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1

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

SciTech Connect

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15

2

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01

3

Diverse gas plays lurk in gas resource pyramid  

SciTech Connect

This final article on the outlook for US future natural gas supplies expands on the concept of the natural gas resource pyramid. A series of poorly understood but potentially significant emerging gas plays is introduced. These plays reside at various levels within the resource pyramid. These emerging resources include sub-volcanic gas, shale gas, deep coalbed methane, and unrecognized tight gas sands. In the main, these are plays that have yet to be included in natural gas resource forecasts.

Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Schmoker, J.W.; Dyman, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-06-08

4

Gas hydrate resources of northern Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large amounts of natural gas, composed mainly of methane, can occur in arctic sedimentary basins in the form of gas hydrates under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions. Gas hydrates are solids, composed of rigid cages of water molecules that trap molecules of gas. These substances are regarded as a potential unconventional source of natural gas because of their enormous gas-storage capacity. Most published gas hydrate resource estimates are highly simplified and based on limited geological data. The gas hydrate resource assessment for northern Alaska presented in this paper is based on a "play analysis" scheme, in which geological factors controlling the accumulation and preservation of gas hydrates are individually evaluated and risked for each hydrate play. This resource assessment identified two gas hydrate plays; the in-place gas resources within the gas hydrates of northern Alaska are estimated to range from 6.7 to 66.8 trillion cubic metres of gas (236 to 2,357 trillion cubic feet of gas), at the 0.50 and 0.05 probability levels respectively. The mean in-place hydrate resource estimate for northern Alaska is calculated to be 16.7 trillion cubic metres of gas (590 trillion cubic feet of gas). If this assessment is valid, the amount of natural gas stored as gas hydrates in northern Alaska could be almost seven times larger then the estimated total remaining recoverable conventional natural gas resources in the entire United States.

Collett, T. S.

1997-01-01

5

Assessment of Natural Gas Resources in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past thirty years, the Geological Survey of Canada, provincial governments and industry have conducted assessments of natural gas resources. The Canadian Gas Potential Committee made the most recent study. It reported on the assessment of the natural gas resources in Canada in its second report published in September 2001, and that report forms the basis for this paper.

Robert A. Meneley

6

Report on audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s energy resource programs  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) must ensure that the costs of its contracts for energy resources are as low as reasonably possible and that the resources are needed. During the audit, we reviewed Bonneville`s energy resource programs and focused on its purchase of electrical output from natural gas fired combustion turbines. The objective of this audit was to determine if Bonneville paid excessive costs to acquire the electrical output from combustion turbine facilities. The audit showed that Bonneville contracted to purchase the output from a combustion turbine facility at excessive cost, and that the electricity was not needed. The cost of the electricity under this contract exceeded the amount of revenue Bonneville could obtain by selling it. Bonneville estimated it would operate the generation facility for only 6 months of the year; the contract, however, required Bonneville to pay the fixed costs of the facility during the other 6 months. Consequently, the cost of the electricity plus the fixed costs in the first year of the contract would exceed revenues by $20.9 million. The contract also contained cost escalators that exceeded the rate of inflation. These cost escalators combined with the excessive initial cost resulted in projected excessive costs of $146.8 million in the first 5 years of the contract, Finally, the contract was not needed due to competition from similar facilities and a desire by customers to diversify their sources of electricity.

NONE

1995-09-08

7

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

EIA Publications

The Energy Information Administration sponsored Advanced Resources International, Inc., to assess 48 gas shale basins in 32 countries, containing almost 70 shale gas formations. This effort has culminated in the report: World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States.

Information Center

2011-04-05

8

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-01-01

9

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

SciTech Connect

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15

10

World resources of natural gas - a discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conventional natural-gas resources are ultimately recoverable in the world in about the same quantities as crude oil. Like crude oil, there are also unconventional sources of natural gas that may someday be recovered in significant quantities. However, the availability of these unconventional resources at high flow rates and acceptable costs are not well understood. Further, the element hydrogen, available in

1993-01-01

11

Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

Collett, T. S.

2002-01-01

12

Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Administrative and political boundaries and offshore sand resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Geospatial Characteristics Geopdf of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, military areas, marine protected areas, cultural resources, locations of submerged cables, and shipping routes. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in the administrative and political boundaries of Florida's coastal and offshore region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will find that they have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers.

Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

2011-01-01

13

Administrative/Office Technology. A Guide to Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide, which was written for general marketing instructors in Ohio, lists nearly 450 resources for use in conjunction with the Administrative/Office Technology Occupational Competency Analysis Profile. The texts, workbooks, modules, software, videos, and learning activities packets listed are categorized by the following topics:…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

14

Enterprise resource planning systems: A physical manifestation of administrative evil  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose that enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) inherently embody the tenets of administrative evil. First, we situate the discussion within a critical theory framework. Then, we provide a brief introduction to ERPs. Next, we present the ERP implementation process as a harbinger for organizational change and standardization. Because of the system's power and inclusiveness, the organization is molded in

Jesse F. Dillard; Linda Ruchala; Kristi Yuthas

2005-01-01

15

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05

16

Geologic studies of deep natural gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1995, the USGS estimated a mean resource of 114 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable natural gas in plays deeper than 15,000 feet/4,572 meters in onshore regions of the United States. This volume summarizes major conclusions of ongoing work. Chapters A and B address the areal extent of drilling and distribution of deep basins in the U.S. Chapter C summarizes distribution of deep sedimentary basins and potential for deep gas in the former Soviet Union. Chapters D and E are geochemical papers addressing source-rock issues and deep gas generation. Chapter F develops a probabilistic method for subdividing gas resources into depth slices, and chapter G analyzes the relative uncertainty of estimates of deep gas in plays in the Gulf Coast Region. Chapter H evaluates the mechanism of hydrogenation of deep, high-rank spent kerogen by water, with subsequent generation of methane-rich HC gas.

edited by Dyman, T. S.; Kuuskraa, V. A.

2001-01-01

17

Outlook bright for U.S. natural gas resources  

SciTech Connect

This series of articles by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) provides a fresh look at new technologies and emerging natural gas plays. It begins, in this article, with three topics: (1) an overview of the controversy surrounding the adequacy of domestic natural gas resources; (2) a look at emerging gas resources in light of advances in technology; and (3) a review of the most frequently referenced natural gas assessments. Future articles in this series will address emerging natural gas resources that may add to the US resource base: deep gas resources (two parts); Barnett shale gas resources; moving into the resource pyramid, a summary of poorly understood but potentially significant emerging gas plays--such as sub-basalt gas plays, deep coalbed methane, and new shale gas resources--not yet included in resource assessments; and gas hydrates.

Kuuskraa, V.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1998-04-13

18

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting

R. M. Cluff; S. G. Cluff; C. M. Murphy

1996-01-01

19

Political, administrative, and economic resources for the control of poliomyelitis.  

PubMed

Control of any major childhood disease in developing countries is dependent on the ability of health services to reach the susceptible population and to administer appropriate therapy or preventive action. Both of these needs are addressed by the development of primary health-care services. The vaccine-preventable diseases, including poliomyelitis, are likely to be controlled only through programs that are executed through the primary health-care system. The implications of the technical aspect of poliomyelitis control on economic resources are secondary to the administrative capability of the programs to manage these technical facilities effectively. The first prerequisite of any health program is the political will on the part of the decision makers to carry it through effectively. This will be reflected in the strength of the administrative structures and the economic resources made available. At present poliomyelitis, with its clinical visibility and its appeal to humanitarian instincts, has an importance as a leader for immunization programs and thus, for primary health care. PMID:6740106

Robinson, D

1984-01-01

20

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01

21

NEPA audits at the Bonneville Power Administration`s office of energy resources  

SciTech Connect

Since 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has evaluated the environmental performance of its energy resource acquisition programs. To date, these programs have mostly comprised conservation activities in residential and commercial buildings. In the environmental documentation for these programs under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the agency has established a set of mitigation measures that ensure against adverse environmental impacts. The agency uses environmental audits to evaluate the programs` performance in meeting the NEPA promises, and how well NEPA documents meet the programs needs and how effectively environmental and program staff interact. Since 1984 the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted 22 of the audits for Bonneville. The audits are inexpensive and unobstrusive; thus they can be repeated as needed and can be used as a tool to facilitate communication rather than simply to meet administrative rules. As Bonneville moves into an aggressive energy resource acquisition mode, these audits will serve as a model for the ongoing evaluation of environmental performance and may be adopted agency-wide to address regulations beyond NEPA.

Beachler, M.C.; Patton, J.E.; Alton, C.C.

1993-05-01

22

Conventional natural gas resource potential, Alaska North Slope  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An estimate of total natural gas resource potential of northern Alaska can be obtained by summing known gas reserves in oil and gas fields (35 TCF), mean estimates of undiscovered nonassociated (61 TCF) and associated (12 TCF) gas resources in NPRA, and mean estimates of undiscovered nonassociated (4 TCF) and associated (5 TCF) gas resources in the 1002 area of ANWR; this yields a total of 117 TCF. When estimates of undiscovered gas resources for non-Federal lands are released in 2005, that total will increase by a non-trivial amount. Thus, the conventional natural gas resource potential of onshore and State offshore areas totals well over 100 TCF. The inclusion of the MMS mean estimate (96 TCF) for undiscovered gas resources in the Beaufort and Chukchi planning areas of the Federal offshore extends that total above 200 TCF.

Houseknecht, David W.

2004-01-01

23

Oil and gas resources of the North Slope, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

After 40 years of oil and as exploration by Government and industry, the North Slope is now known to contain resources of both conventional and unconventional oil and gas. Conventional oil is currently the only economic resource, but an important one that contributes one-fifth of daily U.S. production. Unconventional oil resources include heavy oil, tar, and oil shale. Unconventional gas

Bird

1983-01-01

24

Model of joint resource extraction: natural gas and helium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical model is developed to analyze jointly extracted natural resource, as exemplified by natural gas and helium. The model incorporates general properties of joint resources as well as several properties specific to natural gas and helium, and characterizes the behavior of perfectly competitive owners of the joint resource. Under the assumption of perfect foresight, the resulting intertemporal equilibrium is

Hughey

1984-01-01

25

Is Administration Leaner in Charter Schools? Resource Allocation in Charter and Traditional Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is widespread concern that administration consumes too much of the educational dollar in traditional public schools, diverting needed resources from classroom instruction and hampering efforts to improve student outcomes. By contrast, charter schools are predicted to have leaner administration and allocate resources more intensively to…

Arsen, David; Ni, Yongmei

2012-01-01

26

Russian gas resource base large, overstated, costly to maintain  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas resources of the Former Soviet Union are immense, with an officially estimated initial recoverable endowment of 250.7 trillion cu m (8,852 trillion cu ft). Of this volume, 85% is located in the Russian Federation, which will be the dominant world supplier of gas through 2015. Although Russia possesses an amazing gas resource base, official figures overstate both the recovery factor for gas in place and appear to systematically overestimate volumes of recoverable gas in undiscovered fields. Production and transportation of gas from the Yamal peninsula and the new discoveries in the Kara and Barents seas will cost many times the current average cost of gas production in Russian. The paper discusses resources and reserves and examines the reliability of Soviet-vintage data.

Grace, J.D. (Troika Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States))

1995-02-06

27

Post Chlorine gas exposure administration of nitrite prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality  

PubMed Central

Cl2 gas toxicity is complex and occurs during, and post exposure leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl2 exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios underscoring the need for post-exposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we compared the efficacy of a single dose, post (30min) Cl2 exposure administration of nitrite (1mg/kg) via intraperitoneal (IP) or intramuscular (IM) injection in rats, to decrease ALI. Exposure of rats to Cl2 gas (400ppm, 30min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6–24h post exposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein, PMN and increased airway resistance and elastance prior to and post methacholine challenge. IP nitrite decreased Cl2 - dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMN. In contrast IM nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase independent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h post exposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl2 exposed rats. Both IP and IM nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl2 gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with IM compared to IP nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine induced resistance and elastance after Cl2 gas exposure. Interestingly, IM nitrite, but not IP nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of IM and IP therapy showed a two-fold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl2 exposure dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the IM nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of of BAL protein levels indicating distinct nitrite dose dependence for inhibition of Cl2 dependent lung permeability and inflammation. These data highlight the potential for nitrite as a post-exposure therapeutic for Cl2 gas induced lung injury and also suggest that administration modality is a key consideration in nitrite therapeutics.

Samal, Andrey A.; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M.; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

2012-01-01

28

Human resource development: An underutilized tool of state mental health administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence from federally mandated plans suggests that state mental health administrators have not fully utilized human resource development as a management tool. The importance of human resource development interventions used in collaboration with other management strategies is discussed as an effective approach to mental health system development.

Paul D. Peterson

1994-01-01

29

78 FR 41047 - Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program since...

2013-07-09

30

77 FR 51021 - Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources, Research and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources, Research and Development...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program...Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research Program since...

2012-08-23

31

Sharing Administrative Information Resources through Office Systems Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By linking office systems technology with data processing operations within colleges, administrative support can be improved in the areas of: office records management, document creation and dissemination, management information, data processing, and office communications. Systems implementation efforts at Penn State are outlined. (Author/MLW)

Blunt, Charles R.; Hazboun, Kamal A.

1983-01-01

32

Industry disputes administration report on oil and gas leasing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the Obama administration's efforts to make millions of acres of public lands available for oil and gas development, most of the acreage onshore and offshore of the contiguous United States remains idle, according to “Oil and gas lease utilization, onshore and offshore,” a 15 May report issued by the Department of the Interior (DOI). The report, which is being disputed by industry representatives, notes that 72% of the nearly 36 million leased offshore acres currently are inactive and that 50.6% of onshore leased acres (about 20.8 million acres) also are idle. “As part of the Obama administration's all-of- the-above energy strategy, we continue to make millions of acres of public lands available for safe and responsible domestic energy production on public lands and in federal waters,” said DOI secretary Ken Salazar. “These lands and waters belong to the American people, and they expect those energy supplies to be developed in a timely and responsible manner and with a fair return to taxpayers. We will continue to encourage companies to diligently bring production online quickly and safely on public lands already under lease.”

Showstack, Randy

2012-05-01

33

The Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library: resource for nurse administrators.  

PubMed

This article describes the major knowledge resource of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library, The Registry of Nursing. The first part of this article examines informatics issues and is accompanied by examples of retrieval from a typical bibliographic database and a retrieval from the Registry of Nursing Research using case mix, both as a subject heading and as a research variable. The second part of the article examines the interaction of informatics and technology used in the Registry and presents some other Library resources. PMID:9215008

Graves, J R

1997-01-01

34

Historic Resource Study and Administrative History. George Washington Carver.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is a two part study--the Historic Resource Study, the first part, contains five disparate but related chapters. The first deals with the problems of research--the evaluation of secondary sources and access to primary sources. Part II is the Adm...

A. C. Toogood

1973-01-01

35

Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called \\

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-01-01

36

How perceptions have changed of world oil, gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In this article, some of the trends in the estimates of the oil and gas resources are examined, with a view toward better understanding world oil and gas resources in the context of the next few decades. Quantitative assessments facilitate recognition of the big picture, which is necessary for purposes of planning and investment, and also form the foundation for periodic adjustments to the big picture made necessary by changes in technology and scientific understanding.

Schmoker, J. W.; Dyman, T. S.

1998-01-01

37

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

SciTech Connect

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Progress continues to be made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. Significant progress was made in development of the draft program solicitations. In addition, RPSEA personnel continued an aggressive program of outreach to engage the industry and ensure wide industry participation in the research award solicitation process.

Russell E. Fray

2007-06-30

38

Natural gas hydrates; vast resource, uncertain future  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gas hydrates are naturally occurring icelike solids in which water molecules trap gas molecules in a cagelike structure known as a clathrate. Although many gases form hydrates in nature, methane hydrate is by far the most common; methane is the most abundant natural gas. The volume of carbon contained in methane hydrates worldwide is estimated to be twice the amount contained in all fossil fuels on Earth, including coal.

Collett, T. S.

2001-01-01

39

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of Thailand  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 1.6 billion barrels of undiscovered conventional oil and 17 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas in three geologic provinces of Thailand using a geology-based methodology. Most of the undiscovered conventional oil and gas resource is estimated to be in the area known as offshore Thai Basin province.

Schenk, Chris

2011-01-01

40

Offshore oil and gas: global resource knowledge and technological change  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is argued that the contribution of technological change to the offshore oil and gas industry's progress is under-researched. As a prelude this theme, the changing geography of known offshore oil and gas resources is reviewed. Significant, and largely technologically dependent, developments are identified in terms of the industry's global spread, its extension into deep and ultradeep waters and its

David Pinder

2001-01-01

41

UNCONVENTIONAL NATURAL GAS RESOURCES: AN OVERVIEW COVERING THE RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF PRODUCTION  

EPA Science Inventory

This report covers natural gas from the following unconventional sources: western tight sands, Devonian shale, coal deposits, geopressured aquifers, and landfills. This report covers the resource base, potential production levels, and associated environmental aspects. Over the pa...

42

Stage three in personnel administration: strategic human resources management.  

PubMed

The traditional view of the personnel manager-a glorified record keeper who processes forms, monitors the suggestion box, and administers employee benefits-is fast fading. Top management's notion that the personnel department is merely a cost center-overly concerned with humanistic ideals and with little impact on the bottom line-is giving way under the impact of several changes. Beginning in the late 1970s, a series of major upheavals in the world of work-increasing government regulation, declining productivity, rising concern with the quality of worklife, and the entrance of the post-World War II baby boom population into an already highly competitive job market-have changed the personnel department's status from that of organizational stepchild to a potentially premier force in the organization's ability to survive and grow. Stella A. Nkomo, human resource research associate at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, traces the evolution of the personnel function and discusses how personnel executives can meet the challenge of strategic human resources planning. PMID:10248412

Nkomo, S M

1980-01-01

43

Geological characteristics and resource potential of shale gas in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

With Sichuan Basin as focus, this paper introduces the depositional environment, geochemical and reservoir characteristics, gas concentration and prospective resource potential of three different types of shale in China: marine shale, marine-terrigenous shale and terrigenous shale. Marine shale features high organic abundance (TOC: 1.0%–5.5%), high-over maturity (Ro: 2%–5%), rich accumulation of shale gas (gas concentration: 1.17–6.02 m3\\/t) and mainly continental

Caineng Zou; Dazhong Dong; Shejiao Wang; Jianzhong Li; Xinjing Li; Yuman Wang; Denghua Li; Keming Cheng

2010-01-01

44

Assessment finds more natural gas resources but less oil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The latest report on undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources outside the United States estimates that there are more undiscovered and technically recoverable natural gas and natural gas liquids (NGLs) but less oil than had previously been thought. The 18 April report, issued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of its World Petroleum Resource Project, estimates that there are 5606 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, compared with 4669 trillion cubic feet in the previous assessment, in 2000, and 167 billion barrels of NGLs compared with an earlier 207 billion barrels. The assessment also estimates that there are 565 billion barrels of oil compared with an earlier 649 billion. About 75% of those resources outside the United States are located in four regions: South America and the Caribbean, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arctic provinces portion of North America, according to the new assessment.

Showstack, Randy

2012-05-01

45

Networks, negotiations, and new times: the implementation of enterprise resource planning into an academic administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Higher education is a sector entering an era of IT-enabled modernization in which it may have to cope with an influx of unfamiliar corporate concepts and practices. This paper analyzes one of the first Enterprise Resource Planning implementation projects within the academic administration of an Ivy League university. We contribute to existing qualitative literature in information systems by developing the

S. V. Scott; E. L. Wagner

2003-01-01

46

The Handbook: Secondary Career and Technical Education Resource Handbook for CTE Administrators. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is intended as a user-friendly resource for administrators of career and technical education (CTE) programs in Arizona. The first section presents course descriptions, including a complete list of current competencies for each of Arizona's CTE programs, which are organized on four levels as follows: (1) technological foundations…

Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

47

Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

EIA Publications

Provides an assessment of the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The report was prepared in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and is part of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP).

Floyd Wiesepape

1997-11-01

48

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01

49

Is Administration Leaner in Charter Schools? Resource Allocation in Charter and Traditional Public Schools. Working Paper #24  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is widespread concern that administration consumes too much of the educational dollar in traditional public schools, diverting needed resources from classroom instruction and hampering efforts to improve student outcomes. By contrast, charter schools are predicted to have leaner administration and allocate resources more intensively to…

Arsen, David; Ni, Yongmei

2012-01-01

50

Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum\\u000adepends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until\\u000arecently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the\\u000aso-called \\

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-01-01

51

Gas in the Uinta Basin, Utah - Resources in continuous accumulations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Continuous-type gas plays can be envisioned as large areas within which the reservoir rock is everywhere charged with gas. As part of its 1995 National Assessment of oil and gas resources, the U.S. Geological Survey identified four continuous-type gas plays in the Uinta Basin. These occur in sandstone reservoirs of the lower Tertiary Wasatch Formation (two plays) and the underlying Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group (two plays). Only the play representing the eastern part of the Wasatch Formation continuous accumulation (Natural Buttes area) has been the target of appreciable drilling activity to date. The volume of undiscovered gas estimated to be recoverable from these four plays using existing technology and development practices ranges between 3.7 trillion cubic feet of gas (TCFG) (95th fractile) and 11.9 TCFG (5th fractile), and averages 7.0 TCFG. However, these are geologically based resource estimates, made without direct reference to economic viability. Economic analysis indicates that only a fraction of this assessed resource could be economically found and produced at prices less than $2.00 per thousand cubic feet of gas (MCFG), based on costs that prevailed at the beginning of 1993. Production characteristics of continuous-type gas plays vary significantly from well to well. Difficulty in identifying locations with poor production characteristics in advance of drilling contributes to the unfavorable economics of some plays. The need exists for improvements in technology and geologic understanding that increase the chances of selectively drilling the more productive locations within a continuous-type play.

Schmoker, J. W.; Fouch, T. D.; Charpentier, R. R.

1996-01-01

52

Participant survey results from the Starting Hizentra Administration with Resources and Education (SHARE) program.  

PubMed

Increased use of specialized infusion therapies has necessitated training of health care providers and patients. The Starting Hizentra Administration with Resources and Education (SHARE) program provided 709 US participants with information to educate patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) on self-administration of 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG). Postprogram surveys assessed participants' experience and opinion of 20% SCIG. The most frequent questions about 20% SCIG regarded subcutaneous challenges (29%). Participants stated that all attributes of SCIG were beneficial (51%), and they expressed interest in future programs on non-PIDD diseases (26%). Survey results will assist in future SHARE and other relevant educational program optimization. PMID:24384881

Duff, Carla; Riley, Patty; Zampelli, Annette; Murphy, Elyse

2014-01-01

53

Analysis of Benefits for Research and Development Projects for Unconventional Gas Resources Proposed by the Gas Research Institute: Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The executive summary presents the results of a benefits analysis of GRI's proposed research and development (R&D) projects involving the following unconventional gas resources: western gas sands, eastern gas shales, methane for coal deposits, geopressure...

1978-01-01

54

Analysis of Benefits for Research and Development Projects for Unconventional Gas Resources Proposed by the Gas Research Institute.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents a benefits analysis of GRI's proposed research and development (R&D) projects involving the following unconventional gas resources: western gas sands, eastern gas shales, methane for coal deposits, geopressured zones and saltwater aqui...

1978-01-01

55

Valuation of selected environmental impacts associated with Bonneville Power Administration Resource Program alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work undertaken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its contractors to assist the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in assessing the potential environmental consequences of new power resources. A major purpose of this effort is to describe and evaluate the techniques available for economic valuation of environmental costs. Another is to provide estimates of the environmental costs associated with specific power resources called for under Bonneville's Resource Programs. Bonneville's efforts to extend valuation techniques to as many impacts as can be reliably assessed represents a substantial advance in the application of state-of-the-art economic techniques to environmental assessments. This economic analysis evaluates effects on human health, wildlife, crops, and visibility impacts associated with air pollution. This report also discusses river recreation (primarily fishing) which may be affected by fluctuations in water levels. 70 refs.

Englin, J E; Gygi, K F

1992-03-01

56

Energy Information Administration survey of national oil and gas reserves  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description is given of the reserves estimation program of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA sends survey forms to the top 500 operators in the United States and to about 750 small operators who account for significant amounts of production within selected states. An 8% random sample is taken of the remaining small operators. Data are presented which compare

1981-01-01

57

Eastern Gas Data System: an interactive industry resource  

SciTech Connect

The Gas Research Institute (GRI) Eastern Gas Data System (EGDS) is an interactive information resource developed to provide ready access to substantive data on wells producing from the Devonian shales. The system is a computerized database which contains descriptive and historical geologic and engineering data on a large number of Devonian shale gas wells in the Appalachian Basin. The principal purpose of the system is to meet the technical data requirements of gas producers, researchers and GRI. The data are provided by cooperating industry sources, many of whom were also instrumental in the original definition and design of the system. The information which is being collected and compiled on individual wells includes data on identification, location, elevation, drilling, geology, cementing, perforation, stimulation, cleanup, and production histories. Several personal computer based enhancements to support statistical and economic analyses using this data are currently under development. The Eastern Gas Data System currently contains extensive information on over 620 Devonian shale gas wells completed in the Appalachian Basin. More than 300 additional wells will be included in the system by the end of 1984.

DeVos, D.R.; Hoffmann, R.L.; Skrinak, V.M.

1984-09-01

58

Crude oil and natural gas pricing. Chapters 100 to 299: administrative framework, crude oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This text analyzes the federal statutes and regulations that affect the pricing and allocation of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. It does not cover refined products or imported crude oil except where necessary to place major decisions in historical context. Chapters 100 to 150 concern administrative matters, specifically the organization of the Department of Energy (DOE) and

1980-01-01

59

18 CFR 2.78 - Utilization and conservation of natural resources-natural gas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...conservation of natural resources-natural gas. 2.78 Section 2.78 ...Policy and Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.78 Utilization and conservation of natural resourcesânatural gas. (a)(1) The national...

2010-04-01

60

18 CFR 2.78 - Utilization and conservation of natural resources-natural gas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...conservation of natural resources-natural gas. 2.78 Section 2.78 ...Policy and Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.78 Utilization and conservation of natural resourcesânatural gas. (a)(1) The national...

2009-04-01

61

Trust in Times of Challenge: Exploring the Relationships of Faculty and Administrators at Small, Private Under Resourced Colleges and Universities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an era of declining resources, higher education institutions are marshalling efforts to respond and remain sustainable. For small private college and universities with non-selective admissions criteria and limited resources, this is a particularly challenging period. The relationships between faculty and administrators play a key role in how…

Hoppes, Cherron R.

2009-01-01

62

Undiscovered Arctic gas hydrates: permafrost relationship and resource evaluation.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Though ice-core studies show that multidecadal-scale methane variability is only weakly correlated with reconstructed temperature variations (Mitchell et al., 2010) methane emission to the atmosphere still consider as the most significant contributions to the global warming processes. Pockmarks, seeps, mud volcanoes and other features associated with methane fluxes from the seabed have been widely reported, particularly during the last three decades. On continental margins, seepage of hydrocarbon gases from shallow sedimentary layers is a common phenomenon, resulting either from in situ formation of gases (mainly methane) by bacterial decomposition of organic matter within rapidly accumulated upper sediments or from upward migration of gases formed at greater depths. Furthermore, processes associated with seabed fluid flow have been shown to affect benthic ecology and to supply methane to the hydrosphere and the atmosphere (Judd, 2003; Hovland and Judd, 2007). The most recent investigations testified that revaluation of the role of gas seeps and related gas hydrate formation processes in the Arctic environment is necessary for the understanding of global methane balance and global climate changes (Westbrook et al., 2009; Shahova and Semiletov, 2010). With respect to gas hydrate formation, due to the presence of relict permafrost the Arctic submarine environment holds a specific place that is distinct from the rest of the Ocean. Submarine gas hydrates in the Arctic may be confined to (1) relict permafrost occurrences on the shelf; (2) concentrated methane infiltration toward the seafloor (shallow-seated gas hydrates); (3) dissipated methane infiltration from great depths (deep-seated gas hydrates). Permafrost-related or cryogenic gas hydrates form due to exogenous cooling of sediment (intra- and sub-permafrost gas hydrates). It is also suggested that some parts of hydrates may be preserved owing to a self-preservation effect above the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), which is shifted downwards due to permafrost degradation (Istomin et al., 2006; Dallimore and Collett, 1995). It is also believed that thermal conditions favourable to the formation of gas hydrates within permafrost have existed since the end of the Pliocene (about 1.88 Ma) (Collet and Dallimore, 2000). We estimate the total area of the distribution of GHSZ in the Arctic Ocean (including shelf areas, continental slope, and deep-sea troughs) to be as much as four million km2. Assuming the average gas amount per unit area in a separate gas hydrate accumulation to be 5x106 m3/km2 (Soloviev et al., 1999), it can be estimated that Arctic hydrates contain about 20 billion m3 of methane. The total area of GHSZ distribution within the Arctic seas off Russia is estimated to be about 1 million km2, with potential resources of gas in the hydrate state of about 2.36 billion m3. It should be noted, however, that field data are sparse and investigations are still producing surprising results, indicating that our understanding of gas hydrate formation and distribution within and out of sub-sea permafrost is incomplete. Estimates of the current and future release of methane from still undiscovered hydrates require particularly knowledge of the recent geological history of Polar Regions.

Cherkashov, G. A.; Matveeva, T.

2011-12-01

63

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the East Greenland Rift Basins Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Northeast Greenland is the prototype for the U.S. Geological Survey's Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal. Using a geology-based methodology, the USGS estimates the mean undiscovered, conventional petroleum resources in the province to be approximately 31,400 MBOE (million barrels of oil equivalent) of oil, gas, and natural gas liquids.

Gautier, Donald L.

2007-01-01

64

75 FR 11147 - Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Mail Stop FE-30, 1000...Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources...technology, unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resources...Annual Plan resulted in the selection of 29 projects....

2010-03-10

65

Mature Region, Youthful Potential: Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Appalachian and Illinois Basins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Making optimal use of available domestic fossil fuel resources is key to ensuring adequate supplies of energy for American consumers. This imperative has brought renewed focus to the significant oil and natural gas resources still remaining in America's o...

2005-01-01

66

Resources  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer - resources Cerebral palsy - resources Celiac disease - resources Child abuse - resources Chronic fatigue syndrome - resources Chronic pain - resources Cleft palate - resources Colon cancer - resources Cystic ...

67

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA`s Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). The basic approach used in these assessments was to combine historical drilling, discovery, and production data with EIA reserve estimates and USGS undiscovered resource estimates. Field-level data for discovered oil were used for these previous assessments. In FESAP, supply projections through depletion were typically formulated for the country or major producing region. Until now, EIA has not prepared an assessment of oil and gas provinces in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Before breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Fergana basin was selected for a trial assessment of its discovered and undiscovered oil and gas. The object was to see if enough data could be collected and estimated to perform reasonable field-level estimates of oil and gas in this basin. If so, then assessments of other basins in the FSU could be considered. The objective was met and assessments of other basins can be considered. Collected data for this assessment cover discoveries through 1987. Compared to most other oil and gas provinces in the FSU, the Fergana basin is relatively small in geographic size, and in number and size of most of its oil and gas fields. However, with recent emphasis given to the central graben as a result of the relatively large Mingbulak field, the basin`s oil and gas potential has significantly increased. At least 7 additional fields to the 53 fields analyzed are known and are assumed to have been discovered after 1987.

Not Available

1993-12-07

68

Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgysztan)  

EIA Publications

Provides the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas resources in the Fergana Basin. Includes projections of potential oil supply and U.S. Geological Survey estimates of undiscovered recoverable oil and gas.

Gary R. Long

1994-12-01

69

Funding Landfill Gas Projects. A Guide to State, Federal, and Foundation Resources.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

More than 340 communities, landfill owners and operators, and state officials across the U.S. are learning that landfill gas is an important local and regional resource. To develop landfill gas utilization projects, landfill owners and operators capture l...

2004-01-01

70

Natural-gas hydrates: Resource of the twenty-first century?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although considerable uncertainty and disagreement prevail concerning the world's gas-hydrate resources, the estimated amount of gas in those gas-hydrate accumulations greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. However, the role that gas hydrates will play in contributing to the world's energy requirements will ultimately depend less on the volume of gas-hydrate resources than on the cost to extract them. Gas hydrates occur in sedimentary deposits under conditions of pressure and temperature present in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in outer continental margins. The combined information from arctic gas-hydrate studies shows that in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 m to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors (known as bottom-simulating reflectors) that have been mapped at depths below the seafloor ranging from approximately 100 m to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas-hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Gas hydrate as an energy commodity is often grouped with other unconventional hydrocarbon resources. In most cases, the evolution of a nonproducible unconventional resource to a producible energy resource has relied on significant capital investment and technology development. To evaluate the energy-resource potential of gas hydrates will also require the support of sustained research and development programs. Despite the fact that relatively little is known about the ultimate resource potential of gas hydrates, it is certain that they are a vast storehouse of natural gas, and significant technical challenges will need to be met before this enormous resource can be considered an economically producible reserve.

Collett, T. S.

2001-01-01

71

Joint Natural Resources and Government Policy: Helium and Natural Gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model of jointly extracted natural resources is developed to analyze the effects of taxation policies. Under the assumptions of perfectly competitive resource owners and perfect foresight, the intertemporal equilibrium is described and contrasted with the single resource case. The effects of several subsidies on the equilibrium prices, and the extraction and consumption paths of the two resources, are analyzed

A. M. Hughey

1991-01-01

72

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987  

SciTech Connect

Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

1987-10-01

73

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of four East Africa Geologic Provinces  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four geologic provinces along the east coast of Africa recently were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 27.6 billion barrels of oil, 441.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 13.77 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2012-01-01

74

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Chad Basin Province, North-Central Africa  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Chad Basin Province located in north-central Africa recently was assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 2.32 billion barrels of oil, 14.65 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 391 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2010-01-01

75

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Sud Province, north-central Africa  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sud Province located in north-central Africa recently was assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 7.31 billion barrels of oil, 13.42 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 353 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, M. E.; Klett, T. R.; Schenk, C. J.; Charpentier, R. R.; Cook, T. A.; Pollastro, R. M.; Tennyson, M. E.

2011-01-01

76

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the South Africa Coastal Province, Africa  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The South Africa Coastal Province along the South Africa coast recently was assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 2.13 billion barrels of oil, 35.96 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1,115 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2012-01-01

77

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West African Costal Province, West Africa  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The West African Coastal Province along the west African coastline recently was assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's USGS World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 3.2 billion barrels of oil, 23.63 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 721 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2011-01-01

78

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of Four West Africa Geologic Provinces  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four geologic provinces located along the northwest and west-central coast of Africa recently were assessed for undiscovered oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids resources as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) World Oil and Gas Assessment. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated mean volumes of 71.7 billion barrels of oil, 187.2 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 10.9 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pitman Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2010-01-01

79

Anadarko's Proposed Acquisition of Kerr-McGee and Western Gas Resources  

EIA Publications

Presentation of company-level, non-proprietary data and relevant aggregate data for worldwide oil and natural gas reserves and production of Anadarko, Kerr-McGee, and Western Gas Resources to inform discussions of Anadarko Petroleum Corp.'s proposed acquisition of both Kerr-McGee Corp. and Western Gas Resources Inc. for a total of $23.3 billion, which was announced June 23, 2006.

Neal Davis

2006-06-23

80

Assessment of Undiscovered Natural Gas Resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California, 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a new assessment of undiscovered natural gas resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS mean estimates of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources are 534 billion cubic feet of natural gas and 323 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids in the Sacramento Basin Province. Additional undiscovered oil accumulations larger than 0.5 million barrels are considered unlikely.

Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

2007-01-01

81

Natural Gas Hydrates: Recent Developments on this Potential Future Energy Resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas hydrates, potentially one of the most important energy resources for the future, are naturally occurring ice-like solids in which water molecules trap gas molecules in a cagelike structure known as a clathrate. Although many gases form hydrates, methane hydrate is by far the most common. Gas hydrates exist in huge quantities in marine sediments below the sea floor and

B. Pierce; T. Collett

2007-01-01

82

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Illinois Basin, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated the following quantities of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Illinois Basin, USA: (1) a mean of 214 million barrels of oil; (2) a mean of 4.65 trillion cubic feet of natural gas; and (3) a mean of 24 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Swezey, Christopher S.

2007-01-01

83

National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: geologic assessment of undiscovered gas hydrate resources on the North Slope, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey have completed the first assessment of the undiscovered, technically recoverable gas hydrate resources beneath the North Slope of Alaska. This assessment indicates the existence of technically recoverable gas hydrate resources—that is, resources that can be discovered, developed, and produced using current technology. The approach used in this assessment followed standard geology-based USGS methodologies developed to assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to use the USGS conventional assessment approach on gas hydrate resources, three-dimensional industry-acquired seismic data were analyzed. The analyses indicated that the gas hydrates on the North Slope occupy limited, discrete volumes of rock bounded by faults and downdip water contacts. This assessment approach also assumes that the resource can be produced by existing conventional technology, on the basis of limited field testing and numerical production models of gas hydrate-bearing reservoirs. The area assessed in northern Alaska extends from the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska on the west through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on the east and from the Brooks Range northward to the State-Federal offshore boundary (located 3 miles north of the coastline). This area consists mostly of Federal, State, and Native lands covering 55,894 square miles. Using the standard geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS estimated that the total undiscovered technically recoverable natural-gas resources in gas hydrates in northern Alaska range between 25.2 and 157.8 trillion cubic feet, representing 95 percent and 5 percent probabilities of greater than these amounts, respectively, with a mean estimate of 85.4 trillion cubic feet.

USGS AK Gas Hydrate Assessment Team: Collett, Timothy S.; Agena, Warren F.; Lee, Myung Woong; Lewis, Kristen A.; Zyrianova, Margarita; Bird, Kenneth J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2014-01-01

84

Female and Male Psychologists in Academic Administration: Resource Control and Perceived Influence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined male and female psychologists in academic administrative positions with regard to their perceptions of their own power and their actual power within the administrative hierarchies in which they work. In the past, researchers have compared women and men in academic administrative positions with regard to parity of numbers,…

Schenk, Jennifer

2010-01-01

85

Selected administrative, land, and resource data for known geothermal resources areas in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington  

SciTech Connect

The data are compiled from published and unpublished classification, lease-scale evaluation, and resources assessment documents prepared by the Geological Survey and are current to December 1980. The KGRA's are listed alphabetically for each state.

Burkhardt, H.E.; Brook, C.A.; Smith, F.W.

1980-01-01

86

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01

87

State of natural gas resource base on the territory of Nizhneye Priangarie (lower Angara region)  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are about 6×1012m3 of free gas potential resources concentrated in the Earth entrails of the Nizhneye Priangarie territory [L.L. Kuznetsov, A.A. Kontorovich, Proceedings of the All Russian Conference on Geology and Oil\\/Gas Potential and Prospects of Development of Oil and Gas Fields in Nizhneye Priangarie, Krasnoyarsk, 1996]. Gas of fields discovered here has mainly methane composition (CH4 – 63–86%);

L. L Kuznetsov; A. A Kontorovich; V. G Sibgatulin

1998-01-01

88

Microdialysis of Ethanol During Operant Ethanol Self-administration and Ethanol Determination by Gas Chromatography  

PubMed Central

Operant self-administration methods are commonly used to study the behavioral and pharmacological effects of many drugs of abuse, including ethanol. However, ethanol is typically self-administered orally, rather than intravenously like many other drugs of abuse. The pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs are more complex than intravenously administered drugs. Because understanding the relationship between the pharmacological and behavioral effects of ethanol requires knowledge of the time course of ethanol reaching the brain during and after drinking, we use in vivo microdialysis and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection to monitor brain dialysate ethanol concentrations over time. Combined microdialysis-behavioral experiments involve the use of several techniques. In this article, stereotaxic surgery, behavioral training and microdialysis, which can be adapted to test a multitude of self-administration and neurochemical centered hypotheses, are included only to illustrate how they relate to the subsequent phases of sample collection and dialysate ethanol analysis. Dialysate ethanol concentration analysis via gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection, which is specific to ethanol studies, is described in detail. Data produced by these methods reveal the pattern of ethanol reaching the brain during the self-administration procedure, and when paired with neurochemical analysis of the same dialysate samples, allows conclusions to be made regarding the pharmacological and behavioral effects of ethanol.

Schier, Christina J.; Mangieri, Regina A.; Dilly, Geoffrey A.; Gonzales, Rueben A.

2012-01-01

89

40 CFR 1.33 - Office of Administration and Resources Management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...resources management and systems (including budget...management analysis and systems development, information management and services...automated data processing systems, procurement through...contracts and grants, and human resources management....

2010-07-01

90

40 CFR 1.33 - Office of Administration and Resources Management.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...resources management and systems (including budget...management analysis and systems development, information management and services...automated data processing systems, procurement through...contracts and grants, and human resources management....

2009-07-01

91

The potential of natural gas hydrates as an energy resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many important questions about the potential production of gas hydrates still need to be answered. These include the volumes and purities of hydrate formations. In the hydrate phase itself the gas concentration is high, but in the earth hydrate concentrations can be variable. A second question concerns the method of decomposition of gas hydrates in the earth. Hypothetical models have

G. D. Holder; S. P. Godbole; V. A. Kamath

1984-01-01

92

Assessment of undiscovered, conventional oil and gas resources of Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 19 billion barrels of oil and 83 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas resources in 10 geologic provinces of Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Weaver, Jean N.

2012-01-01

93

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Siberian Basin Province, Russia, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, using a geology-based assessment methodology, estimated mean volumes of technically recoverable, conventional, undiscovered petroleum resources at 8 billion barrels of crude oil, 670 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 21 billion barrels of natural gas liquids for the West Siberian Basin Province in Russia as part of a program to estimate petroleum resources for priority basins throughout the world.

Klett, T. R.

2011-01-01

94

A Resource Requirements Prediction Model for the Central Administration Support Program in a University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between the costs of central administration and academic teaching and research production was studied, based on a large sample of British universities and a separate analysis of the Free University of Brussels, Belgium. To determine variables important to central administration costs, a cross-sectional and intertemporal regression…

Bingen, Franz; Siau, Carlos

95

Resources Work: Careers in Mining, Oil, and Gas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes occupations in the mining, oil, and gas extraction industry. The first section covers the industry's employment and outlook. The second section highlights some common occupations. The third section discusses pros and cons of the work. The fourth section describes how to start a career in mining or oil and gas. And the fifth…

Torpey, Elka

2013-01-01

96

Inll'ovative In-Mine Gas Recovery Techniques Implemented by Resource Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adverse geologic conditions including less than desirable reservoir conditions, have required the development of innovative techniques to improve gas recovery. Such techniques include in-mine horizontal gob boreholes, in-mine hydraulic fracture stimulation and in-mine reservoir testing. These techniques have been formulated, implemented and evaluated by Resource Enterprises and demonstrate considerate potential for increasing gas recovery.

Stephen J. Kravits

97

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the North Sakhalin Basin Province, Russia, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources for the North Sakhalin Basin Province of Russia. The mean volumes were estimated at 5.3 billion barrels of crude oil, 43.8 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 0.8 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

Klett, T. R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Cook, Troy A.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2011-01-01

98

Post-Implementation Success Factors for Enterprise Resource Planning Student Administration Systems in Higher Education Institutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems can represent one of the largest investments of human and financial resources by a higher education institution. They also bring a significant process reengineering aspect to the institution and the associated implementation project through the integration of compiled industry best practices into the…

Sullivan, Linda; Bozeman, William

2010-01-01

99

VA (Veterans Administration) Health Care: Allocation of Resources to Medical Facilities in the Sun Belt.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides information on: Changes in the veteran population, veterans' demand for health care from Veterans Administration (VA), VA medical facility workload, and obligation of VA health care dollars from fiscal years 1981 to 1985. The authors c...

1986-01-01

100

Food and Drug Administration: FDA Faces Challenges Meeting Its Growing Medical Product Responsibilities and Should Develop Complete Estimates of Its Resource Needs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Twenty years ago, GAO reported that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was concerned that it lacked resources to fulfill its mission, which includes oversight of the safety and effectiveness of medical products--human drugs, biologics, and medical dev...

2009-01-01

101

Study of Veterans Administration/Department of Defense Health Care Resources Sharing at Keller Army Community Hospital West Point, New York  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was conducted to develop a model for implementing a Veterans Administration and Department of Defense Health Care Resource Sharing Agreement. Both health care facilities were examined to identify the abilities and deficiencies that could be sha...

D. E. Fine

1984-01-01

102

1995 National Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources: Results, Methodology, and Supporting Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This revised CD-ROM summarizes the results, released in 1995, of the 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States. Minor errors in the original DDS-30 (listed in DDS-35 and DDS-36) are corrected in this revised version and in the data files now released in DDS-35 and DDS-36. Estimates are made of technically recoverable oil, including measured (proved) reserves, future additions to reserves in existing fields, and undiscovered resources. Estimates are also made of the technically recoverable conventional resources of natural gas in measured reserves, in anticipated growth of reserves in existing fields, and in undiscovered resources. Additionally, an assessment is made of recoverable resources in continuous-type (largely unconventional) accumulations in sandstones, shales, chalks, and coal beds.

edited by Gautier, Donald L.; Dolton, Gordon L.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Varnes, Katharine L.

1996-01-01

103

1995 National assessment of United States oil and gas resources; results, methodology, and supporting data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes the results of a 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States by the U.S. Geological Survey. A parallel study of the Federal offshore is being conducted by the Minerals Management Service. Estimates are made of technically recoverable oil, including measured (proved) reserves, future additions to reserves in existing fields, and undiscovered resources. Estimates are also made of the technically recoverable conventional resources of natural gas in measured reserves, in anticipated growth of reserves in existing fields, and in undiscovered resources. Additionally, an assessment is made of recoverable resources in continuous-type (largely unconventional) accumulations in sandstones, shales, chalks, and coal beds.

edited by Gautier, Donald L.; Dolton, G. L.; Takahashi, K. I.; Varnes, K. L.

1995-01-01

104

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01

105

Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

2014-05-01

106

Gas Resources of N.E. British Columbia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The geology of northeastern British Columbia provides a challenging opportunity for significant discoveries of natural gas. An examination of some 20 exploratory plays indicates an average expectation of additional potential of 32 trillion cubic feet (app...

K. E. Wallace-Dudley P. J. Lee R. M. Procter

1982-01-01

107

The oil and gas resource base of the Caspian region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Caspian Sea region's oil and gas potential has attracted the attention of the international oil and gas industry since the late 1980s and early 1990s with the breakup of the Soviet Union when investment in the region became possible. The nations in the Caspian Sea region—Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan—are already major energy producers. Production is expected

Igor Effimoff

2000-01-01

108

Role of medical, technical, and administrative leadership in the human resource management life cycle: a team approach to laboratory management.  

PubMed

We believe the team approach to laboratory management achieves the best outcomes. Laboratory management requires the integration of medical, technical, and administrative expertise to achieve optimal service, quality, and cost performance. Usually, a management team of two or more individuals must be assembled to achieve all of these critical leadership functions. The individual members of the management team must possess the requisite expertise in clinical medicine, laboratory science, technology management, and administration. They also must work together in a unified and collaborative manner, regardless of where individual team members appear on the organizational chart. The management team members share in executing the entire human resource management life cycle, creating the proper environment to maximize human performance. Above all, the management team provides visionary and credible leadership. PMID:10747654

Wilkinson, D S; Dilts, T J

1999-01-01

109

Chapter 9: Oil and gas resource potential north of the Arctic Circle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The US Geological Survey recently assessed the potential for undiscovered conventional petroleumin the Arctic. Using a new map compilation of sedimentary elements, the area north of the Arctic Circle was subdivided into 70 assessment units, 48 of which were quantitatively assessed. The Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA) was a geologically based, probabilistic study that relied mainly on burial history analysis and analogue modelling to estimate sizes and numbers of undiscovered oil and gas accumulations. The results of the CARA suggest the Arctic is gas-prone with an estimated 770-2990 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas, most of which is in Russian territory. On an energy-equivalent basis, the quantity of natural gas ismore than three times the quantity of oil and the largest undiscovered gas eld is expected to be about 10 times the size of the largest undiscovered oil eld. In addition to gas, the gas accumulationsmay contain an estimated 39 billion barrels of liquids. The South Kara Sea is themost prospective gas assessment unit, but giant gas elds containingmore than 6 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas are possible at a 50%chance in 10 assessment units. Sixty per cent of the estimated undiscovered oil resource is in just six assessment units, of which the Alaska Platform, with 31%of the resource, is the most prospective. Overall, the Arctic is estimated to contain between 44 and 157 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Billion barrel oil elds are possible at a 50%chance in seven assessment units.Undiscovered oil resources could be signicant to the Arctic nations, but are probably not sufcient to shift the world oil balance away from the Middle East. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

Gautier, D. L.; Bird, K. J.; Charpentier, R. R.; Grantz, A.; Houseknecht, D. W.; Klett, T. R.; Moore, T. E.; Pitman, J. K.; Schenk, C. J.; Schuenemeyer, J. H.; Sorensen, K.; Tennyson, M. E.; Valin, Z. C.; Wandrey, C. J.

2011-01-01

110

U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the "quantity of resource" and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource are obtained. Distributions and their properties are established for each of the following resources: (1) oil and nonassociated gas from estimates of the probability of the resource being present and the conditional probability distribution of the quantity of resource given that the resource is present, (2) associated-dissolved gas from its corresponding oil distribution, (3) total gas, (4) oil and total gas in two or more provinces. Computer graphics routines are illustrated with examples from the U.S. Geological Survey Circular 860. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

Crovelli, R. A.

1984-01-01

111

Partial US oil, gas resource volumes termed astonishing'  

SciTech Connect

Land and state waters of the US contain technically recoverable volumes of 112.6 billion bbl of oil and 1,073.8 tcf of conventional and unconventional gas, the US Geological Survey estimated. The oil figure is 44% higher than the USGS assessed in its last study, released in 1989. The assessed 715 tcf of technically recoverable conventional gas reserves, expected reserve growth, and undiscovered accumulations is nearly 42% higher than the 1989 assessment. Moreover, the USGS for the first time assessed a further 300 tcf of technically recoverable gas in continuous-type largely unconventional deposits in sandstones, shales, and chalks, and almost another 50 tcf in coal beds. USGS estimated that 60 billion bbl will be added to the oil reserves and 322 tcf to the oil reserves and 322 tcf to the gas reserves of existing fields by way of revisions, extensions, and new pool discoveries during the 80 years following 1991. The estimates assume use of existing technology, and ignore barriers to leasing of onshore federal lands. The paper describes the results more fully.

Petzet, G.A.

1995-03-06

112

Occupational Safety and Health Program Guidelines for Colleges and Universities. An Administrative Resource Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed as an aid for establishing and strengthening occupational safety and health programs on college and university campuses, this administrator guide is divided into four chapters. The first chapter defines and gives background information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA). In addition, it presents a discussion of what the OSHA…

Godbey, Frank W.; Hatch, Loren L.

113

Planning & Information Resources Management: The Case for Combining University Academic & Administrative Computing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report outlines how the University of Alaska (Fairbanks) could move toward institutionalizing a chief information officer and merge campus academic and administrative information systems. The chief information officer would have such responsibilities as strategic planning participation, information systems planning, development of…

Alaska Univ., Fairbanks.

114

America's People: An Imperiled Resource. National Urban Policy Issues for a New Federal Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report seeks to identify and make policy recommendations concerning major urban issues confronting the Bush Administration. The Division of Urban Affairs of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) established working groups and commissioned papers on the following six key urban policy issues: (1)…

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, Washington, DC.

115

Information Resources on Microcomputers in Libraries: Library Administration. A Selected ERIC Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eleven articles and reports published between 1980 and 1984 and cited in "Resources in Education" and "Current Index to Journals in Education" are listed in this bibliography on microcomputers in libraries. Emphasis is on microcomputers in public and school libraries and topics included are factors that should be considered before purchasing a…

ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources, Syracuse, NY.

116

Guiding principles of USGS methodology for assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the last 30 years, the methodology for assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources used by the Geological Survey has undergone considerable change. This evolution has been based on five major principles. First, the U.S. Geological Survey has responsibility for a wide range of U.S. and world assessments and requires a robust methodology suitable for immaturely explored as well as maturely explored areas. Second, the assessments should be based on as comprehensive a set of geological and exploration history data as possible. Third, the perils of methods that solely use statistical methods without geological analysis are recognized. Fourth, the methodology and course of the assessment should be documented as transparently as possible, within the limits imposed by the inevitable use of subjective judgement. Fifth, the multiple uses of the assessments require a continuing effort to provide the documentation in such ways as to increase utility to the many types of users. Undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources are those recoverable volumes in undiscovered, discrete, conventional structural or stratigraphic traps. The USGS 2000 methodology for these resources is based on a framework of assessing numbers and sizes of undiscovered oil and gas accumulations and the associated risks. The input is standardized on a form termed the Seventh Approximation Data Form for Conventional Assessment Units. Volumes of resource are then calculated using a Monte Carlo program named Emc2, but an alternative analytic (non-Monte Carlo) program named ASSESS also can be used. The resource assessment methodology continues to change. Accumulation-size distributions are being examined to determine how sensitive the results are to size-distribution assumptions. The resource assessment output is changing to provide better applicability for economic analysis. The separate methodology for assessing continuous (unconventional) resources also has been evolving. Further studies of the relationship between geologic models of conventional and continuous resources will likely impact the respective resource assessment methodologies. ?? 2005 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Charpentier, R. R.; Klett, T. R.

2005-01-01

117

Oil, Gas and Conflict: A Mathematical Model for the Resource Curse  

PubMed Central

Oil and natural gas are highly valuable natural resources, but many countries with large untapped reserves suffer from poor economic and social-welfare performance. This conundrum is known as the resource curse. The resource curse is a result of poor governance and wealth distribution structures that allow the elite to monopolize resources for self-gain. When rival social groups compete for natural resources, civil unrest soon follows. While conceptually easy to follow, there have been few formal attempts to study this phenomenon. Thus, we develop a mathematical model that captures the basic elements and dynamics of this dilemma. We show that when resources are monopolized by the elite, increased exportation leads to decreased domestic production. This is due to under-provision of the resource-embedded energy and industrial infrastructure. Decreased domestic production then lowers the marginal return on productive activities, and insurgency emerges. The resultant conflict further displaces human, built, and natural capital. It forces the economy into a vicious downward spiral. Our numerical results highlight the importance of governance reform and productivity growth in reducing oil-and-gas-related conflicts, and thus identify potential points of intervention to break the downward spiral.

Cai, Yiyong; Newth, David

2013-01-01

118

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)  

SciTech Connect

This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availability and methodology, resulting in a reservoir-level assessment of ultimate recovery for both oil and gas. Ultimate recovery, as used here, is the sum of cumulative production and remaining Proved plus Probable reserves as of the end of 1987. Reasonable results were obtained when aggregating reservoir-level values to the basin level, and in determining general but important distributions of across-basin reservoir and fluid parameters. Currently, this report represents the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas in the Fergana Basin. This full report provides additional descriptions, discussions and analysis illustrations that are beneficial to those considering oil and gas investments in the Fergana Basin. 57 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1995-01-01

119

Origins, characteristics, controls, and economic viabilities of deep- basin gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dry-gas deposits (methane ???95% of the hydrocarbon (HC) gases) are thought to originate from in-reservoir thermal cracking of oil and C2+ HC gases to methane. However, because methanes from Anadarko Basin dry-gas deposits do not carry the isotopic signature characteristics of C15+ HC destruction, an origin of these methanes from this process is considered improbable. Instead, the isotopic signature of these methanes suggests that they were cogenerated with C15+ HC's. Only a limited resource of deep-basin gas deposits may be expected by the accepted model for the origin of dry-gas deposits because of a limited number of deep-basin oil deposits originally available to be thermally converted to dry gas. However, by the models of this paper (inefficient source-rock oil and gas expulsion, closed fluid systems in petroleum-basin depocenters, and most dry-gas methane cogenerated with C15+ HC's), very large, previously unrecognized, unconventional, deep-basin gas resources are expected. -from Author

Price, L. C.

1995-01-01

120

The Impact of Water Regulation on the Availability of Shale Gas Resources for Production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Visions for a large increase in North American production of natural gas from shale are based heavily on the sharp rise in the estimated available resource. Those estimates are prepared by looking at the underlying geology as well as the cost and availability of technologies for extracting gas. We add to that equation the potential current and future regulation of water injection (subsurface) and runoff (surface). Using the political science theory of "veto points" we show that US water legislation is organized in ways that allow for large numbers of political forces to block (or make costly) access to gas resources. By our estimate, 26% of the shale gas resource will be unavailable-a fraction that could rise if there are strong contagion effects as jurisdictions that have traditionally had industry-friendly regulatory systems apply much stricter rules. This work has potentially large implications for visions of the new natural gas revolution and the price of North American (and potentially world) natural gas.

Victor, D. G.

2011-12-01

121

Future Oil and Gas Resources of the World: A Coming Supply Crisis?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Is the world running out of oil? Where will future oil and gas supplies come from? To help answer these questions, the U.S. Geological Survey completed in 2000 a new assessment of the undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources and potential additions to reserves from field growth. One hundred and twenty-eight provinces were assessed in a 100 man-year effort from 1995-2000. The assessed provinces included 76 priority provinces containing 95 percent of the world's discovered oil and gas and an additional 52 "boutique" provinces, many of which may be highly prospective. Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) were identified and described for each of these provinces along with associated Assessment Units (AU) that are the basic units for assessing undiscovered petroleum. The assessment process coupled geologic analysis with a probabilistic methodology to estimate remaining potential. Within the 128 assessed provinces, were 159 TPS and 274 AU. For these provinces, the endowment of recoverable oil, which includes cumulative production, remaining reserves, reserve growth, and undiscovered resources is estimated at about 3 trillion barrels of oil (TBO). The natural gas endowment is estimated at 2.6 trillion barrels of oil equivalent (TBOE). Oil reserves are currently 1.1 TBO; world consumption is about .028 TBO per year. Natural gas reserves are about .8 TBOE; world consumption is about .014 TBOE. Thus, without any additional discoveries of oil, gas or natural gas liquids, we have about 2 TBOE of proved petroleum reserves. Of the oil and gas endowment of about 5.6 TBOE, we estimate that the world has consumed about 1 TBOE, or 18 percent leaving about 82 percent of endowment to be utilized or found. Half of the world's undiscovered potential is offshore. Arctic basins with about 25 percent of undiscovered petroleum resources make up the next great frontier. An additional 279 provinces contain some oil and gas and, if considered, would increase the oil and gas endowment estimates. While petroleum resources in the world appear to be significant, certain countries such as the U.S. may run into import deficits particularly oil imports from Mexico and natural gas from Canada. The new assessment has been used as the reference supply case in energy supply models by the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Agency of the Department of Energy. Climate energy modeling groups such as Stanford, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and others have also used the estimates in global climate models. Many of these models using the USGS estimates, converge on potential oil shortfalls in 2036-2040. A transition to increased use of natural gas is expected, but gas in turn may experience similar supply concerns in the 2050-2060 time frame. A coal bridge-to-the-future model as well a realistic view of non-renewable resources in the future will be discussed. Non-conventional oil and gas are quite common in the petroleum provinces of the world and represent a significant resource yet to be fully studied and developed. Seventeen non-conventional AU, including coal-bed methane, basin-center gas, continuous oil, and gas hydrate occurrences, have been preliminarily identified for future assessment. Initial efforts to assess heavy oil deposits and other non-conventional oil and gas deposits are also underway. Digital products from the World Energy Project may be downloaded at (http://energy.cr.usgs.gov/energy/WorldEnergy/WEnergy.html).

Ahlbrandt, T. S.

2002-05-01

122

Impacts of Coal Seam Gas (Coal Bed Methane) Extraction on Water Resources in Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While extraction of methane from shale gas deposits has been the principal source of the recent expansion of the industry in the United States and potentially in Europe, extraction of methane from coal bed methane deposits (termed 'coal seam gas' in Australia) has been the focus in Australia. The two sources of methane share many of the same characteristics, with hydraulic fracturing generally (but not always) required to extract coal seam gas also. However, as coal seam gas deposits generally occur at shallower depths than shale gas, the potential impacts of extraction and hydraulic fracturing on surface and groundwater resources may be potentially of more concern for coal seam gas than for shale gas. To determine the potential for coal seam gas extraction (and coal mining more generally) to impact on water resources and water-related assets in Australia, the Commonwealth Government has recently established an Independent Expert Scientific Committee (the IESC) to provide advice to Commonwealth and State Government regulators on potential water-related impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining developments. The IESC has in turn implemented a program of research termed 'bioregional assessments' to investigate these potential impacts. A bioregional assessment can be defined as a scientific analysis of the ecology, hydrology, geology and hydrogeology of a bioregion, with explicit assessment of the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of coal seam gas and large coal mining development on water resources. These bioregional assessments are now being carried out across large portions of eastern Australia which are underlain by coal reserves. Further details of the program can be found at http://www.environment.gov.au/coal-seam-gas-mining/bioregional-assessments.html. This presentation will provide an overview of the issues related to the impacts of coal seam gas extraction on surface and groundwater resources and water-related assets in Australia. The methodology of undertaking bioregional assessments will be described, and the application of this methodology to six priority bioregions in eastern Australia will be detailed. Preliminary results of the program of research to date will be assessed in light of the requirements of the IESC to provide independent advice to the Australian Commonwealth and State Governments. Finally, parallels (and differences) between the expansion of the industry in Australia with that in the United States and Europe will be drawn.

Post, David

2014-05-01

123

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of North Africa, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 19 billion barrels of technically recoverable undiscovered conventional oil and 370 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas resources in 8 geologic provinces of North Africa.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Whidden, Katherine J.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.

2013-01-01

124

Informatics Resources to Support Health Care Quality Improvement in the Veterans Health Administration  

PubMed Central

Information systems are increasingly important for measuring and improving health care quality. A number of integrated health care delivery systems use advanced information systems and integrated decision support to carry out quality assurance activities, but none as large as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) is a large-scale, multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative designed to ensure excellence in all areas where VHA provides health care services, including inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. In this paper, we describe the role of information systems in the VHA QUERI process, highlight the major information systems critical to this quality improvement process, and discuss issues associated with the use of these systems.

Hynes, Denise M.; Perrin, Ruth A.; Rappaport, Steven; Stevens, Joanne M.; Demakis, John G.

2004-01-01

125

Managing the discovery life cycle of a finite resource: a case study of the US natural gas industry. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this report, a System Dynamics model of discovery of U.S. natural gas is developed as an example of the dynamics of the natural resource discovery process. This model permits one to test, through simulation, the probable effects of alternative policies on the discovery life cycle of the resource. This study indicates that in the case of finite, nonrenewable resources

Naill

1972-01-01

126

U.S. Geological Survey probabilistic methodology for oil and gas resource appraisal of the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Probabilistic methodology used by the U.S. Geological Survey is described for estimating the quantity of undiscovered recoverable conventional resources of oil and gas in the United States. A judgmental probability distribution of the quantity of resource and its properties is determined for a geologic province or basin. From this distribution, point and interval estimates of the quantity of undiscovered resource

Robert A. Crovelli

1984-01-01

127

ERISTAR: Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval administrative report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 1972 Systems Engineering program at Marshall Space Flight Center where 15 participants representing 15 U.S. universities, 1 NASA/MSFC employee, and another specially assigned faculty member, participated in an 11-week program is discussed. The Fellows became acquainted with the philosophy of systems engineering, and as a training exercise, used this approach to produce a conceptional design for an Earth Resources Information Storage, Transformation, Analysis, and Retrieval System. The program was conducted in three phases; approximately 3 weeks were devoted to seminars, tours, and other presentations to subject the participants to technical and other aspects of the information management problem. The second phase, 5 weeks in length, consisted of evaluating alternative solutions to problems, effecting initial trade-offs and performing preliminary design studies and analyses. The last 3 weeks were occupied with final trade-off sessions, final design analyses and preparation of a final report and oral presentation.

Vachon, R. I.; Obrien, J. F., Jr.; Lueg, R. E.; Cox, J. E.

1972-01-01

128

US Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves Annual Report 1996: Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The EIA has published "the estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids in the United States as of December 31, 1996, compiled from EIA's oil and gas operator survey." The report shows that while reserves of natural gas have increased, crude oil reserves have declined.

129

RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA  

SciTech Connect

Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

2003-06-02

130

Natural gas hydrates of Circum-Pacific margin-a future energy resource  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are probably present within the uppermost 1100 m (3600 ft) of oceanic sediment in the following regions of outer continental margins rimming the Pacific Ocean basin: (1) the continental slope east of the North Island of New Zealand; (2) the landward slope of the Nankai Trough off Japan; (3) the continental slope of the northwestern and eastern Aleutian Trench; (4) the continental slope off northern California; (5) the landward slope of the Middle America Trench off Central America; (6) the landward slope of the Peru-Chile Trench; and (7) the basinal sediment of the Ross Sea and the continental margin off Wilkes Land, Antarctica. These gas hydrates likely contain and cap significant quantities of methane. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates is found mainly in the widespread occurrence on marine seismic records of an anomalous reflection event that apparently marks the base of the gas-hydrate zone. Geochemical evidence consists of analyses of gases and interstitial fluids obtained from drilling in offshore sedimentary deposits, particularly at nine DSDP sites cored adjacent to the Middle America Trench where gas hydrates were recovered. Natural gas hydrates will probably be identified in many other Circum-Pacific regions as exploration for offshore petroleum moves into deeper waters over continental and island-arc slopes. Initially, these gas hydrates will probably not be considered as potential energy resources, but special drilling procedures may be needed to penetrate them safely. However, if appropriate reservoirs are found in association with the gas hydrates, then an important energy resource may be discovered.

Kvenvolden, K.A.; Cooper, A.K.

1986-07-01

131

75 FR 53963 - Notice of Baseline Filings: The Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, Minnesota Energy Resources...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...PR10-88- 000, Docket No. PR10-89-000, Docket No. PR10-90-000] Notice of Baseline Filings: The Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, Minnesota Energy Resources Corporation, Louisville Gas and Electric Company, Cobra Pipeline Ltd., Humble Gas...

2010-09-02

132

Worldwide estimates of deep natural gas resources based on the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently assessed undiscovered conventional gas and oil resources in eight regions of the world outside the U.S. The resources assessed were those estimated to have the potential to be added to reserves within the next thirty years. This study is a worldwide analysis of the estimated volumes and distribution of deep (>4.5 km or about 15,000 ft), undiscovered conventional natural gas resources based on this assessment. Two hundred forty-six assessment units in 128 priority geologic provinces, 96 countries, and two jointly held areas were assessed using a probabilistic Total Petroleum System approach. Priority geologic provinces were selected from a ranking of 937 provinces worldwide. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment Team did not assess undiscovered petroleum resources in the U.S. For this report, mean estimated volumes of deep conventional undiscovered gas resources in the U.S. are taken from estimates of 101 deep plays (out of a total of 550 conventional plays in the U.S.) from the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources. A probabilistic method was designed to subdivide gas resources into depth slices using a median-based triangular probability distribution as a model for drilling depth to estimate the percentages of estimated gas resources below various depths. For both the World Petroleum Assessment 2000 and the 1995 National Assessment of Oil and Gas Resources, minimum, median, and maximum depths were assigned to each assessment unit and play; these depths were used in our analysis. Two-hundred seventy-four deep assessment units and plays in 124 petroleum provinces were identified for the U.S. and the world. These assessment units and plays contain a mean undiscovered conventional gas resource of 844 trillion cubic ft (Tcf) occuring at depths below 4.5 km. The deep undiscovered conventional gas resource (844 Tcf) is about 17% of the total world gas resource (4,928 Tcf) based on the provinces assessed and includes a mean estimate of 259 Tcf of U.S. gas from the U.S. 1995 National Assessment. Of the eight regions, the Former Soviet Union (Region 1) contains the largest estimated volume of undiscovered deep gas with a mean resource of 343 Tcf. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Dyman, T. S.; Crovelli, R. A.; Bartberger, C. E.; Takahashi, K. I.

2002-01-01

133

Analytical resource assessment method for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations - The "ACCESS" Method  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically assesses petroleum resources of areas within the United States and the world. The purpose of this report is to explain the development of an analytic probabilistic method and spreadsheet software system called Analytic Cell-Based Continuous Energy Spreadsheet System (ACCESS). The ACCESS method is based upon mathematical equations derived from probability theory. The ACCESS spreadsheet can be used to calculate estimates of the undeveloped oil, gas, and NGL (natural gas liquids) resources in a continuous-type assessment unit. An assessment unit is a mappable volume of rock in a total petroleum system. In this report, the geologic assessment model is defined first, the analytic probabilistic method is described second, and the spreadsheet ACCESS is described third. In this revised version of Open-File Report 00-044 , the text has been updated to reflect modifications that were made to the ACCESS program. Two versions of the program are added as appendixes.

Crovelli, Robert A.; revised by Charpentier, Ronald R.

2012-01-01

134

Administrative Investigation: Conflict of Interest, Misuse of Resources, Gratuities, and Failure to Follow Policy, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, Tampa, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General Administrative Investigations Division investigated allegations that engaged in a conflict of interest as a VA employee and owner (7)(c)of misused VA time and resources to do work, and improperly received gifts from a VA...

2012-01-01

135

How to Implement the Ways of Knowing through the Realms of Meaning in Human Resource Management: Ten Recommendations for Selecting Campus Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human resource management in education is a vital function of hiring, developing, nurturing, and sustaining highly-qualified personnel for the school system. In an age where strong accountability measures are in place, school districts across America must become aware of the types of teachers and administrative staff being selected and retained…

Jacobs, Karen Dupre; Kritsonis, William Allan

2006-01-01

136

A Review of the NAS Manpower Studies Subcontracted by the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Health Care Resources in the Veterans Administration. Volume I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The two volume study was performed by the Human Resources Management, Inc., for the Veterans Administration. The nature of this two volume study is to review and analyze the feasibiity, costs, and expected time frame for implementation of four sub-studies...

1977-01-01

137

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last 6 months (July 2004-December 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the US: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2005-01-01

138

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the West Greenland?East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal effort. The West Greenland?East Canada Province is essentially the offshore area between west Greenland and east Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including Kane Basin. The tectonic evolution of the West Greenland?East Canada Province led to the formation of several major structural domains that are the geologic basis for the five assessment units (AU) defined in this study. The five AUs encompass the entire province. Each AU was assessed in its entirety for undiscovered, technically recoverable (assuming absence of sea ice) oil and gas resources, but the assessment results reported here are only for those portions of each AU that are north of the Arctic Circle, as that latitude defines the area of the Circum-Arctic oil and gas assessment.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Brown, Philip J., II; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Shah, Anjana; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2008-01-01

139

Natural gas cost for evaluating energy resource opportunities at Fort Stewart  

SciTech Connect

Ft. Stewart, a United States Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) installation located near Hinesville, Georgia, is currently undergoing an evaluation of its energy usage, which is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. In order to examine the energy resource opportunities (EROs) at Ft. Stewart, marginal fuel costs must be calculated. The marginal, or avoided, cost of gas service is used in conjunction with the estimated energy savings of an ERO to calculate the dollar value of those savings. In the case of natural gas, the costing becomes more complicated due to the installation of a propane-air mixing station. The propane-air station is being built under a shared energy savings (SES) contract. The building of a propane-air station allows Ft. Stewart to purchase natural gas from their local utility at an interruptible rate, which is lower than the rate for contracting natural gas on a firm basis. The propane-air station will also provide Ft. Stewart with fuel in the event that the natural gas supply is curtailed. While the propane-air station does not affect the actual cost of natural gas, it does affect the cost of services provided by gas. Because the propane-air station and the SES contract affect the cost of gas service, they must be included in the analysis. Our analysis indicates a marginal cost of gas service of 30.0 cents per therm, assuming a total propane usage by the mixing station of 42,278 gallons (38,600 therms) annually. Because the amount of propane that may be required in the event of a curtailment is small relative to the total service requirement, variations in the actual amount should not significantly affect the cost per therm.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-01-01

140

Assessment of Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Resources: Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas Total Petroleum System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas Total Petroleum System, lies within the central and northern parts of the Appalachian coal field. It consists of five assessment units (AU): the Pocahontas Basin in southwestern Virginia, southern West Virginia, and eastern Kentucky, the Central Appalachian Shelf in Tennessee, eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, East Dunkard (Folded) in western Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, West Dunkard (Unfolded) in Ohio and adjacent parts of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and the Appalachian Anthracite and Semi-Anthracite AU in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Of these, only the Pocahontas Basin and West Dunkard (Folded) AU were assessed quantitatively by the U.S. Geological survey in 2002 as containing about 3.6 and 4.8 Tcf of undiscovered, technically recoverable gas, respectively (Milici and others, 2003). In general, the coal beds of this Total Petroleum System, which are both the source rock and reservoir, were deposited together with their associated sedimentary strata in Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) time. The generation of biogenic (microbial) gas probably began almost immediately as the peat deposits were first formed. Microbial gas generation is probably occurring at present to some degree throughout the basin, where the coal beds are relatively shallow and wet. With sufficient depth of burial, compaction, and coalification during the late Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic, the coal beds were heated sufficiently to generate thermogenic gas in the eastern part of the Appalachian basin. Trap formation began initially with the deposition of the paleopeat deposits during the Mississippian, and continued into the Late Pennsylvanian and Permian as the Appalachian Plateau strata were deformed during the Alleghanian orogeny. Seals are the connate waters that occupy fractures and larger pore spaces within the coal beds as well as the fine-grained siliciclastic sedimentary strata that are intercalated with the coal. The critical moment for the petroleum system occurred during this orogeny, when deformation created geologic structures in the eastern part of the basin that enhanced fracture porosity within the coal beds. In places, burial by thrust sheets (thrust loading) within the Appalachian fold-and-thrust belt may have resulted in additional generation of thermogenic CBM in the anthracite district of Pennsylvania and in the semianthracite deposits of Virginia and West Virginia.

Milici, Robert C.

2004-01-01

141

Assessment of potential unconventional lacustrine shale-oil and shale-gas resources, Phitsanulok Basin, Thailand, 2014  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed potential technically recoverable mean resources of 53 million barrels of shale oil and 320 billion cubic feet of shale gas in the Phitsanulok Basin, onshore Thailand.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Brownfield, Michael E.

2014-01-01

142

Oil and gas resources of the Cheat Mountain Further Planning Area (Rare II), Randolph County, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This map presents an analysis of the oil and gas resources of the Cheat Mountain Further Planning Area in the Monomgahela National Forest, Randolph County, West Virgina. 28 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

Weed, E.G.A.

1981-01-01

143

Evolving shale gas management: water resource risks, impacts, and lessons learned.  

PubMed

Unconventional shale gas development promises to significantly alter energy portfolios and economies around the world. It also poses a variety of environmental risks, particularly with respect to the management of water resources. We review current scientific understanding of risks associated with the following: water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing; wastewater treatment, discharge and disposal; methane and fluid migration in the subsurface; and spills and erosion at the surface. Some of these risks are relatively unique to shale gas development, while others are variations of risks that we already face from a variety of industries and activities. All of these risks depend largely on the pace and scale of development that occurs within a particular region. We focus on the United States, where the shale gas boom has been on-going for several years, paying particular attention to the Marcellus Shale, where a majority of peer-reviewed study has taken place. Governments, regulatory agencies, industry, and other stakeholders are challenged with responding to these risks, and we discuss policies and practices that have been adopted or considered by these various groups. Adaptive Management, a structured framework for addressing complex environmental issues, is discussed as a way to reduce polarization of important discussions on risk, and to more formally engage science in policy-making, along with other economic, social and value considerations. Data suggests that some risks can be substantially reduced through policy and best practice, but also that significant uncertainty persists regarding other risks. We suggest that monitoring and data collection related to water resource risks be established as part of planning for shale gas development before activity begins, and that resources are allocated to provide for appropriate oversight at various levels of governance. PMID:24664241

Rahm, Brian G; Riha, Susan J

2014-05-28

144

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Azov-Kuban Basin Province, Ukraine and Russia, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, using a geology-based assessment methodology, estimated mean volumes of technically recoverable, conventional, undiscovered petroleum resources at 218 million barrels of crude oil, 4.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 94 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Azov-Kuban Basin Province as part of a program to estimate petroleum resources for priority basins throughout the world.

Klett, T. R.

2011-01-01

145

Managing the discovery life cycle of a finite resource: A case study of the US natural gas industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system dynamics model of discovery of U.S. natural gas is developed as an example of the dynamics of the natural resource discovery process. It is indicated that in the case of finite, nonrenewable resources such as the fossil fuels, the normal behavior mode of the exploitation system is an initial period of exponential growth in consumption, then a period

R. F. Naill

1972-01-01

146

Brine contamination to aquatic resources from oil and gas development in the Williston Basin, United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Williston Basin, which includes parts of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota in the United States and the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan in Canada, has been a leading domestic oil and gas producing region for more than one-half a century. Currently, there are renewed efforts to develop oil and gas resources from deep geologic formations, spurred by advances in recovery technologies and economic incentives associated with the price of oil. Domestic oil and gas production has many economic benefits and provides a means for the United States to fulfill a part of domestic energy demands; however, environmental hazards can be associated with this type of energy production in the Williston Basin, particularly to aquatic resources (surface water and shallow groundwater) by extremely saline water, or brine, which is produced with oil and gas. The primary source of concern is the migration of brine from buried reserve pits that were used to store produced water during recovery operations; however, there also are considerable risks of brine release from pipeline failures, poor infrastructure construction, and flow-back water from hydraulic fracturing associated with modern oilfield operations. During 2008, a multidisciplinary (biology, geology, water) team of U.S. Geological Survey researchers was assembled to investigate potential energy production effects in the Williston Basin. Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey participated in field tours and met with representatives from county, State, tribal, and Federal agencies to identify information needs and focus research objectives. Common questions from agency personnel, especially those from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, were “are the brine plumes (plumes of brine-contaminated groundwater) from abandoned oil wells affecting wetlands on Waterfowl Production Areas and National Wildlife Refuges?” and “are newer wells related to Bakken and Three Forks development different than the older, abandoned wells (in terms of potential for affecting aquatic resources)?” Of special concern were the wetland habitats of the ecologically important Prairie Pothole Region, which overlays a part of the Williston Basin and is recognized for the production of a majority of North America’s migratory waterfowl. On the basis of the concerns raised by on-the-ground land managers, as well as findings from previous research, a comprehensive study was developed with the following goals: summarize existing information pertaining to oil and gas production and aquatic resources in the Williston Basin; assess brine plume migration from new and previously studied sites in the Prairie Pothole Region; perform a regional, spatial evaluation of oil and gas production activities and aquatic resources; assess the potential for brine contamination to wetlands and streams; and hold a decision analysis workshop with key stakeholders to discuss issues pertaining to oil and gas production and environmental effects and to identify information gaps and research needs. This report represents an initial, multidisciplinary evaluation of measured and potential environmental effects associated with oil and gas production in the Williston Basin and Prairie Pothole Region. Throughout this report there are reviews of current knowledge, and discussions relating to data gaps and research needs. On the basis of the information presented, future research needs include: regional geophysical and water-quality assessments to establish baselines for current conditions and estimate the extent of previous brine contamination, investigations into the direct effects of brine to biotic communities, and evaluations to identify the most effective techniques to mitigate brine contamination.

Edited by Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Contributions by Chesley-Preston, Tara L.; Coleman, James L.; Gleason, Robert A.; Haines, Seth S.; Jenni, Karen E.; Nieman, Timothy L.; Peterman, Zell E.; van der Burg, Max Post; Preston, Todd M.; Smith, Bruce D.; Tangen, Brian A.; Thamke, Joanna N.

2014-01-01

147

Applying probabilistic well-performance parameters to assessments of shale-gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In assessing continuous oil and gas resources, such as shale gas, it is important to describe not only the ultimately producible volumes, but also the expected well performance. This description is critical to any cost analysis or production scheduling. A probabilistic approach facilitates (1) the inclusion of variability in well performance within a continuous accumulation, and (2) the use of data from developed accumulations as analogs for the assessment of undeveloped accumulations. In assessing continuous oil and gas resources of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey analyzed production data from many shale-gas accumulations. Analyses of four of these accumulations (the Barnett, Woodford, Fayetteville, and Haynesville shales) are presented here as examples of the variability of well performance. For example, the distribution of initial monthly production rates for Barnett vertical wells shows a noticeable change with time, first increasing because of improved completion practices, then decreasing from a combination of decreased reservoir pressure (in infill wells) and drilling in less productive areas. Within a partially developed accumulation, historical production data from that accumulation can be used to estimate production characteristics of undrilled areas. An understanding of the probabilistic relations between variables, such as between initial production and decline rates, can improve estimates of ultimate production. Time trends or spatial trends in production data can be clarified by plots and maps. The data can also be divided into subsets depending on well-drilling or well-completion techniques, such as vertical in relation to horizontal wells. For hypothetical or lightly developed accumulations, one can either make comparisons to a specific well-developed accumulation or to the entire range of available developed accumulations. Comparison of the distributions of initial monthly production rates of the four shale-gas accumulations that were studied shows substantial overlap. However, because of differences in decline rates among them, the resulting estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) distributions are considerably different.

Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy

2010-01-01

148

The greenhouse impact of unconventional gas for electricity generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

New techniques to extract natural gas from unconventional resources have become economically competitive over the past several years, leading to a rapid and largely unanticipated expansion in natural gas production. The US Energy Information Administration projects that unconventional gas will supply nearly half of US gas production by 2035. In addition, by significantly expanding and diversifying the gas supply internationally,

Nathan Hultman; Dylan Rebois; Michael Scholten; Christopher Ramig

2011-01-01

149

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01

150

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01

151

Western tight sands gas development: economic and regulatory aspects of blanket resource supply. Final report, March 1981May 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the recoverable quantities and extraction costs of western tight-sands gas from blanket formations. Blanket tight-sands gas is found in continuous rock strata of low permeability that often requires stimulation by massive hydraulic fracturing. Families of marginal cost or resource supply curves were derived to present the economic results and illustrate the sensitivity

D. A. Hanson; D. W. South

1983-01-01

152

Evaluating the performance of hydraulically-fractured shale gas resources in the Appalachian Basin (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluating the performance of engineered-natural systems, such as hydraulically-fractured shales associated with natural gas recovery, depends on an understanding of fracture growth within and outside of the target shale formation, as well as the potential for gas and fluids to migrate to other subsurface resources or underground sources of drinking water. The NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) has a broad research portfolio connected with development of hydraulically-fractured shale resources in the Appalachian Basin. Through a combined field, experimental, modeling, and existing data evaluation effort, the following questions are being addressed: 1) Which subsurface features control the extent to which fractures migrate out of the target fracture zone? 2) Can we improve methods for analyzing natural geochemical tracers? What combination of natural and synthetic tracers can best be used to evaluate subsurface fluid and gas migration? 3) How is wellbore integrity affected by existing shallow gas? Can we predict how shallow groundwater hydrology changes due to drilling? 4) Where are existing wellbores and natural fractures located? What field methods can be used to identify the location of existing wells? To date the NETL-RUA team has focused on four key areas: fracture growth, natural isotopic tracers, impacts of well drilling on shallow hydrology, and statistics on wellbores (locations and conditions). We have found that fracture growth is sensitive to overburden geomechanical features, and that the maximum fracture height outside of the Marcellus Shale aligns with prior assessments (e.g., Fisher et al., 2012). The team has also developed methodologies for the rapid preparation of produced-water samples by MC-ICP-MS and ICP-MS; we are using these methodologies to investigate the potential of key geochemical indicators and species of interest (Sr, Ra) as indicators of fluid and gas migration in the Appalachian Basin. Experimental work on subsurface geochemical reactions in the presence of hydraulic fracturing fluid is underway to evaluate potential impacts on produced water chemistry and fracture stability within the shale formation. Additional laboratory experiments, coupled with modeling efforts, are evaluating the effects of well drilling on shallow groundwater hydrology, and the potential for shallow gas to affect cement hydration. At the field scale, the density and distribution of existing wellbores are being assessed through detection with remote magnetometer surveys, and compilation and analysis of existing wellbore databases. Results from these varied research efforts will be used in future predictive assessments of the behavior of engineered shale gas systems.

Huisman, J. A.; Mboh, C.; Rings, J.; Vrugt, J. A.; Vereecken, H.

2011-12-01

153

Evaluating the performance of hydraulically-fractured shale gas resources in the Appalachian Basin (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluating the performance of engineered-natural systems, such as hydraulically-fractured shales associated with natural gas recovery, depends on an understanding of fracture growth within and outside of the target shale formation, as well as the potential for gas and fluids to migrate to other subsurface resources or underground sources of drinking water. The NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) has a broad research portfolio connected with development of hydraulically-fractured shale resources in the Appalachian Basin. Through a combined field, experimental, modeling, and existing data evaluation effort, the following questions are being addressed: 1) Which subsurface features control the extent to which fractures migrate out of the target fracture zone? 2) Can we improve methods for analyzing natural geochemical tracers? What combination of natural and synthetic tracers can best be used to evaluate subsurface fluid and gas migration? 3) How is wellbore integrity affected by existing shallow gas? Can we predict how shallow groundwater hydrology changes due to drilling? 4) Where are existing wellbores and natural fractures located? What field methods can be used to identify the location of existing wells? To date the NETL-RUA team has focused on four key areas: fracture growth, natural isotopic tracers, impacts of well drilling on shallow hydrology, and statistics on wellbores (locations and conditions). We have found that fracture growth is sensitive to overburden geomechanical features, and that the maximum fracture height outside of the Marcellus Shale aligns with prior assessments (e.g., Fisher et al., 2012). The team has also developed methodologies for the rapid preparation of produced-water samples by MC-ICP-MS and ICP-MS; we are using these methodologies to investigate the potential of key geochemical indicators and species of interest (Sr, Ra) as indicators of fluid and gas migration in the Appalachian Basin. Experimental work on subsurface geochemical reactions in the presence of hydraulic fracturing fluid is underway to evaluate potential impacts on produced water chemistry and fracture stability within the shale formation. Additional laboratory experiments, coupled with modeling efforts, are evaluating the effects of well drilling on shallow groundwater hydrology, and the potential for shallow gas to affect cement hydration. At the field scale, the density and distribution of existing wellbores are being assessed through detection with remote magnetometer surveys, and compilation and analysis of existing wellbore databases. Results from these varied research efforts will be used in future predictive assessments of the behavior of engineered shale gas systems.

Hakala, A.; Wall, A. J.; Guthrie, G.

2013-12-01

154

Evaluation of energy information administration form EIA23 annual survey of domestic oil and gas reserves: Report years 1978--1979  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study by the Office of Oil and Gas (OOG), of the Energy Information Administration (EIA), concerns the quality of data gathered on crude oil and natural gas reserves and production for 1978 and 1979. By reporting on its field validation activities, OOG seeks to provide comprehensive information to interested analysts. A summary of background information on OOG's mandate to

R. Kass; G. H. Wakefield

1983-01-01

155

Maritime Administration Title XI. Vessels Engaged in Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes floating offshore oil and gas drilling units, and their support vessels that have been constructed under Title 11 of the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended. It contains a general description of the marine environment, the possible ...

1976-01-01

156

Engineering and Economics of the USGS Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal (CARA) Project  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Open-File report contains illustrative materials, in the form of PowerPoint slides, used for an oral presentation given at the Fourth U.S. Geological Survey Workshop on Reserve Growth of petroleum resources held on March 10-11, 2008. The presentation focused on engineering and economic aspects of the Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal (CARA) project, with a special emphasis on the costs related to the development of hypothetical oil and gas fields of different sizes and reservoir characteristics in the North Danmarkshavn Basin off the northeast coast of Greenland. The individual PowerPoint slides highlight the topics being addressed in an abbreviated format; they are discussed below, and are amplified with additional text as appropriate. Also included in this report are the summary results of a typical ?run? to generate the necessary capital and operating costs for the development of an offshore oil field off the northeast coast of Greenland; the data are displayed in MS Excel format generated using Questor software (IHS Energy, Inc.). U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acknowledges that this report includes data supplied by IHS Energy, Inc.; Copyright (2008) all rights reserved. IHS Energy has granted USGS the permission to publish this report.

Verma, Mahendra K.; White, Loring P.; Gautier, Donald L.

2008-01-01

157

Resources  

Cancer.gov

The Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) promotes the sharing and dissemination of laboratory tested technologies and reagents to benefit and promote research across the world.  To this regard, several key resources (i.e. data, software

158

Resources  

Cancer.gov

Resources General Information Regarding CTRP AACI-NCI Clinical Trials Reporting Program (CTRP) Strategic Subcommittee Report: CTRP Reporting Objectives and Implementation Timeline, July 2011 (PDF, 1 MB) Helpful Tools CTRP User's Guides Troubleshooting

159

Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

160

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, Canada, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed a geoscience-based assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of provinces within the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin primarily comprises the (1) Alberta Basin Province of Alberta, eastern British Columbia, and the southwestern Northwest Territories; (2) the Williston Basin Province of Saskatchewan, southeastern Alberta, and southern Manitoba; and (3) the Rocky Mountain Deformed Belt Province of western Alberta and eastern British Columbia. This report is part of the U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Resources Project assessment of priority geologic provinces of the world. The assessment was based on geoscience elements that define a total petroleum system (TPS) and associated assessment unit(s). These elements include petroleum source rocks (geochemical properties and petroleum generation, migration, and accumulation), reservoir description (reservoir presence, type, and quality), and petroleum traps (trap and seal types, and timing of trap and seal formation relative to petroleum migration). Using this framework, the Elk Point-Woodbend Composite TPS, Exshaw-Fernie-Mannville Composite TPS, and Middle through Upper Cretaceous Composite TPS were defined, and four conventional assessment units within the total petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed for undiscovered resources in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin.

Higley, Debra

2013-01-01

161

Induction Mortality, ATRA Administration, and Resource Utilization in a Nationally Representative Cohort of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in the United States From 1999 to 2009  

PubMed Central

Background Limited data exist on induction mortality of pediatric patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in the United States, usage of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) during acute promyelocytic leukemia induction, and the resources needed to deliver induction therapy. Procedure Using the Pediatric Health Information System database we established a retrospective cohort of patients treated for newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia with ATRA between January 1999 and September 2009 in 32 of 43 PHIS contributing free-standing pediatric hospitals in the United States. Standard statistical methods were used to determine inhospital induction mortality, ATRA administration, and resource utilization during a 60-day observation period. Results A total of 163 children were identified who met eligibility criteria for cohort inclusion; 52% were female and 76% were white with an average age of 12.7 years. A total of 12 patients (7.4%) died, with 7 (58.3%) dying within the first 7 days of first admission. The mean time to first ATRA exposure increased with decreasing age (P=0.0016). Resource utilization for management of retinoic acid syndrome was higher than anticipated based on prior studies and differed significantly from patients with non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusions The induction mortality for pediatric acute promyelocytic leukemia remains substantial with wide variation in ATRA administration and high rates of resource utilization.

Gregory, John; Walker, Dana; Seif, Alix E.; Kavcic, Marko; Aplenc, Richard

2014-01-01

162

Water intensity assessment of shale gas resources in the Wattenberg field in northeastern Colorado.  

PubMed

Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. As the population increases and agriculture and energy needs continue to rise, the pressure on water and other natural resources is expected to intensify. Recent advances in technology have stimulated growth in oil and gas development, as well as increasing the industry's need for water resources. This study provides an analysis of how efficiently water resources are used for unconventional shale development in Northeastern Colorado. The study is focused on the Wattenberg Field in the Denver-Julesberg Basin. The 2000 square mile field located in a semiarid climate with competing agriculture, municipal, and industrial water demands was one of the first fields where widespread use of hydraulic fracturing was implemented. The consumptive water intensity is measured using a ratio of the net water consumption and the net energy recovery and is used to measure how efficiently water is used for energy extraction. The water and energy use as well as energy recovery data were collected from 200 Noble Energy Inc. wells to estimate the consumptive water intensity. The consumptive water intensity of unconventional shale in the Wattenberg is compared with the consumptive water intensity for extraction of other fuels for other energy sources including coal, natural gas, oil, nuclear, and renewables. 1.4 to 7.5 million gallons is required to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells before energy is extracted in the Wattenberg Field. However, when the large short-term total freshwater-water use is normalized to the amount of energy produced over the lifespan of a well, the consumptive water intensity is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2.7 gal/MMBtu and is similar to surface coal mining. PMID:24749865

Goodwin, Stephen; Carlson, Ken; Knox, Ken; Douglas, Caleb; Rein, Luke

2014-05-20

163

Coalbed methane, Cook Inlet, south-central Alaska: A potential giant gas resource  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cook Inlet Basin of south-central Alaska is a forearc basin containing voluminous Tertiary coal deposits with sufficient methane content to suggest a major coalbed gas resource. Coals ranging in thickness from 2 to 50 ft (0.6 to 15 m) and in gas content from 50 to 250 scf/ton (1.6 to 7.8 cm2/g) occur in Miocene-Oligocene fluvial deposits of the Kenai Group. These coals have been identified as the probable source of more than 8 tcf gas that has been produced from conventional sandstone reservoirs in the basin. Cook Inlet coals can be divided into two main groups: (1) those of bituminous rank in the Tyonek Formation that contain mainly thermogenic methane and are confined to the northeastern part of the basin (Matanuska Valley) and to deep levels elsewhere; and (2) subbituminous coals at shallow depths (<5000 ft [1524 m]) in the Tyonek and overlying Beluga formations, which contain mainly biogenic methane and cover most of the central and southern basin. Based on core and corrected cuttings-desorption analyses, gas contents average 230 scf/ton (7.2 cm2/g) for bituminous coals and 80 scf/ton (2.5 cm2/g) for subbituminous coals. Isotherms constructed for samples of both coal ranks suggest that bituminous coals are saturated with respect to methane, whereas subbituminous coals at shallow depths along the eroded west-central basin margin are locally unsaturated. A preliminary estimate of 140 tcf gas in place is derived for the basin.

Montgomery, S. L.; Barker, C. E.

2003-01-01

164

Undiscovered oil and gas resources underlying the U.S. portions of the Great Lakes, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the U.S. portions of the Appalachian Basin and the Michigan Basin in 2002 and 2004, respectively. Following the assessments of these two basins, oil and gas allocations were assigned to the U.S. portions of the Great Lakes - Lake Superior (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), Lake Michigan (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin), Lake Huron (Michigan), Lake Erie (Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania), and Lake Ontario (New York). Allocations for Lake St. Clair (Michigan) were included with those of Lake Erie. The allocations are based on the geologic elements of each total petroleum system defined in the region and the projected extent of those elements from onshore beneath each of the lakes. These geologic elements include the hydrocarbon source rocks, reservoir rocks, and traps. By using this geologic framework, the USGS defined 8 total petroleum systems and 21 assessment units within the Great Lakes and estimated the quantity of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources within 16 of the 21 assessment units in the Great Lakes.

Coleman, James L.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Ryder, Robert T.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

2006-01-01

165

Maritime Administration Title XI Vessels Engaged in Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The statement refers to the guarantee of obligations (notes, bonds, etc.) including interest, that are obtained in the private market by U.S. citizens for the construction in United States shipyards of offshore oil and gas drilling and service vessels.

1975-01-01

166

Resources  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

167

Resources  

Cancer.gov

Posted: 06/23/2014 Posted: 06/23/2014 Resources Helpful Tools International Collaboration in Clinical Trials Portal Find out how to collaborate with U.S. based research groups and get answers to commonly asked questions about collaborating with NCI International

168

Stable Isotopic Constraints on Abiogenic Hydrocarbon gas Contributions to Thermogenic Natural gas Resources in the Northern Appalachian Basin, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The generation of abiogenic methane by serpentinization or by graphite-water reactions in high-grade metamorphic rocks is well documented by isotopic, fluid inclusion, and petrographic studies. However, geochemical evidence is equivocal for abiogenic generation of higher hydrocarbon gases (ethane through pentane) in economic resources. Thermogenic hydrocarbon gases, generated by thermal cracking of sedimentary organic matter of biological origin, are progressively enriched in 13C as a function of increasing number of carbon atoms in the molecule. The isotopic composition is controlled by the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) during carbon-carbon bond breaking with the largest KIE for methane. Published work on gases in Precambrian rocks in Canada and South Africa suggest that some were generated by abiogenic Fischer-Tropsch type reactions that produced gases with carbon isotopic compositions that are reversed from the thermogenic trend. We have documented reversed isotopic compositions in natural gas accumulations in lower Paleozoic reservoirs of the Appalachian basin regionally from West Virginia and eastern Ohio through Pennsylvania to central New York. The regional accumulation in lower Silurian age strata shows progressive enhancement of the isotopic reversal with increasing depth in the basin. Multivariate analysis of the molecular and isotopic data define an end-member in the deep basin with an approximate composition of 98 mol % CH4, 1-2 mol % C2H6, << 1 mol % C3H8, and ?13C (CH4) = -27 ‰, ?13C (C2H6) = -40 ‰, ?13C (C3H8) = - 41‰. The nominal similarity of isotopic reversals in the gases from Precambrian rocks to those in the lower Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachian basin suggests that abiogenic F-T reactions may have generated some fraction of the gases in the deep basin. Comparison of molecular and hydrogen isotopic compositions show that the gases of putative abiogenic F-T origin are significantly different from Appalachian basin gases. All the Precambrian gases have extremely light hydrogen isotopic compositions of CH4 (?2H < -300‰) and are depleted in CH4 (Canada gases C1/C2+ < 10, S. Africa gases C1/C2+ < 60) compared to gases in lower Paleozoic reservoirs of the Appalachian basin (?2H (CH4) > -150‰, C1/C2+ up to 220). New isotopic studies of gas accumulations, gases in fluid inclusions, and of sedimentary organic matter in the Appalachian basin are in progress to constrain the possible contribution of abiogenic hydrocarbon generation to gas accumulations in this basin.

Burruss, R. C.; Laughrey, C. D.

2006-05-01

169

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 86 billion barrels of oil and 336 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas resources in the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt. The USGS assessed the potential for undiscovered conventional oil and gas accumulations within the Arabian Peninsula and Zagros Fold Belt as part of the USGS World Petroleum Resources Project. Twenty-three assessment units within seven petroleum systems were quantitatively assessed in this study, which represents a reassessment of this area last published in 2000.

Pitman, Janet K.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2012-01-01

170

Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources  

SciTech Connect

Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

Not Available

1990-09-01

171

Non-Renewable Resources Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to help teachers and administrators in Alaska develop secondary and postsecondary training in nonrenewable natural resources. Its competencies reflect those needed for entry-level employment in the following industries as identified by international businesses surveyed in Alaska: gas and petroleum, coal, placer, and…

Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

172

Administrative IT  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

2006-01-01

173

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01

174

Mass balance calculation of the pyrolysates generated from marine crude oil: A prediction model of oil cracking gas resources based on solid bitumen in reservoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil cracking gas plays an important role in the resources of natural gas in the basins with high and over mature marine source\\u000a rocks in China. The prediction of the oil cracking gas resources becomes necessary and urgent in the gas exploration in these\\u000a basins. A marine crude oil sample was pyrolyzed using sealed gold tubes system. The pyrolysates including

TongShan Wang; AnSong Geng; YongQiang Xiong; XinHua Geng

2007-01-01

175

Managing for Results: Efforts to Strengthen the Link Between Resources and Results at the Veterans Health Administration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

VHA's budget formulation and planning processes are centrally managed, but are not closely linked. Resource distribution to VHA's health care networks is mostly formulaic, determined primarily by the distribution of the veterans being served. VHA offices ...

2002-01-01

176

Influence of Prolonged Use of Intravenous Administration Sets in Paediatric Cancer Patients on CVAD-related Bloodstream Infection Rates and Hospital Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:  To assess the effects of extending the routine intravenous administration set (IVAS) change-interval from 72 h (group 1) to\\u000a 7 days (group 2) on the incidence density for central venous access device (CVAD)-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) and\\u000a on resource expenditures in a singlecentre pilot study.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Procedure:  Prospective pre-\\/post-intervention comparison of two consecutive 12-month surveillance periods (2001–2003) in a 17-bed paediatric\\u000a oncology

A. Simon; G. Fleischhack; G. Wiszniewsky; C. Hasan; U. Bode; M. H. Kramer

2006-01-01

177

Wide-Area Energy Storage and Management system to Balance Intermittent Resources in the Bonneville Power Administration and California ISO Control Areas  

SciTech Connect

The entire project addresses the issue of mitigating additional intermittency and fast ramps that occur at higher penetration of intermittent resources, including wind genera-tion, in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the California Independent Sys-tem Operator (California ISO) control areas. The proposed Wide Area Energy Storage and Management System (WAEMS) will address the additional regulation requirement through the energy exchange between the participating control areas and through the use of energy storage and other generation resources. For the BPA and California ISO control centers, the new regulation service will look no different comparing with the traditional regulation resources. The proposed project will benefit the regulation service in these service areas, regardless of the actual degree of penetration of the intermittent resources in the regions. The project develops principles, algorithms, market integration rules, functional de-sign and technical specifications for the WAEMS system. The project is sponsored by BPA and supported in kind by California ISO, Beacon Power Corporation, and the Cali-fornia Energy Commission (CEC).

Makarov, Yuri V.; Yang, Bo; DeSteese, John G.; Lu, Shuai; Miller, Carl H.; Nyeng, Preben; Ma, Jian; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.

2008-06-30

178

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Assam, Bombay, Cauvery, and Krishna-Godavari Provinces, South Asia, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources for the Assam, Bombay, Cauvery, and Krishna–Godavari Provinces, South Asia. The estimated mean volumes are as follows: (1) Assam Province, 273 million barrels of crude oil, 1,559 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 43 million barrels of natural gas liquids; (2) Bombay Province, 1,854 million barrels of crude oil, 15,417 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 498 million barrels of natural gas liquids; (3) Cauvery Province, 941 million barrels of crude oil, 25,208 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 654 million barrels of natural gas liquids; and (4) Krishna–Godavari Province, 466 million barrels of crude oil, 37,168 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 484 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The totals for the four provinces are 3,534 million barrels of crude oil, 79,352 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1,679 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Klett, T. R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2012-01-01

179

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29

180

Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-09-01

181

Management of natural gas resources and search for alternative renewable energy resources: A case study of Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy usage in Pakistan has increased rapidly in past few years due to increase in economic growth. Inadequate and inconsistent supply of energy has created pressure on the industrial and commercial sectors of Pakistan and has also affected environment. Demand has already exceeded supply and load shedding has become common phenomenon. Due to excessive consumption of energy resources it would

Sidra Nisar Malik; Osama Rafiq Sukhera

2012-01-01

182

Real-time surrogate analysis for potential oil and gas contamination of drinking water resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public concerns related to the fast-growing shale oil and gas industry have increased during recent years. The major concern regarding shale gas production is the potential of fracturing fluids being injected into the well or produced fluids flowing out of the well to contaminate drinking water resources such as surface water and groundwater. Fracturing fluids contain high total dissolved solids (TDS); thus, changes in TDS concentrations in groundwater might indicate influences of fracturing fluids. An increase of methane concentrations in groundwater could also potentially be due to hydraulic fracturing activities. To understand the possible contamination of groundwater by fracturing activities, real-time groundwater monitoring is being implemented in the Denver-Julesburg basin of northeast Colorado. A strategy of monitoring of surrogate parameters was chosen instead of measuring potential contaminants directly, an approach that is not cost effective or operationally practical. Contaminant surrogates of TDS and dissolved methane were proposed in this study, and were tested for correlation and data distribution with laboratory experiments. Correlations between TDS and electrical conductivity (EC), and between methane contamination and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) were strong at low concentrations of contaminants (1 mg/L TDS and 0.3 mg/L CH4). Dissolved oxygen (DO) was only an effective surrogate at higher methane concentrations (?2.5 mg/L). The results indicated that EC and ORP are effective surrogates for detecting concentration changes of TDS and methane, respectively, and that a strategy of monitoring for easy to measure parameters can be effective detecting real-time, anomalous behavior relative to a predetermined baseline.

Son, Ji-Hee; Carlson, Kenneth H.

2014-05-01

183

Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the North Cuba Basin, Cuba  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Petroleum generation in the North Cuba Basin is primarily the result of thrust loading of Jurassic and Cretaceous source rocks during formation of the North Cuba fold and thrust belt in the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene. The fold and thrust belt formed as Cuban arc-forearc rocks along the leading edge of the Caribbean plate translated northward during the opening of the Yucatan Basin and collided with the passive margin of southern North America in the Paleogene. Petroleum fluids generated during thrust loading migrated vertically into complex structures in the fold and thrust belt, into structures in the foreland basin, and possibly into carbonate reservoirs along the margins of the Yucatan and Bahama carbonate platforms. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defined a Jurassic-Cretaceous Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) and three assessment units (AU)-North Cuba Fold and Thrust Belt AU, North Cuba Foreland Basin AU, and the North Cuba Platform Margin Carbonate AU-within this TPS based mainly on structure and reservoir type (fig. 1). There is considerable geologic uncertainty as to the extent of petroleum migration that might have occurred within this TPS to form potential petroleum accumulations. Taking this geologic uncertainty into account, especially in the offshore area, the mean volumes of undiscovered resources in the composite TPS of the North Cuba Basin are estimated at (1) 4.6 billion barrels of oil (BBO), with means ranging from an F95 probability of 1 BBO to an F5 probability of 9 BBO; and (2) 8.6 trillion cubic feet of of gas (TCFG), of which 8.6 TCFG is associated with oil fields, and about 1.2 TCFG is in nonassociated gas fields in the North Cuba Foreland Basin AU.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

184

Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimates of gas hydrate sequestered on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (NWGOM) continental slope are presented. The volume of gas hydrate reservoir is estimated based on the relationship between geologic setting, water depth and the gas hydrate stability zone. A conceptual model of gas hydrate occurrence defines two types of gas hydrate accumulations in the NW GOM: (1) structurally focused

Alexei V Milkov; Roger Sassen

2001-01-01

185

Hydrocarbons in Soil Gas as Pathfinders in Geothermal Resource Surveys in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

A surface geochemical technique utilizing normal paraffin (C{sub 7+}) and aromatic (C{sub 8}) hydrocarbons in soil gas has been successfully used as pathfinders in surveys for geothermal resources in Indonesia. The Dieng field was used to test the technique. The result shows the paraffin anomalies to be near and over productive wells. Because productive wells usually lie over upflow zones it reinforces our hypothesis that paraffins define the upflow of geothermal systems. The aromatic hydrocarbon alkylbenzene C{sub 8} was found near and around productive wells in the southeast quadrant of the Dieng field (Sikidang-Merdada area) but they are more spread out and more diffuse than the paraffins. The shape of their anomaly seems to suggest a tendency of spreading into the direction of lower elevations. It is thought that the aromatics, which are much more soluble than their corresponding paraffins, express at the surface as anomalies not only of locations of the upflow but also of the outflow of the geothermal system as well. Therefore the combined paraffin and aromatic anomalies, and topography, may be used as an indicator for the direction of the outflow or the flow of the under ground waters. The scarcity of the aromatics in the northwest quadrant of the Dieng field (Sileri area) is unique. A hypothesis has been proposed which could explain this unique feature.

Pudjianto, R.; Suroto, M.; Higashihara, M.; Fukuda, M.; Ong, Akhadiana and Jan

1995-01-01

186

77 FR 23105 - Supporting Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas...responsible development of unconventional domestic natural gas...reduce our dependence on oil, it is hereby ordered...play by regulating oil and gas activities...efficient development of unconventional domestic natural...

2012-04-17

187

A well-based cost function and the economics of exhaustible resources: The case of natural gas  

SciTech Connect

A cost function for natural gas production is estimated, using a pool of data from 29 wells. Statistically exact tests are performed for parameter stability across locations, formations, wells, and producing firms. Costs are determined to be inversely related to remaining recoverable reserves, and marginal costs of production are decreasing in all cases. Theoretical implications of these cost characteristics on optimal exhaustible resource extraction are analyzed. Although marginal cost is decreasing, production effects on the resource stock imply that an interior production path may be optimal. Conditions under which production optimally occurs at the capacity bound are delineated, and optimal interior production paths are characterized. 21 refs., 2 tabs.

Chermak, J.M. [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)] [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Patrick, R.H. [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States)] [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States)

1995-03-01

188

Estimates of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in the United States; a part of the Nation's energy endowment  

SciTech Connect

Two agencies of the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Minerals Management Service (MMS), recently completed this assessment of the undiscovered conventionally recoverable oil and natural gas resources of the United States. It considers new geological, technological and economic information and uses more definitive methods of resource appraisal than previous assessments. This paper presents this assessment which was conducted over a period of more than two years and reflects data and information available as of January 1, 1987.

Mast, R.F.; Dolton, G.L.; Crovelli, R.A.; Root, D.H.; Atanasi, D.D.; Martin, P.E.; Cooke, L.W.; Carpenter, G.B.; Pecora, W.C.; Rose, M.B.

1989-01-01

189

The Permian Whitehill Formation (Karoo Basin, South Africa): deciphering the complexity and potential of an unconventional gas resource  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A key energy policy objective of the South African government is to diversify its energy mix from coal which constitutes 85% of the current mix. Gas will play a key role in the future South African economy with demand coming from electricity generation and gas-to-liquids projects. A study on world shale reserves conducted by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) in 2011 concluded that there could be as much as 485 Tcf recoverable reserves of shale gas in the South African Karoo Basin. However, the true extent and commercial viability is still unknown, due to the lack of exploration drilling and modern 3D seismic. The present study compiles existing data from literature review and new data from outcrop analogue studies on the Permian Whitehill Formation, the main target formation for future shale gas production, including thickness, depth, maturity, TOC, lithologies, sedimentary and organic facies, and dolerite occurrence to provide a first reference dataset for further investigations and resource estimates.

Götz, Annette E.

2014-05-01

190

Changing perceptions of United States natural-gas resources as shown by successive U. S. Department of the Interior assessments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trends in four successive estimates of United States technically recoverable natural gas resources are examined in this report. The effective dates of these assessments were January 1 of 1975, 1980, 1987, and 1994. The 1994 estimate of the U.S. total gas endowment increased significantly over the previous three estimates, indicating that the technically recoverable endowment of gas is not an absolute volume, but rather is a quantity that can increase through time in response to advances in technology and in geologic understanding. Much of this increase was in the category of reserve growth. Reserve growth refers to additions to the estimated ultimate recovery of fields that typically occur as discovered fields are developed and produced. The potential for U.S. reserve growth, rather than being rapidly used up, appears to be sustainable for many years by intensive engineering efforts coupled with improving technology. Potential additions to reserves in continuous (unconventional) accumulations also represent a type of reserve growth, and were estimated (for the first time) in the 1994 assessment at 358 trillion cubic feet of gas. This resource category provides a significant new contribution to the estimated U.S. total gas endowment.

Schmoker, James W.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.

2001-01-01

191

Water resources and shale gas/oil production in the Appalachian Basin: critical issues and evolving developments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Unconventional natural gas and oil resources in the United States are important components of a national energy program. While the Nation seeks greater energy independence and greener sources of energy, Federal agencies with environmental responsibilities, state and local regulators and water-resource agencies, and citizens throughout areas of unconventional shale gas development have concerns about the environmental effects of high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF), including those in the Appalachian Basin in the northeastern United States (fig. 1). Environmental concerns posing critical challenges include the availability and use of surface water and groundwater for hydraulic fracturing; the migration of stray gas and potential effects on overlying aquifers; the potential for flowback, formation fluids, and other wastes to contaminate surface water and groundwater; and the effects from drill pads, roads, and pipeline infrastructure on land disturbance in small watersheds and headwater streams (U.S. Government Printing Office, 2012). Federal, state, regional and local agencies, along with the gas industry, are striving to use the best science and technology to develop these unconventional resources in an environmentally safe manner. Some of these concerns were addressed in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheet 2009–3032 (Soeder and Kappel, 2009) about potential critical effects on water resources associated with the development of gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale of the Hamilton Group (Ver Straeten and others, 1994). Since that time, (1) the extraction process has evolved, (2) environmental awareness related to high-volume hydraulic fracturing process has increased, (3) state regulations concerning gas well drilling have been modified, and (4) the practices used by industry to obtain, transport, recover, treat, recycle, and ultimately dispose of the spent fluids and solid waste materials have evolved. This report updates and expands on Fact Sheet 2009–3032 and presents new information regarding selected aspects of unconventional shale gas development in the Appalachian Basin (primarily Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New York). This document was prepared by the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, and reviews the evolving technical advances and scientific studies made in the Appalachian Basin between 2009 and the present (2013), addressing past and current issues for oil and gas development in the region.

Kappel, William M.; Williams, John H.; Szabo, Zoltan

2013-01-01

192

Planning, development, and administration of the GRI HFTS and related tight-gas-sand research project. Annual report, January 1991-December 1991. [Hydraulic Fracture Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the work performed by CER in the contract are to (1) provide technical and administrative support in fielding the Hydraulic Fracture Test Site; (2) provide technical and administrative support in performing cooperative research wells; (3) provide support in subcontract and consortia administration; (4) provide technical and administrative support in performing research at the existing GRI Staged Field Experiment Wells; and (5) document and transfer project technology. In support of these goals, CER performed the following tasks. CER participated in site selection planning which ultimately led to the section of the Davis Sandstone in the Ft. Worth Basin (Texas) as site suitable for HFTS research. The initial test well, or Data Well No. 1, was drilled in June 1991. CER assisted in the planning, execution and analysis of the data acquisition program on the well. In addition, CER administered all of the project costs associated with the HFTS. Eight Tight Gas Sands Program co-op wells were coordinated or administered by CER in 1991. These wells were performed in cooperation with Kerr McGee Corporation, Maxus Exploration, Amoco Production Company, Phillips Petroleum Company, Enron Oil and Gas Company, Belden and Blake, and Ashland Oil Company. With regard to technology transfer, CER published three volumes of 'In Focus - Tight Gas Sands' to a total distribution of approximately 1,800 individuals. In addition, CER coordinated the execution of a Frontier Formation workshop and initiated efforts to conduct two more in 1992.

Peterson, R.E.

1992-06-01

193

Resource target for gas reserves to be developed by management of water-drive gas reservoirs. Topical report, June 1, 1991-December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The study analyzed eleven documented projects that all showed incremental reserve potential from water-drive gas reservoirs through the use of management techniques. These projects were characterized by a factor called water-drive strength which was correlated with incremental recovery. The correlation confirmed earlier research that predicted the largest incremental potential in the moderate water-drive category. The parameters necessary to apply the correlation are initial gas in place and water-drive strength. Six hundred forty eight (648) reservoirs were analyzed in Texas, Louisiana Onshore and Louisiana Offshore production areas. Water-drive strength and initial gas-in-place were determined for each reservoir. Based on determinations for the 648 reservoirs, the entire production areas were estimated based on number of fields and reservoirs, number of wells, and cumulative production. The result of the calculation shows that the potential Resource Target is about 17 Tcf.

Ancell, K.L.; Fairchild, J.W.; Agnew, J.B.

1993-02-01

194

Assessment of Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Resources: Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) is an important TPS identified in the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Appalachian basin province (Milici and others, 2003). The TPS is named for the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale, which is the primary source rock, and for multiple lower Paleozoic sandstone and carbonate units that are the important reservoirs. Upper Cambrian through Upper Silurian petroleum-bearing strata that constitute the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS thicken eastward from about 2,700 ft at the western margin of the Appalachian basin to about 12,000 ft at the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin. The Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS covers approximately 170,000 mi2 of the Appalachian basin from northeastern Tennessee to southeastern New York and from central Ohio to eastern West Virginia. The boundary of the TPS is defined by the following geologic features: (1) the northern boundary (from central Ontario to northeastern New York) extends along the outcrop limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone; (2) the northeastern boundary (from southeastern New York, through southeastern Pennsylvania-western Maryland-easternmost West Virginia, to northern Virginia) extends along the eastern limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (3) the southeastern boundary (from west-central and southwestern Virginia to eastern Tennessee) extends along the eastern limit of the Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (4) the southwestern boundary (from eastern Tennessee, through eastern Kentucky, to southwestern Ohio) extends along the approximate facies change from the Trenton Limestone with thin black shale interbeds (on the east) to the equivalent Lexington Limestone without black shale interbeds (on the west); (5) the northern part of the boundary in southwestern Ohio to the Indiana border extends along an arbitrary boundary between the Utica Shale of the Appalachian basin and the Utica Shale of the Sebree trough (Kolata and others, 2001); and (6) the northwestern boundary (from east-central Indiana, through northwesternmost Ohio and southeasternmost Michigan, to central Ontario) extends along the approximate southeastern boundary of the Michigan Basin. Although the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS extends into northwestern Ohio, southeastern Michigan, and northeastern Indiana, these areas have been assigned to the Michigan Basin (Swezey and others, 2005) and are outside the scope of this report. Furthermore, although the northern part of the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS extends across the Great Lakes (Lake Erie and Lake Ontario) into southern Ontario, Canada, only the undiscovered oil and gas resources in the U.S. waters of the Great Lakes have been included in the USGS assessment of the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS. This TPS is similar to the Point Pleasant-Brassfield petroleum system previously identified by Drozd and Cole (1994) in the Ohio part of the Appalachian basin.

Ryder, Robert T.

2008-01-01

195

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Devonian Marcellus Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated a mean undiscovered natural gas resource of 84,198 billion cubic feet and a mean undiscovered natural gas liquids resource of 3,379 million barrels in the Devonian Marcellus Shale within the Appalachian Basin Province. All this resource occurs in continuous accumulations. In 2011, the USGS completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Devonian Marcellus Shale within the Appalachian Basin Province of the eastern United States. The Appalachian Basin Province includes parts of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The assessment of the Marcellus Shale is based on the geologic elements of this formation's total petroleum system (TPS) as recognized in the characteristics of the TPS as a petroleum source rock (source rock richness, thermal maturation, petroleum generation, and migration) as well as a reservoir rock (stratigraphic position and content and petrophysical properties). Together, these components confirm the Marcellus Shale as a continuous petroleum accumulation. Using the geologic framework, the USGS defined one TPS and three assessment units (AUs) within this TPS and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered oil and gas resources within the three AUs. For the purposes of this assessment, the Marcellus Shale is considered to be that Middle Devonian interval that consists primarily of shale and lesser amounts of bentonite, limestone, and siltstone occurring between the underlying Middle Devonian Onondaga Limestone (or its stratigraphic equivalents, the Needmore Shale and Huntersville Chert) and the overlying Middle Devonian Mahantango Formation (or its stratigraphic equivalents, the upper Millboro Shale and middle Hamilton Group).

Coleman, James L.; Milici, Robert C.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Kirshbaum, Mark; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

2011-01-01

196

Cooperative Management of Transboundry Oil and Gas Resources in the Maritime Boundary Region of the Gulf of Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

Finding and exploiting oil and gas resources in the ultra-deepwater areas of the Gulf of Mexico is occurring at an accelerated pace. Huge new discoveries have recently been made in a large geological structure known as the Lower Tertiary Wilcox Trend that is located in the U.S.-Mexico Maritime Boundary Region. These discoveries have been projected to boost current U.S. oil

R. J. McLaughlin

2007-01-01

197

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-07-01

198

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

Peggy Robinson

2004-01-01

199

Natural gas resource characterization study of the Mesaverde group in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming: A strategic plan for the exploitation of tight gas sands. Final report, September 1993April 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

This final report summarizes work completed during the contract on developing an innovative exploration and production strategy for the Mesaverde Group tight gas sands in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Thorough investigation of the processes affecting the sources and reservoirs of this gas resource has been undertaken in order to establish the critical parameters that determine how gas accumulates

Surdam

1996-01-01

200

Westerm tight-sands gas development: economic and regulatory aspects of blanket-resource supply. Final report, March 1981May 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to assess the recoverable quantities and extraction costs of western tight-sands gas from blanket formations. Tight-sands gas is one of the four designated unconventional gas resources. Blanket tight-sands gas is characterized by its deposition in continuous rock strata of low permeability and thereby results in a low production rate in the absence of artificial

D. A. Hanson; D. W. South

1983-01-01

201

Assessment of Appalachian basin oil and gas resources:Devonian shale - Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of the technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. The assessment province includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. The assessment was based on six major petroleum systems, which include strata that range in age from Cambrian to Pennsylvanian. The Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) extends generally from New York to Tennessee. This petroleum system has produced a large proportion of the oil and natural gas that has been discovered in the Appalachian basin since the drilling of the Drake well in Pennsylvania in 1859. For assessment purposes, the TPS was divided into 10 assessment units (plays), 4 of which were classified as conventional and 6 as continuous. The results were reported as fully risked fractiles (F95, F50, F5 and the Mean), with the fractiles indicating the probability of recovery of the assessment amount. Products reported were oil (millions of barrels of oil, MMBO), gas (billions of cubic feet of gas, BCFG), and natural gas liquids (millions of barrels of natural gas liquids, MMBNGL). The mean estimates for technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbons in the TPS are: 7.53 MMBO, 31,418.88 BCFG (31.42 trillion cubic feet) of gas, and 562.07 MMBNGL.

Milici, Robert C.; Swezey, Christopher S.

2006-01-01

202

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Dnieper-Donets Basin Province and Pripyat Basin Province, Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, using a geology-based assessment methodology, estimated mean volumes of technically recoverable, conventional, undiscovered petroleum resources at 84 million barrels of crude oil, 4.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 130 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Dnieper-Donets Basin Province and 39 million barrels of crude oil, 48 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Pripyat Basin Province. The assessments are part of a program to estimate these resources for priority basins throughout the world.

Klett, T. R.

2011-01-01

203

Worldwide Natural Gas Supply and Demand and the Outlook for Global LNG Trade  

EIA Publications

This article is adapted from testimony by Jay Hakes, Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on July 23, 1997. The hearing focused on the examination of certain aspects of natural gas into the next century with special emphasis on world natural gas supply and demand to 2015.

Information Center

1997-08-01

204

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12

205

Assessment of Undiscovered Natural Gas Resources of the Arkoma Basin Province and Geologically Related Areas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of undiscovered natural gas, 159 million barrels of natural gas liquid (MMBNGL), and no oil in accumulations of 0.5 million barrels (MMBO) or larger in the Arkoma Basin Province and related areas. More than 97 percent of the undiscovered gas occurs in continuous accumulations-70 percent in shale gas formations, 18 percent in a basin-centered accumulation with tight sandstone reservoirs, and 9 percent in coal beds. Less than 3 percent of the natural gas occurs in conventional accumulations.

Houseknecht, David W.; Coleman, James L.; Milici, Robert C.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Rouse, William A.; Fulk, Bryant R.; Paxton, Stanley T.; Abbott, Marvin M.; Mars, John C.; Cook, Troy A.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.

2010-01-01

206

Variability of Distributions of Well-Scale Estimated Ultimate Recovery for Continuous (Unconventional) Oil and Gas Resources in the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey has completed assessments of continuous (unconventional) resources in the United States based on geologic studies and analysis of well-production data. This publication uses those 132 continuous oil and gas assessmen...

2012-01-01

207

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Advance summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA), in cooperation with the US Geological Survey (USGS), has assessed 13 major petroleum producing regions outside of the United States. This series of assessments has been performed under EIA's Foreign Energy Supp...

1993-01-01

208

Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources, onshore Claiborne Group, United Statespart of the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The middle Eocene Claiborne Group was assessed for undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources using established U.S. Geological Survey assessment methodology. This work was conducted as part of a 2007 assessment of Paleogene-Neogene strata of the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin, including the United States onshore and state waters (Dubiel et al., 2007). The assessed area is within the Upper Jurassic-CretaceousTertiary composite total petroleum system, which was defined for the assessment. Source rocks for Claiborne oil accumulations are interpreted to be organic-rich, downdip, shaley facies of the Wilcox Group and the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group; gas accumulations may have originated from multiple sources, including the Jurassic Smackover Formation and the Haynesville and Bossier shales, the Cretaceous Eagle Ford and Pearsall (?) formations, and the Paleogene Wilcox Group and Sparta Sand. Hydrocarbon generation in the basin started prior to deposition of Claiborne sediments and is currently ongoing. Primary reservoir sandstones in the Claiborne Group include, from oldest to youngest, the Queen City Sand, Cook Mountain Formation, Sparta Sand, Yegua Formation, and the laterally equivalent Cockfield Formation. A geologic model, supported by spatial analysis of petroleum geology data, including discovered reservoir depths, thicknesses, temperatures, porosities, permeabilities, and pressures, was used to divide the Claiborne Group into seven assessment units (AUs) with three distinctive structural and depositional settings. The three structural and depositional settings are (1) stable shelf, (2) expanded fault zone, and (3) slope and basin floor; the seven AUs are (1) lower Claiborne stable-shelf gas and oil, (2) lower Claiborne expanded fault-zone gas, (3) lower Claiborne slope and basin-floor gas, (4) lower Claiborne Cane River, (5) upper Claiborne stable-shelf gas and oil, (6) upper Claiborne expanded fault-zone gas, and (7) upper Claiborne slope and basin-floor gas. Based on Monte Carlo simulation of justified input parameters, the total estimated mean undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources in the seven AUs combined are 52 million bbl of oil, 19.145 tcf of natural gas, and 1.205 billion bbl of natural gas liquids. This article describes the conceptual geologic model used to define the seven Claiborne AUs, the characteristics of each AU, and the justification behind the input parameters used to estimate undiscovered resources for each AU. The great bulk of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources are predicted to be nonassociated gas and natural gas liquids contained in deep (mostiy >12,000-ft [3658 m], present-day drilling depths), overpressured, structurally complex outer shelf or slope and basin-floor Claiborne reservoirs. The continuing development of these downdip objectives is expected to be the primary focus of exploration activity for the onshore middle Eocene Gulf Coast in the coming decades. ?? 2010 U.S. Geological Survey. All rights reserved.

Hackley, P. C.; Ewing, T. E.

2010-01-01

209

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

SciTech Connect

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01

210

Analysis on Correlation Relationship Between Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emission and Life Cycle Cost of Electricity Generation System for Energy Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this work, we analysed correlations between life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and life cycle cost of energy resources.\\u000a Energy resources studied in this paper include coal, natural gas, nuclear power, hydropower, geothermal energy, wind power,\\u000a solar thermal energy, and solar photovoltaic energy, and all of them are used to generate electricity. We calculated the mean\\u000a values, ranges of

Heetae Kim; Tae Kyu Ahn

211

An Allocation of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources to Gauley River National Recreation Area and New River Gorge National River, West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered oil and gas resources that may underlie Gauley River National Recreation Area and New River Gorge National River in West Virginia. Using the results of an assessment of undiscovered resources from ten assessment units in the Appalachian Basin Province that include these land parcels, the USGS allocated 2.9 billion cubic feet of gas, 1.6 thousand barrels of oil, and 45 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to part of Gauley River National Recreation Area, and 39 billion cubic feet of gas, 24 thousand barrels of oil, and 644 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to New River Gorge National River. These allocated volumes of undiscovered resources represent potential volumes in undiscovered fields.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Crovelli, Robert A.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Milici, Robert C.

2003-01-01

212

An allocation of undiscovered oil and gas resources to Big South Fork National Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River, Kentucky and Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated volumes of undiscovered oil and gas resources that may underlie Big South Fork National Recreation Area and Obed Wild and Scenic River in Kentucky and Tennessee. Applying the results of existing assessments of undiscovered resources from three assessment units in the Appalachian Basin Province and three plays in the Cincinnati Arch Province that include these land parcels, the USGS allocated approximately (1) 16 billion cubic feet of gas, 15 thousand barrels of oil, and 232 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to Big South Fork National Recreation Area; and (2) 0.5 billion cubic feet of gas, 0.6 thousand barrels of oil, and 10 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids to Obed Wild and Scenic River. These estimated volumes of undiscovered resources represent potential volumes in new undiscovered fields, but do not include potential additions to reserves within existing fields.

Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Pollastro, Richard M.

2006-01-01

213

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Mackenzie Delta province, North America, 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 40 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered nonassociated gas, a mean of 10.5 billion barrels of undiscovered oil (with 46.6 trillion cubic feet of associated gas), and a mean of 4.0 billion barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Mackenzie Delta Province of North America, exclusive of the unassessed deep-water portion of the province.

Henry, Mitchell E.; Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Ulmishek, Gregory F.

2006-01-01

214

Gas hydrates (clathrates) in the geosciences -- resource, hazard, and global change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural gas hydrates are solid, ice-like substances composed of rigid cages of water molecules that enclose molecules of gas, mainly methane. These substances are sometimes called water clathrates of methane or methane clathrates, but the terms [open quotes]methane hydrates[close quotes] or [open quotes]gas hydrates[close quotes] are most commonly used in the geoscience literature to describe these extensive deposits of solidified

Kvenvolden

1993-01-01

215

Market structure and exhaustible resources: The case of natural gas and crude oil in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a dataset of natural gas and crude oil production in the state of California, evidence shows overextraction incentives among market participants that shared a common pool. Due to these incentives the supply of gas and crude oil extraction tends to become more inelastic as the number of firms in the pool increases. Using an instrumental variables estimation of the supply function, the results show that the common pool externality caused an average overproduction rate of 11% and 4% over the 1977--2001 period, in natural gas and crude oil, respectively. These figures imply 1 year and 4 years of additional production for natural gas and crude oil, respectively.

Czastkiewicz, Carolina

216

Analytic Resource Assessment Method for Continuous (Unconventional) Oil and Gas Accumulations: The 'ACCESS' Method.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically assesses petroleum resources of areas within the United States and the world. The purpose of this report is to explain the development of an analytic probabilistic method and spreadsheet software system calle...

R. A. Crovelli R. R. Charpentier

2012-01-01

217

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Bighorn Basin Province, Wyoming and Montana, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 989 billion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 72 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 13 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Bighorn Basin Providence of Wyoming and Montana.

Geological Survey (U.S.)

2008-01-01

218

Of Teapot Dome, Wind River and Fort Chaffee: Federal Oil and Gas Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The move from a location system to a leasing system for the development of federally owned oil and gas was a controversial and hard fought step. Like most programs for commercial use of public lands, the oil and gas leasing system has been the target of criticism for fraud. A review of the decisions of the US DOI disclose that

Laura Lindley

1995-01-01

219

Market structure and exhaustible resources: The case of natural gas and crude oil in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a dataset of natural gas and crude oil production in the state of California, evidence shows overextraction incentives among market participants that shared a common pool. Due to these incentives the supply of gas and crude oil extraction tends to become more inelastic as the number of firms in the pool increases. Using an instrumental variables estimation of the

Carolina Czastkiewicz

2005-01-01

220

Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

2005-12-30

221

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the North Caspian Basin, Middle Caspian Basin, North Ustyurt Basin, and South Caspian Basin Provinces, Caspian Sea Area, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of technically recoverable, conventional, undiscovered petroleum resources at 19.6 billion barrels of crude oil, 243 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 9.3 billion barrels of natural gas liquids for the Caspian Sea area, using a geology-based assessment methodology.

Klett, T. R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Cook, Troy A.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2010-01-01

222

Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered, Technically Recoverable Coalbed-Gas Resources in Cretaceous and Tertiary Rocks, North Slope and Adjacent State Waters, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geology-based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States, focusing on the distribution, quantity, and availability of oil and natural gas resources. The USGS has completed an assessment of the undiscovered, technically recoverable coalbed-gas resources in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks underlying the North Slope and adjacent State waters of Alaska (USGS Northern Alaska Province 5001). The province is a priority Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) province for the National Assessment because of its potential for oil and gas resources. The assessment of this province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (stratigraphy, sedimentology, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). In the Northern Alaska Province, the USGS used this geologic framework to define one composite coalbed gas total petroleum system and three coalbed gas assessment units within the petroleum system, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered coalbed-gas resources within each assessment unit.

Compiled by Roberts, Stephen B.

2008-01-01

223

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availa...

1995-01-01

224

Assessment of potential additions to conventional oil and gas resources in discovered fields of the United States from reserve growth, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources that have the potential to be added to reserves from reserve growth in 70 discovered oil and gas accumulations of the United States, excluding Federal offshore areas. The mean estimated volumes are 32 billion barrels of crude oil, 291 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 10 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

U.S. Geological Survey Reserve Growth Assessment Team

2012-01-01

225

Cooperative Management of Transboundry Oil and Gas Resources in the Maritime Boundary Region of the Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Finding and exploiting oil and gas resources in the ultra-deepwater areas of the Gulf of Mexico is occurring at an accelerated pace. Huge new discoveries have recently been made in a large geological structure known as the Lower Tertiary Wilcox Trend that is located in the U.S.-Mexico Maritime Boundary Region. These discoveries have been projected to boost current U.S. oil reserves by as much as fifty percent. Technological advancements and market conditions have finally reached a point where production of hydrocarbons in these ultra-deepwaters is commercially feasible. However, due to the transboundary characteristics of many of these hydrocarbons, some form of bi-national cooperation is necessary to effectively manage the shared resources, protect the oceanic environment and comply with evolving norms of international law before commercial production can begin. Well established international customary norms prohibit unilateral exploitation of transboundary oil and gas resources. Consequently, it is important for the two nations to address these issues today rather than putting them off until they become a critical political problem in their bilateral relations. The United States and Mexico have already agreed to temporarily cooperate in the exploration of potential oil and gas resources in one portion of the Gulf of Mexico known as the Western Gap. This is an area in the center of the Gulf of Mexico that falls outside of the 200 mile exclusive economic zones of the two nations. After scientific studies provided evidence that the Western Gap qualifies as part of each nation's extended continental shelf, a Delimitation Treaty was negotiated and ratified in 2000. This Treaty gave Mexico access to about 62 percent of the Gap, while the U.S. retained about 38 percent. The Treaty also established a 2.8 nautical mile buffer zone along the new boundary to account for the possibility that straddling oil and gas reservoirs may be located there. The nations agreed to a ten year drilling moratorium and to share information on the geological and geophysical characteristics of any reservoirs in the buffer zone. In 2010, the moratorium expires and either side may exploit the resources in the zone. Similar transboundary reservoirs of immense size exist along significant portions of the U.S.-Mexico maritime boundary. Yet, proper management and production of these resources will be severely hampered by a variety of legal and policy impediments that await resolution. Resolving many of these impediments will only be possible through the collaborative efforts of both nations. It is time for the U.S. and Mexican Governments to take a more proactive role in managing the transboundary hydrocarbon resources in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. If successful, rather than an arena for competition and legal strife, the U.S.-Mexico Maritime Boundary Region can serve as a model of cooperative management. Such a model would benefit both nations as well as serve as a useful guide for the rest of the international community.

McLaughlin, R. J.

2007-05-01

226

Analysis of the conceptions and expectations of students in the courses of pedagogy, administration and human resources about the discipline of science, technology and society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Provided for the education curricula since 1960, the focus on Science, Technology and Society (STS) has been poorly implemented even until today. Set as a goal to be achieved at all levels of education by 2014, in Brazil it is necessary to undertake specific actions in pursuit of putting into practice what has been stalled over the years in Education. As a result of joint efforts of teachers and students of the Masters in Teaching Science and Mathematics at the Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul comes the challenge of providing a specific discipline dealing with the concepts of STS, offered as a optional special, initially for students of Pedagogy and later, due to the interest of some students, for the course of Administration and Human Resources of this institution. The survey of previous conceptions of students enrolled in the Special Discipline Elective Science, Technology and Society (CTS DOP) on the triad of STS showed a great ignorance on the same theme. The reports reveal conceptions of students who approach the linear model of development. As to the generated expectations in terms of discipline, there stand out the desires of expansion of knowledge for possible applications in personal and professional life. This research aims to evaluate the current course, while identifying ways to improve and strengthen the STS movement in education.

de Souza, Alexandre; de Oliveira Neves, Jobert; Ferreira, Orlando Rodrigues; Lúcia Costa Amaral, Carmem; Delourdes Maciel, Maria; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Nascimento, Rômulo Pereira

2012-10-01

227

76 FR 56412 - Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...blowout and the Deepwater Horizon explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, and growing public opposition to the rapid pace of shale gas development onshore are stark reminders of the environmental risks of our current energy portfolio. The 2011 Annual...

2011-09-13

228

US Landfill Gas Resource: Low-Cost Biogas from Municipal Solid Waste.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, Low-cost biogas from municipal solid waste, covers: numbers and volumes of landfills; gas generation rates; methods; and data and results. 23 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs. (ERA citation 13:050893)

J. E. Bogner

1988-01-01

229

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of Southeast Asia, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated means of 21.6 billion barrels of oil and 299 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas in 22 provinces of southeast Asia.

2010-01-01

230

Origins, characteristics, controls, and economic viabilities of deep-basin gas resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dry-gas deposits (methane ? 95% of the hydrocarbon (HC) gases) are thought to originate from in-reservoir thermal cracking of oil and C2+ HC gases to methane. However, because methanes from Anadarko Basin dry-gas deposits do not carry the isotopic signature characteristic of C15+ HC destruction, an origin of these methanes from this process is considered improbable. Instead, the isotopic signature

Leigh C. Price

1995-01-01

231

Handbook for Alumni Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A definitive look at the field of alumni administration is presented, noting that the subject has until now received little attention. The 34 chapters are divided into nine sections: an overview of alumni administration; alumni as an essential resource; people management; budget and records; programming; communications; alumni education programs…

Webb, Charles H., Ed.

232

Integration and Ruggedization of a Commercially Available Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) for the Resource Prospector Mission (RPM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Resource Prospector is a mission to prospect for lunar volatiles (primarily water) at one of the two lunar poles, as well as demonstrate In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon. The Resource Prospector consists of a lander, a rover, and a rover-borne scientific payload. The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload, will be able to (1) locate near subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith, and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials. The gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) is the primary instrument in the RESOLVE instrumentation suite responsible for identification and quantification of the volatiles evolved from the lunar regolith. Specifically, this instrument must have: a low mass, a low power consumption, be able to perform fast analyses of samples ranging from less than one to greater than ninety nine percent water by mass, be autonomously controlled by the payload's software and avionics platform, and be able to operate in the harsh lunar environment. The RPM's short mission duration is the primary driver of the requirement for a very fast analysis time currently base lined at less than 2 minutes per sample. This presentation will discuss the requirements levied upon the GCMS design, lessons learned from a preliminary field demonstration deployment, the current design, and the path forward.

Loftin, Kathleen; Griffin, Timothy; Captian, Janine

2013-01-01

233

Secondary gas emissions during coal desorption, Marathon Grassim Oskolkoff-1 Well, Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska: Implications for resource assessment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cuttings samples of sub-bituminous humic coals from the Oligocene to Pliocene Tyonek Formation, Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska show secondary gas emissions whose geochemistry is consistent with renewed microbial methanogenesis during canister desorption. The renewed methanogenesis was noted after initial desorption measurements had ceased and a canister had an air and desorbed gas mixture backflow into the canister during a measurement. About a week after this event, a secondary emission of gas began and continued for over two years. The desorbed gas volume reached a new maximum, increasing the total from 3.3 to 4.9 litres, some 48% above the pre-contamination total volume. The gases released during desorption show a shift in the isotopic signature over time of methane from ??13CCH4 of -53.60 ??? and ??DCH4 of -312.60 ??? at the first day to ??13CCH4 of -57.06 ??? and ??DCH4 of -375.80 ??? after 809 days, when the experiment was arbitrarily stopped and the canister opened to study the coal. These isotopic data, interpreted using a Bernard Diagram, indicate a shift from a mixed thermogenic and biogenic source typical of natural gases in the coals and conventional gas reservoirs of the Cook Inlet Basin to a likely biogenic acetate-fermentation methane source. However, the appearance of CO2 during the renewed gas emissions with a ??13CCO2 of +26.08 to +21.72 ???, interpreted using the carbon isotope fractions found for acetate fermentation and CO2 reduction between CO2 and CH4 by Jenden and Kaplan (1986), indicates a biogenic CO2-reduction pathway may also be operative during renewed gas emission. Adding nutrients to the coal cuttings and canister water and culturing the microbial consortia under anaerobic conditions led to additional methane-rich gas generation in the laboratory. After this anaerobic culturing, ultraviolet microscopy showed that canister water contained common, fluorescent, rod-like microbes comparable to Methanobacterium sp. Scanning electron microscope investigations of the coal matrix showed several morphological types of microbes, including rod, cocci and spherical forms attached to the coal surface. These microbes apparently represent at least a portion of the microbial consortia needed to depolymerize coal, as well as to generate the observed secondary methane emission from the canister. The introduction of 48% more methane from secondary sources has a major impact on coal-bed methane resource assessments and also in determining the true, in-situ degree of methane saturation in coal-beds using isotherms. Canister and isotherm measurements that show "supersaturation" of methane may actually be the result of additional gases generated during secondary methanogenesis.

Barker, C. E.; Dallegge, T.

2006-01-01

234

Identify Financial Resources for Vocational Education. Module LT-H-2 of Category H--Business and Financial Management. Competency-Based Vocational Education Administrator Module Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module, one in a series of competency-based administrator instructional packages, focuses on a specific competency that vocational education administrators need to be successful in the area of business and financial management. The purpose of the module is to help administrators identify traditional and alternative funding opportunities for…

Puleo, Nancy F.; And Others

235

Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2008-12-31

236

Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

1995-06-01

237

Of teapot dome, Wind river and Fort chaffee: Federal oil and gas resources  

SciTech Connect

The move from a location system to a leasing system for the development of federally owned oil and gas was a controversial and hard fought step. Like most programs for commercial use of public lands, the oil and gas leasing system has been the target of criticism for fraud. A review of the decisions of the US DOI disclose that DOI`s role has evolved from one largely developed to resolving disputes between competing applicants for a lease to one more concerned with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This article presents a review of decisions.

Lindley, L.

1995-12-31

238

An estimate of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of the world, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 565 billion barrels of conventional oil and 5,606 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas in 171 priority geologic provinces of the world, exclusive of the United States.

Schenk, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

239

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Amu Darya Basin and Afghan-Tajik Basin Provinces, Afghanistan, Iran, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of undiscovered, technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources for the Amu Darya Basin and Afghan–Tajik Basin Provinces of Afghanistan, Iran, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. The mean volumes were estimated at 962 million barrels of crude oil, 52 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 582 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Amu Darya Basin Province and at 946 million barrels of crude oil, 7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 85 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Afghan–Tajik Basin Province.

Klett, T. R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Cook, Troy A.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

2012-01-01

240

Experimental Program for Real Gas Flow Code Validation at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames is described. Ground based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arcjet facilities and heated air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also inc...

G. S. Deiwert A. W. Strawa S. P. Sharma C. Park

1988-01-01

241

Energy resources' utilization in organic and conventional vineyards: Energy flow, greenhouse gas emissions and biofuel production  

Microsoft Academic Search

An energy analysis, in conventional and organic vineyards, combined with ethanol production and greenhouse gas emissions, is useful in evaluating present situation and deciding best management strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in the energy flow between organic and conventional vineyards in three locations, to calculate CO2, CH4 and N2O-emissions based on the used fossil

Stefanos E. Kavargiris; Andreas P. Mamolos; Constantinos A. Tsatsarelis; Anna E. Nikolaidou; Kiriaki L. Kalburtji

2009-01-01

242

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31

243

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads\\/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG

K. G. Darrow; A. B. Ashby; D. M. Nesbitt; R. A. Marshalla

1985-01-01

244

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL AND GAS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five sub-contractors that have taken place during the first six months (January 1, 2003--June 30, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Gnomon, Inc. and all five (5) subcontractors have agreed on a process for the framework of this two-year project. They have also started gathering geomorphological information and entering cultural resource data into databases that will be used to create models later in the project. This data is being gathered in both the Power River Basin of Wyoming, and the Southeastern region of New Mexico. Several meetings were held with key players in this project to explain the purpose of the research, to obtain feedback and to gain support. All activities have been accomplished on time and within budget with no major setbacks.

Peggy Robinson

2003-07-25

245

Elder care - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - elder care ... The following organizations are good resources for information on aging and elder care: Administration on Aging - www.aoa.gov Eldercare Locator - www.eldercare.gov National Institute on ...

246

Experimental Program for Real Gas Flow Code Validation at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Ames Research Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind t...

G. S. Deiwert A. W. Strawa S. P. Sharma C. Park

1989-01-01

247

Basic research opportunities for lasting fuel gas supplies from inorganic resources. Final report 15 Feb 81-28 Feb 82  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-six participants (twenty-five faculty members from U.S. universities and one private consultant) reviewed the status of current research problems relating to the production of fuel gases from inorganic resources using indefinitely sustainable energy sources during a workshop held during the period June 8 to August 14, 1981 at Texas AandM University, College Station, Texas. Photobiological, biomimetic, photochemical, photoelectrochemical, radiolytic and thermochemical pathways leading to the generation of hydrogen from water and hydrogen sulfide, of carbon monoxide and methane from carbon dioxide, and of nitrogen-based fuel gases from atmospheric nitrogen were assessed. The most likely energy sources to drive the endergonic, fuel-producing reactions are solar radiation, and heat and radiation from nuclear reactors. Recommendations at the end of each chapter outline the basic research needed to improve the fuel gas-producing reactions and to provide the basis for developments leading to the practical application of these processes. It was suggested that equal emphasis should be placed on research in photobiology, biomimetic chemistry, photochemistry and photoelectrochemistry pertinent to fuel-gas production. Thermochemical and radiolytic methods appear to deserve less attention at the present time. The report contains 840 literature citations.

Not Available

1982-02-01

248

Determination of hemoglobin adducts following oral administration of 1-nitropyrene to rats using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) has successfully been used as a marker for environmental monitoring of exposure to diesel exhaust. This study presents a sensitive and selective method for detection of Hb adducts after oral administration of a single dose 1-NP to rats, by measuring 1-aminopyrene (1-AP) after in vitro hydrolysis of the adducts. Released 1-AP was extracted with hexane and derivatized with heptafluorobutyric acid anhydride prior to GC-MS-MS analysis. Optimal conditions for the release of 1-AP were hydrolysis under nitrogen, in 1 M NaOH at 70 degrees C for 60 min. Analysis of a stock solution of Hb adducts of 1-NP utilizing these conditions showed to be reproducible over a period of several weeks with a coefficient of variance of 9.5%. The determination limit was 10-20 pg 1-AP per 70-90 mg globin. A study of the time course of Hb adduct formation showed a fast absorption and an early peak concentration of released 1-AP, approximately 39 pg 1-AP/mg globin at 3 h after exposure. After the maximum was reached, 1-AP concentrations decreased bi-phasically. Initially a fast decline was observed, followed by a slow decrease to 5.9+/-1.9 pg 1-AP/mg globin at 24 h after administration. PMID:9389334

van Bekkum, Y M; Scheepers, P T; van den Broek, P H; Velders, D D; Noordhoek, J; Bos, R P

1997-11-01

249

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22

250

Assessment of the Mesaverde Total Petroleum System in Southwestern Wyoming Province: a petroleum system approach to assessing undiscovered oil and gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in a recent assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Southwestern Wyoming Province using a Total Petroleum System (TPS) approach, estimated a mean of 84.6 trillion cubic feet of gas (TCFG), 131 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 2.6 billion barrels of natural gas liquids (BBNGL) that have the potential to be added to reserves over the next 30 years. Only a fraction of this, however, may be economically recoverable . Of the total estimate of 84.6 TCFG, a mean of 25.78 TCFG is in continuous-type reservoirs in the Mesaverde TPS. The Mesaverde TPS is defined as all reservoirs predominantly containing gas derived from the Mesaverde Group east of the pinchout of the Lewis Shale, which acts as a top seal separating the Mesaverde TPS from the overlying Lewis TPS. Continuous-type reservoirs in the Mesaverde TPS were subdivided into the Almond Continuous Gas Assessment Unit (AU) (mean of 13.35 TCFG), Rock Springs-Ericson Continuous Gas AU (mean of 12.18 TCFG), and the Mesaverde Coalbed Gas AU (mean of 0.25 TCFG). Geologic analysis was used to determine the favorable ?sweet spots? for potential gas resources. The Almond AU has been heavily explored at depths less than 11,000 ft, thus additions to reserves will most likely be the result of infill drilling in existing fields and the discovery of sweet spots at depths greater than 11,000 ft. There is much uncertainty in the size of undiscovered resource in the Rock Springs-Ericson AU because potential reservoirs are only sparsely explored. Only a small fraction of in-place coal-bed gas is considered to be recoverable because of low permeability and problems posed by produced water.

Johnson, Ronald C.; Finn, Thomas M.

2003-01-01

251

Empirical Methods for Detecting Regional Trends and Other Spatial Expressions in Antrim Shale Gas Productivity, with Implications for Improving Resource Projections Using Local Nonparametric Estimation Techniques  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The primary objectives of this research were to (1) investigate empirical methods for establishing regional trends in unconventional gas resources as exhibited by historical production data and (2) determine whether or not incorporating additional knowledge of a regional trend in a suite of previously established local nonparametric resource prediction algorithms influences assessment results. Three different trend detection methods were applied to publicly available production data (well EUR aggregated to 80-acre cells) from the Devonian Antrim Shale gas play in the Michigan Basin. This effort led to the identification of a southeast-northwest trend in cell EUR values across the play that, in a very general sense, conforms to the primary fracture and structural orientations of the province. However, including this trend in the resource prediction algorithms did not lead to improved results. Further analysis indicated the existence of clustering among cell EUR values that likely dampens the contribution of the regional trend. The reason for the clustering, a somewhat unexpected result, is not completely understood, although the geological literature provides some possible explanations. With appropriate data, a better understanding of this clustering phenomenon may lead to important information about the factors and their interactions that control Antrim Shale gas production, which may, in turn, help establish a more general protocol for better estimating resources in this and other shale gas plays. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology (outside the USA).

Coburn, T. C.; Freeman, P. A.; Attanasi, E. D.

2012-01-01

252

Water Resource Impacts During Unconventional Shale Gas Development: The Pennsylvania Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The number of unconventional Marcellus shale wells in PA has increased from 8 in 2005 to more than 6000 today. This rapid development has been accompanied by environmental issues. We analyze publicly available data describing this Pennsylvania experience (data from www.shalenetwork.org and PA Department of Environmental Protection, i.e., PA DEP). After removing permitting and reporting violations, the average percent of wells/year with at least one notice of violation (NOV) from PA DEP is 35 %. Most violations are minor. An analysis of NOVs reported for wells drilled before 2013 revealed a rate of casing, cement, or well construction issues of 3.4%. Sixteen wells were given notices specifically related to migration of methane. A similarly low percent of wells were contaminated by brine components. Such contamination could derive from spills, subsurface migration of flowback water or shallow natural brines, or contamination by drill cuttings. Most cases of contamination of drinking water supplies with methane or brine components were reported in the previously glaciated part of the state. Before 2011, flowback and production water was often discharged legally into streams after minimal treatment, possibly increasing dissolved Br concentrations in some rivers. The rate of large spills or releases of gas-related industrial wastes in the state peaked in 2009 but little evidence of spills has been found in publicly available surface water chemistry data. The most likely indicators of spillage or subsurface release of flowback or production waters are the dissolved ions Na, Ca, and Cl. However, the data coverage for any given analyte is generally spatially and temporally sparse. Publicly available water quality data for before and after spills into Larrys Creek and Bobs Creek document the difficulties of detecting such events. An observation from the Pennsylvania experience is that the large number of people who have complained about their water supply (~1000 letters investigated by state regulators) and the media attention during the fast start in PA may have led to better management practices. Maintaining online databases of observations could similarly drive shale-gas practice to become even more environmentally protective.

Brantley, S. L.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Arjmand, S.; Grieve, P.; Vidic, R.; Abad, J. D.; Simon, C. A.; Pollak, J.

2013-12-01

253

Digital map data, text, and graphical images in support of the 1995 National assessment of United States oil and gas resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This CD-ROM contains files in support of the 1995 USGS National assessment of United States oil and gas resources (DDS-30), which was published separately and summarizes the results of a 3-year study of the oil and gas resources of the onshore and state waters of the United States. The study describes about 560 oil and gas plays in the United States--confirmed and hypothetical, conventional and unconventional. A parallel study of the Federal offshore is being conducted by the U.S. Minerals Management Service. This CD-ROM contains files in multiple formats, so that almost any computer user can import them into word processors and mapping software packages. No proprietary data are released on this CD-ROM. The complete text of DDS-30 is also available, as well as many figures. A companion CD-ROM (DDS-36) includes the tabular data, the programs, and the same text data, but none of the map data.

compiled by Beeman, William R.; Obuch, Raymond C.; Brewton, James D.

1996-01-01

254

I Can Soar: How Technology Helps Students Take Off. A Resource Kit for Parents, Educators, and School Administrators Who Work with Students Who Have Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource kit includes the following: Executive Summary; Legal Fact Sheet; Resource Guide; 26-minute "I Can Soar" Videotape; Video User's Guide; and Stories of Students Featured in Video. The materials provide tips to hep guide consumers in better integrating assistive technology (AT) within effective programs and services for children with…

Gruner, Allison; Fleming, Erin; Bradley, Carl; Diamond, Christina M.; Ruedel, Kristin L. A.; Saunders, Jessica; Paulsen, Christine; McInerney, Maurice

255

The Administration's Education Reform Proposal. Hearing on Examining the Administration's Proposal To Reform the National Education System before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, chairman of the committee, opened the hearing by commending President Bush and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Lamar Alexander for putting forward an education reform plan. Kennedy then stated his reservations: the plan does not devote enough attention to school readiness; the administration emphasizes choice as a…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

256

On the resource evaluation of marine gas hydrate deposits using sea-floor transient electric dipole-dipole methods  

SciTech Connect

Methane hydrates are solid, nonstoichiometric mixtures of water and the gas methane. The depth extent and stability of the hydrate zone is governed by the phase diagram for mixtures of methane and hydrate and determined by ambient pressures and temperatures. The base of the hydrate zone is a phase boundary between solid hydrate and free gas and water. It stands out on seismic sections as a bright reflection. The diffuse upper boundary is not as well marked so that the total mass of hydrate is not determined easily by seismic alone. The addition of electrical data, collected with a seafloor transient electric dipole-dipole system, can aid in the evaluation of the resource. Two exploration scenarios are investigated through numerical modeling. In the first, a very simple example illustrating some of the fundamental characteristics of the electrical response, most of the properties of the section including the probable, regional thickness of the hydrate zone (200 m) are assumed known from seismic and spot drilling. In the second example, less information is assumed available a priori and the complementary electrical survey is required to find both the thickness and the hydrate content in a hydrate zone about 200 m thick beneath the sea floor containing 20 and 40% hydrate in the available pore space, respectively. A linear eigenfunction analysis reveals that for these two models, the total mass of hydrate, the product of hydrate content and thickness, may be estimated to an accuracy of about 3{epsilon}% given measurements of traveltime to an accuracy of {epsilon}% over a range of separations from 100 to 1300 m. Based on these data, the author suggests that the value of {epsilon} may be of the order of 3%.

Edwards, R.N. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics

1997-01-01

257

Greenhouse gas impacts of declining hydrocarbon resource quality: Depletion, dynamics, and process emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation explores the environmental and economic impacts of the transition to hydrocarbon substitutes for conventional petroleum (SCPs). First, mathematical models of oil depletion are reviewed, including the Hubbert model, curve-fitting methods, simulation models, and economic models. The benefits and drawbacks of each method are outlined. I discuss the predictive value of the models and our ability to determine if one model type works best. I argue that forecasting oil depletion without also including substitution with SCPs results in unrealistic projections of future energy supply. I next use information theoretic techniques to test the Hubbert model of oil depletion against five other asymmetric and symmetric curve-fitting models using data from 139 oil producing regions. I also test the assumptions that production curves are symmetric and that production is more bell-shaped in larger regions. Results show that if symmetry is enforced, Gaussian production curves perform best, while if asymmetry is allowed, asymmetric exponential models prove most useful. I also find strong evidence for asymmetry: production declines are consistently less steep than inclines. In order to understand the impacts of oil depletion on GHG emissions, I developed the Regional Optimization Model for Emissions from Oil Substitutes (ROMEO). ROMEO is an economic optimization model of investment and production of fuels. Results indicate that incremental emissions (with demand held constant) from SCPs could be 5-20 GtC over the next 50 years. These results are sensitive to the endowment of conventional oil and not sensitive to a carbon tax. If demand can vary, total emissions could decline under a transition because the higher cost of SCPs lessens overall fuel consumption. Lastly, I study the energetic and environmental characteristics of the in situ conversion process, which utilizes electricity to generate liquid hydrocarbons from oil shale. I model the energy inputs and outputs from the ICP use them to calculate the GHG emissions from the ICP. Energy outputs (as refined liquid fuel) range from 1.2 to 1.6 times the total primary energy inputs. Well-to-tank greenhouse gas emissions range from 30.6 to 37.1 gCeq./MJ of final fuel delivered, 21 to 47% larger than those from conventionally produced petroleum-based fuels.

Brandt, Adam Robert

258

Changes in greenhouse gas balance and resource demand of biogas plants in southern Germany after a period of three years.  

PubMed

For five agricultural biogas plants with a high share of energy crops in the input material, a detailed balance of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and cumulated energy demand (CED) was calculated for the years 2007 and 2010. The results vary considerably between plants and over time. In 2010 compared with 2007, all of the five biogas plants reduced their impact on climate change and four of them also reduced their consumption of fossil energy. The strongest influence was from the enhanced utilization of surplus heat energy, whereas variations of environmental impact due to direct emissions from the biogas plants were less distinctive. Compared with a reference system based on fossil resources, electricity production in the biogas plants avoided GHG emissions of 603 g to 940 g carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2-eq)•kilowatt hours electrical energy (kWhel (-1)) and saved 2.48 to 3.23 kilowatt hours primary energy from fossil energy carriers (kWhfossil)•kWhel (-1) CED (results for 2010). PMID:23129609

Bachmaier, Hans; Effenberger, Mathias; Gronauer, Andreas; Boxberger, Josef

2013-04-01

259

7. Administrative structures.  

PubMed

The basic systems of any society rarely can operate independently. Instead, they are dependent and often interdependent upon other entities. Such entities control the resources within their respective systems. Thus, coordination and control agencies require contracts or memoranda of understanding with these entities in order to assure access to the resources required during a crisis. These administrative structures include: (1) governmental institutions and agencies, including the military; (2) intergovernmental organisations; (3) nongovernmental organisations; (4) commercial private sector organisations; and (5) academic institutions. These dependencies create potential barriers to the provision of coordination and control including: (1) the complexity of the administrative structures with which coordination and control must interact; (2) the location of resources; (3) finding responsible person(s); (4) the competence and compatibility; (5) methods of access; (6) payment; (7) contracts and memoranda of understanding; (8) inventories of accessible resources; (9) competition for the mandate, power, and resources; and (10) jealousy. The need for potential interactions between administrative structures requires that agreements for the sharing of resources during crises be reached as part of planning and preparedness. Gaining an understanding of these relationships is an important area for research. PMID:24785804

2014-05-01

260

Top-to-Bottom Review. (Food Safety and Inspection Service). Preliminary Report. Volume 4. FSIS Resource Allocation and Other Administrative Subjects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The review is part of the overall initiative of the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) to improve the safety of meat and poultry products and better protect consumers. It encompasses the Agency's regulatory roles, resource allocation, and organizat...

1995-01-01

261

Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated undiscovered oil and gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the San Juan Basin Province, New Mexico and Colorado. Paleozoic rocks were not appraised. The last oil and gas assessment for the province was in 1995. There are several important differences between the 1995 and 2002 assessments. The area assessed is smaller than that in the 1995 assessment. This assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the San Juan Basin Province also used a slightly different approach in the assessment, and hence a number of the plays defined in the 1995 assessment are addressed differently in this report. After 1995, the USGS has applied a total petroleum system (TPS) concept to oil and gas basin assessments. The TPS approach incorporates knowledge of the source rocks, reservoir rocks, migration pathways, and time of generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons; thus the assessments are geologically based. Each TPS is subdivided into one or more assessment units, usually defined by a unique set of reservoir rocks, but which have in common the same source rock. Four TPSs and 14 assessment units were geologically evaluated, and for 13 units, the undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

U.S. Geological Survey San Juan Basin Assessment Team

2013-01-01

262

Variability of distributions of well-scale estimated ultimate recovery for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey has completed assessments of continuous (unconventional) resources in the United States based on geologic studies and analysis of well-production data. This publication uses those 132 continuous oil and gas assessments to show the variability of well productivity within and among the 132 areas. The production from the most productive wells in an area commonly is more than 100 times larger than that from the poorest productive wells. The 132 assessment units were classified into four categories: shale gas, coalbed gas, tight gas, and continuous oil. For each category, the mean well productivity in the most productive assessment units is considerably greater than that of the least productive assessment units.

U.S. Geological Survey Oil and Gas Assessment Team

2012-01-01

263

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01

264

Career Education. Administrators and Counselors Implementation Model. Module VIII--Implementation. (8.3) Integration of Coordination of School and Community Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a 13-volume series designed to be used as a group inservice or a self-learning system to train school administrators and counselors for their role in career education, this third section (8.3) of module 8 consists of readings and four activities to assist counselors in preparation for their role as coordinators of school and community…

Michel, John

265

Tight Gas Sands Development How to Dramatically Improve Recovery Efficiency Integrated application of joint DOE\\/NETL and industry-sponsored intensive resource development technology could double the volume of natural gas considered technically recoverable from tight gas sands in Rocky Mountain basins. This is the first of a three-part series  

Microsoft Academic Search

hree case studies are presented in this article to demonstrate the application of Intensive Resource Development (IRD). The first case study discusses how IRD is converting the Williams Fork\\/Mesaverde gas play in the Rulison field of the southern Piceance Basin of Colorado from a modest 100 Bcf accumulation into what is potentially a multi-Tcf gas field. The second case study

Vello A. Kuuskraa; James Ammer

2004-01-01

266

Scraping the bottom of the barrel: greenhouse gas emission consequences of a transition to low-quality and synthetic petroleum resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate uncertainties about conventional petroleum resources and substitutes for conventional petroleum, focusing on\\u000a the impact of these uncertainties on future greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We use examples from the IPCC Special Report on\\u000a Emissions Scenarios as a baseline for comparison. The studied uncertainties include, (1) uncertainty in emissions factors\\u000a for petroleum substitutes, (2) uncertainties resulting from poor knowledge of

Adam R. Brandt; Alexander E. Farrell

2007-01-01

267

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

EIA Publications

This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22

268

Management of Resources. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the British Educational Administration Society. (2nd, Edinburg, Scotland, November 10, 1973).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains four conference addresses, responses to those addresses, and a synopsis of eight discussion group reports. The report begins with a paper on staff resources in secondary schools, then considers the problem of assessing the staffing needs of secondary schools and ensuring an adequate supply of qualified secondary teachers,…

Ewan, E. A., Ed.

269

75 FR 76975 - 2015 Resource Pool-Sierra Nevada Region  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Western Area Power Administration 2015 Resource Pool--Sierra Nevada Region AGENCY...administration of DOE, announces the Final 2015 Resource Pool allocations pursuant to its 2004...received on Western's proposed 2015 Resource Pool allocations and Western's...

2010-12-10

270

Natural gas resource characterization study of the Mesaverde group in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming: A strategic plan for the exploitation of tight gas sands. Final report, September 1993-April 1996  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes work completed during the contract on developing an innovative exploration and production strategy for the Mesaverde Group tight gas sands in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Thorough investigation of the processes affecting the sources and reservoirs of this gas resource has been undertaken in order to establish the critical parameters that determine how gas accumulates in gas-saturated, anomalously pressured rocks and that affect the successful and efficient exploitation of tight gas sands. During the contract, IER researchers have (1) developed a natural gas exploration paradigm that can be be used to create improved exploitation strategies for the Mesaverde Group tight gas sands, thereby lowing exploration risk; (2) detected and delineated sweet spots using 2-D and 3-D models of well log responses, petrographic and petrophysical studies, water chemistry analyses, and natural frature studies; (3) investigated the relationship of natural fractures and lineaments to hydrocarbon production in the GGRB; (4) created an expanded database for the GGRB; (5) prioritized volunteered experimental drill sites in the GGRB for potential cooperative research and development; and (6) participated in joint studies on a horizontal well completion in the Almond Formation, Echo Springs field, Washakie Basin.

Surdam, R.C.

1996-05-01

271

CO2 storage resources, reserves, and reserve growth: Toward a methodology for integrated assessment of the storage capacity of oil and gas reservoirs and saline formations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologically based methodologies to assess the possible volumes of subsurface CO2 storage must apply clear and uniform definitions of resource and reserve concepts to each assessment unit (AU). Application of the current state of knowledge of geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and geophysical parameters (contingencies) that control storage volume and injectivity allows definition of the contingent resource (CR) of storage. The parameters known with the greatest certainty are based on observations on known traps (KTs) within the AU that produced oil, gas, and water. The aggregate volume of KTs within an AU defines the most conservation volume of contingent resource. Application of the concept of reserve growth to CR volume provides a logical path for subsequent reevaluation of the total resource as knowledge of CO2 storage processes increases during implementation of storage projects. Increased knowledge of storage performance over time will probably allow the volume of the contingent resource of storage to grow over time, although negative growth is possible. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Burruss, R. C.

2009-01-01

272

Energy Carriers Use in the World: Natural Gas - Conventional and Unconventional Gas Resources / Wykorzystanie No?ników Energii w ?wiecie: Zasoby Gazu Ziemnego w Z?o?ach Konwencjonalnych i Niekonwencjonalnych  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses forecasts of energy carrier use with particular emphasis on the changing position of natural gas due to global climatic conditions and the increasing role of unconventional natural gas reservoirs. Allocation of natural gas resources in the world are discussed as well as global gas consumption and conditions for development of transport infrastructure and storage. The most important indicators of the energy security of countries are presented. The basic properties of unconventional deposits, and differences in the production/extraction of gas from the conventional and unconventional fields are given. In the paper are also discussed natural gas reserves in Poland, including possible non-conventional resources in the fields and issues of increasing the role of gas as an energy carrier in Poland in the background of the energy changes in Europe and the world. W pracy omówiono prognozy energetyczne wykorzystania energii ze szczególnym uwzgl?dnieniem zmieniaj?cej si? pozycji gazu ziemnego z uwagi na uwarunkowania klimatyczne oraz wzrastaj?c? role niekonwencjonalnych z?ó? gazu ziemnego. Omówiono alokacj? zasobów gazu ziemnego w ?wiecie, zu?ycie gazu w regionach oraz warunki rozbudowy infrastruktury transportu i magazynowania. Przedstawiono najwa?niejsze wska?niki dotycz?ce bezpiecze?stwa energetycznego krajów. Omówiono podstawowe w?asno?ci z?ó? niekonwencjonalnych oraz ró?nice w charakterze wydobycia gazu ze z?ó? konwencjonalnych i niekonwencjonalnych. Omówiono zasoby gazu w Polsce, w tym mo?liwe zasoby w z?o?ach niekonwencjonalnych oraz zagadnienia zwi?kszenia roli gazu jako no?nika energii w Polsce w tle energetycznych zmian Europy i ?wiata.

Siemek, Jakub; Nagy, Stanis?aw

2012-11-01

273

Legal and administrative systems for water allocation and management: options for change. Seven perspectives on aspects of water resource planning in the southeastern states  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes seven aspects of water resources planning and management and their implications for the southeastern United States. Its purpose is to provide an assessment of alternatives for changes in the water law of the Southeast. 'Allocation of Supplies Among Competing Offstream Users Within the Basin' suggests that permit systems offer improved capability for balancing public and private interests in water but that this option may be too severe for states with a general abundance of water resources. Options assessed in 'Accommodating Interwatershed Transfer Under the Riparian Doctrine' include a declaration that any water use is protected from actions for damages in the absence of material injury, establishment of reasonableness as the sole criterion for evaluating the legal standing of a nonriparian use and adoption of a procedure for protecting inbasin water users.

Walker, W.R.; Cox, W.E.; Hrezo, M.S.

1983-01-01

274

Educational Technology Links for Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a reference collection of World Wide Web links to Web sites involving technology in education. Web resources are categorized into the following nine sections: (1) Publications/Journals/Articles; (2) Grants and Funding Resources; (3) Software/Hardware/Downloads and Demos; (4) Professional Development for Administrators and…

Shurtleff, Carrie; Pirinelli, Lisa; Pfaffenbach, Dennis; Burruano, Joe; Silver, Heather; Foster, Cheryl; Zastrow, Ann

275

Class 1 overview of cultural resources for the Western Area Power Administration Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects electric power marketing environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted an inventory of known archaeological and historic sites in areas that could be affected by the hydropower operation alternatives under analysis in the power marketing environmental impact statement for the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects. The study areas included portions of the Green River (Flaming Gorge Dam to Cub Creek) in Utah and Colorado and the Gunnison River (Blue Mesa Reservoir to Crystal Dam) in Colorado. All previous archaeological surveys and previously recorded prehistoric and historic sites, structures, and features were inventoried and plotted on maps (only survey area maps are included in this report). The surveys were classified by their level of intensity, and the sites were classified according to their age, type, and contents. These data (presented here in tabular form) permit a general assessment of the character and distribution of archaeological remains in the study areas, as well as an indication of the sampling basis for such an assessment. To provide an adequate context for the descriptions of the archaeological and historic sites, this report also presents overviews of the environmental setting and the regional prehistory, history, and ethnography for each study area.

Moeller, K.L.; Malinowski, L.M.; Hoffecker, J.F.; Walitschek, D.A.; Shogren, L.; Mathews, J.E.; Verhaaren, B.T.

1993-11-01

276

'By papers and pens, you can only do so much': views about accountability and human resource management from Indian government health administrators and workers.  

PubMed

Although accountability drives in the Indian health sector sporadically highlight egregious behaviour of individual health providers, accountability needs to be understood more broadly. From a managerial perspective, while accountability functions as a control mechanism that involves reviews and sanctions, it also has a constructive side that encourages learning from errors and discretion to support innovation. This points to social relationships: how formal rules and hierarchies combine with informal norms and processes and more fundamentally how power relations are negotiated. Drawing from this conceptual background and based on qualitative research, this article analyses the views of government primary health care administrators and workers from Koppal district, northern Karnataka, India. In particular, the article details how these actors view two management functions concerned with internal accountability: supervision and disciplinary action. A number of disjunctures are revealed. Although extensive information systems exist, they do not guide responsiveness or planning. While supportive supervision efforts are acknowledged and practiced, implicit quid-pro-quo bargains that justify poor service delivery performance are more prevalent. Despite the enactment of numerous disciplinary measures, little discipline is observed. These disjunctures reflect nuanced and layered relationships between health administrators and workers, as well as how power is negotiated through corruption and elected representatives within the broader political economy context of health systems in northern Karnataka, India. These various dimensions of accountability need to be addressed if it is to be used more equitably and effectively. PMID:19384895

George, Asha

2009-01-01

277

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future

Erdlac; Richard J

2006-01-01

278

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

SciTech Connect

Electricity markets in the United States have witnessed unprecedented instability over the last few years, with substantial volatility in wholesale market prices, significant financial distress among major industry organizations, and unprecedented legal, regulatory and legislative activity. These events demonstrate the considerable risks that exist in the electricity industry. Recent industry instability also illustrates the need for thoughtful resource planning to balance the cost, reliability, and risk of the electricity supplied to end-use customers. In balancing different supply options, utilities, regulators, and other resource planners must consider the unique risk profiles of each generating source. This paper evaluates the relative risk profiles of renewable and natural gas generating plants. The risks that exist in the electricity industry depend in part on the technologies that are used to generate electricity. Natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plant additions in the United States. To some, this emphasis on a single fuel source signals the potential for increased risk. Renewable generation sources, on the other hand, are frequently cited as a potent source of socially beneficial risk reduction relative to natural gas-fired generation. Renewable generation is not risk free, however, and also imposes certain costs on the electricity sector. This paper specifically compares the allocation and mitigation of risks in long-term natural gas-fired electricity contracts with the allocation and mitigation of these same risks in long-term renewable energy contracts. This comparison highlights some of the key differences between renewable and natural gas generation that decision makers should consider when making electricity investment and contracting decisions. Our assessment is relevant in both regulated and restructured markets. In still-regulated markets, the audience for this report clearly includes regulators and the utilities they regulate. In restructured markets, the role of regulatory oversight of resource planning is more limited. Nonetheless, even in restructured markets, it is increasingly recognized that regulators have a critical role to play in directing the resource planning of providers of last resort--electric suppliers that provide service to those customers who choose not to switch to a competitive supplier. Our review of electricity contracts may also have educational value for those unfamiliar with the typical contents of these agreements. Details of our findings are provided in the body of the paper, but this summary is written to provide a concise alternative to reading the full report.

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-03-12

279

Executive summary--2002 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 1 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated undiscovered oil and gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the San Juan Basin Province (5022), New Mexico and Colorado (fig. 1). Paleozoic rocks were not appraised. The last oil and gas assessment for the province was in 1995 (Gautier and others, 1996). There are several important differences between the 1995 and 2002 assessments. The area assessed is smaller than that in the 1995 assessment. This assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the San Juan Basin Province also used a slightly different approach in the assessment, and hence a number of the plays defined in the 1995 assessment are addressed differently in this report. After 1995, the USGS has applied a total petroleum system (TPS) concept to oil and gas basin assessments. The TPS approach incorporates knowledge of the source rocks, reservoir rocks, migration pathways, and time of generation and expulsion of hydrocarbons; thus the assessments are geologically based. Each TPS is subdivided into one or more assessment units, usually defined by a unique set of reservoir rocks, but which have in common the same source rock. Four TPSs and 14 assessment units were geologically evaluated, and for 13 units, the undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

U.S. Geological Survey San Juan Basin Assessment Team

2013-01-01

280

Geology and oil and gas assessment of the Mancos-Menefee Composite Total Petroleum System: Chapter 4 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Eight assessment units were defined in the Mancos-Menefee Composite TPS. Of the eight assessment units, four were assessed as conventional oil or gas accumulations and four as continuous-type accumulations. The conventional assessment units are Dakota-Greenhorn Conventional Oil and Gas Assessment Unit (AU), Gallup Sandstone Conventional Oil and Gas AU, Mancos Sandstones Conventional Oil AU, and the Mesaverde Updip Conventional Oil AU. Continuous-type assessments are Dakota-Greenhorn Continuous Gas AU, Mancos Sandstones Continuous Gas AU, Mesaverde Central-Basin Continuous Gas AU, and Menefee Coalbed Gas AU. The Mesaverde Updip Conventional AU was not quantitatively assessed for undiscovered oil and gas resources, because the producing oil fields were smaller than the 0.5 million barrel cutoff, and the potential of finding fields above this cutoff was considered to be low. Total oil resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the next 30 years are estimated at a mean of 16.78 million barrels. Most of this resource will come from reservoirs in the Mancos Sandstones Oil AU. Gas resources that have the potential for additions to reserves in the next 30 years are estimated at a mean of 11.11 trillion cubic feet of gas (TCFG). Of this amount, 11.03 TCFG will come from continuous gas accumulations; the remainder will be gas associated with oil in conventional accumulations.Total natural gas liquids (NGL) that have the potential for additions to reserves in the next 30 years are estimated at a mean of 99.86 million barrels. Of this amount, 96.95 million barrels will come from the continuous gas assessment units, and 78.3 percent of this potential resource will come from the Mancos Sandstones Continuous Gas AU.

Ridgley, J. L.; Condon, S. M.; Hatch, J. R.

2013-01-01

281

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata of the Gulf Coast, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 147.4 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, 2.4 billion barrels of undiscovered oil, and 2.96 billion barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata in onshore lands and State waters of the Gulf Coast.

Dubiel, Russell F.; Warwick, Peter D.; Swanson, Sharon; Burke, Lauri; Biewick, Laura R. H.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Coleman, James L.; Cook, Troy A.; Dennen, Kris; Doolan, Colin; Enomoto, Catherine; Hackley, Paul C.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Kinney, Scott A.; Lewan, Michael D.; Merrill, Matt; Pearson, Krystal; Pearson, Ofori N.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Rowan, Elizabeth L.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Valentine, Brett

2011-01-01

282

Oil and gas resource atlas series offshore northern Gulf of Mexico. Annual report, October 1, 1992October 31, 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report summarizes activities conducted during the first year of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Atlas Series program for which the Bureau of Economic Geology is the lead technical contractor. The objective of the program is to develop an atlas of hydrocarbon plays by integrating geologic and engineering data for oil and gas reservoirs with large-scale patterns

S. J. Seni; B. Desselle; A. Standen

1993-01-01

283

Western Tight Sands Gas Development: Economic and Regulatory Aspects of Blanket Resource Supply. Final Report March 1981-May 1983,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study was to assess the recoverable quantities and extraction costs of western tight sands gas from blanket formations. Blanket tight sands gas is found in continuous rock strata of low permeability that often requires stimulation by ma...

D. A. Hanson D. W. South

1983-01-01

284

On the resource evaluation of marine gas hydrate deposits using sea-floor transient electric dipole-dipole methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methane hydrates are solid, nonstoichiometric mixtures of water and the gas methane. The depth extent and stability of the hydrate zone is governed by the phase diagram for mixtures of methane and hydrate and determined by ambient pressures and temperatures. The base of the hydrate zone is a phase boundary between solid hydrate and free gas and water. It stands

R. Nigel Edwards

1997-01-01

285

Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Powder River Basin Province of Wyoming and Montana--2006 Update  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 16.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, 639 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and 131 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Powder River Basin Province.

Geological Survey (U.S)

2006-01-01

286

Small Business Administration: Managing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world of business can be a difficult one, particularly for those entering the business world as owners or managers of a small business. Fortunately, there are a number of resources online that can ease this transition. The United States Small Business Administration has created this resource that is designed to give business owners a basic overview of how to manage, market, and lead their business. The site is divided into several discrete sections, including "Management for Growth", "Leadership" and "Marketing & Sales". Within each section, visitors can read essays that address such topics as the management of employees, buying a franchise, equity financing, and strategic planning. One of the highlights here is a free online growth strategies course. The site is rounded out by an area that provides information about some of the Administration's special initiatives designed to help women, minorities, and veterans.

287

Potential tight gas resources in a frontier province - Jurassic through Tertiary strata beneath the Brooks Range foothills, Arctic Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beneath the foothills of the Brooks Range, rocks of the Lower Cretaceous-Tertiary Brookian and Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Beaufortian megasequences have been deeply buried and exhumed, and now exhibit characteristics of 'tight gas sandstones'. The data recovered from drilling, well tests, and cores exhibit the potential for substantial gas reserves over a large area. These data include recovery of gas from drillstem tests, indications of overpressure from well tests and mud weights, low porosity and permeability in sandstones, and vitrinite reflectance values ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 percent throughout substantial depth intervals.

Nelson, Philip H.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Houseknecht, David W.; Potter, Christopher J.; Moore, Thomas E.

2006-01-01

288

Appraisal of gas hydrate resources based on a P- and S-impedance reflectivity template: case study from the deep sea sediments in Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The occurrence of a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) in the 2D seismic data from Makran's accretionary prism reveals the presence of gas hydrate and free gas several hundred meters below the seafloor of Iran's deep sea. According to the global distribution of marine hydrates, they are widely present in deep sea sediments, where high operational costs and hazards cause a lack of well log information. Therefore, developing a method to quantify the hydrate resources with seismic data is an ultimate goal for unexplored regions. In this study, the so-called reflectivity templates (RTs) are introduced for quantification of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR. These RTs are intuitive crossplots of P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR. They are calculated theoretically based on the effective medium theory for different hydrate distribution modes with some assumptions on porosity and mineralogical composition of unconsolidated sediments. This technique suggests the possibility of using the amplitude variation versus offset (AVO) analysis of the BSR for a quantitative interpretation when well log data are not available. By superimposing the AVO-derived P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR on these RTs, the saturations of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR could be estimated. Validation of this approach by synthetic data showed that a reliable quantification could be achieved if the model parameters were rearranged to a form in which the AVO inversion was independent of the S-wave to P-wave velocity-ratio assumption. Based on this approach applied on the 2D marine pre-stack time migrated seismic line in offshore Iran, 4% to 28% of the gas hydrate and 1% to 2% of the free gas are expected to be accumulated near the thrusted-ridge and thrusted-footwall types of BSRs.

Shoar, Behnam Hosseini; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Keshavarz Farajkhah, Nasser; Seddigh Arabani, Mojtaba

2013-12-01

289

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Coast Mesozoic basins of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge Thrust Belt, Atlantic Coastal Plain, and New England Provinces, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the early opening of the Atlantic Ocean in the Mesozoic Era, numerous extensional basins formed along the eastern margin of the North American continent from Florida northward to New England and parts of adjacent Canada. The basins extend generally from the offshore Atlantic continental margin westward beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the Appalachian Mountains. Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean undiscovered natural gas resource of 3,860 billion cubic feet and a mean undiscovered natural gas liquids resource of 135 million barrels in continuous accumulations within five of the East Coast Mesozoic basins: the Deep River, Dan River-Danville, and Richmond basins, which are within the Piedmont Province of North Carolina and Virginia; the Taylorsville basin, which is almost entirely within the Atlantic Coastal Plain Province of Virginia and Maryland; and the southern part of the Newark basin (herein referred to as the South Newark basin), which is within the Blue Ridge Thrust Belt Province of New Jersey. The provinces, which contain these extensional basins, extend across parts of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

Milici, Robert C.; Coleman, James L.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

2012-01-01

290

Benefits of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation on the Supply, Management, and Use of Water Resources in the United States  

EPA Science Inventory

Climate change impacts on water resources in the U.S. are likely to be far-reaching and substantial, because the water sector spans many parts of the economy, from supply and demand for agriculture, industry, energy production, transportation and municipal use to damages from nat...

291

Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources: Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations, United States Gulf of Mexico coastal plain and State waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations were assessed as part of the 2007 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of Tertiary strata of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Basin onshore and State waters. The Frio Formation, which consists of sand-rich fluvio-deltaic systems, has been one of the largest hydrocarbon producers from the Paleogene in the Gulf of Mexico. The Anahuac Formation, an extensive transgressive marine shale overlying the Frio Formation, contains deltaic and slope sandstones in Louisiana and Texas and carbonate rocks in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. In downdip areas of the Frio and Anahuac Formations, traps associated with faulted, rollover anticlines are common. Structural traps commonly occur in combination with stratigraphic traps. Faulted salt domes in the Frio and Anahuac Formations are present in the Houston embayment of Texas and in south Louisiana. In the Frio Formation, stratigraphic traps are found in fluvial, deltaic, barrier-bar, shelf, and strandplain systems. The USGS Tertiary Assessment Team defined a single, Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) for the Gulf Coast basin, based on previous studies and geochemical analysis of oils in the Gulf Coast basin. The primary source rocks for oil and gas within Cenozoic petroleum systems, including Frio Formation reservoirs, in the northern, onshore Gulf Coastal region consist of coal and shale rich in organic matter within the Wilcox Group (Paleocene–Eocene), with some contributions from the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group (Eocene). The Jurassic Smackover Formation and Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation also may have contributed substantial petroleum to Cenozoic reservoirs. Modeling studies of thermal maturity by the USGS Tertiary Assessment Team indicate that downdip portions of the basal Wilcox Group reached sufficient thermal maturity to generate hydrocarbons by early Eocene; this early maturation is the result of rapid sediment accumulation in the early Tertiary, combined with the reaction kinetic parameters used in the models. A number of studies indicate that the migration of oil and gas in the Cenozoic Gulf of Mexico basin is primarily vertical, occurring along abundant growth faults associated with sediment deposition or along faults associated with salt domes. The USGS Tertiary assessment team developed a geologic model based on recurring regional-scale structural and depositional features in Paleogene strata to define assessment units (AUs). Three general areas, as described in the model, are found in each of the Paleogene stratigraphic intervals assessed: “Stable Shelf,” “Expanded Fault,” and “Slope and Basin Floor” zones. On the basis of this model, three AUs for the Frio Formation were defined: (1) the Frio Stable Shelf Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 4,800 feet in normally pressured intervals; (2) the Frio Expanded Fault Zone Oil and Gas AU, containing reservoirs with a mean depth of about 9,000 feet in primarily overpressured intervals; and (3) the Frio Slope and Basin Floor Gas AU, which currently has no production but has potential for deep gas resources (>15,000 feet). AUs also were defined for the Hackberry trend, which consists of a slope facies stratigraphically in the middle part of the Frio Formation, and the Anahuac Formation. The Frio Basin Margin AU, an assessment unit extending to the outcrop of the Frio (or basal Miocene), was not quantitatively assessed because of its low potential for production. Two proprietary, commercially available databases containing field and well production information were used in the assessment. Estimates of undiscovered resources for the five AUs were based on a total of 1,734 reservoirs and 586,500 wells producing from the Frio and Anahuac Formations. Estimated total mean values of technically recoverable, undiscovered resources are 172 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 9.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (TCFG), and 542 million barrels of natural gas liquids for all of the Frio and Anahuac AUs. Of the five units asse

Swanson, Sharon M.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Valentine, Brett J.

2013-01-01

292

Usage and administration manual for a geodatabase compendium of water-resources data-Rio Grande Basin from the Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, 1889-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, developed a geodatabase compendium (hereinafter referred to as the 'geodatabase') of available water-resources data for the reach of the Rio Grande from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas. Since 1889, a wealth of water-resources data has been collected in the Rio Grande Basin from Rio Arriba-Sandoval County line, New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, for a variety of purposes. Collecting agencies, researchers, and organizations have included the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Reclamation, International Boundary and Water Commission, State agencies, irrigation districts, municipal water utilities, universities, and other entities. About 1,750 data records were recently (2010) evaluated to enhance their usability by compiling them into a single geospatial relational database (geodatabase). This report is intended as a user's manual and administration guide for the geodatabase. All data available, including water quality, water level, and discharge data (both instantaneous and daily) from January 1, 1889, through December 17, 2009, were compiled for the study area. A flexible and efficient geodatabase design was used, enhancing the ability of the geodatabase to handle data from diverse sources and helping to ensure sustainability of the geodatabase with long-term maintenance. Geodatabase tables include daily data values, site locations and information, sample event information, and parameters, as well as data sources and collecting agencies. The end products of this effort are a comprehensive water-resources geodatabase that enables the visualization of primary sampling sites for surface discharges, groundwater elevations, and water-quality and associated data for the study area. In addition, repeatable data processing scripts, Structured Query Language queries for loading prepared data sources, and a detailed process for refreshing all data in the compendium have been developed. The geodatabase functionality allows users to explore spatial characteristics of the data, conduct spatial analyses, and pose questions to the geodatabase in the form of queries. Users can also customize and extend the geodatabase, combine it with other databases, or use the geodatabase design for other water-resources applications.

Burley, Thomas E.

2011-01-01

293

FOREST RESOURCES COMMITTEE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Forest Resources Committee reports that, while there was little new legislation in the first session of Congress, regulations were developed for implementing the 1976 National Forest Management Act and the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act. New bills were introduced that deal with forestry assistance, research, and extension programs. Administrative actions included the development of guidelines and standards

Robert H. Strand; Richard A. Lawrence; Robert D. Day Jr.

1978-01-01

294

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Williston Basin Province of North Dakota, Montana, and South Dakota, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered volumes of 3.8 billion barrels of undiscovered oil, 3.7 trillion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 0.2 billion barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Williston Basin Province, North Dakota, Montana, and South Dakota. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a comprehensive oil and gas assessment of the Williston Basin, which encompasses more than 90 million acres in parts of North Dakota, eastern Montana, and northern South Dakota. The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each total petroleum system (TPS) defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined 11 TPS and 19 Assessment Units (AU).

U.S. Geological Survey Williston Basin Province Assessment Team

2011-01-01

295

Variable pressure supercritical Rankine cycle for integrated natural gas and power production from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

A small-scale power plant cycle that utilizes both a variable pressure vaporizer (heater) and a floating pressure (and temperature) air-cooled condenser is described. Further, it defends this choice on the basis of classical thermodynamics and minimum capital cost by supporting these conclusions with actual comparative examples. The application suggested is for the geopressured geothermal resource. The arguments cited in this application apply to any process (petrochemical, nuclear, etc.) involving waste heat recovery.

Goldsberry, F.L.

1982-03-01

296

Assessment of potential shale gas resources of the Bombay, Cauvery, and Krishna-Godavari Provinces, India, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a performance-based geologic assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a technically recoverable mean volume of 6.1 trillion cubic feet of potential shale gas in the Bombay, Cauvery, and Krishna-Godavari Provinces of India.

U.S. Geological Survey

2012-01-01

297

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center  

MedlinePLUS

... from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center • Georgetown University Feedback • Accessibility • Disclaimer & Copyright • Contact ...

298

2010 updated assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 896 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and about 53 trillion cubic feet (TCFG) of nonassociated natural gas in conventional, undiscovered accumulations within the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska and adjacent State waters. The estimated volume of undiscovered oil is significantly lower than estimates released in 2002, owing primarily to recent exploration drilling that revealed an abrupt transition from oil to gas and reduced reservoir quality in the Alpine sandstone 15-20 miles west of the giant Alpine oil field. The National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) has been the focus of oil exploration during the past decade, stimulated by the mid-1990s discovery of the adjacent Alpine field-the largest onshore oil discovery in the United States during the past 25 years. Recent activities in NPRA, including extensive 3-D seismic surveys, six Federal lease sales totaling more than $250 million in bonus bids, and completion of more than 30 exploration wells on Federal and Native lands, indicate in key formations more gas than oil and poorer reservoir quality than anticipated. In the absence of a gas pipeline from northern Alaska, exploration has waned and several petroleum companies have relinquished assets in the NPRA. This fact sheet updates U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimates of undiscovered oil and gas in NPRA, based on publicly released information from exploration wells completed during the past decade and on the results of research that documents significant Cenozoic uplift and erosion in NPRA. The results included in this fact sheet-released in October 2010-supersede those of a previous assessment completed by the USGS in 2002.

Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.; Attanasi, E.D.; Garrity, C.P.; Schenk, C.J.; Charpentier, R.R.; Pollastro, R.M.; Cook, T.A.; and Klett, T.R.

2010-01-01

299

Chapter 3: Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources in the Phosphoria Total Petroleum System of the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Phosphoria Total Petroleum System (TPS) encompasses the entire Wind River Basin Province, an area of 4.7 million acres in central Wyoming. The source rocks most likely are black, organic-rich shales of the Meade Peak and Retort Phosphatic Shale Members of the Permian Phosphoria Formation located in the Wyoming and Idaho thrust belt to the west and southwest of the province. Petroleum was generated and expelled during Jurassic and Cretaceous time in westernmost Wyoming and is interpreted to have migrated into the province through carrier beds of the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone where it was preserved in hypothesized regional stratigraphic traps in the Tensleep and Permian Park City Formation. Secondary migration occurred during the development of structural traps associated with the Laramide orogeny. The main reservoirs are in the Tensleep Sandstone and Park City Formation and minor reservoirs are in the Mississippian Madison Limestone, Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Amsden Formation, Triassic Chugwater Group, and Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Sundance Formation. The traps are sealed by shale or evaporite beds of the Park City, Amsden, and Triassic Dinwoody Formations, Triassic Chugwater Group, and Jurassic Gypsum Spring Formation. A single conventional oil and gas assessment unit (AU), the Tensleep-Park City AU, was defined for the Phosphoria TPS. Both the AU and TPS cover the entire Wind River Basin Province. Oil is produced from 18 anticlinal fields, the last of which was discovered in 1957, and the possibility of discovering new structural oil accumulations is considered to be relatively low. Nonassociated gas is produced from only two fields, but may be underexplored in the province. The discovery of new gas is more promising, but will be from deep structures. The bulk of new oil and gas accumulations is dependent on the discovery of hypothesized stratigraphic traps in isolated carbonate reservoirs of the Park City Formation. Mean resource estimates for the Tensleep-Park City Conventional Oil and Gas AU total 18 million barrels of oil, 294 billion cubic feet of gas, and 5.9 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

Kirschbaum, M. A.; Lillis, P. G.; Roberts, L. N. R.

2007-01-01

300

The greenhouse impact of unconventional gas for electricity generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New techniques to extract natural gas from unconventional resources have become economically competitive over the past several years, leading to a rapid and largely unanticipated expansion in natural gas production. The US Energy Information Administration projects that unconventional gas will supply nearly half of US gas production by 2035. In addition, by significantly expanding and diversifying the gas supply internationally, the exploitation of new unconventional gas resources has the potential to reshape energy policy at national and international levels—altering geopolitics and energy security, recasting the economics of energy technology investment decisions, and shifting trends in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In anticipation of this expansion, one of the perceived core advantages of unconventional gas—its relatively moderate GHG impact compared to coal—has recently come under scrutiny. In this paper, we compare the GHG footprints of conventional natural gas, unconventional natural gas (i.e. shale gas that has been produced using the process of hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking'), and coal in a transparent and consistent way, focusing primarily on the electricity generation sector. We show that for electricity generation the GHG impacts of shale gas are 11% higher than those of conventional gas, and only 56% that of coal for standard assumptions.

Hultman, Nathan; Rebois, Dylan; Scholten, Michael; Ramig, Christopher

2011-10-01

301

Potential risk of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor administration in prostate cancer external radiotherapy by exceptional rectal gas production: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Radiotherapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer, and image-guided radiotherapy is increasingly being used to aid precision of dose delivery to targeted tissues. However, precision during radiotherapy cannot be maintained when unexpected intrafraction organ motion occurs. Case presentation We report our experience of internal organ motion caused by persistent gas production in a patient taking an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. A 68-year-old Japanese man with prostate cancer visited our institution for treatment with helical tomotherapy. He suffered from diabetes mellitus and took an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. Routine treatment planning computed tomography showed a large volume of rectal gas; an enema was given to void the rectum. Subsequent treatment planning computed tomography again showed a large volume of gas. After exercise (walking) to remove the intestinal gas, a third scan was performed as a test scan without tight fixation, which showed a sufficiently empty rectum for planning. However, after only a few minutes, treatment planning computed tomography again showed extreme accumulation of gas. Therefore, we postponed treatment planning computed tomography and consulted his doctor to suspend the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, which was the expected cause of his persistent gas. Four days after the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor regimen was suspended, we took a fourth treatment planning computed tomography and made a treatment plan without gas accumulation. Thereafter, the absence of rectal gas accumulation was confirmed using daily megavolt computed tomography before treatment, and the patient received 37 fractions of intensity-modified radiotherapy at 74Gy without rectal gas complications. In this case study, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor induced the accumulation of intestinal gas, which may have caused unexpected organ motion, untoward reactions, and insufficient doses to clinical targets. Conclusions We suggest that patients who are taking an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor for diabetes should discontinue use of that particular medicine prior to beginning radiotherapy.

2014-01-01

302

Geologic models and evaluation of undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources: Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk forms a low-permeability, onshore Gulf of Mexico reservoir that produces oil and gas from major fractures oriented parallel to the underlying Lower Cretaceous shelf edge. Horizontal drilling links these fracture systems to create an interconnected network that drains the reservoir. Field and well locations along the production trend are controlled by fracture networks. Highly fractured chalk is present along both regional and local fault zones. Fractures are also genetically linked to movement of the underlying Jurassic Louann Salt with tensile fractures forming downdip of salt-related structures creating the most effective reservoirs. Undiscovered accumulations should also be associated with structure-controlled fracture systems because much of the Austin that overlies the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge remains unexplored. The Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale is the primary source rock for Austin Chalk hydrocarbons. This transgressive marine shale varies in thickness and lithology across the study area and contains both oil- and gas-prone kerogen. The Eagle Ford began generating oil and gas in the early Miocene, and vertical migration through fractures was sufficient to charge the Austin reservoirs.

Pearson, Krystal

2012-01-01

303

Engineering Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

304

15 CFR 922.50 - Appeals of administrative action.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL...an existing lease, permit, license or right of subsistence use or access under...addressed to the Assistant Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone...

2010-01-01

305

18 CFR 375.304 - Delegations to the Chief Administrative Law Judge.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...Delegations to the Chief Administrative Law Judge. 375.304 Section 375.304 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...Delegations to the Chief Administrative Law Judge. (a) The...

2013-04-01

306

76 FR 39470 - Integrated Resource Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Direction, will guide TVA's selection of energy resource options...options include new nuclear, natural gas- fired, and renewable...conservation of the region's natural resources. One component of...hydroelectric (6 percent), and natural gas (1 percent). Other...

2011-07-06

307

Helium resources of the United States, 1977. Information circular 1979  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Bureau of Mines publication estimates that U.S. helium resources as of January 1977 were 710 billion cubic feet. These resources are broken down into four classifications, as follows: Helium in measured natural gas resources and in storage, 201 billion cubic feet; helium in indicated natural gas resources, 150 billion cubic feet; helium in hypothetical natural gas resources, 175 billion

1979-01-01

308

Medication Administration Technician. Instructor Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet contains an instructor's manual, an instructor's resource package, and a student workbook for a course for medication administration technicians in Oklahoma. The course consists of four units of instruction that cover the following: (1) exploring professional, ethical and legal issues; (2) administering medication; (3) document…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

309

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31

310

18 CFR 415.40 - Administrative agency.  

...40 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD...hazards, and: (1) Is located along the mainstem Delaware River or a major tributary thereof, or (2) An agency of a...

2014-04-01

311

Introduction to the 2002 geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks: Chapter 2 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) periodically conducts assessments of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the United States. The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The last major USGS assessment of oil and gas of the most important oil and gas provinces in the United States was in 1995 (Gautier and others, 1996). Since then a number of individual assessment provinces have been reappraised using new methodology. This was done particularly for those provinces where new information has become available, where new methodology was expected to reveal more insight to provide a better estimate, where additional geologic investigation was needed, or where continuous accumulations were deemed important. The San Juan Basin was reevaluated because of industry exploitation of new hydrocarbon accumulations that were not previously assessed and because of a change in application of assessment methodology to potential undiscovered hydrocarbon accumulations. Several changes have been made in this study. The methodology is different from that used in 1995 (Schmoker, 2003; Schmoker and Klett, 2003). In this study the total petroleum system (TPS) approach (Magoon and Dow, 1994) is used rather than the play approach. The Chama Basin is not included. The team of scientists studying the basin is different. The 1995 study focused on conventional accumulations, whereas in this 2002 assessment, it was a priority to assess continuous-type accumulations, including coal-bed gas. Consequently we are presenting here an entirely new study and results for the San Juan Basin Province. The results of this 2002 assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province (5022) are presented in this report within the geologic context of individual TPSs and their assessment units (AU) (table 1). Results are reported as the estimated mean of potential additions to reserves as well as for the 95, 50, and 5 percent fractiles.

U.S. Geological Survey San Juan Basin Assessment Team

2013-01-01

312

TQM Workshop Resource Book (Employment Standards Administration).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The workshop is intended to introduce participants to some tools and techniques useful in quality improvement programs. It provides beginning information about and practice using a problem solving process focused on quality improvement and two sets of too...

J. Ambre J. Blair B. Branley J. Howe C. Smith

1992-01-01

313

Geology and sequence stratigraphy of undiscovered oil and gas resources in conventional and continuous petroleum systems in the Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group and related strata, U.S. Gulf Coast Region  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the technically recoverable undiscovered oil and gas onshore and in State waters of the Gulf Coast region of the United States. The USGS defined three assessment units (AUs) with potential undiscovered conventional and continuous oil and gas resources in Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian to Turonian) strata of the Eagle Ford Group and correlative rocks. The assessment is based on geologic elements of a total petroleum system, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and traps (formation, timing, and seals). Conventional oil and gas undiscovered resources are in updip sandstone reservoirs in the Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa and Woodbine Formations (or Groups) in Louisiana and Texas, respectively, whereas continuous oil and continuous gas undiscovered resources reside in the middip and downdip Upper Cretaceous Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Tuscaloosa marine shale in Louisiana. Conventional resources in the Tuscaloosa and Woodbine are included in the Eagle Ford Updip Sandstone Oil and Gas AU, in an area where the Eagle Ford Shale and Tuscaloosa marine shale display vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values less than 0.6%. The continuous Eagle Ford Shale Oil AU lies generally south of the conventional AU, is primarily updip of the Lower Cretaceous shelf edge, and is defined by thermal maturity values within shales of the Eagle Ford and Tuscaloosa that range from 0.6 to 1.2% Ro. Similarly, the Eagle Ford Shale Gas AU is defined downdip of the shelf edge where source rocks have Ro values greater than 1.2%. For undiscovered oil and gas resources, the USGS assessed means of: 1) 141 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 502 billion cubic feet of natural gas (BCFG), and 4 million barrels of natural gas liquids (MMBNGL) in the Eagle Ford Updip Sandstone Oil and Gas AU; 2) 853 MMBO, 1707 BCFG, and 34 MMBNGL in the Eagle Ford Shale Oil AU; and 3) 50,219 BCFG and 2009 MMBNGL in the Eagle Ford Shale Gas AU.

Dubiel, Russell F.; Pearson, Ofori N.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pearson, Krystal M.; Kinney, Scott A.

2012-01-01

314

Legal issues in implementing secondary and tertiary recovery operations on federal oil and gas leases  

SciTech Connect

Maximizing the recovery of oil and gas resources has become an important national energy goal. In this article, the author addresses the possibility of federal administrative orders requiring secondary and tertiary operations (STR) on leases within federal unit agreements. Issues surrounding such orders are addressed, including the impact of STR orders on offshore leases and problems created by conflicting state conservation laws. 105 references.

Fant, D.V.

1984-01-01

315

SeTES: A self-teaching expert system for the analysis, design, and prediction of gas production from unconventional gas resources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SeTES is a self-teaching expert system that (a) can incorporate evolving databases involving any type and amount of relevant data (geological, geophysical, geomechanical, stimulation, petrophysical, reservoir, production, etc.) originating from unconventional gas reservoirs, i.e., tight sands, shale or coalbeds, (b) can continuously update its built-in public database and refine the its underlying decision-making metrics and process, (c) can make recommendations about well stimulation, well location, orientation, design, and operation, (d) offers predictions of the performance of proposed wells (and quantitative estimates of the corresponding uncertainty), and (e) permits the analysis of data from installed wells for parameter estimation and continuous expansion of its database. Thus, SeTES integrates and processes information from multiple and diverse sources to make recommendations and support decision making at multiple time-scales, while expanding its internal database and explicitly addressing uncertainty. It receives and manages data in three forms: public data, that have been made available by various contributors, semi-public data, which conceal some identifying aspects but are available to compute important statistics, and a user's private data, which can be protected and used for more targeted design and decision making. It is the first implementation of a novel architecture that allows previously independent analysis methods and tools to share data, integrate results, and intelligently and iteratively extract the most value from the dataset. SeTES also presents a new paradigm for communicating research and technology to the public and distributing scientific tools and methods. It is expected to result in a significant improvement in reserve estimates, and increases in production by increasing efficiency and reducing uncertainty.

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Anderson Kuzma, Heidi; Blasingame, Thomas A.; Wayne Huang, Y.; Santos, Ralph; Boyle, Katie L.; Freeman, Craig M.; Ilk, Dilhan; Cossio, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Srimoyee; Nikolaou, Michael

2013-08-01

316

Critical Resources for Hospital Surge Capacity: An Expert Consensus Panel  

PubMed Central

Background: Hospital surge capacity (HSC) is dependent on the ability to increase or conserve resources. The hospital surge model put forth by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) estimates the resources needed by hospitals to treat casualties resulting from 13 national planning scenarios. However, emergency planners need to know which hospital resource are most critical in order to develop a more accurate plan for HSC in the event of a disaster. Objective: To identify critical hospital resources required in four specific catastrophic scenarios; namely, pandemic influenza, radiation, explosive, and nerve gas. Methods: We convened an expert consensus panel comprised of 23 participants representing health providers (i.e., nurses and physicians), administrators, emergency planners, and specialists. Four disaster scenarios were examined by the panel. Participants were divided into 4 groups of five or six members, each of which were assigned two of four scenarios. They were asked to consider 132 hospital patient care resources- extracted from the AHRQ's hospital surge model- in order to identify the ones that would be critical in their opinion to patient care. The definition for a critical hospital resource was the following: absence of the resource is likely to have a major impact on patient outcomes, i.e., high likelihood of untoward event, possibly death. For items with any disagreement in ranking, we conducted a facilitated discussion (modified Delphi technique) until consensus was reached, which was defined as more than 50% agreement. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each scenario, and across all scenarios as a measure of participant agreement on critical resources. For the critical resources common to all scenarios, Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to measure the distribution of scores across all scenarios. Results: Of the 132 hospital resources, 25 were considered critical for all four scenarios by more than 50% of the participants. The number of hospital resources considered to be critical by consensus varied from one scenario to another; 58 for the pandemic influenza scenario, 51 for radiation exposure, 41 for explosives, and 35 for nerve gas scenario. Intravenous crystalloid solution was the only resource ranked by all participants as critical across all scenarios. The agreement in ranking was strong in nerve agent and pandemic influenza (ICC= 0.7 in both), and moderate in explosives (ICC= 0.6) and radiation (ICC= 0.5). Conclusion: In four disaster scenarios, namely, radiation, pandemic influenza, explosives, and nerve gas scenarios; supply of as few as 25 common resources may be considered critical to hospital surge capacity. The absence of any these resources may compromise patient care. More studies are needed to identify critical hospital resources in other disaster scenarios.

Bayram, Jamil D.; Sauer, Lauren M.; Catlett, Christina; Levin, Scott; Cole, Gai; Kirsch, Thomas D.; Toerper, Matthew; Kelen, Gabor

2013-01-01

317

Ohio Mineral Resources Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provides information about Mineral Resources in Ohio and management. Mine safety, oil and gas, coal mining, industrial minerals, and abandoned mined lands are related subheadings for the site. Good for finding history, factual reports, programs, regulations and policies.

2008-10-06

318

Leadership Tendencies of Continuing Education Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Survey responses from 56 continuing education administrators and 58 other deans showed that both operated most of the time within the human resources frame of leadership and least in the political. Continuing education administrators used the symbolic frame more. Males tended to use structural and political, females the symbolic frame. (SK)

Palestini, Robert H.

1999-01-01

319

Integration of gas chromatographs into the Federal Highway Administration/Environmental Protection Agency near road MSAT study in Las Vegas, NV  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper documents the technical evaluation of a semi-continuous gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of benzene and 1,33butadiene in the near road environment. This paper will also consider the some of the non-technical implications associated with the operation of a GC ...

320

NASA Hurricane Resource Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) hurricane resource page includes the latest news stories from the extraordinary hurricane season of 2005, feature articles, satellite images and biographies of NASA hurricane experts. Two features of this page are a re-creation of the storm season with satellite images of all of the major storms of the season and a satellite image of Katrina showing it from development through landfall. This site also includes links to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hurricane resources.

2007-12-12

321

30 CFR 1202.150 - Royalty on gas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Royalty on gas. 1202.150 Section 1202.150 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Federal Gas § 1202.150 Royalty on gas....

2013-07-01

322

Maintaining the Uranium Resources Assessment Data System and assessing the 1990 US uranium potential resources. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Uranium Resource Assessment Data System contains information on potential resources (undiscovered) of uranium in the United States. The purpose of this report is: (1) to describe the work carried out to maintain and update the Uranium Resource Assessment Data (URAD) System, (2) to assess the 1990 US uranium potential resources in various cost categories, and

R. B. McCammon; W. I. Finch; W. D. Grundy; C. T. Pierson

1991-01-01

323

Draft 1992 Resource Program : Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration's primary process for deciding how to meet future resource needs -- how much new resource development is needed by BPA, which types of resources to acquire and option, how to go about acquiring them, and how much to spend. The Northwest Power Planning Council completed a new Northwest Power Plan in 1991. This Draft Resource Program describes how BPA proposes to do its part to meet the Council's regional resource objectives.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01

324

Norwegian gas supplies to Eastern Europe.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper evaluates the supply of gas from Norway to Eastern Europe Following aspects are discussed: Proven natural gas resources; gas supply and demand in Western Europe; East European gas sales prospects; transportation distances; Norwegian natural gas ...

B. Haamsoe

1990-01-01

325

Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.

Not Available

1982-01-01

326

Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

General Services Administration's (GSA's) Information Resources Management (IRM) Service is working with other agencies to provide information environments that are accessible by people with disabilities. The handbook discusses how to integrate informatio...

1991-01-01

327

Unconventional Energy Resources: 2007-2008 Review  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes five 2007-2008 resource commodity committee reports prepared by the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Current United States and global research and development activities related to gas hydrates, gas shales, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources are included in this review. These commodity reports were written to advise EMD leadership and membership of the current status of research and development of unconventional energy resources. Unconventional energy resources are defined as those resources other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks. Gas hydrate resources are potentially enormous; however, production technologies are still under development. Gas shale, geothermal, oil sand, and uranium resources are now increasing targets of exploration and development, and are rapidly becoming important energy resources that will continue to be developed in the future.

NONE

2009-06-15

328

78 FR 79436 - Boulder Canyon Project-Post-2017 Resource Pool  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Boulder Canyon Project--Post-2017 Resource Pool AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration...Boulder Canyon Project (BCP) post-2017 resource pool marketing criteria and is calling...established general eligibility criteria and a resource pool (Post-2017 Resource Pool)...

2013-12-30

329

Natural resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Natural resources are resources that occur in nature. Humans use these resources, but many of these resources are nonrenewable. They will eventually run out. Fossil fuels are naturally occurring fuels that are nonrenewable.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-07-07

330

Educator Exchange Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

331

Resources within Reason  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transitions--from hospital to home, early intervention to preschool, child care to school--are times of major change for children and families. The resources presented in this article can be used to build the capacity of family members, professionals, and administrators to understand and support transition practices that are thoughtful,…

Turnbull, Ann; Catlett, Camille; Winton, Pam

2008-01-01

332

Answering the Critics of School Administration, 2nd Ed.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

All too often, the public perception of school administration is that it is a large bureaucracy diverting critical resources from instruction. According to "Answering the Critics of School Administration: What Are the Facts? Second Edition," by Nancy Protheroe, the data show otherwise. Six common misperceptions of school administration are…

Protheroe, Nancy

2008-01-01

333

18 CFR 385.503 - Consolidation, severance and extension of close-of-record date by Chief Administrative Law Judge...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...date by Chief Administrative Law Judge (Rule 503). 385.503 Section 385.503 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...date by Chief Administrative Law Judge (Rule 503)....

2013-04-01

334

Workshops in Educational Administration for Administrators/Teachers in PA Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is meant as a resource for persons who intend to supervise, plan and/or carry out workshops in educational administration for administrators and teachers who are in PA programs (or in other health professions instructional programs, such as ...

J. Westberg H. Jason

1981-01-01

335

The Legion Resource Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent technological developments, including gigabit networkingtechnology and low-cost, high-performance microprocessors, have givenrise to metacomputing environments. Metacomputing environments combinehosts from multiple administrative domains via transnational andworld-wide networks. Managing the resources in such a system is a complextask, but is necessary to efficiently and economically execute userprograms. The Legion resource management system is flexible both in itssupport...

Steve J. Chapin; Dimitrios Katramatos; John F. Karpovich; Andrew S. Grimshaw

1999-01-01

336

Maintaining the Uranium Resources Assessment Data System and assessing the 1990 US uranium potential resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Uranium Resource Assessment Data System contains information on potential resources (undiscovered) of uranium in the United States. The purpose of this report is: (1) to describe the work carried out to maintain and update the Uranium Resource Assessment Data (URAD) System, (2) to assess the 1990 US uranium potential resources in various cost categories, and

R. B. McCammon; W. I. Finch; W. D. Grundy; C. T. Pierson

1991-01-01

337

1990 Resource Program.  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary providing an overview of the analysis, thought process, and conclusions of the Resource Program. This summary is accompanied by a Technical Report, under separate cover, that provides a more in-depth discussion of the information presented here. Another companion document published under separate cover, the Resource Program Public Comment Summary and BPA's Response, provides a detailed summary of public comments on the Draft 1990 Resource Program and BPA's response to those comments. For a thorough understanding of how BPA arrived at the following conclusions, all three documents should be consulted. The 1990 Resource Program describes the actions Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) will take to develop new resources to meet the power requirements of its customers. The main focus is to determine what BPA should do in Fiscal Years (FY's) 1992 and 1993. This document presents Energy Resource budgets for these years. However, much care has been taken to define near-term actions aimed at meeting BPA's long-term resource needs. consequently, proposed program actions are presented for FY's 1994 through 1997. In addition, the 1990 Resource Program addresses some resource-related policy issues.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-07-01

338

Helium resources of the United States, 1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

The helium resources base of the United States was estimated by the Bureau of Mines to be 894.6 Bcf as of January 1, 1989. These resources are divided into four categories in decreasing degree of the assurance of their existence: (1) helium in storage and in proved natural gas reserves, 282.4 Bcf; (2) helium in probable natural gas resources, estimated

Richard D. Miller; John E. Hamak

1990-01-01

339

Administrator Training: What Relationship to Administrator Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies consistently indicate that the characteristics required of administrators in the performance of their duties are not the characteristics required of students seeking advanced degrees in administration. Consideration of research into the characteristics of administrators, their work, and their training leads to several important…

Pitner, N. J.

340

NOAA Education Resources: Data Resources for Educators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has created this site to help educators find data resources that range from classroom ready, student-friendly interfaces to raw real-time and historical data. The resources here are grouped into several topic areas, including Classroom Ready, Oceans & Freshwater, Climate, and Visualization. This last area is definitely worth a look as it includes the Global Science Investigator. This tool lets viewers choose between different data visualizations including plate movement, human impacts on the ocean, and marine debris. Within Oceans & Freshwaters viewers will find another great resource with Estuaries 101 Real-time Data. The curriculum models here offer a mix of real time data that will help students learn about the world of estuaries around the United States.

341

Unconventional Energy Resources: 2011 Review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains nine unconventional energy resource commodity summaries prepared by committees of the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Unconventional energy resources, as used in this report, are those energy resources that do not occur in discrete oil or gas reservoirs held in structural or stratigraphic traps in sedimentary basins. These resources include coal, coalbed methane, gas hydrates, tight gas sands, gas shale and shale oil, geothermal resources, oil sands, oil shale, and uranium resources. Current U.S. and global research and development activities are summarized for each unconventional energy commodity in the topical sections of this report. Coal and uranium are expected to supply a significant portion of the world's energy mix in coming years. Coalbed methane continues to supply about 9% of the U.S. gas production and exploration is expanding in other countries. Recently, natural gas produced from shale and low-permeability (tight) sandstone has made a significant contribution to the energy supply of the United States and is an increasing target for exploration around the world. In addition, oil from shale and heavy oil from sandstone are a new exploration focus in many areas (including the Green River area of Wyoming and northern Alberta). In recent years, research in the areas of geothermal energy sources and gas hydrates has continued to advance. Reviews of the current research and the stages of development of these unconventional energy resources are described in the various sections of this report.

Collaboration: American Association of Petroleum Geologists

2011-12-15

342

A Resource Book for Building English Proficiency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource book is a collection of articles, annotated references, and resource lists to supplement the accompanying handbook and trainer's guide for educators planning or working with English language programs for limited English proficient (LEP) students. The first part presents resources of interest to administrators adapting programs for a…

Guillen, Leonor; And Others

343

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: The Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teach- ers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation

Jeffrey A. Stearns; Marjorie A. Stearns; Paul M. Paulman; Alexander W. Chessman; Ardis K. Davis; Roger A. Sherwood; Kent J. Sheets; David J. Steele; Christine C. Matson

344

The Real-Time Channel Administration Protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Real-time Channel Administration Protocol (RCAP) provides con- trol and administration services for the Tenet real-time protocol suite, a connection-oriented suite of network and transport layer protocols for real- time communication. RCAP performs per-channel reservation of network resources based on worst-case analysis to provide hard guarantees on delay, jitter, and packet loss bounds. It uses a hierarchical approach to provide

Anindo Banerjea; Bruce A. Mah

1991-01-01

345

Investigator Resources  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Content Home | Investigator Resources | Protocol Development | Initiatives/Programs/Collaborations | Links to More Resources | Funding Opportunities | About CTEP Home | Sitemap | Contact CTEP Search this site Investigator Resources Investigator

346

Herpes - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Genital herpes - resources; Resources - genital herpes ... The following organizations are good resources for information on genital herpes : March of Dimes - www.marchofdimes.com/pregnancy/complications-herpes National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease - ...

347

Managing Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource describes the skills necessary for managing resources, including planning, project management, budget management, information management, change management, and organizational performance assessment.

ITU Leadership Development (George Mason University)

2012-01-20

348

Hearing on the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Program: Views from Participants and State Administrators. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives. One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document records the oral and written testimony of persons who testified before or prepared reports for a Congressional hearing on the usefulness of the JOBS (Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Program). Witnesses included persons who had participated in the programs as well as state and local administrators of JOBS programs, national…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

349

77 FR 53191 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology...Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas...The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...Overview of the Oil and Gas Unconventional Research...

2012-08-31

350

78 FR 53741 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology...Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas...The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...Overview of the Oil and Gas Unconventional Research...

2013-08-30

351

Gas Hydrates: It's A Gas!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will investigate the occurrence of gas hydrates on the ocean floor. They will discover the importance of carbon, where carbon is stored on Earth, and that the largest reservoir of carbon is gas hydrates. Students will discover that Earth's climate changes, and how the greenhouse effect works. They will also learn about the potential of hydrates as a major new energy resource and explore the conditions under which hydrates form.

352

75 FR 78988 - Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects, Allocation Procedures and Call for Applications  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Area Power Administration Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects, Allocation...provides for establishing project-specific resource pools and allocating power from these...framework for allocating power from the LAP resource pool. This resource pool is...

2010-12-17

353

30 CFR 1202.151 - Royalty on processed gas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Royalty on processed gas. 1202.151 Section 1202.151 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Federal Gas § 1202.151 Royalty on...

2013-07-01

354

Paine Appointed Administrator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

President Richard M. Nixon announcing the appointment of Dr. Thomas O. Paine as Administrator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The ceremony was held at the White House. Paine had been serving as acting administrator. From left to right: President Richard M. Nixon NASA Administrator Dr. Thomas O. Paine Vice President Spiro T. Agnew

1969-01-01

355

Educational Administration: International Movement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The field of educational administration is achieving the status of an international movement. Although most voluntary educational administration organizations are not international, the exceptions are the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) and the Commonwealth Council for Educational Administration (CCEA). The UCEA was formed…

Stone, Franklin D.

1978-01-01

356

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources: Classroom Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources provides a number of classroom resources on topics like rocks, minerals, fossils, general geology, glaciers, earthquakes, historic geology and more. Clicking on a topic area will lead users to a webpage with resources such as reading materials, links, and materials appropriate for use in the classroom. The "Oil and Gas Resources" page provides information on Marcellus and Utica shale in the state. The main page also has resources organized into broad categories such as "Bookshelf," "For Teachers" and "Kid's Corner." The "For Teachers" section includes a number of lesson plans, including map lesson plans.

2012-12-05

357

75 FR 57743 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Washington...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2010-09-22

358

77 FR 10485 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Washington...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2012-02-22

359

75 FR 48320 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Washington...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2010-08-10

360

77 FR 63300 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, 1000 Independence...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2012-10-16

361

78 FR 68430 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, 1000 Independence...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2013-11-14

362

78 FR 58294 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, 1000 Independence...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2013-09-23

363

76 FR 64923 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Washington...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2011-10-19

364

77 FR 59182 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, 1000 Independence...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2012-09-26

365

77 FR 5246 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Washington...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2012-02-02

366

78 FR 70932 - Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...announces a meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory...Department of Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, 1000 Independence...Committee: The purpose of the Unconventional Resources Technology...

2013-11-27

367

Economic analysis of geopressured resources: site specific consideration of geopressured methane gas at Brazoria. Final report, 1 March 1980-28 February 1981  

SciTech Connect

The current project is aimed first at narrowing the range of uncertainties in economic information of geopressured resource in light of the recently collected data on the Brazoria Fairway. Secondly, the project has developed a basic analytical framework for determining the investment potential of the geopressured resource at Brazoria. Thirdly, the project quantitatively evaluates the relative effectiveness of a number of financial incentives and other public policy initiatives designed to accelerate the commercialization of geopressured resources. Final results of this project are reported including: (1) a review of current estimates of important resource parameters at the Austin Bayou Project, (2) initial cash flow simulations of development of the Austin Bayou Prospect, (3) sensitivity analysis of these simulations and evaluation of the uncertainties' impact on measures of profitability and investment decision analysis, and (4) a brief review of the well-testing program.

Not Available

1981-04-01

368

30 CFR 1202.152 - Standards for reporting and paying royalties on gas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...paying royalties on gas. 1202.152 ...Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE...OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Federal Gas § 1202.152 ...section. (3) Natural gas liquids (NGL)...

2013-07-01

369

Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins  

SciTech Connect

Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

2008-06-30

370

Maintaining the uranium resources data system and assessing the 1991 US uranium potential resources. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Uranium Resource Assessment Data (URAD) System contains information on potential resources (undiscovered) of uranium in the United States. The purpose of this report is: (1) to describe the work carried out to maintain and update the URAD system; (2)to assess the 1991 U.S. uranium potential resources in various cost categories; and (3) to describe the

R. B. McCammon; W. I. Finch; W. D. Grundy; C. T. Pierson

1992-01-01

371

Tight Gas Sands Log Interpretation: Problem Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A large undeveloped natural gas resource exists in low-permeability (tight) sandstone reservoirs. Difficulties in reservoir characterization and estimation of production potential in tight gas sands have hindered the development of this resource. Interpre...

C. L. Biddison E. R. Monson G. C. Kukal K. E. Simons R. E. Hill

1983-01-01

372

Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations, Gulf Coast, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 957 million barrels of undiscovered oil, 3.6 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, and 363 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Austin Chalk and Tokio and Eutaw Formations in onshore lands and State waters of the Gulf Coast.

Pearson, Krystal; Dubiel, R. F.; Pearson, O. N.; Pitman, J. K.

2011-01-01

373

Natural gas resource characterization study of the mesaverde group in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming: A strategic plan for the exploitation of tight gas sands. Annual report, May 1992-August 1993  

SciTech Connect

During the year, UW researchers (1) completed a petrographic/petrophysical survey of the tight gas sands of the Mesaverde Group, (2) determined the major hydrocarbon source rock intervals associated with the Mesaverde Group, (3) completed a determination of the gas generation, storage, and expulsion mechanisms of the source rocks, (4) completed the first round of documentation of the pressure regime of the Mesaverde and associated formations, (5) completed a preliminary structural fabric study of the Mesaverde Group in the GGRB, (6) completed stratigraphic and sedimentalogic studies of the upper Mesaverde Group and extended these studies to the lower Mesaverde Group, (7) reviewed the oil and gas production and gas reserve estimates of the Mesaverde Group in the GGRB, (8) surveyed the existing drilling and completion practices utilized in exploring the Mesaverde tight gas sands, and (9) continued to work on developing a new and innovative approach to drilling and completing wells in the Mesaverde tight gas sands of the GGRB.

Surdam, R.C.

1994-10-01

374

Setting Up of a Resources Center. 2: Planning and Staffing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Produced for use by educators and administrators in Scotland involved in planning and developing learning resources centers in elementary and secondary schools, this guide contains: (1) examples and discussion of the allocation of space for resources cent...

R. N. Tucker

1976-01-01

375

Methane hydrates as potential energy resource: Part 1 – Importance, resource and recovery facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas hydrates are ice-like crystalline solids that form from mixtures of water and light natural gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane and butane. Methane was the dominant component among other hydrocarbon gases in the sediments. Gas hydrates, potentially one of the most important energy resources for the future. Methane gas hydrates are increasingly considered a potential energy resource.

Ayhan Demirbas

2010-01-01

376

Administrative Team Planning with the Administrative "Advancement."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During a summer retreat, administrative staff at a Columbia, Missouri, middle school discussed the logistics of moving half of their students to a new facility during the middle of the academic year. This team-building effort helped form bonds that sustained administrators, teachers, and students during a difficult year. (MLH)

Roberts, Magie

1999-01-01

377

Early Childhood Education: A Workbook for Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text-workbook is designed to present management theories and principles as they apply to the administration of early childhood programs, and serve as a resource and discussion guide applicable to a wide range of child care situations. Following a brief historical consideration of early childhood education in the United States, information to…

Hewes, Dorothy; Hartman, Barbara

378

Strategies of Administrative Control and Organizational Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of a comparative study of 30 manufacturing firms in India indicated that the most effective organizations tended to choose a unidimensional strategy of administrative control. This strategy consisted of the use of formalized procedures to control decentralized decision-making with respect to both human and material resources. (Author)

Reimann, Bernard C.; Negandhi, Anant R.

1975-01-01

379

The School Administrator Payoff from Teacher Pensions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is widely recognized that teacher quality is the central input in school performance. This insight has put human resource and compensation policies, including performance pay, tenure, alternative route recruitment, and mentoring, at center stage in school reform debates. Some school administrators have been innovators and reform leaders in…

Koedel, Cory; Ni, Shawn; Podgursky, Michael

2013-01-01

380

Supervision and Administration: Programs, Positions, Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This anthology is a collection of 17 articles by arts supervisors and administrators. The authors discuss both specific and general aspects of art education program supervision. Topics include staff development, evaluation of art learning, integrating community cultural resources, establishing elementary art specialists, coordinating multiple arts…

Mills, E. Andrew, Ed.

381

Japanese Management Theory and Library Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of Japanese management theory and suggests applications to library administration. Highlights include participative management; shared decision making; long-term objectives; organizational philosophy; staff training and human resource development; strategic planning; staffing issues; cooperation; quality control; and total…

Clayton, Peter

1992-01-01

382

Maintaining the uranium resources data system and assessing the 1991 US uranium potential resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Uranium Resource Assessment Data (URAD) System contains information on potential resources (undiscovered) of uranium in the United States. The purpose of this report is: (1) to describe the work carried out to maintain and update the URAD system; (2) to assess the 1991 U.S. uranium potential resources in various cost categories; and (3) to describe

R. B. McCammon; W. I. Finch; W. D. Grundy; C. T. Pierson

1992-01-01

383

Maritime Administration Guideline Specifications for Merchant Ship Construction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Maritime Administration Guideline Specifications for Merchant Ship Construction are intended to provide assistance to the maritime industry as a service provided through the National Maritime Resource and Education Center (NMREC). It is intended that ...

1995-01-01

384

Federal Aviation Administration Plan for Research, Engineering and Development, 1995.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) manages and operates the National Airspace System (NAS), a significant national resource. However, the demands on this system are continuously growing, and changing technologies provide the opportunity to improve ...

1994-01-01

385

Assessment of potential shale oil and tight sandstone gas resources of the Assam, Bombay, Cauvery, and Krishna-Godavari Provinces, India, 2013  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a well performance-based geologic assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a technically recoverable mean volume of 62 million barrels of oil in shale oil reservoirs, and more than 3,700 billion cubic feet of gas in tight sandstone gas reservoirs in the Bombay and Krishna-Godavari Provinces of India. The term “provinces” refer to geologically defined units assessed by the USGS for the purposes of this report and carries no political or diplomatic connotation. Shale oil and tight sandstone gas reservoirs were evaluated in the Assam and Cauvery Provinces, but these reservoirs were not quantitatively assessed.

Klett, Timothy R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Wandrey, Craig J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Gautier, Donald L.

2014-01-01

386

75 FR 1616 - Post-2010 Resource Pool, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program-Eastern Division  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Area Power Administration Post-2010 Resource Pool, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program...hereby announces the Post-2010 Resource Pool Power Allocation (Power Allocation...Allocation comes from a Federal power resource pool of the long-term marketable...

2010-01-12

387

75 FR 1271 - Technical Revisions to the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Regulations on Income and Resources  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Income (SSI) Regulations on Income and Resources AGENCY: Social Security Administration...revisions to our rules on income and resources. Many of these revisions reflect legislative...that had otherwise been an excludable resource. Finally, we are updating our...

2010-01-11

388

75 FR 44942 - 2015 Resource Pool-Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ENERGY Western Area Power Administration 2015 Resource Pool--Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region...Marketing Plan provided for a portion of SNR's resources to be reallocated through a 2015 Resource Pool. On June 3, 2009, Western...

2010-07-30

389

76 FR 64085 - Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects, Final Power Allocation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Area Power Administration Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects, Final...Energy (DOE), announces its Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects, Final...billing period. DATES: The Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects,...

2011-10-17

390

76 FR 45551 - Post-2014 Resource Pool; Loveland Area Projects, Proposed Power Allocation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Area Power Administration Post-2014 Resource Pool; Loveland Area Projects, Proposed...Post-2014-Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Resource Pool Proposed Power Allocation developed...461-7204. Information about the Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects...

2011-07-29

391

Natural gas resource characterization study of the mesaverde group in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming: A strategic plan for the exploitation of tight gas sands. Annual report, May 1992August 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the year, UW researchers (1) completed a petrographic\\/petrophysical survey of the tight gas sands of the Mesaverde Group, (2) determined the major hydrocarbon source rock intervals associated with the Mesaverde Group, (3) completed a determination of the gas generation, storage, and expulsion mechanisms of the source rocks, (4) completed the first round of documentation of the pressure regime of

Surdam

1994-01-01

392

Geologic Models and Evaluation of Undiscovered Conventional and Continuous Oil and Gas Resources-Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk, U.S. Gulf Coast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk forms a low- permeability, onshore Gulf of Mexico reservoir that produces oil and gas from major fractures oriented parallel to the underlying Lower Cretaceous shelf edge. Horizontal drilling links these fracture systems ...

K. Pearson

2012-01-01

393

30 CFR 1201.100 - Responsibilities of the Director for Office of Natural Resources Revenue.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE GENERAL Oil and Gas, Onshore § 1201.100 Responsibilities of the Director for Office of Natural Resources Revenue....

2013-07-01

394

30 CFR 1241.51 - What may Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) do if I violate a statute, regulation, order...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Federal or Indian oil and gas lease? 1241.51...Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE PENALTIES...Federal and Indian Oil and Gas Leases Penalties After... What may Office of Natural Resources...

2013-07-01

395

Depression - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good resources of information on depression : American Psychological Association - www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

396

ALS - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association - http://mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

397

SIDS - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - SIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on SIDS : American SIDS Institute - www.sids.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - www.cdc.gov/sids National ...

398

Epilepsy - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - epilepsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on epilepsy : American Epilepsy Society - www.aesnet.org Epilepsy Foundation of America (EFA) - www.efa.org National Institute of ...

399

Cancer - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society - www.cancer.org Cancer Care - www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute - www.cancer.gov

400

Autism - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - autism ... The following organizations and links are good resources for information on autism : Association for Science in Autism Treatment | www.asatonline.org Autism Society of America | www.autism-society.org Autism Speaks | ...

401

Blindness - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - blindness ... The following organizations are good resources for information on blindness : American Foundation for the Blind - www.afb.org Foundation Fighting Blindness - www.blindness.org National Eye Institute - ...

402

Psoriasis - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - psoriasis ... The following organization is a good resource for information on psoriasis : American Academy of Dermatology - www.aad.org/skin-conditions/dermatology-a-to-z/psoriasis National Institute of Arthritis ...

403

Ostomy - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - ostomy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on ostomies: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons - www.fascrs.org/patients/treatments_and_screenings/ostomy United Ostomy ...

404

Lupus - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America - www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

405

Scleroderma - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - scleroderma ... The following organizations are good resources for information on scleroderma : American College of Rheumatology - http://www.rheumatology.org/practice/clinical/patients/diseases_and_conditions/scleroderma.asp National ...

406

Migraine - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation - www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation - www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

407

Infertility - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes - www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

408

Scoliosis - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - scoliosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on scoliosis : American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons - http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00236 National Institute of Arthritis ...

409

Breastfeeding - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - breastfeeding ... The following organizations are good resources for information on breastfeeding and breastfeeding problems : La Leche League International Inc. - www.lalecheleague.org March of Dimes - www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

410

Incontinence - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - incontinence ... The following organizations are good resources for information on incontinence. Fecal incontinence : The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists - www.acog.org/~/media/for%20patients/faq139.ashx ...

411

Alcoholism - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous - www.alcoholics-anonymous.org Al-Anon/Alateen - www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

412

Resource Stewardship.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Table of Contents: Managing Our Resources (Managing Resources, Sharing Expertise, Creating Solutions, Modifying Facilities and Operations); Meeting the Challenges Ahead (Making Water Available, Helping Endangered Species, Improving Water Quality, Combatin...

2000-01-01

413

Educator Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Educators in the southeast United States will find links to resources for ocean science instruction on this website. The resource topics include general ocean and earth science education materials, ocean observing systems, water quality, wetlands and remote sensing data.

414

School Business Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This textbook reviews the principal concerns within each of 13 major responsibility areas in school business administration. The first chapter assesses the political, social, and economic context in which schools function and school administrators work. The role and function of the school business administrator within this context is addressed in…

Jordan, K. Forbis; And Others

415

CSREES Administrator's Report to the Partnership, Fall 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Administrator's Report to the Partnership" includes updates on legislation, grant programs, the budget, and information about other activities. The Fall 2008 report includes: (1) Message from the CSREES Administrator (Colien Hefferan); (2) Transformative Graduate Education in Natural Resources and Environment; (3) Expanding Education to…

Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, 2008

2008-01-01

416

Ocean's resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The resources of the oceans may be broadly grouped as tangible or material, and intangible. The tangible resources group includes petroleum and related substances, such as sulfur; many other minerals, involving partically all of the elements; the biological resources, in which the greatest investments of marine industry to date have been made and where the vast potentials for the future

1968-01-01

417

Towards Session-Aware RBAC Administration and Enforcement with XACML  

Microsoft Academic Search

An administrative role-based access control (AR- BAC) model specifies administrative policies over a role-based access control (RBAC) system, where an administrative per- mission may change an RBAC policy by updating permissions assigned to roles, or assigning\\/revoking users to\\/from roles. Consequently, enforcing ARBAC policies over an active access controller while some users are using protected resources would result in conflicts: a

Min Xu; Duminda Wijesekera; Xinwen Zhang; Deshan Cooray

2009-01-01

418

75 FR 70350 - Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration [USCG-2010-0993] Liberty Natural Gas LLC, Liberty Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Deepwater Port License Application AGENCY...received an application for the licensing of a natural gas deepwater port and the application...

2010-11-17

419

Formulation of a correlated variables methodology for assessment of continuous gas resources with an application to the Woodford play, Arkoma Basin, eastern Oklahoma [Metodolog??a para la evaluaci??n de recursos de gas para el caso de yacimientos continuos usando m??ltiples variables correlacionadas, con un estudio de la arcilla Woodford, cuenca de Arkoma, Oklahoma oriental, EEUU  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shale gas is a form of continuous unconventional hydrocarbon accumulation whose resource estimation is unfeasible through the inference of pore volume. Under these circumstances, the usual approach is to base the assessment on well productivity through estimated ultimate recovery (EUR). Unconventional resource assessments that consider uncertainty are typically done by applying analytical procedures based on classical statistics theory that ignores geographical location, does not take into account spatial correlation, and assumes independence of EUR from other variables that may enter into the modeling. We formulate a new, more comprehensive approach based on sequential simulation to test methodologies known to be capable of more fully utilizing the data and overcoming unrealistic simplifications. Theoretical requirements demand modeling of EUR as areal density instead of well EUR. The new experimental methodology is illustrated by evaluating a gas play in the Woodford Shale in the Arkoma Basin of Oklahoma. Differently from previous assessments, we used net thickness and vitrinite reflectance as secondary variables correlated to cell EUR. In addition to the traditional probability distribution for undiscovered resources, the new methodology provides maps of EUR density and maps with probabilities to reach any given cell EUR, which are useful to visualize geographical variations in prospectivity.

Olea, R. A.; Houseknecht, D. W.; Garrity, C. P.; Cook, T. A.

2011-01-01

420

30 CFR 1202.558 - What standards do I use to report and pay royalties on gas?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and pay royalties on gas? 1202.558 Section...Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE...OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Gas Production From Indian...section. (2) Report natural gas liquid (NGL)...

2013-07-01

421

1990 Resource Program : Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Report is a detailed presentation of the actions Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) will take to develop new resources to meet the power requirements of its customers. The primary focus of this report is on what BPA will do in Fiscal Years (FY's) 1992 and 1993. However, much care has been taken to define near-term actions aimed at meeting BPA's long-term needs. An aggressive, steadily increasing conservation program forms the foundation of the 1990 Resource Program and resource acquisitions for FY's 1992 and 1993. BPA's commitment to a steady ramp-up of the conservation program is key to achieving the least-cost approach to resource development, and to making the conservation resource deliverable in the long run. By itself, conservation can meet much of the likely range of load growth that BPA faces. A diverse mix of generation resources in small increments is the second cornerstone of the 1990 Resource Program. These generation resources can meet the rest of the likely range of BPA resource needs. Finally, a Resource Contingency Plan prepares BPA to reliably meet load in the event that load growth exceeds the likely range. 14 figs., 27 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-07-01

422

77 FR 25881 - Debt Collection and Administrative Offset for Monies Due the Federal Government  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...production of oil, natural gas, coal, geothermal energy, other minerals, and renewable...production of oil, natural gas, coal, geothermal energy, other minerals, and renewable...oil, natural gas, other minerals or geothermal resources, or production of...

2012-05-02

423

Maintaining the Uranium Resources Assessment Data System and assessing the 1990 US uranium potential resources  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Uranium Resource Assessment Data System contains information on potential resources (undiscovered) of uranium in the United States. The purpose of this report is: (1) to describe the work carried out to maintain and update the Uranium Resource Assessment Data (URAD) System, (2) to assess the 1990 US uranium potential resources in various cost categories, and (3) to identify problems and to recommend changes that are needed to improve the URAD System. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

McCammon, R.B. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)); Finch, W.I.; Grundy, W.D.; Pierson, C.T. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-12-31

424

Information technology resources assessment  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis in Information Technology (IT) development has shifted from technology management to information management, and the tools of information management are increasingly at the disposal of end-users, people who deal with information. Moreover, the interactive capabilities of technologies such as hypertext, scientific visualization, virtual reality, video conferencing, and even database management systems have placed in the hands of users a significant amount of discretion over how these resources will be used. The emergence of high-performance networks, as well as network operating systems, improved interoperability, and platform independence of applications will eliminate technical barriers to the use of data, increase the power and range of resources that can be used cooperatively, and open up a wealth of possibilities for new applications. The very scope of these prospects for the immediate future is a problem for the IT planner or administrator. Technology procurement and implementation, integration of new technologies into the existing infrastructure, cost recovery and usage of networks and networked resources, training issues, and security concerns such as data protection and access to experiments are just some of the issues that need to be considered in the emerging IT environment. As managers we must use technology to improve competitiveness. When procuring new systems, we must take advantage of scalable resources. New resources such as distributed file systems can improve access to and efficiency of existing operating systems. In addition, we must assess opportunities to improve information worker productivity and information management through tedmologies such as distributed computational visualization and teleseminar applications.

Loken, S.C. [ed.

1993-01-01

425

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

SciTech Connect

Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-08-13

426

1. Overview of Hailey Administrative Site looking west. Garage/Equipment building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Overview of Hailey Administrative Site looking west. Garage/Equipment building left foreground, Office rear center, Gas and Oil House on the right. - Hailey Administrative Site, 309 South Main Street, Hailey, Blaine County, ID

427

Implementing CORAL: An Electronic Resource Management System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2010 electronic resource management survey conducted by Maria Collins of North Carolina State University and Jill E. Grogg of University of Alabama Libraries found that the top six electronic resources management priorities included workflow management, communications management, license management, statistics management, administrative

Whitfield, Sharon

2011-01-01

428

Testing and Analyzing of Solar Energy Resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solar energy resource of two typical areas was tested by taking advantage of different instruments from home and abroad in Inner Mongolia. Compared the actually tested data with satellite data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration, energy cost was estimated in different solar energy resource conditions through the use of RETScreen project analysis software form Canada. Analysis results show

Zhao Mingzhi; Liu Zhizhang; Zhang Qingzhu

2010-01-01

429

Back to School Resources for School Personnel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the school year begins, staff at the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) would like to offer all school personnel (including educators, administrators, counselors and support staff) the opportunity to use their many resources for schools! Their resources were created to highlight issues related to trauma, to explain how trauma can…

National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2011

2011-01-01

430

Gas Pressure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast discusses the boom in natural gas drilling in the Rocky Mountain region and is possible impacts on the environment. A resource advocate points out the issue of well density, which can range from four wells per square mile to sixteen, 32, or more, and results in fragmentation of habitat as well as an ugly industrial appearance. The clip is 2 minutes in length and is available in MP3 format.

Pomplun, Steve

2012-08-06

431

The application of GIS in identifying mineral resources in Libya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In any country, natural mineral resources are considered the back-bone for the development of the industry and the country's economical growth. Exploration and mining for mineral ores and manufacturing and marketing these ores will add value to the country's national income. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology has an advantage over other information systems because it combines the conventional query operations with the ability to display and analyze spatial data from maps, satellite imagery, and aerial photography. Knowing the importance of mineral ores as a pilar of the economy this paper concentrates on mineral resources in Libya. Geographic information systems (GIS) was used for identifying mineral resources in Libya. Geodatabases were designed and all available information were stored in these geodatabases. The information was collected from scientific researchers, and geological and mining studies. The database also, included the Libyan international boundaries, the administrative boundaries and the oil and gas fields and pipelines, and such maps as geophysical and geological maps. Thus a comprehensive database was created containing all the information available concerning mineral resources in Libya.

Rekhibi, Soliman; Wadi, Monira; Said, Ali

2012-04-01

432

CAUSEweb Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Consortium for the Advancement of Undergraduate Statistics Education (CAUSE) was part of an initiative created by the American Statistical Association, and their website was designed to "support and advance undergraduate statistics education in four target areas resources, professional development, outreach, and research." With monies from the National Science Foundation, they created CAUSEweb, where they provide this set of resources for members of the undergraduate statistics education community. The resources are divided into eleven categories, including "analysis tools", "datasets", and "curriculum". "Curriculum" has 350 resources, including searchable databases of 1000 test questions for an introductory statistics course and a demonstration site that addresses nonprobability sampling. The "lecture examples" shouldn't be missed, as visitors can use these resources to complement their existing lectures and class presentations. The site is rounded out by a listing of their review criteria and editorial standards for determining which resources make the cut for inclusion here.

433

1992 Resource Program, 10 Year Plan : Draft II.  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Program is the Bonneville Power Administration`s primary process for deciding how to meet future electricity resource needs, how much new resources to develop, which types of resources to acquire or option and how to go about acquiring them, and how much BPA will have to spend for these resources. Recognizing that BPA must make a long-term commitment to acquiring conservation effectively, the 1992 Resource Program outlines a 10-year plan. Draft 2 of the 1992 Resource Program provides a framework for discussing the funding levels proposed in the Programs in Perspective (PIP) process. Previous final resource programs have been released prior to the PIP process. This version of the Resource Program recognizes that the PIP discussions are an integral part of the resource decision-making process and, therefore, it will be finalized after PIP.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-05-01

434

EIA (Energy Information Administration) Publications Directory 1984: A User's Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Bibliographic information and abstracts for 97 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications released for printing in 1984 are provided. The abstracts are arranged by broad subject categories, such as coal, natural gas, and energy consumption. A co...

1985-01-01

435

Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2000, the Health Resources and Services Administration, in the interest of fostering curriculum reform in medical schools, awarded a 4-year contract to the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine to develop a curricular resource. The contract directed development of a multi-part resource aimed at (1) preclerkship prerequisites for third-year clerkships in collaboration with internal medicine and pediatrics, (2) the

Ardis K. Davis; Jeffrey A. Stearns; Alexander W. Chessman; Paul M. Paulman; David J. Steele; Roger A. Sherwood

436

Health Effects of Energy Resources  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Energy resources (coal, oil, and natural gas) are among the cornerstones of modern industrial society. The exploitation of these resources, however, is not without costs. Energy materials may contain harmful chemical substances that, if mobilized into air, water, or soil, can adversely impact human health and environmental quality. In order to address the issue of human exposure to toxic substances derived from energy resources, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Energy Resources Program developed a project entitled 'Impacts of Energy Resources on Human Health and Environmental Quality.' The project is intended to provide policymakers and the public with the scientific information needed to weigh the human health and environmental consequences of meeting our energy needs. This fact sheet discusses several areas where the USGS Energy Resources Program is making scientific advances in this endeavor.

Orem, William; Tatu, Calin; Pavlovic, Nikola; Bunnell, Joseph; Kolker, Allan; Engle, Mark; Stout, Ben

2010-01-01

437

Geology, sequence stratigraphy, and oil and gas assessment of the Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 5 in Total petroleum systems and geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the San Juan Basin Province, exclusive of Paleozoic rocks, New Mexico and Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System (TPS) in the San Juan Basin Province contains a continuous gas accumulation in three distinct stratigraphic units deposited in genetically related depositional environments: offshore-marine shales, mudstones, siltstones, and sandstones of the Lewis Shale, and marginal-marine shoreface sandstones and siltstones of both the La Ventana Tongue and the Chacra Tongue of the Cliff House Sandstone. The Lewis Shale was not a completion target in the San Juan Basin (SJB) in early drilling from about the 1950s through 1990. During that time, only 16 wells were completed in the Lewis from natural fracture systems encountered while drilling for deeper reservoir objectives. In 1991, existing wells that penetrated the Lewis Shale were re-entered by petroleum industry operators in order to fracture-stimulate the Lewis and to add Lewis gas production onto preexisting, and presumably often declining, Mesaverde Group production stratigraphically lower in the section. By 1997, approximately 101 Lewis completions had been made, both as re-entries into existing wells and as add-ons to Mesaverde production in new wells. Based on recent industry drilling and completion practices leading to successful gas production from the Lewis and because new geologic models indicate that the Lewis Shale contains both source rocks and reservoir rocks, the Lewis Shale TPS was defined and evaluated as part of this U.S. Geological Survey oil and gas assessment of the San Juan Basin. Gas in the Lewis Shale Total Petroleum System is produced from shoreface sandstones and siltstones in the La Ventana and Chacra Tongues and from distal facies of these prograding clastic units that extend into marine rocks of the Lewis Shale in the central part of the San Juan Basin. Reservoirs are in shoreface sandstone parasequences of the La Ventana and Chacra and their correlative distal parasequences in the Lewis Shale where both natural and artificially enhanced fractures produce gas. The Lewis Continuous Gas Assessment Unit (AU 50220261) is thought to be self-sourced from and self-sealed by marine shales and mudstones deposited within the Lewis Shale that enclose clastic parasequences in the La Ventana and Chacra Tongues. The gas resource is thought to be a continuous accumulation sourced from the Lewis Shale throughout the depositional basin. In the Lewis Continuous Gas Assessment Unit (AU 50220261), for continuous gas resources, there is an F95 of 8,315.22 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) and an F5 of 12,282.31 BCFG, with a mean value of 10,177.24 BCFG. There is an F95 of 18.08 million barrels of natural gas liquids (MMBNGL) and an F5 of 47.32 MMBNGL, with a mean of 30.53 MMBNGL.

Dubiel, R. F.

2013-01-01

438

NASA Water Resources Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. In addition to the numerous water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The potential crises and conflicts especially arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. and also in numerous parts of the world. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands and needs requires using existing water resources more efficiently. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products and technology to address these critical water issues. The primary goal of the Water Resources is to facilitate application of NASA Earth science products as a routine use in integrated water resources management for the sustainable use of water. This also includes the extreme events of drought and floods and the adaptation to the impacts from climate change. NASA satellite and Earth system observations of water and related data provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as precipitation, snow, soil moisture, water levels, land cover type, vegetation type, and health. NASA Water Resources Program works closely to use NASA and Earth science data with other U.S. government agencies, universities, and non-profit and private sector organizations both domestically and internationally. The NASA Water Resources Program organizes its projects under five functional themes. I) Streamflow and Flood Forecasting 2) Water Supply and Irrigation (includes evapotranspiration) 3) Drought 4) Water Quality 5) Climate and Water Resources. To maximize this activity NASA Water Resources Program works closely with other government agencies (e.g., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USAID, the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA)), universities, non-profit national and international organizations, and the private sector. The NASA Water Resources program currently is funding 21 active projects under the functional themes (http://wmp.gsfc.nasa.gov & http://science.nasa.gov/earth-science/applied-sciences/).

Toll, David L.

2011-01-01

439

Helium resources of the United States, 1989. Information Circular\\/1990  

Microsoft Academic Search

The helium resources base of the United States was estimated by the Bureau of Mines to be 894.6 Bcf as of January 1, 1989. These resources are divided into four categories in decreasing degree of the assurance of their existence: (1) helium in storage and in proved natural gas reserves, 282.4 Bcf, (2) helium in probable natural gas resources, estimated

R. D. Miller; J. E. Hamak

1990-01-01

440

Global Hydrology Resource Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration provides data ingest, archive, and distribution services for the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC). Eight categories of online data are available to download using FTP. These include MSFC SSM/I Brightness Temperature, MSFC SSM/I Daily Gridded Products, and MSU Daily/Monthly Anomalies/Annual Cycle Temperatures-Limb90. The entire database can be viewed through HyDRO, the Hydrologic Data search, Retrieval, and Order system. Note that some data is restricted to Earth Observing System (EOS) affiliated investigators.

1997-01-01

441

Global Hydrology Resource Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration provides data ingest, archive, and distribution services for the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC). Eight categories of online data are available to download using FTP. These include MSFC SSM/I Brightness Temperature, MSFC SSM/I Daily Gridded Products, and MSU Daily/Monthly Anomalies/Annual Cycle Temperatures-Limb90. The entire database can be viewed through HyDRO, the Hydrologic Data search, Retrieval, and Order system. Note that some data is restricted to Earth Observing System (EOS) affiliated investigators.

2007-08-05

442

Space Resources Utilization Roundtable  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Space Resources Utilization Roundtable, October 27-29, 1999, in Golden, Colorado. The program committee consisted of M. B. Duke (Lunar and Planetary Institute), G. Baughman (Colorado School of Mines), D. Criswell (University of Houston), C. Graham (Canadian Mining Industry Research Organization), H. H. Schmitt (Apollo Astronaut), W. Sharp (Colorado School of Mines), L. Taylor (University of Tennessee), and a space manufacturing representative. Administration and publications support for this meeting were provided by the staff of the Publications and Program Services Department at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

1999-01-01

443

Water, Water Everywhere --- But. A Study of the Politico-Administrative Aspects of Water Development in Montana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study is devoted to the task of describing the political-administrative environment in which natural resources decision-making takes place; to surveying administrative theory pointing out desirable changes; to recommending action in the light of theor...

R. G. Sheridan

1968-01-01

444

Resource Manual  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual was designed primarily for use by individuals with developmental disabilities and related conditions. The main focus of this manual is to provide easy-to-read information concerning available resources, and to provide immediate contact information for the purpose of applying for resources and/or locating additional information. The…

Human Development Institute, 2008

2008-01-01

445

Resource Inventories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The series of "Resource Inventories" is designed to encourage wider use of available information and services in the field of special education technology. A resource inventory is provided for each of 46 states of the United States. Each inventory includes directory information on public and private agencies and organizations that offer…

Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

446

Inventor's Resource  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Inventor Andy Gibbs developed the Inventor's Resource site to provide information to new inventors, intellectual property managers and intellectual property creators. The site features a newsletter, a yellow page of investors, copyright and trademark links, downloadable forms for inventors, and a listing of inventions for sale. The site also features annotated links to technological transfer resources, funding, patent laws, and international intellectual property organizations.

Gibbs, Andy.

1998-01-01

447

Extractable resources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of information from space systems in the operation of extractive industries, particularly in exploration for mineral and fuel resources was reviewed. Conclusions and recommendations reported are based on the fundamental premise that survival of modern industrial society requires a continuing secure flow of resources for energy, construction and manufacturing, and for use as plant foods.

1975-01-01

448

Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of learning about diabetes and provides a list of ways to obtain this information. Different resources include videos, internet sites, books, cookbooks, and magazines. Provides a detailed list of each of the previous resources and recommends that people with or without diabetes make a concerted effort to educate…

Hiestand, M. Ed.

2003-01-01

449

Taxation of mineral resources  

SciTech Connect

There has been a substantial increase in recent years in the level of taxation imposed on mining firms by state and local governments. This increase can be attributed to three factors: (1) a heightened awareness that resources are limited in quantity; (2) environmental damage resulting from mining operations has brought demands for just compensations; and (3) significant price increases for some minerals have often been viewed by states as an opportunity to collect additional tax revenue. The broad aim of this book is to provide a comprehensive economic analysis of the effects of mining taxation on the extraction of mineral resources and to offer a set of recommendations for tax policy. The primary objective of this design is to minimize the distortionary incentives created by the taxation. From a practical standpoint, however, one must also recognize the degrees of difficulty in the administration of the various taxes. 90 references, 1 figure, 14 tables.

Conrad, R.F.; Hool, R.B.

1980-01-01

450

Eocene Formation of the Bering Sea basin linked to regional-scale tectonism of Alaska -- implications for energy gas resources and the accumulation of massive hydrate deposits (VAMPs)  

SciTech Connect

The creation of the deep-water Aleutian Basin (Bering Sea) is inextricably linked to the formation of the three co-genetic arcs that structurally frame the basin--the active Aleutian arc subduction zone (SZ), and the fossil submarine Shirshov and Bowers arcs. The origin of these arcs is tied to an early Eocene episode of accelerated tectonism and terrane movement that affected the north Pacific rim from British Columbia westward to Kamchatka. Transpressive tectonism was driven by rapid northward movement of the Kula plate into terrane-clogged SZs of southern Alaska and Kamchatka. A clogged Kamchatka SX and N-S compression of southern Alaska extruded interior Alaska southwestward along regional strike-slip shear zones toward the Beringian sector of the Pacific rim. Circum-north Pacific continental deformation transmitted shortening stresses to the adjacent Kula plate and formed the offshore family of SZs and arcs that cordoned off the Aleutian Basin from the Pacific Basin. The basin`s sedimentary sequence (4-12 km) is largely terrigenous in character, but dominantly diatomaceous deposits characterize turbidite beds that seismic relection data reveal