Log facies recognition within these carbonate gas reservoirs is problematic due mainly to the large gas effect. This problem is being addressed by (1) application of neural network techniques and (2) using borehole imaging tools. Cores obtained from the M1, M3, and M4 gas fields were calibrated with the FMS/FMI images. Reservoir characterization was obtained at two different scales. The larger scale (i.e., 1:40 and 1:200) involved static normalized images where the vertical stacking pattern was observed based on recognition of bed boundaries. In addition, the greater vertical resolution of the FMS/FMI images allowed recognition of thin beds. For recognition of specific lithofacies, dynamically normalized images were used to highlight lithofacies-specific sedimentary features, e.g., clay seams/stylolites, vugs, and breccia zones. In general, the FMS/FMI images allowed (1) easier recognition of reservoir features, e.g., bed boundaries, and (2) distinction between lithofacies that are difficult to characterize on conventional wireline logs.

  19. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil reservoir management methodology to maximize both fluid recovery and free up currently injected HC gases for domestic consumption. Moreover, this study identified the main uncertainty parameters impacting the gas and oil production performance with all proposed alternatives. Maximizing both fluids oil and gas in oil rim reservoir are challenging. The reservoir heterogeneity will have a major impact on the performance of non hydrocarbon gas flooding. Therefore, good reservoir description is a key to achieve acceptable development process and make reliable prediction. The lab study data were used successfully to as a tool to identify the range of uncertainty parameters that are impacting the hydrocarbon recovery.

  20. Mapping the Fluid Pathways and Permeability Barriers of a Large Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A.; Zhang, Y. L.; Sun, L. F.; Saleh, R.; Pun, W.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between the physical properties of gas hydrate saturated sedimentary basins aids in the detection, exploration and monitoring one of the world's upcoming energy resources. A large gas hydrate reservoir is located in the MacKenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic and geophysical logs from the Mallik test site are available for the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) between depths of approximately 850 m to 1100 m. The geophysical data sets from two neighboring boreholes at the Mallik test site are analyzed. Commonly used porosity logs, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion logs are used to map zones of elevated and severely reduced porosity and permeability respectively. The lateral continuity of horizontal permeability barriers can be further understood with the aid of surface seismic modeling studies. In this integrated study, the behavior of compressional and Stoneley wave velocity dispersion and surface seismic modeling studies are used to identify the fluid pathways and permeability barriers of the gas hydrate reservoir. The results are compared with known nuclear magnetic resonance-derived permeability values. The aim of investigating this heterogeneous medium is to map the fluid pathways and the associated permeability barriers throughout the gas hydrate stability zone. This provides a framework for an understanding of the long-term dissociation of gas hydrates along vertical and horizontal pathways, and will improve the knowledge pertaining to the production of such a promising energy source.

  1. Hydrothermal origin of oil and gas reservoirs in basement rock of the South Vietnam continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriyevskiy, A.N.; Kireyev, F.A.; Bochko, R.A.; Fedorova, T.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Oil-saturated granites, with mineral parageneses typical of hydrothermal metasomatism and leaching haloes, have been found near faults in the crystalline basement of the South Vietnam continental shelf. The presence of native silver, barite, zincian copper, and iron chloride indicates a deep origin for the mineralizing fluids. Hydrothermally altered granites are a new possible type of reservoir and considerably broaden the possibilities of oil and gas exploration. 15 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  2. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2001-06-30

    This report outlines progress in the third 3 quarter of the first year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs.'' A simple theoretical formulation of vertical flow with capillary/gravity equilibrium is described. Also reported are results of experimental measurements for the same systems. The results reported indicate that displacement behavior is strongly affected by the interfacial tension of phases that form on the tie line that extends through the initial oil composition.

  3. Percolation Pore Network Study on the Residue Gas Saturation of Dry Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Tang, Y. B.; Zou, G. Y.; Jiang, K.; Li, M.

    2014-12-01

    We tried to model the effect of pore size heterogeneity and pore connectivity on the residue gas saturation for dry gas reservoir rocks. If we consider that snap-off does not exist and only piston displacement takes place in all pores with the same size during imbibition process, in the extreme case, the residue gas saturation will be equal to zero. Thus we can suppose that the residue gas saturation of dry rocks is mainly controlled by the pore size distribution. To verify the assumption, percolation pore networks (i.e., three-dimensional simple cubic (SC) and body-center cubic (BCC)) were used in the study. The connectivity and the pore size distribution in percolation pore network could be changed randomly. The concept of water phase connectivity zw(i.e., water coordination number) and gas phase connectivity zg (i.e., gas coordination number) was introduced here. zw and zg will change during simulation and can be estimated numerically from the results of simulations through gradually saturated networks by water. The Simulation results show that when zg less than or equal to 1.5 during water quasi - static imbibition, the gas will be trapped in rock pores. Network simulation results also shows that the residue gas saturation Srg follows a power law relationship (i.e.,Srg??r?, where ?r is normalized standard deviation of the pore radius distribution, and exponent ? is a function of coordination number). This indicates that the residue gas saturation has no explicit relationship with porosity and permeability as it should have in light of previous study, pore radius distribution is the principal factor in determining the residue gas saturation of dry reservoir rocks.

  4. Gas hydrate reservoir degassing: thermodynamic and kinetic data as basis for predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicks, J. M.; Girod, M.; Naumann, R.; Erzinger, J.; Horsfield, B.; di Primio, R.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates contain predominantly methane but sometimes also other hydrocarbon- and non- hydrocarbon gases such as CO2 or H2S. The amount of other gases beside methane depends on the source of the gas: in case of a microbial origin the gas is almost pure methane whereas gases from thermal origin may contain a high percentage of higher-molecular weight compounds, such as ethane, propane and larger hydrocarbons. Calculated compositions of gas leaking from an oil reservoir also show a significant amount of nitrogen beside the other components. All components in addition to methane have a strong influence on the stability field of the resulting hydrate phase. In the presence of higher hydrocarbons the stability of the resulting gas hydrate is shifted to higher temperatures and lower pressures whereas the enclathration of nitrogen induces a shift of the hydrate stability to higher pressures and lower temperatures in comparison to pure methane hydrate. Furthermore, hydrate formation kinetics also depend on the composition of the gas phase: recent studies have shown the rapid formation of hydrates containing H2S in addition to methane, whereas the formation of hydrates containing small amounts of ethane and propane seemed to be kinetically inhibited. Due to the significant changes in hydrate stability and formation kinetics depending on gas composition thermodynamic and kinetic data for gas mixtures is crucial for all calculations and predictions regarding gas hydrate reservoir degassing as a consequence of climate change. In this study we will present thermodynamic and kinetic data from in-situ measurements (X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy) on gas hydrates that had been synthesized under natural conditions.

  5. The noble gas geochemistry of natural CO 2 gas reservoirs from the Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountain provinces, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Stuart M. V.; Ballentine, Chris J.; Holland, Greg; Blagburn, Dave; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Stevens, Scott; Schoell, Martin; Cassidy, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Identification of the source of CO 2 in natural reservoirs and development of physical models to account for the migration and interaction of this CO 2 with the groundwater is essential for developing a quantitative understanding of the long term storage potential of CO 2 in the subsurface. We present the results of 57 noble gas determinations in CO 2 rich fields (>82%) from three natural reservoirs to the east of the Colorado Plateau uplift province, USA (Bravo Dome, NM., Sheep Mountain, CO. and McCallum Dome, CO.), and from two reservoirs from within the uplift area (St. John's Dome, AZ., and McElmo Dome, CO.). We demonstrate that all fields have CO 2/ 3He ratios consistent with a dominantly magmatic source. The most recent volcanics in the province date from 8 to 10 ka and are associated with the Bravo Dome field. The oldest magmatic activity dates from 42 to 70 Ma and is associated with the McElmo Dome field, located in the tectonically stable centre of the Colorado Plateau: CO 2 can be stored within the subsurface on a millennia timescale. The manner and extent of contact of the CO 2 phase with the groundwater system is a critical parameter in using these systems as natural analogues for geological storage of anthropogenic CO 2. We show that coherent fractionation of groundwater 20Ne/ 36Ar with crustal radiogenic noble gases ( 4He, 21Ne, 40Ar) is explained by a two stage re-dissolution model: Stage 1: Magmatic CO 2 injection into the groundwater system strips dissolved air-derived noble gases (ASW) and accumulated crustal/radiogenic noble gas by CO 2/water phase partitioning. The CO 2 containing the groundwater stripped gases provides the first reservoir fluid charge. Subsequent charges of CO 2 provide no more ASW or crustal noble gases, and serve only to dilute the original ASW and crustal noble gas rich CO 2. Reservoir scale preservation of concentration gradients in ASW-derived noble gases thus provide CO 2 filling direction. This is seen in the Bravo Dome and St. John's Dome fields. Stage 2: The noble gases re-dissolve into any available gas stripped groundwater. This is modeled as a Rayleigh distillation process and enables us to quantify for each sample: (1) the volume of groundwater originally 'stripped' on reservoir filling; and (2) the volume of groundwater involved in subsequent interaction. The original water volume that is gas stripped varies from as low as 0.0005 cm 3 groundwater/cm 3 gas (STP) in one Bravo Dome sample, to 2.56 cm 3 groundwater/cm 3 gas (STP) in a St. John's Dome sample. Subsequent gas/groundwater equilibration varies within all fields, each showing a similar range, from zero to 100 cm 3 water/cm 3 gas (at reservoir pressure and temperature).

  6. Computing gas solubility in reservoir waters for environmental chemistry applications: the role of satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, R.; Lima, I.; Ramos, F.; Bambace, L.; Assireu, A.; Stech, J.; Novo, E.; Lorenzeti, L.

    Atmospheric greenhouse gases concentration has increased during the past centuries basically due to biogenic and pyrogenic anthopogenic emissions Recent investigations have shown that gas emission methane as an important example from tropical hydroelectric reservoirs may comprise a considerable fraction of the total anthropogenic bulk In order to evaluate the concentration of gases of potential importance in environmental chemistry the solubility of such gases have been collected and converted into a uniform format using the Henry s law which states that the solubility of a gas in a liquid is directly proportional to its partial pressure However the Henry s law can be derived as a function of temperature density molar mixing ratio in the aqueous phase and molar mass of water In this paper we show that due to the complex temperature variation and water composition measured in brazilian tropical reservoirs as Serra da Mesa and Manso expressive secular variation on the traditional solubility constants concentration of a species in the aqueous phase by the partial pressure of that species in the gas phase can change in a rate of approximately 30 in 6 decades This estimation comes from a computational analysis of temperature variation measured during 6 months in Serra da Mesa and Manso reservoirs taking into account a simulated density and molar mass variation of the aqueous composition in these environments As an important global change issue from this preliminary analysis we discuss its role in the current estimations on the concentration emission rates

  7. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    Simulating natural scenarios on lab scale is a common technique to gain insight into geological processes with moderate effort and expenses. Due to the remote occurrence of gas hydrates, their behavior in sedimentary deposits is largely investigated on experimental set ups in the laboratory. In the framework of the submarine gas hydrate research project (SUGAR) a large reservoir simulator (LARS) with an internal volume of 425 liter has been designed, built and tested. To our knowledge this is presently a word-wide unique set up. Because of its large volume it is suitable for pilot plant scale tests on hydrate behavior in sediments. That includes not only the option of systematic tests on gas hydrate formation in various sedimentary settings but also the possibility to mimic scenarios for the hydrate decomposition and subsequent natural gas extraction. Based on these experimental results various numerical simulations can be realized. Here, we present the design and the experimental set up of LARS. The prerequisites for the simulation of a natural gas hydrate reservoir are porous sediments, methane, water, low temperature and high pressure. The reservoir is supplied by methane-saturated and pre-cooled water. For its preparation an external gas-water mixing stage is available. The methane-loaded water is continuously flushed into LARS as finely dispersed fluid via bottom-and-top-located sparger. The LARS is equipped with a mantle cooling system and can be kept at a chosen set temperature. The temperature distribution is monitored at 14 reasonable locations throughout the reservoir by Pt100 sensors. Pressure needs are realized using syringe pump stands. A tomographic system, consisting of a 375-electrode-configuration is attached to the mantle for the monitoring of hydrate distribution throughout the entire reservoir volume. Two sets of tubular polydimethylsiloxan-membranes are applied to determine gas-water ratio within the reservoir using the effect of permeability differences between gaseous and dissolved methane (Zimmer et al., 2011). Gas hydrate is formed using a confined pressure of 12-15 MPa and a fluid pressure of 8-11 MPa with a set temperature of 275 K. The duration of the formation process depends on the required hydrate saturation and is usually in a range of several weeks. The subsequent decomposition experiments aiming at testing innovative production scenarios such as the application of a borehole tool for thermal stimulation of hydrate via catalytic oxidation of methane within an autothermal catalytic reactor (Schicks et al. 2011). Furthermore, experiments on hydrate decomposition via pressure reduction are performed to mimic realistic scenarios such as found during the production test in Mallik (Yasuda and Dallimore, 2007). In the near future it is planned to scale up existing results on CH4-CO2 exchange efficiency (e.g. Strauch and Schicks, 2012) by feeding CO2 to the hydrate reservoir. All experiments are due to the gain of high-resolution spatial and temporal data predestined as a base for numerical modeling. References Schicks, J. M., Spangenberg, E., Giese, R., Steinhauer, B., Klump, J., Luzi, M., 2011. Energies, 4, 1, 151-172. Zimmer, M., Erzinger, J., Kujawa, C., 2011. Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 4, 995-1001. Yasuda, M., Dallimore, S. J., 2007. Jpn. Assoc. Pet. Technol., 72, 603-607. Beeskow-Strauch, B., Schicks, J.M., 2012. Energies, 5, 420-437.

  8. Simulator for unconventional gas resources multi-dimensional model SUGAR-MD. Volume I. Reservoir model analysis and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been supporting the development of flow models for Devonian shale gas reservoirs. The broad objectives of this modeling program are: (1) To develop and validate a mathematical model which describes gas flow through Devonian shales. (2) To determine the sensitive parameters that affect deliverability and recovery of gas from Devonian shales. (3) To recommend laboratory and field measurements for determination of those parameters critical to the productivity and timely recovery of gas from the Devonian shales. (4) To analyze pressure and rate transient data from observation and production gas wells to determine reservoir parameters and well performance. (5) To study and determine the overall performance of Devonian shale reservoirs in terms of well stimulation, well spacing, and resource recovery as a function of gross reservoir properties such as anisotropy, porosity and thickness variations, and boundary effects. The flow equations that are the mathematical basis of the two-dimensional model are presented. It is assumed that gas transport to producing wells in Devonian shale reservoirs occurs through a natural fracture system into which matrix blocks of contrasting physical properties deliver contained gas. That is, the matrix acts as a uniformly distributed gas source in a fracture medium. Gas desorption from pore walls is treated as a uniformly distributed source within the matrix blocks. 24 references.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  10. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways from Smackover source rocks to younger reservoir traps in the Monroe gas field, NE Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The Monroe gas field contained more than 7 tcf of gas in its virgin state. Much of the original gas reserves have been produced through wells penetrating the Upper Cretaceous Monroe Gas Rock Formation reservoir. Other secondary reservoirs in the field area are Eocene Wilcox, the Upper Cretaceous Arkadelphia, Nacatoch, Ozan, Lower Cretaceous, Hosston, Jurassic Schuler, and Smackover. As producing zones, these secondary producing zones reservoirs have contributed an insignificant amount gas to the field. The source of much of this gas appears to have been in the lower part of the Jurassic Smackover Formation. Maturation and migration of the hydrocarbons from a Smackover source into Upper Cretaceous traps was enhanced and helped by igneous activity, and wrench faults/unconformity conduits, respectively. are present in the pre-Paleocene section. Hydrocarbon transfer pathways appear to be more vertically direct in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous section than the complex pattern present in the Upper Cretaceous section.

  11. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.

  12. Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

  13. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to tritium migration.

  14. Microseismic study of an underground natural gas storage reservoir. Vol. 1. Instrumentation and data analysis techniques, and field site details

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.R. Jr.; Mowrey, G.L.; Kimble, E.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    As part of an A.G.A. program to develop techniques for evaluating the optimum pressures for underground gas storage reservoirs and their mechanical stability under operating conditions, this study involved a detailed microseismic analysis of Michigan Consolidated Gas Co's New Haven storage reservoir in central Michigan. The results disclosed that the overall stability of the reservoir increased with higher storage pressures. Volume 1 describes the storage site, the development and operation of the microseismic field instumentation, and the design and operation of the data analysis facilities.

  15. Reservoir fluid and gas chemistry during CO2 injection at the Cranfield field, Mississippi, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Cole, D. R.; Horita, J.; Hovorka, S.

    2009-12-01

    At Cranfield field, Mississippi, USA, a monitored CO2-EOR project provides a unique opportunity to understand geochemical interactions of injected CO2 within the reservoir. Cranfield field, discovered in 1943, is a simple anticlinal four-way closure and had a large gas cap surrounded by an oil ring (Mississippi Oil and Gas Board, 1966). The field was abandoned in 1966. The reservoir returned to original reservoir pressure (hydrostatic pressure) by a strong aquifer drive by 2008. The reservoir is in the lower Tuscaloosa Formation at depths of more than 3000 m. It is composed of stacked and incised channel fills and is highly heterogeneous vertically and horizontally. A variable thickness (5 to 15 m) of terrestrial mudstone directly overlies the basal sandstone providing the primary seal, isolating the injection interval from a series of fluvial sand bodies occurring in the overlying 30 m of section. Above these fluvial channels, the marine mudstone of the Middle Tuscaloosa forms a continuous secondary confining system of approximately 75 m. The sandstones of the injection interval are rich in iron, containing abundant diagenetic chamosite (ferroan chlorite), hematite and pyrite. Geochemical modeling suggests that the iron-bearing minerals will be dissolved in the face of high CO2 and provide iron for siderite precipitation. CO2 injection by Denbury Resources Inc. begun in mid-July 2008 on the north side of the field with rates at ~500,000 tones per year. Water and gas samples were taken from seven production wells after eight months of CO2 injection. Gas analyses from three wells show high CO2 concentrations (up to 90 %) and heavy carbon isotopic signatures similar to injected CO2, whereas the other wells show original gas composition and isotope. The mixing ratio between original and injected CO2 is calculated based on its concentration and carbon isotope. However, there is little variation in fluid samples between the wells which have seen various levels of CO2. Comparison between preinjection and postinjection fluid analyses also shows little difference. It suggests that CO2 injection has not induced significant mineral-water reactions to change water chemistry. In October 2009, CO2 will be injected into the down-dip, non-productive Tuscaloosa Formation on the east side of the same field. In-situ fluid and gas samples will be collected using downhole U-tube. Fluid chemistry data through time will reveal mineral reactions during and after injection and confine timescales of the interactions. This project was funded thought the National Energy Technology Laboratory Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program as part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership.

  16. Factors Influencing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Three Gorges Reservoir of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhao, X.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Three gorges reservoir (TGR) of China located in a subtropical climate region. It has attracted tremendous attentions on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from TGR, including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous Oxide (N2O). Results on monthly fluxes and their spatial and seasonal variations have been determined by a static chamber method and have published elsewhere recently. Here we made further discussions on the factors influencing GHG emissions from TGR. We conclude that the hydrodynamic situation was the key parameter controlling the fluxes. TGR was a typical valley-type reservoir and with a complex terrain in the surrounding catchment, where almost 94% of the region was occupied by mountainous, this situation made the reservoir had sufficient allochthonous organic carbon input origin from eroded soil. But no significant relationship between organic carbon (both dissolved and particulate form) and GHG fluxes, we thought that TGR was not a carbon-limited reservoir on the GHG issue. In the mainstream of the reservoir, dissolved CO2 and CH4 were supersaturation in the water, the relative high flow together with the narrow-deep channel result in great disturbance, which would promote more dissolved gas escape into the atmosphere. This could also approved by the differences in CO2 and CH4 fluxes in different reach from up to downstream of the reservoir. In the reservoir tail water, the mainstream remained the high flow rate, both CO2 and CH4 fluxes is relative high, while downwards, the fluxes were gradually dropped, as after the impoundment of the reservoir, flow rate have greatly decreased. Another evidence was the relative higher CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the rainy season. As the rainy season approaches, TGR would empty the storage to prepare for retention and mitigation. The interplay between water inflows and outflows produced marked variations in the water residence times. During the rainy season times, this could be as short as 6 days with higher water flow rate which would also cause higher disturbance, while for other periods of a year, the reservoir would act more like a lake and residence times could exceed 30 days. Meanwhile the manipulate of the reservoir made the water column not only well mixed top to bottom for most of the year, but also the complete water column has high dissolved oxygen concentrations (> 6 mg/L). Only in April and May is there substantial temperature stratification in mainstream and tributaries. The high dissolved oxygen concentrations even in the deepest parts of the TGR storage minimize the scope for sediment anoxia and less GHG was produced, especially for CH4. In the tributaries, the totally different hydrodynamic situation made these regions a different GHG emission dynamics. After the impoundment, water velocity had greatly decreased, these regions showed more Limnology characteristics compared to the mainstream. This made the tributaries prone to algal blooms which would great affect the surface GHG fluxes, especially for CO2, which would consume the dissolved CO2 in water and cause the intake of atmospheric CO2.

  17. Paving the road for hydraulic fracturing in Paleozoic tight gas reservoirs in Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzarouni, Asim

    This study contributes to the ongoing efforts of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) to improve gas production and supply in view of increasing demand and diminishing conventional gas reservoirs in the region. The conditions of most gas reservoirs with potentially economical volumes of gas in Abu Dhabi are tight abrasive deep sand reservoirs at high temperature and pressures. Thus it inevitably tests the limit of both conventional thinking and technology. Accurate prediction of well performance is a major challenge that arises during planning phase. The primary aim is to determine technical feasibility for the implementation of the hydraulic fracture technology in a new area. The ultimate goal is to make economical production curves possible and pave the road to tap new resource of clean hydrocarbon energy source. The formation targeted in this study is characterized by quartzitic sandstone layers and variably colored shale and siltstones with thin layers of anhydrites. It dates back from late Permian to Carboniferous age. It forms rocks at the lower reservoir permeability ranging from 0.2 to less than 1 millidarcy (mD). When fractured, the expected well flow in Abu Dhabi offshore deep gas wells will be close to similar tight gas reservoir in the region. In other words, gas production can be described as transient initially with high rates and rapidly declining towards a pseudo-steady sustainable flow. The study results estimated fracturing gradient range from 0.85 psi/ft to 0.91 psi/ft. In other words, the technology can be implemented successfully to the expected rating without highly weighted brine. Hence, it would be a remarkable step to conduct the first hydraulic fracturing successfully in Abu Dhabi which can pave the road to tapping on a clean energy resource. The models predicted a remarkable conductivity enhancement and an increase of production between 3 to 4 times after fracturing. Moreover, a sustainable rate above 25 MMSCFD between 6 to 10 years is predicted based on a single well model. The forecasts also show that most of the contribution will come from one zone and therefore optimized operational cost can be achieved in future. Once pressures during a diagnostic injection test are known prior to the main hydraulic fracturing treatment, precise calibration will enable accurate design of fracture geometry and containment for full field development. The feasibility of hydraulic fracture is based on available offset well data. The biggest two challenges in Abu-Dhabi at this stage are high depths and high temperatures as well as offshore conditions. For this reason, a higher well pressure envelop and fracturing string installation is envisaged as a necessity in a future well where unknown tectonic stress could result in higher fracturing load. Finally the study recommends drilling a candidate well designed for the implementation of hydraulic fracturing. This well should consider required pressure rating for the fracturing string. Thermal design considerations will also play a role during production due to high temperature. A dipole or multi pole sonic log from the same well is essential to confirm in situ stresses. The planned well will be in the crest at close proximity to studied offset wells to minimize uncertainty where tested wells produced dry gas and to avoid drilling to watered zones down the flank of the reservoir.

  18. Geochemical constraints on microbial methanogenesis in an unconventional gas reservoir: Devonian Antrim shale, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, A.M.; Budal, J.M.; Walter, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Upper Devonian Antrim Shale is a self-sourced, highly fractured gas reservoir. It subcrops around the margin of the Michigan Basin below Pleistocene glacial drift, which has served as a source of meteoric recharge to the unit. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich (>10% total organic carbon), hydrogen-rich (Type I kerogen) and thermally immature (R{sub o} = 0.4 to 0.6). Reserve estimates range from 4-8 Tcf, based on assumptions of a thermogenic gas play. Chemical and isotopic properties measured in the formation waters show significant regional variations and probably delineate zones of increased fluid flow controlled by the fracture network. {sup 14}C determinations on dissolved inorganic carbon indicate that freshwater recharge occurred during the period between the last glacial advance and the present. The isotopic composition of Antrim methane ({delta}{sup 13}C = -49 to -59{per_thousand}) has been used to suggest that the gas is of early thermogenic origin. However, the highly positive carbon of co-produced CO{sub 2} gas ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} +22{per_thousand}) and DIC in associated Antrim brines ({delta}{sup 13}C = +19 to +31{per_thousand}) are consistent with bacterially mediated fractionation. The correlation of deuterium in methane ({delta}D = -200 to -260{per_thousand}) with that of the co-produced waters (SD = -20 to -90176) suggests that the major source of this microbial gas is via the CO{sub 2} reduction pathway within the reservoir. Chemical and isotopic results also demonstrate a significant (up to 25%) component of thermogenic gas as the production interval depth increases. The connection between the timing of groundwater recharge, hydrogeochemistry and gas production within the Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, is likely not unique and may find application to similar resources elsewhere.

  19. Gas reservoir potential of the Lower Ordovician Beekmantown Group, Quebec Lowlands, Canada discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1996-10-01

    Dykstra and Longman (1995), in an interesting paper, discussed the gas-reservoir potential of the Lower Ordovician Beekmantown Group of Quebec, Canada. They pointed out that the dolomites of this group provide an important exploration target in both the autochthon and the overlying thrust sheets. They then compare their rocks with those of correlative units in Oklahoma. Nowhere in their paper do they relate their study to the extensive work on these same rocks in the contiguous parts of the same basin in neighboring New York state. The purpose of this discussion is to fill in this lack and provide information on prospective Cambrian-Ordovician reservoirs in New York state, for which the Oil and Gas Investor (Anonymous, 1995a) has predicted counties of western New York are the next frontier for the Cambrian-Ordovician play. Dykstra and Longman (1995) compare their Quebec rocks with those of correlative rocks in faraway Oklahoma and completely overlook those in the same basin in nearby New York. At least one of the boreholes that we have studied in the St. Lawrence Valley is only tens of miles from their boreholes (Harris and Friedman, 1982). During the past 31 yr our team alone has published at least 50 papers and abstracts on the surface and subsurface geology of the Beekmantown Group in New York state. Dykstra and Longman`s (1995) paper provides data identical to those we have obtained for the contiguous New York Beekmantown (for a partial reference list see Friedman, 1993, 1994a, b, 1995). Because no reference to New York state is included in their reference section, I want to quote from an abstract titled {open_quotes}Gas Potential of the Eastern Overthrust...New York{close_quotes}(Friedman, s1992), which compares with their title {open_quotes}Gas Reservoir Potential...of Quebec, Canada{close_quotes} (Dykstra and Longman, 1995).

  20. Gas reservoir potential of the Lower Ordovician Beekmantown Group, Quebec Lowlands, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Dykstra, J.C.F.; Longman, M.W.

    1995-04-01

    The Beekmantown Group in the Quebec Lowlands was deposited as part of an extensive Early Ordovician coastal and shallow marine complex on the eastern margin of the North American craton. The Beekmantown is stratigraphically equivalent to the Beekmantown, Knox, Arbuckle, and Ellenburger rocks of the United States, and is subdivided into two formations: the sandstone-rich Theresa Formation and the overlying dolomite-rich Beauharnois. Dolomites of the Beekmantown provide an important exploration target in both the autochthon and the overlying thrust sheets of the Canadian and U.S. Appalachians. The reservoir potential of the autochthonous Beekmantown Group in the Quebec Lowlands can be determined from seismic data, well logs, cuttings, and petrographic analyses of depositional and diagenetic textures. Deposition of the Beekmantown occurred alongson the western passive margin of the Iapetus Ocean. By the Late Ordovician, the passive margin had been transformed into a foreland basin. Faulting locally positioned Upper Ordovician Utica source rocks against the Beekmantown and contributed to forming hydrocarbon reservoirs. The largest Beekmantown reservoir found to date is the St. Flavien field, with 7.75 bcf of original gas (methane) in place in fractured and possibly karst-influenced allochthonous dolomites within a thrust-fault anticline. Seven major depositional units can be distinguished in cuttings and correlated with wireline logs. Dolomites in the Beekmantown contain vuggy, moldic, intercrystalline, and fracture porosity. Early porosity formed at the top of the major depositional units in peritidal dolomites; however, much of this porosity was later filled by late-stage calcite cement after hydrocarbon migration. Thus, a key to finding gas reservoirs in the autochthonous Beekmantown is to define Ordovician poleostructures in which early and continuous entrapment of hydrocarbons prevented later cementation.

  1. Characteristics and genesis of the Feixianguan Formation oolitic shoal reservoir, Puguang gas field, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Tan, Xiucheng; Yang, Huiting; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Yiwei; Jin, Xiuju; Yu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    The Lower Triassic Feixianguan Formation at the well-known Puguang gasfield in the northeastern Sichuan Basin of southwest China produces a representative oolitic reservoir, which has been the biggest marine-sourced gasfield so far in China (discovered in 2003 with proven gas reserves greater than 350108 m3). This study combines core, thin section, and scanning electron microscopy observations, and geochemical analysis (C, O, and Sr isotopes) in order to investigate the basic characteristics and formation mechanisms of the reservoir. Observations indicate that platform margin oolitic dolomites are the most important reservoir rocks. Porosity is dominated by intergranular and intragranular solution, and moldic pore. The dolomites are characterized by medium porosity and permeability, averaging at approximately 9% and 29.7 mD, respectively. 87Sr/86Sr (0.707536-0.707934) and ?13CPDB (1.8-3.5) isotopic values indicate that the dolomitization fluid is predominantly concentrated seawater by evaporation, and the main mechanism for the oolitic dolomite formation is seepage reflux at an early stage of eodiagenesis. Both sedimentation and diagenesis (e.g., dolomitization and dissolution) have led to the formation of high-quality rocks to different degrees. Dolomite formation may have little contribution, karst may have had both positive and negative influences, and burial dissolution-TSR (thermochemical sulfate reduction) may not impact widely. The preservation of primary intergranular pores and dissolution by meteoric or mixed waters at the early stage of eogenesis are the main influences. This study may assist oil and gas exploration activities in the Puguang area and in other areas with dolomitic reservoirs.

  2. Reservoir Characterization using geostatistical and numerical modeling in GIS with noble gas geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, D. A.; Swift, J. N.; Tan, S.; Darrah, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of precise geochemical analyses with quantitative engineering modeling into an interactive GIS system allows for a sophisticated and efficient method of reservoir engineering and characterization. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is utilized as an advanced technique for oil field reservoir analysis by combining field engineering and geological/geochemical spatial datasets with the available systematic modeling and mapping methods to integrate the information into a spatially correlated first-hand approach in defining surface and subsurface characteristics. Three key methods of analysis include: 1) Geostatistical modeling to create a static and volumetric 3-dimensional representation of the geological body, 2) Numerical modeling to develop a dynamic and interactive 2-dimensional model of fluid flow across the reservoir and 3) Noble gas geochemistry to further define the physical conditions, components and history of the geologic system. Results thus far include using engineering algorithms for interpolating electrical well log properties across the field (spontaneous potential, resistivity) yielding a highly accurate and high-resolution 3D model of rock properties. Results so far also include using numerical finite difference methods (crank-nicholson) to solve for equations describing the distribution of pressure across field yielding a 2D simulation model of fluid flow across reservoir. Ongoing noble gas geochemistry results will also include determination of the source, thermal maturity and the extent/style of fluid migration (connectivity, continuity and directionality). Future work will include developing an inverse engineering algorithm to model for permeability, porosity and water saturation.This combination of new and efficient technological and analytical capabilities is geared to provide a better understanding of the field geology and hydrocarbon dynamics system with applications to determine the presence of hydrocarbon pay zones (or other reserves) and improve oil field management (e.g. perforating, drilling, EOR and reserves estimation)

  3. Western Greece unconventional hydrocarbon potential from oil shale and shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakitsios, Vasileios; Agiadi, Konstantina

    2013-04-01

    It is clear that we are gradually running out of new sedimentary basins to explore for conventional oil and gas and that the reserves of conventional oil, which can be produced cheaply, are limited. This is the reason why several major oil companies invest in what are often called unconventional hydrocarbons: mainly oil shales, heavy oil, tar sand and shale gas. In western Greece exist important oil and gas shale reservoirs which must be added to its hydrocarbon potential1,2. Regarding oil shales, Western Greece presents significant underground immature, or close to the early maturation stage, source rocks with black shale composition. These source rock oils may be produced by applying an in-situ conversion process (ICP). A modern technology, yet unproven at a commercial scale, is the thermally conductive in-situ conversion technology, developed by Shell3. Since most of western Greece source rocks are black shales with high organic content, those, which are immature or close to the maturity limit have sufficient thickness and are located below 1500 meters depth, may be converted artificially by in situ pyrolysis. In western Greece, there are several extensive areas with these characteristics, which may be subject of exploitation in the future2. Shale gas reservoirs in Western Greece are quite possibly present in all areas where shales occur below the ground-water level, with significant extent and organic matter content greater than 1%, and during their geological history, were found under conditions corresponding to the gas window (generally at depths over 5,000 to 6,000m). Western Greece contains argillaceous source rocks, found within the gas window, from which shale gas may be produced and consequently these rocks represent exploitable shale gas reservoirs. Considering the inevitable increase in crude oil prices, it is expected that at some point soon Western Greece shales will most probably be targeted. Exploration for conventional petroleum reservoirs, through the interpretation of seismic profiles and the surface geological data, will simultaneously provide the subsurface geometry of the unconventional reservoirs. Their exploitation should follow that of conventional hydrocarbons, in order to benefit from the anticipated technological advances, eliminating environmental repercussions. As a realistic approach, the environmental consequences of the oil shale and shale gas exploitation to the natural environment of western Greece, which holds other very significant natural resources, should be delved into as early as possible. References 1Karakitsios V. & Rigakis N. 2007. Evolution and Petroleum Potential of Western Greece. J.Petroleum Geology, v. 30, no. 3, p. 197-218. 2Karakitsios V. 2013. Western Greece and Ionian Sea petroleum systems. AAPG Bulletin, in press. 3Bartis J.T., Latourrette T., Dixon L., Peterson D.J., Cecchine G. 2005. Oil Shale Development in the United States: Prospect and Policy Issues. Prepared for the National Energy Tech. Lab. of the U.S. Dept Energy. RAND Corporation, 65 p.

  4. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas hydrate dissociation applying the foamy oil approach, a method earlier adopted to model the Mallik production test (see abstract Abendroth et al., this volume). Combined with a dense set of data from a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array (see abstract Priegnitz et al., this volume), very valuable information were gained on the spatial as well as temporal formation and dissociation of gas hydrates as well as changes in permeability and resulting pathways for the fluid flow. Here we present the set-up and execution of the experiment and discuss the results from temperature and flow measurements with respect to the gas hydrate dissociation and characteristics of resulting fluid flow. Uddin, M., Wright, F., and Coombe, D. 2011. Numerical Study of Gas Evolution and Transport Behaviours in Natural Gas-Hydrate Reservoirs. Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology 50, 70-89.

  5. OT1_acrocker_1: Origin of massive outer gas reservoirs in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, A.

    2010-07-01

    A surprising number (~50%) of field early-type galaxies (E and S0s) contain a cool interstellar medium phase detected through the 21cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen. In some cases, this gas is distributed in extremely extensive outer distributions of up to a few 10^9 solar masses of HI. The origin and relation of such outer gas reservoirs to their host early-type galaxies is currently unknown. The gas may be directly accreted from the IGM, stripped during a tidal interaction, or acquired during a gas-rich merger. Alternatively, such gas may have been long associated with the early-type galaxy, not being exhausted due to a low star formation efficiency. In each of these cases the gas is expected to have a different enrichment history and thus a different present-day metallicity and dust-to-gas ratio. With Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometry, we propose to measure dust masses in the outer HI distributions of 15 nearby early-type galaxies. With interferometric HI data already in hand, we can then calculate dust-to-gas ratios and constrain the origin of such gas. The sample size and variety of HI masses, radial extents and morphologies will let us test if the dust-to-gas ratios vary among the sample in a way described best by a single accretion scenario. Additionally, the temperature derived for the dust in the outer gas will let us constrain the possible heating sources for the dust. In some sample galaxies, coincident UV emission suggests young stars are present. If heating from these young stars is important, we expect a variation of dust temperature in systems with and without UV emission.

  6. Reservoir characterization of marine and permafrost associated gas hydrate accumulations with downhole well logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation depend on a number of reservoir parameters, one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well-logging devices. This study demonstrates that electrical resistivity and acoustic transit-time downhole log data can be used to quantify the amount of gas hydrate in a sedimentary section. Two unique forms of the Archie relation (standard and quick look relations) have been used in this study to calculate water saturations (S(w)) [gas-hydrate saturation (S(h)) is equal to (1.0 - S(w))] from the electrical resistivity log data in four gas hydrate accumulations. These accumulations are located on (1) the Blake Ridge along the Southeastern continental margin of the United States, (2) the Cascadia continental margin off the pacific coast of Canada, (3) the North Slope of Alaska, and (4) the Mackenzie River Delta of Canada. Compressional wave acoustic log data have also been used in conjunction with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate gas-hydrate saturations in all four areas assessed.

  7. Geophysical assessments of renewable gas energy compressed in geologic pore storage reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Al Hagrey, Said Attia; Köhn, Daniel; Rabbel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy resources can indisputably minimize the threat of global warming and climate change. However, they are intermittent and need buffer storage to bridge the time-gap between production (off peak) and demand peaks. Based on geologic and geochemical reasons, the North German Basin has a very large capacity for compressed air/gas energy storage CAES in porous saltwater aquifers and salt cavities. Replacing pore reservoir brine with CAES causes changes in physical properties (elastic moduli, density and electrical properties) and justify applications of integrative geophysical methods for monitoring this energy storage. Here we apply techniques of the elastic full waveform inversion FWI, electric resistivity tomography ERT and gravity to map and quantify a gradually saturated gas plume injected in a thin deep saline aquifer within the North German Basin. For this subsurface model scenario we generated different synthetic data sets without and with adding random noise in order to robust the applied techniques for the real field applications. Datasets are inverted by posing different constraints on the initial model. Results reveal principally the capability of the applied integrative geophysical approach to resolve the CAES targets (plume, host reservoir, and cap rock). Constrained inversion models of elastic FWI and ERT are even able to recover well the gradual gas desaturation with depth. The spatial parameters accurately recovered from each technique are applied in the adequate petrophysical equations to yield precise quantifications of gas saturations. Resulting models of gas saturations independently determined from elastic FWI and ERT techniques are in accordance with each other and with the input (true) saturation model. Moreover, the gravity technique show high sensitivity to the mass deficit resulting from the gas storage and can resolve saturations and temporal saturation changes down to ±3% after reducing any shallow fluctuation such as that of groundwater table. PMID:24936391

  8. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2004-05-01

    This final technical report describes and summarizes results of a research effort to investigate physical mechanisms that control the performance of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs and to represent those physical effects in an efficient way in simulations of gas injection processes. The research effort included four main lines of research: (1) Efficient compositional streamline methods for 3D flow; (2) Analytical methods for one-dimensional displacements; (3) Physics of multiphase flow; and (4) Limitations of streamline methods. In the first area, results are reported that show how the streamline simulation approach can be applied to simulation of gas injection processes that include significant effects of transfer of components between phases. In the second area, the one-dimensional theory of multicomponent gas injection processes is extended to include the effects of volume change as components change phase. In addition an automatic algorithm for solving such problems is described. In the third area, results on an extensive experimental investigation of three-phase flow are reported. The experimental results demonstrate the impact on displacement performance of the low interfacial tensions between the gas and oil phases that can arise in multicontact miscible or near-miscible displacement processes. In the fourth area, the limitations of the streamline approach were explored. Results of an experimental investigation of the scaling of the interplay of viscous, capillary, and gravity forces are described. In addition results of a computational investigation of the limitations of the streamline approach are reported. The results presented in this report establish that it is possible to use the compositional streamline approach in many reservoir settings to predict performance of gas injection processes. When that approach can be used, it requires substantially less (often orders of magnitude) computation time than conventional finite difference compositional simulation.

  9. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time.

  10. Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP Low Permeability Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Willis; Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2008-09-30

    Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

  11. Relief-well requirements to kill a high-rate gas blowout from a deepwater reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Warriner, R.A. ); Cassity, T.G. )

    1988-12-01

    Relief-well requirements were investigated for a dynamic kill of a high-rate gas blowout from a deepwater reservoir to define any necessary special procedures or equipment. Results of the investigation show that a high injection rate and a special-design large-diameter injection riser are required to dynamically kill such a blowout with seawater. The injection riser is necessary to limit surface pump pressure during the high-rate kill operation. Procedures to complete the kill operation hydrostatically with heavy fluid following the dynamic kill are outlined.

  12. The formation of magnetic ferric oxides in soils over underground gas storage reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, N. V.; Pronina, V. V.; Ivanov, A. V.; Shoba, S. A.; Zagurskii, A. M.

    2007-06-01

    The concepts of the specific mechanisms responsible for the formation of magnetic ferric oxides in soils over artificial gas storage reservoirs are considered for the first time. Upon the interaction of technogenic allochthonous methane with soil, some biogeochemical barriers are formed that are characterized by the accumulation of solid products resulting from the functioning and development of the soil. The pedogenic new formations are represented by fine magnetic ferric oxides of specific shape. They are the result of an elementary soil-forming processoxidogenesis composed of a complex of microprocesses of biogenic and abiogenic nature.

  13. New method for gas and oil shale reservoirs characterisation using magnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Aleksandr; Telman, Meruert; Makarova, Maria; Zhaksylyk, Zhanaim; Abirov, Rustem; Makhatova, Meruyert

    2015-04-01

    This research describes proposed method for determination of total organic content (TOC), clay typing and relative degree of maturation in shale unconventional reservoirs based on analysis of magnetic properties of shales. Experimental measurements were undertaken in shales from United Kingdom (Edinburgh shales) and Kazakhstan for comparison of their magnetic properties, including low field and high field magnetic susceptibilities, together with SEM and XRD analysis. The results showed that studied shales comprised of various clay types had different capacity in accumulation of organic matter, thus, affecting the total organic content and magnetic properties. Based on the results we proposed magnetic indicators (MI) of productive gas and oil shale intervals in order to determine relative TOC, clay typing and a degree of maturation. The set of magnetic measurements, used as a logging tool or core scanning procedure, can potentially provide data about selecting the best shale productive reservoir horizons. This can be a non-destructive and rapid method for shale reservoir characterization, being used routinely in both laboratory and field conditions.

  14. Interpretation of Microseismicity Resulting from Gel and Water Fracturing of Tight Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinske, C.; Shapiro, S. A.; Rutledge, J. T.

    2010-02-01

    We provide a comparative analysis of the spatio-temporal dynamics of hydraulic fracturing-induced microseismicity resulting from gel and water treatments. We show that the growth of a hydraulic fracture and its corresponding microseismic event cloud can be described by a model which combines geometry- and diffusion-controlled processes. It allows estimation of important parameters of fracture and reservoir from microseismic data, and contributes to a better understanding of related physical processes. We further develop an approach based on this model and apply it to data from hydraulic fracturing experiments in the Cotton Valley tight gas reservoir. The treatments were performed with different parameters such as the type of treatment fluid, the injection flow rate, the total volume of fluid and of proppant. In case of a gel-based fracturing, the spatio-temporal evolution of induced microseismicity shows signatures of fracture volume growth, fracturing fluid loss, as well as diffusion of the injection pressure. In contrast, in a water-based fracturing the volume creation growth and the diffusion controlled growth are not clearly separated from each other in the space-time diagram of the induced event cloud. Still, using the approach presented here, the interpretation of induced seismicity for the gel and the water treatments resulted in similar estimates of geometrical characteristics of the fractures and hydraulic properties of the reservoir. The observed difference in the permeability of the particular hydraulic fractures is probably caused by the different volume of pumped proppant.

  15. Spatial and temporal patterns of greenhouse gas emissions from Three Gorges Reservoir of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Wu, B. F.; Zeng, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Anthropogenic activity has led to significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG), which is thought to play important roles in global climate changes. It remains unclear about the kinetics of GHG emissions, including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous Oxide (N2O) from the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) of China, which was formed after the construction of the famous Three Gorges Dam. Here we report monthly measurements for one year of the fluxes of these gases at multiple sites within the TGR region, including three major tributaries, six mainstream sites, two downstream sites and one upstream site. The tributary areas have lower CO2 fluxes than the main storage; CH4 fluxes in the tributaries and upper reach mainstream sites are relative higher. Overall, TGR showed significantly lower CH4 emission rates than most new reservoirs in temperate and tropical regions. We attribute this to the well-oxygenated deep water and high water velocities that may facilitate the consumption of CH4. TGR's CO2 fluxes were lower than most tropical reservoirs and higher than most temperate systems. This could be explained by the high load of labile soil carbon delivered through erosion to the Yangtze River. Compared to fossil-fuelled power plants of equivalent power output, TGR is a very small GHG emitter - annual CO2-equivalent emissions are approximately 1.7% of that of a coal-fired generating plant of comparable power output.

  16. Core acid treatment influence on well reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janishevskii, A.; Ezhova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The research involves investigation of the influence of hydrochloric acid (HCI-12%) and mud acid (mixture: HCl - 10% and HF - 3%) treatment on the Upper-Jurassic reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field wells. The sample collection included three lots of core cylinders from one and the same depth (all in all 42). Two lots of core cylinders were distributed as following: first lot - reservoir properties were determined, and, then thin sections were cut off from cylinder faces; second lot- core cylinders were exposed to hydrochloric acid treatment, then, after flushing the reservoir properties were determined, and thin sections were prepared. Based on the quantitative petrographic rock analysis, involvin 42 thin sections, the following factors were determined: granulometric mineral composition, cement content, intergranular contacts and pore space structure. According to the comparative analysis of initial samples, the following was determined: content decrease of feldspar, clay and mica fragments, mica, clay and carbonate cement; increase of pore spaces while in the investigated samples- on exposure of rocks to acids effective porosity and permeability value range is ambiguous.

  17. Characterization of the deep microbial life in the Altmark natural gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, D.; Alawi, M.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Kock, D.; Krüger, M.; Wuerdemann, H.; Shaheed, M.

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the CLEAN project (CO2 Largescale Enhanced gas recovery in the Altmark Natural gas field) technical basics with special emphasis on process monitoring are explored by injecting CO2 into a gas reservoir. Our study focuses on the investigation of the in-situ microbial community of the Rotliegend natural gas reservoir in the Altmark, located south of the city Salzwedel, Germany. In order to characterize the microbial life in the extreme habitat we aim to localize and identify microbes including their metabolism influencing the creation and dissolution of minerals. The ability of microorganisms to speed up dissolution and formation of minerals might result in changes of the local permeability and the long-term safety of CO2 storage. However, geology, structure and chemistry of the reservoir rock and the cap rock as well as interaction with saline formation water and natural gases and the injected CO2 affect the microbial community composition and activity. The reservoir located at the depth of approximately 3500 m, is characterised by high salinity (420 g/l) and temperatures up to 127°C. It represents an extreme environment for microbial life and therefore the main focus is on hyperthermophilic, halophilic anaerobic microorganisms. In consequence of the injection of large amounts of CO2 in the course of a commercial EGR (Enhanced Gas Recovery), the environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, pressure and solubility of minerals) for the autochthonous microorganisms will change. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes are applied for detecting structural changes in the community by using PCR- SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism), DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) and 16S rRNA cloning. First results of the baseline survey indicate the presence of microorganisms similar to representatives from other deep environments. The sequence analyses revealed the presence of several H2-oxidising bacteria (Hydrogenophaga sp., Adicdovorax sp., Ralstonia sp., Pseudomonas sp.), thiosulfate-oxidising bacteria (Diaphorobacter sp.) and biocorrosive thermophilic microorganisms, which have not previously been cultivated. Furthermore, several uncultivated microorganisms were found, that were similar to representatives from other saline, hot, anoxic, deep environments. However, due to the hypersaline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, cell numbers are low, so that the quantification of those microorganisms as well as the determination of microbial activity was not yet possible. Microbial monitoring methods have to be further developed to study microbial activities under these extreme conditions to access their influence on the EGR technique and on enhancing the long term safety of the process by fixation of carbon dioxide by precipitation of carbonates. We thank GDF SUEZ for providing the data for the Rotliegend reservoir, sample material and supporting sampling campaigns. The CLEAN project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the framework of the GEOTECHNOLOGIEN Program.

  18. Evidence for Expulsion of the Star Formation Gas Reservoir by the AGN in Local Blue Ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Lintott, Chris; Smethurst, Rebecca; Kruk, Sandor; Matsushita, Satoki; Wong, Ivy; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The formation and assembly of the local galaxy population remains a major open question. Recent works show that elliptical galaxies can rapidly transition from blue star forming to red quiescent systems. Such rapid reddening of stellar populations implies that gas reservoirs are being depleted on timescales which are much shorter than mere exhaustion thanks to ongoing star formation. Feedback, either from star formation itself or from nuclear activity associated with black hole growth is typically invoked. Yet observational confirmation has remained elusive.Using the 10.4-m CSO, we recently obtained 12CO(2-1) observations for a sample of blue star forming local elliptical galaxies to probe the state of the gas and look at the changes in excitation temperature across the star forming sequence. Previous IRAM 12CO(1-0) measurements indicate this population is undergoing a sudden decline in molecular gas fraction. This drop occurs ~200 Myr after a recent peak in star formation- a timescale suggesting AGN triggered feedback switches on rapidly and is immediately effective. The jets or outflows from the central supermassive black hole likely either heat or expel residual gas cutting off star formation, but the 12CO(1-0) measurements alone were insufficient to distinguish between these two scenarios. The 12CO(2-1) to 12CO(1-0) ratio has previously proved diagnostic of the conditions which exist in star forming galaxies. Combining the new 12CO(2-1) measurements with the previous 12CO(1-0) data, we find evidence for active quenching of star formation due to the expulsion of the gas reservoir by the central massive black holes residing in these galaxies. We will discuss our observations and analysis and compare our results to those from other early type populations.

  19. Role of organic matter fractions in the Montney tight gas reservoir quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanei, Hamed; Wood, James M.; Haeri Ardakani, Omid; Clarkson, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a new approach in Rock-Eval analysis to quantify various organic matter fractions in unconventional reservoirs. The results of study on core samples from the Triassic Montney Formation tight gas reservoir in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin show that operationally-defined S1 and S2 hydrocarbon peaks from conventional Rock-Eval analysis may not adequately characterize the organic constituents of unconventional reservoir rocks. Modification of the thermal recipe for Rock-Eval analysis, in conjunction with manual peak integration, provides important information with significance for the evaluation of reservoir quality. An adapted Rock-Eval method, herein called the extended slow heating (ESH) cycle, was developed in which the heating rate was slowed to 10°C per minute over an extended temperature range (150 to 650°C). For Montney core samples from the wet gas window, this method provided quantitative distinctions between major organic matter components of the rock. We show that the traditional S1 and S2 peaks can now be quantitatively divided into three components: (S1ESH) free light oil, (S2a ESH) condensed hydrocarbon residue (CHCR), and (S2b ESH + residual carbon) solid bitumen (refractory, consolidated bitumen/pyrobitumen). The majority of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the studied Montney core samples consists of solid bitumen that represents a former liquid oil phase which migrated into the larger paleo-intergranular pore spaces. Subsequent physicochemical changes to the oil environment led to the precipitation of asphaltene aggregates. Further diagenetic and thermal maturity processes consolidated these asphaltene aggregates into "lumps" of solid bitumen (or pyrobitumen at higher thermal maturity). Solid bitumen obstructs porosity and hinders fluid flow, and thus shows strong negative correlations with reservoir qualities such as porosity and pore throat size. We also find a strong positive correlation between the quantities of solid bitumen and pyrite, a relationship confirmed by petrographic evidence showing a close spatial association of bacterially-derived framboidal pyrite with solid bitumen accumulations in the intergranular paleo-pore spaces. These relationships suggest that solid bitumen and framboidal pyrite were both early products of bacterial sulphate reduction of liquid hydrocarbons following initial oil charging of the Montney Formation. Although the CHCR fraction constitutes a small portion of the mass and volume of TOC in Montney samples it has important implications for reservoir quality. This fraction represents a thin film of condensed, heavy molecular hydrocarbon adsorbed onto mineral surfaces and may represent the lighter component of the paleo-oil that migrated into the Montney reservoir. The CHCR fraction potentially plays an important role in wettability alteration by creating hydrophobic matrix pore networks in portions of the reservoir that were not already filled with solid bitumen.

  20. Influence of depositional environment and diagenesis on gas reservoir properties in St. Peter Sandstone, Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.B. III; Turmelle, T.M.; Barnes, D.A.

    1987-05-01

    The St. Peter Sandstone in the Michigan basin subsurface is rapidly becoming a major exploration target for natural gas. This reservoir was first proven with the successful completion of the Dart-Edwards 7-36 (Falmouth field, Missaukee County, Michigan) in 1981. Fifteen fields now are known, with a maximum of three producing wells in any one field. The production from these wells ranges from 1 to more than 10 MMCFGD on choke, with light-gravity condensate production of up to 450 b/d. Depth to the producing intervals ranges from about 7000 ft to more than 11,000 ft. The St. Peter Sandstone is an amalgamated stack of shoreface and shelf sequences more than 1100 ft in thickness in the basin center and thinning to zero at the basin margins. Sandstone composition varies from quartzarenite in the coarser sizes to subarkose and arkose in the finer sizes. Thin salty/shaly lithologies and dolomite-cemented sandstone intervals separate the porous sandstone packages. Two major lithofacies are recognized in the basin: a coarse-grained, well-sorted quartzarenite with various current laminations and a fine-grained, more poorly sorted subarkose and arkose with abundant bioturbation and distinct vertical and horizontal burrows. Reservoir quality is influenced by original depositional and diagenetic fabrics, but there is inversion of permeability and porosity with respect to primary textures in the major lithofacies. The initially highly porous and permeable, well-sorted, coarser facies is now tightly cemented with syntaxial quartz cement, resulting in a low-permeability, poor quality reservoir. The more poorly sorted, finer facies with initially lower permeabilities did not receive significant fluid flux until it passed below the zone of quartz cementation. This facies was cemented with carbonate which has subsequently dissolved to form a major secondary porosity reservoir.

  1. Structural-Diagenetic Controls on Fracture Opening in Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Alberta Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Eichhubl, Peter; Fall, Andras; Hooker, John

    2013-04-01

    In tight gas reservoirs, understanding the characteristics, orientation and distribution of natural open fractures, and how these relate to the structural and stratigraphic setting are important for exploration and production. Outcrops provide the opportunity to sample fracture characteristics that would otherwise be unknown due to the limitations of sampling by cores and well logs. However, fractures in exhumed outcrops may not be representative of fractures in the reservoir because of differences in burial and exhumation history. Appropriate outcrop analogs of producing reservoirs with comparable geologic history, structural setting, fracture networks, and diagenetic attributes are desirable but rare. The Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Nikanassin Formation from the Alberta Foothills produces gas at commercial rates where it contains a network of open fractures. Fractures from outcrops have the same diagenetic attributes as those observed in cores <100 km away, thus offering an ideal opportunity to 1) evaluate the distribution and characteristics of opening mode fractures relative to fold cores, hinges and limbs, 2) compare the distribution and attributes of fractures in outcrop vs. core samples, 3) estimate the timing of fracture formation relative to the evolution of the fold-and-thrust belt, and 4) estimate the degradation of fracture porosity due to postkinematic cementation. Cathodoluminescence images of cemented fractures in both outcrop and core samples reveal several generations of quartz and ankerite cement that is synkinematic and postkinematic relative to fracture opening. Crack-seal textures in synkinematic quartz are ubiquitous, and well-developed cement bridges abundant. Fracture porosity may be preserved in fractures wider than ~100 microns. 1-D scanlines in outcrop and core samples indicate fractures are most abundant within small parasitic folds within larger, tight, mesoscopic folds. Fracture intensity is lower away from parasitic folds; intensity progressively decreases from the faulted cores of mesoscopic folds to their forelimbs, with lowest intensities within relatively undeformed backlimb strata. Fracture apertures locally increase adjacent to reverse faults without an overall increase in fracture frequency. Fluid inclusion analyses of crack-seal quartz cement indicate both aqueous and methane-rich inclusions are present. Homogenization temperatures of two-phase inclusions indicate synkinematic fracture cement precipitation and fracture opening under conditions at or near maximum burial of 190-210C in core samples, and 120-160C in outcrop samples. In comparison with the fracture evolution in other, less deformed tight-gas sandstone reservoirs such as the Piceance and East Texas basins where fracture opening is primarily controlled by gas generation, gas charge, and pore fluid pressure, these results suggest a strong control of regional tectonic processes on fracture generation. In conjunction with timing and rate of gas charge, rates of fracture cement growth, and stratigraphic-lithological controls, these processes determine the overall distribution of open fractures in these reservoirs.

  2. Structural-Diagenetic Controls on Fracture Opening in Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Alberta Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukar, E.; Eichhubl, P.; Fall, A.; Hooker, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    In tight gas reservoirs, understanding the characteristics, orientation and distribution of natural open fractures, and how these relate to the structural and stratigraphic setting are important for exploration and production. Outcrops provide the opportunity to sample fracture characteristics that would otherwise be unknown due to the limitations of sampling by cores and well logs. However, fractures in exhumed outcrops may not be representative of fractures in the reservoir because of differences in burial and exhumation history. Appropriate outcrop analogs of producing reservoirs with comparable geologic history, structural setting, fracture networks, and diagenetic attributes are desirable but rare. The Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Nikanassin Formation from the Alberta Foothills produces gas at commercial rates where it contains a network of open fractures. Fractures from outcrops have the same diagenetic attributes as those observed in cores <100 km away, thus offering an ideal opportunity to 1) evaluate the distribution and characteristics of opening mode fractures relative to fold cores, hinges and limbs, 2) compare the distribution and attributes of fractures in outcrop vs. core samples, 3) estimate the timing of fracture formation relative to the evolution of the fold-and-thrust belt, and 4) estimate the degradation of fracture porosity due to postkinematic cementation. Cathodoluminescence images of cemented fractures in both outcrop and core samples reveal several generations of quartz and ankerite cement that is synkinematic and postkinematic relative to fracture opening. Crack-seal textures in synkinematic quartz are ubiquitous, and well-developed cement bridges abundant. Fracture porosity may be preserved in fractures wider than ~100 microns. 1-D scanlines in outcrop and core samples indicate fractures are most abundant within small parasitic folds within larger, tight, mesoscopic folds. Fracture intensity is lower away from parasitic folds; intensity progressively decreases from the faulted cores of mesoscopic folds to their forelimbs, with lowest intensities within relatively undeformed backlimb strata. Fracture apertures locally increase adjacent to reverse faults without an overall increase in fracture frequency. Fluid inclusion analyses of crack-seal quartz cement indicate both aqueous and methane-rich inclusions are present. Homogenization temperatures of two-phase inclusions indicate synkinematic fracture cement precipitation and fracture opening under conditions at or near maximum burial of 190-210C in core samples, and 120-160C in outcrop samples. In comparison with the fracture evolution in other, less deformed tight-gas sandstone reservoirs such as the Piceance and East Texas basins where fracture opening is primarily controlled by gas generation, gas charge, and pore fluid pressure, these results suggest a strong control of regional tectonic processes on fracture generation. In conjunction with timing and rate of gas charge, rates of fracture cement growth, and stratigraphic-lithological controls, these processes determine the overall distribution of open fractures in these reservoirs.

  3. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  4. Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan L.; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-05-05

    Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9 percent silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

  5. Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Atlas Series: Play analysis of oligocene and miocene reservoirs from Texas State Offshore Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of the Offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Resource Atlas Series is to define hydrocarbon plays by integrating geologic and engineering data for oil and gas reservoirs with large-scale patterns of depositional basin fill and geologic age. The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas set for the offshore northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location. The oil and gas atlas for the Gulf of Mexico will provide a critically compiled, comprehensive reference that is needed to more efficiently develop reservoirs, to extend field limits, and to better assess the opportunities for intrafield exploration. The play atlas will provide an organizational framework to aid development in mature areas and to extend exploration paradigms from mature areas into frontier areas deep below the shelf and into deep waters of the continental slope. In addition to serving as a model for exploration and education, the offshore atlas will aid resource assessment efforts of State, Federal, and private agencies by allowing for greater precision in the extrapolation of variables within and between plays. Classification and organization of reservoirs into plays have proved to be effective in previous atlases produced by the Bureau, including the Texas oil and gas atlases, the Midcontinent gas atlas, and Central and Eastern Gulf Coast gas atlas.

  6. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilotin Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-04-28

    A geologic sequestration pilot in the Thornton gas field in Northern California, USA involves injection of up to 4000 tons of CO{sub 2} into a stacked gas and saline formation reservoir. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading the pilot test in collaboration with Rosetta Resources, Inc. and Calpine Corporation under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy and California Energy Commission's WESTCARB, Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The goals of the pilot include: (1) Demonstrate the feasibility of CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations representative of major geologic sinks in California; (2) Test the feasibility of Enhanced Gas Recovery associated with the early stages of a CO{sub 2} storage project in a depleting gas field; (3) Obtain site-specific information to improve capacity estimation, risk assessment, and performance prediction; (4) Demonstrate and test methods for monitoring CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations and storage/enhanced recovery projects in gas fields; and (5) Gain experience with regulatory permitting and public outreach associated with CO{sub 2} storage in California. Test design is currently underway and field work begins in August 2006.

  7. ALMA probes the molecular gas reservoirs in the changing-look Seyfert galaxy Mrk 590

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Vestergaard, M.; Casasola, V.; Lawther, D.; Peterson, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate if the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of Mrk 590, whose supermassive black hole was until recently highly accreting, is turning off due to a lack of central gas to fuel it. We analyse new subarcsecond resolution Atacama Large Millimetre/submilllimetre Array maps of the 12CO(3-2) line and 344 GHz continuum emission in Mrk 590. We detect no 12CO(3-2) emission in the inner 150 pc, constraining the central molecular gas mass to M(H2) ≲ 1.6 × 105 M⊙, no more than a typical giant molecular gas cloud, for a CO luminosity to gas mass conversion factor of αCO ˜ 0.8 M⊙ (K km s- 1 pc2)- 1. However, there is still potentially enough gas to fuel the black hole for another 2.6 × 105 yr assuming Eddington-limited accretion. We therefore cannot rule out that the AGN may just be experiencing a temporary feeding break, and may turn on again in the near future. We discover a ring-like structure at a radius of ˜1 kpc, where a gas clump exhibiting disturbed kinematics and located just ˜200 pc west of the AGN, may be refuelling the centre. Mrk 590 does not have significantly less gas than other nearby AGN host galaxies at kpc scales, confirming that gas reservoirs at these scales provide no direct indication of on-going AGN activity and accretion rates. Continuum emission detected in the central 150 pc likely originates from warm AGN-heated dust, although contributions from synchrotron and free-free emission cannot be ruled out.

  8. System-level modeling for economic evaluation of geological CO2storage in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-03-02

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine aquifers ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research is being conducted to improveunderstanding of factors affecting particular aspects of geological CO2storage (such as storage performance, storage capacity, and health,safety and environmental (HSE) issues) as well as to lower the cost ofCO2 capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasisto date on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedprocess models to representations of engineering components andassociated economic models. The objective of this study is to develop asystem-level model for geological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture andseparation, compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, andCO2 injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection into a gas reservoir and relatedenhanced production of methane. Potential leakage and associatedenvironmental impacts are also considered. The platform for thesystem-level model is GoldSim [GoldSim User's Guide. GoldSim TechnologyGroup; 2006, http://www.goldsim.com]. The application of the system modelfocuses on evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration withenhanced gas recovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. Thereservoir simulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2simulator, EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2.Using a system-level modeling approach, the economic benefits of enhancedgas recovery can be directly weighed against the costs and benefits ofCO2 injection.

  9. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

    2010-05-01

    The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

  10. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Curtis M; Freifeld, Barry M; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J

    2012-12-11

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000 bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300 MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30 m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000 bbl/d of oil (170 MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5 m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000 bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate. PMID:21730177

  11. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000bbl/d of oil (170MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate. PMID:21730177

  12. Sustaining Fracture Area and Conductivity of Gas shale Reservoirs for Enhancing Long-term Production and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Marino, S.; Ghassemi, A.

    2010-12-01

    Natural gas from organic rich shale formations has become an increasingly important energy resource worldwide over the past decade. Extensive hydraulic fracture networks with massive contact surface areas are frequently required to achieve satisfactory economic production in these highly heterogeneous reservoirs, with permeability in the nano-Darcy range. Current operational experience in gas shale plays indicates that the loss of productive fracture area and loss of fracture conductivity, both immediate and over time, are the major factors leading to reduced flow rates, marginal production, and poor gas recovery. This theoretical and experimental project, funded by a RPSEA (Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America) program, is aimed at understanding the multiple causes of loss of fracture surface area and fracture conductivity. The main objectives of the project are: understand the multiple causes of loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define solutions to mitigate the resulting loss of production. Define the types of fracture networks that are more prone to loosing fracture area and define critical parameters, for each reservoir type, (including proppant concentration, fluid interaction, relative shear displacement and others) to preserve fracture conductivity, and define an integrated methodology for evaluating reservoir properties that result in proneness to loss of fracture area and fracture conductivity, and define adequate solutions for the various reservoir types Current results include the evaluation of reservoir geology, mineralogy, reservoir properties, mechanical properties, including surface hardness, and petrologic analysis on cores representative of Barnett, Haynesville and Marcellus reservoir shales. A comparison of these properties provides an initial reference frame for identifying differences in behavior between the various reservoirs, and for anticipating the potential for embedment and loss of fracture conductivity. Actual measurements of fracture conductivity as a function of stress will be measured and presented in the future.

  13. Coupling Hydraulic Fracturing Propagation and Gas Well Performance for Simulation of Production in Unconventional Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Winterfeld, P. H.; Wu, Y. S.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Yin, C.; Pan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing combined with horizontal drilling has made it possible to economically produce natural gas from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. An efficient methodology for evaluating hydraulic fracturing operation parameters, such as fluid and proppant properties, injection rates, and wellhead pressure, is essential for the evaluation and efficient design of these processes. Traditional numerical evaluation and optimization approaches are usually based on simulated fracture properties such as the fracture area. In our opinion, a methodology based on simulated production data is better, because production is the goal of hydraulic fracturing and we can calibrate this approach with production data that is already known. This numerical methodology requires a fully-coupled hydraulic fracture propagation and multi-phase flow model. In this paper, we present a general fully-coupled numerical framework to simulate hydraulic fracturing and post-fracture gas well performance. This three-dimensional, multi-phase simulator focuses on: (1) fracture width increase and fracture propagation that occurs as slurry is injected into the fracture, (2) erosion caused by fracture fluids and leakoff, (3) proppant subsidence and flowback, and (4) multi-phase fluid flow through various-scaled anisotropic natural and man-made fractures. Mathematical and numerical details on how to fully couple the fracture propagation and fluid flow parts are discussed. Hydraulic fracturing and production operation parameters, and properties of the reservoir, fluids, and proppants, are taken into account. The well may be horizontal, vertical, or deviated, as well as open-hole or cemented. The simulator is verified based on benchmarks from the literature and we show its application by simulating fracture network (hydraulic and natural fractures) propagation and production data history matching of a field in China. We also conduct a series of real-data modeling studies with different combinations of hydraulic fracturing parameters and present the methodology to design these operations with feedback of simulated production data. The unified model aids in the optimization of hydraulic fracturing design, operations, and production.

  14. An evaluation of the deep reservoir conditions of the Bacon-Manito geothermal field, Philippines using well gas chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amore, Franco; Maniquis-Buenviaje, Marinela; Solis, Ramonito P.

    1993-01-28

    Gas chemistry from 28 wells complement water chemistry and physical data in developing a reservoir model for the Bacon-Manito geothermal project (BMGP), Philippines. Reservoir temperature, THSH, and steam fraction, y, are calculated or extrapolated from the grid defined by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and H2-H2S (HSH) gas equilibria reactions. A correction is made for H2 that is lost due to preferential partitioning into the vapor phase and the reequilibration of H2S after steam loss.

  15. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to augment the National Reservoir Database (TORIS database), to increase our understanding of geologic heterogeneities that affect the recoveries of oil and gas from carbonate reservoirs in the State of Alabama, and to identify resources that are producible at moderate cost. This objective will be achieved through detailed geological, geostatistical, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon, and engineering characterization of typical Jurassic Smackover Formation hydrocarbon reservoirs in selected productive fields in the state of Alabama. The results of these studies will be used to develop and test mathematical models for prediction of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities in hydrocarbon production. Work to date has focused on completion of Subtasks 1, 2, and 3 of this project. Work on Subtask 4 began in this quarter, and substantial additional work has been accomplished on Subtask 2. Subtask 1 included the survey and tabulation of available reservoir engineering and geological data. Subtask 2 comprises the geologic and engineering characterization of smackover reservoir lithofacies. Subtask 3 includes the geologic modeling of reservoir heterogeneities. Subtask 4 includes the development of reservoir exploitation methodologies for strategic infill drilling. 1 fig.

  16. Geochemical analysis of atlantic rim water, carbon county, wyoming: New applications for characterizing coalbed natural gas reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, J.F.; Frost, C.D.; Sharma, S.

    2011-01-01

    Coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production typically requires the extraction of large volumes of water from target formations, thereby influencing any associated reservoir systems. We describe isotopic tracers that provide immediate data on the presence or absence of biogenic natural gas and the identify methane-containing reservoirs are hydrologically confined. Isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon and strontium, along with water quality data, were used to characterize the CBNG reservoirs and hydrogeologic systems of Wyoming's Atlantic Rim. Water was analyzed from a stream, springs, and CBNG wells. Strontium isotopic composition and major ion geochemistry identify two groups of surface water samples. Muddy Creek and Mesaverde Group spring samples are Ca-Mg-S04-type water with higher 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting relatively young groundwater recharged from precipitation in the Sierra Madre. Groundwaters emitted from the Lewis Shale springs are Na-HCO3-type waters with lower 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting sulfate reduction and more extensive water-rock interaction. To distinguish coalbed waters, methanogenically enriched ??13CDIC wasused from other natural waters. Enriched ??13CDIC, between -3.6 and +13.3???, identified spring water that likely originates from Mesaverde coalbed reservoirs. Strongly positive ??13CDIC, between +12.6 and +22.8???, identified those coalbed reservoirs that are confined, whereas lower ??13CDIC, between +0.0 and +9.9???, identified wells within unconfined reservoir systems. Copyright ?? 2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, Anne E.; Anderson, Barbara I.; Rasmus, John; Sun, Keli; Li, Qiming; Collett, Timothy S.; Goldberg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present new results and interpretations of the electricalanisotropy and reservoir architecture in gashydrate-bearingsands using logging data collected during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sandreservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R| and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R|. We find the sandreservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R| and R| values close to 2 Ω m. In contrast, the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R| is between 2 and 30 Ω m, and R| is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger's WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gashydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10-100 cm) with varying gashydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gashydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

  18. A Theoretical Investigation of Radial Lateral Wells with Shockwave Completion in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jia

    As its role in satisfying the energy demand of the U.S. and as a clean fuel has become more significant than ever, the shale gas production in the U.S. has gained increasing momentum over recent years. Thus, effective and environmentally friendly methods to extract shale gas are critical. Hydraulic fracturing has been proven to be efficient in the production of shale gas. However, environmental issues such as underground water contamination and high usage of water make this technology controversial. A potential technology to eliminate the environmental issues concerning water usage and contamination is to use blast fracturing, which uses explosives to create fractures. It can be further aided by HEGF and multi-pulse pressure loading technology, which causes less crushing effect near the wellbore and induces longer fractures. Radial drilling is another relatively new technology that can bypass damage zones due to drilling and create a larger drainage area through drilling horizontal wellbores. Blast fracturing and radial drilling both have the advantage of cost saving. The successful combination of blast fracturing and radial drilling has a great potential for improving U.S. shale gas production. An analytical productivity model was built in this study, considering linear flow from the reservoir rock to the fracture face, to analyze factors affecting shale gas production from radial lateral wells with shockwave completion. Based on the model analyses, the number of fractures per lateral is concluded to be the most effective factor controlling the productivity index of blast-fractured radial lateral wells. This model can be used for feasibility studies of replacing hydraulic fracturing by blast fracturing in shale gas well completions. Prediction of fracture geometry is recommended for future studies.

  19. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. Kennedy, B.M. Farrar, C.D. Hainsworth, L.J. Hausback, B.

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  20. Scale-dependent gas hydrate saturation estimates in sand reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Through the use of 2-D and 3-D seismic data, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea and thirteen drill sites were established and logging-while-drilling (LWD) data were acquired from each site in 2010. Sites UBGH26 and UBGH210 were selected to test a series of high amplitude seismic reflections, possibly from sand reservoirs. LWD logs from the UBGH26 well indicate that there are three significant sand reservoirs with varying thickness. Two upper sand reservoirs are water saturated and the lower thinly bedded sand reservoir contains gas hydrate with an average saturation of 13%, as estimated from the P-wave velocity. The well logs at the UBGH26 well clearly demonstrated the effect of scale-dependency on gas hydrate saturation estimates. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the high resolution LWD acquired ring resistivity (vertical resolution of about 58 cm) reaches about 90% with an average saturation of 28%, whereas gas hydrate saturations estimated from the low resolution A40L resistivity (vertical resolution of about 120 cm) reaches about 25% with an average saturation of 11%. However, in the UBGH210 well, gas hydrate occupies a 5-m thick sand reservoir near 135 mbsf with a maximum saturation of about 60%. In the UBGH210 well, the average and a maximum saturation estimated from various well logging tools are comparable, because the bed thickness is larger than the vertical resolution of the various logging tools. High resolution wireline log data further document the role of scale-dependency on gas hydrate calculations.

  1. Simulation of Geomechanically Coupled IOR Processes in Unconventional Oil and Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Winterfeld, P. H.; Fakcharoenphol, P.

    2012-12-01

    Fracture network creation has been shown to be a key factor in facilitating economic production of oil and gas from unconventional reservoirs. These networks provide highly permeable flow paths that allow access to tight matrix blocks. A recent water injection study in Bakken has illustrated how stress changes during water injection could induce micro-fractures that further extend the fracture network into the matrix. To capture such physics, we present a coupled flow and geomechanics model for dual porosity reservoirs. The tight matrix is refined into multiple continua to capture the stress change on the matrix surface. This stress change is calculated using equivalent mechanical properties for fractured rock. These properties are based on the assumption that the deformation of fractured rock is the sum of the deformation of intact rock and fractures. In addition, Hoek-Brown failure criterion is used to calculate when matrix rock fails. Once induced stress exceeds rock strength, matrix block failure is assumed and the transfer function between fracture and matrix is improved. Our simulation results indicate viscous displacement and spontaneous imbibition processes are negligible because they cannot penetrate into the tight matrix block. However, once matrix blocks are cracked due to thermally induced stresses on the matrix surface, these processes become more pronounced and can improve oil production from the cracked tight matrix. These positive effects are particularly important farther away from the immediate vicinity of the hydraulic fracture where much of the undrained oil resides.

  2. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-01-28

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sup 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sup 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several results related to subtask 1.1 are given. In this period, most of our research centered on how to estimate the dispersivity at the field scale. Simulation studies (Solano et al. 2001) show that oil recovery for enriched gas drives depends on the amount of dispersion in reservoir media. But the true value of dispersion, expressed as dispersivity, at the field scale, is unknown. This research investigates three types of dispersion in permeable media to obtain realistic estimates of dispersive mixing at the field scale. The dispersivity from single-well tracer tests (SWTT), also known as echo dispersivity, is the dispersivity that is unaffected by fluid flow direction. Layering in permeable media tends to increase the observed dispersivity in well-to-well tracer tests, also known as transmission dispersivity, but leaves the echo dispersivity unaffected. A collection of SWTT data is analyzed to estimate echo dispersivity at the SWTT scale. The estimated echo dispersivities closely match a published trend with length scale in dispersivities obtained from groundwater tracer tests. This unexpected result--it was thought that transmission dispersivity should be greater than echo dispersivity--is analyzed with numerical simulation. A third type of dispersive mixing is local dispersivity, or the mixing observed at a point as tracer flows past it. Numerical simulation results show that the local dispersivity is always less than the transmission dispersivity and greater than the echo dispersivity limits. It is closer to one limit or the other depending on the amount and type of heterogeneity, the autocorrelation structure of the medium's permeability, and the lateral (vertical) permeability. The agreement between the SWTT echo dispersivities and the field trend suggests that the field data are measuring local dispersivities. All dispersivities appear to grow with length. Regarding Task 2, two results are described: (1) An experimental study of N{sup 2} foam finds the two steady-state foam-flow regimes at elevated temperature and with acid, adding evidence that the two regimes occur widely, if not universally, in foam in porous media. (2) A simulation finds that the optimal injection strategy for overcoming gravity override in homogeneous reservoirs is injection of large alternating slugs of surfactant and gas at fixed, maximum attainable injection rates. A simple model for the process explains why the this strategy works so well. Before conducting simulations of SAG displacements, however, it is important to analyze the given foam model using fractional-flow theory. Fractional-flow theory predicts that some foam processes will give foam collapse immediately behind the gas front. In simulations, numerical dispersion leads to a false impression of good sweep efficiency. In this case simply grid refinement may not warn of the inaccuracy of the simulation.

  4. Numerical simulations of depressurization-induced gas production from gas hydrate reservoirs at the Walker Ridge 312 site, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Gaddipati, Manohar; Rose, Kelly; Anderson, Brian J.

    2012-06-01

    In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Gas Hydrates Joint-Industry-Project (JIP) Leg II drilling program confirmed that gas hydrate occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the GOM. A comprehensive logging-while-drilling dataset was collected from seven wells at three sites, including two wells at the Walker Ridge 313 site. By constraining the saturations and thicknesses of hydrate-bearing sands using logging-while-drilling data, two-dimensional (2D), cylindrical, r-z and three-dimensional (3D) reservoir models were simulated. The gas hydrate occurrences inferred from seismic analysis are used to delineate the areal extent of the 3D reservoir models. Numerical simulations of gas production from the Walker Ridge reservoirs were conducted using the depressurization method at a constant bottomhole pressure. Results of these simulations indicate that these hydrate deposits are readily produced, owing to high intrinsic reservoir-quality and their proximity to the base of hydrate stability. The elevated in situ reservoir temperatures contribute to high (540 MMscf/day) predicted production rates. The production rates obtained from the 2D and 3D models are in close agreement. To evaluate the effect of spatial dimensions, the 2D reservoir domains were simulated at two outer radii. The results showed increased potential for formation of secondary hydrate and appearance of lag time for production rates as reservoir size increases. Similar phenomena were observed in the 3D reservoir models. The results also suggest that interbedded gas hydrate accumulations might be preferable targets for gas production in comparison with massive deposits. Hydrate in such accumulations can be readily dissociated due to heat supply from surrounding hydrate-free zones. Special cases were considered to evaluate the effect of overburden and underburden permeability on production. The obtained data show that production can be significantly degraded in comparison with a case using impermeable boundaries. The main reason for the reduced productivity is water influx from the surrounding strata; a secondary cause is gas escape into the overburden. The results dictate that in order to reliably estimate production potential, permeability of the surroundings has to be included in a model.

  5. Geomechanical response to seasonal gas storage in depleted reservoirs: A case study in the Po River basin, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teatini, P.; Castelletto, N.; Ferronato, M.; Gambolati, G.; Janna, C.; Cairo, E.; Marzorati, D.; Colombo, D.; Ferretti, A.; Bagliani, A.; Bottazzi, F.

    2011-06-01

    Underground gas storage (UGS) in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs is a strategic practice to cope with the growing energy demand and occurs in many places in Europe and North America. In response to summer gas injection and winter gas withdrawal the reservoir expands and contracts essentially elastically as a major consequence of the fluid (gas and water) pore pressure fluctuations. Depending on a number of factors, including the reservoir burial depth, the difference between the largest and the smallest gas pore pressure, and the geomechanical properties of the injected formation and the overburden, the porous medium overlying the reservoir is subject to three-dimensional deformation with the related cyclic motion of the land surface being both vertical and horizontal. We present a methodology to evaluate the environmental impact of underground gas storage and sequestration from the geomechanical perspective, particularly in relation to the ground surface displacements. Long-term records of injected and removed gas volume and fluid pore pressure in the "Lombardia" gas field, northern Italy, are available together with multiyear detection of vertical and horizontal west-east displacement of the land surface above the reservoir by an advanced permanent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR) analysis. These data have been used to calibrate a 3-D fluid-dynamic model and develop a 3-D transversally isotropic geomechanical model. The latter has been successfully implemented and used to reproduce the vertical and horizontal cyclic displacements, on the range of 8-10 mm and 6-8 mm, respectively, measured between 2003 and 2007 above the reservoir where a UGS program has been underway by Stogit-Eni S.p.A. since 1986 following a 5 year field production life. Because of the great economical interest to increase the working gas volume as much as possible, the model addresses two UGS scenarios where the gas pore overpressure is pushed from the current 103%pi, where pi is the gas pore pressure prior to the field development, to 107%pi and 120%pi. Results of both scenarios show that there is a negligible impact on the ground surface, with deformation gradients that remain well below the most restrictive admissible limits for the civil structures and infrastructures.

  6. Eos modeling and reservoir simulation study of bakken gas injection improved oil recovery in the elm coulee field, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wanli

    The Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is one of the most productive liquid-rich unconventional plays. The Bakken Formation is divided into three members, and the Middle Bakken Member is the primary target for horizontal wellbore landing and hydraulic fracturing because of its better rock properties. Even with this new technology, the primary recovery factor is believed to be only around 10%. This study is to evaluate various gas injection EOR methods to try to improve on that low recovery factor of 10%. In this study, the Elm Coulee Oil Field in the Williston Basin was selected as the area of interest. Static reservoir models featuring the rock property heterogeneity of the Middle Bakken Member were built, and fluid property models were built based on Bakken reservoir fluid sample PVT data. By employing both compositional model simulation and Todd-Longstaff solvent model simulation methods, miscible gas injections were simulated and the simulations speculated that oil recovery increased by 10% to 20% of OOIP in 30 years. The compositional simulations yielded lower oil recovery compared to the solvent model simulations. Compared to the homogeneous model, the reservoir model featuring rock property heterogeneity in the vertical direction resulted in slightly better oil recovery, but with earlier CO2 break-through and larger CO2 production, suggesting that rock property heterogeneity is an important property for modeling because it has a big effect on the simulation results. Long hydraulic fractures shortened CO2 break-through time greatly and increased CO 2 production. Water-alternating-gas injection schemes and injection-alternating-shut-in schemes can provide more options for gas injection EOR projects, especially for gas production management. Compared to CO2 injection, separator gas injection yielded slightly better oil recovery, meaning separator gas could be a good candidate for gas injection EOR; lean gas generated the worst results. Reservoir simulations also indicate that original rock properties are the dominant factor for the ultimate oil recovery for both primary recovery and gas injection EOR. Because reservoir simulations provide critical inputs for project planning and management, more effort needs to be invested into reservoir modeling and simulation, including building enhanced geologic models, fracture characterization and modeling, and history matching with field data. Gas injection EOR projects are integrated projects, and the viability of a project also depends on different economic conditions.

  7. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

    2010-11-30

    Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

  8. Total Organic Carbon prediction in shale gas reservoirs using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Aliouane, Leila

    2015-04-01

    Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic approach for the prediction of the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from well-logs data in shale gas reservoirs, two models are used for the estimation of the TOC from well-logs data; the first one is called the Schmoker's model while the second one is called the Passey's model. Scmocker's model requires the continuous measurement of the Bulk density, in case of absence of the bulk density measurement the Schmoker's model is not able to predict the TOC. In this case we suggest the use fuzzy logic system able to predict the total organic carbon in shale gas formations. The input of the fuzzy system is the four raw well-logs data measurements corresponding to the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the primary and shear waves. The desired output is the calculated TOC using the Schmoker's model. Application to well-logs data of two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale clearly shows the ability of the fuzzy logic approach to suggest values of the total organic carbon in case of no bulk density measurement. Keywords TOC, Schmoker's model, Fuzzy logic, shale gas, Barnett shale, prediction.

  9. Prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs using a semi-analytical solution of the non-linear gas flow equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattar, L.; Adegbesan, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equation for flow of gases in a porous medium is nonlinear and cannot be solved by strictly analytical methods. Previous studies in the literature have obtained analytical solutions to this equation by linearlization (i.e., treating viscosity and compressibilty as constant). In this study, the solution for nonlinear gas flow equation is obtained using the semianalytical technique developed by Kale and Mattar which solves the nonlinear equation by the method of perturbation. Results obtained, for prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs, indicate that the solution of the linearlized form of the equation is valid for both low and high permeability reservoirs.

  10. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  11. Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Appendix 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

    1992-06-01

    This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

  12. DOE THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A METHANE HYDRATE DEPOSIT AND GAS RESERVOIR, BLAKE RIDGE

    SciTech Connect

    W. Steven Holbrook

    2004-11-11

    This report contains a summary of work conducted and results produced under the auspices of award DE-FC26-00NT40921, ''DOE Three-Dimensional Structure and Physical Properties of a Methane Hydrate Deposit and Gas Reservoir, Blake Ridge.'' This award supported acquisition, processing, and interpretation of two- and three-dimensional seismic reflection data over a large methane hydrate reservoir on the Blake Ridge, offshore South Carolina. The work supported by this project has led to important new conclusions regarding (1) the use of seismic reflection data to directly detect methane hydrate, (2) the migration and possible escape of free gas through the hydrate stability zone, and (3) the mechanical controls on the maximum thickness of the free gas zone and gas escape.

  13. Reservoir engineering in coal seams: Part 1 - The physical process of gas storage and movement in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, I.

    1987-02-01

    This is the first of two papers concerning the movement of gas in coal seams. It deals directly with the physical behavior of the coal seam as a reservoir. Coal seams show considerable differences in behavior from normal porous gas reservoirs in both the mode of gas storage and permeability characteristics. Most of the storage of gas in coal is by sorption into the coal structure, while the coal permeability is cleat-(fracture-) or joint-controlled and may vary over a wide range during production. This permeability fluctuation is not solely a phase relative permeability effect, but is rather a result of the opposing effects of effective stress increase with fluid pressure reduction and shrinkage of the coal. Reducing fluid pressure tends to close the cleats, reducing permeability, while shrinkage tends to open them.

  14. Naturally fractured tight gas: Gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Economically viable natural gas production from the low permeability Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin, Colorado requires the presence of an intense set of open natural fractures. Establishing the regional presence and specific location of such natural fractures is the highest priority exploration goal in the Piceance and other western US tight, gas-centered basins. Recently, Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) completed a field program at Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, to test and demonstrate the use of advanced seismic methods to locate and characterize natural fractures. This project began with a comprehensive review of the tectonic history, state of stress and fracture genesis of the basin. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey, interpreted satellite and SLAR imagery, and 400 line miles of 2-D seismic provided the foundation for the structural interpretation. The central feature of the program was the 4.5 square mile multi-azimuth 3-D seismic P-wave survey to locate natural fracture anomalies. The interpreted seismic attributes are being tested against a control data set of 27 wells. Additional wells are currently being drilled at Rulison, on close 40 acre spacings, to establish the productivity from the seismically observed fracture anomalies. A similar regional prospecting and seismic program is being considered for another part of the basin. The preliminary results indicate that detailed mapping of fault geometries and use of azimuthally defined seismic attributes exhibit close correlation with high productivity gas wells. The performance of the ten new wells, being drilled in the seismic grid in late 1996 and early 1997, will help demonstrate the reliability of this natural fracture detection and mapping technology.

  15. Gas-and water-saturated conditions in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado: Implications for fractured reservoir detection in a gas-centered coal basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hoak, T.E.; Decker, A.D.

    1995-10-01

    Mesaverde Group reservoirs in the Piceance Basin, Western Colorado contain a large reservoir base. Attempts to exploit this resource base are stymied by low permeability reservoir conditions. The presence of abundant natural fracture systems throughout this basin, however, does permit economic production. Substantial production is associated with fractured reservoirs in Divide Creek, Piceance Creek, Wolf Creek, White River Dome, Plateau, Shire Gulch, Grand Valley, Parachute and Rulison fields. Successful Piceance Basin gas production requires detailed information about fracture networks and subsurface gas and water distribution in an overall gas-centered basin geometry. Assessment of these three parameters requires an integrated basin analysis incorporating conventional subsurface geology, seismic data, remote sensing imagery analysis, and an analysis of regional tectonics. To delineate the gas-centered basin geometry in the Piceance Basin, a regional cross-section spanning the basin was constructed using hydrocarbon and gamma radiation logs. The resultant hybrid logs were used for stratigraphic correlations in addition to outlining the trans-basin gas-saturated conditions. The magnitude of both pressure gradients (paludal and marine intervals) is greater than can be generated by a hydrodynamic model. To investigate the relationships between structure and production, detailed mapping of the basin (top of the Iles Formation) was used to define subtle subsurface structures that control fractured reservoir development. The most productive fields in the basin possess fractured reservoirs. Detailed studies in the Grand Valley-Parachute-Rulison and Shire Gulch-Plateau fields indicate that zones of maximum structural flexure on kilometer-scale structural features are directly related to areas of enhanced production.

  16. PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF CO2 SEPARATION AND STORAGE PROPERTIES OF COAL GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    John Kemeny; Satya Harpalani

    2004-03-01

    An attractive alternative of sequestering CO{sub 2} is to inject it into coalbed methane reservoirs, particularly since it has been shown to enhance the production of methane during near depletion stages. The basis for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep coals is the preferential sorption property of coal, with its affinity for carbon dioxide being significantly higher than that for methane. Yet, the sorption behavior of coal under competitive sorptive environment is not fully understood. Hence, the original objective of this research study was to carry out a laboratory study to investigate the effect of studying the sorption behavior of coal in the presence of multiple gases, primarily methane, CO{sub 2} and nitrogen, in order to understand the mechanisms involved in displacement of methane and its movement in coal. This had to be modified slightly since the PVT property of gas mixtures is still not well understood, and any laboratory work in the area of sorption of gases requires a definite equation of state to calculate the volumes of different gases in free and adsorbed forms. This research study started with establishing gas adsorption isotherms for pure methane and CO{sub 2}. The standard gas expansion technique based on volumetric analysis was used for the experimental work with the additional feature of incorporating a gas chromatograph for analysis of gas composition. The results were analyzed first using the Langmuir theory. As expected, the Langmuir analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} is more than three times as sorptive as methane. This was followed by carrying out a partial desorption isotherm for methane, and then injecting CO{sub 2} to displace methane. The results indicated that CO{sub 2} injection at low pressure displaced all of the sorbed methane, even when the total pressure continued to be high. However, the displacement appeared to be occurring due to a combination of the preferential sorption property of coal and reduction in the partial pressure of methane. As a final step, the Extended Langmuir (EL) model was used to model the coal-methane-CO{sub 2} binary adsorption system. The EL model was found to be very accurate in predicting adsorption of CO{sub 2}, but not so in predicting desorption of methane. The selectivity of CO{sub 2} over methane was calculated to be 4.3:1. This is, of course, not in very good agreement with the measured values which showed the ratio to be 3.5:1. However, the measured results are in good agreement with the field observation at one of the CO{sub 2} injection sites. Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that low pressure injection of CO{sub 2} can be fairly effective in displacing methane in coalbed reservoirs although this might be difficult to achieve in field conditions. Furthermore, the displacement of methane appears to be not only due to the preferential sorption of methane, but reduction in partial pressure as well. Hence, using a highly adsorbing gas, such as CO{sub 2}, has the advantages of inert gas stripping and non-mixing since the injected gas does not mix with the recovered methane.

  17. Compaction bands in high temperature/pressure diagenetically altered unconventional shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Veveakis, M.; Poulet, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy and mineral resources are typically trapped in a low porosity/permeability environment and are difficult to produce. An extreme end-member is the shale gas reservoir in the Cooper Basin (Australia) that is located at 3500-4000 m depth and ambient temperature conditions around 200oC. Shales of lacustrine origin (with high clay content) are diagenetically altered. Diagenesis involves fluid release mineral reactions of the general type Asolid ? Bsolid +Cfluid and switches on suddenly in the diagenetic window between 100-200oC. Diagenetic reactions can involve concentrations of smectite, aqueous silica compound, illite, potassium ions, aqueous silica, quartz, feldspar, kerogen, water and gas . In classical petroleum engineering such interlayer water/gas release reactions are considered to cause cementation and significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Yet in contradiction to the expected permeability reduction gas is successfully being produced. We propose that the success is based on the ductile equivalent of classical compaction bands in solid mechanics. The difference being that that the rate of the volumetric compaction is controlled by the diagenetic reactions. Ductile compaction bands are forming high porosity fluid channels rather than low porosity crushed grains in the solid mechanical equivalent. We show that this new type of volumetric instability appears in rate-dependent heterogenous materials as Cnoidal waves. These are nonlinear and exact periodic stationary waves, well known in the shallow water theory of fluid mechanics. Their distance is a direct function of the hydromechanical diffusivities. These instabilities only emerge in low permeability environment where the fluid diffusivity is about an order of magnitude lower than the mechanical loading. The instabilities are expected to be of the type as shown in the image below. The image shows a CT-scan of a laboratory experiment kindly provided by Papamichos (pers.comm.). Periodic compaction bands are clearly detected by the CT analysis of a shale sample compressed under high confining pressure.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-01-28

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sup 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sup 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several key results are described in this report relating to subtask 1.1. In particular, we show how for slimtube experiments, oil recoveries do not increase significantly with enrichments greater than the MME. For field projects, however, the optimum enrichment required to maximize recovery on a pattern scale may be different from the MME. The optimum enrichment is likely the result of greater mixing in reservoirs than in slimtubes. In addition, 2-D effects such as channeling, gravity tonguing, and crossflow can impact the enrichment selected. We also show the interplay between various mixing mechanisms, enrichment level, and numerical dispersion. The mixing mechanisms examined are mechanical dispersion, gravity crossflow, and viscous crossflow. UTCOMP is used to evaluate the effect of these mechanisms on recovery for different grid refinements, reservoir heterogeneities, injection boundary conditions, relative permeabilities, and numerical weighting methods including higher-order methods. For all simulations, the reservoir fluid used is a twelve-component oil displaced by gases enriched above the MME. The results for subtask 1.1 show that for 1-D enriched-gas floods, the recovery difference between displacements above the MME and those at or near the MME increases significantly with dispersion. The trend, however, is not monotonic and shows a maximum at a dispersivity (mixing level) of about 4 ft. The trend is independent of relative permeabilities and gas trapping for dispersivities less than about 4 ft. For 2-D enriched gas floods with slug injection, the difference in recovery generally increases as dispersion and crossflow increase. The magnitude of the recovery differences is less than observed for the 1-D displacements. Recovery differences for 2-D models are highly dependent on relative permeabilities and gas trapping. For water alternating gas (WAG) injection, the differences in recovery increase slightly as dispersion decreases. That is, the recovery difference is significantly greater with WAG at low levels of dispersion than with slug injection. For the cases examined, the magnitude of recovery difference varies from about 1 to 8 percent of the original oil-in-place (OOIP). Regarding Task 2, three results are described in this report: (1) New experiments with N{sup 2} foam examined the mobility of liquid injected following foam in alternating-slug (SAG) foam processes. These experiments were conducted in parallel with a simulation study of foam for acid diversion in well stimulation. The new experiments qualitatively confirm several of the trends predicted by simulation. (2) A literature study finds that the two steady-state foam-flow regimes seen with a wide variety of N{sup 2} foams also appears in many studies of CO{sup 2} foams, if the data are replotted in a format that makes these regimes clear. A new experimental study of dense CO{sup 2} foam here failed to reproduce these trends, however; the reason remains under investigation. (3) A number of published foam models were examined in terms of the two foam-flow regimes and using fractional-flow theory. At least two of the foam models predict the two foam-flow regimes. Fractional-flow t

  19. 3-D geomechanical modelling of a gas reservoir in the North German Basin: workflow for model building and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, K.; Henk, A.

    2013-06-01

    The optimal use of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs depends, amongst others, on the local tectonic stress field. For example, wellbore stability, orientation of hydraulically induced fractures and - especially in fractured reservoirs - permeability anisotropies are controlled by the recent in situ stresses. Faults and lithological changes can lead to stress perturbations and produce local stresses that can significantly deviate from the regional stress field. Geomechanical reservoir models aim for a robust, ideally "pre-drilling" prediction of the local variations in stress magnitude and orientation. This requires a~numerical modelling approach that is capable to incorporate the specific geometry and mechanical properties of the subsurface reservoir. The workflow presented in this paper can be used to build 3-D geomechanical models based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and ranging from field-scale models to smaller, detailed submodels of individual fault blocks. The approach is successfully applied to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. The in situ stresses predicted by the geomechanical FE model were calibrated against stress data actually observed, e.g. borehole breakouts and extended leak-off tests. Such a validated model can provide insights into the stress perturbations in the inter-well space and undrilled parts of the reservoir. In addition, the tendency of the existing fault network to slip or dilate in the present-day stress regime can be addressed.

  20. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2003-03-31

    This report outlines progress in the second quarter of the third year of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. This report presents results of an investigation of the effects of variation in interfacial tension (IFT) on three-phase relative permeability. We report experimental results that demonstrate the effect of low IFT between two of three phases on the three-phase relative permeabilities. In order to create three-phase systems, in which IFT can be controlled systematically, we employed analog liquids composing of hexadecane, n-butanol, isopropanol, and water. Phase composition, phase density and viscosity, and IFT of three-phase system were measured and are reported here. We present three-phase relative permeabilities determined from recovery and pressure drop data using the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann (JBN) method. The phase saturations were obtained from recovery data by the Welge method. The experimental results indicate that the wetting phase relative permeability was not affected by IFT variation whereas the other two-phase relative permeabilities were clearly affected. As IFT decreases the ''oil'' and ''gas'' phases become more mobile at the same phase saturations.

  1. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lower Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by cross-bedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are non-homogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  2. Sedimentology and reservoir characteristics of tight gas sandstones, Frontier formation, southwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F.; Tillman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    The lower Frontier Formation, Moxa arch area, southwestern Wyoming, is one of the most prolific gas-producing formations in the Rocky Mountain region. Lowr Frontier sediments were deposited as strandplains and coalescing wave-dominated deltas that prograding into the western margin of the Cretaceous interior seaway during the Cenomanian. In this study, sedimentologic, petrologic, and stratigraphic analyses were conducted on cores and logs of Frontier wells from the Whiskey Buttes and Moxa fields. Twelve sedimentary facies have been identified. The most common sequence consists of burrowed to cross-bedded near shore marine (delta-front and inner-shelf) sandstones disconformably overlain by crossbedded (active) to deformed (abandoned) distributary-channel sandstones and conglomerates. The sequence is capped by delta-plain mudstones and silty sandstones. Tight-gas sandstone reservoir facies are nonhomogenous and include crevasse splay, abandoned and active distributary channel, shoreface, foreshore, and inner shelf sandstones. Distributary-channel facies represent 80% of perforated intervals in wells in the southern part of the Moxa area, but only 50% to the north. Channel sandstone bodies are occasionally stacked, occur on the same stratigraphic horizon, and are laterally discontinuous with numerous permeability barriers. Percentage of perforated intervals in upper shoreface and foreshore facies increases from 20% in the south to 50% in the north.

  3. Efficiency optimization of a closed indirectly fired gas turbine cycle working under two variable-temperature heat reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheshu; Wu, Jieer

    2011-08-01

    Indirectly or externally fired gas turbines (IFGT or EFGT) are interesting technologies under development for small and medium scale combined heat and power (CHP) supplies in combination with micro gas turbine technologies. The emphasis is primarily on the utilization of the waste heat from the turbine in a recuperative process and the possibility of burning biomass even "dirty" fuel by employing a high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) to avoid the combustion gases passing through the turbine. In this paper, finite time thermodynamics is employed in the performance analysis of a class of irreversible closed IFGT cycles coupled to variable temperature heat reservoirs. Based on the derived analytical formulae for the dimensionless power output and efficiency, the efficiency optimization is performed in two aspects. The first is to search the optimum heat conductance distribution corresponding to the efficiency optimization among the hot- and cold-side of the heat reservoirs and the high temperature heat exchangers for a fixed total heat exchanger inventory. The second is to search the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching corresponding to the maximum efficiency between the working fluid and the high-temperature heat reservoir for a fixed ratio of the thermal capacitance rates of the two heat reservoirs. The influences of some design parameters on the optimum heat conductance distribution, the optimum thermal capacitance rate matching and the maximum power output, which include the inlet temperature ratio of the two heat reservoirs, the efficiencies of the compressor and the gas turbine, and the total pressure recovery coefficient, are provided by numerical examples. The power plant configuration under optimized operation condition leads to a smaller size, including the compressor, turbine, two heat reservoirs and the HTHE.

  4. Influence of environmental variables on diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes at hydroelectric reservoirs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rogério, J P; Santos, M A; Santos, E O

    2013-11-01

    For almost two decades, studies have been under way in Brazil, showing how hydroelectric reservoirs produce biogenic gases, mainly methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), through the organic decomposition of flooded biomass. This somewhat complex phenomenon is due to a set of variables with differing levels of interdependence that directly or indirectly affect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of this paper is to determine, through a statistical data analysis, the relation between CO2, CH4 diffusive fluxes and environmental variables at the Furnas, Itumbiara and Serra da Mesa hydroelectric reservoirs, located in the Cerrado biome on Brazil's high central plateau. The choice of this region was prompted by its importance in the national context, covering an area of some two million square kilometers, encompassing two major river basins (Paraná and Tocantins-Araguaia), with the largest installed power generation capacity in Brazil, together accounting for around 23% of Brazilian territory. This study shows that CH4 presented a moderate negative correlation between CO2 and depth. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for pH, water temperature and wind. The CO2 presented a moderate negative correlation for pH, wind speed, water temperature and air temperature. Additionally, a moderate positive correlation was noted for CO2 and water temperature. The complexity of the emission phenomenon is unlikely to occur through a simultaneous understanding of all the factors, due to difficulties in accessing and analyzing all the variables that have real, direct effects on GHG production and emission. PMID:24789391

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-01-28

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sub 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several very important results were achieved this period for subtask 1.2. In particular, we successfully developed a robust Windows-based code to calculate MMP and MME for fluid characterizations that consist of any number of pseudocomponents. We also were successful in developing a new technique to quantify the displacement mechanism of a gas flood--that is, to determine the fraction of a displacement that is vaporizing or condensing. These new technologies will be very important to develop new correlations and to determine important parameters for the design of gas injection floods. Regarding Task 2, several results were achieved: (1) A detailed study of the accuracy of foam simulation validates the model with fits to analytical fractional-flow solutions. It shows that there is no way to represent surfactant-concentration effects on foam without some numerical artifacts. (2) New results on capillary crossflow with foam show that this is much less detrimental than earlier studies had argued. (3) It was shown that the extremely useful model of Stone for gravity segregation with foam is rigorously true as long as the standard assumptions of fractional-flow theory apply. Without this proof, it was always possible that this powerful model would break down in some important application.

  6. Surface-bounded reservoir compartmentalization in the Caddo Conglomerate, Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate) Gas Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.L. ); Oliver, K.L. )

    1996-01-01

    Interpretation of cores and logs from 222 wells and a 26 mi[sup 2] 3-D seismic survey in the Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate) Gas Field indicates the Caddo Conglomerate zone (Atoka) contains two reservoir sandstone bodies which are physically separated by a key chronostratigraphic erosion surface. The oil-productive Lower Caddo sandstone represents a southward-prograding, strike-oriented highstand delta system. Downdip wells have encountered both oil and gas in a younger valley-fill sandstone complex comprising the Upper Caddo lowstand systems tract. Abandoned delta-platform limestones at the top of the Lower Caddo highstand tract were truncated during lowstand valley incision prior to Upper Caddo sandstone deposition. The limestones do not occur above the sharp-based, blocky to upward-fining Upper Caddo valley-fill sandstones, and underlying Lower Caddo sandstones typically display upward-coarsening, progradational patterns. Significant gas reserves in Upper Caddo wells located structurally downdip to the Lower Caddo oil accumulation indicate the two units are hydraulically separate reservoir compartments. Both reservoir compartments have been successfully imaged using 3-D seismic attributes analysis, confirming the original, log-based interpretation and providing a powerful infill drilling and reservoir management tool.

  7. Surface-bounded reservoir compartmentalization in the Caddo Conglomerate, Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate) Gas Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.L.; Oliver, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    Interpretation of cores and logs from 222 wells and a 26 mi{sup 2} 3-D seismic survey in the Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate) Gas Field indicates the Caddo Conglomerate zone (Atoka) contains two reservoir sandstone bodies which are physically separated by a key chronostratigraphic erosion surface. The oil-productive Lower Caddo sandstone represents a southward-prograding, strike-oriented highstand delta system. Downdip wells have encountered both oil and gas in a younger valley-fill sandstone complex comprising the Upper Caddo lowstand systems tract. Abandoned delta-platform limestones at the top of the Lower Caddo highstand tract were truncated during lowstand valley incision prior to Upper Caddo sandstone deposition. The limestones do not occur above the sharp-based, blocky to upward-fining Upper Caddo valley-fill sandstones, and underlying Lower Caddo sandstones typically display upward-coarsening, progradational patterns. Significant gas reserves in Upper Caddo wells located structurally downdip to the Lower Caddo oil accumulation indicate the two units are hydraulically separate reservoir compartments. Both reservoir compartments have been successfully imaged using 3-D seismic attributes analysis, confirming the original, log-based interpretation and providing a powerful infill drilling and reservoir management tool.

  8. Strategies for prevention and control of microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.A.; Derr, R.M.; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen sulfide production (souring) in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems is a problem that can lead to operational shutdown when environmental and safety standards are exceeded. Systems affected by microbial souring have historically been treated using biocides that target the general microbial community. Recent strategies have involved nutritional augmentation of the sour environment and/or use of low toxicity chemicals to remediate souring without incurring significant environmental risk. In this paper, discussion is provided on practical approaches to prevent or delay microbial souring and diagnosing the cause of existing souring problems. Case histories on conventional and innovative treatment are described. The conventional treatment involved the use of glutaraldehyde in a natural gas aquifer-storage reservoir and demonstrated that treatment success relies heavily on the manner in which the biocide is applied. The innovative treatments involved elemental iodine applied to two natural gas storage wells and nitrate applied to a surface produced-water system.

  9. Structural and sedimentological controls and diagenesis in the Ravenspurn north gas reservoir United Kingdom southern North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P. ); Jones, M. ); Prosser, J. ); Williams, G. )

    1993-09-01

    The Ravenspurn area is divided into two main northwest-southeast-trending fault blocks which are markedly different in terms of their diagenetic evolution and reservoir performance. The northeasterly B structure contained gas earlier and was unaffected by Middle to Late Jurassic illitization. The southwesterly A structure was uplifted later and received accumulated gas after reservoir quality was reduced by pervasive illitization. The deposition of allogenic clay and the formation of early quartz, nonferroan dolomite, and anhydrite reduced the reservoir quality of fluvial sheetflood. Burial diagenesis resulted initially in ferroan dolomite, kaolinite, and later quartz precipitation in available primary and secondary porosity. Stable-isotope and fluid-inclusion studies indicate that Ferroan dolomite and later quartz precipitated at about 100[degrees]C in the Triassic-Early Jurassic from reduced fluids derived partly from the Carboniferous basement. Gas accumulation took place first in the northeasterly B structure, which had early closure. Elsewhere diagenetic fluids evolved to a more alkaline state, and widespread illitization took place which particularly affected more permeable eolian facies. The illitization reduced the reservoir quality of the lower Leman Sandstone and contributed to diagenetic sealing (to the northwest) of the field. K-Ar dating indicates that peak illitization took place between 150 and 170 Ma (Middle-Late Jurassic). Subsequent periods of uplift in the late Cimmerian and particularly during the early Tertiary-Miocene produced the final structure of Ravenspurn North and the spillage of gas into this structure. The combination of structural and diagenetic events explains the differences in reservoir quality and well performance of the two structural blocks in the field.

  10. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.; Digert, S. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S.; Weeks, M. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

  11. Evaluation of the 3-D channeling flow in a fractured type of oil/gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Tsuchiya, N.; Tamagawa, T.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the flow and transport characteristics through rock fracture networks is of critical importance in many engineering and scientific applications. These include effective recovery of targeted fluid such as oil/gas, geothermal, or potable waters, and isolation of hazardous materials. Here, the formation of preferential flow path (i.e. channeling flow) is one of the most significant characteristics in considering fluid flow through rock fracture networks; however, the impact of channeling flow remains poorly understood. In order to deepen our understanding of channeling flow, the authors have developed a novel discrete fracture network (DFN) model simulator, GeoFlow. Different from the conventional DFN model simulators, we can characterize each fracture not by a single aperture value but by a heterogeneous aperture distribution in GeoFlow [Ishibashi et al., 2012]. As a result, the formation of 3-D preferential flow paths within fracture network can be considered by using this simulator. Therefore, we would challenge to construct the precise fracture networks whose fractures have heterogeneous aperture distributions in field scale, and to analyze fluid flows through the fracture networks by GeoFlow. In the present study, the Yufutsu oil/gas field in Hokkaido, Japan is selected as the subject area for study. This field is known as the fractured type of reservoir, and reliable DFN models can be constructed for this field based on the 3-D seismic data, well logging, in-situ stress measurement, and acoustic emission data [Tamagawa et al., 2012]. Based on these DFN models, new DFN models for 1,080 (East-West) 1,080 (North-South) 1,080 (Depth) m^3, where fractures are represented by squares of 44-346 m on a side, are re-constructed. In these new models, scale-dependent aperture distributions are considered for all fractures constructing the fracture networks. Note that the multi-scale modeling of fracture flow has been developed by the authors [Ishibashi et al., in preparation]. For the DFN models with aperture distributions, fluid flow simulations are conducted by GeoFlow. Before entering upon a discussion of the GeoFlow simulations, we show the interesting fact that approximately three-orders-of-magnitude difference in productivity is observed between two neighboring wells in the Yufutsu field. The conventional DFN model simulations can predict which productivity is high between these two wells, but they never reproduce the huge difference in well productivity. One of the reasons for this result is that the conventional DFN simulations ignored the concept of channeling flow. With these views in our mind, we see the result of the GeoFlow simulations. In the GeoFlow simulations, the huge difference in well productivity in the Yufutsu oil/gas field is successfully reproduced. This means that proper evaluation of 3D channeling flow is the key to predict well productivity in fractured reservoirs. Moreover, it is also clarified that the actual flow area is estimated to be around 20-50% of the flow area predicted by conventional DFN models. In this presentation, we will show the detail of the precise fracture network modeling and fluid flow analysis within them. The suggested method would be one of the most effective methods to improve our understanding of 3D channeling flow in fractured type of reservoirs.

  12. Monitoring of a gas reservoir in Western Siberia through SqueeSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucci, Alessio; Ferretti, Alessandro; Fokker, Peter A.; Jager, Johan; Lou, Sten

    2014-05-01

    The success of surface movement monitoring using InSAR is critically dependent on the coherence of the radar signal though time and over space. As a result, rural areas are more difficult to monitor with this technology than are areas with a lot of infrastructure. The development of advanced algorithms exploiting distributed scatterers, such as SqueeSAR, has improved these possibilities considerably. However, in rural areas covered with varying quantities of snow and ice, it had not yet been possible to demonstrate the applicability of the technology. We performed a study to assess the applicability of InSAR for assessing land movement is Western Siberia, where we chose the area of the Yuznho Russkoye field for a detailed analysis, after a screening using data that involved a number of fields in the vicinity of the Yuznho Russkoye Field. A first evaluation with C-band data ranging from 2004 - 2010 was unsuccessful due to the small number of images. Therefore we investigated the applicability of X-band data. 75 images were available spanning a period spanning May 2012 until July 2013. Within the summer periods when there was no snow coverage, the X-band data showed good coherence. The subsidence during a summer season, however, was not sufficient to make a quantitative comparison between geomechanical predictions and geodetic observations. Including the winter season in the analysis, however, destroyed the coherence and no subsidence signal could be derived. Quite unexpectedly, however, by cutting out the winter season and using the two disconnected summer seasons simultaneously, the coherence re-appeared and a subsidence estimate was established covering the full period. This way, the temporal surface movement could be established as a function of the position in the field. The spatial subsidence distribution was subsequently compared with the expected pattern expected from the location of producing wells and was found to be show a good correlation. Subsidence was clearly concentrated in the areas with the most producing wells and therefore where the gas production was assumed to be the largest. The potential of the technology is to use the distribution of the subsidence pattern in combination with the gas production characteristics to better assess the flow properties of the reservoir. These characteristics include the sealing behavior of faults causing reservoir compartments and possible activity of connected aquifers.

  13. Depositional and diagenetic controls on reservoir quality and gas composition in a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate setting, Thomasville field, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Shew, R.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The Smackover Formation in central Mississippi is sour gas productive from siliciclastics interbedded with tight carbonates. The sandstones have low reservoir quality (porosity and permeability of 7.0% and 0.35 md, respectively), but wells are capable of producing at high rates and with large volumes because of the extremely large geopressures and locally thick continuous sandstone packages. Production is from a hostile subsurface environment which includes high temperatures (>365{degree}F), high pressures (>0.88 psi/ft), great depths (>20,000 ft), and variable and corrosive sour gas mixtures (CH{sub 4} = 55%, H{sub 2}S = 36%, CO{sub 2} = 9%). Five fields are productive in this trend; Thomasville, the largest field, is used to illustrate the depositional and diagenetic controls on productivity. Deposition occurred as an upward-shoaling sequence of outer ramp to nearshore and sabkha environments. The lower sandstones are bioturbated, low-quality reservoirs interbedded with carbonate mudstones and packstones; the middle interval consists of the thickest and most continuous sandstones that are interpreted to be amalgamated inner-ramp shoal and ridge deposits; the upper interval consists of the common but tight Smackover ooid grainstone shoals that are interbedded with continuous but thin shoal and shoreface sandstone. The middle interval has the best reservoir quality and contains 75% of the hydrocarbons. Seismic may be used to map the sandstone packages but not the individual sandstones. In addition to the larger net/gross and more continuous sandstones in the middle zone, two postdepositional controls also govern the reservoir quality. These include small-scale faulting but more importantly diagenetic events which strongly overprint but do not obscure the original depositional control. At least 15 different diagenetic events have occurred in the sour gas fields that have generally decreased reservoir quality.

  14. Application of modified AOGST to study the low frequency shadow zone in a gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi Aghdam, B.; Riahi, M. Ali

    2015-10-01

    The adaptive optimized window generalized S transform (AOGST) variant with frequency and time is a method for the time-frequency mapping of a signal. According to the AOGST method, an optimized regulation factor is calculated based on the energy concentration of the S transform. The value of this factor is 1 for standard S transform where in the AOGST method its value is limited by the interval of [0, 1]. However, AOGST may not produce an acceptable resolution for all parts of the time-frequency representation. We applied aggregation of confined interval-adaptive optimized generalized S transforms (ACI-AOGST) instead of the AOGST method. The proposed method applies the modified AOGST method to specific frequency and time intervals. By calculating regulation factors for limited frequency and time intervals of signal, arranging them in a suitable order and applying the ACI-AOGST one can provide a transformation with lowest distortion and highest resolution in comparison to other transformations. The proposed method has been used to analyse the time-frequency distribution of a synthetic signal as well as a real 2D seismic section of a producing gas reservoir located south of Iran. The results confirmed the robustness of the ACI-AOGST method.

  15. Satellite linear features and pressure variations in Cretaceous shallow gas reservoirs, southern Bowdoin dome, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.; Tozer, M.K.; Tweed, A.D. ); Wosick, F.D. )

    1991-06-01

    For three decades prior to 1960, shallow gas was produced in the southern part of Bowdoin dome from the Cretaceous Bowdoin Sandstone of the Carlile Formation and the Phillips Sandstone of the Greenhorn Formation. Historical production records from this period suggest that patterns of pressure decline are closely related to the geometry of linear features visible on satellite images. Linear features mapped at a scale of 1:1,000,000 on multispectral scanner Landsat images correspond with geomorphic elements of the Milk River, Beaver Creek, and White Water Creek drainage systems. Regional lineament zones interpreted from linear features are believed to outline basement blocks which controlled deposition and deformation on Bowdoin Dome and in other areas of the northern Great Plains. Initial formation pressures on southern Bowdoin dome are lower in a zone marked by northwest linear features, and subsequent pressure declines through several decades show areas of greatest change are bounded by linear features. A series of pressure maps illustrate isobars elongated along the northwest trend and shifting to the northwest as production continues. In the western part of the field, isobars also parallel a northeast-trending linear feature. Correspondence of isobar patterns and linear features may be related to increased fracture porosity and permeability along a basement block boundary, or it may be influenced by other geologic features related to block geometry such as depth of burial or reservoir distribution.

  16. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly status report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-15

    The objective of the study will be to demonstrate the geological and geophysical technology needed to detect and analyze, economically, naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Delays in subcontract approval for the RTM model with Indiana University had caused additional delays in commencement of the modeling effort. Now that the subcontract is signed, modeling work has commenced. Subcontract preparation and negotiations for the aeromagnetic fly-over by World Geoscience are also proceeding as planned. Because we have clearly documented production trends in the Parachute and Rulison fields, future effort will be directed toward geologic explanations of these production trends. Several regional cross-sections through these fields will be used to illustrate geologic differences and similarities between the two fields. This information will be critical to calibration of the RTM model and development of the optimal locations for infill drilling and recompletion strategies. Upon completion of the field studies, focus will be redirected toward development of a regional tectonic synthesis from Precambrian through today for the Piceance Basin and the uplifts surrounding this region. This effort will integrate published studies, seismic, wellbore, gravity and remote sensing data to delineate regions in the basin where additional field work is necessary to fully determine the geologic evolution of the basin.

  17. The application of a new second-generation highstrength proppant in tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Callanan, M.J.; Cipolla, C.L.; Lewis, P.E.

    1983-03-01

    An analysis is made to illustrate the effectiveness of a new second generation high strength low density proppant as compared to that of sintered bauxite and Ottawa sand in a variety of applications. This is accomplished through the use of a reservoir simulator and a fracture design program. Gas producing formations are simulated which exhibit permeabilities between 0.001 md and 0.1 md and closure stresses up to 9500 psi. In these simulations the second generation proppant and sintered bauxite yield essentially identical production histories. However, the second generation proppant shows far superior performance to Ottawa sand in all applications. Also shown are cases revealing that tail-ins with the second generation proppant can yield a higher return on investment than pumping all high strength proppant. The simulations reveal the importance of non-Darcy flow and conductivity damage considerations in proppant selection. It is shown that these two factors have much less of an effect on the performance of the second generation proppant than on that of sand. With all of this considered the second generation proppant should prove to have a substantial economic advantage over both sintered bauxite and sand in a variety of applications.

  18. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

  19. Evolution of overpressured and underpressured oil and gas reservoirs, Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Phillip H.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Departures of resistivity logs from a normal compaction gradient indicate that overpressure previously extended north of the present-day overpressured zone. These indicators of paleopressure, which are strongest in the deep basin, are mapped to the Kansas-Oklahoma border in shales of Desmoinesian age. The broad area of paleopressure has contracted to the deep basin, and today the overpressured deep basin, as determined from drillstem tests, is bounded on the north by strata with near normal pressures (hydrostatic), grading to the northwest to pressures that are less than hydrostatic (underpressured). Thus the pressure regime in the northwest portion of the Anadarko Basin has evolved from paleo-overpressure to present-day underpressure. Using pressure data from drillstem tests, we constructed cross sections and potentiometric maps that illustrate the extent and nature of present-day underpressuring. Downcutting and exposure of Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian strata along, and east of, the Nemaha fault zone in central Oklahoma form the discharge locus where pressure reaches near atmospheric. From east to west, hydraulic head increases by several hundred feet in each rock formation, whereas elevation increases by thousands of feet. The resulting underpressuring of the aquifer-supported oil and gas fields, which also increases from east to west, is a consequence of the vertical separation between surface elevation and hydraulic head. A 1,000-ft thick cap of Permian evaporites and shales isolates the underlying strata from the surface, preventing re-establishment of a normal hydrostatic gradient. Thus, the present-day pressure regime of oil and gas reservoirs, overpressured in the deep basin and underpressured on the northwest flank of the basin, is the result of two distinct geologic events-rapid burial and uplift/erosion-widely separated in time.

  20. A MASSIVE MOLECULAR GAS RESERVOIR IN THE z = 5.3 SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AzTEC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Capak, Peter L.; Yan, Lin; Carilli, Christopher L.; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Schinnerer, Eva; Bertoldi, Frank

    2010-09-10

    We report the detection of CO J = 2{yields}1, 5{yields}4, and 6{yields}5 emission in the highest-redshift submillimeter galaxy (SMG) AzTEC-3 at z = 5.298, using the Expanded Very Large Array and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. These observations ultimately confirm the redshift, making AzTEC-3 the most submillimeter-luminous galaxy in a massive z {approx_equal} 5.3 protocluster structure in the COSMOS field. The strength of the CO line emission reveals a large molecular gas reservoir with a mass of 5.3 x 10{sup 10}({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M {sub sun}, which can maintain the intense 1800 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} starburst in this system for at least 30 Myr, increasing the stellar mass by up to a factor of six in the process. This gas mass is comparable to 'typical' z {approx} 2 SMGs and constitutes {approx_gt}80% of the baryonic mass (gas+stars) and 30%-80% of the total (dynamical) mass in this galaxy. The molecular gas reservoir has a radius of <4 kpc and likely consists of a 'diffuse', low-excitation component, containing (at least) 1/3 of the gas mass (depending on the relative conversion factor {alpha}{sub CO}), and a 'dense', high-excitation component, containing {approx}2/3 of the mass. The likely presence of a substantial diffuse component besides highly excited gas suggests different properties between the star-forming environments in z > 4 SMGs and z > 4 quasar host galaxies, which perhaps trace different evolutionary stages. The discovery of a massive, metal-enriched gas reservoir in an SMG at the heart of a large z = 5.3 protocluster considerably enhances our understanding of early massive galaxy formation, pushing back to a cosmic epoch where the universe was less than 1/12 of its present age.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2002-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  3. Role of reservoir engineering in the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, M.K.; Bird, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    The geology and reservoir-engineering data were integrated in the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). VVhereas geology defined the analog pools and fields and provided the basic information on sizes and numbers of hypothesized petroleum accumulations, reservoir engineering helped develop necessary equations and correlations, which allowed the determination of reservoir parameters for better quantification of in-place petroleum volumes and recoverable reserves. Seismic- and sequence-stratigraphic study of the NPRA resulted in identification of 24 plays. Depth ranges in these 24 plays, however, were typically greater than depth ranges of analog plays for which there were available data, necessitating the need for establishing correlations. The basic parameters required were pressure, temperature, oil and gas formation volume factors, liquid/gas ratios for the associated and nonassociated gas, and recovery factors. Finally, the re sults of U.S. Geological Survey deposit simulation were used in carrying out an economic evaluation, which has been separately published. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. [Quarterly report], January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-04-01

    The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task I is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

  5. Predicting variations of the least principal stress magnitudes in shale gas reservoirs utilizing variations of viscoplastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, H.; Zoback, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting variations of the magnitude of least principal stress within unconventional reservoirs has significant practical value as these reservoirs require stimulation by hydraulic fracturing. It is common to approach this problem by calculating the horizontal stresses caused by uniaxial gravitational loading using log-derived linear elastic properties of the formation and adding arbitrary tectonic strain (or stress). We propose a new method for estimating stress magnitudes in shale gas reservoirs based on the principles of viscous relaxation and steady-state tectonic loading. Laboratory experiments show that shale gas reservoir rocks exhibit wide range of viscoplastic behavior most dominantly controlled by its composition, whose stress relaxation behavior is described by a simple power-law (in time) rheology. We demonstrate that a reasonable profile of the principal stress magnitudes can be obtained from geophysical logs by utilizing (1) the laboratory power-law constitutive law, (2) a reasonable estimate of the tectonic loading history, and (3) the assumption that stress ratios ([S2-S3]/[S1-S3]) remains constant due to stress relaxation between all principal stresses. Profiles of horizontal stress differences (SHmax-Shmin) generated based on our method for a vertical well in the Barnett shale (Ft. Worth basin, Texas) generally agrees with the occurrence of drilling-induced tensile fractures in the same well. Also, the decrease in the least principal stress (frac gradient) upon entering the limestone formation underlying the Barnett shale appears to explain the downward propagation of the hydraulic fractures observed in the region. Our approach better acknowledges the time-dependent geomechanical effects that could occur over the course of the geological history. The proposed method may prove to be particularly useful for understanding hydraulic fracture containment within targeted reservoirs.

  6. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  7. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  8. Gas Migration from a Tight-/Shale-Gas Reservoir to an Overlying Aquifer Through Long Fractures, Conductive Faults and Abandoned Older Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, G. J.; Freeman, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural gas from shale reservoirs has become an increasingly important energy resource in recent years. However, the environmental challenges posed by hydraulic fracturing (a necessary stimulation method in tight- and shale-gas reservoirs) remain poorly characterized. There exist theoretical risks of leakage of contaminants from such reservoirs through hydraulically-induced fractures into groundwater resources, but no rigorous model-based analysis has been performed to assess the magnitude of these risks. The mechanisms and quantities of fluids that may realistically be transmitted through induced fractures and faults between geological strata are unknown. Possible exacerbating factors in shale gas well completion or stimulation design are likewise unknown. Quantification of these factors is necessary to quantify possible environmental risks and to aid the industry in the continuing development of sustainable hydraulic fracturing practices. We used the TOUGH+RealGasH2O code to model the two-phase flow of water and gas through long conductive features (such as fractures, conductive faults and abandoned older wells) connecting shale gas systems to shallower aquifers. The complex 3D domains in this study involve Voronoi grids describing challenging geometries that include vertical wells (in the aquifers and abandoned older gas wells), the hydraulically fractured system along long horizontal wells, and thin vertically extensive features intersecting multiple geologic strata. We investigate various configurations of the fractured system, we determine the upper limit if the possible contaminant transport solutions stemming from "worst-case scenarios", and we conduct a thorough sensitivity analysis to determine the dominant mechanisms, conditions and parameters. These include the conductivity of vertically extensive faults and fractures, the relative pressure differential of the underlying shale layer and the aquifer, the permeabilities of the productive intervals, the vertical distances between layers, etc..

  9. HIGH RESOLUTION PREDICTION OF GAS INJECTION PROCESS PERFORMANCE FOR HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2003-09-30

    This report outlines progress in the first quarter of the extension of the DOE project ''High Resolution Prediction of Gas Injection Process Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs''. This report presents experimental results that demonstrate combined scaling effects of viscous, capillary, and gravity crossflow mechanisms that apply to the situations in which streamline models are used. We designed and ran a series of experiments to investigate combined effects of capillary, viscous, and gravity forces on displacement efficiency in layered systems. Analog liquids (isooctane, isopropanol, and water) were employed to control scaling parameters by changing interfacial tension (IFT), flow rate, and density difference. The porous medium was a two-dimensional (2-D) 2-layered glass bead model with a permeability ratio of about 1:4. In order to analyze the combined effect of only capillary and viscous forces, gravity effects were eliminated by changing the orientation of the glass bead model. We employed a commercial simulator, Eclipse100 to calculate displacement behavior for comparison with the experimental data. Experimental results with minimized gravity effects show that the IFT and flow rate determine how capillary and viscous forces affect behavior of displacement. The limiting behavior for scaling groups for two-phase displacement was verified by experimental results. Analysis of the 2-D images indicates that displacements having a capillary-viscous equilibrium give the best sweep efficiency. Experimental results with gravity effects, but with low IFT fluid systems show that slow displacements produce larger area affected by crossflow. This, in turn, enhances sweep efficiency. The simulation results represent the experimental data well, except for the situations where capillary forces dominate the displacement.

  10. A reservoir of ionized gas in the galactic halo to sustain star formation in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J Christopher

    2011-11-18

    Without a source of new gas, our Galaxy would exhaust its supply of gas through the formation of stars. Ionized gas clouds observed at high velocity may be a reservoir of such gas, but their distances are key for placing them in the galactic halo and unraveling their role. We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to blindly search for ionized high-velocity clouds (iHVCs) in the foreground of galactic stars. We show that iHVCs with 90 ≤ |v(LSR)| ≲ 170 kilometers per second (where v(LSR) is the velocity in the local standard of rest frame) are within one galactic radius of the Sun and have enough mass to maintain star formation, whereas iHVCs with |v(LSR)| ≳ 170 kilometers per second are at larger distances. These may be the next wave of infalling material. PMID:21868626

  11. Sedimentology and permeability architecture of Atokan Valley-fill natural gas reservoirs, Boonsville Field, north-central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, M.J.; Carr, D.L.; Stuede, J.

    1994-09-01

    The Boonsville {open_quotes}Bend Conglomerate{close_quotes} gas field in Jack and Wise counties comprises numerous thin (10-20 ft) conglomerate sandstone reservoirs within an approximately 1000-ft-thick section of Atokan strata. Reservoir sandstone bodies commonly overlie sequence-boundary unconformities and exhibit overall upward-fining grain-size trends. Many represent incised valleyfill deposits that accumulated during postunconformity baselevel rise. This stratal architecture is repeated at several levels throughout the Bend Conglomerate, suggesting that sediment accumulation occurred in a moderate-to low-accommodation setting and that base level fluctuated frequently. The reservoir units were deposited by low-sinuosity fluvial processes, causing a hierarchy of bed forms and grain-avalanche bar-front processes to produce complex grain-size variations. Permeability distribution is primarily controlled by depositional factors but may also be affected by secondary porosity created by the selective dissolution of chert clasts. High-permeability zones (up to 2.8 darcys) are characterized by macroscopic vugs comprised of clast-shaped moldic voids (up to 5 mm in diameter). Tight (low-permeability) zones are heavily cemented by silica, calcite, dolomite, and ankerite and siderite cements. Minipermeameter, x-radiograph, and petrographic studies and facies analysis conducted on cores from two Bend Conglomerate reservoirs illustrate the hierarchy of sedimentological and diagenetic controls on permeability architecture.

  12. Sedimentology and permeability architecture of Atokan Valley-Fill natural gas reservoirs, Boonsville Field, North-Central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, M.J.; Carr, D.L.; Stuede, J.

    1994-12-31

    The Boonsville {open_quotes}Bend Conglomerate{close_quotes} gas field in Jack and Wise Counties comprises numerous thin (10-20 ft) conglomeratic sandstone reservoirs within an approximately 1,000-ft-thick section of Atokan strata. Reservoir sandstone bodies commonly overlie sequence-boundary unconformities and exhibit overall upward-fining grain-size trends. Many represent incised valley-fill deposits that accumulated during postunconformity base-level rise. This stratal architectures is repeated at several levels throughout the Bend Conglomerate, suggesting that sediment accumulation occurred in a moderate- to low-accommodation setting and that base level fluctuated frequently. The reservoir units were deposited by low-sinuosity fluvial processes, causing a hierarchy of bed forms and grain-avalanche bar-front processes to produce complex grain-size variations. Permeability distribution is primarily controlled by depositional factors but may also be affected by secondary porosity created by the selective dissolution of chert clasts. High-permeability zones ({approximately}2.8 darcys) are characterized by macroscopic vugs composed of clast-shaped moldic voids ({approximately}5 mm in diameter). Tight (low-permeability) zones are heavily cemented by silica, calcite, dolomite, and ankerite and siderate cements. Minipermeameter, x-radiography, and petrographic studies and facies analysis conducted on cores from two Bend Conglomerate reservoirs (Threshold Development Company, I.G. Yates 33, and OXY U.S.A. Sealy {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} 2) illustrate the hierarchy of sedimentological and diagenetic controls on permeability architecture.

  13. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

  14. Fracture patterns and their origin in the upper Devonian Antrim Shale gas reservoir of the Michigan basin; a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Black shale members of the Upper Devonian Antrim Shale are both the source and reservoir for a regional gas accumulation that presently extends across parts of six counties in the northern part of the Michigan basin (fig. 1). Natural fractures are considered by most petroleum geologists and oil and gas operators who work the Michigan basin to be a necessary condition for commercial gas production in the Antrim Shale. Fractures provide the conduits for free gas and associated water to flow to the borehole through the black shale which, otherwise, has a low matrix permeability. Moreover, the fractures assist in the release of gas adsorbed on mineral and(or) organic matter in the shale (Curtis, 1992). Depths to the gas-producing intervals (Norwood and Lachine Members) generally range from 1,200 to 1,800 ft (Oil and Gas Journal, 1994). Locally, wells that produce gas from the accumulation are as deep as 2,200 (Oil and Gas Journal, 1994). Even though natural fractures are an important control on Antrim Shale gas production, most wells require stimulation by hydraulic fracturing to attain commercial production rates (Kelly, 1992). In the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of United States oil and gas, Dolton (1995) estimates that, at a mean value, 4.45 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of gas are recoverable as additions to already discovered quantities from the Antrim Shale in the productive area of the northern Michigan trend. Dolton (1995) also suggests that undiscovered Antrim Shale gas accumulations exist in other parts of the Michigan basin. The character, distribution, and origin of natural fractures in the Antrim Shale gas accumulation have been studied recently by academia and industry. The intent of these investigations is to: 1) predict 'sweet spots', prior to drilling, in the existing gas-producing trend, 2) improve production practices in the existing trend, 3) predict analogous fracture-controlled gas accumulations in other parts of the Michigan basin, and 4) improve estimates of the recoverable gas in the Antrim Shale gas plays (Dolton, 1995). This review of published literature on the characteristics of Antrim Shale fractures, their origin, and their controls on gas production will help to define objectives and goals in future U.S. Geological Survey studies of Antrim Shale gas resources.

  15. Characterization of gas hydrate reservoirs by integration of core and log data in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahk, J.-J.; Kim, G.-Y.; Chun, J.-H.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, J.Y.; Ryu, B.-J.; Lee, J.-H.; Son, B.-K.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of core and well-log data from the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) drill sites suggest that Sites UBGH2-2_2 and UBGH2-6 have relatively good gas hydrate reservoir quality in terms of individual and total cumulative thicknesses of gas-hydrate-bearing sand (HYBS) beds. In both of the sites, core sediments are generally dominated by hemipelagic muds which are intercalated with turbidite sands. The turbidite sands are usually thin-to-medium bedded and mainly consist of well sorted coarse silt to fine sand. Anomalies in infrared core temperatures and porewater chlorinity data and pressure core measurements indicate that gas hydrate occurrence zones (GHOZ) are present about 68155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-2_2 and 110155 mbsf at Site UBGH2-6. In both the GHOZ, gas hydrates are preferentially associated with many of the turbidite sands as pore-filling type hydrates. The HYBS identified in the cores from Site UBGH2-6 are medium-to-thick bedded particularly in the lower part of the GHOZ and well coincident with significant high excursions in all of the resistivity, density, and velocity logs. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 12% to 79% with an average of 52% based on pore-water chlorinity. In contrast, the HYBS from Site UBGH2-2_2 are usually thin-bedded and show poor correlations with both of the resistivity and velocity logs owing to volume averaging effects of the logging tools on the thin HYBS beds. Gas-hydrate saturations in the HYBS range from 15% to 65% with an average of 37% based on pore-water chlorinity. In both of the sites, large fluctuations in biogenic opal contents have significant effects on the sediment physical properties, resulting in limited usage of gamma ray and density logs in discriminating sand reservoirs.

  16. Multi-Method Monitoring of Shallow Gas Injection in Saline Coastal Reservoir at Maguelone (Languedoc coastline, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, N.; Pezard, P. A.; Lofi, J.; Luquot, L.; Neyens, D.; Jaafar, O.; Perroud, H.; Abdelghafour, H.; Henry, G.; Levannier, A.

    2014-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 is still a recent technology and many questions remain open, particularly for saline formations. Geological storage in accessible saline formations is, in fact, expected to become over time more important than that in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Maguelone shallow experimental site, located near Montpellier (Languedoc, France) has been used over the past few years to perform CO2 injection experiments. The geology, petrophysics and hydrology of this site are well known from previous studies. The presence of small saline coastal reservoirs bounded above and below by clay-rich layers provides an opportunity to study a saline formation for geological storage at field laboratory scale with a set of hydrogeophysical (seismic, electrical, sonic, pressure) and geochemical (pH, minor and major ion concentrations) methods, either downhole or at surface. Series of experiments can be run at moderate costs from the shallow depth of one of these reservoirs (13-16 m), offering flexibility for testing different monitoring configurations, performing repeated injection releases with variable injection parameters and type of gas (e.g., N2, CO2), and cross-calibrating the monitoring methods. Moreover, additional methods/boreholes can be easily implemented at this experimental site. Three N2 injections were thus undertaken at Maguelone in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. An experiment involving the release of CO2 was successively conducted in January 2013. A volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours. Both the N2 and CO2 gas plumes were detected by all monitoring techniques, and the response to gas propagation was instantaneous. Integrating the lesson learned from past injection experiments, the next stage of the project will allow to establish the best guidelines for CO2 injection and post-injection monitoring and, in perspective, not only to detect the CO2 plume but to quantify CO2 migration in the subsurface.

  17. Greenhouse Gas Production From a Young Boreal Hydroelectric Reservoir (Eastern Canada): A Carbon Isotope Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, A.; Helie, J.

    2007-12-01

    It is now accepted that boreal hydroelectric reservoirs and lakes produce greenhouse gases (GHG) mainly in the form of CO2. Much of the research has so far focused on old (> 20 year) reservoirs. However, the problems associated with a newly flooded reservoir are different because after flooding, salts and nutrients from the flooded soils are released into the water column (i.e. the reservoir's effect). It is anticipated that the CO2 fluxes should be higher in young reservoirs than in older ones, but little is known about their magnitude and their sources. The Eastmain-1 hydroelectric reservoir is a small reservoir of 603 km2 with a mean depth of 11.5m. Flooding began in November 2005 and ended in May 2006. The flooded area was covered with approximately 65% boreal forests, 21% rivers and lakes and 14% peatlands. Here, we make use stable carbon isotopes to constrain carbon sources and cycling in this disturbed environment. Ultimately, the study aims at estimating annual CO2 fluxes at the water-air interface of the reservoir. Sampling was performed four times (June 2006, August 2006, October 2006 and June 2007) to account for seasonality of the carbon cycle. Twelve sites were visited on the reservoir as well as a natural lake near the reservoir. Three sites were also sampled along a depth gradient. At each sampling site, in situ measurements included water and air temperatures, pH, alkalinity, wind speed, conductivity and dissolved oxygen content. Samples were collected for the analysis of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (respectively DOC and DIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, for the analysis of the carbon isotopic compositions of DOC, DIC, POC and air CO2 at the water-air interface and finally for the C:N of DOM and POM. DOC concentrations are highest averaging 6.861.40 mg*l-1, DIC concentrations average 1.510.76 mg*l-1 and POC concentrations are up to 2 orders of magnitude lower averaging 0.0360.018 mg*l-1. ?13C values of DOC average -27.420.32 vs V-PDB, close to average C3 plant values and vary little throughout the year as well as throughout the reservoir. ?13C-DIC values vary slightly throughout the reservoir but show large variations from one sampling campaign to the next. Depth profiles show a small decrease in ?13C-DIC with depth, in a well mixed water column. A strong relationship is observed between ?13C-DIC and DIC concentrations. Keeling type regressions (using ?13C-DIC and DIC concentrations) suggest that dissolved CO2 in the reservoir originate from the oxidation of dissolved organic matter within the reservoir.

  18. CO2 utilization and storage in shale gas reservoirs: Experimental results and economic impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Owen, Antionette Toni; Miller, Quin R. S.; Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-12-31

    Natural gas is considered a cleaner and lower-emission fuel than coal, and its high abundance from advanced drilling techniques has positioned natural gas as a major alternative energy source for the U.S. However, each ton of CO2 emitted from any type of fossil fuel combustion will continue to increase global atmospheric concentrations. One unique approach to reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions involves coupling CO2 based enhanced gas recovery (EGR) operations in depleted shale gas reservoirs with long-term CO2 storage operations. In this paper, we report unique findings about the interactions between important shale minerals and sorbing gases (CH4 and CO2) and associated economic consequences. Where enhanced condensation of CO2 followed by desorption on clay surface is observed under supercritical conditions, a linear sorption profile emerges for CH4. Volumetric changes to montmorillonites occur during exposure to CO2. Theory-based simulations identify interactions with interlayer cations as energetically favorable for CO2 intercalation. Thus, experimental evidence suggests CH4 does not occupy the interlayer and has only the propensity for surface adsorption. Mixed CH4:CO2 gas systems, where CH4 concentrations prevail, indicate preferential CO2 sorption as determined by in situ infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Collectively, these laboratory studies combined with a cost-based economic analysis provide a basis for identifying favorable CO2-EOR opportunities in previously fractured shale gas reservoirs approaching final stages of primary gas production. Moreover, utilization of site-specific laboratory measurements in reservoir simulators provides insight into optimum injection strategies for maximizing CH4/CO2 exchange rates to obtain peak natural gas production.

  19. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. For the months January 1, 1984-May 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    The objective is to provide technical assistance to METC's effort to develop a leading program in the evaluation of hydrate samples in porous media at reservoir conditions. An existing computer program has been modified to calculate enthalpies of dissociation, equilibrium pressures, and earth temperature-depth profiles for hydrate formation as a function of gas composition. In this report results of the depth-temperature studies are presented. The effect of gas composition, geothermal gradient, permafrost thickness and pressure gradient on the thickness of a hydrate stability zone in permafrost regions is covered. The effect of ocean bottom temperature, gas composition and ocean depth on a hydrate stability zone beneath the ocean is shown. These variables are considered to be among the more important in determining the potential that a particular region has for containing hydrates and they need to be measured in any geological investigation of a region. 24 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  20. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Arthur J; Mosher, Jennifer J; Mulholland, Patrick J; Fortner, Allison M; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

  1. Potential for significant oil and gas fracture reservoirs in Cretaceous rocks of Raton Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, L.A.

    1984-05-01

    The Raton basin in New Mexico contains up to 4,700 ft of marine shale and subordinate sandstone, limestone, coal, and terrestrial shale of Cretaceous age. Clastic reservoir rocks are sparse in the Cretaceous section below the Trinidad Sandstone. Other Rocky Mountain basins have fracture reservoirs that have proven to be productive of hydrocarbons where there is maximum curvature of brittle interbeds in shale sequences at fairly shallow depths. Fracture reservoirs can occur along anticlines, synclines, monoclines, and in areas where there is an abrupt change in dip and/or strike. Numerous flexures in the Raton basin could have excellent fracture systems. Carbonate-rich beds of the Greenhorn Limestone, the Codell Sandstone Member, the Fort Hays Limestone Member, and the overall Niobrara Formation appear to be the most widespread and thickest intervals that might develop fracture reservoirs. Favorable areas for development of fracture reservoirs within the Cretaceous rocks of the Raton basin are along the synclinal bend at the foot of the western limb of the basin, along the hinges of smaller flexures within the basin, and where there are abrupt changes in dip and/or strike.

  2. Diagenesis and fluid evolution of deeply buried Permian (Rotliegende) gas reservoirs, Northwest Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Gaupp, R. ); Matter, A.; Ramseyer, K.; Platt, J. ); Walzebuck, J. )

    1993-07-01

    Depositional environment and tectonic setting were important in the diagenesis and evolution of reservoir properties in the Rotliegende sequence of the North German Basin. Facies belts paralleling the edge of a central saline lake controlled the distribution of early and shallow burial cements. Lake shoreline sands with radial chlorite cement show the best reservoir properties in the study area. Juxtaposition of Rotliegende deposits against either Carboniferous Coal Measures or Late Permian (Zechstein) evaporites by faulting resulted in cross-formational fluid exchange. The introduction of fluids from Carboniferous Coal Measures into Rotliegende reservoirs produced intense clay cementation, significantly reducing rock permeabilities. Influx of Zechstein fluids favored precipitation of late carbonate and anhydrite cements. Cross-formational and fault-related fluid flow was enhanced during periods of fault activity. 50 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Detailed evaluation of gas hydrate reservoir properties using JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well downhole well-log displays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well project was designed to investigate the occurrence of in situ natural gas hydrate in the Mallik area of the Mackenzie Delta of Canada. Because gas hydrate is unstable at surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole logging program to determine the in situ physical properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Downhole logging tool strings deployed in the Mallik 2L-38 well included the Schlumberger Platform Express with a high resolution laterolog, Array Induction Imager Tool, Dipole Shear Sonic Imager, and a Fullbore Formation Microlmager. The downhole log data obtained from the log- and core-inferred gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary interval (897.25-1109.5 m log depth) in the Mallik 2L-38 well is depicted in a series of well displays. Also shown are numerous reservoir parameters, including gas hydrate saturation and sediment porosity log traces, calculated from available downhole well-log and core data. The gas hydrate accumulation delineated by the Mallik 2L-38 well has been determined to contain as much as 4.15109 m3 of gas in the 1 km2 area surrounding the drill site.

  4. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, November 1, 1990--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

  5. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. For the months December 1, 1983-April 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this work is to provide technical assistance to Morgantown Energy Technology Center's effort to develop a leading program in the evaluation of hydrate samples in porous media at reservoir conditions. During the period from January to March work done on the project focused on the preparation of the heat transfer and hydrate formation data and on the writing of the previous reports. During the last two months, including April, time has been devoted to the modification of our computer program to generate hydrate stability data in the earth. In addition to this work, the effect of gas composition on dissociation enthalpy is being studied.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz; K.G. Brown

    2003-02-01

    There are four primary goals of contract DE-FG26-99FT40703: (1) We seek to better understand how and why a specific iron-related inorganic precipitant, siderite, occurs at the reservoir/wellbore interface in gas storage wells. (2) We plan on testing potential prevention and remediation strategies related to this damage mechanism in the laboratory. (3) We expect to demonstrate in the field, cost-effective prevention and remediation strategies that laboratory testing deems viable. (4) We will investigate new technology for the gas storage industry that will provide operators with a cost effective method to reduce non-darcy turbulent flow effects on flow rate. For the above damage mechanism, our research efforts will demonstrate the diagnostic technique for determining the damage mechanisms associated with lost deliverability as well as demonstrate and evaluate the remedial techniques in the laboratory setting and in actual gas storage reservoirs. We plan on accomplishing the above goals by performing extensive lab analyses of rotary sidewall cores taken from at least two wells, testing potential remediation strategies in the lab, and demonstrating in the field the applicability of the proposed remediation treatments. The benefits from this work will be quantified from this study and extrapolated to the entire storage industry. The technology and project results will be transferred to the industry through DOE dissemination and through the industry service companies that work on gas storage wells. Achieving these goals will enable the underground gas storage industry to more cost-effectively mitigate declining deliverability in their storage fields.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-01-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-09-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-06-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2003-07-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-05-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2004-12-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2003-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2002-12-01

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-03-31

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  18. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2005-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  19. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

    2005-08-21

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  20. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N.P Paulsson

    2006-05-05

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

  1. Active microbial community in gas reservoirs in the North German Plain and the effects of high CO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Janin; Gniese, Claudia; Mhling, Martin; Krger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    From the IPCC report on global warming, it is clear that large-scale solutions are needed immediately to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. The CO2 capture and storage offers one option for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Favourable CO2 storage sites are depleted gas and oil fields and thus, are currently investigated by the BMBF-Geotechnologien RECOBIO-2 project. Our study is focussing on the direct influence of high CO2 concentrations on the autochthonous microbial population and environmental parameters (e.g. availability of nutrients). The gas fields Schneeren in the 'North German Plain' is operated by Gaz de France SUEZ E&V Deutschland GmbH. The conditions in the reservoir formation waters of two bore wells differ in various geochemical parameters (pH, salinity and temperature). In previous studies the community of this gas field was described by Ehinger et al. 2009. Based on these results our study included cultivation and molecular biological approaches. Our results showed significant differences of the community structure in regional distinctions of the gas reservoir. The activity profiles of two wells differed clearly in the inducible activity after substrate addition. The fluids of well A showed a high methane production rate after the addition of methanol or acetate. Well B showed a high sulphide production after the addition of sulphate and hydrogen. The molecular biological analysis of the original fluids supports the activity profile for both sites. The community analysis via real-time PCR showed for the production well head A a higher abundances for Archaea than for B. The community at site B in contrast was dominated by Bacteria. Fluids of both wells were also incubated with high CO2 concentrations in the headspace. These enrichments showed a significant decrease of methane and sulphide production with increasing CO2 levels. Currently, the community composition is analysed to identify changes connected to increased CO2 concentrations. This will provide information about possible biogeochemical and microbiological changes during and after the storage of CO2, and effects on the storage capacity and injectivity of the reservoir formation.

  2. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  3. Sedimentologic and diagenetic controls on reservoir development at Rosevear gas field, Swan Hills Formation (upper Devonian), central Alberta

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, J.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1988-02-01

    Carbonate strata at the Rosevear gas field consist of three major sedimentological packages: (1) basal platform, (2) platform reef, and (3) capping platform. Gas production is localized within two narrow trends of porous, massive, replacive dolostone occurring in the platform-reef sequence; tight limestones updip form the reservoir seal. Porosity trends are primarily restricted to the margins of a marine channel developed through the platform reef, but not the basal platform. Channel-margin strata consist mostly of dolomitized branching-stromatoporoid floatstones and rudstones. Massive replacive dolostone is composed of inclusion-rich coarsely crystalline nonferroan euhedral to anhedral rhombs that show a red cathodoluminescence. This dolomite has selectively replaced the limemud matrix; fossils were replaced to a much lesser extent. Fossils not dolomitized were selectively leached, resulting in well-developed biomoldic and vuggy porosity that forms the reservoir. Dolomitization occurred after cementation by clear, equant calcite and after early pressure solution. Secondary porosity in the dolostone trends was only partially reduced during later diagenesis, which consisted of, in order of decreasing age, precipitation of saddle dolomite, anhydrite, and coarsely crystalline calcite. Hydrocarbon migration occurred after the saddle dolomites, but before some late-stage calcite cement.

  4. The interplay of fractures and sedimentary architecture: Natural gas from reservoirs in the Molina sandstones, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation produces natural gas from several fields along the Colorado River in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado. The Molina Member is a distinctive sandstone that was deposited in a unique fluvial environment of shallow-water floods. This is recorded by the dominance of plane-parallel bedding in many of the sandstones. The Molina sandstones crop out on the western edge of the basin, and have been projected into the subsurface and across the basin to correlate with thinner sandy units of the Wasatch Formation at the eastern side of the basin. Detailed study, however, has shown that the sedimentary characteristics of the type-section Molina sandstones are incompatible with a model in which the eastern sandstones are its distal facies equivalent. Rather, the eastern sandstones represent separate and unrelated sedimentary systems that prograded into the basin from nearby source-area highlands. Therefore, only the subsurface {open_quotes}Molina{close_quotes} reservoirs that are in close proximity to the western edge of the basin are continuous with the type-section sandstones. Reservoirs in the Grand Valley and Rulison gas fields were deposited in separate fluvial systems. These sandstones contain more typical fluvial sedimentary structures such as crossbeds and lateral accretion surfaces. Natural fractures play an important role in enhancing the conductivity and permeability of the Molina and related sandstones of the Wasatch Formation.

  5. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Geologic text and tables: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Dry Gas Zone was defined by US Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Engineering Committee (1957) as ''/hor ellipsis/all sands bearing dry gas above the top of the Lower Scalez marker bed. The term is used to include the stratigraphic interval between the Scalez Sand Zone and the Tulare Formation - the Mya Sand Zone. The reservoirs in this upper zone are thin, lenticular, loosely cemented sandstones with relatively high permeabilities.'' Other than the limited Tulare production in the western part of the field, the Dry Gas Zone is the shallowest productive zone in the Elk Hills Reserve and is not included in the Shallow Oil Zone. It is Pliocene in age and makes up approximately eighty percent of the San Joaquin Formation as is summarized in Exhibit TL-1. The lithologic character of the zone is one of interbedded shales and siltstones with intermittent beds of various thickness sands. The stratigraphic thickness of the Dry Gas Zone ranges from 950 to 1150 feet with a general thickening along the flanks and thinning over the crests of the anticlines. The productive part of the Dry Gas Zone covers portions of 30 sections in an area roughly 10 miles long by 4 miles wide. 4 refs.

  6. The Influence of Local and Large-Scale Environment on Galaxy Gas Reservoirs in the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, David V.; Kannappan, Sheila; Baker, Ashley; Berlind, Andreas A.; Burchett, Joseph; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Florez, Jonathan; Hall, Kirsten; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Gonzalez, Roberto; Guynn, David; Hoversten, Erik A.; Leroy, Adam K.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Pisano, Daniel J.; Watson, Linda C.; Wei, Lisa H.; Resolve Team

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest galaxy gas reservoirs have been replenished over time, but a clear picture of how this process depends on local and large-scale environment is still an active area of research. I will present an analysis of galaxy gas content with respect to environment using the ~90% complete 21cm census for the volume-limited RESOLVE survey, which yields an unbiased inventory of HI masses (or strong upper limits < 5-10% of the stellar mass) for ~1550 galaxies with baryonic mass greater than 109 M? in >50,000 cubic Mpc of the z=0 universe. We quantify large-scale environment via identification of cosmic web filaments and walls using a modified friends-of-friends technique, while also using photometric redshifts to identify additional potential companions around each galaxy. Combining this powerful data set with estimates of HI profile asymmetries and star formation histories, we examine whether there are local or large-scale environments where cold gas accretion is more effective. Specifically, we investigate whether galaxy interactions can induce enhanced HI content. We also explore whether galaxies residing in large-scale filaments or walls, where simulations show large-scale gas flows, display signatures of enhanced gas accretion relative to other large-scale environments. This project is supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368), the GBT Student Observing Support program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  7. TSR versus non-TSR processes and their impact on gas geochemistry and carbon stable isotopes in Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic marine carbonate gas reservoirs in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Y.; Worden, R. H.; Jin, Z. J.; Liu, W. H.; Li, J.; Gao, B.; Zhang, D. W.; Hu, A. P.; Yang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Palaeozoic and lowermost Mesozoic marine carbonate reservoirs of the Sichuan Basin in China contain variably sour and very dry gas. The source of the gas in the Carboniferous, Permian and Lower Triassic reservoirs is not known for certain and it has proved difficult to discriminate and differentiate the effects of thermal cracking- and TSR-related processes for these gases. Sixty-three gas samples were collected and analysed for their composition and carbon stable isotope values. The gases are all typically very dry (alkane gases being >97.5% methane), with low (<1%) nitrogen and highly variable H2S and CO2. Carboniferous gas is negligibly sour while the Lower Triassic gas tends to be most sour. The elevated H2S (up to 62%) is due to thermochemical sulphate reduction with the most sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs being deeper than 4800 m. The non-TSR affected Carboniferous gas is a secondary gas that was derived from the cracking of sapropelic kerogen-derived oil and primary gas and is highly mature. Carboniferous (and non-sour Triassic and Permian) gas has unusual carbon isotopes with methane and propane being isotopically heavier than ethane (a reversal of typical low- to moderate-maturity patterns). The gas in the non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs has the same geochemical and isotopic characteristics (and therefore the same source) as the Carboniferous gas. TSR in the deepest Triassic reservoirs altered the gas composition reaching 100% dryness in the deepest, most sour reservoirs showing that ethane and propane react faster than methane during TSR. Ethane evolves to heavier carbon isotope values than methane during TSR leading to removal of the reversed alkane gas isotope trend found in the Carboniferous and non-sour Triassic and Permian reservoirs. However, methane was directly involved in TSR as shown by the progressive increase in its carbon isotope ratio as gas souring proceeded. CO2 increased in concentration as gas souring proceeded, but typical CO2 carbon isotope ratios in sour gases remained about -4 V-PDB showing that it was not solely derived from the oxidation of alkanes. Instead CO2 may partly result from reaction of sour gas with carbonate reservoir minerals, such as Fe-rich dolomite or calcite, resulting in pyrite growth as well as CO2-generation.

  8. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-30

    This progress report covers the following tasks: Computational geochemistry (Indiana University Laboratory); and geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin. Computational geochemistry covers; three- dimensional basin simulator; stress solver; two-dimensional basin simulator; organic reactions and multi-phase flow; grid optimization; database calibration and data input; and Piceance Basin initial simulation. Sub-tasks under geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin include: structural analysis; reservoir characterization; stratigraphic interpretation; seismic interpretation; and remote sensing interpretation.

  9. Spatial and temporal aspects of greenhouse gas emissions from Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Wu, B. F.; Zeng, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Before completion of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China, there was growing apprehension that it would become a major emitter of greenhouse gases (GHG): Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4) and Nitrous Oxide (N2O). We report monthly measurements for one year of the fluxes of these gases at multiple sites within the TGR, Yangtze River, China, and from several major tributaries, and immediately downstream of the dam. The tributary areas have lower CO2 fluxes than the main storage; CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere after passage through the turbines are negligible. Overall, TGR showed significantly lower CH4 emission rates than most new reservoirs in temperate and tropical regions. We attribute this to the well-oxygenated deep water and high water velocities which produce oxic mainstem conditions inimical to CH4 emission. TGR's CO2 fluxes were lower than most tropical reservoirs and higher than most temperate systems. This is due to the high load of metabolizable soil carbon delivered through erosion to the Yangtze River. Compared to fossil fuelled power plants of equivalent power output TGR is a very small GHG emitter, annual CO2-equivalent emissions are approximately 1.7% of a coal-fired generating plant of comparable power output.

  10. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This progress report covers field performance test plan and three- dimensional basins simulator. The southern portion of the Rulison Field was originally selected as the location for the seismic program. Due to permitting problems the survey was unable to go forward. The northern Rulison Field has been modeled to determine suitability for the seismic program. The survey has been located over an area that contains the best producing, most intensively fractured wells and the worst, least fractured wells. Western Geophysical surveyed in the 564 vibrator points and 996 receiver stations. Maps displaying the survey design and modeled offset ranges can be found in Appendix A. The seismic acquisition crew is scheduled to arrive on location by April 7th. The overall development of the fracture prediction simulator has led to new insights into the nature of fractured reservoirs. In particular, the investigators have placed them within the context of recent idea on basin compartments. These concepts an their overall view of the physico-chemical dynamics of fractured reservoir creation are summarized in the report included as Appendix B entitled ``Prediction of Fractured Reservoir Location and Characteristics: A Basin Modeling Approach.`` The full three dimensional, multi-process basin simulator, CIRF.B, is operational and is being tested.

  11. Exploratory Simulation Studies of Caprock Alteration Induced byStorage of CO2 in Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-11-23

    This report presents numerical simulations of isothermalreactive flows which might be induced in the caprock of an Italiandepleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.Our objective is to verify that CO2 geological disposal activitiesalready planned for the study area are safe and do not induce anyundesired environmental impact.Gas-water-rock interactions have beenmodelled under two different intial conditions, i.e., assuming that i)caprock is perfectly sealed, or ii) partially fractured. Field conditionsare better approximated in terms of the "sealed caprock model". Thefractured caprock model has been implemented because it permits toexplore the geochemical beahvior of the system under particularly severeconditions which are not currently encountered in the field, and then todelineate a sort of hypothetical maximum risk scenario.Major evidencessupporting the assumption of a sealed caprock stem from the fact that nogas leakages have been detected during the exploitation phase, subsequentreservoir repressurization due to the ingression of a lateral aquifer,and during several cycles of gas storage in the latest life of reservoirmanagement.An extensive program of multidisciplinary laboratory tests onrock properties, geochemical and microseismic monitoring, and reservoirsimulation studies is underway to better characterize the reservoir andcap-rock behavior before the performance of a planned CO2 sequestrationpilot test.In our models, fluid flow and mineral alteration are inducedin the caprock by penetration of high CO2 concentrations from theunderlying reservoir, i.e., it was assumed that large amounts of CO2 havebeen already injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effectof these geochemical transformations on the sealing efficiency of caprockformations. Batch and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling has been usedto investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Our simulationsaccount for fracture-matrix interactions, gas phase participation inmultiphase fluid flow and geochemical reactions, and kinetics offluid-rock interactions.The main objectives of the modeling are torecognize the geochemical processes or parameters to which theadvancement of high CO2 concentrations in the caprock is most sensitive,and to describe the most relevant mineralogical transformations occurringin the caprock as a consequence of such CO2 storage in the underlyingreservoir. We also examine the feedback of these geochemical processes onphysical properties such as porosity, and evaluate how the sealingcapacity of the caprock evolves in time.

  12. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  13. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  14. Magnetotelluric survey for exploration of a volcanic-rock reservoir in the Yurihara oil and gas field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Matsuo, Koichi; Minegishi, Masato

    1999-03-01

    The Yurihara oil and gas field is located on the southern edge of Akita Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In this area, drilling, surface geological surveys and many seismic surveys have been used to investigate the geological structure. Wells drilled into the Nishikurosawa Basalt Group (NBG) of Miocene age found oil and gas reservoirs at depths of 1.5--2 km. Oil and gas are now being produced commercially and further exploration is required in the surrounding areas. However, since the neighboring areas are covered with young volcanic products from the Chokai volcano, and have a rough topography, the subsurface distribution of the NBG must be investigated using other methods in addition to seismic reflection. According to the well data, the resistivity of the NBG is comparatively higher than that of the overlying sedimentary formations, and therefore the magnetotelluric (MT) method is expected to be useful for the estimation of the distribution of the NBG. An MT survey was conducted along three survey lines in this area. Each line trended east-west, perpendicular to the regional geological strike, and was composed of about 25 measurement sites. Induction vectors evaluated from the magnetic field show that this area has a two-dimensional structure. The evaluated resistivity sections are in agreement with the log data. In conclusion, the authors were able to detect resistive layers (the NBG) below conductive layers. The results indicate that the NBG becomes gradually less resistive from north to south. In the center of the northern line, an uplifted resistive area is interpreted as corresponding to the reservoir. By comparison with a seismic section, the authors prove the effectiveness of the integration of seismic and MT surveys for the investigation of the morphology and internal structure of the NBG. On other survey lines, the resistive uplifted zones are interpreted as possible prospective areas.

  15. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  16. Conference on the topic: {open_quotes}Exploration and production of petroleum and gas from chalk reservoirs worldwide{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.G.

    1995-07-01

    More than 170 delegates from 14 countries in Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia took part in a conference on the topic: Exploration and Production of Petroleum and Gas from Chalk Reservoirs Worldwide. The conference was held in Copenhagen, Denmark in September,1994, and was a joint meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), and the European Association of Petroleum Geoscientists and Engineers (EAPG). In addition to the opening remarks, 25 oral and nine poster reports were presented. The topics included chalk deposits as reservoir rocks, the occurrence of chalk deposits worldwide, the North Sea oil and gas fields, and other related topics.

  17. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-07-26

    This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

  18. Anisotropic Velocities of Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Fractured Reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2009-01-01

    During the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01), one of the richest marine gas hydrate accumulations was discovered at drill site NGHP-01-10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, offshore of southeast India. The occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate at this site is primarily controlled by the presence of fractures. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from P- and S-wave velocities, assuming that gas hydrate-bearing sediments (GHBS) are isotropic, are much higher than those estimated from the pressure cores. To reconcile this difference, an anisotropic GHBS model is developed and applied to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocities, assuming high-angle fractures, agree well with saturations estimated from the cores. An anisotropic GHBS model assuming two-component laminated media - one component is fracture filled with 100-percent gas hydrate, and the other component is the isotropic water-saturated sediment - adequately predicts anisotropic velocities at the research site.

  19. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D. (2010) - Numerical Study of gas evolution and transport behaviors in natural gas hydrate reservoirs; CSUG/SPE 137439. Wright J.F., Uddin M., Dallimore S.R. and Coombe D. (2011) - Mechanisms of gas evolution and transport in a producing gas hydrate reservoir: an unconventional basis for successful history matching of observed production flow data; International Conference on Gas Hydrates (ICGH 2011).

  20. Ultra trace determination of fluorobenzoic acids in reservoir and ground water using isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mller, Karsten; Seubert, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The accurate ultra-trace analysis of six fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) via isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry through their deuterated analogues is described. North Sea reservoir and ground water samples were spiked with six deuterated FBAs (dFBAs), enriched using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysed using GC/MS after derivatisation with BF 3 MeOH. All FBAs were enriched and determined simultaneously. SPE allowed a 250-fold enrichment of the acids if 100 mL of sample volume was used. The method enables the determination of FBAs down to the range of 8-37 ng L (-1) with recoveries between 66 % and 85 %. It uses low amounts of chemicals and is adaptable to larger and smaller sample volumes. PMID:24620719

  1. Radionuclide Migration at the Rio Blanco Site, A Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Clay A. Cooper; Ming Ye; Jenny Chapman; Craig Shirley

    2005-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability gas reservoirs. The third and final project in the program, Project Rio Blanco, was conducted in Rio Blanco County, in northwestern Colorado. In this experiment, three 33-kiloton nuclear explosives were simultaneously detonated in a single emplacement well in the Mesaverde Group and Fort Union Formation, at depths of 1,780, 1,899, and 2,039 m below land surface on May 17, 1973. The objective of this work is to estimate lateral distances that tritium released from the detonations may have traveled in the subsurface and evaluate the possible effect of postulated natural-gas development on radionuclide migration. Other radionuclides were considered in the analysis, but the majority occur in relatively immobile forms (such as nuclear melt glass). Of the radionuclides present in the gas phase, tritium dominates in terms of quantity of radioactivity in the long term and contribution to possible whole body exposure. One simulation is performed for {sup 85}Kr, the second most abundant gaseous radionuclide produced after tritium.

  2. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  3. Detecting Low-Frequency Seismic Signals From Surface Microseismic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing of a Tight-Sand Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Zhang, H.; Zeng, X.

    2013-12-01

    For both surface and downhole microseismic monitoring, generally geophones with resonance frequency greater than 4.5 Hz are used. Therefore, useful information below 4.5 Hz may not be detected. In a recent experiment, we installed14 3-component broadband seismic sensors on the surface to monitor the process of hydraulic fracturing of tight sand gas reservoirs. The sensor has a broad frequency range of 30 s to 100 Hz with a very high sensitivity of 2400 m/v/s. The reservoirs are located around 1.5 km depth. There are two fracturing stages along a vertical well, lasting for about 2 hours. We recorded the data continuously during the fracturing process at a sampling rate of 50 Hz. From time-frequency analysis of continuous data, we found some high-energy signals at resonance frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz and a relatively weaker signal at a resonance frequency of ~27 Hz during the hydraulic fracturing. These signals with various resonance frequencies are likely caused by vibrations of high-pressure pipes. In addition to the resonance frequencies, the time-frequency analysis also showed consistent low frequency signals between 3 and 4 Hz at different time. The move-out analysis showed that these signals traveled at shear-wave speeds. We have detected 77 effective low frequency events during the 2-hour hydraulic fracturing process, among which 42 were located by a grid-search location method. The horizontal distribution of the events aligns with the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. Because of the uncertainty in the velocity model, the low-frequency seismic events are not located in the fracturing depths. Recently, long-period, long-duration seismic events in the frequency band of 10 to 80 Hz were detected during hydraulic fracture stimulation of a shale gas reservoir, which may be caused by slow slip along faults/fractures (Das and Zoback, 2011). In the active volcanic areas, monochromatic events that are related to circulation of hydrothermal fluids are often detected. Our detected low frequency seismic signals have waveforms and frequency contents resembling the monochromatic events detected in volcanic areas, therefore we believe they are also likely caused by movement of fracturing fluids.

  4. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  5. Laboratory analysis of gas hydrate cores for evaluation of reservoir conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.

    1984-06-01

    Methodology and procedures for the study of hydrate cores are detailed. Topics discussed are the (1) equipment and procedures for the formation and evaluation of hydrate cores in the laboratory, (2) the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates, (3) the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation, (4) conditions in the earth where hydrates can form, (5) kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, and (6) heat transfer to gas hydrates. Empirical correlations for these properties and kinetic behavior are given. 24 references, 39 figures, 10 tables.

  6. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400 level receiver array can be used to obtain 3D 9C data. These 9C borehole seismic data provide both compressional wave and shear wave information that can be used for quantitative prediction of rock and pore fluid types. The 400-level borehole receiver array has been deployed successfully in a number of oil and gas wells during the course of this project, and each survey has resulted in marked improvements in imaging of geologic features that are critical for oil or gas production but were previously considered to be below the limits of seismic resolution. This added level of reservoir detail has resulted in improved well placement in the oil and gas fields that have been drilled using the Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} images. In the future, the 400-level downhole seismic receiver array is expected to continue to improve reservoir characterization and drilling success in deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs.

  7. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  8. A workflow for building and calibrating 3-D geomechanical models &ndash a case study for a gas reservoir in the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, K.; Henk, A.

    2013-10-01

    The optimal use of conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs depends, amongst other things, on the local tectonic stress field. For example, wellbore stability, orientation of hydraulically induced fractures and - especially in fractured reservoirs - permeability anisotropies are controlled by the present-day in situ stresses. Faults and lithological changes can lead to stress perturbations and produce local stresses that can significantly deviate from the regional stress field. Geomechanical reservoir models aim for a robust, ideally "pre-drilling" prediction of the local variations in stress magnitude and orientation. This requires a numerical modelling approach that is capable to incorporate the specific geometry and mechanical properties of the subsurface reservoir. The workflow presented in this paper can be used to build 3-D geomechanical models based on the finite element (FE) method and ranging from field-scale models to smaller, detailed submodels of individual fault blocks. The approach is successfully applied to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. The in situ stresses predicted by the geomechanical FE model were calibrated against stress data actually observed, e.g. borehole breakouts and extended leak-off tests. Such a validated model can provide insights into the stress perturbations in the inter-well space and undrilled parts of the reservoir. In addition, the tendency of the existing fault network to slip or dilate in the present-day stress regime can be addressed.

  9. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  10. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  11. Application of geo-microbial prospecting method for finding oil and gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, M. A.; Hasan, Syed Zaheer; Rao, P. L. Srinivasa; Boruah, Annapurna; Sudarshan, V.; Kumar, B.; Harinarayana, T.

    2015-03-01

    Microbial prospecting of hydrocarbons is based on the detection of anomalous population of hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria in the surface soils, indicates the presence of subsurface oil and gas accumulation. The technique is based on the seepage of light hydrocarbon gases such as C1-C4 from the oil and gas pools to the shallow surface that provide the suitable conditions for the development of highly specialized bacterial population. These bacteria utilize hydrocarbon gases as their only food source and are found enriched in the near surface soils above the hydrocarbon bearing structures. The methodology involves the collection of soil samples from the survey area, packing, preservation and storage of samples in pre-sterilized sample bags under aseptic and cold conditions till analysis and isolation and enumeration of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria such as methane, ethane, propane, and butane oxidizers. The contour maps for the population density of hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria are drawn and the data can be integrated with geological, geochemical, geophysical methods to evaluate the hydrocarbon prospect of an area and to prioritize the drilling locations thereby reducing the drilling risks and achieve higher success in petroleum exploration. Microbial Prospecting for Oil and Gas (MPOG) method success rate has been reported to be 90%. The paper presents details of microbial prospecting for oil and gas studies, excellent methodology, future development trends, scope, results of study area, case studies and advantages.

  12. Ordovician carbonate buildups: Potential gas reservoirs in the Ordos basin, central China

    SciTech Connect

    Huaida Hsu )

    1991-03-01

    The Ordos basin of central China covers an area of about 25,000 km{sup 2}. A series of eastward moving overthrusts developed along its western flank, but most of the basin consists of a stable slope that dips westward less than one degree. The basin contains sediments from Sinian to Middle Ordovician and from the Middle Carboniferous to Cretaceous. Its evolutionary history is similar to that of the Alberta basin. Recently drilled wildcat wells have produced commercial gas flows that are closely associated with Ordovician carbonate buildups and a weathered surface between the Ordovician and Carboniferous. Most of the buildups consist of agal mounds; however, some Middle Ordovician reefs developed in the western portion and along the southern margin of the Ordos basin. More than 200 buildups were delineated using seismic stratigraphic techniques. They can be divided into four distinct types. The growth and distribution of buildups were controlled by sea-level fluctuations. The interpretations made in this study were based on the integration of results from a variety of analyses including vertical profiling, differential interformational velocity analysis, amplitude versus offset comparisons, G-log analysis, seismic modeling techniques, and high-precision gravity surveys. The best gas prospects are the Ordovician carbonate buildups distributed around the basin's central uplift. The delineation of carbonate buildups and the demonstration that they are associated with commercial gas flows open the gate for future gas exploration in this area.

  13. Increasing Production from Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs by Optimizing Zone Isolation for Successful Stimulation Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2005-03-31

    Maximizing production from wells drilled in low-permeability reservoirs, such as the Barnett Shale, is determined by cementing, stimulation, and production techniques employed. Studies show that cementing can be effective in terms of improving fracture effectiveness by 'focusing' the frac in the desired zone and improving penetration. Additionally, a method is presented for determining the required properties of the set cement at various places in the well, with the surprising result that uphole cement properties in wells destined for multiple-zone fracturing is more critical than those applied to downhole zones. Stimulation studies show that measuring pressure profiles and response during Pre-Frac Injection Test procedures prior to the frac job are critical in determining if a frac is indicated at all, as well as the type and size of the frac job. This result is contrary to current industry practice, in which frac jobs are designed well before the execution, and carried out as designed on location. Finally, studies show that most wells in the Barnett Shale are production limited by liquid invasion into the wellbore, and determinants are presented for when rod or downhole pumps are indicated.

  14. Geological implications and controls on the determination of water saturation in shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, David; Lovell, Mike; Davies, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    A significant challenge to the petrophysical evaluation of shale gas systems can be attributed to the conductivity behaviour of clay minerals and entrained clay bound waters. This is compounded by centimetre to sub-millimetre vertical and lateral heterogeneity in formation composition and structure. Where despite significant variation in formation geological and therefore petrophysical properties, we routinely rely on conventional resistivity methods for the determination of water saturation (Sw), and hence the free gas saturation (Sg) in gas bearing mudstones. The application of resistivity based methods is the subject of continuing debate, and there is often significant uncertainty in both how they are applied and the saturation estimates they produce. This is partly a consequence of the view that "the quantification of the behaviour of shale conductivity....has only limited geological significance" (Rider 1986). As a result, there is a separation between our geological understanding of shale gas systems and the petrophysical rational and methods employed to evaluate them. In response to this uncertainty, many petrophysicists are moving away from the use of more complex 'shaly-sand' based evaluation techniques and returning to traditional Archie methods for answers. The Archie equation requires various parameter inputs such as porosity and saturation exponents (m and n), as well as values for connate fluid resistivity (Rw). Many of these parameters are difficult to determine in shale gas systems, where obtaining a water sample, or carrying out laboratory experiments on recovered core is often technically impractical. Here we assess the geological implications and controls on variations in pseudo Archie parameters across two geological formations, using well data spanning multiple basinal settings for a prominent shale gas play in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin. The results, of numerical analysis and systematic modification of parameter values to minimise the error between core derived Sw (Dean Stark analysis) and computed Sw, links sample structure with composition, highlighting some unanticipated impacts of clay minerals on the effective bulk fluid resistivity (Rwe) and thus formation resistivity (Rt). In addition, it highlights simple corrective empirical adaptations that can significantly reduce the error in Sw estimation for some wells. Observed results hint at the possibility of developing a predictive capability in selecting Archie parameter values based on geological facies association and log composition indicators (i.e. V Clay), establishing a link between formation depositional systems and their petrophysical properties in gas bearing mudstones. Rider, M.H., 1986. The Geological Interpretation of Well Logs, Blackie.

  15. Rate and State Frictional Properties of Shale Gas Reservoir Rocks and FIB/SEM Microscopy of Lab-Generated Fault Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, A. H.; Zoback, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the slip behavior of natural faults in shale gas reservoirs under the conditions of hydraulic stimulation, we conduct laboratory investigations of the frictional and hydrologic properties of shale gas reservoir rocks. We report on several initial studies of the frictional properties of cores from the Haynesville and Eagleford shale reservoirs, performed under dry and wet conditions and in-situ confining and pore pressures. The results of velocity-stepping experiments show strongly velocity-strengthening frictional behavior at sliding velocities ranging from 0.1 - 100 ?m/s and sliding displacements of up to 5 mm. Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy of the fault sliding surfaces from these experiments reveals slickenside lineations in the direction of fault slip and significant production of sub-micron clay gouge. In addition, fault surface damage is visible in the form of bedding-parallel, micron scale cracks, which form at pre-existing pores in the intact shale matrix, suggesting a mechanism for permeability enhancement during slow slip. These results are evaluated in terms of rate-and-state constitutive models for frictional stability to develop a physical model for induced slip by hydraulic stimulation in shale gas reservoirs.

  16. Gas reservoir of a hyper-luminous quasar at z = 2.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, C.; Bongiorno, A.; Fiore, F.; Krips, M.; Brusa, M.; Daddi, E.; Gavignaud, I.; Maiolino, R.; Piconcelli, E.; Sargent, M.; Vignali, C.; Zappacosta, L.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Understanding the relationship between the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central super-massive black holes (SMBH) is one of the main topics in extragalactic astrophysics. Links and feedback may reciprocally affect both black hole and galaxy growth. Aims: Observations of the CO line at the main epoch of galaxy and SMBH assembly (z = 2-4) are crucial to investigating the gas mass, star formation, and accretion onto SMBHs, and the effect of AGN feedback. Potential correlations between AGN and host galaxy properties can be highlighted by observing extreme objects. Methods: We targeted CO(3-2) in ULAS J1539+0557, a hyper-luminous quasar (Lbol > 1048 erg/s) at z = 2.658, selected through its unusual red colour in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (ULAS). Results: We find a molecular gas mass of 4.1 0.8 1010 M?, by adopting a conversion factor ? = 0.8 M? K-1 km s-1 pc2, and a gas fraction of ~0.4-0.1, depending mostly on the assumed source inclination. We also find a robust lower limit to the star-formation rate (SFR = 250-1600 M?/yr) and star-formation efficiency (SFE = 25-350 L?/(K km s-1 pc2) by comparing the observed optical-near-infrared spectral energy distribution with AGN and galaxy templates. The black hole gas consumption timescale, M(H2) /?acc, is ~160 Myr, similar to or higher than the gas consumption timescale. Conclusions: The gas content and the star formation efficiency are similar to those of other high-luminosity, highly obscured quasars, and at the lower end of the star-formation efficiency of unobscured quasars, in line with predictions from AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary scenarios. Further measurements of the (sub)mm continuum in this and similar sources are mandatory to obtain a robust observational picture of the AGN evolutionary sequence. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  17. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, K. Decker; Yang, Yujin; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A.

    2015-03-01

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H? emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO(1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30 m and SMT 10 m telescopes in 32 nearby (0.01 < z < 0.12) post-starburst galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect CO in 17 (53%). Using CO as a tracer for molecular hydrogen, and a Galactic conversion factor, we obtain molecular gas masses of M(H2) = 108.6-109.8 M ? and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of ~10-2-10-0.5, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on M(H2) for the 15 undetected galaxies range from 107.7 M ? to 109.7 M ?, with the median more consistent with early-type galaxies than with star-forming galaxies. Upper limits on the post-starburst star formation rates (SFRs) are lower by ~10 than for star-forming galaxies with the same M(H2). We also compare the molecular gas surface densities (? _H_2) to upper limits on the SFR surface densities (?SFR), finding a significant offset, with lower ?SFR for a given ? _H_2 than is typical for star-forming galaxies. This offset from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation suggests that post-starburst galaxies have lower star formation efficiency, a low CO-to-H2 conversion factor characteristic of ultraluminous infrared galaxies, and/or a bottom-heavy initial mass function, although uncertainties in the rate and distribution of current star formation remain.

  18. A cold-gas reservoir to fuel the M 31 nuclear black hole and stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, A.-L.; Combes, F.

    2013-01-01

    With IRAM-30 m/HERA, we have detected CO(2-1) gas complexes within 30 arcsec (~100 pc) from the center of M 31 that amount to a minimum total mass of 4.2 104 M? (one third of the positions are detected). Averaging the whole HERA field, we show that there is no additional undetected diffuse component. Moreover, the gas detection is associated with gas lying on the far side of the M 31 center as no extinction is observed in the optical, but some emission is present on infrared Spitzer maps. The kinematics is complex. (1) The velocity pattern is mainly redshifted: the dynamical center of the gas differs from the black hole position and the maximum of optical emission, and only the redshifted side is seen in our data. (2) Several velocity components are detected in some lines of sight. Our interpretation is supported by the reanalysis of the effect of dust on a complete planetary nebula sample. Two dust components are detected with respective position angles of 37 deg and -66 deg. This is compatible with a scenario where the superposition of the (PA = 37 deg) disk is dominated by the 10 kpc ring and the inner 0.7 kpc ring detected in infrared data, whose position angle (-66 deg) we measured for the first time. The large-scale disk, which dominates the HI data, is steeply inclined (i = 77 deg), warped and superposed on the line of sight on the less inclined inner ring. The detected CO emission might come from both components. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A27

  19. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in sandstone reservoirs of the Cotton Valley Group, U.S. Gulf Coast, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eoff, Jennifer D.; Biewick, Laura R.H.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Burke, Lauri; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Dubiel, Russell F.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.; Kinney, Scott A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Paxton, Stanley T.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Pitman, Janet K.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered mean volumes of 14 million barrels of conventional oil, 430 billion cubic feet of conventional gas, 34,028 billion cubic feet of continuous gas, and a mean total of 391 million barrels of natural gas liquids in sandstone reservoirs of the Upper Jurassic–Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group in onshore lands and State waters of the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  20. Estimating Effective Seismic Anisotropy Of Coal Seam Gas Reservoirs from Sonic Log Data Using Orthorhombic Buckus-style Upscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Lutz; Tyson, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Fracture density and orientation are key parameters controlling productivity of coal seam gas reservoirs. Seismic anisotropy can help to identify and quantify fracture characteristics. In particular, wide offset and dense azimuthal coverage land seismic recordings offers the opportunity for recovery of anisotropy parameters. In many coal seam gas reservoirs (eg. Walloon Subgroup in the Surat Basin, Queensland, Australia (Esterle et al. 2013)) the thickness of coal-beds and interbeds (e.g mud-stone) are well below the seismic wave length (0.3-1m versus 5-15m). In these situations, the observed seismic anisotropy parameters represent effective elastic properties of the composite media formed of fractured, anisotropic coal and isotropic interbed. As a consequence observed seismic anisotropy cannot directly be linked to fracture characteristics but requires a more careful interpretation. In the paper we will discuss techniques to estimate effective seismic anisotropy parameters from well log data with the objective to improve the interpretation for the case of layered thin coal beds. In the first step we use sonic log data to reconstruct the elasticity parameters as function of depth (at the resolution of the sonic log). It is assumed that within a sample fractures are sparse, of the same size and orientation, penny-shaped and equally spaced. Following classical fracture model this can be modeled as an elastic horizontally transversely isotropic (HTI) media (Schoenberg & Sayers 1995). Under the additional assumption of dry fractures, normal and tangential fracture weakness is estimated from slow and fast shear wave velocities of the sonic log. In the second step we apply Backus-style upscaling to construct effective anisotropy parameters on an appropriate length scale. In order to honor the HTI anisotropy present at each layer we have developed a new extension of the classical Backus averaging for layered isotropic media (Backus 1962) . Our new method assumes layered HTI media with constant anisotropy orientation as recovered in the first step. It leads to an effective horizontal orthorhombic elastic model. From this model Thomsen-style anisotropy parameters are calculated to derive azimuth-dependent normal move out (NMO) velocities (see Grechka & Tsvankin 1998). In our presentation we will show results of our approach from sonic well logs in the Surat Basin to investigate the potential of reconstructing S-wave velocity anisotropy and fracture density from azimuth dependent NMO velocities profiles.

  1. GAS RESERVOIRS AND STAR FORMATION IN A FORMING GALAXY CLUSTER AT zbsime0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-10

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of 'field-like' galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z {approx} 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  2. Radio Continuum Variability and Molecular Gas Reservoirs in the Type-Transitioning Seyfert Galaxy Mrk 590

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Jun Yi; Vestergaard, Marianne; Casasola, Viviana; Peterson, Bradley M.

    2015-08-01

    Sometime between 2006 and 2012, the broad H? emission line of Mrk 590, once classified as a bona-fide Seyfert 1 galaxy, has completely disappeared! The optical-UV continuum emission has decreased to the point where it can be fully accounted for by stellar population models of the host galaxy. As such, Mrk 590 would now be classified as a Seyfert 1.9 or 2 galaxy, which goes against the prevailing scheme of AGN classification and unification where the presence of broad emission lines depends only on source orientation. Similar decreases in X-ray and radio continuum fluxes show that the central engine of Mrk 590 may be turning off or transitioning into a radiatively inefficient mode of accretion. We discuss the origin of the compact, unresolved radio emission in Mrk 590 and the physics of its variability in relation to the variability observed at other wavelengths, based on archival radio data and new VLBI observations. We also present recent ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) spectral line and sub-mm continuum emission; these provide the strongest limits to date on the molecular gas mass in the central ~100 pc, plus reveal the gas distribution and kinematics in the central kpc, to determine if this intriguing AGN is indeed running out of fuel.

  3. A Huge Reservoir of Ionized Gas around the Milky Way: Accounting for the Missing Mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.; Nicastro, F.; Galeazzi, M.

    2012-09-01

    Most of the baryons from galaxies have been "missing" and several studies have attempted to map the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies in their quest. We report on X-ray observations made with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory probing the warm-hot phase of the CGM of our Milky Way at about 106 K. We detect O VII and O VIII absorption lines at z = 0 in extragalactic sight lines and measure accurate column densities using both K? and K? lines of O VII. We then combine these measurements with the emission measure of the Galactic halo from literature to derive the density and the path length of the CGM. We show that the warm-hot phase of the CGM is massive, extending over a large region around the Milky Way, with a radius of over 100 kpc. The mass content of this phase is over 10 billion solar masses, many times more than that in cooler gas phases and comparable to the total baryonic mass in the disk of the Galaxy. The missing mass of the Galaxy appears to be in this warm-hot gas phase.

  4. Deep Subsurface Biodegradation of Sedimentary Organic Matter in a Methane-Rich Shale Gas Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formolo, M. J.; Petsch, S.; Salacup, J.; Waldron, P.; Martini, A.; Nusslein, K.

    2006-12-01

    Extensive, sustained subsurface microbial activity in the Antrim Shale (Late Devonian, Michigan Basin, USA) has led to the accumulation of an important unconventional natural gas resource, from which is produced ~14 million m3 of methane per day. Both geochemical and molecular evidence supports a community comprising diverse methanogens, fermentative microorganisms, and little else. The diversity of methanogens is strongly associated with a sharp gradient in formation water salinity spanning 10-4000 mM Cl-1. Analysis of hydrocarbon biomarkers within the Antrim reveal patterns of degradation that are directly associated with zones of active methanogenesis, with marked differences observed between methane- producing and non-producing sections of the formation. Maturity and source indicators show that these patterns do not result from varying degrees of thermal maturity or source inputs across the Basin, but instead demonstrate that biodegradation is confined solely to regions of the Basin exhibiting extensive methanogenesis. Calculated biodegradation indices provide evidence for nearly quantitative loss of saturated hydrocarbons, specifically n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids, during biodegradation associated with methanogenesis. These results are the first to document deep subsurface ancient sedimentary organic matter biodegradation associated with the formation of economic microbial gas reserves within low permeability, thermally-immature source rocks. As such, the results provide insight into microbial activity in the deep subsurface, specifically the role that methanogen-dominated communities may play in carbon-rich, electron acceptor-poor sedimentary basins.

  5. Scientific Challenges of Producing Natural Gas from Organic-Rich Shales - From the Nano-Scale to the Reservoir Scale (Louis Nel Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, Mark D.

    2013-04-01

    In this talk I will discuss several on-going research projects with the PhD students and post-Docs in my group that are investigating the wide variety of factors affecting the success of stimulating gas production from extremely low permeability organic-rich shales. First, I will present laboratory measurements of pore structure, adsorption and nano-scale fluid transport on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Marcellus and Horn River shale (all in North America). I will also discuss how these factors affect ultimate gas recovery. Second, I present several lines of evidence that indicate that during hydraulic fracturing stimulation of shale gas reservoirs there is pervasive slow slip occurring on pre-existing fractures and faults that are not detected by standard microseismic monitoring. I will also present laboratory and modeling studies that demonstrate why slowly slipping faults are to be expected. In many cases, slow slip on faults may be the most important process responsible for stimulating gas production in the reservoirs. Finally, I discuss our research on the viscoplastic behavior of the shales and what viscoplasticity implies for the evolution of the physical properties of the reservoir and in situ stress magnitudes.

  6. Impact of Shallow Convection on the Gas Hydrate Reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico Salt Tectonics Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2005-12-01

    Previous modeling studies have suggested that subseafloor hydrogeology in the northern Gulf of Mexico could be strongly affected by the presence of salt domes, but these efforts were at the time limited to formulations that decoupled thermal and chemical buoyancy. The earlier studies concluded that downwelling associated with the negative buoyancy of dense briny fluids dominated upwelling associated with positive thermal buoyancy near salt domes. In this study, we use modern hydrologic models that fully couple thermal and chemical effects to re-examine this problem with particular focus on Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate reservoirs. We first demonstrate that even slight variations in seafloor bathymetry lead to the onset of shallow convection in marine sediments and that the existence of such convective patterns is not dependent on the presence of salt or the geometry of the salt body. Bathymetric highs are generally the loci of upwelling, while downwelling is concentrated in bathymetric lows. The length scale of the convective cells depends on the wavelength of seafloor topography but is generally hundreds to less than 2000 m, consistent with observational evidence one of us has earlier reported for the Mississippi Canyon and Garden Banks gas hydrate areas. The model calculations are consistent with the observed pattern of chloride, sulfate, and thermal anomalies, suggesting that the modeling results can be used to estimate the variation in the depth of hydrate stability and hydrate occurrence in these highly dynamic systems. Our simulations of the transient evolution of convective regimes near salt domes show that the near-surface, thermally-driven system eventually separates from the deeper, chemically-driven system dominated by stable, dense brines. In this scenario, the gas hydrate stability zone will change as a function of time due to the changing hydraulic regime in the sediments. Superposed on such hydraulic effects on the hydrate stability zone would be the influence of better understood processes such as sedimentation or erosion of the sedimentary column. Finally, we explicitly consider the role of faults in focusing fluids in these systems and conclude that faults can radically perturb the chemical and thermal conditions near salt domes to the point of entirely dominating the flow field and thus the gas hydrate stability field. The results are applied to zones of focused flux, such as the mud mounds in the Garden Banks and Mississippi Canyon areas and the seeps at Bush Hill, and to a zone of 'diffuse advective flux' characterized by a regional BSR at Keathley Canyon.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

    2004-12-01

    The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can be used by operators to guide treatment selection in wells with significant non-darcy damage component. In addition, the effectiveness of the remediation treatment designed to reduce damage caused by the inorganic precipitate siderite was measured, and the benefits of this work are extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry. Similarly the potential benefits realized from more effective identification and treatment of wells with significant nondarcy damage component are also presented, and these benefits are also extrapolated to the entire U.S. storage industry.

  8. The Impacts of Rock Composition and Properties on the Ability to Stimulate Production of Ultra-Low Permeability Oil and Gas Reservoirs Through Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Sone, H.; Kohli, A. H.; Heller, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this talk, we present the results of several research projects investigating how rock properties, natural fractures and the state of stress affect the success of hydraulic fracturing operations during stimulation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. First, through laboratory measurements on samples of the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville and Horn River shales, we discuss pore structure, adsorption and permeability as well as the importance of clay content on the viscoplastic behavior of shale formations. Second, we present several lines of evidence that indicates that the principal way in which hydraulic fracturing stimulates production from shale gas reservoirs is by inducing slow slip on pre-existing fractures and faults, which are not detected by conventional microseismic monitoring, Finally, we discuss how hydraulic fracturing can be optimized in response to variations of rock properties.

  9. Sweet spots discrimination in shale gas reservoirs using seismic and well-logs data. A case study from the Worth basin in the Barnett shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2014-05-01

    Here, we present a case study of sweet spots discrimination in shale gas reservoirs located in the Worth basin of the Barnett shale using seismic and well-logs data. Seismic attributes such the Chaos and the ANT-Tracking are used for natural fractures system identification from seismic data, the maps of the stress and the Poisson ratio obtained from the upscaling of well-logs data of a horizontal well are able to provide an information about the drilling direction which is usually in the minimum horizontal stress profile, the map of the Poisson ratio can provide an information hardness of the source rock. The set of well logs data is used for geo-mechanical and petrophysical discrimination of the sweet spots, after discrimination the identified zones are useful for reserves estimation from unconventional shale gas reservoir.

  10. Radon-222 content of natural gas samples from Upper and Middle Devonian sandstone and shale reservoirs in Pennsylvania—preliminary data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, E.L.; Kraemer, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Samples of natural gas were collected as part of a study of formation water chemistry in oil and gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. Nineteen samples (plus two duplicates) were collected from 11 wells producing gas from Upper Devonian sandstones and the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania. The samples were collected from valves located between the wellhead and the gas-water separator. Analyses of the radon content of the gas indicated 222Rn (radon-222) activities ranging from 1 to 79 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) with an overall median of 37 pCi/L. The radon activities of the Upper Devonian sandstone samples overlap to a large degree with the activities of the Marcellus Shale samples.

  11. Structural evolution of the Pematang Reservoirs, Kelabu-Jingga Gas Fields, Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, J.E.; Atmodipurwo, S.P.; Rauf, A. )

    1994-07-01

    The Kelabu-Jingga area, located in the Kiri trough of the central Sumatra Basin, produces gas from the Paleogene Pematang Group. The Pematang Group consists of sandstones, claystones, organic-rich shales, and conglomerates deposited in fluvial and fresh-water deltaic and lacustrine environments. Deposition occurred during a regional extensional tectonic event that resulted from a major plate reorganization in the Pacific and Indian oceans 43 m.y. Subsequent rifting and basin development occurred in the Kiri Trough area in central Sumatra. Deposition of the Pematang Group during active extension resulted in lateral discontinuity of individual sand members. Syngenetic listric faults and associated [open quotes]rollover[close quotes] formed during rifting. During the Neogene, oblique convergence resulted in a regional transpressional event, which overprinted the earlier extensional style of faulting. In the Kiri Trough area, both extensional and transpressional features are evident. A Jingga Kelabu 3-D seismic survey combined with wireline logs (including dipmeter and FMS data) and core provides geological information useful for identifying both faults and depositional trends within the Pematang Group. The resultant maps and cross sections show hydrocarbon reserves and new drilling opportunities in the Kelabu-Jingga fields.

  12. CHARACTERIZING MARINE GAS-HYDRATE RESERVOIRS AND DETERMINING MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MARINE GAS-HYDRATE STRATA WITH 4-COMPONENT OCEAN-BOTTOM-CABLE SEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    B.A. Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; P. Murray; L.J. Wood assisted by K. Rogers

    2002-01-01

    The technical approach taken in this gas-hydrate research is unique because it is based on applying large-scale, 3-D, multi-component seismic surveys to improve the understanding of marine gas-hydrate systems. Other gas-hydrate research uses only single-component seismic technology. In those rare instances when multi-component seismic data have been acquired for gas-hydrate research, the data acquisition has involved only a few receiver stations and a few source stations, sometimes only three or four of each. In contrast, the four-component, 3-D, ocean-bottom-cable (4C3D OBC) data used in this study were acquired at thousands of receiver stations spaced 50 m apart over an area of approximately 1,000 km{sup 2} using wavefields generated at thousands of source stations spaced 75 m apart over this same survey area. The reason for focusing research attention on marine multi-component seismic data is that 4C3D OBC will provide a converted-SV image of gas-hydrate systems in addition to an improved P-wave image. Because P and SV reflectivities differ at some stratal surfaces, P and SV data provide two independent, and different, images of subsurface geology. The existence of these two independent seismic images and the availability of facies-sensitive SV seismic attributes, which can be combined with conventional facies-sensitive, P-wave seismic attributes, means that marine gas-hydrate systems should be better evaluated using multi-component seismic data than using conventional single-component seismic data. Conventional seismic attributes, such as instantaneous reflection amplitude and reflection coherency, have been extracted from the P and SV data volumes created from the 4C3D OBC data used in this research. Comparisons of these attributes and comparisons of P and SV time slices and vertical slices show that SV data provide a more reliable image of stratigraphy and structure associated with gas-invaded strata than do P-wave data. This finding confirms that multi-component seismic data will be more valuable than conventional P-wave seismic data for exploiting gas-hydrate reservoirs that cause gas invasion into surrounding strata. Published laboratory studies have shown that the ratio of P-wave velocity (V{sub p}) and SV velocity (V{sub s}) is an important parameter for identifying lithofacies. (In this report, the subscript S that accompanies a parameter can be replaced with the subscript SV to more accurately define the type of shear wave data used in this study.) Seismic estimates of V{sub p}/V{sub s} can be made when multi-component seismic data are acquired. Seismic-based V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratios are being analyzed across the research study area to determine what types of shallow lithofacies can be distinguished by this velocity parameter. These research findings will be summarized in the final project report.

  13. Microseismic study of an underground natural gas storage reservoir. Vol. 2. Compilation of field data, analysis and results

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, H.R. Jr.; Mowrey, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Volume 2 deals almost exclusively with the acquisition and detailed processing of the microseismic data obtained from the New Haven, Michigan site and the analysis of these data in terms of various reservoir parameters. The study concluded that the reservoir stability increased with higher storage pressures.

  14. Drill Cuttings-based Methodology to Optimize Multi-stage Hydraulic Fracturing in Horizontal Wells and Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Mercado, Camilo Ernesto

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques have become almost mandatory technologies for economic exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs. Key to commercial success is minimizing the risk while drilling and hydraulic fracturing these wells. Data collection is expensive and as a result this is one of the first casualties during budget cuts. As a result complete data sets in horizontal wells are nearly always scarce. In order to minimize the data scarcity problem, the research addressed throughout this thesis concentrates on using drill cuttings, an inexpensive direct source of information, for developing: 1) A new methodology for multi-stage hydraulic fracturing optimization of horizontal wells without any significant increases in operational costs. 2) A new method for petrophysical evaluation in those wells with limited amount of log information. The methods are explained using drill cuttings from the Nikanassin Group collected in the Deep Basin of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). Drill cuttings are the main source of information for the proposed methodology in Item 1, which involves the creation of three 'log tracks' containing the following parameters for improving design of hydraulic fracturing jobs: (a) Brittleness Index, (b) Measured Permeability and (c) An Indicator of Natural Fractures. The brittleness index is primarily a function of Poisson's ratio and Young Modulus, parameters that are obtained from drill cuttings and sonic logs formulations. Permeability is measured on drill cuttings in the laboratory. The indication of natural fractures is obtained from direct observations on drill cuttings under the microscope. Drill cuttings are also the main source of information for the new petrophysical evaluation method mentioned above in Item 2 when well logs are not available. This is important particularly in horizontal wells where the amount of log data is almost non-existent in the vast majority of the wells. By combining data from drill cuttings and previously available empirical relationships developed from cores it is possible to estimate water saturations, pore throat apertures, capillary pressures, flow units, porosity (or cementation) exponent m, true formation resistivity Rt, distance to a water table (if present), and to distinguish the contributions of viscous and diffusion-like flow in the tight gas formation. The method further allows the construction of Pickett plots using porosity and permeability obtained from drill cuttings, without previous availability of well logs. The method assumes the existence of intervals at irreducible water saturation, which is the case of the Nikanassin Group throughout the gas column. The new methods mentioned above are not meant to replace the use of detailed and sophisticated evaluation techniques. But the proposed methods provide a valuable and practical aid in those cases where geomechanical and petrophysical information are scarce.

  15. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. [Quarterly technical progress report], April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1993-08-01

    The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task I is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

  16. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen inNatural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis,George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-06-29

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methane carbon dioxide (CH4-CO2) or methane-nitrogen (CH4-N2) with or without an aqueous phase and H2O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestration sites and natural gas reservoirs. EOS7C models supercritical CO2 and subcritical CO2 as a non-condensible gas, hence EOS7C does not model the transition to liquid or solid CO2 conditions. The components modeled in EOS7C are water, brine, non-condensible gas, gas tracer, methane, and optional heat. The non-condensible gas (NCG) can be selected by the user to be CO2 or N2. The real gas properties module has options for Peng-Robinson, Redlich-Kwong, or Soave-Redlich-Kwong equations of state to calculate gas mixture density, enthalpy departure, and viscosity. Partitioning of the NCG and CH4 between the aqueous and gas phases is calculated using a very accurate chemical equilibrium approach. Transport of the gaseous and dissolved components is by advection and Fickian molecular diffusion. We present instructions for use and example problems to demonstrate the accuracy and practical application of EOS7C.

  17. Paleozoic oil/gas shale reservoirs in southern Tunisia: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soua, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    During these last years, considerable attention has been given to unconventional oil and gas shale in northern Africa where the most productive Paleozoic basins are located (e.g. Berkine, Illizi, Kufra, Murzuk, Tindouf, Ahnet, Oued Mya, Mouydir, etc.). In most petroleum systems, which characterize these basins, the Silurian played the main role in hydrocarbon generation with two main 'hot' shale levels distributed in different locations (basins) and their deposition was restricted to the Rhuddanian (Lllandovery: early Silurian) and the Ludlow-Pridoli (late Silurian). A third major hot shale level had been identified in the Frasnian (Upper Devonian). Southern Tunisia is characterized by three main Paleozoic sedimentary basins, which are from North to South, the southern Chotts, Jeffara and Berkine Basin. They are separated by a major roughly E-W trending lower Paleozoic structural high, which encompass the Mehrez-Oued Hamous uplift to the West (Algeria) and the Nefusa uplift to the East (Libya), passing by the Touggourt-Talemzane-PGA-Bou Namcha (TTPB) structure close to southern Tunisia. The forementioned major source rocks in southern Tunisia are defined by hot shales with elevated Gamma ray values often exceeding 1400 API (in Hayatt-1 well), deposited in deep water environments during short lived (c. 2 Ma) periods of anoxia. In the course of this review, thickness, distribution and maturity maps have been established for each hot shale level using data for more than 70 wells located in both Tunisia and Algeria. Mineralogical modeling was achieved using Spectral Gamma Ray data (U, Th, K), SopectroLith logs (to acquire data for Fe, Si and Ti) and Elemental Capture Spectroscopy (ECS). The latter technique provided data for quartz, pyrite, carbonate, clay and Sulfur. In addition to this, the Gamma Ray (GR), Neutron Porosity (ΦN), deep Resistivity (Rt) and Bulk Density (ρb) logs were used to model bulk mineralogy and lithology. Biostratigraphic and complete geochemical review has been undertaken from published papers and unpublished internal reports to better assess these important source intervals.

  18. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively preventing larger events from occurring. Nevertheless, care should be taken with continuous monitoring of induced seismicity during the entire injection process to detect any runaway fracturing along faults.

  19. EQUILGAS: Program to estimate temperatures and in situ two-phase conditions in geothermal reservoirs using three combined FT-HSH gas equilibria models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Rosa María; Núñez, José; Arellano, Víctor Manuel; Nieva, David

    2016-03-01

    Exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources require the estimation of important physical characteristics of reservoirs including temperatures, pressures and in situ two-phase conditions, in order to evaluate possible uses and/or investigate changes due to exploitation. As at relatively high temperatures (>150 °C) reservoir fluids usually attain chemical equilibrium in contact with hot rocks, different models based on the chemistry of fluids have been developed that allow deep conditions to be estimated. Currently either in water-dominated or steam-dominated reservoirs the chemistry of steam has been useful for working out reservoir conditions. In this context, three methods based on the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and combined H2S-H2 (HSH) mineral-gas reactions have been developed for estimating temperatures and the quality of the in situ two-phase mixture prevailing in the reservoir. For these methods the mineral buffers considered to be controlling H2S-H2 composition of fluids are as follows. The pyrite-magnetite buffer (FT-HSH1); the pyrite-hematite buffer (FT-HSH2) and the pyrite-pyrrhotite buffer (FT-HSH3). Currently from such models the estimations of both, temperature and steam fraction in the two-phase fluid are obtained graphically by using a blank diagram with a background theoretical solution as reference. Thus large errors are involved since the isotherms are highly nonlinear functions while reservoir steam fractions are taken from a logarithmic scale. In order to facilitate the use of the three FT-HSH methods and minimize visual interpolation errors, the EQUILGAS program that numerically solves the equations of the FT-HSH methods was developed. In this work the FT-HSH methods and the EQUILGAS program are described. Illustrative examples for Mexican fields are also given in order to help the users in deciding which method could be more suitable for every specific data set.

  20. Pore- and fracture-filling gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Green Canyon 955 H well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) downhole logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII in the spring of 2009. Well logs obtained in one of the wells, the GreenCanyon Block 955Hwell (GC955-H), indicate that a 27.4-m thick zone at the depth of 428 m below sea floor (mbsf; 1404 feet below sea floor (fbsf)) contains gashydrate within sand with average gashydrate saturations estimated at 60% from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity and 65% (locally more than 80%) from resistivity logs if the gashydrate is assumed to be uniformly distributed in this mostly sand-rich section. Similar analysis, however, of log data from a shallow clay-rich interval between 183 and 366 mbsf (600 and 1200 fbsf) yielded average gashydrate saturations of about 20% from the resistivity log (locally 50-60%) and negligible amounts of gashydrate from the P-wave velocity logs. Differences in saturations estimated between resistivity and P-wave velocities within the upper clay-rich interval are caused by the nature of the gashydrate occurrences. In the case of the shallow clay-rich interval, gashydrate fills vertical (or high angle) fractures in rather than fillingpore space in sands. In this study, isotropic and anisotropic resistivity and velocity models are used to analyze the occurrence of gashydrate within both the clay-rich and sand dominated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs in the GC955-Hwell.

  1. Reservoir sequence analysis: A new technology for the 90`s and its application to oil and gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wornardt, W.W.

    1996-08-01

    Reservoir Sequence Analysis when applied to existing fields can increase the production, life of the field and extend the field with a minimum of cost. In this technology we identify reservoir sands in a standard-of-reference well, to establish a seismic sequence stratigraphic well-tie for the entire field. Age date the Maximum Flooding Surfaces and Sequence Boundaries above and below reservoir sands on a well-log and seismic pro- file and/or workstation using High Resolution Biostratigraphic Analysis, species abundance and diversity histograms and their patterns, and paleoenvironmental paleobathymetric changes. Identify the systems tracts and their corresponding reservoir sands in between age dated Maximum Flooding Surfaces. Interpret the reservoir sands as to type, i.e. IVF, point bar, coastal belt, forced regression, falling stage, bottom-set (shingled) turbidites, slope fan channel, channel overbank, and basin floor fans. Identify and correlate the same individual sands in different wells, and note new sands in a well and sands that shale-out in a well. Correlate the Maximum Flooding Surfaces above and below the reservoir section in additional wells to see which part of the reservoir section and sands have been penetrated. Identify systems tracts in additional wells and construct isopach, sand percent maps of individual systems tract interval in each well. Correlate sand packages, with a high degree of confidence, from upthrown to downthrown fault blocks, around salt domes, and updip with downdip.

  2. Reservoir Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khn, Michael

    Geothermal power generation affects chemical processes within reservoirs and in turn chemical reactions affect geothermal power generation. Reactive transport modeling is a technique that provides opportunities to help reduce costs and environmental impact due to geothermal power generation. Additionally numerical simulation is a means to investigate and approximate the long term performance of installed wells of geothermal plants. The following set of practical chemical problems, which should be and could be studied in detail by reactive transport modeling, arise from industrial experience: Chemical brine rock interaction due to the injection of undersaturated, supersaturated or acidic brine in wells. Reservoir management aided by modeling chemically reactive tracers. Recovery of precious minerals from geothermal brines. Minimizing gas production and probable resulting scaling products through optimized water injection and or production. Effect of exploitation on CO2 flux from geothermal systems. The first part of this chapter gives a short overview of numerical simulations performed by other authors investigating the mentioned topics. In the second part a detailed investigation is presented of the long term performance of the geothermal potential Stralsund (Germany).

  3. Geologic controls on reservoir properties in gas-bearing middle and Upper Devonian rocks, southern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Vessell, R.K.; Davies, D.K.

    1988-08-01

    Porosities and permeabilities have been measured for a wide range of nonfractured Devonian lithologies in 23 wells from southeastern Ohio, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, and Virginia. These reservoir properties can be related directly to the geometry of the pore system. Pore geometry, in turn, is a function of rock lithology and mineralogy. Despite the lithologic complexity of the Devonian sequence, reservoir quality can be related to a small number of differing pore geometries.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Correlates of Greenhouse Gas Diffusion from a Hydropower Reservoir in the Southern United States

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mosher, Jennifer; Fortner, Allison M.; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Stewart, Arthur; Troia, Matthew J.

    2015-10-29

    Emissions of CO2 and CH4 from freshwater reservoirs constitute a globally significant source of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), but knowledge gaps remain with regard to spatiotemporal drivers of emissions. We document the spatial and seasonal variation in surface diffusion of CO2 and CH4 from Douglas Lake, a hydropower reservoir in Tennessee, USA. Monthly estimates across 13 reservoir sites from January to November 2010 indicated that surface diffusions ranged from 236 to 18,806 mg m-2 day-1 for CO2 and 0 to 0.95 mg m-2 day-1 for CH4. Next, we developed statistical models using spatial and physicochemical variables to predict surface diffusionsmore » of CO2 and CH4. Models explained 22.7 and 20.9% of the variation in CO2 and CH4 diffusions, respectively, and identified pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and Julian day as the most informative important predictors. These findings provide baseline estimates of GHG emissions from a reservoir in eastern temperate North America a region for which estimates of reservoir GHGs emissions are limited. Our statistical models effectively characterized non-linear and threshold relationships between physicochemical predictors and GHG emissions. Further refinement of such models will aid in predicting current GHG emissions in unsampled reservoirs and forecasting future GHG emissions.« less

  5. Greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) emissions from a high altitude hydroelectric reservoir in the tropics (Riogrande II, Colombia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, Frédéric; Leon, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Tropical hydroelectric reservoirs are considered as very significant source of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), especially when flooding dense forest. We report emissions from the Rio Grande II Reservoir located at 2000 m.a.s.l. in the Colombian Andes. The dam was built at the confluence of the Rio Grande and Rio Chico in 1990. The reservoir has a surface of 12 km2, a maximum depth of 40m and a residence time of 2.5 month. Water quality (temperature, oxygen, pH, conductivity), nitrate, ammonium, dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC), CO2 and CH4 were monitored bi-monthly during 1.5 year at 9 stations in the reservoir. Diffusive fluxes of CO2 and CH4 and CH4 ebullition were measured at 5 stations. The Rio grande II Reservoir is weakly stratified thermally with surface temperature ranging from 20 to 24°C and a constant bottom temperature of 18°C. The reservoir water column is well oxygenated at the surface and usually anoxic below 10m depth. At the stations close to the tributaries water inputs, the water column is well mixed and oxygenated from the surface to the bottom. As reported for other reservoirs located in "clear water" watersheds, the concentrations of nutrients are low (NO3-<0.1ppm, NH4+<0.2ppm), the concentrations of DOC are high (2-8 mg L-1) and POC concentrations are low (< 3 mg L-1). Surface CH4 concentrations at the central stations of the reservoirs are 0.5 μmol L-1 (0.07-2.14 μmol L-1) and 3 times higher at the stations close to the tributaries inputs (up to 7 μmol L-1). In the hypolimnion, CH4 concentration is <100 μmol L-1 in the wet season and can reach up to 400 μmol L-1 in the dry season. The spatial and temporal variability are lower for CO2. Surface CO2 concentration was on average 72 μmol L-1 (up to 300) and hypolimnic concentration ranged between 250 and 1000 μmol L-1. The CO2 diffusive flux is 517±331 mmol m-2 d-1 with little seasonal and spatial variations. At the center of the reservoir, the median diffusive flux of CH4 is 1.75 mmol m-2 d-1 and sporadic high fluxes (>10 mmol m-2 d-1) were observed during the dry season. Close to the tributaries water inputs where the water column is well mixed, the average diffusive flux is 8 mmol m-2 d-1. CH4 ebullition was 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 and no ebullition was observed for a water depth higher than 5m. The zone under the influence of the water inputs from tributaries represents 25% of the surface of the reservoir but contributed half of total CH4 emissions from the reservoir (29MgC month-1). Ebullition contributed only to 12% of total CH4 emissions over a year but it contributed up to 60% during the dry season. CH4 emissions from the Rio Grande Reservoir contributed 30% of the total GHG emissions (38GgCO2eq y-1). Overall, this study show that the majority of CH4 emissions from this reservoir occur through hotspot and hot moments and that mountainous reservoir located in the tropics could have emission factors as high as Amazonian reservoirs.

  6. Prediction of slug-to-annular flow pattern transition (STA) for reducing the risk of gas-lift instabilities and effective gas/liquid transport from low-pressure reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, P.R.; Vargas, E.; Kuru, E.

    2007-08-15

    Flow-pattern instabilities have frequently been observed in both conventional gas-lifting and unloading operations of water and oil in low-pressure gas and coalbed reservoirs. This paper identifies the slug-to-annular flow-pattern transition (STA) during upward gas/liquid transportation as a potential cause of flow instability in these operations. It is recommended that the slug-flow pattern be used mainly to minimize the pressure drop and gas compression work associated with gas-lifting large volumes of oil and water. Conversely, the annular flow pattern should be used during the unloading operation to produce gas with relatively small amounts of water and condensate. New and efficient artificial lifting strategies are required to transport the liquid out of the depleted gas or coalbed reservoir level to the surface. This paper presents held data and laboratory measurements supporting the hypothesis that STA significantly contributes to flow instabilities and should therefore be avoided in upward gas/liquid transportation operations. Laboratory high-speed measurements of flow-pressure components under a broad range of gas-injection rates including STA have also been included to illustrate the onset of large STA-related flow-pressure oscillations. The latter body of data provides important insights into gas deliquification mechanisms and identifies potential solutions for improved gas-lifting and unloading procedures. A comparison of laboratory data with existing STA models was performed first. Selected models were then numerically tested in field situations. Effective field strategies for avoiding STA occurrence in marginal and new (offshore) field applications (i.e.. through the use of a slug or annular flow pattern regimen from the bottomhole to wellhead levels) are discussed.

  7. Numerical modeling of self-limiting and self-enhancing caprock alteration induced by CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2007-09-07

    This paper presents numerical simulations of reactive transport which may be induced in the caprock of an on-shore depleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The objective is to verify that CO{sub 2} geological disposal activities currently being planned for the study area are safe and do not induce any undesired environmental impact. In our model, fluid flow and mineral alteration are induced in the caprock by penetration of high CO{sub 2} concentrations from the underlying reservoir, where it was assumed that large amounts of CO{sub 2} have already been injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effect of precipitation and dissolution processes on the sealing efficiency of caprock formations. Concerns that some leakage may occur in the investigated system arise because the seal is made up of potentially highly-reactive rocks, consisting of carbonate-rich shales (calcite+dolomite averaging up to more than 30% of solid volume fraction). Batch simulations and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling have been used to investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Numerical simulations account for fracture-matrix interactions, gas phase participation in multiphase fluid flow and geochemical reactions, and kinetics of fluid-rock interactions. The geochemical processes and parameters to which the occurrence of high CO{sub 2} concentrations are most sensitive are investigated by conceptualizing different mass transport mechanisms (i.e. diffusion and mixed advection+diffusion). The most relevant mineralogical transformations occurring in the caprock are described, and the feedback of these geochemical processes on physical properties such as porosity is examined to evaluate how the sealing capacity of the caprock could evolve in time. The simulations demonstrate that the occurrence of some gas leakage from the reservoir may have a strong influence on the geochemical evolution of the caprock. In fact, when a free CO{sub 2}-dominated phase migrates into the caprock through fractures, or through zones with high initial porosity possibly acting as preferential flow paths for reservoir fluids, low pH values are predicted, accompanied by significant calcite dissolution and porosity enhancement. In contrast, when fluid-rock interactions occur under fully liquid-saturated conditions and a diffusion-controlled regime, pH will be buffered at higher values, and some calcite precipitation is predicted which leads to further sealing of the storage reservoir.

  8. Post - sedimentation influence on filtration capacity reservoir rock properties (Pur-Tazov oil\\gas-bearing area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaeva, E.; Stolbova, N.; Dolgaya, T.

    2015-11-01

    The processes of the second mineral formation (kaolinite, carbonates and micas) were identified during the post-sedimentation transformation studies in oil?s deposits. Besides, quartz regeneration, solid product destructive formation processes and hydrocarbon oxidation processes were -determined. Correlation analysis of the mineralogy and petrophysics data revealed the post-sedimentation influence factors on the reservoir properties of deposits. It should be noted that the second kaolinite composition increase results in water saturation and density decrease, porosity and, especially, permeability increase. Quartz regeneration and second mica formation deteriorate the reservoir properties or poorly influence them. The hydrocarbon decay and oxidation products, as well as secondary carbonate seal the void space, replace the soluble rock debris and sharply deteriorate the reservoir properties of oil andgas deposits.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Correlates of Greenhouse Gas Diffusion from a Hydropower Reservoir in the Southern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Jennifer; Fortner, Allison M.; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Stewart, Arthur; Troia, Matthew J.

    2015-10-29

    Emissions of CO2 and CH4 from freshwater reservoirs constitute a globally significant source of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), but knowledge gaps remain with regard to spatiotemporal drivers of emissions. We document the spatial and seasonal variation in surface diffusion of CO2 and CH4 from Douglas Lake, a hydropower reservoir in Tennessee, USA. Monthly estimates across 13 reservoir sites from January to November 2010 indicated that surface diffusions ranged from 236 to 18,806 mg m-2 day-1 for CO2 and 0 to 0.95 mg m-2 day-1 for CH4. Next, we developed statistical models using spatial and physicochemical variables to predict surface diffusions of CO2 and CH4. Models explained 22.7 and 20.9% of the variation in CO2 and CH4 diffusions, respectively, and identified pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and Julian day as the most informative important predictors. These findings provide baseline estimates of GHG emissions from a reservoir in eastern temperate North America a region for which estimates of reservoir GHGs emissions are limited. Our statistical models effectively characterized non-linear and threshold relationships between physicochemical predictors and GHG emissions. Further refinement of such models will aid in predicting current GHG emissions in unsampled reservoirs and forecasting future GHG emissions.

  10. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report for the period: 7/1/93--9/31/93

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-10-23

    The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical paths of production. During this eighth quarter of the seismic study of this area, work continued in processing seismic data, collecting additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, and integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with observations of structure in the study area.

  11. Chemical, mineralogical and molecular biological characterization of the rocks and fluids from a natural gas storage deep reservoir as a baseline for the effects of geological hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Daria; Kasina, Monika; Weigt, Jennifer; Merten, Dirk; Pudlo, Dieter; Würdemann, Hilke

    2014-05-01

    Planned transition to renewable energy production from nuclear and CO2-emitting power generation brings the necessity for large scale energy storage capacities. One possibility to store excessive energy produced is to transfer it to chemical forms like hydrogen which can be subsequently injected and stored in subsurface porous rock formations like depleted gas reservoirs and presently used gas storage sites. In order to investigate the feasibility of the hydrogen storage in the subsurface, the collaborative project H2STORE ("hydrogen to store") was initiated. In the scope of this project, potential reactions between microorganism, fluids and rocks induced by hydrogen injection are studied. For the long-term experiments, fluids of natural gas storage are incubated together with rock cores in the high pressure vessels under 40 bar pressure and 40° C temperature with an atmosphere containing 5.8% He as a tracer gas, 3.9% H2 and 90.3% N2. The reservoir is located at a depth of about 2 000 m, and is characterized by a salinity of 88.9 g l-1 NaCl and a temperature of 80° C and therefore represents an extreme environment for microbial life. First geochemical analyses showed a relatively high TOC content of the fluids (about 120 mg l-1) that were also rich in sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron. Remarkable amounts of heavy metals like zinc and strontium were also detected. XRD analyses of the reservoir sandstones revealed the major components: quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, anhydrite and analcime. The sandstones were intercalated by mudstones, consisting of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, analcime, chlorite, mica and carbonates. Genetic profiling of amplified 16S rRNA genes was applied to characterize the microbial community composition by PCR-SSCP (PCR-Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism) and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). First results indicate the presence of microorganisms belonging to the phylotypes alfa-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Sequences of these organisms have been found in subsurface environments before, e.g. in saline, hot, anoxic, and deep milieus. Due to the saline and hyperthermophilic reservoir conditions, the quantification of those microorganisms by DAPI staining revealed very low cell numbers of about 102 cells ml-1. Investigations of the microbial community composition, mineralogy and fluid chemistry after 6 months of incubation are in progress to determine to what extent hydrogen injection may contribute to a shift in the microbial community structure and abundance, microbial-mineral interactions and hydrogen-based methanogenesis.

  12. Petroleum reservoir data for testing simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.M.; Harrison, W.

    1980-09-01

    This report consists of reservoir pressure and production data for 25 petroleum reservoirs. Included are 5 data sets for single-phase (liquid) reservoirs, 1 data set for a single-phase (liquid) reservoir with pressure maintenance, 13 data sets for two-phase (liquid/gas) reservoirs and 6 for two-phase reservoirs with pressure maintenance. Also given are ancillary data for each reservoir that could be of value in the development and validation of simulation models. A bibliography is included that lists the publications from which the data were obtained.

  13. A fuzzy logic approach for estimation of permeability and rock type from conventional well log data: an example from the Kangan reservoir in the Iran Offshore Gas Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadkhodaie Ilkhchi, Ali; Rezaee, Mohammadreza; Moallemi, Seyed Ali

    2006-12-01

    Permeability and rock type are the most important rock properties which can be used as input parameters to build 3D petrophysical models of hydrocarbon reservoirs. These parameters are derived from core samples which may not be available for all boreholes, whereas, almost all boreholes have well log data. In this study, the importance of the fuzzy logic approach for prediction of rock type from well log responses was shown by using an example of the Vp to Vs ratio for lithology determination from crisp and fuzzy logic approaches. A fuzzy c-means clustering technique was used for rock type classification using porosity and permeability data. Then, based on the fuzzy possibility concept, an algorithm was prepared to estimate clustering derived rock types from well log data. Permeability was modelled and predicted using a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy inference system. Then a back propagation neural network was applied to verify fuzzy results for permeability modelling. For this purpose, three wells of the Iran offshore gas field were chosen for the construction of intelligent models of the reservoir, and a forth well was used as a test well to evaluate the reliability of the models. The results of this study show that fuzzy logic approach was successful for the prediction of permeability and rock types in the Iran offshore gas field.

  14. Analytical solution for Joule-Thomson cooling during CO2 geo-sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, S.A.; Gluyas, J.G.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2010-05-21

    Mathematical tools are needed to screen out sites where Joule-Thomson cooling is a prohibitive factor for CO{sub 2} geo-sequestration and to design approaches to mitigate the effect. In this paper, a simple analytical solution is developed by invoking steady-state flow and constant thermophysical properties. The analytical solution allows fast evaluation of spatiotemporal temperature fields, resulting from constant-rate CO{sub 2} injection. The applicability of the analytical solution is demonstrated by comparison with non-isothermal simulation results from the reservoir simulator TOUGH2. Analysis confirms that for an injection rate of 3 kg s{sup -1} (0.1 MT yr{sup -1}) into moderately warm (>40 C) and permeable formations (>10{sup -14} m{sup 2} (10 mD)), JTC is unlikely to be a problem for initial reservoir pressures as low as 2 MPa (290 psi).

  15. Acoustic velocity log numerical simulation and saturation estimation of gas hydrate reservoir in Shenhu area, South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Zou, Changchun; Xiang, Biao; Liu, Jieqiong

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate model and free gas model are established, and two-phase theory (TPT) for numerical simulation of elastic wave velocity is adopted to investigate the unconsolidated deep-water sedimentary strata in Shenhu area, South China Sea. The relationships between compression wave (P wave) velocity and gas hydrate saturation, free gas saturation, and sediment porosity at site SH2 are studied, respectively, and gas hydrate saturation of research area is estimated by gas hydrate model. In depth of 50 to 245 m below seafloor (mbsf), as sediment porosity decreases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as gas hydrate saturation increases, P wave velocity increases gradually; as free gas saturation increases, P wave velocity decreases. This rule is almost consistent with the previous research result. In depth of 195 to 220 mbsf, the actual measurement of P wave velocity increases significantly relative to the P wave velocity of saturated water modeling, and this layer is determined to be rich in gas hydrate. The average value of gas hydrate saturation estimated from the TPT model is 23.2%, and the maximum saturation is 31.5%, which is basically in accordance with simplified three-phase equation (STPE), effective medium theory (EMT), resistivity log (Rt), and chloride anomaly method. PMID:23935407

  16. CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir bycombined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-08-28

    Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity and electrical conductivity during a CO2 injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization using Archie's law provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity and the electrical conductivity. The rock properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. The electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation. The estimated changes in water saturation are used with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO2 relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. The residual compressional velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO2 /oil ratio. Resulting images of CO2/oil ratio show CO2 rich zones that are well correlated with the location of injection perforations with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO2. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO2 than are any of the individual images of change in geophysical parameters.

  17. Reservoir engineering in coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, I.

    1983-11-01

    This study examines the behavior of coal seam gas reservoirs which are found to exhibit significantly different behavior from conventional gas reservoirs. These differences involve the nature of permeability variations and the method of gas storage. The permeability variations appear to be caused primarily by effective stress variations and to a lesser extent to water saturation changes. These effective stress changes are brought about both by fluid pressure variations and by coal matrix shrinkage and expansion with changing gas content. Directional permeability with cleat (joint) direction is shown to be important. Experimental work was conducted in underground mines of the Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia.

  18. Hydrologic and geochemical data collected near Skewed Reservoir, an impoundment for coal-bed natural gas produced water, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Bartos, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    The Powder River Structural Basin is one of the largest producers of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the United States. An important environmental concern in the Basin is the fate of groundwater that is extracted during CBNG production. Most of this produced water is disposed of in unlined surface impoundments. A 6-year study of groundwater flow and subsurface water and soil chemistry was conducted at one such impoundment, Skewed Reservoir. Hydrologic and geochemical data collected as part of that study are contained herein. Data include chemistry of groundwater obtained from a network of 21 monitoring wells and three suction lysimeters and chemical and physical properties of soil cores including chemistry of water/soil extracts, particle-size analyses, mineralogy, cation-exchange capacity, soil-water content, and total carbon and nitrogen content of soils.

  19. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  20. Chemistry in protoplanetary disks: the gas-phase CO/H2 ratio and the carbon reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboussin, L.; Wakelam, V.; Guilloteau, S.; Hersant, F.; Dutrey, A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. The gas mass of protoplanetary disks and the gas-to-dust ratio are two key elements driving the evolution of these disks and the formation of planetary system. Aims: We explore to what extent CO (or its isotopologues) can be used as a tracer of gas mass. Methods: We use a detailed gas-grain chemical model and study the evolution of the disk composition, starting from a dense prestellar core composition. We explore a range of disk temperature profiles, cosmic-ray ionization rates, and disk ages for a disk model representative of T Tauri stars. Results: At the high densities that prevail in disks, we find that because of fast reactions on grain surfaces, CO can be converted to less volatile forms (principally s-CO2, and to a lesser extent s-CH4) instead of being evaporated over a wide range of temperature. The canonical gas-phase abundance of 10-4 is only reached above about 30-35 K. The dominant carbon bearing entity depends on the temperature structure and age of the disk. The chemical evolution of CO is also sensitive to the cosmic-ray ionization rate. Larger gas phase CO abundances are found in younger disks. Initial conditions, such as parent cloud age and density, have a limited impact. Conclusions: This study reveals that CO gas-phase abundance is heavily dependent on grain surface processes, which remain very incompletely understood so far. The strong dependence on dust temperature profile makes CO a poor tracer of the gas-phase content of disks.

  1. Experimental Determination of P-V-T-X Properties and Adsorption Kinetics in the CO2-CH4 System under Shale Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas production via hydrofracturing has profoundly changed the energy portfolio in the USA and other parts of the world. Under the shale gas reservior conditions, CO2 and H2O, either in residence or being injected during hydrofracturing or both, co-exist with CH4. One important feature characteristic of shale is the presence of nanometer-scale (1-100 nm) pores in shale or mudstone. The interactions among CH4, CO2 and H2O in those nano-sized pores directly impact shale gas storage and gas release from the shale matrix. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of interactions among CH4, CO2 and H2O in nanopore confinement would provide guidance in addressing a number of problems such as rapid decline in production after a few years and low recovery rates. We are systematically investigating the P-V-T-X properties and adsorption kinetics in the CH4-CO2-H2O system under the reservior conditions. We have designed and constructed a unique high temperature and pressure experimental system that can measure both of the P-V-T-X properties and adsorption kinetics sequentially. We measure the P-V-T-X properties of CH4-CO2 mixtures with CH4 up to 95 vol. %, and adsorption kinetics of various materials, under the conditions relevant to shale gas reservoir. We use three types of materials: (I) model materials, (II) single solid phases separated from shale samples, and (III) crushed shale samples from both the known shale gas producing formations and the shale gas barren formations. The model materials are well characterized in terms of pore sizes. Therefore, the results associated with the model material serve as benchmarks for our model development. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is supported by a Geoscience Foundation LDRD.

  2. Fundamentals of gas flow in shale; What the unconventional reservoir industry can learn from the radioactive waste industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuss, Robert; Harrington, Jon; Graham, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Tight formations, such as shale, have a wide range of potential usage; this includes shale gas exploitation, hydrocarbon sealing, carbon capture & storage and radioactive waste disposal. Considerable research effort has been conducted over the last 20 years on the fundamental controls on gas flow in a range of clay-rich materials at the British Geological Survey (BGS) mainly focused on radioactive waste disposal; including French Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, Belgian Boom Clay, Swiss Opalinus Clay, British Oxford Clay, as well as engineered barrier material such as bentonite and concrete. Recent work has concentrated on the underlying physics governing fluid flow, with evidence of dilatancy controlled advective flow demonstrated in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. This has resulted in a review of how advective gas flow is dealt with in Performance Assessment and the applicability of numerical codes. Dilatancy flow has been shown in Boom clay using nano-particles and is seen in bentonite by the strong hydro-mechanical coupling displayed at the onset of gas flow. As well as observations made at BGS, dilatancy flow has been shown by other workers on shale (Cuss et al., 2012; Angeli et al. 2009). As well as experimental studies using cores of intact material, fractured material has been investigated in bespoke shear apparatus. Experimental results have shown that the transmission of gas by fractures is highly localised, dependent on normal stress, varies with shear, is strongly linked with stress history, is highly temporal in nature, and shows a clear correlation with fracture angle. Several orders of magnitude variation in fracture transmissivity is seen during individual tests. Flow experiments have been conducted using gas and water, showing remarkably different behaviour. The radioactive waste industry has also noted a number of important features related to sample preservation. Differences in gas entry pressure have been shown across many laboratories and these may be attributed to different core preparation techniques. Careful re-stressing of core barrels and sealing techniques also ensure that experiments are conducted on near in situ condition. The construction of tunnels within shale clearly aids our understanding of the interaction of engineered operations (borehole drilling or tunnelling) on the behaviour of the rock. References: Angeli, M., Soldal, M., Skurtveit, E. and Aker, E., (2009) Experimental percolation of supercritical CO2 through a caprock. Energy Procedia 1, 3351-3358 Cuss, R.J., Harrington, J.F., Giot, R., and Auvray, C. (2012) Experimental observations of mechanical dilation at the onset of gas flow in Callovo-Oxfordian Claystone. Poster Presentation 5th International Meeting Clays in Natural and Engineered Barriers for Radioactive Waste Confinement, Montpellier, France October 22nd - 25th 2012.

  3. Analysis of active microorganisms and their potential role in carbon dioxide turnover in the natural gas reservoirs Altmark and Schneeren (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gniese, Claudia; Muschalle, Thomas; Mhling, Martin; Frerichs, Janin; Krger, Martin; Kassahun, Andrea; Seifert, Jana; Hoth, Nils

    2010-05-01

    RECOBIO-2, part of the BMBF-funded Geotechnologien consortium, investigates the presence of active microorganisms and their potential role in CO2 turnover in the formation waters of the Schneeren and Altmark gas fields, which are both operated by GDF SUEZ E&P Germany GmbH. Located to the north west of Hannover the natural gas reservoir Schneeren is composed of compacted Westfal-C sandstones that have been naturally fractured into a subsalinar horst structure. This gas field is characterized by a depth of 2700 to 3500m, a bottom-hole temperature between 80 and 110 C as well as a moderate salinity (30-60g/l) and high sulfate contents (~1000mg/l). During RECOBIO-1 produced formation water collected at wells in Schneeren was already used to conduct long term laboratory experiments. These served to examine possible microbial processes of the autochthonous biocenosis induced by the injection of CO2 (Ehinger et al. 2009 submitted). Microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogens were able to grow in the presence of powdered rock material, CO2 and H2 without any other added nutrients. The observed development of DOC was now proven in another long term experiment using labelled 13CO2. In contrast to Schneeren, the almost depleted natural gas reservoir Altmark exhibits an average depth of 3300m, a higher bottom-hole temperature (111 C to 120 C), a higher salinity (275-350g/l) but sulfate is absent. This Rotliegend formation is located in the southern edge of the Northeast German Basin and is of special interest for CO2 injection because of favourable geological properties. Using molecular biological techniques two types of samples are analyzed: formation water collected at the well head (November 2008) and formation water sampled in situ from a depth of around 3000m (May 2009). Some of the wells are treated frequently with a foaming agent while others are chemically untreated. Despite the extreme environmental conditions in the Altmark gas field, RNA of apparently active microorganisms was successfully extracted from all samples. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA revealed mainly fermentative bacteria belonging to the phylogenetic group of Actinobacteria (e.g. Propionibacterium spp.) and ?-Proteobacteria (e.g. Hyphomicrobium spp.) possibly involved in the nitrogen cycle. Cell numbers were determined using a PCR-independent molecular detection method (CARD-FISH) with universal 16S rRNA-specific probes (EUB338, ARCH915). The fraction of bacterial cells comprised up to 104 cells per milliliter, which corresponds to the cell numbers obtained with a generic DNA stain (DAPI). Archaeal cells could not be detected by CARD-FISH, though archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments were amplified from DNA extracts using PCR. So far differences have neither been observed between treated and untreated formation waters nor between well head and in situ sampled formation waters. Further investigations are underway to elucidate whether particular metabolic pathways are present in the microbial assemblage of the Altmark gas field fluids. In addition, microbe-mineral interactions will be assessed using electron microscopic approaches. Ehinger, S., Kassahun, A., Muschlle, T., Gniese, C., Schlmann, M., Hoth, N., Seifert, J. (2009 submitted) Sulfate reduction by novel Thermoanaerobacteriaceae in bioreactor inoculated with gas-field brine. Environmental Microbiology

  4. Geologic factors controlling CO2 storage capacity and permanence: case studies based on experience with heterogeneity in oil and gas reservoirs applied to CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, W. A.; Lakshminarasimhan, S.; Holtz, M. H.; Nez-Lpez, V.; Hovorka, S. D.; Duncan, I.

    2008-06-01

    A variety of structural and stratigraphic factors control geological heterogeneity, inferred to influence both sequestration capacity and effectiveness, as well as seal capacity. Structural heterogeneity factors include faults, folds, and fracture intensity. Stratigraphic heterogeneity is primarily controlled by the geometry of depositional facies and sandbody continuity, which controls permeability structure. The permeability structure, in turn, has implications for CO2 injectivity and near-term migration pathways, whereas the long-term sequestration capacity can be inferred from the production history. Examples of Gulf Coast oil and gas reservoirs with differing styles of stratigraphic heterogeneity demonstrate the impact of facies variability on fluid flow and CO2 sequestration potential. Beach and barrier-island deposits in West Ranch field in southeast Texas are homogeneous and continuous. In contrast, Seeligson and Stratton fields in south Texas, examples of major heterogeneity in fluvial systems, are composed of discontinuous, channel-fill sandstones confined to narrow, sinuous belts. These heterogeneous deposits contain limited compartments for potential CO2 storage, although CO2 sequestration effectiveness may be enhanced by the high number of intraformational shale beds. These field examples demonstrate that areas for CO2 storage can be optimized by assessing sites for enhanced oil and gas recovery in mature hydrocarbon provinces.

  5. A Handbook for the Application of Seismic Methods for Quantifying Naturally Fractured Gas Reservoirs in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernest; Queen, John; Daley, Tom; Fortuna, Mark; Cox, Dale; D'Onfro, Peter; Goetz, Rusty; Coates, Richard; Nihei, Kurt; Nakagawa, Seiji; Myer, Larry; Murphy, Jim; Emmons, Charles; Lynn, Heloise; Lorenz, John; LaClair, David; Imhoff, Mathias; Harris, Jerry; Wu, Chunling; Urban, Jame; Maultzsch, Sonja; Liu, Enru; Chapman, Mark; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2004-09-28

    A four year (2000-2004) comprehensive joint industry, University and National Lab project was carried out in a 20 square mile area in a producing gas field in the Northwest part of the San Juan Basin in New Mexico to develop and apply multi-scale seismic methods for detecting and quantifying fractures in a naturally fractured gas reservoirs. 3-D surface seismic, multi-offset 9-C VSP, 3-C single well seismic, and well logging data were complemented by geologic/core studies to model, process and interpret the data. The overall objective was to determine the seismic methods most useful in mapping productive gas zones. Data from nearby outcrops, cores, and well bore image logs suggest that natural fractures are probably numerous in the subsurface reservoirs at the site selected and trend north-northeast/south-southwest despite the apparent dearth of fracturing observed in the wells logged at the site (Newberry and Moore wells). Estimated fracture spacing is on the order of one to five meters in Mesaverde sandstones, less in Dakota sandstones. Fractures are also more frequent along fault zones, which in nearby areas trend between north-northeast/south-southwest and northeast-southwest and are probably spaced a mile or two apart. The maximum, in situ, horizontal, compressive stress in the vicinity of the seismic test site trends approximately north-northeast/south-southwest. The data are few but they are consistent. The seismic data present a much more complicated picture of the subsurface structure. Faulting inferred from surface seismic had a general trend of SW - NE but with varying dip, strike and spacing. Studies of P-wave anisotropy from surface seismic showed some evidence that the data did have indications of anisotropy in time and amplitude, however, compared to the production patterns there is little correlation with P-wave anisotropy. One conclusion is that the surface seismic reflection data are not detecting the complexity of fracturing controlling the production. Conclusions from the P-wave VSP studies showed a definite 3-D heterogeneity in both P- and S-wave characteristics. The analysis of shear-wave splitting from 3D VSP data gave insight into the anisotropy structure with depth around the borehole. In the reservoir, the VSP shear-wave splitting data do not provide sufficient constraints against a model of lower symmetry than orthorhombic, so that the existence of more than one fracture set must be considered. It was also demonstrated that a VTI and orthorhombic symmetry could be well defined from the field data by analyzing shear-wave splitting patterns. The detection of shear-wave singularities provides clear constraints to distinguish between different symmetry systems. The P-wave VSP CDP data showed evidence of fault detection at a smaller scale than the surface seismic showed, and in directions consistent with a complicated stress and fracture pattern. The single well data indicated zones of anomalous wave amplitude that correlated well with high gas shows. The high amplitude single well seismic data could not be explained by well bore artifacts, nor could it be explained by known seismic behavior in fractured zones. Geomechanical and full wave elastic modeling in 2- and 3-D provided results consistent with a complicated stress distribution induced by the interaction of the known regional stress and faults mapped with seismic methods. Sophisticated modeling capability was found to be a critical component in quantifying fractures through seismic data. Combining the results with the historical production data showed that the surface seismic provided a broad picture consistent with production, but not detailed enough to consistently map complex structuring which would allow accurate well placement. VSP and borehole methods show considerable promise in mapping the scale of fracturing necessary for more successful well placement. Specific recommendations are given at which scale each method and fracture complexity is appropriate.

  6. Litho-facies and paleotectonic background of hydrocarbon reservoirs in North Kalinov gas-condensate field (Tomsk Oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten, T. G.; Panova, E. V.; Abramova, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    Based on micro-macroscopic core analysis, geophysical field data, contour mapping and referencing detailed litho-facies and paleotectonic investigation of Upper Jurassic pay thickness in North Kalinov gas condensate field was conducted. Paleotectonic analysis reflected the structure development history and determined the formation and distribution of oil fields.

  7. CO(J = 1{yields}0) IN z > 2 QUASAR HOST GALAXIES: NO EVIDENCE FOR EXTENDED MOLECULAR GAS RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Maddalena, Ronald J.; Hodge, Jacqueline; Walter, Fabian; Harris, Andrew I.; Baker, Andrew J.; Sharon, Chelsea E.; Wagg, Jeff; Vanden Bout, Paul A.; Weiss, Axel

    2011-09-20

    We report the detection of CO(J = 1{yields}0) emission in the strongly lensed high-redshift quasars IRAS F10214+4724 (z = 2.286), the Cloverleaf (z = 2.558), RX J0911+0551 (z = 2.796), SMM J04135+10277 (z = 2.846), and MG 0751+2716 (z = 3.200), using the Expanded Very Large Array and the Green Bank Telescope. We report lensing-corrected CO(J = 1{yields}0) line luminosities of L'{sub CO} = (0.34-18.4) x 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2} and total molecular gas masses of M(H{sub 2}) = (0.27-14.7) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} for the sources in our sample. Based on CO line ratios relative to previously reported observations in J {>=} 3 rotational transitions and line excitation modeling, we find that the CO(J = 1{yields}0) line strengths in our targets are consistent with single, highly excited gas components with constant brightness temperature up to mid-J levels. We thus do not find any evidence for luminous-extended, low-excitation, low surface brightness molecular gas components. These properties are comparable to those found in z > 4 quasars with existing CO(J = 1{yields}0) observations. These findings stand in contrast to recent CO(J = 1{yields}0) observations of z {approx_equal} 2-4 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), which have lower CO excitation and show evidence for multiple excitation components, including some low-excitation gas. These findings are consistent with the picture that gas-rich quasars and SMGs represent different stages in the early evolution of massive galaxies.

  8. Petrographic and reservoir features of Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon in the Malay gas field, Amu-Darya basin, east Turkmenia

    SciTech Connect

    Naz, H.; Ersan, A.

    1996-08-01

    Malay gas field in Amu-Darya basin, eastern Turkmenia, is located on the structural high that is on the Malay-Bagadzha arch north of the Repetek-Kelif structure zone. With 500 km{sup 2} areal coverage, 16 producing wells and 200 billion m{sup 3} estimated reserves, the field was discovered in 1978 and production began in 1987 from 2400-m-deep Hauterivian-age (Early Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon. The Shatlyk elastic sequence shows various thickness up to 100 m in the Malay structural closure and is studied through E-log, core, petrographic data and reservoir characteristics. The Shatlyk consists of poorly indurated, reddish-brown and gray sandstones, and sandy gray shales. The overall sand-shale ratio increases up and the shales interleave between the sand packages. The reservoir sandstones are very fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, compositionally immature, subarkosic arenites. The framework grains include quartz, feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Quartz grains are monocrystalline in type and most are volcanic in origin. Feldspars consist of K- Feldspar and plagioclase. The orthoclases are affected by preferential alteration. The sandstones show high primary intergranular porosity and variations in permeability. Patch-like evaporate cement and the iron-rich grain coatings are reducing effects in permeability. The coats are pervasive in reddish-brown sandstones but are not observed in the gray sandstones. The evaporate cement is present in all the sandstone samples examined and, in places, follows the oxidation coats. The petrographic evidences and the regional facies studies suggest the deposition in intersection area from continental to marine nearshore deltaic environment.

  9. Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

  10. Fracture characterization of multilayered reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, L.K.; Larsen, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Fracture treatment optimization techniques have been developed using Long-Spaced-Digital-Sonic (LSDS) log, pumpin-flowback, mini-frac, and downhole treating pressure data. These analysis techniques have been successfully applied in massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) of ''tight gas'' wells. Massive hydraulic fracture stimulations have been used to make many tight gas reservoirs commercially attractive. However, studies have shown that short highly conductive fractures are optimum for the successful stimulation of wells in moderate permeability reservoirs. As a result, the ability to design and place optimal fractures in these reservoirs is critical. This paper illustrates the application of fracture analysis techniques to a moderate permeability multi-layered reservoir. These techniques were used to identify large zonal variations in rock properties and pore pressure which result from the complex geology. The inclusion of geologic factors in fracture treatment design allowed the placement of short highly conductive fractures which were used to improve injectivity and vertical sweep, and therefore, ultimate recovery.

  11. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  12. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  13. PHYSICS OF A PARTIALLY IONIZED GAS RELEVANT TO GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS-THE IONIZATION POTENTIAL ENERGY RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.; Schroyen, J.; Jachowicz, N.

    2013-07-01

    Simulation codes for galaxy formation and evolution take on board as many physical processes as possible beyond the standard gravitational and hydrodynamical physics. Most of this extra physics takes place below the resolution level of the simulations and is added in a ''sub-grid'' fashion. However, these sub-grid processes affect the macroscopic hydrodynamical properties of the gas and thus couple to the ''on-grid'' physics that is explicitly integrated during the simulation. In this paper, we focus on the link between partial ionization and the hydrodynamical equations. We show that the energy stored in ions and free electrons constitutes a potential energy term which breaks the linear dependence of the internal energy on temperature. Correctly taking into account ionization hence requires modifying both the equation of state and the energy-temperature relation. We implemented these changes in the cosmological simulation code GADGET2. As an example of the effects of these changes, we study the propagation of Sedov-Taylor shock waves through an ionizing medium. This serves as a proxy for the absorption of supernova feedback energy by the interstellar medium. Depending on the density and temperature of the surrounding gas, we find that up to 50% of the feedback energy is spent ionizing the gas rather than heating it. Thus, it can be expected that properly taking into account ionization effects in galaxy evolution simulations will drastically reduce the effects of thermal feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this potential energy term is not used in current simulations of galaxy formation and evolution.

  14. Physics of a Partially Ionized Gas Relevant to Galaxy Formation SimulationsThe Ionization Potential Energy Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.; Schroyen, J.; Jachowicz, N.

    2013-07-01

    Simulation codes for galaxy formation and evolution take on board as many physical processes as possible beyond the standard gravitational and hydrodynamical physics. Most of this extra physics takes place below the resolution level of the simulations and is added in a "sub-grid" fashion. However, these sub-grid processes affect the macroscopic hydrodynamical properties of the gas and thus couple to the "on-grid" physics that is explicitly integrated during the simulation. In this paper, we focus on the link between partial ionization and the hydrodynamical equations. We show that the energy stored in ions and free electrons constitutes a potential energy term which breaks the linear dependence of the internal energy on temperature. Correctly taking into account ionization hence requires modifying both the equation of state and the energy-temperature relation. We implemented these changes in the cosmological simulation code GADGET2. As an example of the effects of these changes, we study the propagation of Sedov-Taylor shock waves through an ionizing medium. This serves as a proxy for the absorption of supernova feedback energy by the interstellar medium. Depending on the density and temperature of the surrounding gas, we find that up to 50% of the feedback energy is spent ionizing the gas rather than heating it. Thus, it can be expected that properly taking into account ionization effects in galaxy evolution simulations will drastically reduce the effects of thermal feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this potential energy term is not used in current simulations of galaxy formation and evolution.

  15. Performance specifications for water supply facilities Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 and pump station. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Water is supplied to the WyCoalGas Coal Gasification Plant from four major facilities: the Mortons Area Well Field; Panhandle Reservoir No. 1; the Green Valley Well Field; and LaPrele Reservoir. The Mortons Area Well Field is located approximately three miles west of the proposed gasification plant. Panhandle reservoir No. 1 and the auxillary pump station are located approximately thirteen miles southwest of the plant site. The Green Valley Well Field Area and LaPrele Reservoir are located approximately twenty-five miles southwest of the plant area. This report deals with the systems to bring the various water supplies to the plant site and focuses on Panhandle Dam No. 1 and appurtenances. Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 and appurtenances consist of a zoned earthen embankment, spillway, outlet works, pump station, intake channel, and intake structure. The proposed embankment dam will be a zoned earth embankment approximately 114 feet high above the original ground surface at Soldier Creek with a crest elevation of 4976 and a crest length of approximately 6500 feet. The upstream slope of the embankment will be 3H:1V and the downstream slope of the embankment will be 2.5H:1V. The dam will have a compacted earth cutoff excavated 10 feet into the underlying bedrock. Four zones of earthwork are planned in the embankment. these are described in detail.

  16. Gas reservoir sweet spot detection and delineation in Rocky Mountain laramide basins. Topical report, May 1993-March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Surdam, R.C.; Iverson, W.O.; Yin, P.

    1995-10-01

    The determination of the position and configuration of the pressure boundary between normal and anomalously pressured regimes, and the detection and delineation of porosity/permeability `sweet spots` below this boundary are the two most important elements in exploring for basin-center or deep-basin gas in Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins. These two exploration elements from the basis for a new exploration paradigm. To utilize this new paradigm, the following tasks need to be included in the exploration strategy: (1) determine the position of the pressure boundary; (2) evaluate the three-dimensional aspects of the pressure boundary surface; (3) determine which depositional facies has the greatest potential for enhances storage capacity and deliverability below the pressure boundary; (4) document the determinative factors that control sweet spot development in the targeted lithofacies; and (5) detect and delineate sweet spots using 2-D and 3-D models of eletric log responses and seismic data.

  17. Migration depths of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead relative to total dissolved gas supersaturation in a Columbia River reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Maule, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The in situ depths of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. were studied to determine whether hydrostatic compensation was sufficient to protect them from gas bubble disease (GBD) during exposure to total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation from a regional program of spill at dams meant to improve salmonid passage survival. Yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and juvenile steelhead O. mykiss implanted with pressure-sensing radio transmitters were monitored from boats while they were migrating between the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River and the forebay of McNary Dam on the Columbia River during 1997-1999. The TDG generally decreased with distance from the tailrace of the dam and was within levels known to cause GBD signs and mortality in laboratory bioassays. Results of repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that the mean depths of juvenile steelhead were similar throughout the study area, ranging from 2.0 m in the Snake River to 2.3 m near the McNary Dam forebay. The mean depths of yearling Chinook salmon generally increased with distance from Ice Harbor Dam, ranging from 1.5 m in the Snake River to 3.2 m near the forebay. Juvenile steelhead were deeper at night than during the day, and yearling Chinook salmon were deeper during the day than at night. The TDG level was a significant covariate in models of the migration depth and rates of each species, but no effect of fish size was detected. Hydrostatic compensation, along with short exposure times in the area of greatest TDG, reduced the effects of TDG exposure below those generally shown to elicit GBD signs or mortality. Based on these factors, our results indicate that the TDG limits of the regional spill program were safe for these juvenile salmonids.

  18. Foam as an agent to reduce gravity override effect during gas injection in oil reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, J.C.; Sanyal, S.K.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.; Shah, D.O.

    1980-08-01

    A two-dimensional, vertical, rectangular plexiglas model holding a 45-1/2 in. high by 11-3/8 in. wide by 1/4 in. thick sandpack (1.147 x 0.237 x 0.008 m) was used to investigate gravity override of injected gases in gas drive processes. Saturation of the sandpack by a surfactant solution instead of pure water sharply increased liquid recovery and breakthrough time in a nitrogen flooding process. The improvement in production was shown to be due to a reduction of gravity override caused by in-situ generation of foam at the gas-liquid interface. Solutions of two different surfactants (Suntech IX and IV) of various concentrations with different amounts of alcohol were studied to determine their effectiveness as foamers. Surface tension and rate of drainage of the foamers as functions of surfactant concentration were measured. In-situ foaming in the model increased generally with surfactant concentration until an optimum concentration was reached; above this concentration, additional amounts of surfactant had very little effect on the phenomenon. Alcohols seem to improve the performance of low molecular weight surfactants and exhibitied a negative effect on the others. A similar increase of recovery and delay in the breakthrough time was observed in the oil flooding process. A slug of surfactant solution was injected into the pack which was saturated with a white mineral oil and water at irreducible water saturation, and then nitrogen was injected. Gravity override was much less than in the cases when no surfactant was present.

  19. Use of {18}O/ {16}O in O {2} to Constrain Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Carbon Cycling Processes in Experimental Boreal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkiteswaran, J. J.; Schiff, S. L.; Matthews, C. J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Beaty, K. G.; Bodaly, R. A.

    2004-05-01

    Understanding the biogeochemistry of greenhouse gas (GHG) production in boreal upland reservoirs is one objective of the FLooded Upland Dynamics EXperiment (FLUDEX) at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA). The decomposition of flooded organic matter produces dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH {4}), and consumes oxygen (O {2}). To determine the magnitude of biological processes (community respiration, primary production, CH {4} production, and CH {4} oxidation), isotopic ratio mass budgets of {13}C/ {12}C in DIC and CH {4}, and {18}O/ {16}O in O {2} were constructed for the 5 years of FLUDEX. {Analysis of } {{18}}{O/} {{16}}{O in O} {{2}}{ by continuous flow is a relatively new technique}{ an can }{be used to separate}{ }{O} {{2}}{ }{consumed by decomposition }{from O} {{2}}{ produced by primary production because each process affects the } {{18}}{O/} {{16}}{O in O} {{2}}{ }{at a different magnitude }{and in opposite direction}{.}{ }Isotopic ratio analyses show that up to 40% of DIC produced by community respiration is removed by primary production and that O {2} evolution by primary producers is an important source of O {2} to keep the water column fully oxygenated for fish survival. O {2} production by benthic primary producers also facilitated increased CH4 oxidation across the sediment-water interface. In addition to the important role O {2} played in GHG biogeochemistry, diurnal and seasonal dynamics of {18}O/ {16}O in O {2} were used to constrain GHG emissions.

  20. New constraints on the sulfur reservoir in the dense interstellar medium provided by Spitzer observations of S I in shocked gas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dana E.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of fine-structure line emission of atomic sulfur, iron, and rotational lines of molecular hydrogen in shocks associated with several Class 0 protostars obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope. We use these observations to investigate the 'missing sulfur problem', that significantly less sulfur is found in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) than in diffuse regions. For sources where the sulfur fine-structure line emission is co-spatial with the detected molecular hydrogen emission and in the presence of weak iron emission, we derive sulfur and H{sub 2} column densities for the associated molecule-dominated C-shocks. We find the S I abundance to be ≳5%-10% of the cosmic sulfur abundance, indicating that atomic sulfur is a major reservoir of sulfur in shocked gas. This result suggests that in the quiescent dense ISM sulfur is present in some form that is released from grains as atoms, perhaps via sputtering, within the shock.

  1. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  2. 300-Myr-old magmatic CO2 in natural gas reservoirs of the west Texas Permian basin.

    PubMed

    Ballentine, C J; Schoell, M; Coleman, D; Cain, B A

    2001-01-18

    Except in regions of recent crustal extension, the dominant origin of carbon dioxide in fluids in sedimentary basins has been assumed to be from crustal organic matter or mineral reactions. Here we show, by contrast, that Rayleigh fractionation caused by partial degassing of a magma body can explain the CO2/3He ratios and delta13C(CO2) values observed in CO2-rich natural gases in the west Texas Val Verde basin and also the mantle 3He/22Ne ratios observed in other basin systems. Regional changes in CO2/3He and CO2/CH4 ratios can be explained if the CO2 input pre-dates methane generation in the basin, which occurred about 280 Myr ago. Uplift to the north of the Val Verde basin between 310 and 280 Myr ago appears to be the only tectonic event with appropriate timing and location to be the source of the magmatic CO2. Our identification of magmatic CO2 in a foreland basin indicates that the origin of CO2 in other mid-continent basin systems should be re-evaluated. Also, the inferred closed-system preservation of natural gas in a trapping structure for approximately 300 Myr is far longer than the residence time predicted by diffusion models. PMID:11201738

  3. Optimization of fracture length and well spacing in heterogeneous reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, D.N.

    1995-05-01

    Well spacing and hydraulic fracture treatment designs are the two most important operator-controlled factors in the development of low permeability gas reservoirs. Prior studies of optimization of fracture length and well spacing assumed homogeneous permeability, porosity, thickness, etc. This analysis illustrates the importance of understanding spatial variability of permeability and permeability anisotropy. Geostatistical techniques are incorporated with economic and reservoir modeling to show the quantitative value of reservoir description in tight gas reservoirs.

  4. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  5. High-temperature quartz cement and the role of stylolites in a deep gas reservoir, Spiro Sandstone, Arkoma Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worden, Richard H.; Morad, Sadoon; Sptl, C.; Houseknecht, D.W.; Riciputi, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Spiro Sandstone, a natural gas play in the central Arkoma Basin and the frontal Ouachita Mountains preserves excellent porosity in chloritic channel-fill sandstones despite thermal maturity levels corresponding to incipient metamorphism. Some wells, however, show variable proportions of a late-stage, non-syntaxial quartz cement, which post-dated thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons to pyrobitumen plus methane. Temperatures well in excess of 150C and possibly exceeding 200C are also suggested by (i) fluid inclusions in associated minerals; (ii) the fact that quartz post-dated high-temperature chlorite polytype IIb; (iii) vitrinite reflectance values of the Spiro that range laterally from 1.9 to ? 4%; and (iii) the occurrence of late dickite in these rocks. Oxygen isotope values of quartz cement range from 17.5 to 22.4 VSMOW (total range of individual in situ ion microprobe measurements) which are similar to those of quartz cement formed along high-amplitude stylolites (18.424.9). We favour a model whereby quartz precipitation was controlled primarily by the availability of silica via deep-burial stylolitization within the Spiro Sandstone. Burial-history modelling showed that the basin went from a geopressured to a normally pressured regime within about 1015 Myr after it reached maximum burial depth. While geopressure and the presence of chlorite coats stabilized the grain framework and inhibited nucleation of secondary quartz, respectively, stylolites formed during the subsequent high-temperature, normal-pressured regime and gave rise to high-temperature quartz precipitation. Authigenic quartz growing along stylolites underscores their role as a significant deep-burial silica source in this sandstone.

  6. Surrogate Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) is new solution for fast track, comprehensive reservoir analysis (solving both direct and inverse problems) using existing reservoir simulation models. SRM is defined as a replica of the full field reservoir simulation model that runs and provides accurate results in real-time (one simulation run takes only a fraction of a second). SRM mimics the capabilities of a full field model with high accuracy. Reservoir simulation is the industry standard for reservoir management. It is used in all phases of field development in the oil and gas industry. The routine of simulation studies calls for integration of static and dynamic measurements into the reservoir model. Full field reservoir simulation models have become the major source of information for analysis, prediction and decision making. Large prolific fields usually go through several versions (updates) of their model. Each new version usually is a major improvement over the previous version. The updated model includes the latest available information incorporated along with adjustments that usually are the result of single-well or multi-well history matching. As the number of reservoir layers (thickness of the formations) increases, the number of cells representing the model approaches several millions. As the reservoir models grow in size, so does the time that is required for each run. Schemes such as grid computing and parallel processing helps to a certain degree but do not provide the required speed for tasks such as: field development strategies using comprehensive reservoir analysis, solving the inverse problem for injection/production optimization, quantifying uncertainties associated with the geological model and real-time optimization and decision making. These types of analyses require hundreds or thousands of runs. Furthermore, with the new push for smart fields in the oil/gas industry that is a natural growth of smart completion and smart wells, the need for real time reservoir modeling becomes more pronounced. SRM is developed using the state of the art in neural computing and fuzzy pattern recognition to address the ever growing need in the oil and gas industry to perform accurate, but high speed simulation and modeling. Unlike conventional geo-statistical approaches (response surfaces, proxy models ) that require hundreds of simulation runs for development, SRM is developed only with a few (from 10 to 30 runs) simulation runs. SRM can be developed regularly (as new versions of the full field model become available) off-line and can be put online for real-time processing to guide important decisions. SRM has proven its value in the field. An SRM was developed for a giant oil field in the Middle East. The model included about one million grid blocks with more than 165 horizontal wells and took ten hours for a single run on 12 parallel CPUs. Using only 10 simulation runs, an SRM was developed that was able to accurately mimic the behavior of the reservoir simulation model. Performing a comprehensive reservoir analysis that included making millions of SRM runs, wells in the field were divided into five clusters. It was predicted that wells in cluster one & two are best candidates for rate relaxation with minimal, long term water production while wells in clusters four and five are susceptive to high water cuts. Two and a half years and 20 wells later, rate relaxation results from the field proved that all the predictions made by the SRM analysis were correct. While incremental oil production increased in all wells (wells in clusters 1 produced the most followed by wells in cluster 2, 3 ) the percent change in average monthly water cut for wells in each cluster clearly demonstrated the analytic power of SRM. As it was correctly predicted, wells in clusters 1 and 2 actually experience a reduction in water cut while a substantial increase in water cut was observed in wells classified into clusters 4 and 5. Performing these analyses would have been impossible using the original full field simulation model.

  7. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  8. Prediction and exploitation of basement-controlled production trends in Piceance Basin fractured tight gas reservoirs: Results of an integrated analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoak, T.E.; Klawitter, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The ability to delineate and accurately predict fracured reservoir conditions represents critical information necessary for field development srategies, and development of play concepts in less-developed areas. To demonstrate relationships between fracture-controlled production, stratigraphy and structural geology, the Piceance Basin is being used as the site for an integrated fracture detection and reservoir characterization program utilizing high-resolution aeromagnetics, seismic, and conventional subsurface structural and stratigraphic mapping. In the Piceance Basin, there are two primary controls on well performance. The first is reservoir thickness and the second is deliverability, a funciton of fracture permeability. Reservoir thickness is controlled by depositional systems whereas fracture permeability is controlled by tectonic deformation. In Rulison Field, a sidetrack well with a 142 foot difference in bottomhole location shows a 50% difference in net sandstone pay between the two wellbores. This intense variability underscores the difficulty of predicting sand geometries in the basin. Depositional systems analysis is important as a means of predicting reservoir quality and reservoir thickness, however, in the Piceance Basin, reservoir thickness and quality cannot be accurately predicted because of complex fluvial and paludal stratigraphy, In addition, stratigraphy does not exert the greatest control on production economics. Instead, fracture permeability is the predictable and most important variable for successful development programs. In support of this, the orientation of fracture-controlled production trends lie either orthogonal or oblique to depositional trends in White River Dome, Divide Creek, Shire Gulch, Plateau, Grand Valley, Parachute and Rulison fields.

  9. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  10. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  11. The molecular gas reservoir of 6 low-metallicity galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey. A ground-based follow-up survey of CO(1-0), CO(2-1), and CO(3-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Madden, S. C.; Lebouteiller, V.; Hony, S.; Aalto, S.; Costagliola, F.; Hughes, A.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Abel, N.; Bayet, E.; Bigiel, F.; Cannon, J. M.; Cumming, R. J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Viti, S.; Wu, R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Observations of nearby starburst and spiral galaxies have revealed that molecular gas is the driver of star formation. However, some nearby low-metallicity dwarf galaxies are actively forming stars, but CO, the most common tracer of this reservoir, is faint, leaving us with a puzzle about how star formation proceeds in these environments. Aims: We aim to quantify the molecular gas reservoir in a subset of 6 galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey with newly acquired CO data and to link this reservoir to the observed star formation activity. Methods: We present CO(1-0), CO(2-1), and CO(3-2) observations obtained at the ATNF Mopra 22-m, APEX, and IRAM 30-m telescopes, as well as [C ii] 157μm and [O i] 63μm observations obtained with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer in the 6 low-metallicity dwarf galaxies: Haro 11, Mrk 1089, Mrk 930, NGC 4861, NGC 625, and UM 311. We derived their molecular gas masses from several methods, including using the CO-to-H2 conversion factor XCO (both Galactic and metallicity-scaled values) and dust measurements. The molecular and atomic gas reservoirs were compared to the star formation activity. We also constrained the physical conditions of the molecular clouds using the non-LTE code RADEX and the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. Results: We detect CO in 5 of the 6 galaxies, including first detections in Haro 11 (Z ~ 0.4 Z⊙), Mrk 930 (0.2 Z⊙), and UM 311 (0.5 Z⊙), but CO remains undetected in NGC 4861 (0.2 Z⊙). The CO luminosities are low, while [C ii] is bright in these galaxies, resulting in [C ii]/CO(1-0) ≥ 10 000. Our dwarf galaxies are in relatively good agreement with the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for total gas. They show short molecular depletion timescales, even when considering metallicity-scaled XCO factors. Those galaxies are dominated by their H i gas, except Haro 11, which has high star formation efficiency and is dominated by ionized and molecular gas. We determine the mass of each ISM phase in Haro 11 using Cloudy and estimate an equivalent XCO factor that is 10 times higher than the Galactic value. Overall, our results confirm the emerging picture that CO suffers from significant selective photodissociation in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies.

  12. Pockmarks on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar: formation from overpressured shallow contourite gas reservoirs and internal wave action during the last glacial sea-level lowstand?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Len, Ricardo; Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; Gonzlez, Francisco Javier; Gimenez-Moreno, Carmen Julia; Prez-Lpez, Ral

    2014-06-01

    Integrating novel and published swath bathymetry (3,980 km2), as well as chirp and high-resolution 2D seismic reflection profiles (2,190 km), this study presents the mapping of 436 pockmarks at water depths varying widely between 370 and 1,020 m on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar. On the Atlantic side in the south-eastern Gulf of Cdiz near the Camarinal Sill, 198 newly discovered pockmarks occur in three well localized and separated fields: on the upper slope ( n=14), in the main channel of the Mediterranean outflow water (MOW, n=160), and on the huge contourite levee of the MOW main channel ( n=24) near the well-known TASYO field. These pockmarks vary in diameter from 60 to 919 m, and are sub-circular to irregularly elongated or lobate in shape. Their slope angles on average range from 3 to 25. On the Mediterranean side of the strait on the Ceuta Drift of the western Alborn Basin, where pockmarks were already known to occur, 238 pockmarks were identified and grouped into three interconnected fields, i.e. a northern ( n=34), a central ( n=61) and a southern field ( n=143). In the latter two fields the pockmarks are mainly sub-circular, ranging from 130 to 400 m in diameter with slope angles averaging 1.5 to 15. In the northern sector, by contrast, they are elongated up to 1,430 m, probably reflecting MOW activity. Based on seismo-stratigraphic interpretation, it is inferred that most pockmarks formed during and shortly after the last glacial sea-level lowstand, as they are related to the final erosional discontinuity sealed by Holocene transgressive deposits. Combining these findings with other existing knowledge, it is proposed that pockmark formation on either side of the Strait of Gibraltar resulted from gas and/or sediment pore-water venting from overpressured shallow gas reservoirs entrapped in coarse-grained contourites of levee deposits and Pleistocene palaeochannel infillings. Venting was either triggered or promoted by hydraulic pumping associated with topographically forced internal waves. This mechanism is analogous to the long-known effect of tidal pumping on the dynamics of unit pockmarks observed along the Norwegian continental margin.

  13. Activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria under simulated reservoir conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosnes, J.T.; Graue, A.; Lien, T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that have been isolated from hot oilfield waters from subsea oil reservoirs in the North Sea. Experiments with these bacteria in a reservoir simulator indicate that SRB may maintain their activity in the conditions found in most North Sea reservoirs and, if precautions are not taken, may contribute to souring of the oil and gas.

  14. Horizontal drilling in shallow reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.F. Jr.; Schrider, L.A.; McCallister, J.V.; Mazza, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Belden & Blake and the US DOE will cofund a horizontal well to be drilled in the Clinton Sandstone as part of the DOE`s multi well program titled ``Horizontal Drilling in Shallow Geologic Complex Reservoirs.`` This well will be located in Mahoning County, Ohio in an area which has demonstrated above average Clinton gas production. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first horizontal well drilled to the Clinton Sand formation in Ohio. Since many of the remaining Clinton Sand drilling sites are of poorer reservoir quality, they may not be developed unless technology such as horizontal drilling can be successfully demonstrated.

  15. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  16. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  17. Geologic aspects of horizontal drilling in self-sourcing reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Illich, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Horizontal drilling techniques provide a way to exploit hydrocarbon reserves that are either noneconomic or only marginally economic using vertical drilling techniques. A significant fraction of these reserves is contained in reservoirs that are self-sourcing or in reservoirs that are closely associated with their resources. Most formations drilled as horizontal targets are self-sourcing. The Austin Chalk, Niobrara, Mesaverde, and Bakken are examples of horizontally drilled, self-sourcing reservoir systems. In formations like the Bakken or Austin Chalk, the close relationship between reservoir and source makes risks associated with migration and accumulation less important. Reservoirs of this kind can contain oil or gas and often have little or no associated water. They can be matrix-dominated reservoirs, dual-porosity reservoirs (Mesaverde), or fractured reservoirs (Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara). Fractured, self-sourcing reservoirs also can possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess highly heterogeneous reservoir systems. Characterization of the style of reservoir heterogeneity in self-sourcing systems is important if the favorable properties of horizontally oriented bore holes are to be realized. Production data and rock mechanics considerations are important in horizontal drilling ventures. Examples of the use of these data for the purpose of defining reservoir characteristics are discussed. Knowledge of lateral changes in reservoir properties is essential if we are to recover known reserves efficiently.

  18. Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

    1997-01-13

    Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

  19. Geothermal reservoir definition

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, R.N.

    1983-12-01

    The state of the geothermal reservoir definition research is summarized and the future of research in this area is postulated. Reservoir engineering procedures are considered in reference to the importance of fractures in geothermal reservoirs. Examples of field applications of reservoir engineering procedures are given. (MHR)

  20. 30 CFR 250.1154 - How do I determine if my reservoir is sensitive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I determine if my reservoir is sensitive... SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Classifying Reservoirs 250.1154 How do I determine if my reservoir is sensitive? (a) You must determine whether each reservoir is sensitive. You must classify...

  1. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tenness