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Sample records for gas single shell

  1. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  2. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  3. Safety basis for selected activities in single-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, R.L.

    1996-02-05

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for single-shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade.

  4. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  5. Vapor and gas sampling of single-shell tank 241-S-106 using the in situ vapor sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Lockrem, L.L.

    1997-08-05

    The Vapor Issue Resolution Program tasked the Vapor Team (VT) to collect representative headspace samples from Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) 241-S-106. This document presents In Situ vapor Sampling System (ISVS) data resulting from the June 13, 1996 sampling of SST 241-S-106. Analytical results will be presented in separate reports issued by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) which`supplied and analyzed the sample media.

  6. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  7. Hanford Site single-shell tank roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Roadmap covers the near-term waste management activities to ensure safe interim storage of 140 million liters of waste. It also addresses the environmental restoration activities to close the 6 single-shell tank operable units, which include 149 single-shell tanks. These tanks were constructed starting in the 1940`s. Sixty-six tanks have leaked or are assumed to be leaking. This Roadmap has highlighted the need for integrated planning and resource allocation. The June 1990 Five-Year Plan did not address the tank safety concerns that evolved since its publication. Potential impacts to Tri-Party Agreement milestones for characterization, stabilization and isolation, technology development/demonstration, and closure will be examined in greater detail to strengthen the technical decision basis and to minimize consequences. The Roadmap indicates the advantage of accelerating characterization programs, technology evaluations, and supplemental environmental impact statement preparation. Working with regulators and expanded public outreach programs are essential to successful completion of this activity.

  8. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  9. Hanford single-shell tank grouping study

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Anderson, C.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1995-10-01

    A tank grouping study has been conducted to find Hanford single-shell tanks with similar waste properties. The limited sampling resources of the characterization program could be allocated more effectively by having a better understanding of the groups of tanks that have similar waste types. If meaningful groups of tanks can be identified, tank sampling requirements may be reduced, and the uncertainty of the characterization estimates may be narrowed. This tank grouping study considers the analytical sampling information and the historical information that is available for all single-shell tanks. The two primary sources of historical characterization estimates and information come from the Historical Tank Content Estimate (HTCE) Model and the Sort on Radioactive Waste Tanks (SORWT) Model. The sampling and historical information are used together to come up with meaningful groups of similar tanks. Based on the results of analyses presented in this report, credible tank grouping looks very promising. Some groups defined using historical information (HTCE and SORWT) correspond well with those based on analytical data alone.

  10. Single-Shell tank system description

    SciTech Connect

    FIELD, J.G.

    2003-03-04

    The Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) system consists of 149 underground SSTs and processing equipment designed and constructed between 1940 and 1964 to transport and store radioactive hazardous/dangerous wastes generated from irradiated nuclear fuel processing. The tanks, designed to store waste, vary in size from between 190,000 to 3,800,000 L (50,000 gal to 1,000,000 gal) and contain a variety of solid and liquid waste. The system also includes miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUST). In addition to the tanks, there is a large amount of ancillary equipment associated with the system and although not designed to store wastes, the ancillary equipment is contaminated through contact with the waste. Waste was routed to the tanks through a network of underground piping, with interconnections provided in concrete pits that allowed changes to the routing through instrumentation. Processing vaults used during waste handling operations, evaporators used to reduce the waste stored in the system, and other miscellaneous structures used for a variety of waste handling operations are also included in the system. The SST system was taken out of service in 1980 and no additional waste has been added to the tanks. The SSTs and ancillary equipment were designed and constructed before promulgation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1986. The purpose of this document is to describe the SST system for use in performing an engineering and compliance assessment in support of M-23 milestones (Ecology, et al. 2000). This system description provides estimated locations and volumes of waste within the SST system, including storage tanks, transfer systems, evaporators aid miscellaneous support facilities.

  11. Preventing Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Hanford Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the predictive methods used to ensure that waste transfer operations in Hanford waste tanks do not create waste configurations that lead to unsafe gas release events. The gas release behavior of the waste in existing double-shell tanks has been well characterized, and the flammable gas safety issues associated with safe storage of waste in the current configuration are being formally resolved. However, waste is also being transferred between double-shell tanks and from single-shell tanks into double-shell tanks by saltwell pumping and sluicing that create new wastes and waste configurations that have not been studied as well. Additionally, planning is underway for various waste transfer scenarios to support waste feed delivery to the proposed vitrification plant. It is critical that such waste transfers do not create waste conditions with the potential for dangerous gas release events.

  12. Single-shell tank riser resistance to ground test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kiewert, L.R.

    1996-03-11

    This Test Procedure provides the general directions for conducting Single-Shell Tank Riser to Earth Measurements which will be used by engineering as a step towards providing closure for the Lightning Hazard Issue.

  13. Single-shell tank ventilation upgrades needs analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    This report was written to comply with the objectives of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-43-03 Provide to the Washington State Department of Ecology and Department of Health the Results of the Single-Shell Tank Ventilation Upgrades Needs Analysis. The needs analysis consists of identifying the current type and status of each single-shell tank ventilation system, identifying current and projected authorization basis requirements, and identifying ventilation system compliance deficiencies.

  14. Core-in-shell sorbent for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Akiti, Jr., Tetteh T.

    2004-02-10

    A core-in-shell sorbent is described herein. The core is reactive to the compounds of interest, and is preferably calcium-based, such as limestone for hot gas desulfurization. The shell is a porous protective layer, preferably inert, which allows the reactive core to remove the desired compounds while maintaining the desired physical characteristics to withstand the conditions of use.

  15. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many ({approximately}25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval.

  16. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  17. Kinematic arguments against single relativistic shell models for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Ramirez, E.; Sumner, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Two main types of models have been suggested to explain the long durations and multiple peaks of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). In one, there is a very quick release of energy at a central site resulting in a single relativistic shell that produces peaks in the time history through its interactions with the ambient material. In the other, the central site sporadically releases energy over hundreds of seconds forming a peak with each burst of energy. The authors show that the average envelope of emission and the presence of gaps in GRBs are inconsistent with a single relativistic shell. They estimate that the maximum fraction of a single shell that can produce gamma-rays in a GRB with multiple peaks is 10(exp (minus)3), implying that single relativistic shells require 10(exp 3) times more energy than previously thought. They conclude that either the central site of a GRB must produce (approx)10(exp 51) erg/s(exp (minus)1) for hundreds of seconds, or the relativistic shell must have structure on a scales the order of (radical)(epsilon)(Gamma)(exp (minus)1), where (Gamma) is the bulk Lorentz factor ((approximately)10(exp 2) to 10(exp 3)) and (epsilon) is the efficiency.

  18. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  19. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  20. Single-photon superradiance and radiation trapping by atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A.; Li, Fu; Li, Hongyuan; Zhang, Xiwen; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-04-01

    The collective nature of light emission by atomic ensembles yields fascinating effects such as superradiance and radiation trapping even at the single-photon level. Light emission is influenced by virtual transitions and the collective Lamb shift which yields peculiar features in temporal evolution of the atomic system. We study how two-dimensional atomic structures collectively emit a single photon. Namely, we consider spherical, cylindrical, and spheroidal shells with two-level atoms continuously distributed on the shell surface and find exact analytical solutions for eigenstates of such systems and their collective decay rates and frequency shifts. We identify states which undergo superradiant decay and states which are trapped and investigate how size and shape of the shell affects collective light emission. Our findings could be useful for quantum information storage and the design of optical switches.

  1. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-05-11

    This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities, and interfaces; and operational methods. This plan serves as the project executional baseline.

  2. Segregation of gas and stars in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Using a code which is capable of evolving composite systems of collisionless matter and gas, we explore mergers like those thought responsible for the shells seen around many elliptical galaxies. If a small companion containing both gas and stars is accreted by a more massive primary, the stellar and gaseous debris are rapidly segregated: while the stars are free to oscillate back and forth in the primary's potential, thereby forming shells, the oppositely directed flows near the center of the primary effectively dissipate the orbital kinetic energy of the gas. Consequently, the gas settles into compact disks or rings in the nucleus of the primary, depending on orbital parameters. We note implications of these findings for the production of polar rings and the onset of nuclear activity in galaxies.

  3. The Physics of 106 K Gas in LMC Supergiant Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomans, D. J.; Dennerl, K.

    Supergiant shells are the largest interstellar structures in galaxies. The Magellanic Clouds habour several good examples of such objects, like LMC 1, LMC 4, and SMC 1. For LMC 4 we could show earlier, that it contains 106 K hot gas and that 105 K gas exists on boundary layers between hot and cold gas. Supergiant shells are therefore not only important for the understanding of galaxy evolution, but also exquisit laboratories for the interplay of the cold, warm, and hot gas phases of the interstellar medium. We will present a study of the prototypical supergiant shell LMC 4 using a new, high spatial resolution X-ray mosaic in comparison with a deep H alpha mosaic based on CCD data taken with the CTIO Curtis Schmidt telescope, and reprocessed IRAS data. The improved spatial resolution of both X-ray and optical data allows in much more detail the study of physical properties of the boundary regions between the hot interior and the cool shell walls. The new data show clearly the nature of local X-ray minima and maxima inside LMC 4, and the origin of diffuse X-ray patches which appeared spilling over the boundaries of LMC 4. LMC 4 is not only much more complex than thought before, but also reveals many new details on the physical processes involved with a large hot bubble expanding inside a galactic disk and beaking out into the lower halo. In addition, implications for the hot halo of the LMC will be presented.

  4. Single-shell tank interim stabilization project plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.E.

    1998-03-27

    Solid and liquid radioactive waste continues to be stored in 149 single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. To date, 119 tanks have had most of the pumpable liquid removed by interim stabilization. Thirty tanks remain to be stabilized. One of these tanks (C-106) will be stabilized by retrieval of the tank contents. The remaining 29 tanks will be interim stabilized by saltwell pumping. In the summer of 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) placed a moratorium on the startup of additional saltwell pumping systems because of funding constraints and proposed modifications to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestones to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). In a letter dated February 10, 1998, Final Determination Pursuant to Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in the Matter of the Disapproval of the DOE`s Change Control Form M-41-97-01 (Fitzsimmons 1998), Ecology disapproved the DOE Change Control Form M-41-97-01. In response, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) directed Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LNMC) to initiate development of a project plan in a letter dated February 25, 1998, Direction for Development of an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan in Support of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In a letter dated March 2, 1998, Request for an Aggressive Single-Shell Tank (SST) Interim Stabilization Completion Project Plan, the DOE reaffirmed the need for an aggressive SST interim stabilization completion project plan to support a finalized Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-41 recovery plan. This project plan establishes the management framework for conduct of the TWRS Single-Shell Tank Interim Stabilization completion program. Specifically, this plan defines the mission needs and requirements; technical objectives and approach; organizational structure, roles, responsibilities

  5. Detached Shells of Dust and Gas around Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Schöier, F. L.

    2011-09-01

    We present observations of dust-scattered light of the carbon stars U Ant, R Scl, and U Cam taken with the EFOSC2 camera on the ESO 3.6-m telescope and the ACS on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations show the detached shells around these stars in unprecedented detail, revealing a distinctively clumpy structure in the HST images of R Scl, and a separation of the dust and gas in the ground-based data for U Ant. This allows us to investigate the detached shells and their origin with exceptional precision.

  6. Attempts to Produce D2-Gas-Filled Be Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B; McElfresh, M; Alford, C; Fought, E; Letts, S

    2005-01-14

    We have attempted to fabricate some 0.5 mm diameter D{sub 2}-gas-filled Be shells by coating gas-filled PVA-coated GDP mandrels with Cu-doped Be. We find that during the coating all (or most) of the gas leaks out. This is likely due to either small cracks or holes in the coating that are formed at the earliest points and are maintained during the thickness build-up of the coating, and/or to some level of intrinsic porosity in the coating. This memo documents our efforts.

  7. Enhanced Ethanol Gas Sensing Properties of SnO2-Core/ZnO-Shell Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Tharsika, T.; Haseeb, A. S. M. A.; Akbar, Sheikh A.; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd; Hoong, Wong Yew

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ∼5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures. PMID:25116903

  8. Enhanced ethanol gas sensing properties of SnO₂-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tharsika, T; Haseeb, A S M A; Akbar, Sheikh A; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd; Hoong, Wong Yew

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive single-step carbon-assisted thermal evaporation method for the growth of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures is described, and the ethanol sensing properties are presented. The structure and phases of the grown nanostructures are investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. XRD analysis indicates that the core-shell nanostructures have good crystallinity. At a lower growth duration of 15 min, only SnO2 nanowires with a rectangular cross-section are observed, while the ZnO shell is observed when the growth time is increased to 30 min. Core-shell hierarchical nanostructures are present for a growth time exceeding 60 min. The growth mechanism for SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanowires and hierarchical nanostructures are also discussed. The sensitivity of the synthesized SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards ethanol sensing is investigated. Results show that the SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures deposited at 90 min exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ethanol. The sensitivity of SnO2-core/ZnO-shell nanostructures towards 20 ppm ethanol gas at 400 °C is about ~5-times that of SnO2 nanowires. This improvement in ethanol gas response is attributed to high active sensing sites and the synergistic effect of the encapsulation of SnO2 by ZnO nanostructures. PMID:25116903

  9. Structural qualification of the multifunctional instrument tree for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strohlow, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the technical basis and methodology for qualifying the multifunctional instrument tree (MIT) structure for installation in double-shell and 100-series single-shell tanks. Structural qualification for MIT installations in specific tanks are also contained in this document.

  10. Spherical thin-shell wormholes and modified Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Azam, M. E-mail: azammath@gmail.com

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to construct spherical thin-shell wormhole solutions through cut and paste technique and investigate the stability of these solutions in the vicinity of modified Chaplygin gas. The Darmois-Israel formalism is used to formulate the stresses of the surface concentrating the exotic matter. We explore the stability of the wormhole solutions by using the standard potential method. We conclude that there exist more stable as well as unstable solutions than the previous study with generalized Chaplygin gas [19].

  11. Single-shell tank systems technical support program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, M.J.; Golberg, C.E.; Gibby, R.D.; Giese, K.A.; Ruck, F.A.; Sonnichsen, J.C.; Wanner, D.D.; Wing, N.R.; Woodworth, K.A. ); Fletcher, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    This Single-Shell Tank Systems Technical Support Program Plan (TSPP) provides documentation of the required technology, resources, equipment, program funding, and plans for closure of the six single-shell tank (SST) operable units (OU). The SST OUs comprise treatment, storage, and disposal units (wastes, tanks, and soil contaminated by leaks) and past practice units (ancillary units and soil contaminated by spills). A systems engineering approach is being used as a management tool to assist in reaching a final disposal decision for the SST OUs. The systems approach is a structured process to define and solve a problem. It is useful for large programs that involve multiple scientific and engineering disciplines and span long time periods. The systems approach ensures that development activities are conducted in an integrated, efficient, thorough, logical, defensible, auditable, and verifiable manner. It will allow the US Department of Energy to meet Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestones and develop the technology required for the supplemental environmental impact statement for SST waste. 19 refs., 41 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Single Step Sintered Calcium Phosphate Fibers from Avian EGG Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, Prabhash; Das, Bodhisatwa; Dhara, Santanu

    2013-11-01

    Different forms of calcium-phosphate (Hydoxyapatite, α-TCP, β-TCP, CDHA) minerals are found to be major component of bone tissue. Development of calcium-phosphate (CaP) based fibrous microstructures is of significant research interest worldwide owing to its improved mechanical properties and higher interconnectivity. Here we represent a method for single step sintered wet-spun Fibers of calcium phosphate from avian egg shells for biomedical applications. Raw egg shell powder was mixed with chitosan solution and Phosphoric acid. The mixture is milled in a ball mill overnight and then filtered. The slurry was de-aired using 100 microliter 1-octanol per 100 ml of slurry as antifoaming and wet spun in coagulation bath. Fiber was dried overnight and sintered at different temperatures for microstructure and phase analysis. Both green and sintered Fibers were physico-chemical characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, TGA, DSC, FTIR, and stereo-zoom microscopy. The fibers obtained in this procedure are found to have highly porous interconnected structures which can provide good cell adhesion and therefore can be used for bioactive scaffold making.

  13. Architecture in outer space. [multilayer shell systems filled with gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pokrovskiy, G. I.

    1974-01-01

    Mulilayer thin film structures consisting of systems of shells filled with gas at some pressure are recommended for outer space structures: Large mirrors to collect light and radio waves, protection against meteoric impact and damage, and for connectors between state space stations in the form of orbital rings. It is projected that individual orbital rings will multiply and completely seal a star trapping its high temperature radiation and transforming it into low temperature infrared and short wave radio emission; this radiation energy could be utilized for technological and biological processes.

  14. Mission analysis report for single-shell tank leakage mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    This document provides an analysis of the leakage mitigation mission applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall missions of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineers principles are being applied to this effort. Mission analysis supports early decision making by clearly defining program objectives. This documents identifies the initial conditions and acceptable final conditions, defines the programmatic and physical interfaces and constraints, estimates the resources to carry out the mission, and establishes measures of success. The results of the mission analysis provide a consistent basis for subsequent systems engineering work.

  15. A detailed view of the gas shell around R Sculptoris with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Brunner, M.; De Beck, E.; Humphreys, E. M.; Kerschbaum, F.; Lindqvist, M.; Olofsson, H.; Ramstedt, S.

    2016-02-01

    Context. During the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, stars undergo thermal pulses - short-lived phases of explosive helium burning in a shell around the stellar core. Thermal pulses lead to the formation and mixing-up of new elements to the stellar surface. They are hence fundamental to the chemical evolution of the star and its circumstellar envelope. A further consequence of thermal pulses is the formation of detached shells of gas and dust around the star, several of which have been observed around carbon-rich AGB stars. Aims: We aim to determine the physical properties of the detached gas shell around R Sculptoris, in particular the shell mass and temperature, and to constrain the evolution of the mass-loss rate during and after a thermal pulse. Methods: We analyse 12CO(1-0), 12CO(2-1), and 12CO(3-2) emission, observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) during Cycle 0 and complemented by single-dish observations. The spatial resolution of the ALMA data allows us to separate the detached shell emission from the extended emission inside the shell. We perform radiative transfer modelling of both components to determine the shell properties and the post-pulse mass-loss properties. Results: The ALMA data show a gas shell with a radius of 19.̋5 expanding at 14.3 km s-1. The different scales probed by the ALMA Cycle 0 array show that the shell must be entirely filled with gas, contrary to the idea of a detached shell. The comparison to single-dish spectra and radiative transfer modelling confirms this. We derive a shell mass of 4.5 × 10-3 M⊙ with a temperature of 50 K. Typical timescales for thermal pulses imply a pulse mass-loss rate of 2.3 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1. For the post-pulse mass-loss rate, we find evidence for a gradual decline of the mass-loss rate, with an average value of 1.6 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1. The total amount of mass lost since the last thermal pulse is 0.03 M⊙, a factor four higher compared to classical models, with a

  16. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out. PMID:25804669

  17. Design of multiple-shell gas nozzles for refurbished Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Velikovich, Aleksandr Lazarevich; Madden, R.; Thornhill, W.; Ampleford, David J.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Coleman, P. L.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Wilson Elliott, Kristi; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Clark, R.; Jones, Brent Manley

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents initial designs of multiple-shell gas puff imploding loads for the refurbished Z generator. The nozzle has three independent drivers for three independent plena. The outer and middle plena may be charged to 250psia whilst the central jet can be charged to 1000psia. 8-cm and 12-cm outer diameter nozzles have been built and tested on the bench. The unique valve design provides a very fast opening, hence the amount of stray gas outside the core nozzle flow is minimized. A similar 8-cm nozzle was characterized earlier using a fiber optic interferometer, but at lower pressures and without the central jet. Those data have been scaled to the higher pressures required for refurbished Z and used to estimate performance. The use of three independent plena allows variation of the pressure (hence mass distribution) in the nozzle flow, allowing optimization of implosion stability and the on-axis mass that most contributes to K-shell emission. Varying the outer/middle mass ratios influences the implosion time and should affect the details of the assembly on axis as well as the radiation physics. Varying the central jet pressure will have a minor effect on implosion dynamics, but a strong effect on pinch conditions and radiation physics. Optimum mass distributions for planned initial Ar shots on refurbished Z are described. Additional interferometer data including the central jet and at higher pressures will also be presented.

  18. HUBBLE SEES CHANGES IN GAS SHELL AROUND NOVA CYGNI 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The European Space Agency's ESA Faint Object Camera utilizing the corrective optics provided by NASA's COSTAR (Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement), has given astronomers their best look yet at a rapidly ballooning bubble of gas blasted off a star. The shell surrounds Nova Cygni 1992, which erupted on February 19, 1992. A nova is a thermonuclear explosion that occurs on the surface of a white dwarf star in a double star system. The new HST image [right] reveals an elliptical and slightly lumpy ring-like structure. The ring is the edge of a bubble of hot gas blasted into space by the nova. The shell is so thin that the FOC does not resolve its true thickness, even with HST's restored vision. An HST image taken on May 31 1993, [left] 467 days after the explosion, provided the first glimpse of the ring and a mysterious bar-like structure. But the image interpretation was severely hampered by HST's optical aberration, that scattered light from the central star which contaminated the ring's image. A comparison of the pre and post COSTAR/FOC images reveals that the ring has evolved in the seven months that have elapsed between the two observations. The ring has expanded from a diameter of approximately 74 to 96 billion miles. The bar-like structure seen in the earlier HST image has disappear. These changes might confirm theories that the bar was produced by a dense layer of gas thrown off in the orbital plane of the double star system. The gas has subsequently grown more tenuous and so the bar has faded. The ring has also grown noticeably more oblong since the earlier image. This suggests the hot gas is escaping more rapidly above and below the system's orbital plane. As the gas continues escaping the ring should grow increasingly egg-shaped in the coming years. HST's newly improved sensitivity and high resolution provides a unique opportunity to understand the novae by resolving the effects of the explosion long before they can be resolved in ground

  19. Assessment groundwater monitoring plan for single shell tank waste management area B-BX-BY

    SciTech Connect

    Caggiano, J.A.

    1996-09-27

    Single Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY has been placed into groundwater quality assessment monitoring under interim-status regulations. This document presents background and an assessment groundwater monitoring plan to evaluate any impacts of risks/spills from these Single Shell Tanks in WMA B-BX-BY on groundwater quality.

  20. OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123

    SciTech Connect

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  1. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs.

  2. The detached dust and gas shells around the carbon star U Antliae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Schöier, F. L.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Geometrically thin, detached shells of gas have been found around a handful of carbon stars. The current knowledge on these shells is mostly based on CO radio line data. However, imaging in scattered stellar light adds important new information as well as allows studies of the dust shells. Aims: Previous observations of scattered stellar light in the circumstellar medium around the carbon star U Ant were taken through filters centred on the resonance lines of K and Na. These observations could not separate the scattering by dust and atoms. The aim of this paper is to remedy this situation. Methods: We have obtained polarization data on stellar light scattered in the circumstellar medium around U Ant through filters which contain no strong lines, making it possible to differentiate between the two scattering agents. Kinematic, as well as spatial, information on the gas shells were obtained through high-resolution echelle spectrograph observations of the KI and NaD lines. Results: We confirm the existence of two detached shells around U Ant. The inner shell (at a radius of ≈43´´ and a width of ≈2´´) consists mainly of gas, while the outer shell (at a radius of ≈50´´ and a width of ≈7´´) appears to consist exclusively of dust. Both shells appear to have an over-all spherical geometry. The gas shell mass is estimated to be 2 × 10-3~M⊙, while the mass of the dust shell is estimated to be 5 × 10-5~M⊙. The derived expansion velocity, from the KI and NaD lines, of the gas shell, 19.5 km s-1, agrees with that obtained from CO radio line data. The inferred shell age is 2700 years. There is structure, e.g. in the form of arcs, inside the gas shell, but it is not clear whether these are due to additional shells. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that the observed geometrically thin, detached shells around carbon stars are the results of brief periods of intense mass loss, probably associated with thermal pulses, and subsequent wind

  3. Does low gas permeability of rigid-shelled gekkotan eggs affect embryonic development?

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M; Thompson, Michael B; Greene, Virginia W

    2013-06-01

    Parchment-shelled eggs are characteristic of most squamates, including the basal clades of gekkotan lizards. The majority of gekkotan lizards, however, produce rigid-shelled eggs that are highly impermeable to gas exchange; eggs are laid in dry sites and experience a net loss of water during incubation. We tested the hypothesis that the 1,000-fold lower rate of oxygen diffusion through the shells of rigid- compared to parchment-shelled eggs imposes a physiological cost on development. To do this, we contrasted species with rigid and with parchment shells with regards to (1) rates of embryonic metabolism and (2) rates and patterns of development of the yolk sac and chorioallantois, the vascularized extra-embryonic membranes that transport oxygen to embryonic tissues. Metabolic rates of embryos from the rigid-shelled eggs of Gehyra variegata did not differ from those of the parchment-shelled eggs of Oedura lesueurii. Moreover, maximum metabolic rates of gekkotans with rigid shells did not differ from those of gekkotan or scincid lizards with parchment shells. In contrast, the yolk sac covered more of the surface area of the egg at oviposition, and the chorioallantois reached its full extent earlier for the species with rigid shelled eggs (Chondrodactylus turneri, G. variegata) than for the species with parchment-shelled eggs (Eublepharis macularius, O. lesueurii). Differences in the temporal patterns of yolk sac and chorioallantois development would thus serve to compensate for low rates of oxygen diffusion through rigid shells of gekkotans. PMID:23495191

  4. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    SciTech Connect

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle`s 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics `D` waste codes; and against state waste codes.

  5. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

  6. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

  7. Suspended core-shell Pt-PtOx nanostructure for ultrasensitive hydrogen gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Palash Kr.; Kallatt, Sangeeth; Anumol, Erumpukuthickal A.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2015-06-01

    High sensitivity gas sensors are typically realized using metal catalysts and nanostructured materials, utilizing non-conventional synthesis and processing techniques, incompatible with on-chip integration of sensor arrays. In this work, we report a new device architecture, suspended core-shell Pt-PtOx nanostructure that is fully CMOS-compatible. The device consists of a metal gate core, embedded within a partially suspended semiconductor shell with source and drain contacts in the anchored region. The reduced work function in suspended region, coupled with built-in electric field of metal-semiconductor junction, enables the modulation of drain current, due to room temperature Redox reactions on exposure to gas. The device architecture is validated using Pt-PtO2 suspended nanostructure for sensing H2 down to 200 ppb under room temperature. By exploiting catalytic activity of PtO2, in conjunction with its p-type semiconducting behavior, we demonstrate about two orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity and limit of detection, compared to the sensors reported in recent literature. Pt thin film, deposited on SiO2, is lithographically patterned and converted into suspended Pt-PtO2 sensor, in a single step isotropic SiO2 etching. An optimum design space for the sensor is elucidated with the initial Pt film thickness ranging between 10 nm and 30 nm, for low power (<5 μW), room temperature operation.

  8. SHELL NOX/SO2 FLUE GAS TREATMENT PROCESS: PILOT PLANT EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the Shell Flue Gas Treatment process in a pilot-scale test for simultaneously reducing the emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas produced in a coal-fired utility boiler. Flue gas leaving the economiz...

  9. Observations of the circumstellar gas shells around Betelgeuse and Antares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernat, A. P.; Lambert, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented on the direct observations of the circumstellar shell around alpha-Ori, along with new observations of the Ca II infrared triplet lines which provide lower limits for the Ca(+) shell radii for alpha-Ori and alpha-Sco (Antares). The 8542-A line in alpha-Ori does not show a circumstellar absorption core, and the shell radius limit is estimated to be at least 31 times stellar radius. A 108-mA circumstellar core is observed in the 8542-A line in Antares for which a shell radius equal to 4.0 times stellar radius is suggested. The discovery of circumstellar emission through resonance line scattering will provide valuable additional information on the physical conditions in the shell.

  10. Optimization of heat transfer in cooled shell elements of gas-turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, N. G.; Grinkrug, M. S.

    1985-08-01

    A theoretical solution is presented for the problem of finding an optimum distribution of the coefficients of heat transfer from the coolant in the shell structures of gas-turbine engines. The approach proposed here provides a way to efficiently use the mechanical properties of materials, to optimize coolant distribution over the shell surface, and, ultimately to improve the economy and performance of gas-turbine engines.

  11. Size Effect of Silica Shell on Gas Uptake Kinetics in Dry Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Diwei; Bai, Dongsheng; Li, Shujing; Wang, Xinrui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-07-26

    Two kinds of dry water (DW) particles are prepared by mixing water and hydrophobic silica particles with nanometer or micrometer dimensions, and the two DW particles are found to have similar size distributions regardless of the size of the silica shell. The CO2 uptake kinetics of DW with nanometer (nanoshell) and micrometer shells (microshell) are measured, and both uptake rate and capacity show the obvious size effect of the silica shell. The DW with a microshell possesses a larger uptake capacity, whereas the DW with a nanoshell has a faster uptake rate. By comparing the uptake kinetics of soluble NH3 and CO2 further, we found that the microshell enhances the stability and the dispersion degree of DW and the nanoshell offers a shorter path for the transit of guest gas into the water core. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation is introduced to illustrate the nanosize effect of the silica shell on the initial step of the gas uptake. It is found that the concentration of gas molecules close to the silica shell is higher than that in the bulk water core. With the increase in the size of the silica shell, the amount of CO2 in the silica shell decreases, and it is easier for the gas uptake to reach steady state. PMID:27350177

  12. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  13. Magnetically controlled multifrequency invisibility cloak with a single shell of ferrite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Youwen

    2015-02-01

    A magnetically controlled multifrequency invisibility cloak with a single shell of the isotropic and homogeneous ferrite material has been investigated based on the scattering cancellation method from the Mie scattering theory. The analytical and simulated results have demonstrated that such this shell can drastically reduce the total scattering cross-section of this cloaking system at multiple frequencies. These multiple cloaking frequencies of this shell can be externally controlled since the magnetic permeability of ferrites is well tuned by the applied magnetic field. This may provide a potential way to design a tunable multifrequency invisibility cloak with considerable flexibility.

  14. A Survey of Vapors in the Headspaces of Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Leon M.; Huckaby, James L.

    2000-10-31

    This report summarizes data on the organic vapors in the single-shell high level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site to support a forthcoming toxicological study. All data were obtained from the Tank Characterization Database (PNNL 1999). The TCD contains virtually all the available tank headspace characterization data from 1992 to the present, and includes data for 109 different single-shell waste tanks. Each single-shell tank farm and all major waste types are represented. Descriptions of the sampling and analysis methods have been given elsewhere (Huckaby et al. 1995, Huckaby et al. 1996), and references for specific data are available in the TCD. This is a revision of a report with the same title issued on March 1, 2000 (Stock and Huckaby 2000).

  15. Preliminary design requirements document for the initial single-shell tank retrieval system

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzel, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-24

    The scope of this Preliminary Design Requirements Document is to identify and define the functions, with associated requirements, which must be performed to demonstrate and accomplish the initial single-shell tank saltcake retrieval from selected tanks. This document sets forth functions, requirements, performance requirements and design constraints necessary to begin conceptual design for the Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System. System and physical interfaces between the Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System project and the Tank Waste Remediation are identified. The constraints, performance requirements, and transfer of information and data across a technical interface will be documented in an Interface Control Document. The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design to be documented by the project.

  16. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  17. The scale dependence of single-nucleon shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somà, V.; Duguet, T.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    We address the scale dependence of (effective) single-particle energies, non-observable quantities that are commonly used for interpreting nuclear structure observables measured in experiments and computed in many-body theories. We first demonstrate their scale dependence on a formal level, making them intrinsically theoretical objects, before illustrating this point via ab initio calculations in the oxygen isotopes. Finally, we consider a modified definition of effective single-particle energy and investigate its running properties.

  18. The scale dependence of single-nucleon shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Somà, V.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.

    2015-10-15

    We address the scale dependence of (effective) single-particle energies, non-observable quantities that are commonly used for interpreting nuclear structure observables measured in experiments and computed in many-body theories. We first demonstrate their scale dependence on a formal level, making them intrinsically theoretical objects, before illustrating this point via ab initio calculations in the oxygen isotopes. Finally, we consider a modified definition of effective single-particle energy and investigate its running properties.

  19. Preparation of highly dispersed core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Kanda, Takashi; Shibata, Hirobumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Abe, Masahiko

    2006-04-19

    Core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle were prepared. Ag nanoparticles were prepared using the reduction of silver nitrate with hydrazine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as protective agent. The sol-gel reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used to prepare core/shell-type titania nanocapsules with CTAB-coated Ag nanoparticles as the core. TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. In addition, the nanocapsules were found to be dispersed in the medium as individual particles without aggregation. Moreover, titania coating caused the surface plasmon absorption of Ag nanoparticles to shift toward the longer wavelength side. PMID:16608315

  20. Fifth Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project Expert Panel Meeting August 28-29, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Todd M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2015-01-07

    On August 28th and 29th, 2014 the Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) Expert Panel (Panel) convened in Richland, Washington. This was the Panel’s first meeting since 2011 and, as a result, was focused primarily on updating the Panel on progress in response to the past recommendations (Single-Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel Report, RPP-RPT-45921, Rev 0, May 2010). This letter documents the Panel’s discussions and feedback on Phase I activities and results.

  1. Test procedures and instructions for single shell tank saltcake cesium removal with crystalline silicotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1997-01-07

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test, using Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake from tanks 24 t -BY- I 10, 24 1 -U- 108, 24 1 -U- 109, 24 1 -A- I 0 1, and 24 t - S-102, in a bench-scale column. The cesium sorbent to be tested is crystalline siticotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-024, Hanford Single Shell Tank Saltcake Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  2. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-07-19

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability.

  3. Role of the interfaces in multiple networked one-dimensional core-shell nanostructured gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunghoon; Ko, Hyunsung; Kim, Soohyun; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-06-25

    This study examined the gas sensing mechanism of multiple networked core-shell nanowire sensors. The ethanol gas sensing properties of In2O3/ZnO core-shell nanowires synthesized by the thermal evaporation of indium powder in an oxidizing atmosphere followed by the atomic layer deposition of ZnO were examined as an example. The pristine In2O3 nanowires and In2O3-core/ZnO-shell nanowires exhibited responses of ∼30% and ∼196%, respectively, to 1000 ppm ethanol at 300 °C. The response of the core-shell nanostructures to ethanol also showed a strong dependence on the shell layer width. The strongest response to ethanol was obtained with a shell layer thickness of ∼44 nm corresponding to 2λD, where λD is the Debye length of ZnO. The enhanced sensing properties of the core-shell nanowires toward ethanol can be explained based on the potential barrier-controlled carrier transport model combined with the surface depletion model; the former is predominant over the latter. PMID:24850501

  4. Assessment of single-shell tank residual-liquid issues at Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, K.S.; Stout, L.A.; Napier, B.A.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Landstrom, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    This report provides an assessment of the overall effectiveness and implications of jet pumping the interstitial liquids (IL) from single-shell tanks at Hanford. The jet-pumping program, currently in progress at Hanford, involves the planned removal of IL contained in 89 of the 149 single-shell tanks and its transfer to double-shell tanks after volume reduction by evaporation. The purpose of this report is to estimate the public and worker doses associated with (1) terminating pumping immediately, (2) pumping to a 100,000-gal limit per tank, (3) pumping to a 50,000-gal limit per tank, and (4) pumping to the maximum practical liquid removal level of 30,000 gal. Assessment of the cost-effectiveness of these various levels of pumping in minimizing any undue health and safety risks to the public or worker is also presented.

  5. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-SX-112: Best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1997-08-29

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-SX-112 was performed, and a best-basis, inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  6. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BX-111: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1997-08-29

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-BX-111 was performed, and a best-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  7. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-116: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Place, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-TX-116 was performed, and a bost-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  8. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-01-01

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The focus of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  9. Geology Data Package for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2007-12-14

    This data package discusses the geology of the single-shell tank (SST) farms and the geologic history of the area. The purpose of this report is to provide the most recent geologic information available for the SST farms. This report builds upon previous reports on the tank farm geology and Integrated Disposal Facility geology with information available after those reports were published.

  10. Engineering report single-shell tank farms interim measures to limit infiltration through the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    HAASS, C.C.

    1999-10-14

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  11. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-104: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1997-09-02

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-TX-104 was performed, and a best-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  12. Initial single shell tank retrieval system project system engineering management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Systems Engineering approach that will be used to manage the retrieval of waste from the first single shell tank farm using past practice sluicing techniques. This Project SEMP is used to supplement the requirements of the TWRS SEMP, WHC-SD-WM-SEMP-002.

  13. Controlled, clean, and stable design requirements document for single-shell tank farms

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderzanden, M.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-19

    The Controlled, Clean, and Stable (CCS) Design Requirements Document (DRD) contains the technically defensible and traceable functions and requirements for maintaining the Single-Shell Tank Farms in a cost effective and safe interim end state. The CCSDRD functions and requirements constitute the project characteristics that are minimally sufficient to meet the CCS mission goals.

  14. Single-crystal apatite nanowires sheathed in graphitic shells: synthesis, characterization, and application.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Namjo; Cha, Misun; Park, Yun Chang; Lee, Kyung Mee; Lee, Jae Hyup; Park, Byong Chon; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-07-23

    Vertically aligned one-dimensional hybrid structures, which are composed of apatite and graphitic structures, can be beneficial for orthopedic applications. However, they are difficult to generate using the current method. Here, we report the first synthesis of a single-crystal apatite nanowire encapsulated in graphitic shells by a one-step chemical vapor deposition. Incipient nucleation of apatite and its subsequent transformation to an oriented crystal are directed by derived gaseous phosphorine. Longitudinal growth of the oriented apatite crystal is achieved by a vapor-solid growth mechanism, whereas lateral growth is suppressed by the graphitic layers formed through arrangement of the derived aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. We show that this unusual combination of the apatite crystal and the graphitic shells can lead to an excellent osteogenic differentiation and bony fusion through a programmed smart behavior. For instance, the graphitic shells are degraded after the initial cell growth promoted by the graphitic nanostructures, and the cells continue proliferation on the bare apatite nanowires. Furthermore, a bending experiment indicates that such core-shell nanowires exhibited a superior bending stiffness compared to single-crystal apatite nanowires without graphitic shells. The results suggest a new strategy and direction for bone grafting materials with a highly controllable morphology and material conditions that can best stimulate bone cell differentiation and growth. PMID:23755838

  15. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior.

  16. SHELL NOX/SO2 FLUE GAS TREATMENT PROCESS: INDEPENDENT EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an independent evaluation of the Shell Flue Gas Treatment (SFGT) process which simultaneously reduces nitrogen oxide (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. NOx emissions from stationary sources may be reduced by 80-90 percent by applying selective c...

  17. The Beta Pictoris Phenomenon in A-Shell Stars: Detection of Accreting Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Perez, Mario R.; Talavera, A.; McCollum, B.; Rawley, L. A.; England, M. N.; Schlegel, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of an expanded survey of A-shell stars using IUE high-dispersion spectra and find accreting, circumstellar gas in the line of sight to nine stars, in addition to the previously identified beta Pic, HR 10, and 131 Tau, which can be followed to between +70 and 100 km/s relative to the star. Two of the program stars, HD 88195 and HD 148283, show variable high-velocity gas. Given the small number of IUE spectra for our program stars, detection of high-velocity, accreting gas in 2/3 of the A-shell stars sampled indicates that accretion is an intrinsic part of the A-shell phenomenon and that beta Pic is not unique among main-sequence A stars in exhibiting such activity. Our program stars, as a group, have smaller column densities of high-velocity gas and smaller near-IR excesses compared with beta Pic. These features are consistent with greater central clearing of a remnant debris disk, compared with beta Pic, and suggest that the majority of field A-shell stars are older than beta Pic.

  18. Nd(3+)-Sensitized Ho(3+) Single-Band Red Upconversion Luminescence in Core-Shell Nanoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqin; Liu, Lu; Huang, Ping; Ding, Mingye; Zhong, Jiasong; Ji, Zhenguo

    2015-07-16

    A strategy to achieve 808 nm excited single-band red upconversion luminescence of Ho(3+) via the core-shell nanoarchitecture design was provided. Specifically, the synthesized Yb/Ho/Ce: NaGdF4@Yb/Nd: NaYF4 active-core@active-shell nanoparticles were evidenced to enable high-content doping of Nd(3+) (∼10 mol %) in the shell layer and, thus, markedly enhance red upconversion emission from Ho(3+) activators in the core with the assistance of spatially confined doping of Nd(3+) ions and efficient energy transfer of Nd(3+) → Yb(3+)(shell) → Yb(3+)(core) → Ho(3+). Importantly, introducing Ce(3+) into the core was beneficial to the competition of radiation transitions from the two intermediate excited states of Ho(3+): (5)S2,(5)F4 (green-emitting) and Ho(3+): (5)F5 (red-emitting), which induced great enhancement in the red to green intensity ratio and ultimately intense single-band red upconversion emission. We believe that this preliminary study will provide an important advance in developing luminescent markers suitable for biolabeling applications. PMID:26266869

  19. The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P. A.

    2014-06-15

    An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1 μg (0.15 μm of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1 μg and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20 μm and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20 atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5 keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25 μm, the YOM values drop to 0.10 ± 0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

  20. Optimization of microporous palm shell activated carbon production for flue gas desulphurization: experimental and statistical studies.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, S; Bhatia, S; Lee, K T; Mohamed, A R

    2009-02-01

    Optimizing the production of microporous activated carbon from waste palm shell was done by applying experimental design methodology. The product, palm shell activated carbon was tested for removal of SO2 gas from flue gas. The activated carbon production was mathematically described as a function of parameters such as flow rate, activation time and activation temperature of carbonization. These parameters were modeled using response surface methodology. The experiments were carried out as a central composite design consisting of 32 experiments. Quadratic models were developed for surface area, total pore volume, and microporosity in term of micropore fraction. The models were used to obtain the optimum process condition for the production of microporous palm shell activated carbon useful for SO2 removal. The optimized palm shell activated carbon with surface area of 973 m(2)/g, total pore volume of 0.78 cc/g and micropore fraction of 70.5% showed an excellent agreement with the amount predicted by the statistical analysis. Palm shell activated carbon with higher surface area and microporosity fraction showed good adsorption affinity for SO2 removal. PMID:18952414

  1. Examination of Simulated Non-Compliant Waste from Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, Richard; Page, J. S.; Venetz, T. J.; Cooke, G. A.

    2014-07-10

    This report summarizes the electrochemical testing results for the aggressive layers testing recommended by the single-shell tank integrity expert panel. From single-shell chemistry data, 39 layers were identified as possible aggressive waste layers and were grouped by aggressive ion and inhibitor ions. From those groups 18 segments were identified as representative segments and tested. The testing reported here showed pitting corrosion for six aggressive layers, and one layer showed a propensity for crevice corrosion. In these cases there was a lack of inhibitors, an abundance of aggressive ions, or both. A good prediction for pitting corrosion could be made by considering the pH value of the layer. When the pH was less than 12, there was a high probability for pitting to occur. However, the pH of the solution was not always an indicator, and the inhibitor ion and aggressive ion concentrations then needed to be considered.

  2. Progress of the Enhanced Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project

    SciTech Connect

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Castleberry, Jim L.

    2015-01-07

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. In late 2010, seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

  3. Energy expressions for n=3 and 4 systems in a single-j shell

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Chong

    2010-03-15

    For systems with three and four fermions within a single-j shell, analytical expressions for the state energies are presented from a decomposition of the angular momentum. In some important cases the expressions acquire a very simple form. The expression may help us in understanding the structure of isomeric states. The decomposition also makes it possible to construct the algebraic condition for conservation of seniority.

  4. Evaluation of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks Suspected of Water Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Feero, Amie J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Schofield, John S.

    2013-11-14

    Intrusions evaluations for twelve single-shell tanks were completed in 2013. The evaluations consisted of remote visual inspections, data analysis, and calculations of estimated intrusion rates. The observation of an intrusion or the preponderance of evidence confirmed that six of the twelve tanks evaluated had intrusions. These tanks were tanks 241-A-103, BX-101, BX-103, BX-110, BY-102, and SX-106.

  5. Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, John, R.

    2005-04-28

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers.

  6. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  7. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli

    2011-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approximately 1.5 keY, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked supernova (SN) ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from SN ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approximately 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma that also gives rise to the hot X-my emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-my emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) x solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide

  8. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Kes 75 Supernova Shell Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Arendt, Richard G.; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of approx 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keY. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and IR emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of approx 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) Solar Mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative

  9. Infrared and X-Ray Spectroscopy of the KES 75 Supernova Remnant Shell: Characterizing the Dust and Gas Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Slane, Patrick; Arendt, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    We present deep Chandra observations and Spitzer Space Telescope infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the shell in the composite supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 75 (G29.7-0.3). The remnant is composed of a central pulsar wind nebula and a bright partial shell in the south that is visible at radio, IR, and X-ray wavelengths. The X-ray emission can be modeled by either a single thermal component with a temperature of 1.5 keV, or with two thermal components with temperatures of 1.5 and 0.2 keV. Previous studies suggest that the hot component may originate from reverse-shocked SN ejecta. However, our new analysis shows no definitive evidence for enhanced abundances of Si, S, Ar, Mg, and Fe, as expected from supernova (SN) ejecta, or for the IR spectral signatures characteristic of confirmed SN condensed dust, thus favoring a circumstellar or interstellar origin for the X-ray and IR emission. The X-ray and ill emission in the shell are spatially correlated, suggesting that the dust particles are collisionally heated by the X-ray emitting gas. The IR spectrum of the shell is dominated by continuum emission from dust with little, or no line emission. Modeling the IR spectrum shows that the dust is heated to a temperature of 140 K by a relatively dense, hot plasma, that also gives rise to the hot X-ray emission component. The density inferred from the IR emission is significantly higher than the density inferred from the X-ray models, suggesting a low filling factor for this X-ray emitting gas. The total mass of the warm dust component is at least 1.3 x 10(exp -2) solar mass, assuming no significant dust destruction has occurred in the shell. The IR data also reveal the presence of an additional plasma component with a cooler temperature, consistent with the 0.2 keV gas component. Our IR analysis therefore provides an independent verification of the cooler component of the X-ray emission. The complementary analyses of the X-ray and IR emission provide quantitative estimates of

  10. Ab initio approach to effective single-particle energies in doubly closed shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguet, T.; Hagen, G.

    2012-03-01

    The present work discusses, from an ab initio standpoint, the definition, the meaning, and the usefulness of effective single-particle energies (ESPEs) in doubly closed shell nuclei. We perform coupled-cluster calculations to quantify to what extent selected closed-shell nuclei in the oxygen and calcium isotopic chains can effectively be mapped onto an effective independent-particle picture. To do so, we revisit in detail the notion of ESPEs in the context of strongly correlated many-nucleon systems and illustrate the necessity of extracting ESPEs through the diagonalization of the centroid matrix, as originally argued by Baranger. For the purpose of illustration, we analyze the impact of correlations on observable one-nucleon separation energies and nonobservable ESPEs in selected closed-shell oxygen and calcium isotopes. We then state and illustrate the nonobservability of ESPEs. Similarly to spectroscopic factors, ESPEs can indeed be modified by a redefinition of inaccessible quantities while leaving actual observables unchanged. This leads to the absolute necessity of employing consistent structure and reaction models based on the same nuclear Hamiltonian to extract the shell structure in a meaningful fashion from experimental data.

  11. Single particle optical investigation of gold shell enhanced upconverted fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Kory; Lim, Shuang Fang; Hallen, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) excited in the near IR offer novel advantages as fluorescent contrast agents, allowing for background free bio-imaging. However, their fluorescence brightness is hampered by low quantum efficiency due to the low absorption cross section of Ytterbium and Erbium ions in the near IR. We enhance the efficiency of these particles by investigating the plasmonic coupling of 30nm diameter core NaYF4: Yb, Er upconverting particles (UCNPs) with a gold shell coating. An enhancement of green emission by a factor of five and a three times overall increase in emission intensity has been achieved for single particle spectra. UV-Vis absorption has confirmed the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the gold shell to the near IR and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images demonstrates successful growth of a gold shell around the upconversion particle. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that gold shell coupling changes the lifetime of the energy levels of the Erbium ion that are relevant to the emission process.

  12. Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Cooling Technology in Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, James

    2014-12-29

    In this Advanced Turbine Program-funded Phase III project, Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) has developed and tested, at a pre-commercial prototypescale, spar-shell turbine airfoils in a commercial gas turbine. The airfoil development is based upon FTT’s research and development to date in Phases I and II of Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants. During this program, FTT has partnered with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), Siemens Energy, to produce sparshell turbine components for the first pre-commercial prototype test in an F-Class industrial gas turbine engine and has successfully completed validation testing. This project will further the commercialization of this new technology in F-frame and other highly cooled turbine airfoil applications. FTT, in cooperation with Siemens, intends to offer the spar-shell vane as a first-tier supplier for retrofit applications and new large frame industrial gas turbines. The market for the spar-shell vane for these machines is huge. According to Forecast International, 3,211 new gas turbines units (in the >50MW capacity size range) will be ordered in ten years from 2007 to 2016. FTT intends to enter the market in a low rate initial production. After one year of successful extended use, FTT will quickly ramp up production and sales, with a target to capture 1% of the market within the first year and 10% within 5 years (2020).

  13. Characterization of Direct Push Vadose Zone Sediments from the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Iovin, Cristian; Clayton, Ray E.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Clayton, Eric T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Orr, Robert D.

    2007-12-20

    The overall goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid, via collection of geochemical information and data, the future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs). For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at WMA U are found in Crumpler (2003). To meet these goals, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses of vadose zone sediment collected within the U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specifically, this report contains all the geochemical and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from ten direct push characterization holes emplaced to investigate vadose zone contamination associated with potential leaks within the 241-U Single-Shell Tank Farm. Specific tanks targeted during this characterization campaign included tanks 241-U-104/241-U-105, 241-U-110, and 241-U-112. Additionally, this report compiles data from direct push samples collected north of tank 241-U-201, as well as sediment collected from the background borehole (C3393). After evaluating all the characterization and analytical data, there is no question that the vadose zone in the vicinity of tanks 241-U-104 and 241-U-105 has been contaminated by tank-related waste. This observation is not new, as gamma logging of drywells in the area has identified uranium contamination at the

  14. Novel shell device for gas exchange in an operculate land snail.

    PubMed

    Páll-Gergely, Barna; Naggs, Fred; Asami, Takahiro

    2016-07-01

    The operculum of terrestrial snails tightly seals the shell aperture providing protection from predators and body-water loss. To allow respiration with a closed operculum, operculate land snails repeatedly evolved shell devices such as tubes or channels that open to the air. In all Asian members of the Alycaeidae, an externally closed tube lies along the suture behind the aperture that possesses a small internal opening into the last whorl at the tube's anterior end. However, this structure presents a paradox: how is gas exchanged through an externally closed tube? Here we show that many microtunnels open into the tube and run beneath radial ribs along the growth line of the last whorl in Alycaeus conformis These tunnels open to the outside of the shell surface near the umbilicus. Examination under high magnification revealed that the outermost shell layer forms these tunnels only in the whorl range beneath the sutural tube. Each tunnel (ca 16 µm diameter) is far narrower than any known metazoan parasite. These findings support our hypothesis that the externally closed sutural tube functions with microtunnels as a specialized apparatus for predator-free gas exchange with minimal water loss when the operculum seals the aperture. PMID:27405378

  15. Single-step in situ synthesis of double bond-grafted yttrium-hydroxide nanotube core-shell structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijia; Wang, Xun; Li, Yadong

    2004-01-21

    Novel MMA-Y(OH)(3) nanotube core-shell structures have been successfully prepared with double bonds successfully grafted on the surface through a single-step in-situ hydrothermal method. PMID:14737530

  16. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Prestel, S.; Torrielli, P.

    2016-06-06

    We study the hadroproduction of a W b pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t -channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t -channel single-top production. Furthermore, we formulate our approach so that it can be appliedmore » to the general case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.« less

  17. Off-shell single-top production at NLO matched to parton showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, R.; Frixione, S.; Papanastasiou, A. S.; Prestel, S.; Torrielli, P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the hadroproduction of a W b pair in association with a light jet, focusing on the dominant t-channel contribution and including exactly at the matrix-element level all non-resonant and off-shell effects induced by the finite top-quark width. Our simulations are accurate to the next-to-leading order in QCD, and are matched to the Herwig6 and Pythia8 parton showers through the MC@NLO method. We present phenomenological results relevant to the 8 TeV LHC, and carry out a thorough comparison to the case of on-shell t-channel single-top production. We formulate our approach so that it can be applied to the general case of matrix elements that feature coloured intermediate resonances and are matched to parton showers.

  18. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-04-17

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop {number_sign}2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages.

  19. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  20. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor`s controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first.

  1. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    SciTech Connect

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Lambie, R.W.; Franklin, J.D.; Seymour, B.J.; Johnson, K.W.; Stevens, R.H.; Remund, K.M.; Sasaki, L.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1995-02-01

    This document provides the characterization information and interprets the data for Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109. Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109 is an underground storage tank containing high-level radioactive waste. It is located in the C Tank Farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. The tank was sampled in September of 1992 to address the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question. Analyses of tank waste were also performed to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-44-08. Tank 241-C-109 went into service in 1946 and received first-cycle decontamination waste from bismuth phosphate process operations at B Plant in 1948. Other waste types added that are expected to contribute to the current contents include ferrocyanide scavenging waste and Strontium Semiworks waste. It is the last tank in a cascade with Tanks 241-C-107 and 241-C-108. The tank has a capacity of 2,010 kL (530 kgal) and currently contains 250 kL (66 kgal) of waste, existing primarily of sludge. Approximately 9.15 kL (4 kgal) of supernate remain. The sludge is heterogeneous, with significantly different chemical compositions depending on waste depth. The major waste constituents include aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, sodium, sulfate and uranium. The major radionuclides present are Cesium 137 and Strontium 90. The results of this characterization indicate that the waste in this tank is adequately described in the Dangerous Waste Permit Application of the Single-Shell Tank System.

  2. Theoretical investigation of single dopant in core/shell nanocrystal in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, A.; Feddi, E.; Oukerroum, A.; Assaid, E.; Dujardin, F.; Addou, M.

    2015-09-01

    The control of single dopant or "solitary dopant" in semiconductors constitute a challenge to achieve new range of tunable optoelectronic devices. Knowing that the properties of doped monocrystals are very sensitive to different external perturbations, the aim of this study is to understand the effect of a magnetic field on the ground state energy of an off-center ionized donor in a core/shell quantum dot (CSQD). The binding energies with and without an applied magnetic field are determined by the Ritz variational method taking into account the electron-impurity correlation in the trial wave function deduced from the second-order perturbation. It has been found that the external magnetic field affects strongly the binding energy, and its effect varies as a function of the core radius and the shell thickness. We have shown the existence of a threshold ratio (a / b) crit which represents the limit between the tridimensional and the spherical surface confinement. In addition our analysis demonstrates the important influence of the position of ionized donor in the shell material.

  3. Tank selection for Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) system hot testing in a single shell tank

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, P.K.

    1995-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to recommend a single shell tank in which to hot test the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in Fiscal Year 1996. The LDUA is designed to utilize a 12 inch riser. During hot testing, the LDUA will deploy two end effectors (a High Resolution Stereoscopic Video Camera System and a Still/Stereo Photography System mounted on the end of the arm`s tool interface plate). In addition, three other systems (an Overview Video System, an Overview Stereo Video System, and a Topographic Mapping System) will be independently deployed and tested through 4 inch risers.

  4. Analytical Derivations of Single-Particle Matrix Elements in Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah, Aziz H.; Radhi, R. A.; Abdullah, Nzar R.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical method to calculate single particle matrix elements used in atomic and nuclear physics. We show seven different formulas of matrix elements of the operator f(r)dr m where f(r) = rμ, rμ jJ(qr), V(r) corresponding to the Gaussian and the Yukawa potentials used in nuclear shell models and nuclear structure. In addition, we take into account a general integral formula of the matrix element that covers all seven matrix elements obtained analytically.

  5. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of the carbon steel liner in Hanford Site single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Schwenk, E.B.; Danielson, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    Six safety initiatives have been identified for accelerating the resolution of waste tank safety issues and closure of unreviewed safety questions. Safety Initiative 5 is to reduce safety and environmental risk from tank leaks. Item d of Safety Initiative 5 is to complete corrosion studies of single-shell tanks to determine failure mechanisms and corrosion control options to minimize further degradation by June 1994. This report has been prepared to fulfill Safety Initiative 5, Item d. The corrosion mechanisms that apply to Hanford Site single-shell tanks are stress corrosion cracking, pitting/crevice corrosion, uniform corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The corrosion data relevant to the single-shell tanks dates back three decades, when results were obtained from in-situ corrosion coupons in a few single-shell tanks. Since that time there have been intertank transfers, evaporation, and chemical alterations of the waste. These activities have changed the character and the present composition of the waste is not well characterized. All conclusions and recommendations are made in the absence of relevant laboratory experimental data and tank inspection data. The report attempts to identify the failure mechanisms by a literature survey of carbon steel data in environments similar to the single-shell tank wastes, and by a review of the work performed at the Savannah River Site where similar wastes are stored in similar carbon steel tanks. Based on these surveys, and in the absence of data specific to Hanford single-shell tanks, it may be concluded that the single-shell tanks identified as leakers failed primarily by stress corrosion cracking due to the presence of high nitrate/low hydroxide wastes and residual stresses. In addition, some failures may be attributed to pitting under crevices in low hydroxide locations.

  6. THE S1 SHELL AND INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD AND GAS NEAR THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Priscilla C.

    2010-05-10

    Many studies of the Loop I magnetic superbubble place the Sun at the edges of the bubble. One recent study models the polarized radio continuum of Loop I as two magnetic shells with the Sun embedded in the rim of the 'S1' shell. If the Sun is in such a shell, it should be apparent in both the local interstellar magnetic field and the distribution of nearby interstellar material. The properties of these subshells are compared to the interstellar magnetic field and the distribution of interstellar Fe{sup +} and Ca{sup +} within {approx}55 pc of the Sun. Although the results are not conclusive, the interstellar magnetic field direction obtained from polarized stars within {approx}30 pc is consistent with the interstellar magnetic field direction of the S1 shell. The distribution of nearby interstellar Fe{sup +} with log N(Fe{sup +}) < 12.5 cm{sup -2} is described equally well by a uniform distribution or an origin in spherical shell-like features. Higher column densities of Fe{sup +} (log N(Fe{sup +})>12.5 cm{sup -2}) tend to be better described by the path length of the sightline through the S1 and S2 subshells. Column densities of the recombinant ion Ca{sup +} are found to increase with the strength of the interstellar radiation field, rather than with star distance or total pathlength through the two magnetic subshells. The ion Ca{sup +} cannot be used to trace the distribution of local interstellar gas unless the spatial variations in the radiation field are included in the calculation of the ionization balance, in addition to possible abundance variations. The result is that a model of Loop I as composed of two spherical magnetic subshells remains a viable description of the distribution of nearby low density interstellar medium, but is not yet proven.

  7. Fiber density estimation from single q-shell diffusion imaging by tensor divergence.

    PubMed

    Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Umarova, Roza; Maier, Simon; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Kiselev, Valerij G

    2013-08-15

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging provides information about the nerve fiber bundle geometry of the human brain. While the inference of the underlying fiber bundle orientation only requires single q-shell measurements, the absolute determination of their volume fractions is much more challenging with respect to measurement techniques and analysis. Unfortunately, the usually employed multi-compartment models cannot be applied to single q-shell measurements, because the compartment's diffusivities cannot be resolved. This work proposes an equation for fiber orientation densities that can infer the absolute fraction up to a global factor. This equation, which is inspired by the classical mass preservation law in fluid dynamics, expresses the fiber conservation associated with the assumption that fibers do not terminate in white matter. Simulations on synthetic phantoms show that the approach is able to derive the densities correctly for various configurations. Experiments with a pseudo ground truth phantom show that even for complex, brain-like geometries the method is able to infer the densities correctly. In-vivo results with 81 healthy volunteers are plausible and consistent. A group analysis with respect to age and gender show significant differences, such that the proposed maps can be used as a quantitative measure for group and longitudinal analysis. PMID:23541798

  8. Contaminant Release Data Package for Residual Waste in Single-Shell Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-12-01

    The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation report be submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The RCRA Facility Investigation report will provide a detailed description of the state of knowledge needed for tank farm performance assessments. This data package provides detailed technical information about contaminant release from closed single-shell tanks necessary to support the RCRA Facility Investigation report. It was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., which is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with tank closure. This data package is a compilation of contaminant release rate data for residual waste in the four Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have been tested (C-103, C-106, C-202, and C-203). The report describes the geochemical properties of the primary contaminants of interest from the perspective of long-term risk to groundwater (uranium, technetium-99, iodine-129, chromium, transuranics, and nitrate), the occurrence of these contaminants in the residual waste, release mechanisms from the solid waste to water infiltrating the tanks in the future, and the laboratory tests conducted to measure release rates.

  9. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Kenneth I.; Deibler, John E.; Julyk, Larry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2012-12-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection has commissioned a structural analysis of record (AOR) for the Hanford single shell tanks (SSTs) to assess their structural integrity. The analysis used finite element techniques to predict the tank response to the historical thermal and operating loads. The analysis also addressed the potential tank response to a postulated design basis earthquake. The combined response to static and seismic loads was then evaluated against the design requirements of American Concrete Institute (ACI) standard, ACI-349-06, for nuclear safety-related concrete structures. Further analysis was conducted to estimate the plastic limit load and the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of the tanks. The limit load and buckling analyses estimate the margin between the applied loads and the limiting load capacities of the tank structure. The potential for additional dome loads from waste retrieval equipment and the addition of large dome penetrations to accommodate retrieval equipment has generated additional interest in the limit load and buckling analyses. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling of the single shell tanks.

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-S-104

    SciTech Connect

    DiCenso, A.T.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-29

    In July and August 1992, Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 was sampled as part of the overall characterization effort directed by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Sampling was also performed to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also presents expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background historical and surveillance tank information. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding operational safety. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics the waste in Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 (hereafter, Tank 241-S-104) based on information obtained from a variety of sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the chemical and physical properties of the waste in Tank 241-S-104, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a format useful for making management and technical decisions concerning waste tank safety and disposal issues. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are presented based on safety issues and further characterization needs.

  11. Demonstration of Confined Electron Gas and Steep-Slope Behavior in Delta-Doped GaAs-AlGaAs Core-Shell Nanowire Transistors.

    PubMed

    Morkötter, S; Jeon, N; Rudolph, D; Loitsch, B; Spirkoska, D; Hoffmann, E; Döblinger, M; Matich, S; Finley, J J; Lauhon, L J; Abstreiter, G; Koblmüller, G

    2015-05-13

    Strong surface and impurity scattering in III-V semiconductor-based nanowires (NW) degrade the performance of electronic devices, requiring refined concepts for controlling charge carrier conductivity. Here, we demonstrate remote Si delta (δ)-doping of radial GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell NWs that unambiguously exhibit a strongly confined electron gas with enhanced low-temperature field-effect mobilities up to 5 × 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The spatial separation between the high-mobility free electron gas at the NW core-shell interface and the Si dopants in the shell is directly verified by atom probe tomographic (APT) analysis, band-profile calculations, and transport characterization in advanced field-effect transistor (FET) geometries, demonstrating powerful control over the free electron gas density and conductivity. Multigated NW-FETs allow us to spatially resolve channel width- and crystal phase-dependent variations in electron gas density and mobility along single NW-FETs. Notably, dc output and transfer characteristics of these n-type depletion mode NW-FETs reveal excellent drain current saturation and record low subthreshold slopes of 70 mV/dec at on/off ratios >10(4)-10(5) at room temperature. PMID:25923841

  12. Exciton-trion transitions in single CdSe-CdS core-shell nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniel E; van Embden, Joel; Mulvaney, Paul; Fernée, Mark J; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2009-08-25

    We report on the observation of an intermediate state in the blinking of single CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals. This state has a low quantum yield and connects the "on" and "off" states commonly observed in the photoluminescence blinking of individual nanocrystals. We find that the transitions between these two emitting states follow nearly single-exponential statistics. The transitions from the "on" state to this intermediate state result from changes in the surface passivation of the nanocrystal. The data are consistent with photoinduced, adsorption/desorption events that take place at the surface of the nanocrystals. The trion state leads to a reduction in photoluminescence in nanocrystals. PMID:19655720

  13. Semi-analytical approach for the study of linear static behaviour and buckling of shells with single constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leo, Andrea Matteo; Contento, Alessandro; Di Egidio, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    A model of linear, internally constrained shell with single, constant curvature is used to describe the behaviour of existing structures, such as barrel shells. A linear, elastic, isotropic material is considered. Observing that in the shell two families of mono-dimensional interacting beams can be recognized: straight longitudinal beams and transversal arches, a non-conventional semi-analytical approximate solution, which uses the method of separation of variables, is proposed. By using an integral procedure, reduced differential, ordinary equations, capable of describing the behaviour of the shell, are obtained. Both linear static behaviour and longitudinal buckling of the shell are investigated. The approximate solution proposed leads to results that match those of a finite element model and permits to give a description of shells similar to that of beams on elastic soil. With regard to the linear static behaviour of the shell, a "short" and a "long" characterization is proposed and original graphical abaci are obtained with the purpose of facilitating the classification. An extensive study is then performed in order to analyse the buckling of the shells.

  14. Born-Infeld thin-shell wormholes supported by generalized Cosmic Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates thin-shell wormholes in Born-Infeld theory supported by generalized Cosmic Chaplygin gas (GCCG). We study their stability via radial perturbations for distinct values of charge and Born-Infeld parameter. The comparison of wormhole solutions corresponding to generalized Chaplygin gas, modified Chaplygin gas with GCCG quation of state is established. It is found that similar type of wormhole solutions exists for small value of charge and Born-Infeld parameter for all type of equation of state, while some extra stable as well as unstable solution are found corresponding to large value of charge and Born-Infeld parameter. Thus, it is concluded that GCCG and large value of charge may responsible for such extra solutions.

  15. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-21

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. PMID:27044886

  16. Design of highly sensitive and selective Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prabhakar; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Jeong, Hyun-Mook; Hwang, Su-Jin; Kwak, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2014-07-21

    Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H₂S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH₃, CO and H₂). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm of H₂S gas at 300 °C, which was approximately 19 times higher than that for the interfering gases. The response of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs to H₂S was approximately 4 times higher than that of bare NiO hollow nanospheres. Improved performance of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs was attributed to hollow spaces that allowed the accessibility of Au NPs to gas molecules. It was suggested that adsorption of H₂S on Au NPs resulted in the formation of sulfide layer, which possibly lowered its work function, and therefore tuned the electron transfer from Au to NiO rather NiO to Au, which leaded to increase in resistance and therefore response. PMID:24933405

  17. Discovery of Molecular Gas Shells around the Unusual Galaxy Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Recent observations by an international team of astronomers [1] with the 15-metre Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope at the La Silla observatory (Chile) have shown that the unusual, nearby galaxy Centaurus A is surrounded by shells in which carbon monoxide molecules are present. These new exciting results are the first of their kind. In addition to the intrinsic scientific value of this discovery, it also provides an instructive example of what will become possible for more distant galaxies with the projected Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) , now in the planning phase. Ellipticals and spirals Galaxies come in different shapes. Some of these take the form of more or less perfect spirals, some have the form of ellipsoids and still others have an irregular appearance. One of the major differences between elliptical and spiral galaxies is that the former do not possess extensive gaseous discs in which young stars can be formed. This is despite the fact that most elliptical galaxies are probably formed by the merger of two or more spiral galaxies. However, during such a process most of the gas in the spirals is either quickly turned into stars by massive bursts of star formation or is completely lost into the surrounding space. Shells around elliptical galaxies Most galaxies are members of groups. Once they have been formed, massive elliptical galaxies in these often behave like "cannibals" by swallowing one or more smaller companion galaxies. Some vestiges of such an event may remain visible for a certain time after the merger, normally in the form of weak structures in the otherwise smooth light distribution over the elliptical galaxy. These structures resemble the ripples or waves that develop on the water surface when you throw a small stone into a calm pond. While long-exposure photos show them as faint "rings" around the galaxy, they are in fact the projected images of three-dimensional structures and are often referred to as shells . By means of

  18. Results from directly driven implosions of deuterated plastic shells filled with tritium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Casey, Daniel; Fincke, Jim; Pino, Jesse; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Steinkamp, Mike; Tipton, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Results from implosions of tritium filled plastic shells containing thin deuterated sub-layers, as well as comparisons with 1-D capsule only simulations will be reported. The implosions were directly driven using a square, 1 ns wide, 27 kJ laser pulse, provided by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. The 15 um thick, by 865 μm OD, CH capsules were fabricated with 1 μm thick, deuterated plastic layers, located either in direct contact with the tritium gas, or offset by a layer of CH. Neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusions signify atomic mixing between the deuterated shell and the gas payload, allowing for a detailed study of the dynamics of mix in 3-D implosions. Data has been collected on implosions from capsules with a depth of burial of 0, 1, and 2 um of CH, as well as non-deuterated control shots. Capsules were shot with two gas fill pressures, 4 and 10 atm., to provide information on mix as a function of convergence. We report nuclear and X-ray data collected from these experiments. Further, we present comparisons with, 1-D and 2-D, capsule only simulations. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA.

  19. Development of the CD symcap platform to study gas-shell mix in implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Casey, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Grim, G. P.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; et al

    2014-09-09

    Surrogate implosions play an important role at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for isolating aspects of the complex physical processes associated with fully integrated ignition experiments. The newly developed CD Symcap platform has been designed to study gas-shell mix in indirectly driven, pure T₂-gas filled CH-shell implosions equipped with 4 μm thick CD layers. This configuration provides a direct nuclear signature of mix as the DT yield (above a characterized D contamination background) is produced by D from the CD layer in the shell, mixing into the T-gas core. The CD layer can be placed at different locations within themore » CH shell to probe the depth and extent of mix. CD layers placed flush with the gas-shell interface and recessed up to 8 μm have shown that most of the mix occurs at the inner-shell surface. In addition, time-gated x-ray images of the hotspot show large brightly-radiating objects traversing through the hotspot around bang-time, which are likely chunks of CH/CD plastic. This platform is a powerful new capability at the NIF for understanding mix, one of the key performance issues for ignition experiments.« less

  20. Development of the CD symcap platform to study gas-shell mix in implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Grim, G. P.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Chen, K. C.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoover, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Kervin, P.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Widmann, K.; Wilson, D. C.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-09

    Surrogate implosions play an important role at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for isolating aspects of the complex physical processes associated with fully integrated ignition experiments. The newly developed CD Symcap platform has been designed to study gas-shell mix in indirectly driven, pure T₂-gas filled CH-shell implosions equipped with 4 μm thick CD layers. This configuration provides a direct nuclear signature of mix as the DT yield (above a characterized D contamination background) is produced by D from the CD layer in the shell, mixing into the T-gas core. The CD layer can be placed at different locations within the CH shell to probe the depth and extent of mix. CD layers placed flush with the gas-shell interface and recessed up to 8 μm have shown that most of the mix occurs at the inner-shell surface. In addition, time-gated x-ray images of the hotspot show large brightly-radiating objects traversing through the hotspot around bang-time, which are likely chunks of CH/CD plastic. This platform is a powerful new capability at the NIF for understanding mix, one of the key performance issues for ignition experiments.

  1. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-19

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document.

  2. Investigation of Photovoltaic Properties of Single Core-Shell GaN/InGaN Wires.

    PubMed

    Messanvi, A; Zhang, H; Neplokh, V; Julien, F H; Bayle, F; Foldyna, M; Bougerol, C; Gautier, E; Babichev, A; Durand, C; Eymery, J; Tchernycheva, M

    2015-10-01

    We report the investigation of the photovoltaic properties of core-shell GaN/InGaN wires. The radial structure is grown on m-plane {11̅00} facets of self-assembled c̅-axis GaN wires elaborated by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. The conversion efficiency of wires with radial shell composed of thick In0.1Ga0.9N layers and of 30× In0.18Ga0.82N/GaN quantum wells are compared. We also investigate the impact of the contact nature and layout on the carrier collection and photovoltaic performances. The contact optimization results in an improved conversion efficiency of 0.33% and a fill factor of 83% under 1 sun (AM1.5G) on single wires with a quantum well-based active region. Photocurrent spectroscopy demonstrates that the response ascribed to the absorption of InGaN/GaN quantum wells appears at wavelengths shorter than 440 nm. PMID:26378593

  3. Functions and requirements for subsurface barriers used in support of single-shell tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.

    1993-11-16

    The mission of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Program includes project and program activities for receiving, storing, maintaining, treating, and disposing onsite, or packaging for offsite disposal, all Hanford tank waste. Hanford tank waste includes the contents of 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), plus any new waste added to these facilities, and all encapsulated cesium and strontium stored onsite and returned from offsite users. A key element of the TWRS Program is retrieval of the waste in the SSTs. The waste stored in these underground tanks must be removed in order to minimize environmental, safety, and health risks associated with continuing waste storage. Subsurface barriers are being considered as a means to mitigate the effects of tank leaks including those occurring during SST waste retrieval. The functions to be performed by subsurface barriers based on their role in retrieving waste from the SSTs are described, and the requirements which constrain their application are identified. These functions and requirements together define the functional baseline for subsurface barriers.

  4. p -shell carrier assisted dynamic nuclear spin polarization in single quantum dots at zero external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, C. F.; Ota, Y.; Harbord, E.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Repeated injection of spin-polarized carriers in a quantum dot (QD) leads to the polarization of nuclear spins, a process known as dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNP). Here, we report the observation of p-shell carrier assisted DNP in single QDs at zero external magnetic field. The nuclear field—measured by using the Overhauser shift of the singly charged exciton state of the QDs—continues to increase, even after the carrier population in the s-shell saturates. This is also accompanied by an abrupt increase in nuclear spin buildup time as p-shell emission overtakes that of the s shell. We attribute the observation to p-shell electrons strongly altering the nuclear spin dynamics in the QD, supported by numerical simulation results based on a rate equation model of coupling between electron and nuclear spin system. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization with p-shell carriers could open up avenues for further control to increase the degree of nuclear spin polarization in QDs.

  5. Safety basis For activities in double-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, R.L.

    1996-02-05

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for double shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade.

  6. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-108: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.

    1997-08-26

    This document is a preliminary Tank Characterization Report (TCR). It only contains the current best-basis inventory (Appendix D) for single-shell tank 241-TX-108. No TCR has been previously issued for this tank, and current core sample analyses are not available. The best-basis inventory, therefore, is based on an engineering assessment of waste type, process flowsheet data, and/or other available information. The Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes describes standard methodology used to derive the tank-by-tank best-basis inventories. This preliminary TCR will be updated using this same methodology when additional data on tank contents become available.

  7. Seniority in quantum many-body systems. I. Identical particles in a single shell

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2014-10-15

    A discussion of the seniority quantum number in many-body systems is presented. The analysis is carried out for bosons and fermions simultaneously but is restricted to identical particles occupying a single shell. The emphasis of the paper is on the possibility of partial conservation of seniority which turns out to be a peculiar property of spin-9/2 fermions but prevalent in systems of interacting bosons of any spin. Partial conservation of seniority is at the basis of the existence of seniority isomers, frequently observed in semi-magic nuclei, and also gives rise to peculiar selection rules in one-nucleon transfer reactions. - Highlights: • Unified derivation of conditions for the total and partial conservation of seniority. • General analysis of the partial conservation of seniority in boson systems. • Why partial conservation of seniority is crucial for seniority isomers in nuclei. • The effect of partial conservation of seniority on one-nucleon transfer intensities.

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-107

    SciTech Connect

    Mccain, D.J.

    1997-04-09

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-BY-107. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with 241-BY-107 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 provides the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information.

  9. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.

    1997-05-23

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-109. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241 C-109 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices.

  10. Investigation into Photoconductivity in Single CNF/TiO2-Dye Core-Shell Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuangzhi; Rochford, Caitlin; Javier Baca, F.; Liu, Jianwei; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2010-09-01

    A vertically aligned carbon nanofiber array coated with anatase TiO2 (CNF/TiO2) is an attractive possible replacement for the sintered TiO2 nanoparticle network in the original dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) design due to the potential for improved charge transport and reduced charge recombination. Although the reported efficiency of 1.1% in these modified DSSC’s is encouraging, the limiting factors must be identified before a higher efficiency can be obtained. This work employs a single nanowire approach to investigate the charge transport in individual CNF/TiO2 core-shell nanowires with adsorbed N719 dye molecules in dark and under illumination. The results shed light on the role of charge traps and dye adsorption on the (photo) conductivity of nanocrystalline TiO2 CNF’s as related to dye-sensitized solar cell performance.

  11. Remediation and cleanout levels for Hanford site single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Boothe, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1994), requires the retrieval of 99 percent of the Hanford Site single-shell tank (SST) waste. Retrieval of the waste requires the completion of saltwell pumping and then the sluicing of all 149 tanks, at a cost of over $3 billion. The retrieved waste is to be processed and vitrified for ultimate disposal as glass. This document shows that the intent of the Tri-Party Agreement can be met by sluicing the waste from only 86 tanks, after the completion of saltwell pumping. This partial retrieval option will result in a cost savings of over $600 million in construction and operation alone, and will significantly reduce the volume of glass requiring disposal

  12. OVERVIEW OF ENHANCED HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK (SST) INTEGRITY PROJECT - 12128

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; BOOMER KD; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The change package identified two phases of work for SST integrity. The initial phase has been focused on efforts to envelope the integrity of the tanks. The initial phase was divided into two primary areas of investigation: structural integrity and leak integrity. If necessary based on the outcome from the initial work, a second phase would be focused on further definition of the integrity of the concrete and liners. Combined these two phases are designed to support the formal integrity assessment of the Hanford SSTs in 2018 by Independent Qualified Registered Engineer. The work to further define the DOE's understanding of the structural integrity SSTs involves preparing a modern Analysis of Record using a finite element analysis program. Structural analyses of the SSTs have been conducted since 1957, but these analyses used analog calculation, less rigorous models, or focused on individual structures. As such, an integrated understanding of all of the SSTs has not been developed to modern expectations. In support of this effort, other milestones will address the visual inspection of the tank concrete and the collection of concrete core samples from the tanks for analysis of

  13. Trade study of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies to support Hanford single-shell waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System to safely manage and dispose of low-level, high-level, and transuranic wastes currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Eastern Washington. This report supports the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone No. M-45-08-T01 and addresses additional issues regarding single-shell tank leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies and provide an indication of the scope of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation activities necessary to support the Tank Waste Remedial System Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System project.

  14. Groundwater Quality Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ronald M.; Hodges, Floyd N.; Williams, Barbara A.

    2001-08-29

    Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area U (WMA U) is in the 200 West Area on the Hanford Site. The area includes the U Tank Farm that contains 16 underground, single-shell tanks and their ancillary equipment and waste systems. WMA U is regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as codified in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington's Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA, RCW 70.105) and its implementing requirements in the Washington State dangerous waste regulations (WAC 173-303-400). Releases of hazardous wastes from WMA U have contaminated groundwater beneath the area. Therefore, the WMA U is being assessed to determine the rate of movement and extent of the contamination released and to determine the concentrations in groundwater. The original finding of groundwater impact was determined from elevated specific conductance in downgradient well 299-W19-41. The elevated specific conductance was attributed to the nonhazardous constituents calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and chloride. Tank waste constituents nitrate and technetium-99 are also present as co-contaminants and have increased over the past several years; however, at concentrations well below the respective drinking water standards. Chromium concentrations in downgradient wells have generally exceeded background levels, but similar levels were also observed in upgradient well 299-W18-25 in early 2000 before it went dry. The objective of this report is to present the current conceptual model for how and where contaminant releases have reached the water table and how that contamination has dispersed in the groundwater system. These efforts will achieve the requirements of a groundwater quality assessment under RCRA [40 CFR 265.93 (d)(4)]. On that basis, a monitoring schedule with appropriate analytes and proposals for new wells and tests are presented in this document.

  15. INITIAL SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The ''Initial Single-Shell Tank System Performance Assessment for the Hanford Site [1] (SST PA) presents the analysis of the long-term impacts of residual wastes assumed to remain after retrieval of tank waste and closure of the SST farms at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The SST PA supports key elements of the closure process agreed upon in 2004 by DOE, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The SST PA element is defined in Appendix I of the ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) [2], the document that establishes the overall closure process for the SST and double-shell tank (DST) systems. The approach incorporated in the SST PA integrates substantive features of both hazardous and radioactive waste management regulations into a single analysis. The defense-in-depth approach used in this analysis defined two major engineering barriers (a surface barrier and the grouted tank structure) and one natural barrier (the vadose zone) that will be relied on to control waste release into the accessible environment and attain expected performance metrics. The analysis evaluates specific barrier characteristics and other site features that influence contaminant migration by the various pathways. A ''reference'' case and a suite of sensitivity/uncertainty cases are considered. The ''reference case'' evaluates environmental impacts assuming central tendency estimates of site conditions. ''Reference'' case analysis results show residual tank waste impacts on nearby groundwater, air resources; or inadvertent intruders to be well below most important performance objectives. Conversely, past releases to the soil, from previous tank farm operations, are shown to have groundwater impacts that re significantly above most performance objectives. Sensitivity/uncertainty cases examine single and multiple parameter variability along with plausible alternatives

  16. On the Flutter of Cylindrical Shells and Panels Moving in a Flow of Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanov, R. D.

    1958-01-01

    The equations of shells are taken in the form of the general technical theory of shallow shells and shells of medium length. The aerodynamic forces acting on a shell are taken into account only as forces of excess pressure according to the formula proposed by A.A. Iliushin in reference 3.

  17. Engineering Report Single Shell Tank (SST) Farms Interim Measures to Limit Infiltration through the Vadose Zone [SEC 1 & 2 & 3

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, F.J.

    2001-05-07

    Identifies, evaluates and recommends interim measures for reducing or eliminating water sources and preferential pathways within the vadose zone of the single-shell tank farms. Features studied: surface water infiltration and leaking water lines that provide recharge moisture, and wells that could provide pathway for contaminant migration. An extensive data base, maps, recommended mitigations, and rough order of magnitude costs are included.

  18. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  19. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    SciTech Connect

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-09-22

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant.

  20. Size-controlled synthesis of thermal stable single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yu, Hongbo; Lim, Zi-Yian; Yang, Guangming; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Shenghu; Yin, Hongfeng

    2016-06-01

    Single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 (H: hollow) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) with around 4.3 nm Ru cores and hollow SiO2 shells were prepared successfully. In this synthetic process, we obtained multi-cored Ru@SiO2 NPs initially, single-cored RuO2@H-SiO2 NPs during treatment, and single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 NPs in the end. The Ru@SiO2 NPs were prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion method, and the size and core number of Ru@SiO2 NPs can be controlled. Single-cored RuO2@H-SiO2 NPs and Ru@H-SiO2 NPs were successively obtained by calcination and reduction. The structure showed promising aggregate-resistant performance and potential application in catalysis.

  1. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-01

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis.A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis and characterization of the Ag@SiO2@Au superstructures (SEM and TEM images, UV/vis and SERS spectra). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00278a

  2. Characterizing Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site.

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2010-03-03

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241 C 106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred into and out of each tank and the different sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. The studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or coprecipitated within oxide/hydroxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; böhmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides/hydroxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. The studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements, respectively, may alter the composition of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other

  3. Investigating photoinduced charge transfer in double- and single-emission PbS@CdS core@shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiguang; Liang, Hongyan; Gonfa, Belete Atomsa; Chaker, Mohamed; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Tijssen, Peter; Vidal, François; Ma, Dongling

    2013-12-01

    We present for the first time detailed investigation of the charge transfer behavior of PbS@CdS core@shell quantum dots (QDs) showing either a single emission peak from the core or intriguing double emission peaks from the core and shell, respectively. A highly non-concentric core@shell structure model was proposed to explain the origin of double emissions from monodisperse QDs. Their charge transfer behavior was investigated by monitoring photoluminescence (PL) intensity variation with the introduction of electron or hole scavengers. It was found that the PL quenching of the PbS core is more efficient than that of the CdS shell, suggesting more efficient charge transfer from the core to scavengers, although the opposite was expected. Further measurements of the PL lifetime followed by wave function calculations disclosed that the time scale is the critical factor explaining the more efficient charge transfer from the core than from the shell. The charge transfer behavior was also examined on a series of single-emission core@shell QDs with either different core sizes or different shell thicknesses and dominant factors were identified. Towards photovoltaic applications, these PbS@CdS QDs were attached onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their charge transfer behavior was compared with that in the PbS-QD/MWCNT system. Results demonstrate that although the CdS shell serves as an electron transfer barrier, the electrons excited in the PbS cores can still be transferred into the MWCNTs efficiently when the shell thickness is ~0.7 nm. Considering their higher stability, these core@shell QDs are very promising for the development of highly efficient QD-based photovoltaic devices.We present for the first time detailed investigation of the charge transfer behavior of PbS@CdS core@shell quantum dots (QDs) showing either a single emission peak from the core or intriguing double emission peaks from the core and shell, respectively. A highly non-concentric core@shell

  4. Germanium-silicon alloy and core-shell nanocrystals by gas phase synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehringer, Christian; Kloner, Christian; Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into the second reactor stage (HWR II) and a mixture of SiH4 and GeH4 is added. The ratio of the precursors in the feed, their partial pressures, the synthesis temperature in HWR II and the overall pressure are varied depending on the desired morphology and composition. Alloy particle production is achieved in the heterogeneous surface reaction regime, meaning that germanium (Ge) and Si are deposited on the seed surface simultaneously. The NCs can be synthesized with any desired composition, whilst maintaining a mean diameter around 30 nm with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) around 1.25. The absorption behavior and the related fundamental optical band gap energy in dependence on the alloy composition are exemplarily presented. They prove the possibility to tailor NC properties for electronical and opto-electronical applications. In the homogeneous gas phase reaction regime facetted Ge-Si core-shell structures are accessible. The Ge deposition on the seeds precedes the Si deposition due to different gas phase reaction kinetics of the precursors. The Si layer grows epitaxially on the Ge core and is around 5 nm thick.In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into

  5. Germanium-silicon alloy and core-shell nanocrystals by gas phase synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mehringer, Christian; Kloner, Christian; Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-12

    In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into the second reactor stage (HWR II) and a mixture of SiH4 and GeH4 is added. The ratio of the precursors in the feed, their partial pressures, the synthesis temperature in HWR II and the overall pressure are varied depending on the desired morphology and composition. Alloy particle production is achieved in the heterogeneous surface reaction regime, meaning that germanium (Ge) and Si are deposited on the seed surface simultaneously. The NCs can be synthesized with any desired composition, whilst maintaining a mean diameter around 30 nm with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) around 1.25. The absorption behavior and the related fundamental optical band gap energy in dependence on the alloy composition are exemplarily presented. They prove the possibility to tailor NC properties for electronical and opto-electronical applications. In the homogeneous gas phase reaction regime facetted Ge-Si core-shell structures are accessible. The Ge deposition on the seeds precedes the Si deposition due to different gas phase reaction kinetics of the precursors. The Si layer grows epitaxially on the Ge core and is around 5 nm thick. PMID:25700152

  6. Shell thickness dependent photoinduced hole transfer in hybrid conjugated polymer/quantum dot nanocomposites: from ensemble to single hybrid level.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihua; Hine, Corey R; Maye, Mathew M; Meng, Qingping; Cotlet, Mircea

    2012-06-26

    Photoinduced hole transfer is investigated in inorganic/organic hybrid nanocomposites of colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and a cationic conjugated polymer, poly(9,9'-bis(6-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl)fluorene-alt-phenylene, in solution and in solid thin film, and down to the single hybrid level and is assessed to be a dynamic quenching process. We demonstrate control of hole transfer rate in these quantum dot/conjugated polymer hybrids by using a series of core/shell quantum dots with varying shell thickness, for which a clear exponential dependency of the hole transfer rate vs shell thickness is observed, for both solution and thin-film situations. Furthermore, we observe an increase of hole-transfer rate from solution to film and correlate this with changes in quantum dot/polymer interfacial morphology affecting the hole transfer rate, namely, the donor-acceptor distance. Single particle spectroscopy experiments reveal fluctuating dynamics of hole transfer at the single conjugated polymer/quantum dot interface and an increased heterogeneity in the hole-transfer rate with the increase of the quantum dot's shell thickness. Although hole transfer quenches the photoluminescence intensity of quantum dots, it causes little or no effect on their blinking behavior over the time scales probed here. PMID:22686521

  7. LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, D.M.

    2004-08-03

    This report forms the basis for a feasibility study and conceptual design to control vapor emissions from waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Carbtrol, Vapor Mixing, and High Efficiency Gas Absorber (HEGA) vapor controls were evaluated to determine the lessons learned from previous failed vapor control attempts. This document illustrates the resulting findings based on that evaluation.

  8. Size-controlled, magnetic, and core-shell nanoparticles synthesized by inert-gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Mark A.

    Interest in nanoparticles (2 to 100 nm in diameter) and clusters of atoms (0.5 to 2 nm in diameter) has heightened over the past two and a half decades on both fundamental and functional levels. Nanoparticles and clusters of atoms are an exciting branch of materials science because they do not behave like normal bulk matter, nor do they act like molecules. They can have shockingly different physical, chemical, optical, or magnetic properties from the same material at a larger scale. In the case of nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio can change fundamental properties like melting temperature, binding energy, or electron affinity. The definitions of markers used to distinguish between metallic, semiconducting, and insulating bulk condensed matter, such as the band gap and polarizability, can even be blurred or confused on the nanoscale. Similarly, clusters of atoms can form in structures that are only stable at finite sizes, and do not translate to bulk condensed matter. Thermodynamics of finite systems changes dramatically in nanovolumes such as wires, rods, cubes, and spheres, which can lead to complex core-shell and onion-like nanostructures. Consequently, these changes in properties and structure have led to many new possibilities in the field of materials engineering. Inert-gas condensation (IGC) is a well-established method of producing nanoparticles that condense from the gas phase. Its first use dates back to the early 1990s, and it has been used to fabricate nanoparticles both commercially and in research and development for applications in magnetism, biomedicine, and catalysts. In this dissertation, IGC was used to produce a wide variety of nanoparticles. First, control over the size distributions of Cu nanoparticles and how it relates to the plasma properties inside the nucleation chamber was investigated. Next, the formation of phase pure WFe2 nanoparticles revealed that this Laves phase is ferromagnetic instead of non-magnetic. Finally, core-shell

  9. Design of highly sensitive and selective Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Prabhakar; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Jeong, Hyun-Mook; Hwang, Su-Jin; Kwak, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2014-06-01

    Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H2S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH3, CO and H2). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm of H2S gas at 300 °C, which was approximately 19 times higher than that for the interfering gases. The response of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs to H2S was approximately 4 times higher than that of bare NiO hollow nanospheres. Improved performance of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs was attributed to hollow spaces that allowed the accessibility of Au NPs to gas molecules. It was suggested that adsorption of H2S on Au NPs resulted in the formation of sulfide layer, which possibly lowered its work function, and therefore tuned the electron transfer from Au to NiO rather NiO to Au, which leaded to increase in resistance and therefore response.Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H2S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH3, CO and H2). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-105

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1998-06-18

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-T-105. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-T-105 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03, to ``issue characterization deliverables consistent with the waste information requirements documents developed for 1998``.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of amino-functionalized single magnetic core-silica shell composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhanwang; Wei, Xinlin; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yuanfeng

    2012-10-01

    The thermal decomposition approach, reverse micro-emulsion system and surface modification technique had been successfully used to synthesis single magnetic core Fe3O4@Organic Layer@SiO2-NH2 complex microspheres. The magnetization of the magnetic microspheres core could be easily tuned between 28 and 56 emu/g by adjusting the amount of 2-mercaptobarbituric acid. It was found that the Organic Layer to some extent had a protective effect on avoiding Fe3O4 being oxidized into Fe2O3. Each Fe3O4@Organic Layer microsphere could be coated uniformly by about 30 nm of silica shell. The average diameter of the Fe3O4@Organic Layer@SiO2 composites was about 538 nm. The saturation magnetization of the Fe3O4@Organic Layer@SiO2 complex microspheres was 12.5% less than magnetic microspheres cores. The Fe3O4@Organic Layer@SiO2-NH2 composites possessed a huge application potentiality in specificity enriching and separating biological samples.

  12. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-S-104

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.

    1997-04-15

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-S-104. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with 241-S- 104 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendixes. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1996) milestone M-44-05.

  13. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  14. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-04-19

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

  15. Tank characterization report for single-shell tak 241-C-112. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.

    1997-06-11

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (IWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (CR). This report and its appendixes serve as the CR for single-shell tank 24 1 -C- 1 12. The objectives of this report are: 1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 24 1 -C- 1 12 waste, and 2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-05 (Ecology et al. 1996).

  16. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-112

    SciTech Connect

    McCain, D.J.

    1998-06-11

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-T-112. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-T-112 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03, to ``issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Documents developed for 1998.``

  17. Task analysis for the single-shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes a task analysis for the Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System. A task analysis is a formal method of examining work that must be done by the operators of human-machine systems. The starting point for a task analysis is the mission that a human-machine system must perform, and the ending point is a list of requirements for human actions and the displays and controls that must be provided to support them. The task analysis approach started with a top-down definition of the steps in a tank retrieval campaign. It started by dividing a waste retrieval campaign for one single-shell tank into the largest logical components (mission phases), then subdivided these into secondary components (sub functions), and then further subdivided the secondary components into tertiary units (tasks). Finally, the tertiary units were divided into potentially observable operator behaviors (task elements). In the next stage of the task analysis, the task elements were evaluated by completing an electronic task analysis form patterned after one developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for task analysis of nuclear power plant control rooms. In the final stage, the task analysis data base was used in a bottom-up approach to develop clusters of controls and displays called panel groups and to prioritize these groups for each subfunction. Panel groups are clusters of functionally related controls and displays. Actual control panels will be designed from panel groups, and panel groups will be organized within workstations to promote efficient operations during retrieval campaigns.

  18. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-SX-115

    SciTech Connect

    HULSE, N.L.

    1999-05-13

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-SX-115. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-SX-115 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  19. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103

    SciTech Connect

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-02-24

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report. This report and its appendices serve as the tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-103 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with Waste Information Requirements Documents developed for 1998.''

  20. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  1. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BX-110

    SciTech Connect

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    1999-02-23

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-BX-110. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-BX-110 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of the waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the tank's safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for 1998.''

  2. Preliminary assessment of candidate immobilization technologies for retrieved single-shell tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemers, K.D.; Mendel, J.E.; Kruger, A.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the initial work that has been performed to select technologies for immobilization of wastes that may be retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Two classes of waste will require immobilization. One is the combined high-level waste/transuranic (HLW/TRU) fraction, the other the low-level waste (LLW) fraction. A number of potential immobilization technologies are identified for each class of waste. Immobilization technologies were initially selected based on a number of considerations, including (1) the waste loading that could likely be achieved within the constraint of producing acceptable waste forms, (2) process flexibility (primarily compatibility with anticipated waste variability), (3) process complexity, and (4) state of development. Immobilization technologies selected for further development include the following: for HLW/TRU waste -- borosilicate glass, lead-iron phosphate glass, glass-calcine composites, glass-ceramics, and cement based forms; for non-denitrated LLW -- grout, laxtex-modified concrete, and polyethylene; and for denitrated LLW -- silicate glass, phosphate glass, and clay calcination or tailored ceramic in various matrices.

  3. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-106

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1997-04-15

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-U-106. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-106 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ikology et al. 1996), Milestone M-44-10.

  4. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-106

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1996-09-25

    This tank characterization report summarizes information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in single-shell underground tank 241-C-106. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-C-106 is the only tank on the High-Heat Load Watch List. As a result of the analyses addressed by this report, the supernate and upper 60 percent of the sludge in the tank do not pose any safety concerns in addition to the high-heat load issue based on the decision limits of the safety screening data quality objective (DQO) (Dukelow et al. 1995). The lower 40 percent of the sludge was not sampled; therefore, no statements regarding the safety of this waste can be made. A portion of the tank sludge is scheduled to be retrieved in fiscal year 1997 in order to mitigate the high-heat load in the tank.

  5. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank 241-T-107

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, B.D.; Jensen, L.

    1994-09-01

    Single shell tank 241-T-107 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank most recently sampled in March 1993. Analyses of materials obtained from tank T-107 were conducted to support the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-06 as well as Milestones M-44-05 and M-44-07. Characterization of the tank waste T-107 will support the ferrocyanide safety issue in order to classify the tank as safe, conditionally safe, or unsafe. This tank characterization report expands on the data found in Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Data Interpretation Report for Tank 241-T-107 Core Samples. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank T-107 strongly indicate the cyanide and oxidizer (nitrate/nitrite) concentrations in the tank waste are not significant enough to support a self-sustaining exothermic reaction. Therefore, the contents of tank T-107 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment. Because the possibility of an exothermic reaction is remote, the consequences of an accident scenario, as proposed by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  6. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-112

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1998-05-28

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-U-112. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-112 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for 1998.

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) WASTES A MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-12-21

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt, mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site closure consent order entered into by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to the proposed treatment process where a high curie (primarily {sup 137}Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high level waste, or low level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase.

  8. Neutron production in deuterium gas-puff z-pinch with outer plasma shell at current of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Frusov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.; Krasa, J.

    2015-11-01

    Z-pinch experiments at the current of about 3 MA were carried out on the GIT-12 generator. The outer plasma shell of deuterium gas-puff was generated by the system of 48 plasma guns. This configuration exhibits a high efficiency of the production of DD fusion neutrons with the yield of above 1012 neutrons produced in a single shot with the duration of about 20 ns. The maximum energy of the neutrons produced in this pulse exceeded 30 MeV. The neutron radiation was measured using scintillation TOF detectors, CR-39 nuclear track detectors, bubble detectors BD-PND and BDS-10000 and by several types of nuclear activation detectors. These diagnostic tools were used to measure the anisotropy of neutron fluence and neutron energy spectra. It allows us to estimate the total number of DD neutrons, the contribution of other nuclear reactions, the amount of scattered neutrons, and other parameters of neutron production. This work was supported by the MSMT grants LH13283, LD14089.

  9. Review of high convergence implosion experiments with single and double shell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N. D.; Watt, R. G.; Varnum, W. S.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been been performed in recent years at the Omega laser studying double shell capsules as an a1 teinative, 11011 cryogenic, path towards ignition at NTF. Double shell capsules designed to mitigate the Au M-band radiation asymmetries, were experimentally found to perform well in both spherical and cylindrical hohlraums, achieving near 1-D (-90 %) clean calculated yield at convergence comparable to that required for NIF ignition. Near-term plans include directly driven double shell experiments at Omega, which eliminates Au M-band radiation as a yield degradation m ec h an i s in.

  10. Isolating scattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell using iterative, single-channel time reversal.

    PubMed

    Waters, Zachary J; Dzikowicz, Benjamin R; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    Iterative, single-channel time reversal is employed to isolate backscattering resonances of an air-filled spherical shell in a frequency range of 0.5-20 kHz. Numerical simulations of free-field target scattering suggest improved isolation of the dominant target response frequency in the presence of varying levels of stochastic noise, compared to processing returns from a single transmission and also coherent averaging. To test the efficacy of the technique in a realistic littoral environment, monostatic scattering experiments are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida. The time reversal technique is applied to returns from a hollow spherical shell target sitting proud on a sandy bottom in 14 m deep water. Distinct resonances in the scattering response of the target are isolated, depending upon the bandwidth of the sonar system utilized. PMID:22280594

  11. The fractal dimension of cell membrane correlates with its capacitance: A new fractal single-shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xujing; Becker, Frederick F.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2010-12-15

    The scale-invariant property of the cytoplasmic membrane of biological cells is examined by applying the Minkowski-Bouligand method to digitized scanning electron microscopy images of the cell surface. The membrane is found to exhibit fractal behavior, and the derived fractal dimension gives a good description of its morphological complexity. Furthermore, we found that this fractal dimension correlates well with the specific membrane dielectric capacitance derived from the electrorotation measurements. Based on these findings, we propose a new fractal single-shell model to describe the dielectrics of mammalian cells, and compare it with the conventional single-shell model (SSM). We found that while both models fit with experimental data well, the new model is able to eliminate the discrepancy between the measured dielectric property of cells and that predicted by the SSM.

  12. Refinement of Modeling Techniques for the Structural Evaluation of Hanford Single-Shell Nuclear Waste Storage Tanks - 12288

    SciTech Connect

    Karri, Naveen K.; Rinker, Michael W.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Bapanapalli, Satish K.

    2012-07-01

    The single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site (in Washington State, USA) were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and are well beyond their estimated 25 year design life. This article discusses the structural analysis approach and modeling challenges encountered during the ongoing analysis of record for evaluating the structural integrity of the single-shell tanks. There are several geometrical and material nonlinearities and uncertainties to be dealt with while performing the modern finite element analysis of these tanks. The analysis takes into account the temperature history of the tanks and allowable mechanical operating loads for proper estimation of creep strains and thermal degradation of material properties. The loads prescribed in the analysis of record models also include anticipated loads that may occur during waste retrieval and closure. Due to uncertainty in a number of modeling details, sensitivity studies were conducted to address questions related to boundary conditions that realistically or conservatively represent the influence of surrounding tanks in a tank farm, the influence of backfill excavation slope, the extent of backfill and the total extent of undisturbed soil surrounding the backfill. Because of the limited availability of data on the thermal and operating history for many of the individual tanks, some of the data was assumed or interpolated. However, the models developed for the analysis of record represent the bounding scenarios and include the loading conditions that the tanks were subjected to or anticipated. The modeling refinement techniques followed in the analysis of record resulted in conservative estimates for force and moment demands at various sections in the concrete tanks. This article discusses the modeling aspects related to Type-II and Type-III single-shell tanks. The modeling techniques, methodology and evaluation criteria developed for evaluating the structural integrity of single-shell tanks at Hanford are in general

  13. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) WASTES FROM CONCEPT TO PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    GENIESSE, D.J.; NELSON, E.A.; HAMILTON, D.W.; MAJORS, J.H.; NORDAHL, T.K.

    2006-12-08

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site-closure consent order entered into by the US Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to a proposed pretreatment process where a high-curie (primarily {sup 137}Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high-level waste, or low-level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase. The aforementioned parameters, along with evaporation rate, proper agitation, and residence time, determine nucleation and growth kinetics and the resulting habit and size distribution of the product crystals. These crystals properties are important considerations for designing the crystallizer and solid/liquid separation equipment. A structured program was developed to (a) demonstrate that fractional crystallization could be used to pre-treat Hanford tank wastes and (b) provide data to develop a pilot plant design.

  14. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank 241-BX-107

    SciTech Connect

    Raphael, G.F.

    1994-09-01

    This study examined and assessed the status, safety issues, composition, and distribution of the wastes contained in the tank 241-BX-107. Historical and most recent information, ranging from engineering structural assessment experiments, process history, monitoring and remediation activities, to analytical core sample data, were compiled and interpreted in an effort to develop a realistic, contemporary profile for the tank BX-107 contents. The results of this is study revealed that tank BX-107, a 2,006,050 L (530,000 gal) cylindrical single-shell, dished-bottom carbon-steel tank in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, was classified as sound. It has been interim stabilized and thus contains less than 189,250 L (50,000 gal) of interstitial liquid, and less than 18,925 L (5,000 gal) of supernatant. It has also been partially interim isolated, whereby all inlets to the tank are sealed to prevent inadvertent addition of liquid. At a residual waste level of {approximately}3.07 m (120.7 {+-} 2 in. from sidewall bottom or {approximately}132.9 in. from center bottom), it is estimated that the tank BX-107 contents are equivalent to 1,305,825 L (345,000 gal). The vapor space pressure is at atmospheric. The latest temperature readings, which were taken in July 1994, show a moderate temperature value of 19{degrees}C (66{degrees}F). Two supernatant samples were collected in 1974 and 1990, prior to interim stabilization. Sludge core samples were obtained in 1979 and 1992.

  15. Risks from Past, Current, and Potential Hanford Single Shell Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Mark B.; Watson, David J.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-05-24

    Due to significant delays in constructing and operating the Waste Treatment Plant, which is needed to support retrieval of waste from Hanford’s single shell tanks (SSTs), SSTs may now be required to store tank waste for two to three more decades into the future. Many SSTs were built almost 70 years ago, and all SSTs are well beyond their design lives. Recent examination of monitoring data suggests several of the tanks, which underwent interim stabilization a decade or more ago, may be leaking small amounts (perhaps 150–300 gallons per year) to the subsurface environment. A potential leak from tank T-111 is estimated to have released approximately 2,000 gallons into the subsurface. Observations of past leak events, recently published simulation results, and new simulations all suggest that recent leaks are unlikely to affect underlying groundwater above regulatory limits. However, these recent observations remind us that much larger source terms are still contained in the tanks and are also present in the vadose zone from historical intentional and unintentional releases. Recently there have been significant improvements in methods for detecting and characterizing soil moisture and contaminant releases, understanding and controlling mass-flux, and remediating deep vadose zone and groundwater plumes. To ensure extended safe storage of tank waste in SSTs, the following actions are recommended: 1) Improve capabilities for intrusion and leak detection. 2) Develop defensible conceptual models of intrusion and leak mechanisms. 3) Apply enhanced subsurface characterization methods to improve detection and quantification of moisture changes beneath tanks. 4) Maintain a flux-based assessment of past, present, and potential tank leaks to assess risks and to maintain priorities for applying mitigation actions. 5) Implement and maintain effective mitigation and remediation actions to protect groundwater resources. These actions will enable limited resources to be applied to

  16. Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank 241-B-110

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, L.C.; De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Rutherford, J.H.; Stephens, R.H.; Heasler, P.G.; Brown, T.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Single-shell Tank 241-B-110 is an underground storage tank containing radioactive waste. The tank was sampled at various times between August and November of 1989 and later in April of 1990. The analytical data gathered from these sampling efforts were used to generate this Tank Characterization Report. Tank 241-B-110, located in the 200 East Area B Tank Farm, was constructed in 1943 and 1944, and went into service in 1945 by receiving second cycle decontamination waste from the B and T Plants. During the service life of the tank, other wastes were added including B Plant flush waste, B Plant fission product waste, B Plant ion exchange waste, PUREX Plant coating waste, and waste from Tank 241-B-105. The tank currently contains 246,000 gallons of non-complexed waste, existing primarily as sludge. Approximately 22,000 gallons of drainable interstitial liquid and 1,000 gallons of supernate remain. The solid phase of the waste is heterogeneous, for the top layer and subsequent layers have significantly different chemical compositions and are visually distinct. A complete analysis of the top layer has not been done, and auger sampling of the top layer is recommended to fully characterize the waste in Tank 241-B-110. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank; however, it is a Confirmed Leaker, having lost nearly 10,000 gallons of waste. The waste in Tank 241-B-110 is primarily precipitated salts, some of which are composed of radioactive isotopes. The most prevalent analytes include water, bismuth, iron, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. The major radionuclide constituents are {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr.

  17. Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-16

    This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

  18. Engineering high-performance Pd core-MgO porous shell nanocatalysts via heterogeneous gas-phase synthesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Cassidy, Cathal; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Aranishi, Kengo; Kumar, Sushant; Lal, Chhagan; Gspan, Christian; Grogger, Werner; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2015-08-28

    We report on the design and synthesis of high performance catalytic nanoparticles with a robust geometry via magnetron-sputter inert-gas condensation. Sputtering of Pd and Mg from two independent neighbouring targets enabled heterogeneous condensation and growth of nanoparticles with controlled Pd core-MgO porous shell structure. The thickness of the shell and the number of cores within each nanoparticle could be tailored by adjusting the respective sputtering powers. The nanoparticles were directly deposited on glassy carbon electrodes, and their catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The measurements indicated that the catalytic activity was superior to conventional bare Pd nanoparticles. As confirmed by electron microscopy imaging and supported by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the improved catalytic performance primarily to inhibition of Pd core sintering during the catalytic process by the metal-oxide shell. PMID:26203627

  19. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  20. Engineering high-performance Pd core-MgO porous shell nanocatalysts via heterogeneous gas-phase synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Cassidy, Cathal; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Aranishi, Kengo; Kumar, Sushant; Lal, Chhagan; Gspan, Christian; Grogger, Werner; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2015-08-01

    We report on the design and synthesis of high performance catalytic nanoparticles with a robust geometry via magnetron-sputter inert-gas condensation. Sputtering of Pd and Mg from two independent neighbouring targets enabled heterogeneous condensation and growth of nanoparticles with controlled Pd core-MgO porous shell structure. The thickness of the shell and the number of cores within each nanoparticle could be tailored by adjusting the respective sputtering powers. The nanoparticles were directly deposited on glassy carbon electrodes, and their catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The measurements indicated that the catalytic activity was superior to conventional bare Pd nanoparticles. As confirmed by electron microscopy imaging and supported by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the improved catalytic performance primarily to inhibition of Pd core sintering during the catalytic process by the metal-oxide shell.We report on the design and synthesis of high performance catalytic nanoparticles with a robust geometry via magnetron-sputter inert-gas condensation. Sputtering of Pd and Mg from two independent neighbouring targets enabled heterogeneous condensation and growth of nanoparticles with controlled Pd core-MgO porous shell structure. The thickness of the shell and the number of cores within each nanoparticle could be tailored by adjusting the respective sputtering powers. The nanoparticles were directly deposited on glassy carbon electrodes, and their catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The measurements indicated that the catalytic activity was superior to conventional bare Pd nanoparticles. As confirmed by electron microscopy imaging and supported by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the improved catalytic performance primarily to inhibition of Pd core sintering during the catalytic process by the metal-oxide shell

  1. Single-shot diffusion measurement in laser-polarized Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peled, S.; Tseng, C. H.; Sodickson, A. A.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.; Cory, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    A single-shot pulsed gradient stimulated echo sequence is introduced to address the challenges of diffusion measurements of laser polarized 3He and 129Xe gas. Laser polarization enhances the NMR sensitivity of these noble gases by >10(3), but creates an unstable, nonthermal polarization that is not readily renewable. A new method is presented which permits parallel acquisition of the several measurements required to determine a diffusive attenuation curve. The NMR characterization of a sample's diffusion behavior can be accomplished in a single measurement, using only a single polarization step. As a demonstration, the diffusion coefficient of a sample of laser-polarized 129Xe gas is measured via this method. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Interaction between single neutral atoms and an ultracold atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michael; Kindermann, Farina; Franzreb, Philipp; Gänger, Benjamin; Phieler, Jan; Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Spethmann, Nicolas; Meschede, Dieter; Widera, Artur

    2013-05-01

    Recently hybrid systems immersing single atoms in a many body system have been a subject of intense interest. Here we present an example of controlled doping of an ultracold Rubidium cloud with single neutral Cesium impurity atoms. We observe thermalization of ``hot'' Cs atoms by elastic interaction with an ultracold Rb gas, employing different schemes of measuring the impurities' energy distribution. In addition we present a concept and review the current status of a new setup, which will be capable of breeding an all optical BEC in a few seconds. Our setup will feature mechanisms for independently manipulating and imaging both single atoms and the BEC, thereby providing an unrivaled level of control over impurities in a quantum gas. Possible research directions include the investigation of coherent impurity physics and the creation and characterization of polarons in a BEC. Funded by the ERC, starting grant project QuantumProbe.

  3. Best-basis estimates of solubility of selected radionuclides in sludges in Hanford single-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-02-24

    The Hanford Defined Waste (HDW) model (Rev. 4) (Agnew et al. 1997) projects inventories (as of January 1, 1994) of 46 radionuclides in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. To model the distribution of the 46 radionuclides among the 177 tanks, it was necessary for Agnew et al. to estimate the solubility of each radionuclide in the various waste types originally added to the single-shell tanks. Previous editions of the HDW model used single-point solubility estimates. The work described in this report was undertaken to provide more accurate estimates of the solubility of all 46 radionuclides in the various wastes.

  4. A Single Nanobelt Transistor for Gas Identification: Using a Gas-Dielectric Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bin; Song, Zhiqi; Tong, Yanhong; Tang, Qingxin; Shaymurat, Talgar; Liu, Yichun

    2016-01-01

    Despite tremendous potential and urgent demand in high-response low-cost gas identification, the development of gas identification based on a metal oxide semiconductor nanowire/nanobelt remains limited by fabrication complexity and redundant signals. Researchers have shown a multisensor-array strategy with “one key to one lock” configuration. Here, we describe a new strategy to create high-response room-temperature gas identification by employing gas as dielectric. This enables gas discrimination down to the part per billion (ppb) level only based on one pristine single nanobelt transistor, with the excellent average Mahalanobis distance (MD) as high as 35 at the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) space. The single device realizes the selective recognition function of electronic nose. The effect of the gas dielectric on the response of the multiple field-effect parameters is discussed by the comparative investigation of gas and solid-dielectric devices and the studies on trap density changes in the conductive channel. The current work opens up exciting opportunities for room-temperature gas recognition based on the pristine single device. PMID:27338394

  5. A Single Nanobelt Transistor for Gas Identification: Using a Gas-Dielectric Strategy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Song, Zhiqi; Tong, Yanhong; Tang, Qingxin; Shaymurat, Talgar; Liu, Yichun

    2016-01-01

    Despite tremendous potential and urgent demand in high-response low-cost gas identification, the development of gas identification based on a metal oxide semiconductor nanowire/nanobelt remains limited by fabrication complexity and redundant signals. Researchers have shown a multisensor-array strategy with "one key to one lock" configuration. Here, we describe a new strategy to create high-response room-temperature gas identification by employing gas as dielectric. This enables gas discrimination down to the part per billion (ppb) level only based on one pristine single nanobelt transistor, with the excellent average Mahalanobis distance (MD) as high as 35 at the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) space. The single device realizes the selective recognition function of electronic nose. The effect of the gas dielectric on the response of the multiple field-effect parameters is discussed by the comparative investigation of gas and solid-dielectric devices and the studies on trap density changes in the conductive channel. The current work opens up exciting opportunities for room-temperature gas recognition based on the pristine single device. PMID:27338394

  6. Implosion of reactor-size, gas-filled spherical shell targets driven by shaped pressure pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A.R.; Atzeni, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The implosion of a family of reactor-size targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is studied analytically and numerically. The targets consist of a deuterium--tritium (D--T) shell filled with D--T vapor and they are imploded by a multistep pressure pulse designed in such a way that the final hot spot is formed mainly from the initially gaseous fuel. The formation of the hot spot is described by means of a relatively simple model, and scaling laws for the quantities that characterize the state of the initially gaseous part of the fuel prior to ignition are derived. The results of the model are compared with one-dimensional fluid simulations, and good agreement is found. A parametric study of the fuel energy gain is then presented; the dependence of the gain and of the hot spot convergence ratio on the pulse parameters and on the filling gas density is analyzed. It is also shown that a substantial increase in the gain (for a given target and pulse energy) can be achieved by replacing the last step of the pulse with an exponential ramp.

  7. Design of Gas-phase Synthesis of Core-Shell Particles by Computational Fluid - Aerosol Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buesser, B; Pratsinis, S E

    2011-11-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the bulk properties (e.g. magnetic, optical) of the core while its surface is modified by a shell material. Continuous aerosol coating of core TiO2 nanoparticles with nanothin silicon dioxide shells by jet injection of hexamethyldisiloxane precursor vapor downstream of titania particle formation is elucidated by combining computational fluid and aerosol dynamics. The effect of inlet coating vapor concentration and mixing intensity on product shell thickness distribution is presented. Rapid mixing of the core aerosol with the shell precursor vapor facilitates efficient synthesis of hermetically coated core-shell nanoparticles. The predicted extent of hermetic coating shells is compared to the measured photocatalytic oxidation of isopropanol by such particles as hermetic SiO2 shells prevent the photocatalytic activity of titania. Finally the performance of a simpler, plug-flow coating model is assessed by comparisons to the present detailed CFD model in terms of coating efficiency and silica average shell thickness and texture. PMID:23729817

  8. Enhanced performance of core-shell structured polyaniline at helical carbon nanotube hybrids for ammonia gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Xiangnan; Yang, Weiqing; Xu, Xiaoling E-mail: bihan-2001@163.com; Jiang, Man; Zhou, Zuowan E-mail: bihan-2001@163.com; Wu, Zuquan

    2014-11-17

    A core-shell structured hybrid of polyaniline at helical carbon nanotubes was synthesized using in situ polymerization, which the helical carbon nanotubes were uniformly surrounded by a layer of polyaniline nanorods array. More interestingly, repeatable responses were experimentally observed that the sensitivity to ammonia gas of the as-prepared helical shaped core-shell hybrid displays an enhancement of more than two times compared to those of only polyaniline or helical carbon nanotubes sensors because of the peculiar structures with high surface area. This kind of hybrid comprising nanorod arrays of conductive polymers covering carbon nanotubes and related structures provide a potential in sensors of trace gas detection for environmental monitoring and safety forecasting.

  9. Fabrication and NO2 gas sensing performance of TeO2-core/CuO-shell heterostructure nanorod sensors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    TeO2-nanostructured sensors are seldom reported compared to other metal oxide semiconductor materials such as ZnO, In2O3, TiO2, Ga2O3, etc. TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorods were fabricated by thermal evaporation of Te powder followed by sputter deposition of CuO. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that each nanorod consisted of a single crystal TeO2 core and a polycrystalline CuO shell with a thickness of approximately 7 nm. The TeO2/CuO core-shell one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures exhibited a bamboo leaf-like morphology. The core-shell nanorods were 100 to 300 nm in diameter and up to 30 μm in length. The multiple networked TeO2/CuO core-shell nanorod sensor showed responses of 142% to 425% to 0.5- to 10-ppm NO2 at 150°C. These responses were stronger than or comparable to those of many other metal oxide nanostructures, suggesting that TeO2 is also a promising sensor material. The responses of the core-shell nanorods were 1.2 to 2.1 times higher than those of pristine TeO2 nanorods over the same NO2 concentration range. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced NO2 sensing properties of the core-shell nanorod sensor can be explained by the potential barrier-controlled carrier transport mechanism. PACS 61.46. + w; 07.07.Df; 73.22.-f PMID:25489289

  10. DEPLOYING TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS FOR CHARACTERIZING THE VADOSE ZONE IN SINGLE-SHELL TANK WASTE MANAGEMENT AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    EBERLEIN SJ; SYDNOR HA; DA MYERS

    2010-01-14

    As much as one million gallons of waste is believed to have leaked from tanks, pipelines or other equipment in the single-shell tank farm waste management areas (WMAs) within the 200 East and West areas of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although some contamination has reached groundwater, most contamination still resides in the vadose zone. The magnitude ofthis problem requires new approaches for soil characterization if we are to understand the nature and extent of the contamination and take action to protect the enviromnent. Because of the complexity and expense of drilling traditional boreholes in contaminated soil, direct push characterization using a hydraulic hammer has been extensively employed. Direct push probe holes <3-inch diameter have been pushed to a maximum depth of 240 feet below ground surface in 200 East area. Previously gross gamma and moisture logging of these narrow probe holes was perfonned to identify the location of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) (which has limited mobility in Hanford soil) and moisture peaks. Recently a bismuth germinate detector has been deployed for detecting and quantifying the spectrum of cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co) (a more mobile contaminant), which provides additional information. The direct push system is configured to allow the collection ofmultiple soil core samples throughout the depth ofthe probe hole. The direct push unit has been used to place individual electrodes at a variety of depths as the probe hole is being decommissioned. These deep electrodes enable the use of soil resistivity measurement methods between surface and deep electrodes as-well-as between sets of deep electrodes. Initial testing of surface-to-deep electrode resistivity measurements in WMA C demonstrated significant improvement in defining the three dimensional extent of a contamination plume. A multiple-electrode string is presently being developed to further enhance the resolution of resistivity data. The

  11. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-110. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Benar, C.J.

    1997-06-14

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (IWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-110. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with 241-C-110 waste and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendixes. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-44-05. Characterization information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. While only the results from recent sample events will be used to fulfill the requirements of the data quality objectives (DQOs), other information can be used to support or question conclusions derived from these results. Historical information for tank 241-C-110 are provided included surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and1124 expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. The sampling events are listed, as well as sample data obtained before 1989. The results of the 1992 sampling events are also reported in the data package. The statistical analysis and numerical manipulation of data used in issue resolution are reported in Appendix C. Appendix D contains the evaluation to establish the best basis for the inventory estimate and the statistical analysis performed for this evaluation. A bibliography that resulted from an in-depth literature search of all known information sources applicable to tank 241-C-110 and its respective waste types is contained in Appendix E

  12. Single-field inflation à la generalized Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Sergio del

    2013-11-01

    In the simplest scenario for inflation, i.e. in the single-field inflation, it is presented an inflaton field with properties equivalent to a generalized Chaplygin gas. Their study is performed using the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to cosmology. The main results are contrasted with the measurements recently released by the Planck data, combined with the WMAP large-angle polarization. If the measurements released by Planck for the scalar spectral index together with its running are taken into account it is found a value for the α-parameter associated to the generalized Chaplygin gas given by α = 0.2578±0.0009.

  13. Multi-function waste tank facility path forward engineering analysis technical task 3.3, single-shell tank liquid contents

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Mattichak, R.W.

    1995-04-28

    Results are reported on actions taken to determine the quantity of liquid wastes in the single shell tanks that still need stabilization, and to determine the amount of flush water needed to support the stabilization effort.

  14. Development and Deployment of the Extended Reach Sluicing System (ERSS) for Retrieval of Hanford Single Shell Tank Waste. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Roger E.; Figley, Reed R.; Innes, A. G.

    2013-11-11

    A history of the evolution and the design development of Extended Reach Sluicer System (ERSS) is presented. Several challenges are described that had to be overcome to create a machine that went beyond the capabilities of prior generation sluicers to mobilize waste in Single Shell Tanks for pumping into Double Shell Tank receiver tanks. Off-the-shelf technology and traditional hydraulic fluid power systems were combined with the custom-engineered components to create the additional functionality of the ERSS, while still enabling it to fit within very tight entry envelope into the SST. Problems and challenges inevitably were encountered and overcome in ways that enhance the state of the art of fluid power applications in such constrained environments. Future enhancements to the ERSS design are explored for retrieval of tanks with different dimensions and internal obstacles.

  15. Experimental Results from Plasma Shell on Deuterium Gas-puff Z-pinch on the Current Level of 3 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.; Shishlov, A.; Labetsky, A.; Kokshenev, V.; Ratakhin, N.; GIT-12 Team

    2013-10-01

    The experiments with a plasma shell on deuterium gas-puff Z-pinch were carried out on the GIT-12 generator at IHCE in Tomsk. We diagnosed Z-pinch shots with deuterium linear mass of about 100 μg/cm. The outer shell of the load was formed by 48 plasma guns positioned on diameter of 350 mm, the diameter of the nozzle producing deuterium inner shell gas-puff was 80 mm. Results obtained from X-ray and neutron diagnostics, especially neutron time-of-flight signals, where 15 MeV neutrons (in radial direction) and 22 MeV neutrons (in axial direction) were registered, are presented. Obtained implosion velocity of the gas-puff had the value of 4 . 5 ×107 cm/s, neutron yield from D(d,n)3He reaction was in order of 1012 neutrons/shot on a current level of about 2.7 MA. The time correlations of the TOF diagnostics with other diagnostics such as electrical characteristics, an MCP frames, and a visible streak camera are also presented. Work supported by MEYS CR research programs No. ME090871, No. LG13029, by GACR grant No. P205/12/0454, grant CRA IAEA No. 17088 and RFBR research project No. 13-08-00479-a.

  16. Comparison of Multi Disk Exponential Gas Distribution vs. Single Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Erica; O'Brien, James

    2013-04-01

    In fitting galactic rotation curves to data, most standard theories make use of a single exponential disk approximation of the gas distribution to account for the HI synthesis data observed at various radio telescope facilities. We take a sample of surface brightness profiles from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS), and apply both single disk exponentials and Multi-Disk exponentials, and use these various models to see how the modelling procedure changes the Newtonian prediction of the mass of the galaxy. Since the missing mass problem has not been fully explained in large spiral galaxies, different modelling procedures could account for some of the missing matter.

  17. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  18. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E; Coleman, P L; Thompson, John R; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D C; McKenney, J L; Strizic, T; Johnson, D; Johns, O; Vigil, M P; Jones, B; Ampleford, D J; Savage, M E; Cuneo, M E; Jones, M C

    2013-06-01

    Tests are ongoing to conduct ~20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D2 gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the ~2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system. PMID:23822342

  19. Architecture, implementation, and testing of a multiple-shell gas injection system for high current implosions on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Madden, Robert E.; Coleman, P. L.; Thompson, John R.; Bixler, Alex; Lamppa, D. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Strizic, T.; Johnson, D.; Johns, O.; Vigil, M. P.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Savage, M. E.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, M. C.

    2013-06-15

    Tests are ongoing to conduct {approx}20 MA z-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratory using Ar, Kr, and D{sub 2} gas puffs as the imploding loads. The relatively high cost of operations on a machine of this scale imposes stringent requirements on the functionality, reliability, and safety of gas puff hardware. Here we describe the development of a prototype gas puff system including the multiple-shell nozzles, electromagnetic drivers for each nozzle's valve, a UV pre-ionizer, and an inductive isolator to isolate the {approx}2.4 MV machine voltage pulse present at the gas load from the necessary electrical and fluid connections made to the puff system from outside the Z vacuum chamber. This paper shows how the assembly couples to the overall Z system and presents data taken to validate the functionality of the overall system.

  20. In-flight gas phase growth of metal/multi layer graphene core shell nanoparticles with controllable sizes.

    PubMed

    Sengar, Saurabh K; Mehta, B R; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we present a general method for a continuous gas-phase synthesis of size-selected metal/multi layer graphene (MLG) core shell nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution of metal core and MLG shell for direct deposition onto any desired substrate kept under clean vacuum conditions. Evolution of MLG signature is clearly observed as the metal-carbon agglomerates get transformed to well defined metal/MLG core shell nanoparticles during their flight through the sintering zone. The growth takes place via an intermediate state of alloy nanoparticle (Pd-carbon) or composite nanoparticle (Cu-carbon), depending upon the carbon solubility in the metal and relative surface energy values. It has been also shown that metal/MLG nanoparticles can be converted to graphene shells. This study will have a large impact on how graphene or graphene based composite nanostructures can be grown and deposited in applications requiring controllable dimensions, varied substrate choice, large area and large scale depositions. PMID:24100702

  1. In-flight gas phase growth of metal/multi layer graphene core shell nanoparticles with controllable sizes

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we present a general method for a continuous gas-phase synthesis of size-selected metal/multi layer graphene (MLG) core shell nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution of metal core and MLG shell for direct deposition onto any desired substrate kept under clean vacuum conditions. Evolution of MLG signature is clearly observed as the metal-carbon agglomerates get transformed to well defined metal/MLG core shell nanoparticles during their flight through the sintering zone. The growth takes place via an intermediate state of alloy nanoparticle (Pd-carbon) or composite nanoparticle (Cu-carbon), depending upon the carbon solubility in the metal and relative surface energy values. It has been also shown that metal/MLG nanoparticles can be converted to graphene shells. This study will have a large impact on how graphene or graphene based composite nanostructures can be grown and deposited in applications requiring controllable dimensions, varied substrate choice, large area and large scale depositions. PMID:24100702

  2. The effect of gradients at stagnation on K-shell x-ray line emission in high-current Ar gas-puff implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B. Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Moore, N. W.; Lamppa, D. C.; Johnson, D.; Jones, M. C.; Waisman, E. M.; Coverdale, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Apruzese, J. P.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Ouart, N. D.; Chong, Y. K.; Velikovich, A. L.; Dasgupta, A.; and others

    2015-02-15

    Argon gas puffs have produced 330 kJ ± 9% of x-ray radiation above 3 keV photon energy in fast z-pinch implosions, with remarkably reproducible K-shell spectra and power pulses. This reproducibility in x-ray production is particularly significant in light of the variations in instability evolution observed between experiments. Soft x-ray power measurements and K-shell line ratios from a time-resolved spectrum at peak x-ray power suggest that plasma gradients in these high-mass pinches may limit the K-shell radiating mass, K-shell power, and K-shell yield from high-current gas puffs.

  3. Optical heating and temperature determination of core-shell gold nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotube microparticles.

    PubMed

    Yashchenok, Alexey; Masic, Admir; Gorin, Dmitry; Inozemtseva, Olga; Shim, Bong Sup; Kotov, Nicholas; Skirtach, Andre; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-03-18

    The real-time temperature measurement of nanostructured materials is particularly attractive in view of increasing needs of local temperature probing with high sensitivity and resolution in nanoelectronics, integrated photonics, and biomedicine. Light-induced heating and Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotubes with adsorbed gold nanoparticles decorating silica microparticles are reported, by both green and near IR lasers. The plasmonic shell is used as nanoheater, while the single-walled carbon nanotubes are Raman active and serve as a thermometer. Stokes and Anti-Stokes Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes serve to estimate the effective light-induced temperature rise on the metal nanoparticles. The temperature rise is constant with time, indicating stability of the adsorption density. The effective temperatures derived from Stokes and Anti-Stokes intensities are correlated with those measured in a heating stage. The resolution of the thermal experiments in our study was found to be 5-40 K. PMID:25367373

  4. Single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles: synthesis and high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Kallio, Tanja; Reynaud, Olivier; Nasibulin, Albert G; Johans, Christoffer; Sainio, Jani; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I; Laasonen, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) through effective and inexpensive electrocatalysts is a valuable approach for clean and renewable energy systems. Here, single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (SCEINs) decorated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are introduced as a novel highly active and durable non-noble-metal catalyst for the HER. This catalyst exhibits catalytic properties superior to previously studied nonprecious materials and comparable to those of platinum. The SCEIN/SWNT is synthesized by a novel fast and low-cost aerosol chemical vapor deposition method in a one-step synthesis. In SCEINs the single carbon layer does not prevent desired access of the reactants to the vicinity of the iron nanoparticles but protects the active metallic core from oxidation. This finding opens new avenues for utilizing active transition metals such as iron in a wide range of applications. PMID:25683139

  5. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  6. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  7. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-102

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1997-06-24

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-T-102. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-T-102 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendixes. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-44-05. Characterization information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. The most recent core sampling of tank 241-T-102 (March 1993) predated the existence of data quality objectives (DQOs). An assessment of the technical issues from the currently applicable DQOs was made using data from the 1993 push mode core sampling event, a July 1994 grab sampling event, and a May 1996 vapor flammability measurement. Historical information for tank 241-T-102, provided in Appendix A, includes surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. Appendix B contains further sampling and analysis data from the March 1993 push mode core sampling event and data from the grab sampling event in August 1994 and May 1996 vapor flammability measurement. Of the two push mode cores taken in March of 1993, cores 55

  8. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  9. Appurtenance Influence on Type III Hanford Single-Shell Tank Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, Scott E.; Larsen, Brian M.; Julyk, Larry J.; Johnson, Kenneth I.

    2012-02-26

    The interim stabilized Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs) are currently undergoing a state of the art analysis to assess the structural integrity of the waste storage tanks, for cleanup and closure operations, considering their adverse thermal histories and an updated seismic hazard for the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The SSTs contain a variety of ancillary pits, piping, piping supports, risers, equipment, and penetrations known as appurtenances. These appurtenances may alter the structural response and ultimately could affect the structural integrity of the SSTs. An important challenge to the structural analysis of the SSTs is determining the impact of these appurtenances on structural integrity. To achieve this, the various appurtenances were reviewed and bounding appurtenance configurations for SST Types II and III tank designs were analyzed using finite element software. The bounding configurations for the Type II tanks considered four heavy offset pits with a central pit with and without a 36-inch diameter central post-construction penetration and four 42-inch diameter offset penetrations. The bounding configuration for the Type III tanks is a tank with two heavy offset pits and one heavy central pit. For each bounding configuration two finite element models are developed: a seismic analysis model and a thermal and operating loads analysis (TOLA) model. The TOLA models include a Type II or III thermal history, concrete cracking and thermal degradation, reinforcement yielding, and soil plasticity. Additionally, operating loads such as internal waste pressure and concentrated and distributed soil surface loads are applied to the TOLA model. The seismic model treats the tank concrete as linear elastic based on the present day degraded concrete properties. Also, in the seismic model the soil is treated as linear elastic while special techniques are used in the soil above the tank dome and along the tank wall to avoid soil arching and achieve the proper

  10. Identification of single-shell tank in-tank hardware obstructions to retrieval at Hanford Site Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Two retrieval technologies, one of which uses robot-deployed end effectors, will be demonstrated on the first single-shell tank (SST) waste to be retrieved at the Hanford Site. A significant impediment to the success of this technology in completing the Hanford retrieval mission is the presence of unique tank contents called in-tank hardware (ITH). In-tank hardware includes installed and discarded equipment and various other materials introduced into the tank. This paper identifies those items of ITH that will most influence retrieval operations in the arm-based demonstration project and in follow-on tank operations within the SST farms.

  11. Design and synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with gold shells for single particle optical tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jitkang

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of iron oxide core, gold shell nanoparticles are studied in this thesis. Firstly, nanoparticles with 18 +/- 1.7 nm diameter iron oxide cores with ˜5 nm thick gold shells were synthesized via a new seed-mediated electroless deposition method. The nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and could be reversibly collected by a permanent magnet. These nanoparticles displayed a sharp localized surface plasmon resonance peak at 605 nm, as predicted by scattering theory, and their large scattering cross-section allowed them to be individually resolved in darkfield optical microscopy while undergoing Brownian motion in aqueous suspension. Later, commercially available 38 +/- 3.8 nm diameter spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (from Ocean Nanotech, Inc) were employed to make core-shell particles. These particles were decorated with cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) which further promotes the attachment of small gold clusters. After gold seeding, the average hydrodynamic diameter of the core-shell particles is 172 +/- 65.9 nm. The magnetophoretic motion of these particles was guided by a piece of magnetized mu-metal. Individual particle trajectories were observed by darkfield optical microscopy. The typical magnetophoretic velocity achieved was within the range of 1--10 mum/sec. Random walk analysis performed on these particles while undergoing Brownian motion confirmed that individual particles were indeed being imaged. The particle size variation within the observed sample obtained through random walk analysis was within the size distribution obtained by dynamic light scattering. When the current to the solenoid used to magnetize the mu-metal was turned off, all the collected core-shell particles were readily redispersed by diffusion back into the surrounding environment. A Peclet number analysis was performed to probe the convective motion of nanospheres and nanorods under the influence of

  12. Single-shell direct-drive capsule designs to study effects of perturbations on burn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magelssen, G. R.; Cobble, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Batha, S. H.; Bradley, P. A.; Defriend Obrey, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    The effect of small localized perturbations, such as fill tubes and mounting tents, on the NIF ignition capsule and the effect of hemi-joints on high gain double shell capsules are an important issue in achieving ignition on NIF. Our codes have difficulty modeling small features and their effect on mix. Because of issues of symmetry, shock timing, high-z shells, mix etc. trying to understand the effect of localized perturbations ("defect") on these high gain NIF capsules will be difficult. To begin the study of defects on DT burn, a direct-drive exploding pusher is used. Experimental results are presented for capsules with and without defects. The unperturbed capsules give reproducible yields while the perturbed capsules show significant drops in yield. Both AMR and Lasnex codes over predict the unperturbed capsule yield

  13. Synthesis and morphology of iron–iron oxide core–shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-01

    Core–shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core–shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10–20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  14. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lijuan; Ten Brink, Gert H; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-27

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth. PMID:27089553

  15. Single and multi-layered core-shell structures based on ZnO nanorods obtained by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M.

    2015-07-15

    Core–shell nanorod structures were prepared by a sequential synthesis using an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. Several samples consisting of ZnO nanorods were initially grown over TiO{sub 2} film-coated borosilicate glass substrates, following the synthesis conditions reported elsewhere. Later on, a uniform layer consisting of individual Al, Ni, Ti or Fe oxides was grown onto ZnO nanorod samples forming the so-called single MO{sub x}/ZnO nanorod core–shell structures, where MO{sub x} was the metal oxide shell. Additionally, a three-layer core–shell sample was developed by growing Fe, Ti and Fe oxides alternately, onto the ZnO nanorods. The microstructure of the core–shell materials was characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to corroborate the formation of different metal oxides. X-ray diffraction outcomes for single core–shell structures showed solely the presence of ZnO as wurtzite and TiO{sub 2} as anatase. For the multi-layered shell sample, the existence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as hematite was also detected. Morphological observations suggested the existence of an outer material grown onto the nanorods and further microstructural analysis by HR-STEM confirmed the development of core–shell structures in all cases. These studies also showed that the individual Al, Fe, Ni and Ti oxide layers are amorphous; an observation that matched with X-ray diffraction analysis where no apparent extra oxides were detected. For the multi-layered sample, the development of a shell consisting of three different oxide layers onto the nanorods was found. Overall results showed that no alteration in the primary ZnO core was produced during the growth of the shells, indicating that the deposition technique used herein was and it is suitable for the synthesis of homogeneous and complex nanomaterials high in quality and purity. In addition

  16. One- and two-dimensional modeling of argon K-shell emission from gas-puff Z-pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Apruzese, J. P.; Davis, J.; Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Terry, R. E.; Velikovich, A. L.; Commisso, R. J.; Whitney, K. G.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Levine, J. S.; Qi, N.; Sze, H.; Failor, B. H.; Banister, J. W.; Coleman, P. L.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.; Deeney, C.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model is described and demonstrated that serves as a useful tool for understanding K-shell radiating Z-pinch plasma behavior. Such understanding requires a self-consistent solution to the complete nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium kinetics and radiation transport in order to realistically model opacity effects and the high-temperature state of the plasma. For this purpose, we have incorporated into the MACH2 two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code [R. E. Peterkin et al., J. Comput. Phys. 140, 148 (1998)] an equation of state, called the tabular collisional radiative equilibrium (TCRE) model [J. W. Thornhill et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 3480 (2001)], that provides reasonable approximations to the plasma's opacity state. MACH2 with TCRE is applied toward analyzing the multidimensional implosion behavior that occurred in Decade Quad (DQ) [D. Price et al., Proceedings of the 12th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, edited by C. Stallings and H. Kirbie (IEEE, New York, 1999), p. 489] argon gas puff experiments that employed a 12cm diameter nozzle with and without a central gas jet on axis. Typical peak drive currents and implosion times in these experiments were ˜6MA and ˜230ns. By using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measured initial density profiles as input to the calculations, the effect these profiles have on the ability of the pinch to efficiently produce K-shell emission can be analyzed with this combined radiation-MHD model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental result that the DQ central-jet configuration is superior to the no-central-jet experiment in terms of producing more K-shell emission. These theoretical results support the contention that the improved operation of the central-jet nozzle is due to the better suppression of instabilities and the higher-density K-shell radiating conditions that the central-jet configuration promotes. When we applied the model toward projecting argon K-shell

  17. One- and two-dimensional modeling of argon K-shell emission from gas-puff Z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Apruzese, J. P.; Davis, J.; Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L. Jr.; Terry, R. E.; Velikovich, A. L.; Commisso, R. J.; Whitney, K. G.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Levine, J. S.; Qi, N.; Sze, H.; Failor, B. H.; Banister, J. W.; Coleman, P. L.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper, a theoretical model is described and demonstrated that serves as a useful tool for understanding K-shell radiating Z-pinch plasma behavior. Such understanding requires a self-consistent solution to the complete nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium kinetics and radiation transport in order to realistically model opacity effects and the high-temperature state of the plasma. For this purpose, we have incorporated into the MACH2 two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code [R. E. Peterkin et al., J. Comput. Phys. 140, 148 (1998)] an equation of state, called the tabular collisional radiative equilibrium (TCRE) model [J. W. Thornhill et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 3480 (2001)], that provides reasonable approximations to the plasma's opacity state. MACH2 with TCRE is applied toward analyzing the multidimensional implosion behavior that occurred in Decade Quad (DQ) [D. Price et al., Proceedings of the 12th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, edited by C. Stallings and H. Kirbie (IEEE, New York, 1999), p. 489] argon gas puff experiments that employed a 12 cm diameter nozzle with and without a central gas jet on axis. Typical peak drive currents and implosion times in these experiments were {approx}6 MA and {approx}230 ns. By using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measured initial density profiles as input to the calculations, the effect these profiles have on the ability of the pinch to efficiently produce K-shell emission can be analyzed with this combined radiation-MHD model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental result that the DQ central-jet configuration is superior to the no-central-jet experiment in terms of producing more K-shell emission. These theoretical results support the contention that the improved operation of the central-jet nozzle is due to the better suppression of instabilities and the higher-density K-shell radiating conditions that the central-jet configuration promotes. When we applied the model toward

  18. Pinning and gas oversaturation imply stable single surface nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-03-01

    Surface nanobubbles are experimentally known to survive for days at hydrophobic surfaces immersed in gas-oversaturated water. This is different from bulk nanobubbles, which are pressed out by the Laplace pressure against any gas oversaturation and dissolve in submilliseconds, as derived by Epstein and Plesset [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 1505 (1950), 10.1063/1.1747520]. Pinning of the contact line has been speculated to be the reason for the stability of the surface nanobubbles. Building on an exact result by Popov [Phys. Rev. E 71, 036313 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.71.036313] on coffee stain evaporation, here we confirm this speculation by an exact calculation for single surface nanobubbles. It is based only on (i) the diffusion equation, (ii) Laplace pressure, and (iii) Henry's equation, i.e., fluid dynamical equations which are all known to be valid down to the nanometer scale. The crucial parameter is the gas oversaturation ζ of the liquid. At the stable equilibrium, the gas overpressures due to this oversaturation and the Laplace pressure balance. The theory predicts how the contact angle of the pinned bubble depends on ζ and the surface nanobubble's footprint lateral extension L . It also predicts an upper lateral extension threshold for stable surface nanobubbles to exist.

  19. The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type model: A method to sort single-shell tanks into characteristic groups. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.G.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Sort on Radioactive Waste Type (SORWT) model presents a method to categorize Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) into groups of tanks expected to exhibit similar chemical and physical characteristics based on their major waste types and processing histories. This model has identified 29 different waste-type groups encompassing 135 of the 149 SSTs and 93% of the total waste volume in SSTs. The remaining 14 SSTs and associated wastes could not be grouped according to the established criteria and were placed in an ungrouped category. This letter report will detail the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the SORWT model and present the grouping results. Included with this report is a brief description and approximate compositions of the single-shell tank waste types. In the near future, the validity of the predicted groups will be statistically tested using analysis of variance of characterization data obtained from recent (post-1989) core sampling and analysis activities. In addition, the SORWT model will be used to project the nominal waste characteristics of entire waste type groups that have some recent characterization data available. These subsequent activities will be documented along with these initial results in a comprehensive, formal PNL report cleared for public release by September 1994.

  20. Fluorescence signals of core-shell quantum dots enhanced by single crystalline gold caps on silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, S. H.; Chou, J. W.; Becker, M.; Sivakov, V.; Ehrhold, K.; Berger, A.; Chou, W. C.; Chuu, D. S.; Gösele, U.

    2009-04-01

    We use nanoscale (20-300 nm in diameter) single crystalline gold (Au)-caps on silicon nanowires (NWs) grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism to enhance the fluorescence photoluminescence (PL) signals of highly dilute core/shell CdSeTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous solution (10-5 M). For NWs without Au-caps, as they appear, for example, after Au etching in aqua regia or buffered KI/I2-solution, essentially no fluorescence signal of the same diluted QDs could be observed. Fluorescence PL signals were measured using excitation with a laser wavelength of 633 nm. The signal enhancement by single crystalline, nanoscale Au-caps is discussed and interpreted based on finite element modeling (FEM).

  1. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-07-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal for instructional use, especially to illustrate HS analysis or as an alternative to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to which it is very similar. The basic principles and practice of HS-GC using SDME are described, including a complete review of the literature. Some possible experiments are suggested using water and N -methylpyrrolidone (NMP) as solvents.

  2. Plans for Double Shell Experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Gunderson, M. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Watt, R. G.; Kline, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Boswell, M.; Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (~ 250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We present preliminary double-shell capsule designs for NIF using a cryogenic gas DT fill which are optimized for yield and minimized for fall-line mix. Challenges will be discussed, as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells. A development path for double-shell experiments on NIF will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Glass shell manufacturing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, R. L.; Ebner, M. A.; Nolen, R. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Highly-uniform, hollow glass spheres (shells), which are used for inertial confinement fusion targets, were formed from metal-organic gel powder feedstock in a vertical furnace. As a result of the rapid pyrolysis caused by the furnace, the gel is transformed to a shell in five distinct stages: (a) surface closure of the porous gel; (b) generation of a closed-cell foam structure in the gel; (c) spheridization of the gel and further expansion of the foam; (d) coalescence of the closed-cell foam to a single-void shell; and (e) fining of the glass shell. The heat transfer from the furnace to the falling gel particle was modeled to determine the effective heating rate of the gel. The model predicts the temperature history for a particle as a function of mass, dimensions, specific heat, and absorptance as well as furnace temperature profile and thermal conductivity of the furnace gas. A model was developed that predicts the gravity-induced degradation of shell concentricity in falling molten shells as a function of shell characteristics and time.

  4. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vernieres, Jerome Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Bobo, Jean-François; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  5. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-12-30

    The report provides a summation of the status of safety issues associated with interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs (organic, ferrocyanide, and flammable gas), as extracted from recent safety analyses, including the Tank Farms Accelerated Safety Analysis efforts.

  6. Luminescence and electrical properties of single ZnO/MgO core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Grinblat, Gustavo; Comedi, David; Bern, Francis; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Esquinazi, Pablo; Tirado, Mónica

    2014-03-10

    To neutralise the influence of the surface of ZnO nanowires for photonics and optoelectronic applications, we have covered them with insulating MgO film and individually contacted them for electrical characterisation. We show that such a metal-insulator-semiconductor-type nanodevice exhibits a high diode ideality factor of 3.4 below 1 V. MgO shell passivates ZnO surface states and provides confining barriers to electrons and holes within the ZnO core, favouring excitonic ultraviolet radiative recombination, while suppressing defect-related luminescence in the visible and improving electrical conductivity. The results indicate the potential use of ZnO/MgO nanowires as a convenient building block for nano-optoelectronic devices.

  7. Fragmentation dynamics of gas-phase furan following K-shell ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, Z. D.; Rolles, D.; Dumitriu, I.; Berrah, N.

    2010-07-15

    A multicoincidence velocity-map-imaging technique was employed to study the fragmentation of inner-shell excited furan molecules for the photon energies encompassing the C and O K edges. We have analyzed the kinetic energy distributions and the momentum correlations of detected ionic fragments. Comparisons of our experimental observations with predictions of a Coulomb explosion model elucidate possible fragmentation pathways.

  8. Reconstruction of the Orientation Distribution Function in Single and Multiple Shell Q-Ball Imaging within Constant Solid Angle

    PubMed Central

    Aganj, Iman; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam

    2010-01-01

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is a high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) technique which has been proven very successful in resolving multiple intravoxel fiber orientations in MR images. The standard computation of the orientation distribution function (ODF, the probability of diffusion in a given direction) from q-ball data uses linear radial projection, neglecting the change in the volume element along each direction. This results in spherical distributions that are different from the true ODFs. For instance, they are neither normalized nor as sharp as expected, and generally require post-processing, such as artificial sharpening. In this paper, a new technique is proposed that, by considering the solid angle factor, uses the mathematically correct definition of the ODF and results in a dimensionless and normalized ODF expression. Our model is flexible enough so that ODFs can be estimated either from single q-shell datasets, or by exploiting the greater information available from multiple q-shell acquisitions. We show that the latter can be achieved by using a more accurate multi-exponential model for the diffusion signal. The improved performance of the proposed method is demonstrated on artificial examples and high-resolution HARDI data acquired on a 7T magnet. PMID:20535807

  9. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.

  10. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 -- Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets.

  11. Groundwater quality assessment plan for single-shell waste management area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    SM Narbutovskih

    2000-03-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a first determination groundwater quality assessment at the Hanford Site. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement during the time period 1996--1998. The purpose of the assessment was to determine if waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) B-BX-BY had entered the groundwater at levels above the drinking water standards (DWS). The resulting assessment report documented evidence demonstrating that waste from the WMA has, most likely, impacted groundwater quality. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and of rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  12. Contaminant Release from Residual Waste in Closed Single-Shell Tanks and Other Waste Forms Associated with the Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, William J.

    2008-01-17

    This chapter describes the release of contaminants from the various waste forms that are anticipated to be associated with closure of the single-shell tanks. These waste forms include residual sludge or saltcake that will remain in the tanks after waste retrieval. Other waste forms include engineered glass and cementitious materials as well as contaminated soil impacted by previous tank leaks. This chapter also describes laboratory testing to quantify contaminant release and how the release data are used in performance/risk assessments for the tank waste management units and the onsite waste disposal facilities. The chapter ends with a discussion of the surprises and lessons learned to date from the testing of waste materials and the development of contaminant release models.

  13. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine. PMID:25354532

  14. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

  15. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  16. Characterization of solids in residual wastes from single-shell tanks at the Hanford site, Washington, USA.

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K. M.; Cantrell, K. J.; Todd Schaef, H.; Arey, B. W.; Heald, S. M.; Deutsch, W. J.; Lindberg, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    Solid phase physical and chemical characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes from several single-shell underground waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Because these wastes are highly-radioactive dispersible powders and are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases, their detailed characterization offers an extraordinary technical challenge. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) are the two principal methods used, along with a limited series of analyses by synchrotron-based methods, to characterize solid phases and their contaminant associations in these wastes.

  17. Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-09-28

    This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

  18. Bose gas in a single-beam optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Lena; Strunz, Walter T.

    2010-06-15

    We study an ultracold Bose gas in an optical dipole trap consisting of one single focused laser beam. An analytical expression for the corresponding density of states beyond the usual harmonic approximation is obtained. We are thus able to discuss the existence of a critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation and find that the phase transition must be enabled by a cutoff near the threshold. Moreover, we study the dynamics of evaporative cooling and observe significant deviations from the findings for the well-established harmonic approximation. Furthermore, we investigate Bose-Einstein condensates in such a trap in Thomas-Fermi approximation and determine analytical expressions for chemical potential, internal energy, and Thomas-Fermi radii beyond the usual harmonic approximation.

  19. Spatially-Resolved Argon and Neon K-Shell X-Ray Spectra from Triple-Nozzle Gas-Puff Z-Pinches on Cobra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Niansheng; de Grouchy, Philip; Hoyt, Cad; Shelkovenko, Tania; Pikuz, Sergei; Atoyan, Levon; Potter, William; Cahill, Adam; Greenly, John; Kusse, Bruce; Hammer, David

    2014-10-01

    We present the x-ray spectra obtained during Ar/Ne gas puff z-pinch experiments on the 1MA, 200ns COBRA pulsed power generator at Cornell University. A triple-nozzle gas-puff, which produces two annular (``outer'' and ``inner'') gas puffs and a high density center jet, is used to tailor the radial mass density distribution. Argon and/or neon plasmas are imploded. Filtered x-ray photo-conducting detectors are used for timing the neon and argon K-shell emission and a filtered x-ray pinhole camera images the K-shell x-ray source size. A spectrometer with three spherical mica crystals is used to capture the K-shell x-ray emission. Our objective is to diagnose the Ar and Ne pinch plasma densities (1019-1020 cm-3) and temperatures (0.5-2 keV) with 0.1 mm axial and/or radial spatial resolution from the K-shell X-ray spectra. The He-like resonance to intercombination line ratio will be used to estimate the electron density and the He-like resonance to Li-like satellite line ratio will be used to estimate the electron temperature. We will also add Cl as a dopant in either the center Ar gas jet or inner annular puff for K-shell x-ray spectrum studies. Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-NA0001836.

  20. Photothermal imaging and measurement of protein shell stoichiometry of single HIV-1 Gag virus-like nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vieweger, Mario; Goicochea, Nancy; Koh, Eun Sohl; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-09-27

    Virus life stages often constitute a complex chain of events, difficult to track in vivo and in real-time. Challenges are associated with spatial and time limitations of current probes: most viruses are smaller than the diffraction limit of optical microscopes while the entire time scale of virus dynamics spans over 8 orders of magnitude. Thus, virus processes such as entry, disassembly, and egress have generally remained poorly understood. Here we discuss photothermal heterodyne imaging (PHI) as a possible alternative to fluorescence microscopy in the study of single virus-like nanoparticle (VNP) dynamics, with relevance in particular to virus uncoating. Being based on optical absorption rather than emission, PHI could potentially surpass some of the current limitations associated with fluorescent labels. As proof-of-principle, single VNPs self-assembled from 60 nm DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) encapsulated in a Gag protein shell of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were imaged, and their photothermal response was compared with DNA-Au NPs. For the first time, the protein stoichiometry of a single virus-like particle was estimated by a method other than electron microscopy. PMID:21854038

  1. Photothermal Imaging and Measurement of Protein Shell Stoichiometry of Single HIV-1 Gag Virus-Like Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vieweger, Mario; Goicochea, Nancy; Koh, Eun Sohl; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Virus life stages often constitute a complex chain of events, difficult to track in-vivo and in real-time. Challenges are associated with spatial and time limitations of current probes: most viruses are smaller than the diffraction limit of optical microscopes while the entire time-scale of virus dynamics spans over 8 orders of magnitude. Thus, virus processes such as entry, disassembly, and egress have generally remained poorly understood. Here we discuss photothermal heterodyne imaging (PHI) as a possible alternative to fluorescence microscopy in the study of single virus-like nanoparticle (VNP) dynamics, with relevance in particular to virus uncoating. Being based on optical absorption rather than emission, PHI could potentially surpass some of the current limitations associated with fluorescent labels. As proof-of-principle, single VNPs self-assembled from 60 nm DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) encapsulated in a Gag protein shell of the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were imaged and their photothermal response compared with DNA-Au NPs. For the first-time, the protein stoichiometry of a single virus-like particle was estimated by a method other than electron microscopy. PMID:21854038

  2. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Teng, I-Ju; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Ho, Cheng-Long; Kuo, Han-Wen; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Ren; Shi, Gia-Nan; Chang, Chang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3. PMID:22164044

  3. Methanogenic calcite, 13C-depleted bivalve shells, and gas hydrate from a mud volcano offshore southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Normark, W.R.; McIntyre, B.R.; Lorenson, T.D.; Powell, C.L., II

    2006-01-01

    Methane and hydrogen sulfide vent from a cold seep above a shallowly buried methane hydrate in a mud volcano located 24 km offshore southern California in?? 800 m of water. Bivalves, authigenic calcite, and methane hydrate were recovered in a 2.1 m piston core. Aragonite shells of two bivalve species are unusually depleted in 13C (to -91??? ??13C), the most 13C-depleted shells of marine macrofauna yet discovered. Carbon isotopes for both living and dead specimens indicate that they used, in part, carbon derived from anaerobically oxidized methane to construct their shells. The ??13C values are highly variable, but most are within the range -12??? to -91???. This variability may be diagnostic for identifying cold-seep-hydrate systems in the geologic record. Authigenic calcite is abundant in the cores down to ???1.5 m subbottom, the top of the methane hydrate. The calcite is depleted in 13C (??13C = -46??? to -58???), indicating that carbon produced by anaerobically oxidized methane is the main source of the calcite. Methane sources include a geologic hydrocarbon reservoir from Miocene source rocks, and biogenic and thermogenic degradation of organic matter in basin sediments. Oxygen isotopes indicate that most calcite formed out of isotopic equilibrium with ambient bottom water, under the influence of gas hydrate dissociation and strong methane flux. High metal content in the mud volcano sediment indicates leaching of basement rocks by fluid circulating along an underlying fault, which also allows for a high flux of fossil methane. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  4. Critical evaluation of current cleaning protocols for foraminiferal trace metal analyses using single shell Laser-Ablation -ICP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadekov, A.; Eggins, S. M.; Misra, S.; Kerr, J.; Greaves, M.; Elderfield, H.

    2012-12-01

    Trace element compositions of foraminiferal calcite have been widely used as proxies for past ocean conditions. However, it has been shown that the presence of detrital material, particulate organic matter and diagenically-precipitated overgrowth on test surfaces significantly limit the accuracy of trace element analyses. A number of cleaning methods had been proposed to remove impurities from foraminiferal calcite but their relative effectiveness for foraminiferal trace metal analyses is still debatable. In this work, we employed the microanalytical technique Laser Ablation ICP-MS to compare the most commonly-used cleaning protocols. Distribution of Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Ba, Sr, Li, B, Fe, Al across tests of Orbulina universa from modern and Holocene sediments were analysed before and after each cleaning step. The use of Laser Ablation ICP-MS provides accurate and direct comparison of the effectiveness of each cleaning protocol, which was applied to fragments of a single foraminifera test. We also present results obtained using a novel automated cleaning device, "fOraccle", for cleaning single shell and bulk foraminiferal samples. This instrument minimises manual handling of chemical reagents during cleaning, thereby improving reproducibility of the Me/Ca measurements. Based on these results, we will discuss the composition of surface contamination on foraminiferal tests as well as possible ways to improve current cleaning protocols.

  5. A high-resolution infrared spectrum of IRC +10216. [carbon star immersed in expanding gas/dust shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Hinkle, K. H.; Lambert, D. L.; Beer, R.

    1977-01-01

    The IR-emitting core and shell of IRC +10216 are investigated using a high-resolution spectrum covering the wavelength interval between 3 and 5 microns. Line identifications made or confirmed include those due to (C-12)(O-16), (C-13)(O-16), (C-12)(O-17), and (C-12)(O-18). A mean heliocentric velocity of about -32 km/s is obtained from the 42 least blended (C-12)O and (C-13)O lines, and the following isotopic abundance ratios are derived by comparing equivalent widths of the observed lines: C-12/C-13, C-12/C-14, O-16/O-17, and O-17/O-18. The structure of the expanding gas shell is examined, an explanation is offered for the lack of P Cygni profiles in the spectrum, and an unsuccessful search for other molecules is briefly discussed. It is concluded that a low C-12/C-13 ratio is not necessarily a signature of a carbon star.

  6. DNA origami based Au-Ag-core-shell nanoparticle dimers with single-molecule SERS sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, J.; Heck, C.; Ellerik, L.; Merk, V.; Bald, I.

    2016-03-01

    DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled.DNA origami nanostructures are a versatile tool to arrange metal nanostructures and other chemical entities with nanometer precision. In this way gold nanoparticle dimers with defined distance can be constructed, which can be exploited as novel substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We have optimized the size, composition and arrangement of Au/Ag nanoparticles to create intense SERS hot spots, with Raman enhancement up to 1010, which is sufficient to detect single molecules by Raman scattering. This is demonstrated using single dye molecules (TAMRA and Cy3) placed into the center of the nanoparticle dimers. In conjunction with the DNA origami nanostructures novel SERS substrates are created, which can in the future be applied to the SERS analysis of more complex biomolecular targets, whose position and conformation within the SERS hot spot can be precisely controlled. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information about materials and methods, designs of DNA origami templates, height profiles, additional SERS spectra, assignment of DNA

  7. Hybrid Co3O4/SnO2 Core-Shell Nanospheres as Real-Time Rapid-Response Sensors for Ammonia Gas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Lou, Zheng; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Tingting; Deng, Jianan; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-16

    Novel hybrid Co3O4/SnO2 core-shell nanospheres have been effectively realized by a one-step hydrothermal, template-free preparation method. Our strategy involves a simple fabrication scheme that entails the coating of natural cross-link agents followed by electrostatic interaction between the positive charges of Sn and Co ions and the negative charge of glutamic acid. The core-shell architecture enables novel flexibility of gas sensor surfaces compared to commonly used bulk materials. The highly efficient charge transfer and unique structure are key to ensuring the availability of high response and rapid-response speed. It demonstrates how hybrid core-shell nanospheres can be used as an advance function material to fabricate electrical sensing devices that may be useful as gas sensors. PMID:26943006

  8. Metal-organic framework-immobilized polyhedral metal nanocrystals: reduction at solid-gas interface, metal segregation, core-shell structure, and high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aijaz, Arshad; Akita, Tomoki; Tsumori, Nobuko; Xu, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, this work presents surfactant-free monometallic and bimetallic polyhedral metal nanocrystals (MNCs) immobilized to a metal-organic framework (MIL-101) by CO-directed reduction of metal precursors at the solid-gas interface. With this novel method, Pt cubes and Pd tetrahedra were formed by CO preferential bindings on their (100) and (111) facets, respectively. PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals showed metal segregation, leading to Pd-rich core and Pt-rich shell. Core-shell Pt@Pd nanocrystals were immobilized to MIL-101 by seed-mediated two-step reduction, representing the first example of core-shell MNCs formed using only gas-phase reducing agents. These MOF-supported MNCs exhibited high catalytic activities for CO oxidation. PMID:24138338

  9. Characterization of Solids in Residual Wastes from Single-Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9277

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.; Heald, Steve M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    Solid-phase characterization methods have been used in an ongoing study of residual wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from the underground single-shell storage tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112 at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions of those residual wastes and the compositions, morphologies, and crystallinities of the individual phases that make up these wastes. These differences undoubtedly result from the various waste types stored and transferred in and out each tank and the sluicing and retrieval operations used for waste retrieval. Our studies indicate that these residual wastes are chemically-complex assemblages of crystalline and amorphous solids that contain contaminants as discrete phases and/or co-precipitated within oxide phases. Depending on the specific tank, various solids (e.g., gibbsite; boehmite; dawsonite; cancrinite; Fe oxides such as hematite, goethite, and maghemite; rhodochrosite; lindbergite; whewellite; nitratine; and numerous amorphous or poorly crystalline phases) have been identified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in residual wastes studied to date. Our studies also show that contact of residual wastes with Ca(OH)2- and CaCO3-saturated aqueous solutions, which were used as surrogates for the compositions of pore-fluid leachants derived from young and aged cements respectively, may alter the compositions of solid phases present in the contacted wastes. Fe oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual wastes studied to date. They occur in these wastes as discrete particles, particles intergrown within a matrix of other phases, and surface coatings on other particles or particle aggregates. These Fe oxides/hydroxides typically contain trace concentrations of other transition metals, such Cr, Mn

  10. Novel Kinetic Theory of the Classical Isotropic Oscillator Gas, the Flexible Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruben, Dale

    2013-12-01

    Ever since Chapman and Enskog first used the hard sphere model to evaluate the collision integral in the Boltzmann equation, more sophisticated models for molecular encounters have been sought. Rotation of molecules in kinetic theory has been pursued with a number of models, such as the spherocylinder or loaded sphere, to account for that aspect. As these efforts continued, more workers started to incorporate quantum mechanics methods in pursuit of solutions to the Boltzmann equation. Progress there with both rotational and vibrational features of molecules has been attained. Until now though, there has been no classical vibration model for molecules in kinetic theory. Far from standard kinetic theory, here a simple classical mechanics isotropic oscillator is combined, through a flexible shell, with the hard sphere model in a full Chapman Enskog procedure. The intent here has been to introduce the model, so items like translational-vibrational coupling have not been included. Still, the results compliment literature.