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Sample records for gas stream cleanup

  1. Gas stream cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, S.J.; Cicero, D.C.; Zeh, C.M.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of gas stream cleanup (GSCU) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Gas Stream Cleanup Program is to develop contaminant control strategies that meet environmental regulations and protect equipment in advanced coal conversion systems. Contaminant control systems are being developed for integration into seven advanced coal conversion processes: Pressurized fludized-bed combustion (PFBC), Direct coal-fueled turbine (DCFT), Intergrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), Gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), Gasification/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), Coal-fueled diesel (CFD), and Mild gasification (MG). These advanced coal conversion systems present a significant challenge for development of contaminant control systems because they generate multi-contaminant gas streams at high-pressures and high temperatures. Each of the seven advanced coal conversion systems incorporates distinct contaminant control strategies because each has different contaminant tolerance limits and operating conditions. 59 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. High-temperature gas stream cleanup test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, J.; Chiang, T.

    1995-12-01

    The high-temperature gas stream cleanup facility at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center will provide a versatile platform for testing novel hot gas cleanup filtration concepts. The facility will be available for joint ventures with CRADA partners.

  3. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1999-09-30

    The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

  4. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchak, T.P.; Pontiu, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The nature of the collected ash has been identified as an issue creating barriers to the commercialization of advanced particle control technologies. Since most of the emphasis and extended operation of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) facilities have been with ceramic candle filters, problems with ash characteristics can be understood in terms of their effects on these control devices. This project is designed to identify the ways ash characteristics affect advanced particle control technologies, to construct and maintain a data base of HGCU ashes and their measured characteristics, and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these facilities. The key characteristics of the collected ash are the morphology of the overall ash aggregate (porosity, geometry of the pores, specific surface area, etc.), and the cohesivity of the aggregate. Our data base currently comprises 242 ash samples from 12 combustion and gasification (HGCU) sources.

  5. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Potius, D.; Snyder, T.

    1997-07-01

    The characteristics of entrained particles generated by advanced coal conversion technologies and the harsh flue gas environments from which these particles must be removed challenge current ceramic barrier filtration systems. Measurements have shown that the size distribution, morphology, and chemical composition of particles generated by pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and gasification processes differ significantly from the corresponding characteristics of conventional pulverized-coal ash particles. The entrained particulate matter from these advanced conversion technologies often comprise fine size distributions, irregular particle morphologies, high specific surface areas, and significant proportions of added sorbent material. These characteristics can create high ash cohesivity and high pressure losses through the filter cakes. In addition, the distributions of chemical constituents among the collected particles provide local, highly concentrated chemical species that promote reactions between adjacent particles that ultimately cause strong, nodular deposits to form in the filter vessel. These deposits can lead directly to bridging and filter element failure. This project is designed to address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic filter elements. The activities conducted under Task 1, Assessment of Ash Characteristics, are discussed in this paper. Activities conducted under Task 2, Testing and Failure Analysis of Ceramic Filters, are discussed in a separate paper included in the proceedings of the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference. The specific objectives of Task I include the generation of a data base of the key characteristics of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and the identification of relationships between HGCU ash properties and the operation and

  6. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-05

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  7. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-30

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97 ® . Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  8. PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-05

    This is the fourth annual report describing the activities performed under Task 1 of Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This work is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. This report summarizes characterizations of ash and char samples from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities. Efforts are under way to develop a method for preserving fragile filter cakes formed on ceramic filter elements. The HGCU data base was formatted for Microsoft Access 97{reg_sign}. Plans for the remainder of the project include characterization of additional samples collected during site visits to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility and completion and delivery of the HGCU data base.

  9. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task I is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, analyses were performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. A site visit was made to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to collect ash samples from the filter vessel and to document the condition of the filter vessel with still photographs and videotape. Particulate samples obtained during this visit are currently being analyzed for entry into the Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) data base. Preparations are being made for a review meeting on ash bridging to be held at Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center - Morgantown (DOE/FETC-MGN) in the near future. Most work on Task 2 was on hold pending receipt of additional funds; however, creep testing of Schumacher FT20 continued. The creep tests on Schumacher FT20 specimens just recently ended and data analysis and comparisons to other data are ongoing. A summary and analysis of these creep results will be sent out shortly. Creep

  10. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the thirteenth quarterly report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task I research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of additional ash samples from Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) facilities to the HGCU data base. Task I plans for the next quarter include characterization of samples collected during a site visit on January 20 to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Further work on the HGCU data base is also planned. Task 2 work during the past quarter included creep testing of a Coors P- I OOA- I specimen machined from Candle FC- 007 after 1166 hours in-service at the Karhula Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility. Samples are currently in preparation for microstructural evaluations of Coors P-IOOA-I.Sixteen cordierite rings manufactured by Specific Surfaces were received for testing. Three of the specimens were exposed to the PFBC environment at the PSDF. These specimens are currently being machined for testing.

  11. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-08-31

    This is the fifteenth quarterly report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data bank of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task 1 research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of samples collected during a site visit on May 18 to the Department of Energy / Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) and a particulate sample collected in the Westinghouse filter at Sierra Pacific Power Company's Piñon Pine Power Project. Analysis of this Piñon Pine sample is ongoing: however, this report contains the results of analyses completed to date. Significant accomplishments were achieved on the HGCU data bank during this reporting quarter. The data bank was prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems 98 Conference scheduled for July, 1998. Task 2 work during the past quarter consisted of testing two Dupont PRD-66C candle filters, one McDermott ceramic composite candle filter, one Blasch 4-270 candle filter, and one Specific Surface cordierite candle filter. Tensile and thermal expansion testing is complete and the rest of the testing is in progress. Also, some 20-inch long Dupont

  12. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This is the eleventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic bed filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, analyses were completed on samples obtained during a site visit to the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Analyses are in progress on ash samples from the Advanced Particulate Filter (APF) at the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) that was in operation at Tidd and ash samples from the Pressurized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) system located at Karhula, Finland. An additional analysis was performed on a particulate sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. A manuscript and poster were prepared for presentation at the Advanced Coal-Based Power and Environmental Systems `97 Conference scheduled for July 22 - 24, 1997. A summary of recent project work covering the mechanisms responsible for ash deposit consolidation and ash bridging in APF`s collecting PFB ash was prepared and presented at FETC-MGN in early July. The material presented at that meeting is included in the manuscript prepared for the Contractor`s Conference and also in this report. Task 2 work during the past quarter included mechanical testing and microstructural examination of Schumacher FT20 and Pall 326 as- manufactured, after 540 hr in service at Karhula, and after 1166 hr in service at

  13. Gas stream cleanup papers from DOE/METC sponsored contractors review meetings in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Kothari, V.P.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains gas stream cleanup papers that were presented at two contractors review meetings sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy in 1988. The two meetings were (1) the Eighth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held May 10-12, 1988, and (2) the Annual Coal Fuel Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held June 14-16, 1988. The purpose of the meetings was to present recent technical information on selected projects in the gasification, heat engines, and gas stream cleanup programs. The meetings provided a forum for the exchange and dissemination of gasification, heat engine, and gas stream cleanup research results generated under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. The gas stream cleanup program was discussed in combination with the gasification and heat engines programs to emphasize the importance of approaching research on gas stream cleanup concepts from a system perspective. Gas stream cleanup is an integral part of all coal conversion technologies. Individual papers are processed separately for the data bases.

  14. Proceedings of the eight annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Longanbach, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Research programs presented at the Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting are presented. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: To review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 320 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 3-day meeting. Forty-three papers and 31 poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. This volume covers sessions three and four on systems for the production of synthesis gas and systems for the production of coproducts. Individual topics within each session are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. Proceedings of the tenth annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Beeson, J.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Tenth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held August 28--30, 1990 at the Lakeview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogue which would identify novel concepts that would make coal-based gasification and hot gas cleanup systems more attractive economically and environmentally. Two hundred thirty representatives of government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the three-day meeting. Thirty papers and thirty-three poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Scientists, engineers, and administrators discussed many of the issues facing those engaged in the research and development activities that constitute these programs. This document records Volume 1 of the proceedings of that meeting, and summarizes the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  16. Proceedings of the tenth annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Beeson, J.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Tenth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held August 28--30, 1990 at the Lakview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. To foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities. To facilitate interactive dialogue which would identify novel concepts that would make coal-based gasification and hot gas cleanup systems more attractive economically and environmentally. Two hundred thirty representatives of government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the three-day meeting. Thirty papers and thirty-three poster displays were resented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Scientists, engineers, and administrators discussed many of the issues facing those engaged in the research and development activities that constitute these programs. This document records the Volume 2 of the proceedings of that meeting, and summarizes the gasification and gas stream of cleanup programs. Individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  17. Proceedings of the eight annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, V.P.; Longanbach, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    Forty-three papers and 31 poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs at the contractors review meeting. This volume covers sessions one and two on systems for the production of power and systems for the production of industrial fuel gas. Individual projects of those sessions are processed separately for the data bases.

  18. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster displays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume I covers information presented at sessions 1 through 4 on systems for the production of Co-products and industrial fuel gas, environmental projects, and components and materials. Individual papers have been processed for the Energy Data Base.

  19. Proceedings of the seventh annual gasification and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, M.R.; Markel, K.E. Jr.; Jarr, L.A.; Bossart, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    On June 16 through 19, 1987, METC sponsored the Seventh Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting which was held at the Sheraton Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The primary purpose of the meeting was threefold: to review the technical progress and current status of the gasification and gas stream cleanup projects sponsored by the Department of Energy; to foster technology exchange among participating researchers and other technical communities; to facilitate interactive dialogues which would identify research needs that would make coal-based gasification systems more attractive economically and environmentally. More than 310 representatives of Government, academia, industry, and foreign energy research organizations attended the 4-day meeting. Fifty-three papers and thirty poster dsplays were presented summarizing recent developments in the gasification and gas stream cleanup programs. Volume II covers papers presented at sessions 5 and 6 on system for the production of synthesis gas, and on system for the production of power. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  20. Proceedings of the seventh annual coal-fueled heat engines and gas stream cleanup systems contractors review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, H.A.; Rekos, N.F.; Kothari, V.P.; Bedick, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    The seventh Annual Coal-Fueled Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting was held March 26--28, 1990, at the Lakeview Resort and Conference Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting was sponsored and hosted by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide an opportunity for scientists and engineers working in heat engines and gas stream cleanup technologies to present their research results, exchange ideas, and discuss their future plans. About 300 attendees from industry, academia, and Government participated in this 3-day meeting. Almost 60 papers and poster presentations were given on the following topics: proof of concept, systems assessment; advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems; gas stream cleanup, two sessions; panel discussion: turbine emissions; panel discussion: diesel emissions; panel discussion: low cost fuels; and poster presentations. Individual projects were processed separately for the data bases.

  1. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This is the seventh in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed for this project. Our analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic barrier filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task 1 during the past quarter, we received and analyzed a hopper ash sample from the Transport Reactor Demonstration Unit (TRDU) located at the University of North Dakota`s Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). We also received six ash samples from the Ahlstrom 10 MWt Pressurized Fluidized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility located at Karhula, Finland. We selected one of the filter cake ashes from this batch of samples for detailed analyses. We continued our work on the HGCU data base we are constructing in Microsoft Access{reg_sign}. We have been entering a variety of information into the data base, including numerical values, short or long text entries, and photographs. Task 2 efforts during the past quarter focused on hoop tensile testing of Schumacher FT20 and Refractron candle filter elements removed from the Karhula APF after {approximately}540 hours of service.

  2. Particulate Hot Gas Stream Cleanup Technical Issues: Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1996-12-09

    This is the eighth in a series of quarterly reports describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance address aspects of filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash or the performance of the ceramic barrier filter elements. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFS) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analysis of ceramic filter elements. Under Task I during the past quarter, additional analyses were performed on ashes from the Ahlstrom 10 MWt Pressurized Fluidized Circulating Fluid Bed (PCFB) facility located at Karhula, Finland. Work continued on the HGCU data base being constructed in Microsoft Access. A variety of information has been entered into the data base, including numerical values, short or long text entries, and photographs. Detailed design of a bench top device for high temperature measurement of ash permeability has also begun. In addition to these activities, a paper was prepared and a poster was presented summarizing recent work performed under this contract at the 1996 DOE/METC Contractor`s Conference. A presentation was also given corresponding to the manuscript entitled Particle Characteristics and High-Temperature Filtration that was prepared for publication in the Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference held this September in Pittsburgh, PA. Arrangements have been made to be present at the DOE/METC Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) at the conclusion of the next run of the DOE/METC air blown Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG). This visit will include on-site sampling to collect and characterize the filter cakes collected during FGB operation. Task 2 efforts during the past quarter focused on

  3. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The analyses of Hot Gas Stream Cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. Task 1 is designed to generate a data base of the key characteristics of ashes collected from operating advanced particle filters (APFs) and to relate these ash properties to the operation and performance of these filters and their components. APF operations have also been limited by the strength and durability of the ceramic materials that have served as barrier filters for the capture of entrained HGCU ashes. Task 2 concerns testing and failure analyses of ceramic filter elements currently used in operating APFs and the characterization and evaluation of new ceramic materials. Task 1 research activities during the past quarter included characterizations of samples collected during a site visit on January 20 to the Department of Energy/Southern Company Services Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). Comparisons were made between laboratory analyses of these PSDF ashes and field data obtained from facility operation. In addition, selected laboratory techniques were reviewed to assess their reproducibility and the influence of non-ideal effects and differences between laboratory and filter conditions on the quantities measured. Further work on the HGCU data base is planned for the next quarter. Two Dupont PRD-66 candle filters, one McDermott candle filter, one Blasch candle filter, and one Specific Surfaces candle filter were received at SRI for testing. A test plan and cutting plan for these candles was developed. Acquisition of two of the Dupont PRD-66 candle filters will allow candle-to-candle variability to be examined.

  4. A gas stream clean-up filter and method for forming same

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Halow, J.S.; DeVault, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    A gas cleaning filter is formed in-situ within a vessel containing a fluidizable bed of granular material of a relatively large size fraction. A filter membrane provided by a porous metal or ceramic body or such a body supported a perforated screen on one side thereof is coated in-situ with a layer of the granular material from the fluidized bed by serially passing a bed-fluidizing gas stream through the bed of granular material and the membrane. The layer of granular material provides the filtering medium for the combined membrane-granular layer filter. The filter is not blinded by the granular material and provides for the removal of virtually all of the particulates from a process gas stream. The granular material can be at least partially provided by a material capable of chemically reacting with and removing sulfur compounds from the process gas stream. Low level radioactive waste containing organic material may be incinerated in a fluidized bed in communication with the described filter for removing particulates from the gaseous combustion products.

  5. Gas stream clean-up filter and method for forming same

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Joseph S.; DeVault, James; Halow, John S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas cleaning filter is formed in-situ within a vessel containing a fluidizable bed of granular material of a relatively large size fraction. A filter membrane provided by a porous metal or ceramic body or such a body supported a perforated screen on one side thereof is coated in-situ with a layer of the granular material from the fluidized bed by serially passing a bed-fluidizing gas stream through the bed of granular material and the membrane. The layer of granular material provides the filtering medium for the combined membrane-granular layer filter. The filter is not blinded by the granular material and provides for the removal of virtually all of the particulates from a process gas stream. The granular material can be at least partially provided by a material capable of chemically reacting with and removing sulfur compounds from the process gas stream. Low level radioactive waste containing organic material may be incinerated in a fluidized bed in communication with the described filter for removing particulates from the gaseous combustion products.

  6. HOT GAS CLEANUP PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to identify and classify 22 hot gas cleanup (HGC) processes for desulfurizing reducing gases at above 430 C according to absorbent type into groups employing solid, molten salt, and molten metal absorbents. It describes each process in terms of...

  7. Gas cleanup for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, R.M.

    1984-08-01

    Visual aids are presented describing various classes of primary gas cleanup. These are: (1) amine systems (MDEA Process); (2) alkali salt systems; (3) physical absorption systems (Selexol Process, Stretford Process); (4) mixed solvent systems; and (5) Claus Sulfur Recovery System. Flowsheets are also presented for the MDEA, Selexol and Stretford processes.

  8. Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bissett, Larry A.

    2001-11-06

    Using regenerable sorbents and transport or fluid-bed contacting, the Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU) at NETL-Morgantown will be used to demonstrate the process feasibility of removing sulfur from coal gasification or other fuel gas streams at temperatures above dew point of the gas. This technology, also known as hot or warm gas desulfurization, is expected to remove sulfur to concentrations lower than conventional systems at comparable cost. The project was constructed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system program and is an ''enabling technology'' in the Vision 21 program. The GPDU was designed to be the smallest scale research and development facility capable of providing viable scale-up design data for new integrated transport or fluid-bed desulfurization processes. With the capability to test at process conditions representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, major compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling, the unit is expected to generate important information on process control, configuration, and sorbent suitability. In this way, the GPDU fills a strategic role between past/current small-scale testing and large-scale demonstrations. A primary objective of the project is to gain insight into which reactor combination (i.e., both transport, both fluid bed, or mixed) is more suitable for desulfurization technology and why. Assuming process feasibility is demonstrated, this guides future development or commercial ventures by answering the question of what to build, and provides performance and scale-up data (e.g., required transport reactor densities). Another important objective, which naturally derives from the process development activities, is demonstration of sorbent suitability and readiness for commercial deployment (e.g., sorbent attrition and cycle life). In this sense, the GPDU can serve as a final testing ground to reduce the risks of

  9. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  10. CONOCO DOLOMITE HOT GAS CLEANUP SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report analyzes a proposal that EPA sponsor a large-scale pilot plant to develop the Conoco (formerly Consol) Dolomite Hot Gas Clean-up system. The report includes a history of the prior development program, the technology involved comparisons with competitive technologies i...

  11. Landfill gas cleanup for fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    EPRI is to test the feasibility of using a carbonate fuel cell to generate electricity from landfill gas. Landfills produce a substantial quantity of methane gas, a natural by-product of decaying organic wastes. Landfill gas, however, contains sulfur and halogen compounds, which are known contaminants to fuel cells and their fuel processing equipment. The objective of this project is to clean the landfill gas well enough to be used by the fuel cell without making the process prohibitively expensive. The cleanup system tested in this effort could also be adapted for use with other fuel cells (e.g., solid oxide, phosphoric acid) running on landfill gas.

  12. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, R.E.; Griswold, G.H.; Fankhanel, M.O.; Kastner, C.E.; Pontium, D.H.

    1992-11-01

    Efficiencies in advanced power generation systems such as integrated gasification combined cycle, pressurized fluidized bed combustion and integrated gasification fuel cells can be maximized by feeding hot fuel gas or flue gas to the power block. However, advanced gas turbines have strict particulate requirements to minimize wear on the blades due to the close tolerances used to maximize the efficiency of the turbomachinery. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells also have strict particulate requirements to prevent blinding of the electrodes. Therefore, one of the main barriers to developing these advanced power generation systems is the removal of particulates in a hot gas stream. Although the development of several high temperature/pressure PCD systems has been ongoing for the past several years, long term operation under realistic conditions for advanced power generation has been limited. The demonstration of reliable operation is critical to the commercialization of PCD technology for advanced power generation. The conceptual design of the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Project was expanded to include additional modules to better address the scope of the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE/METC. The expanded test facility, referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility, will provide a flexible test location in which the development of advanced power system components, the evaluation of advanced turbine and fuel cell configurations, and the integration and control issues of these systems. The facility is intended to provide direct support for upcoming DOE demonstrations of power generation technologies utilizing hot stream cleanup and will provide a resource for rigorous testing and performance assessment of hot stream cleanup devices now being developed with the support of DOE/METC.

  13. Pilot gasification and hot gas cleanup operations

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.; Galloway, E.; Thomson, T.A.; Rutten, J.; Lui, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has an integrated gasification hot gas cleanup facility to develop gasification, hot particulate and desulfurization process performance data for IGCC systems. The objective of our program is to develop fluidized-bed process performance data for hot gas desulfurization and to further test promising sorbents from lab-scale screening studies at highpressure (300 psia), and temperatures (1,200{degrees}F) using coal-derived fuel gases from a fluid-bed gasifier. The 10-inch inside diameter (ID), nominal 80 lb/hr, air blown gasifier is capable of providing about 300 lb/hr of low BTU gas at 1,000{degrees}F and 425 psig to downstream cleanup devices. The system includes several particle removal stages, which provide the capability to tailor the particle loading to the cleanup section. The gas pressure is reduced to approximately 300 psia and filtered by a candle filter vessel containing up to four filter cartridges. For batch-mode desulfurization test operations, the filtered coal gas is fed to a 6-inch ID, fluid-bed reactor that is preloaded with desulfurization sorbent. Over 400 hours of gasifier operation was logged in 1993 including 384 hours of integration with the cleanup rig. System baseline studies without desulfurization sorbent and repeatability checks with zinc ferrite sorbent were conducted before testing with the then most advanced zinc titanate sorbents, ZT-002 and ZR-005. In addition to the desulfurization testing, candle filters were tested for the duration of the 384 hours of integrated operation. One filter was taken out of service after 254 hours of filtering while another was left in service. At the conclusion of testing this year it is expected that 3 candles, one each with 254, 530, and 784 hours of filtering will be available for analysis for effects of the exposure to the coal gas environment.

  14. Denitrification of a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Tamony, A.E.; Youngson, C.R.

    1981-10-13

    Nitric oxide and other oxides of nitrogen is removed from a gas stream by contacting the gas stream with chlorine in the presence of water in the liquid phase and scrubbing the gas stream with an aqueous mixture of a hydrochloride and a hypochlorite.

  15. Natural gas cleanup by means of membranes.

    PubMed

    Ohlrogge, Klaus; Brinkmann, Torsten

    2003-03-01

    This paper deals with the use of membranes for hydrocarbon dewpointing and dehydration of natural gas. Based on experience gained from membrane applications in separating organic vapors from off-gas and process streams, as well as the dehydration of compressed air, membranes have been developed and tested for use in high pressure applications. Membranes and membrane modules have been modified to withstand the high operating pressure. Calculation programs were developed to understand the separation performance and to provide the necessary information for optimizing membrane design. A real challenge was the introduction of the vacuum mode dehydration operation in order to achieve the highest possible dewpoint reduction with minimum methane loss. PMID:12783826

  16. General Electric hot gas cleanup and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, E.; Furman, A.H.; Ayala, R.

    1993-06-01

    GE Environmental Services, Inc. (GEESI) and its major subcontractors GE Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) and GE Power Generation (GEPG) have completed significant further pilot plant scale test operation of an integrated fixed bed gasification, hot gas cleanup and gas turbine simulation facility located at GE-CRD in Schenectady, NY. Progress during the past year has included first desulfurization and regeneration testing with zinc titanate, significant regeneration hardware and process modifications, continued test exposure of a full scale gas turbine fuel control valve, first long term integrated operation of the MS6000 based gas turbine simulator and off-line operation of a subscale, staged combustor system designed to minimize NO{sub x} production from fuel bound nitrogen. Long Duration Tests 3, 3AR1, 3AR2 and 3A were conducted with zinc titanate sorbent and demonstrated the continued ability of the absorber to reduce inlet H{sub 2}S levels of 3500 ppmv to less than 30 ppmv provided properly regenerated sorbent was returned to the absorber. Tests 3AR1 and 3AR2 were limited duration, off line regeneration tests, utilizing residual sulfided material from Test 3, to evaluate continuing regeneration hardware, instrumentation and process modification. Test 3A was a fully integrated 100 hour test incorporating final regenerator modifications and resulted in first fully controlled regeneration. Anthracite coal was utilized for Test 3A as a means of partial elimination of halogens in the fuel gas prior to inclusion of a specific halogen removal process step envisioned for Long Duration Test 4. Further test operation will revert to use of Illinois bituminous coal with up to 3.4 percent sulfur and 0.1 to 0.28 percent chloride content in order to fully evaluate high sulfur regeneration operation as well as halogen removal.

  17. Assessment of fuel-gas-cleanup systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, F.L.; Blecher, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the performance, economics and emission characteristics of low-, medium-, and high-temperature fuel gas cleanup processes for use in coal gasification combined-cycle power plants based on high-temperature gas turbines. Processes considered were the Allied Chemical low-temperature Selexol process, METC medium-temperature iron oxide process and Conoco high-temperature half-calcined dolomite process. Process evaluations were carried out for twenty-four combinations of gasifiers and cleanup processes. Based upon the process evaluations, five combinations of gasifiers and cleanup process were selected for integration with an advanced, 2600 F gas turbine into an overall power system. Heat and mass balances and process schematics for these plants were prepared and the cost of electricity estimated. The results of the study indicate that medium- or high-temperature cleanup systems in combined-cycle power plants could meet or exceed EPA New Source Performance Standards. Performance and cost of the systems studied can be improved by high- and intermediate-temperature cleanup systems or by integration of developmental hot gas heat exchangers with suitable commercially available low-temperature cleanup systems. Unresolved problems in the use of medium- and high-temperature cleanup are efficient regeneration of iron oxide, particulate removal at high temperature and the fate of fuel bound nitrogen and trace metals that may appear in the hot fuel gas.

  18. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  19. Biomass gasification hot gas cleanup demonstration program status

    SciTech Connect

    Wiant, B.C.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Onischak, M.

    1994-12-31

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Biomass Power Program, Westinghouse Electric has been conducting research and development of a hot gas cleaning system compatible with a pressurized fluidized bed biomass gasifier and the operation of a gas turbine. The hot gas cleanup system must be capable of filtering out the flyash particulates at gasifier operating conditions, dealing with the feedstock`s inherent tars and oils, and removing excessive levels of alkali. The Westinghouse led team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Gilbert/Commonwealth, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research began work in April 1993 on this 30 month program. Status of the program is: hot gas cleanup (HGCU) requirements and system evaluation have been completed; the hot gas cleanup filter system has been designed, fabricated and installed in the 10 ton-per-day process development unit (PDU) at IGT in Chicago, IL; a tar cracker has been designed, fabricated and installed in the PDU; the testing plan has been developed; PDU modifications have been completed along with complete facility shakedown; and testing of the cleanup system is in process. This paper discusses the status of each of the major program elements described above.

  20. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  1. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; and Combustion Gas Turbine. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  2. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion project. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDs) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during this quarter.

  3. Hot particulate removal and desulfurization results from the METC integrated gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is conducting experimental testing using a 10-inch diameter fluid-bed gasifier (FBG) and modular hot gas cleanup rig (MGCR) to develop advanced methods for removing contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas streams for commercial development of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The program focus is on hot gas particulate removal and desulfurization technologies that match the temperatures and pressures of the gasifier, cleanup system, and power generator. The purpose of this poster is to present the program objectives and results of the work conducted in cooperation with industrial users and vendors to meet the vision for IGCC of reducing the capital cost per kilowatt to $1050 and increasing the plant efficiency to 52% by the year 2010.

  4. CRADA opportunities with METC`s gasification and hot gas cleanup facility

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, E.N.; Rockey, J.M.; Tucker, M.S.

    1995-06-01

    Opportunities exist for Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to support commercialization of IGCC power systems. METC operates an integrated gasifier and hot gas cleanup facility for the development of gasification and hot gas cleanup technologies. The objective of our program is to gather performance data on gasifier operation, particulate removal, desulfurization and regeneration technologies. Additionally, slip streams are provided for developing various technologies such as; alkali monitoring, particulate measuring, chloride removal, and contaminate recovery processes. METC`s 10-inch diameter air blown Fluid Bed Gasifier (FBG) provides 300 lb/hr of coal gas at 1100{degrees}F and 425 psig. The particulate laden gas is transported to METC`s Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR). The gas pressure is reduced to 285 psig before being fed into a candle filter vessel. The candle filter vessel houses four candle filters and multiple test coupons. The particulate free gas is then desulfurized in a sorbent reactor. Starting in 1996 the MGCR system will be able to regenerate the sorbent in the same vessel.

  5. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  6. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes the work completed during the first quarter, April 1 through June 30, 1995. The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasificafion and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel continued at a good pace during the quarter.

  7. [Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion]. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, October 1 through December 31, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; (2) hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; (3) combustion gas turbine; (4) fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  8. Pilot scale experience on IGCC hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, K.; Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.

    1995-11-01

    In September 1993 Enviropower Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Department of Energy in order to develop and demonstrate the major components of an IGCC process such as hot gas cleanup systems. The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate: (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable metal oxide sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator, and (3) hot gas particulate removal using ceramic candle filters.

  9. Assessment of coal gasification/hot gas cleanup based advanced gas turbine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The major objectives of the joint SCS/DOE study of air-blown gasification power plants with hot gas cleanup are to: (1) Evaluate various power plant configurations to determine if an air-blown gasification-based power plant with hot gas cleanup can compete against pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization for baseload expansion at Georgia Power Company's Plant Wansley; (2) determine if air-blown gasification with hot gas cleanup is more cost effective than oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (3) perform Second-Law/Thermoeconomic Analysis of air-blown IGCC with hot gas cleanup and oxygen-blown IGCC with cold gas cleanup; (4) compare cost, performance, and reliability of IGCC based on industrial gas turbines and ISTIG power island configurations based on aeroderivative gas turbines; (5) compare cost, performance, and reliability of large (400 MW) and small (100 to 200 MW) gasification power plants; and (6) compare cost, performance, and reliability of air-blown gasification power plants using fluidized-bed gasifiers to air-blown IGCC using transport gasification and pressurized combustion.

  10. [PFBC Hot Gas Cleanup Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Four hundred and fifty four clay bonded silicon carbide Schumacher Dia Schumalith candle filters were purchased for installation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particle Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) plant in Brilliant, Ohio. A surveillance effort has been identified which will monitor candle filter performance and life during hot gas cleaning in AEP's pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. A description of the candle surveillance program, strategy for candle filter location selection, as well as candle filter post-test characterization is provided in this memo. The period of effort for candle filter surveillance monitoring is planned through March 1994.

  11. METC integrated bench scale gasification and hot gas cleanup studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.; Kanosky, J.P.; Rutten, J.

    1992-11-01

    The cleanup test section consists of a closely coupled modular gas cleanup rig (MGCR) which was acquired from The Institute of Gas Technology. The MGCR receives coal-derived gas at 425 psig and 1,000{degrees}F from the METC Fluid-Bed Gasifier. The gas pressure is reduced to approximately 300 psia, reheated to 1,200{degrees}F, and filtered by a candle filter vessel containing up to four filter cartridges. For batch-mode test operations, the filtered coal gas is fed into a 6-inch ID, fluid-bed reactor that is preloaded with desulfurization sorbent. Batch-mode sulfidation tests demonstrated that the prospects for developing an effective fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization system are promising, since H{sub 2}S removal of greater than 99 percent was consistently shown with sorbent utilization up to 25 percent. Conversely, the regeneration conducted in the batch mode MGCR was not useful because the regeneration occurs too quickly, and thus process concerns cannot be suitably evaluated in the batch fluid-bed mode reactor. Pursuant to batch mode tests, the gas cleanup system is being modified to incorporate a reactor in parallel with the batch reactor so that solids can be fed into and withdrawn from the reactor without impacting batch mode operation in the meantime. The new reactor setup which allows for through-flow of solid sorbent during operation is also being designed to operate using smaller (70--150 micron) particles in addition to the larger (200--300 micron) particles used in prior tests.

  12. METC integrated bench scale gasification and hot gas cleanup studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.; Kanosky, J.P. ); Rutten, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The cleanup test section consists of a closely coupled modular gas cleanup rig (MGCR) which was acquired from The Institute of Gas Technology. The MGCR receives coal-derived gas at 425 psig and 1,000[degrees]F from the METC Fluid-Bed Gasifier. The gas pressure is reduced to approximately 300 psia, reheated to 1,200[degrees]F, and filtered by a candle filter vessel containing up to four filter cartridges. For batch-mode test operations, the filtered coal gas is fed into a 6-inch ID, fluid-bed reactor that is preloaded with desulfurization sorbent. Batch-mode sulfidation tests demonstrated that the prospects for developing an effective fluid-bed hot-gas desulfurization system are promising, since H[sub 2]S removal of greater than 99 percent was consistently shown with sorbent utilization up to 25 percent. Conversely, the regeneration conducted in the batch mode MGCR was not useful because the regeneration occurs too quickly, and thus process concerns cannot be suitably evaluated in the batch fluid-bed mode reactor. Pursuant to batch mode tests, the gas cleanup system is being modified to incorporate a reactor in parallel with the batch reactor so that solids can be fed into and withdrawn from the reactor without impacting batch mode operation in the meantime. The new reactor setup which allows for through-flow of solid sorbent during operation is also being designed to operate using smaller (70--150 micron) particles in addition to the larger (200--300 micron) particles used in prior tests.

  13. Biomass Gas Cleanup Using a Therminator

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, David C; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Rabhubir

    2012-03-06

    The objective of the project is to develop and demonstrate a novel fluidized-bed process module called a Therminator to simultaneously destroy and/or remove tar, NH3 and H2S from raw syngas produced by a fluidized-bed biomass gasifier. The raw syngas contains as much as 10 g/m3 of tar, 4,000 ppmv of NH3 and 100 ppmv of H2S. The goal of the Therminator module would be to use promising regenerable catalysts developed for removing tar, ammonia, and H2S down to low levels (around 10 ppm). Tars are cracked to a non-condensable gas and coke that would deposit on the acid catalyst. We will deposit coke, much like a fluid catalytic cracker (FCC) in a petroleum refinery. The deposited coke fouls the catalyst, much like FCC, but the coke would be burned off in the regenerator and the regenerated catalyst would be returned to the cracker. The rapid circulation between the cracker and regenerator would ensure the availability of the required amount of regenerated catalyst to accomplish our goal. Also, by removing sulfur down to less than 10 ppmv, NH3 decomposition would also be possible in the cracker at 600-700°C. In the cracker, tar decomposes and lays down coke on the acid sites of the catalyst, NH3 is decomposed using a small amount of metal (e.g., nickel or iron) catalyst incorporated into the catalyst matrix, and H2S is removed by a small amount of a metal oxide (e.g. zinc oxide or zinc titanate) by the H2S-metal oxide reaction to form metal sulfide. After a tolerable decline in activity for these reactions, the catalyst particles (and additives) are transported to the regenerator where they are exposed to air to remove the coke and to regenerate the metal sulfide back to metal oxide. Sulfate formation is avoided by running the regeneration with slightly sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen. Following regeneration, the catalyst is transported back to the cracker and the cycling continues. Analogous to an FCC reactor system, rapid cycling will allow the use of very

  14. Ceramem filters for removal of particles from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.A.; Goldsmith, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    The need for hot gas cleanup in the power, advanced coal conversion, process and incineration industries is well documented and extensive development is being undertaken to develop and demonstrate suitable filtration technologies. In general, process conditions include (a) oxidizing or reducing atmospheres, (b) temperatures to 1800{degree}F, (c) pressures to 300 psi, and (d) potentially corrosive components in the gas stream. The most developed technologies entail the use of candle or tube filters, which suffer from fragility, lack of oxidation/corrosion resistance, and high cost. The ceramic membrane filter described below offers the potential to eliminate these limitations.

  15. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion Project. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived as streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed Include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning, techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing, Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1 . Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating, Fluidized Bed Gas Source; 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; 3. Combustion Gas Turbine; 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during, this reporting period was continuing, the detailed design of the FW portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is complete and the construction of steel for the coal preparation structure is complete.

  16. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  17. Enhancement of mercury control in flue-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, Hann S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper summarizes research at Argonne National Laboratory which is focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury and integrate its control into existing flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems. Both laboratory and field tests have shown that very little elemental mercury is captured in a wet scrubber system due to the low solubility of that species. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, Argonne has studied improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into a more soluble species that can be easily absorbed. Current research is investigating the roles of several halogen species either alone or in combination with typical flue-gas components such as sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the oxidation of mercury to form compounds that are easily scrubbed from the flue gas.

  18. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  19. Phase 1 of the North Site cleanup: Definition of product streams. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sorini, S.; Merriam, N.

    1994-03-01

    Various materials and equipment have accumulated at the Western Research Institute (WRI) North Site Facility since its commissioning in 1968. This facility was built by the US Bureau of Mines, transferred to the US Energy Research Development Administration (ERDA) in 1976, and transferred once again to the US Department of Energy (DOE) shortly thereafter. In 1983, the North Site Facility became part of WRI. The materials that have accumulated over the years at the site have been stored in drums, tanks, and open piles. They vary from oil shale, tar sand, and coal feedstocks to products and materials associated with in situ simulation and surface process developments associated with these feedstocks. The majority of these materials have been associated with DOE North Site activities and work performed at the North Site under DOE-WRI cooperative agreement contracts. In phase I of the North Site Facility cleanup project, these materials were sampled and evaluated to determine their chemical characteristics for proper disposal or use in accordance with current local, state, and federal regulations. Phase I of the North Site Facility cleanup project involved dividing the stored materials into product streams and dividing each product stream into composite groups. Composite groups contain materials known to be similar in composition, source, and process exposure. For each composite group, materials, which are representative of the composite, were selected for sampling, compositing, and analysis.

  20. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  1. Emissions from biomass combustion in a fluidized bed combustor and gas cleanup system

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, B.; Lighty, J.S.; Inkley, D.; Eddings, E.; Overacker, D.; Davis, K.; Lee, C.; Sarofim, A.

    1999-07-01

    The University of Utah Department of Chemical and Fuels Engineering and Reaction Engineering International have designed and tested a fluidized bed for resource recovery in a Mars or lunar space station for feed streams consisting of inedible plant biomass and solid human waste. In conjunction with the combustor, the system has an extensive flue gas clean-up system to meet Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs). This paper discusses the selection of a rich low-temperature combustion mode that minimizes the ash fusion problems with the high potassium feed and which generates sufficient unburned carbon monoxide to enable the reduction of NO. The components of the gas clean-up stream include: particle removal; HCl removal; NO{sub x} reduction; hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide destruction; sulfur capture; and a final gas polishing unit. Major developmental efforts were required to develop systems for trouble-free waste feeding and NO{sub x} reduction. The combustor is operated at temperatures below 700 C since the ash component of the hydroponically grown inedible biomass has a very low melting point. Low temperature operation results in high levels of CO and unburned hydrocarbons, which can be used as reducing agents for NO{sub x} in the downstream catalytic unit. This is more desirable than using ammonia, which is hazardous, and an expendable reagent that must be stored in sufficient quantity for the duration of a mission. The paper will discuss the results of an innovative catalyst system to reduce NO{sub x}, hydrocarbons, and CO. One important feature of this totally regenerative system is the potential reuse of potassium and sulfur captured in the ash for the hydroponic plant solution.

  2. Removal of acid gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a method for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a stream of a treating agent consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of N-methyldiethanolamine and imidazole or a methyl substituted imidazole to thereby remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified gas stream from the absorption zone, discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone; and subsequently regenerating the enriched treating agent.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A CALCIUM-BASED SORBENT FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

    1999-10-01

    The development and testing of potential calcium-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup continued. One of the most promising materials combines powdered limestone and a calcium aluminate cement by two step pelletization followed by steam curing. Reasonably strong pellets are produced with good adsorption characteristics by incorporating 20 wt.% cement in the core and 40 wt.% cement in the shell. The resulting 4.76 mm diameter pellets are capable of withstanding a crushing force approaching 11.5 N/mm before breaking and are also capable of removing H{sub 2}S from dilute, hot gas streams. The pellets are also regenerable and reusable. Another promising material combines calcium carbonate powder and finely ground calcined alumina in tablet form. The small tablets are prepared by mixing the materials with water to form a thick paste which is then molded and dried. The tablets are hardened by calcining at either 1000 to 1100 C. The resulting tablets are strong and capable of removing H{sub 2}S from a dilute, hot gas stream.

  4. Fluidized-Bed Reactor and Hot Gas Cleanup Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rockey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    As part of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC) Advanced Gasification and Hot Gas Cleanup Facility, a 907 kg (1 ton) coal-per-day (10-inch inside diameter) jetting fluidized-bed gasifier provides realistic fuel gas for testing and developing high-temperature, high-pressure components and processes in a reducing (gasification) and oxidizing (combustion) environment. Operated mainly as a gasifier, the 0.25-m (10-inch) diameter reactor produces up to 227 kg/hr (500 lb/hr) of coal gas at 866 K (1,100{degrees}F) and 30 atmospheres (425 psig) for downstream testing. The raw coal gas is sampled for major and trace species and sent to a filter vessel capable of operating at 894 K (1,150{degrees}F) and 20 atmospheres (290 psig) of pressure. After particulate removal, the gas can be independently controlled to up to five sampling or reaction vessels including fluid-bed desulfurization, transport desulfurization, chloride, alkali, or other contaminant removal or recovery processes. The fluid-bed desulfurizer is capable of being isolated, purged, and exposed to an oxidizing environment for sorbent regeneration or other oxidation reaction. Isokinetic hazardous air pollutant (HAPS) monitoring is provided at the upstream and downstream of particulate removal. Over the post three years, 1,200 hours of operation have been completed in support of six separate Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs). These research agreements have been in the areas of candle filters and materials testing, direct sulfur recovery from sorbent regeneration tail gases, and gasifier development.

  5. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  6. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  7. Hot gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells. A zinc oxide reactor model, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.

    1980-09-16

    Utilization of coal gasifiers to power MCFC requires a cleanup system to remove sulfur and particulates. Of the two near term options available for desulfurization of gasifier effluent, namely low temperature cleanup utilizing absorber/stripper technology, and hot gas cleanup utilizing metal oxides, there is a clear advantage to using hot gas cleanup. Since the MCFC will operate at 1200/sup 0/F, and the gasifier effluent could be between 1200 to 1900/sup 0/F, a hot gas cleanup system will require little or no change in process gas temperature, thereby contributing to a high overall system efficiency. A hot gas cleanup system will consist of FeO for bulk H/sub 2/S removal and ZnO for reduction of H/sub 2/S to sub ppM levels. Hot gas cleanup systems at present are not available commercially, and therefore it is the objective of this project to model the components of the system in order to help bring this technology closer to commercialization, by providing simulated operating characteristics to aid in system design, and system simulations of gasifier/MCFC systems. The modeling of the ZnO reactor is presented.

  8. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  9. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  10. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  11. Sulfur hexafluoride gas tracer studies in streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, D.E.; Gulliver, J.S.; Parkhill, K.L.

    1998-08-01

    Gas tracers are useful investigative tools in the study of reaeration and the fate of volatile organic contaminants in many natural streams. They enable the direct measurement of a variety of stream parameters, including the gas exchange rates between the stream and the atmosphere, as well as the spreading rate for dissolved pollutants downstream of a discharge point or spill site. The air-water mass transfer coefficients, dispersion coefficients, and mean residence times in two experimental streams and one natural stream are measured using a variation of the standard volatile tracer-dye technique. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is used as the volatile tracer and rhodamine WT is used as the conservative tracer. The low limit of quantification of SF{sub 6} makes it possible to inject SF{sub 6}-rich water into many streams and avoid complications with dosing a stream with a gaseous tracer. The experimental methods are described in detail. The SF{sub 6} measurements were extremely precise, producing smooth concentration time curves. The SF{sub 6} measurements collected in side-by-side experimental channels yielded similar values of the gas transfer coefficient.

  12. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

  13. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    This two-volume report summarizes the state of the art in performance modeling of advanced high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) gas cleanup devices. Volume I contains the culmination of the research effort carried over the past 12 months and is a summary of research achievements. Volume II is the user's manual for the computer programs developed under the present research project. In this volume, Section 2 presents background information on pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion concepts, a description of the role of the advanced gas cleanup systems, and a list of advanced gas cleanup systems that are currently in development under DOE sponsorship. Section 3 describes the methodology for the software architecture that forms the basis of the well-disciplined and structured computer programs developed under the present project. Section 4 reviews the fundamental theories that are important in analyzing the cleanup performance of HTHP gas filters. Section 5 discusses the effect of alkali agents in HTHP gas cleanup. Section 6 evaluates the advanced HTHP gas cleanup models based on their mathematical integrity, availability of supporting data, and the likelihood of commercialization. As a result of the evaluation procedure detailed in Section 6, five performance models were chosen to be incorporated into the overall system simulation code, ASPEN. These five models (the electrocyclone, ceramic bag filter, moving granular bed filter, electrostatic granular bed filter, and electrostatic precipitator) are described in Section 7. The method of cost projection for these five models is discussed in Section 8. The supporting data and validation of the computer codes are presented in Section 9, and finally the conclusions and recommendations for the HTHP gas cleanup system model development are given in Section 10. 72 references, 19 figures, 25 tables.

  14. Gas stream cleaning system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kunchal, S. Kumar; Erck, Louis J.; Harris, Harry A.

    1979-04-13

    An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

  15. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  16. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

    2003-09-01

    The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high

  17. Conversion method for gas streams containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Mallinson, Richard G.; Lobban, Lance; Liu, Chang-jun

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method of using the apparatus are provided for converting a gas stream containing hydrocarbons to a reaction product containing effluent molecules having at least one carbon atom, having at least one interior surface and at least one exterior surface, a first electrode and a second electrode with the first and second electrodes being selectively movable in relation to each other and positioned within the housing so as to be spatially disposed a predetermined distance from each other, a plasma discharge generator between the first and second electrodes, gas stream introducer and a collector for collecting the reaction product effluent produced by the reaction of the gas stream containing hydrocarbons with the plasma discharge between the first and second electrodes.

  18. Kinetics of combined SO/sub 2//NO in flue gas clean-up

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.

    1985-03-01

    The kinetics of reactions involving SO/sub 2/, NO, and ferrous chelate additives in wet flue gas simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification scrubbers are discussed. The relative importance of these reactions are assessed. The relevance of these reactions to spray dryer processes for combined SO/sub 2//NO flue gas clean-up is addressed. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Tritium test of cryogenic molecular sieve bed for He GDC gas cleanup by 60 SLM test loop

    SciTech Connect

    Enoeda, Mikio; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Okuno, Kenji

    1996-12-31

    This work presents demonstrative test results of CMSB by simulated helium glow discharge exhaust gas condition in 60 l/min of flow rate. This work focused on H{sub 2} and HT adsorption and regeneration performance of CMSB and optimum regeneration procedure, so that the operation cycle time becomes smaller. Test results showed consistency with bench-scale experiments. Obtained engineering data are applicable for the design of the CMSB process for ITER He GDC gas cleanup. As the results of this work, it was demonstrated that CMSB process could clean up 54.3 SLM of He stream with H{sub 2}(400) ppm+HT(0.5 ppm). Regeneration performance in various total pressure were obtained and evaluated by the calculation and clarified necessary information for determining the optimum regeneration procedure of CMSB which allow continuous operation in the shorter period of operation cycle (adsorption and regeneration). 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Strategies for NO{sub x} cleanup from air streams using dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, A.C.; Kushner, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Efficient processes for the removal of NO{sub x} from exhaust gases due to the combustion of fossil fuels is of increasing interest due to stringent EPA limits on allowable emissions. Strategies for plasma remediation of NO{sub x} using both reduction (N + NO {yields} N{sub 2} + O) and oxidation (NO{sub 2} + OH {yields} HNO{sub 3}) techniques are being developed as an energy efficient cleansing method. The dry reduction technique is preferred since there is no acidic waste product. The authors have developed a plasma chemistry computer model for atmospheric pressure gas streams excited by dielectric barrier discharges to investigate optimum methods to remove NO{sub x} from air. They will report on efficiencies for removing 100s ppm of NO{sub x} while varying water content and power deposition. Comparisons will be made to experiments by Chang et. al.

  1. Giant Intergalactic Gas Stream Longer Than Thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A giant stream of gas flowing from neighbor galaxies around our own Milky Way is much longer and older than previously thought, astronomers have discovered. The new revelations provide a fresh insight on what started the gaseous intergalactic streamer. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to fill important gaps in the picture of gas streaming outward from the Magellanic Clouds. The first evidence of such a flow, named the Magellanic Stream, was discovered more than 30 years ago, and subsequent observations added tantalizing suggestions that there was more. However, the earlier picture showed gaps that left unanswered whether this other gas was part of the same system. "We now have answered that question. The stream is continuous," said David Nidever, of the University of Virginia. "We now have a much more complete map of the Magellanic Stream," he added. The astronomers presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. The Magellanic Clouds are the Milky Way's two nearest neighbor galaxies, about 150,000 to 200,000 light-years distant from the Milky Way. Visible in the Southern Hemisphere, they are much smaller than our Galaxy and may have been distorted by its gravity. Nidever and his colleagues observed the Magellanic Stream for more than 100 hours with the GBT. They then combined their GBT data with that from earlier studies with other radio telescopes, including the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico, the Parkes telescope in Australia, and the Westerbork telescope in the Netherlands. The result shows that the stream is more than 40 percent longer than previously known with certainty. One consequence of the added length of the gas stream is that it must be older, the astronomers say. They now estimate the age of the stream at 2.5 billion years. The revised size and age of the Magellanic Stream also provides a new potential explanation for how the flow got started

  2. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  3. The effect of water spray upon incineration flue gas clean-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haigang; Li, Bin; Liu, Shi; Pan, Zhonggang; Yan, Guizhang

    2000-06-01

    The existence of liquid water was found very important in incineration flue gas clean-up systems for enhancing the absorption of acid components contained. In a newly developed incineration flue gas clean-up tower, which works in a semi-dry mode, the water is injected in the form of spray to maximum its contact surface with the gas. The criteria for the design of the water nozzles would be high water concentration but no liquid impinging on the solid wall and complete evaporation inside the tower. In order to optimize the atomizer design, the effects of the spray type (hollow or solid cone), their initial droplet size distribution and water flow rate on the performance of the acid gas absorption were investigated. The liquid behaviour was studied with a fluid dynamic simulation code, and the overall performance was checked experimentally. This paper presents the use of a commercial CFD code, FLUENT, and some modifications made during such investigation. The modification includes the viscosity of the flue gas defined as a function of the temperature, and the initial mass fraction of different droplet size group described with an exponential distribution formula of Rosin-Rammler. The investigation results (the optimal spray parameters) were used to guide the water nozzle design. The general performance of the flue gas clean-up system measured during the plant operation complied with the design criteria.

  4. Task 3.10 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup: Topical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}-, CO-, and CH{sub 4}-rich mixtures of gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life, it is desired to separate as much of the inert components (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i e., H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}) as possible from the fuel gas before it enters the fuel cell. In addition, the economics of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) can be improved by separating as much of the hydrogen as possible from the fuel, since hydrogen is a high-value product. Researchers at the Energy {ampersand} Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Bend Research, Inc., investigated pressure-driven membranes as a method for accomplishing this gas separation and hot- gas cleanup. These membranes are operated at temperatures as high as 800{degrees}C and at pressures up to 300 psig. They have very small pore sizes that separate the undesirable gases by operating in the Knudsen diffusion region of mass transport (30-50 A) or in the molecular sieving region of mass transport phenomena (less than 5A). In addition, H{sub 2} separation through a palladium metal membrane proceeds via a solution- diffusion mechanism for atomic hydrogen. This allows the membranes to exhibit extremely high selectivity for hydrogen separation.

  5. Task 6.5 - Gas Separation and Hot-Gas Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael L.; Ness Jr., Robert O.; Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Donald P.

    1997-06-01

    Catalytic gasification of coal to produce H{sub 2}- and CH{sub 4}-rich gases for consumption in molten carbonate fuel cells is currently under development; however, to optimize the fuel cell performance and extend its operating life, it is desired to separate as much of the inerts (i.e., CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and impurities (i.e., H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}) as possible from the fuel gas before they enter the fuel cell. In addition, the economics of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) can be improved by separating as much of the hydrogen as possible from the fuel, since hydrogen is a high-value product. One process currently under development by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) for accomplishing this gas separation and hot-gas cleanup involves gas separation membranes. These membranes are operated at temperatures as high as 800 C and pressures up to 300 psig. Some of these membranes can have very small pores (30-50 {angstrom}), which inefficiently separate the undesired gases by operating in the Knudsen diffusion region of mass transport. Other membranes with smaller pore sizes (<5 {angstrom}) operate in the molecular sieving region of mass transport phenomena, Dissolution of atomic hydrogen into thin metallic membranes made of platinum and palladium alloys is also being developed. Technological and economic issues that must be resolved before gas separation membranes are commercially viable include improved gas separation efficiency, membrane optimization, sealing of membranes in pressure vessels, high burst strength of the ceramic material, pore thermal stability, and material chemical stability. Hydrogen separation is dependent on the temperature, pressure, pressure ratio across the membrane, and ratio of permeate flow to total flow. For gas separation under Knudsen diffusion, increasing feed pressure and pressure ratio across the membrane should increase gas permeability; decreasing the temperature and the permeate-to-total flow

  6. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  7. NANOMATERIAL SOLUTIONS FOR HOT COAL GAS CLEANUP - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a new coal gasification technique that efficiently uses the hot (900-1500°C) generated syngas to power both steam and gas turbines. Due to regulations, this syngas must be free of sulfur and purification is normally carried ...

  8. A novel carbon-based process for flue gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K. ); Silveston, P.L. )

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the preliminary technical and economic feasibility of a novel carbon-based process for removal of at least 95% SO{sub 2} and at least 75% NO{sub x} from coal combustion flue gas. In the process, flue gas leaving the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is passed through a trickle bed of activated carbon catalyst employing a periodic flush of low strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2} is oxidized to SO{sub 3} and removed as medium strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2}-free flue gas is then mixed with NH{sub 3}, and the NO{sub x} in the gas is subjected to selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to N{sub 2} over a fixed bed of activated carbon catalyst. In the previous three quarters, a detailed project management plan was prepared describing the experimental setup, work plan, and test plan. The experimental system was completed for SO{sub 2} conversion at Waterloo and for NO{sub x} conversion at RTI. Shakedown experiments were completed. In the present quarter, the NO{sub x} removal performance of two additional modified carbon catalysts (MCCII and MCCIII) was studied. MCCII showed NO{sub x} removal efficiency which was similar to that observed for MCCI. However, MCCI was considerably less active for NO{sub x} removal. SO{sub 2} removal experiments with NO present in the feed gas were performed with MCCI. SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was consistently about 98% over each of 10 cycles and was very similar to that observed earlier with no NO present in the feed. Finally, a preliminary economic evaluation of the process was performed and a project review meeting was held. The economic evaluation showed that the Rn-Waterloo process was competitive with SCR/IFGD and other combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, removal processes.

  9. A novel carbon-based process for flue gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the preliminary technical and economic feasibility of a novel carbon-based process for removal of at least 95% SO{sub 2} and at least 75% NO{sub x} from coal combustion flue gas. In the process, flue gas leaving the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is passed through a trickle bed of activated carbon catalyst employing a periodic flush of low strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2} is oxidized to SO{sub 3} and removed as medium strength sulfuric acid. The SO{sub 2}-free flue gas is then mixed with NH{sub 3}, and the NO{sub x} in the gas is subjected to selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to N{sub 2} over a fixed-bed of activated carbon catalyst. The project is being carried over 14 months (June 4, 1991 to July 31, 1992). The experimental work is divided between Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and the University of Waterloo (Waterloo). RTI will conduct the NO{sub x} removal studies, whereas Waterloo will conduct the SO{sub 2} removal studies. The ultimate goal of the project is to demonstrate that the process can reduce the cost of electricity by 20% over conventional SCR/flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. In the present quarter, a detailed project management plan was prepared describing the experimental set-up, work plan and test plan. The experimental equipment is being constructed and is nearly complete with shakedown experiments scheduled to begin on or about November 1, 1991. Also, a paper was prepared and presented for the Seventh Annual Contractor's Conference. The first set of experiments will be completed in the next quarter. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Mercury-binding membranes for flue gas clean-up

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Franklin O. Kroh; Thane Morgan

    2001-07-31

    All Phase I objectives were met. In the Phase I program, TPL developed a material, T- 450, capable of removing elemental mercury from air. It was found to have high porosity, good mechanical strength, good affinity for aqueous ionic mercury, and good stability to hot acidic gas. The material, used as a granular solid, was tested for adsorption of mercury in two protocols, one involving static room-temperature air and one using flowing hot air. In each case, it was superior to activated carbon. The following results were obtained: 1. Sol-gel methods were found to be applicable for synthesis of silicates containing oxidized thiol (disulfide) groups. 2. Synthetic parameters were determined for silicates with a variety of physical properties and performances. 3. Measurement of physical properties indicate high porosity strength, and stability to conditions found in flue gases. 4. The Hg° adsorption of T-450 was superior to that of activated carbon; static testing indicated a 2.4-fold increase in mercury adsorption, while a flow system mimicking hot flue gas indicated a 3.6-fold increase in Hg adsorption. 5. Economic analysis indicated that T-450 is a strong candidate for scale-up and commercial development. For the cost of removing Hg from flue gas, a savings of 23.5% is estimated, relative to use of activated carbon.

  11. SUBTASK 3.12 – GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS PRODUCTION WITH ILLINOIS COAL

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Curran, Tyler; Henderson, Ann

    2014-06-30

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the performance of Illinois No. 6 coal blended with biomass in a small-scale entrained-flow gasifier and demonstrate the production of liquid fuels under three scenarios. The first scenario used traditional techniques for cleaning the syngas prior to Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis, including gas sweetening with a physical solvent. In the second scenario, the CO2 was not removed from the gas stream prior to FT synthesis. In the third scenario, only warm-gas cleanup techniques were used, such that the feed gas to the FT unit contained both moisture and CO2. The results of the testing showed that the liquid fuels production from the FT catalyst was significantly hindered by the presence of moisture and CO2 in the syngas. Further testing would be needed to determine if this thermally efficient process is feasible with other FT catalysts. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  12. Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

  13. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Ventura, S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The process will generate only marketable by-products. Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water-soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI as well as polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. The final novelty of our approach is the arrangement of the absorbers in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This arrangement is possible only because of the high efficiency of the hollow fiber scrubbing devices, as indicated by our preliminary laboratory data. This arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring the large ducting and gas pressure drop costs necessary if a second conventional absorber vessel were used. Because we have separate scrubbers, we will have separate liquor loops and simplify the chemical complexity of simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing.

  14. Granular flow in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiau, S.S.; Smid, J.; Tsai, H.H.; Kuo, J.T.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Drofan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls, the velocity fields of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The PE beads with diameter of 6 mm were used as filter granules. The filter bed was filled with beads continuously and circulated until the granular flows inside the panel reached the steady state condition. In the moving granular bed, there is a central fast flowing core of filter granules surrounded by large quasi-stagnant zones located close to the louver walls. The existence of quasi-stagnant zones may result in the dust plugging problems. The velocity fields of filter granules are plotted for three different louver geometries.

  15. Engineering a new material for hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Constant, K.

    2000-03-01

    The engineering development of a promising sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas was initiated and preliminary results are presented. The sorbent is calcium-based and is designed to be regenerated and reused repeatedly. It is prepared by pelletizing powdered limestone in a rotating drum pelletizer followed by the application of a coating which becomes a strong, porous shell upon further treatment. The resulting spherical pellets combine the high reactivity of lime with the strength of an inert protective shell. Preliminary work indicates that a satisfactory shell material is comprised of a mixture of ultrafine alumina powder, somewhat coarser alumina particles, and pulverized limestone which upon heating to 1,373 K (1,100 C) becomes a coherent solid through the mechanism of particle sintering. Several batches of core-in-shell pellets were prepared and tested with encouraging results.

  16. Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.L.; Way, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The more difficult part of developing a membrane reactor was making a membrane with suitable permselectivity. Since both the ammonia and H[sub 2]S decomposition reactions produce H[sub 2], we want a membrane that selectively permeates hydrogen. We have taken the approach of coating a substrate that has fine pores (a microfilter or ultrafilter) with a completely dense layer and then (except for palladium coatings) malting super fine pores in the dense layer by leaching or pyrolysis. We used four different substrates (Norton 0.2 alumina monolith, Refractron alumina microfilters, Vycor glass, Alcoa ultrafilter) and five different coating materials (Poly N-methyl silazane, Aremco 617 alumina-based glaze, Polycyclohydridomethyl silazane, Aluminum phosphorus oxides, palladium). Only the palladium films on an alumina ultrafilter could be made regularly with a negligible defect population. The other approaches were plagued with cracks and poor reproducibility. We made palladium films on a tubular alumina ultrafilter (US Filter, Warrendale, PA) by electroless plating from a platinum amine complex solution in hydrazine (Rhoda, 1959). The best results were achieved with an ultrafilter pore size of 100 angstroms and with pretreatment of the surface in a stannic/stannous chloride solution. The films were about 5 microns thick and appeared defect free under electron microscopy. Because defect-free palladium films are infinitely selective to hydrogen with respect to the other components of gasifier product gas, we expect that the selectivity of our palladium films will exceed 1000 even with the inevitable defects that accompany real membranes. We have analyzed the performance and economics of membrane reactors for H[sub 2]S and NH[sub 3] decomposition using the reaction rates determined experimentally in our catalyst development work and using the permeation behavior of palladium films reported in the literature.

  17. Development of ceramic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.L.; Way, J.D.

    1992-11-01

    The more difficult part of developing a membrane reactor was making a membrane with suitable permselectivity. Since both the ammonia and H{sub 2}S decomposition reactions produce H{sub 2}, we want a membrane that selectively permeates hydrogen. We have taken the approach of coating a substrate that has fine pores (a microfilter or ultrafilter) with a completely dense layer and then (except for palladium coatings) malting super fine pores in the dense layer by leaching or pyrolysis. We used four different substrates (Norton 0.2 alumina monolith, Refractron alumina microfilters, Vycor glass, Alcoa ultrafilter) and five different coating materials (Poly N-methyl silazane, Aremco 617 alumina-based glaze, Polycyclohydridomethyl silazane, Aluminum phosphorus oxides, palladium). Only the palladium films on an alumina ultrafilter could be made regularly with a negligible defect population. The other approaches were plagued with cracks and poor reproducibility. We made palladium films on a tubular alumina ultrafilter (US Filter, Warrendale, PA) by electroless plating from a platinum amine complex solution in hydrazine (Rhoda, 1959). The best results were achieved with an ultrafilter pore size of 100 angstroms and with pretreatment of the surface in a stannic/stannous chloride solution. The films were about 5 microns thick and appeared defect free under electron microscopy. Because defect-free palladium films are infinitely selective to hydrogen with respect to the other components of gasifier product gas, we expect that the selectivity of our palladium films will exceed 1000 even with the inevitable defects that accompany real membranes. We have analyzed the performance and economics of membrane reactors for H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} decomposition using the reaction rates determined experimentally in our catalyst development work and using the permeation behavior of palladium films reported in the literature.

  18. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

    2001-06-30

    The overall objective of this project is the engineering development of a reusable calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. A two-step pelletization method has been employed to produce relatively strong, ''core-in-shell,'' spherical pellets. Each pellet consists of a highly reactive core surrounded by a strong, inert, porous shell. A suitable core is composed largely of CaO which reacts with H{sub 2}S to form CaS. Pellet cores have been prepared by pelletizing either pulverized limestone or plaster of Paris, and shells have been made of various materials. The most suitable shell material has been formed from a mixture of alumina and limestone particles. The core-in-shell pellets require treatment at high temperature to convert the core material to CaO and to partially sinter the shell material. Pellet cores derived from plaster of Paris have proved superior to those derived from limestone because they react more rapidly with H{sub 2}S and their reactivity does not seem to decline with repeated loading and regeneration. The rate of reaction of H{sub 2}S with CaO derived from either material is directly proportional to H{sub 2}S concentration. The rate of reaction does not appear to be affected significantly by temperature in the range of 1113 K (840 C) to 1193 K (920 C) but decreases markedly at 1233 K (960 C). The rate is not affected by shell thickness within the range tested, which also provides adequate compressive strength.

  19. Design, construction, and operation of a life-cycle test system for the evaluation of flue gas cleanup processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Yeh, James T.; Hoffman, J.S.; Longton, E.J.; Vore, P.A.; Resnik, K.P.; Gromicko, F.N.

    1995-12-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has designed, constructed, and operated a Life-Cycle Test Systems (LCTS) that will be used primarily for the investigation of dry, regenerable sorbent flue gas cleanup processes. Sorbent continuously cycles from an absorber reactor where the pollutants are removed from the flue gas, to a regenerator reactor where the activity of the spent sorbent is restored and a usable by-product stream of gas is produced. The LCTS will initially be used to evaluate the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process by determining the effects of various process parameters on SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removals. The purpose of this paper is to document the design rationale and details, the reactor/component/instrument installation, and the initial performance of the system. Although the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process will be investigated initially, the design of the LCTS evolved to make the system a multipurpose, versatile research facility. Thus, the unit can be used to investigate various other processes for pollution abatement of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates, air toxics, and/or other pollutants.

  20. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  1. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  2. Production of activated char from Illinois coal for flue gas cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Kruse, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Activated chars were produced from Illinois coal and tested in several flue gas cleanup applications. High-activity chars that showed excellent potential for both SO2 and NOx removal were prepared from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal. The SO2 (120 ??C) and NOx (25 ??C) removal performance of one char compared favorably with that of a commercial activated carbon (Calgon Centaur). The NOx removal performance of the same char at 120 ??C exceeded that of the Centaur carbon by more than 1 order of magnitude. Novel char preparation methods were developed including oxidation/thermal desorption and hydrogen treatments, which increased and preserved, respectively, the active sites for SO2 and NOx adsorption. The results of combined SO2/NOx removal tests, however, suggest that SO2 and NOx compete for similar adsorption sites and SO2 seems to be more strongly adsorbed than NO. A low-activity, low-cost char was also developed for cleanup of incinerator flue gas. A three-step method involving coal preoxidation, pyrolysis, and CO2 activation was used to produce the char from Illinois coal. Five hundred pounds of the char was tested on a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial incinerator in Germany. The char was effective in removing >97% of the dioxins and furans present in the flue gas; mercury levels were below detectable limits.

  3. Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01

    Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

  4. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  5. Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jost Wendt; Sung Jun Lee; Paul Blowers

    2008-09-30

    The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.

  6. Treatment of gas streams for removal of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, E.C.Y.

    1987-09-29

    A method is described for the purification of a stream of gas comprising a normally gaseous hydrocarbon or synthesis gas contaminated with acid gases which comprises the steps of: countercurrently contacting the gas stream in an absorption zone with a treating agent to remove a substantial portion of the acid contaminants from the hydrocarbon gas stream by absorption into the treating agent, discharging an at least partially purified hydrocarbon gas stream from the absorption zone, and discharging the treating agent enriched with absorbed acid gas components from the absorption zone. The treating agent consists essentially of an aqueous solution of from about 40 to about 60 wt. % of N-methyldiethanolamine and from about 5 to about 15 wt. % of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine.

  7. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  8. Methanation of gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having a relatively high concentration of hydrogen are pretreated so as to remove the hydrogen in a recoverable form for use in the second step of a cyclic, essentially two-step process for the production of methane. The thus-treated streams are then passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. This active carbon is reacted with said hydrogen removed from the feed gas stream to form methane. The utilization of the CO in the feed gas stream is appreciably increased, enhancing the overall process for the production of relatively pure, low-cost methane from CO-containing waste gas streams.

  9. Flue gas cleanup using the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, Henry W.; Hoffman, James S.

    2013-10-01

    The use of copper oxide on a support had been envisioned as a gas cleanup technique to remove sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation. In general, dry, regenerable flue gas cleanup techniques that use a sorbent can have various advantages, such as simultaneous removal of pollutants, production of a salable by-product, and low costs when compared to commercially available wet scrubbing technology. Due to the temperature of reaction, the placement of the process into an advanced power system could actually increase the thermal efficiency of the plant. The Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process is capable of simultaneously removing sulfur oxides and nitric oxides within the reactor system. In this regenerable sorbent technique, the use of the copper oxide sorbent was originally in a fluidized bed, but the more recent effort developed the use of the sorbent in a moving-bed reactor design. A pilot facility or life-cycle test system was constructed so that an integrated testing of the sorbent over absorption/regeneration cycles could be conducted. A parametric study of the total process was then performed where all process steps, including absorption and regeneration, were continuously operated and experimentally evaluated. The parametric effects, including absorption temperature, sorbent and gas residence times, inlet SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} concentration, and flyash loadings, on removal efficiencies and overall operational performance were determined. Although some of the research results have not been previously published because of previous collaborative restrictions, a summary of these past findings is presented in this communication. Additionally, the potential use of the process for criteria pollutant removal in oxy-firing of fossil fuel for carbon sequestration purposes is discussed.

  10. Electrolytic trapping of iodine from process gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Horner, Donald E.; Mailen, James C.; Posey, Franz A.

    1977-01-25

    A method for removing molecular, inorganic, and organic forms of iodine from process gas streams comprises the electrolytic oxidation of iodine in the presence of cobalt-III ions. The gas stream is passed through the anode compartment of a partitioned electrolytic cell having a nitric acid anolyte containing a catalytic amount of cobalt to cause the oxidation of effluent iodine species to aqueous soluble species.

  11. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Rossa W.; Zoll, August H.

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  12. A new Growing Neural Gas for clustering data streams.

    PubMed

    Ghesmoune, Mohammed; Lebbah, Mustapha; Azzag, Hanene

    2016-06-01

    Clustering data streams is becoming the most efficient way to cluster a massive dataset. This task requires a process capable of partitioning observations continuously with restrictions of memory and time. In this paper we present a new algorithm, called G-Stream, for clustering data streams by making one pass over the data. G-Stream is based on growing neural gas, that allows us to discover clusters of arbitrary shapes without any assumptions on the number of clusters. By using a reservoir, and applying a fading function, the quality of clustering is improved. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated on public datasets. PMID:26997530

  13. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  14. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  15. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  16. Developments in flue gas cleanup research at the Federal Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, H.W.; Hargis, R.A.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.S.; O`Dowd, W.J.; Warzinski, R.P.; Yeh, J.T.; Scierka, S.J.; Granite, E.J.

    1997-12-31

    A major research effort in the cleanup of flue gas, which is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, is being conducted by the in-house research program at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Novel technologies being developed can abate sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), hazardous air pollutants (also referred to as air toxics), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas. Laws within the US mandate the control of some of these pollutants and the initial characterization of others, while potential new regulations impact the status of others. Techniques that can control one or more of the targeted pollutants in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner are of prime interest. Past efforts have included low-temperature dry scrubbing SO{sub 2} removal techniques that typically use a calcium or sodium-based disposable sorbent either in a spray drying mode or in a duct injection mode of operation; novel techniques for enhancing sorbent utilization in conventional wet or dry scrubbing processes; and control of emissions produced from small-scale combustors (residential or commercial-size) that burn coal or coal/sorbent briquettes. Recent research at FETC has focused on investigations of air toxics produced by burning various coals, with a particular emphasis on the speciation of mercury and the control of the various mercury species; dry, regenerable sorbent processes that use a metal oxide sorbent to simultaneously remove SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}; catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR)-type NO{sub x} control; and the utilization and sequestering of CO{sub 2} removed from flue gas produced by fossil fuel combustion. The research projects range from laboratory-scale work to testing with the combustion products of coal at a scale equivalent to about 0.75 megawatt of electric power generation. An overview and status of the in-house flue gas cleanup projects at FETC are reported.

  17. High-temperature gas stream filter and method

    SciTech Connect

    Notestein, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to the removal of solid particulate material from high-temperature gas streams, and more particularly the removal of such particulate material by employing a barrier filter formed of a carbon-carbon composite provided by a porous carbon fiber substrate with open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed carbon fibers selectively restricted by carbon integrally attached to the carbon fibers of the substrate. In a typical utilization of a particulate-bearing hot gas stream, the particulate loading of the gas stream after cleaning is normally less than about 50 ppm and with essentially no particulates larger than about 10 microns. This carbon-carbon filter for removing particulate material of a particle size larger than a preselected particle size from a gas stream at a temperature greater than about 800 F, is produced by the steps which comprise: providing a substrate of carbonaceous fibers with pore-forming open interstitial regions between adjacently disposed fibers; and, sufficiently filling these open interstitial regions with carbon integrally attached to and supported by the fibers for providing the interstitial regions with throughgoing passage-ways of a pore size sufficient to provide for the passage of the gas stream while preventing the passage of particulate material larger than a preselected particle size.

  18. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Chou, Chun-Chao

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  19. Indirect gas chromatographic measurement of water for process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.

    1993-05-01

    This project was conducted to develop a moisture measurement method for process gas streams of fossil fuels. Objective was to from pyrolysis to measure the molar concentration of water in a gas stream without flow measurements. The method developed has been incorporated into the hydrocarbon gas analysis method currently used at Western Research Institute. A literature search of types of direct measuring moisture sensors was conducted, and a list of sensors available is given; most of them could not survive in the environment of the process streams. Indirect methods of measuring water involve changing the water via reaction to a compound that can be more readily measured. These methods react water with various reagents to form hydrogen, acetylene, and acetone. The method chose for this study uses a calcium carbide reaction column to convert the water present in the gas stream to acetylene for analysis. Relative deviation for the daily determination of water varied from 0.5 to 3.4%. The method chosen was tested for linearity over a wide range of gas stream water content. Response over 2 to 15 mole % water appears to be linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.991.

  20. Stream primary producers relate positively to watershed natural gas measures in north-central Arkansas streams.

    PubMed

    Austin, Bradley J; Hardgrave, Natalia; Inlander, Ethan; Gallipeau, Cory; Entrekin, Sally; Evans-White, Michelle A

    2015-10-01

    Construction of unconventional natural gas (UNG) infrastructure (e.g., well pads, pipelines) is an increasingly common anthropogenic stressor that increases potential sediment erosion. Increased sediment inputs into nearby streams may decrease autotrophic processes through burial and scour, or sediment bound nutrients could have a positive effect through alleviating potential nutrient limitations. Ten streams with varying catchment UNG well densities (0-3.6 wells/km(2)) were sampled during winter and spring of 2010 and 2011 to examine relationships between landscape scale disturbances associated with UNG activity and stream periphyton [chlorophyll a (Chl a)] and gross primary production (GPP). Local scale variables including light availability and water column physicochemical variables were measured for each study site. Correlation analyses examined the relationships of autotrophic processes and local scale variables with the landscape scale variables percent pasture land use and UNG metrics (well density and well pad inverse flow path length). Both GPP and Chl a were primarily positively associated with the UNG activity metrics during most sample periods; however, neither landscape variables nor response variables correlated well with local scale factors. These positive correlations do not confirm causation, but they do suggest that it is possible that UNG development can alleviate one or more limiting factors on autotrophic production within these streams. A secondary manipulative study was used to examine the link between nutrient limitation and algal growth across a gradient of streams impacted by natural gas activity. Nitrogen limitation was common among minimally impacted stream reaches and was alleviated in streams with high UNG activity. These data provide evidence that UNG may stimulate the primary production of Fayetteville shale streams via alleviation of N-limitation. Restricting UNG activities from the riparian zone along with better enforcement of

  1. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1991-12-31

    The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

  2. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Bischoff, Brian L.; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2016-07-19

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  3. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  4. Proof-of concept testing of the advanced NOXSO flue gas cleanup process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The NOXSO Process uses a regenerable sorbent that removes SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} simultaneously from flue gas. The sorbent is a stabilized {gamma}-alumina bed impregnated with sodium carbonate. The process was successfully tested at three different scales, equivalent to 0.017, 0.06 and 0.75 MW of flue gas generated from a coal-fired power plant. The Proof-of-Concept (POC) Test is the last test prior to a full-scale demonstration. A slip stream of flue gas equivalent to a 5 MW coal-fired power plant was used for the POC test. This paper summarizes the NOXSO POC plant and its test results.

  5. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  6. Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, H.J.; Judkins, R.R.

    1995-06-01

    The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of carboniferous materials in a gasifier consists predominantly of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and, for air-blown units, N{sub 2} in various proportions at temperatures ranging from about 400 to 1000{degree}C. Depending on the source of the fuel, smaller concentrations of H{sub 2}S, COS, and NH{sub 3} can also be present. The gas phase is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials used in the gasifier can occur. Therefore, there are numerous concerns about materials performance in coal gasification systems, particularly at the present time when demonstration-scale projects are in or nearing the construction and operation phases. This study focused on the subset of materials degradation phenomena resulting from carbon formation and carburization processes, which are related to potential operating problems in certain gasification components and subsystems. More specifically, it examined the current state of knowledge regarding carbon deposition and a carbon-related degradation phemonenon known as metal dusting as they affect the long-term operation of the gas clean-up equipment downstream of the gasifier and addressed possible means to mitigate the degradation processes. These effects would be primarily associated with the filtering and cooling of coal-derived fuel gases from the gasifier exit temperature to as low as 400{degree}C. However, some of the consideratins are sufficiently general to cover conditions relevant to other parts of gasification systems.

  7. Achieving Accelerated Cleanup of Cesium Contaminated Stream at the Savannah River Site; Collaboration between Stakeholders, Regulators, and the Federal Government - 13182

    SciTech Connect

    Bergren, Chris; Flora, Mary; Socha, Ron; Burch, Joseph; Freeman, Candice; Hennessey, Brian

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina that contains six primary stream/river systems. The Lower Three Runs Stream (LTR) is one of the primary streams within the site that is located in the southeast portion of the Savannah River Site and is a large black water stream system that originates in the northeast portion of SRS and follows a southerly direction before it enters the Savannah River. During reactor operations, secondary reactor cooling water, storm sewer discharges, and miscellaneous wastewater was discharged and contaminated a 36 kilometer stretch of Lower Three Runs Stream that narrows providing a limited buffer of US DOE property along the stream and flood plain. Based on data collected during 2009 and 2010 under Recover Act Funding, the stream was determined to be contaminated with cesium-137 at levels that exceeded acceptable risk based limits. As efficiencies were realized within the SRS Recovery Act Program, funding was made available to design, permit and execute remediation of the LTR. This accelerated Project allowed for the remediation of 36 kilometers of LTR in only nine months from inception to completion, contributing significantly to the Foot Print Reduction of SRS. The scope consisted of excavation and disposal of more than 2064 cubic meters of contaminated soil, and installing 11 kilometers of fence and 2,000 signs at 1000 locations. Confirmatory sampling and analysis, and radiological surveying were performed demonstrating that soil concentrations met the cleanup goals. The project completed with a very good safety record considering the harsh conditions including, excessive rain in the early stages of the project, high summer temperatures, swampy terrain, snakes, wild boar, insects and dense vegetation. The regulatory approval process was compressed by over 75% and required significant efforts from SRS

  8. Development of mercury control enhancements for flue-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1995-08-01

    Combustion sources, including those using coal for fuel, contribute a significant fraction of total anthropogenic mercury emissions. Unfortunately, recent field studies have shown that current flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems are relatively ineffective in controlling elemental mercury, which is a major component of the mercury emissions for many systems. Research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury in existing FGC systems. For dry processes, these studies have included evaluation of the factors that control mercury capture by commercial activated carbons (both with and without chemical pretreatment), testing of novel proprietary sorbents under development by several firms, and investigation of sorbents based upon chemical pretreatment of low-cost mineral substrates. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, the studies have looked at the effects of improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into more soluble species that can be easily absorbed.

  9. Hot-gas cleanup system model development. Volume II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ushimaru, K.; Bennett, A.; Bekowies, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Under Contract to the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Flow Industries, Inc., has developed computer models to simulate the physical performance of five hot-gas cleanup devices for pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), combined-cycle power plants. Separate cost models have also been developed to estimate the cost of each device. The work leading to the development of these models is described in Volume I of this report. This volume contains the user's manuals for both the physical and cost models. The manuals for the physical models are given first followed by those for the cost models. Each manual is a complete and separate document. The model names and devices and their respective subroutine names are: (1) Moving Granular Bed Filter by Combustion Power Company, USRCGB, QFCOST; (2) Ceramic Bag Filter by Acurex, USRACB, QDCOST; (3) Electrostatic Granular Bed Filter by General Electric, USRGGB, QACOST; (4) Electrostatic Precipitator by Research Cottrell, USRCEP, QECOST; and (5) Electrocyclone by General Electric, USRGCY, QBCOST.

  10. Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. Progress report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

    1992-08-27

    Progress includes studies of the adsorption and desorption of SO{sub 2} on alumina and impregnated alumina. This report describes the adsorption and desorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide in contact with a high purity {gamma}-alumina and initial results of our efforts to prepare samples of the {gamma}-alumina decorated with magnesium acetylacetonate dehydrate [Mg(acac){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]. The NOXSO regenerable flue gas cleanup catalyst uses a {gamma}-alumina which has been doped with sodium through an aqueous impregnation with sodium carbonate and subsequent calcination. We are investigating other metals as promoters for the adsorption Of S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} on alumina. We have characterized the aluminas with regard to impurities present and crystallinity and have set up a controlled environment infrared spectroscopic cell and thermal gravimetric apparatus. These issues have been covered in previous reports. In this report, we report our adsorption/desorption studies of S0{sub 2} on pure alumina. As part of our investigation of the modification of alumina surfaces for the selective adsorption Of S0{sub 2,} we are investigating the use of non-aqueous impregnation techniques for the preparation of well-dispersed monolayers of promoters on alumina surfaces.

  11. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  12. Biomass gasification with air in fluidized bed. Hot gas cleanup with selected commercial and full-size nickel-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, M.A.; Corella, J.; Aznar, M.P.; Gil, J.

    2000-05-01

    Three selected commercial, full-size steam-reforming catalysts for naphthas, BASF G1-50, ICI 46-1, and Topsoee R-67, are tested at pilot-scale level for hot gas cleanup in biomass gasification in a fluidized bed. Gas composition and tar content in the flue gas are measured before and after the catalytic bed. Variations of the catalytic bed in H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O contents are reported for different operating conditions. Tar conversions and an apparent first-order kinetics constant for the overall tar removal reaction are calculated. Tar contents at the exit of the catalytic reactor as low as 10 mg/m{sub n}{sup 3} are obtained in a test of 50 h-on-stream without noticeable catalyst deactivation. Important variations in tar conversion with space time in the catalytic bed, with H{sub 2}O/C* in the flue gas, and with the equivalence ratio in the upstream gasifier are observed. These results obtained at the pilot-scale level and with the use of full-sized commercial catalysts are an important forward step in demonstrating the technical feasibility of the overall biomass gasification process.

  13. A novel carbon-based process for flue-gas cleanup. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Howe, G.B.; McMichael, W.J.; Spivey, J.J.

    1993-10-01

    A low-temperature process employing activated carbon-based catalysts and operating downstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was evaluated jointly by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) and the University of Waterloo (Waterloo). The RTI-Waterloo process was projected to be capable of removing more than 95% SO{sub 2} and 75% NO{sub x }from coal combustion flue gas. In the process, the flue gas leaving the ESP is first cooled to approximately 100{degree}C. The SO{sub 2} is then catalytically oxidized to SO{sub 3} which is removed as medium-strength sulfuric acid in a series of periodically flushed trickle-bed reactors containing an activated carbon-based catalyst. The SO{sub 2}-free gas is then reheated to approximately 150{degree}C and NH{sub 3} is injected into the gas stream. It is then passed over a fixed bed of another activated carbon-based catalyst to reduce the NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The clean flue gas is then vented to the stack. The feasibility of the process has been demonstrated in laboratory-scale experiments using simulated flue gas. Catalysts have been identified that gave the required performance for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal with <25 ppM NH{sub 3} slip. Potential for producing up to 10 N sulfuric acid by periodically flushing the SO{sub 2} removal reactor and further concentration to industrial strength 93.17% sulfuric acid was also demonstrated. Using the results of the experimental work, an engineering evaluation was conducted. Cost for the RTI-Waterloo process was competitive with conventional selective catalytic reduction (SCR) -- flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process and other emerging combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal processes.

  14. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The SNRB{trademark} Flue Gas Cleanup Demonstration Project was cooperatively funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO), B&W, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Ohio Edison, Norton Chemical Process Products Company and the 3M Company. The SNRB{trademark} technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. Development of the SNRB{trademark} process at B&W began with pilot testing of high-temperature dry sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} removal in the 1960`s. Integration of NO{sub x} reduction was evaluated in the 1970`s. Pilot work in the 1980`s focused on evaluation of various NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, SO{sub 2} sorbents and integration of the catalyst with the baghouse. This early development work led to the issuance of two US process patents to B&W - No. 4,309,386 and No. 4,793,981. An additional patent application for improvements to the process is pending. The OCDO was instrumental in working with B&W to develop the process to the point where a larger scale demonstration of the technology was feasible. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B&W tested the SNRB{trademark} pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB{trademark} process. The SNRB{trademark} facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993.

  15. Toxicological and chemical characterization of the process stream materials and gas combustion products of an experimental low-Btu coal gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hanson, R.L.; Royer, R.E.; Clark, C.R.; Henderson, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    The process gas stream of an experimental pressurized McDowell-Wellman stirred-bed low-Btu coal gasifier, and combustion products of the clean gas were characterized as to their mutagenic properties and chemical composition. Samples of aerosol droplets condensed from the gas were obtained at selected positions along the process stream using a condenser train. Mutagenicity was assessed using the Ames Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay (TA98, with and without rat liver S9). All materials required metabolic activation to be mutagenic. Droplets condensed from gas had a specific mugtagenicity of 6.7 reverants/..mu..g (50,000 revertants/liter of raw gas). Methylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and nitrogen-containing compounds were positively identified in a highly mutagenic fraction of raw gas condensate. While gas cleanup by the humidifier-tar trap system and Venturi scrubber led to only a small reduction in specific mutagenicity of the cooled process stream material (4.1 revertants/..mu..g), a significant overall reduction in mutagenicity was achieved (to 2200 reverants/liter) due to a substantial reduction in the concentration of material in the gas. By the end of gas cleanup, gas condensates had no detectable mutagenic activity. Condensates of combustion product gas, which contained several polycyclic aromatic compounds, had a specific mutagenicity of 1.1 revertants/..mu..g (4.0 revertants/liter). Results indicate that the process stream material is potentially toxic and that care should be taken to limit exposure of workers to the aerosolized tars emitted in fugitive emissions. Health risks to general population resulting from exposure to gas combustion products are expected to be minimal. 28 references.

  16. Hot gas cleanup and gas turbine aspects of an advanced PFBC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. ); Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E. . Science and Technology Center)

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the second-generation PFBC development program is to advance this concept to a commercial status. Three major objectives of the current Phase 2 program activities are to: Separately test key components of the second-generation PFBC power plant at sub-scale to ascertain their performance characteristics, Revise the commercial plant performance and economic predictions where necessary, Prepare for a 1.6 MWe equivalent Phase 3 integrated subsystem test of the key components. The key components of the plant, with respect to development risk, are the carbonizer, the circulating PFBC unit, the ceramic barrier filter, and the topping combustor. This paper reports on the development and testing of one key component -- the ceramic barrier filter for the carbonizer fuel gas. The objective of the Phase 2 carbonizer ceramic barrier filter testing has been to confirm filter performance and operability in the carbonizer fuel gas environment.

  17. Process for removing SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ compounds from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.

    1989-02-14

    A process is described for removing SO/sub x/ compounds from a feed gas stream and producing a purified gas stream of reduced SO/sub x/ content, which process comprises: contacting a feed gas stream containing SO/sub x/ compounds; withdrawing from step (1) a liquid stream of spent absorbent containing the absorbed SO/sub x/ compounds; regenerating the spent absorbent back to a form active for absorbing SO/sub x/ compounds; separating the products of step (3) into a liquid stream containing a regenerated absorbent and a product gas stream containing H/sub 2/S; recycling at least some of the liquid stream containing regenerated absorbent; and recovering the purified gas stream of reduced SO/sub x/ content and the product gas stream containing H/sub 2/S.

  18. Gas-rich and gas-poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations, we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second-order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109 M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few × 107 M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z = 10 is ˜10 per cent for objects with M ˜ 107 M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas-dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  19. Gas-rich and gas poor structures through the stream velocity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Cristina; Naoz, Smadar; Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Using adiabatic high-resolution numerical simulations we quantify the effect of the streaming motion of baryons with respect to dark matter at the time of recombination on structure formation and evolution. Formally a second order effect, the baryonic stream velocity has proven to have significant impact on dark matter halo abundance, as well as on the gas content and morphology of small galaxy clusters. In this work, we study the impact of stream velocity on the formation and gas content of haloes with masses up to 109M⊙, an order of magnitude larger than previous studies. We find that the non-zero stream velocity has a sizable impact on the number density of haloes with masses ≲ few× 107M⊙ up to z = 10, the final redshift of our simulations. Furthermore, the gas stream velocity induces a suppression of the gas fraction in haloes, which at z=10 is ˜10% for objects with M ˜ 107M⊙, as well as a flattening of the gas density profiles in the inner regions of haloes. We further identify and study the formation, in the context of a non-zero stream velocity, of moderately long lived gas dominated structures at intermediate redshifts 10 < z < 20, which Naoz and Narayan have recently proposed as potential progenitors of globular clusters.

  20. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  1. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  2. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  3. A method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Huang, Hann-Sheng

    1997-12-01

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents.

  4. Method for the removal of elemental mercury from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.

    1999-05-04

    A method is provided to remove elemental mercury from a gas stream by reacting the gas stream with an oxidizing solution to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds. Other constituents are also oxidized. The gas stream is then passed through a wet scrubber to remove the mercuric compounds and oxidized constituents. 7 figs.

  5. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  6. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  7. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Final report, February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Bhown, A.S.; Alvarado, D.; Pakala, N.; Tagg, T.; Riggs, T.; Ventura, S.; Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumick, D.

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this work by SRI International was to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regenerating spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. High efficiency, hollow fiber contactors (HFCs) were proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system would be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub 2} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process would generate only marketable by-products, if any (no waste streams are anticipated). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, the approach was to reduce the capital cost by using high-efficiency, hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The authors also introduced new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. The process and progress in its development are described.

  8. Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Bustard, Cynthia Jean

    1999-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  9. Efficient gas-separation process to upgrade dilute methane stream for use as fuel

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C.; Lin, Haiqing; Thompson, Scott; Daniels, Ramin

    2012-03-06

    A membrane-based gas separation process for treating gas streams that contain methane in low concentrations. The invention involves flowing the stream to be treated across the feed side of a membrane and flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side. Carbon dioxide permeates the membrane preferentially and is picked up in the sweep air stream on the permeate side; oxygen permeates in the other direction and is picked up in the methane-containing stream. The resulting residue stream is enriched in methane as well as oxygen and has an EMC value enabling it to be either flared or combusted by mixing with ordinary air.

  10. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, D.; Bhown, A.; Ventura, S.; Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, D.

    1993-04-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent S0{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO(x) and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize stationary well-known problems with S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example, we will extract the S0{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI and also of polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO(x) scrubbing media described in the open literature. Our past work with the phthalocyanine compounds, used as sensors for NO and N0{sub 2} in flue gases, shows that these compounds bind NO and N0{sub 2} reversibly and with no interference from 0{sub 2}, C0{sub 2}, S0{sub 2}, or other components of flue gas.

  11. The Interstellar Gas Dust Streams and Seeds of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleg, Khavroshkin; Vladislav, Tsyplakov

    Gas dust Streams from Double Stars & Lunar Seismicity. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on the ordinate axis the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on abscissa axis - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were used. Spectrum of the series disclosed time picks on hidden cosmological periodicities of lunar seismicity. A part of results (picks) presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. The explanation of that results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars systems and interacting of it with lunar surface. Information content of the Nakamura`s Catalog of moonquakes is very rich: from solar-earth tides to clustering among the meteoroid streams [1, 2]. The histograms from meteoroid impacts seismic data revealed the seismic wave responses of the Moon to solar oscillations and the action on the lunar surface by dust-gas plasma of meteoroid streams [3]. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on an axis of ordinates - the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on an abscissa - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were put aside [4]. Spectrum of the series of meteoroid streams seismicity disclosed time picks on orbital periods some planets and their satellites and solar oscillations [4, 5]. The research of peculiarities of histogram envelopes [3] and comparative common analysis solar bursts data and mass meteoroid distribution are confirmed [3, 4] and revealed Forbush`s effect for gas-dust plasma [6]. Hidden astrophysical periodicities of lunar seismicity were obtained early from an analysis of time series [7] which were similarity to series [4]. The path of results of [7] is presented in the Table where picks presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. Hypothesis for explanation of the Table results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars near

  12. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-12-15

    This is the fourth quarterly report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Task 1 of this contract concerns analyses of HGCU ashes and descriptions of filter performance that are designed to address the problems with filter operation linked to the characteristics of the collected ash. Task 2 of this contract includes characterization of new and used filter elements. Some of the problems observed at the Tidd and Karhula PFBC facilities include excessive filtering pressure drop, the formation of large, tenacious ash deposits within the filter vessel, and bent or broken candle filter elements. These problems have been attributed to ash characteristics, durability of the ceramic filter elements, and specific limitations of the filter design. In addition to these problems related to the characteristics of PFBC ashes, our laboratory characterizations of gasifier and carbonize ashes have shown that these ashes also have characteristics that might negatively affect filtration. Problems with the durability of the filter elements are being addressed by the development and evaluation of elements constructed from alternative ceramic materials.

  13. Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-19

    This is the first annual report describing the activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. Task I of this contract is concerned with the analyses of HGCU ashes and descriptions of filter performance and is designed to address the problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to the characteristics of the collected ash. Task 2 of this contract includes characterization of new and used filter elements. Some of the problems observed at the Tidd and Karhula PFBC facilities include excessive filtering pressure drop, the formation of large, tenacious ash deposits within the filter vessel, and bent or broken candle filter elements. In addition to these problems related to the characteristics of PFBC ashes and the ceramic materials used to construct candle filters, our previous laboratory characterizations of gasifier and carbonizer ashes have shown that these ashes also have characteristics that might negatively affect filtration.

  14. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Mulderink, Kenneth A.; Marin, Ovidiu

    2005-09-13

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  15. Composite clay materials for removal of SOx from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.; Polansky, C.A.; Amarasekera, J.

    1993-07-06

    A method is described for preparing a composite material capable of removing SO[sub x] from a gas stream comprising the steps of: (a) providing a suspension containing a smectite clay in water; (b) dissolving an amount of sodium carbonate in the suspension of the clay; (c) adding a soluble alkaline earth metal salt in stoichiometric amount for reaction with the sodium carbonate to form an alkaline earth metal carbonate precipitate in the suspension with the clay; and (d) drying the suspension to provide the composite material, wherein when the composite material is heated, the SO[sub x], is removed from the gas. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal carbonate and clay are mixed with an iron salt selected from the group consisting of ferric chloride and ferric nitrate. A method is described in accordance with claim 3 wherein the alkaline earth metal is selected from the group consisting of magnesium and calcium.

  16. Method for directly recovering fluorine from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Orlett, Michael J.; Saraceno, Anthony J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a process for the direct recovery of gaseous fluorine from waste-gas streams or the like. The process comprises passing the gas stream through a bed of anhydrous K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets to fluorinate the same to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 and subsequently desorbing the fluorine by heating the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.7 pellets to a temperature re-converting them to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6. The efficiency of the fluorine-absorption step is maximized by operating in a selected and conveniently low temperature. The desorbed fluorine is highly pure and is at a pressure of several atmospheres. Preferably, the K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6 pellets are prepared by a method including the steps of forming agglomerates of hydrated K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5, sintering the agglomerates to form K.sub.3 NiF.sub.5 pellets of enhanced reactivity with respect to fluorine, and fluorinating the sintered pellets to K.sub.3 NiF.sub.6.

  17. Catalytic process for removing toxic gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Baglio, J.A.; Gaudet, G.G.; Palilla, F.C.

    1983-02-22

    A multi-stage process for reducing the content of sulfurcontaining gases-notably hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide-in waste gas streams is provided. In the first stage, the gas stream is passed through a reaction zone at a temperature between about 150 and 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a pretreated novel catalyst of the formula xLn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in which Ln is yttrium or a rare earth element and T is cobalt, iron or nickel, and each of x and y is independently a number from 0 to 3, said catalyst being substantially non-crystalline and having a surface area of from about 10 m/sup 2//g to about 40 m/sup 2//g. The preferred catalyst is one in which Ln is lanthanum, T is cobalt, and x and y range from 1 to 3, including non-integers. The first stage yields a product stream having a reduced content of sulfur-containing gases, including specifically, substantial reduction of carbonyl sulfide and virtual elimination of carbon disulfide. An intermediate stage is a claus reaction, which may take place in one or more reaction zones, at temperatures less than about 130/sup 0/ C, in the presence of known catalysts such as bauxite, alumina or cobalt molybdates. The final stage is the air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide at a temperature between about 150 and 300/sup 0/ C in the presence of a catalyst usable in first stage.

  18. The Interstellar Gas Dust Streams and Seeds of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleg, Khavroshkin; Vladislav, Tsyplakov

    Gas dust Streams from Double Stars & Lunar Seismicity. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on the ordinate axis the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on abscissa axis - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were used. Spectrum of the series disclosed time picks on hidden cosmological periodicities of lunar seismicity. A part of results (picks) presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. The explanation of that results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars systems and interacting of it with lunar surface. Information content of the Nakamura`s Catalog of moonquakes is very rich: from solar-earth tides to clustering among the meteoroid streams [1, 2]. The histograms from meteoroid impacts seismic data revealed the seismic wave responses of the Moon to solar oscillations and the action on the lunar surface by dust-gas plasma of meteoroid streams [3]. The time series of seismic events were generated as follows: on an axis of ordinates - the peak amplitudes of events in standard units, on an abscissa - seismogram durations of the same moonquakes and subsequent time intervals between them were put aside [4]. Spectrum of the series of meteoroid streams seismicity disclosed time picks on orbital periods some planets and their satellites and solar oscillations [4, 5]. The research of peculiarities of histogram envelopes [3] and comparative common analysis solar bursts data and mass meteoroid distribution are confirmed [3, 4] and revealed Forbush`s effect for gas-dust plasma [6]. Hidden astrophysical periodicities of lunar seismicity were obtained early from an analysis of time series [7] which were similarity to series [4]. The path of results of [7] is presented in the Table where picks presents orbital periods of double stars nearest to the Solar system. Hypothesis for explanation of the Table results is existing gas-dust streams from binary stars near

  19. Evaluation of gasification and gas-cleanup processes for use in molten-carbonate fuel-cell power plants. Task D topical report summary analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Vidt, E.J.

    1982-06-08

    In previous tasks, ten coal gas system configurations were chosen for fuel supply to MCFC power plants. In this report, we have ranked configurations by efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effects. The ranking shows that, for MCFC power plants, air-blown, low-Btu, fluidized-bed or entrained-bed gasification systems with hot gas cleanup have cost, operability, efficiency, and environmental advantages over other systems. The cost of electricity, for example, from a hot-gas cleanup, low-Btu, fluidized-bed fuel supply system is 12 percent less than from a medium-Btu system with hot cleanup, and is about 20 percent less than a medium-Btu system with conventional wet, low-temperature cleanup. Additional development of hot cleanup systems is required. Hot halogen removal costs used in this report need to have experimental verification, as does the effectiveness of ZnO for removing H/sub 2/S/COS to below 1 ppM at 650/sup 0/C. Also, the availability of a more effective hot bulk desulfurization system, such as the zinc ferrite system now under development by DOE/METC, would have additional benefits in cost and efficiency for MCFC power plants.

  20. Method for cleansing noxious constituents from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.J.; Schauer, J.M.

    1982-05-18

    An apparatus and method for chemically altering and scrubbing the noxious constituents from foundry core manufacturing and arc welding operations is disclosed. An upstanding closed container is provided and a gas washing liquid is disposed within the container to a predetermined level. A horizontal baffle is mounted stationarily within the container at an elevation spaced above the level of the gas washing liquid therein and spaced peripheral portions of the baffle are spaced inwardly of the opposing inner surface of the container. A gas drive pipe extends into the container, downwardly past the baffle , and opens downwardly in a central lower portion of the container, below the baffle and near the bottom of the liquid. The container includes a top cover and an outlet duct is provided which opens outwardly of the container through a central portion of the cover. The gases are pumped into the drive pipe to achieve a critical velocity at the exit of the drive pipe of about 2, 300-20,000 linear feet per minu entering the liquid in a substantially vertical downward direction within the critical velocity range, small gascontaining bubbles, on the order of 1/8 - 3/8 inches in diameter, are formed as the gas stream rises, which bubbles impact against the horizontal baffle. The high velocity gases impart sufficient kinetic energy to the system to enable the necessary chemical reactions and scrubbing to proceed.

  1. Assessing sorbent injection mercury control effectiveness in flue gas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    One promising approach for removing mercury from coal-fired, utility flue gas involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility coal-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents in this application. Bench-scale, pilot-scale, and field tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. This paper focuses on recent bench-scale and field test results evaluating the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon and fly ash and the use of these results to develop a predictive mercury removal model. Field tests with activated carbon show that adsorption characteristics measured in the lab agree reasonably well with characteristics measured in the field. However, more laboratory and field data will be needed to identify other gas phase components which may impact performance. This will allow laboratory tests to better simulate field conditions and provide improved estimates of sorbent performance for specific sites. In addition to activated carbon results, bench-scale and modeling results using fly ash are presented which suggest that certain fly ashes are capable of adsorbing mercury.

  2. Fate of a few selected trace elements in pressurized fluidized-bed gasification and hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Mojtahedi, W.; Salo, K.

    1996-12-31

    Increasingly more stringent environmental regulations have focused attention on the emissions of the so-called air toxics toxic trace elements (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se). In this paper, the results of an experimental program designed to measure the emissions of a few selected trace elements from a 15 MW{sub th} pressurized fluidized bed gasification pilot plant are reported and discussed. The pilot plant is equipped with an advanced hot gas cleanup train which includes a two fluidized-bed reactor system for high-temperature, high-pressure external sulfur removal and a filtration unit housing porous, rigid ceramic candle filters. The trace element concentrations in the fuel, bottom ash, and filter ash are determined and the results compared with EPA regulatory levels.

  3. Method of purifying a gas stream using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunald; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    A method for separating a target gas from a gaseous mixture using 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids is presented. Industrial effluent streams may be cleaned by removing carbon dioxide from the stream by contacting the effluent stream with a 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquid compound.

  4. Preferential oxidation of methanol and carbon monoxide for gas cleanup during methanol fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsell, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Inbody, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Methanol fuel processing generates hydrogen for low-temperature, PEM fuel cell systems now being considered for transportation and other applications. Although liquid methanol fuel is convenient for this application, existing fuel processing techniques generate contaminants that degrade fuel cell performance. Through mathematical models and laboratory experiments chemical processing is described that removes CO and other contaminants from the anode feed stream.

  5. Coaxial twin-fluid atomization with pattern air gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei Ng, Chin; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Coaxial twin-fluid atomization has numerous industrial applications, most notably fuel injection and spray coating. In the coating process of pharmaceutical tablets, the coaxial atomizing air stream is accompanied by two diametrically opposed side jets that impinge on the liquid/gas coaxial jets at an angle to produce an elliptical shape of the spray's cross section. Our study focuses on the influence of these side jets on the break up process and on the droplet velocity and diameter distribution along the cross section. The ultimate goal is to predict the size distribution and volume flux per unit area in the spray. With this predictive model, an optimal atomizing air/pattern air ratio can be found to achieve the desired coating result. This model is also crucial in scaling up the laboratory setup to production level. We have performed experiments with different atomized liquids, such as water and glycerine-water mixtures, that allow us to establish the effect of liquid viscosity, through the Ohnesorge number, in the spray characteristics. The gas Reynolds number of our experiments ranges from 9000 to 18000 and the Weber number ranges from 400 to 1600. We will present the effect of pattern air in terms of the resulting droplets size, droplet number density and velocity at various distances downstream of the nozzle where the effect of pattern air is significant.

  6. Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Livengood, C. David

    2006-10-10

    A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

  7. Apparatus and method for removing mercury vapor from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Ganesan, Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A metallic filter effectively removes mercury vapor from gas streams. The filter captures the mercury which then can be released and collected as product. The metallic filter is a copper mesh sponge plated with a six micrometer thickness of gold. The filter removes up to 90% of mercury vapor from a mercury contaminated gas stream.

  8. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  9. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas F.; Robin, Allen M.; Wolfenbarger, James K.; Suggitt, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  10. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  11. An experimental study of NO sub x recycle in the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-19

    This current project is pilot-scale testing of NO{sub x} recycle. The objective is to provide further fundamental understanding and useful information for its implementation at the Niles station. A Babcock Wilcox's 6 million Btu/hr Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) has been chosen to perform the tests. The SBS is the same type of cyclone furnace as that at Niles and simulates a large cyclone unit very well. The project involves conducting a series of tests which include injecting NO, NO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and simulated NO{sub x} recycle stream respectively. The work performed during this reporting period focused on the site preparation, shakedown tests, and baseline tests. The shakedown testing of NO injection into the primary air stream alone and the secondary air stream alone showed promising results. A large amount of NO injected into furnace was destroyed, especially when the NO was injected into the primary air duct. However, the measuring instrumentation needs to be improved to give accurate data.

  12. Method and apparatus for decreased undesired particle emissions in gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Bustard, C.J.

    1999-04-13

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 5 figs.

  13. COAL GASIFICATION/GAS CLEANUP TEST FACILITY: VOLUME I. DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes an integrated fluidized-bed coal gasification reactor and acid gas removal system. The gasifier operates at 100 psig at up to 2000 F, and has a coal feed capacity of 50 lb/hr. The gas cleaning system contains a cyclone, a venturi scrubber, and an absorber/fla...

  14. Evaluation of advanced separation techniques for application to flue gas cleanup processes for the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Drummond, C.J.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    Thirteen advanced separation techniques were reviewed in detail for application to flue gas cleanup processes. Of these, the three most promising for application to systems for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from flue gas are solvent extraction, electrodialysis, and inverse thermal phase separation. Gas separation membranes would also be promising if a membrane could be developed that would be selective for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/. Specific utility or industrial systems incorporating some of these processes are suggested. Preliminary estimates of annual revenue requirements for three gas-separation-membrane flue gas cleanup systems and an electrodialysis system are compared with an estimate for a limestone system with selective catalytic reduction. In addition, fourteen wet simultaneous SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ flue gas cleanup processes that have progressed beyond bench scale were reviewed for possible modification to incorporate advanced separation techniques. It appeared that in processes where modifications were possible, either such modification would result in marginal improvement, or the process would no longer be recognizable.

  15. Evaluation of advanced separation techniques for application to flue gas cleanup processes for the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Drummond, C.J.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1985-06-01

    Thirteen advanced separation techniques were reviewed in detail for application to flue gas cleanup processes. Of these, the three most promising for application to systems for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from flue gas are solvent extraction, electrodialysis, and inverse thermal phase separation. Gas separation membranes would also be promising if a membrane could be developed that would be selective for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/. Specific utility or industrial systems incorporating some of these processes are suggested. Preliminary estimates of annual revenue requirements for three gas-separation-membrane flue gas cleanup systems and an electrodialysis system are compared with an estimate for a limestone system with selective catalytic reduction. In addition, fourteen wet simultaneous SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ flue gas cleanup processes that have progressed beyond bench scale were reviewed for possible modification to incorporate advanced separation techniques. It appeared that in processes where modifications were possible, either such modification would result in marginal improvement, or the process would no longer be recognizable. 147 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

    1982-01-01

    This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

  17. Optical backscatter probe for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, James E; Partridge, William P

    2013-05-28

    A system for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream is disclosed. The system transmits light into a combustion gas stream, and thereafter detects a portion of the transmitted light as scattered light in an amount corresponding to the amount of particulates in the emissions. Purge gas may be supplied adjacent the light supply and the detector to reduce particles in the emissions from coating or otherwise compromising the transmission of light into the emissions and recovery of scattered light from the emissions.

  18. Hot gas stream application in micro-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrijasevic, Daniela; Giouroudi, Ioanna; Smetana, Walter; Boehm, Stefan; Brenner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept for bonding micro-parts with dimensions in the range of 50 μm to 300 μm. Two different kinds of adhesives - polyurethane adhesive foil and hot melt glue - were applied to a basic substrate by different techniques. The focused and concentrated hot gas stream softened glue which had been applied in a solid state. Micro-parts were then embossed in the softened glue, or covered and shielded by it. In this way, a rigid and compact bond was obtained after cooling. For the positioning of micro-parts (optical fibers), it has been necessary to manufacture adequate V-grooves. Finite element analyses using the ANSYS TM program package were performed in order to evaluate parameters which govern the heat transfer to the adhesive and substrate respectively. Experimental results are in good agreement with results obtained by the numerical simulations. The advantages of this new approach are small system size, low capital costs, simple usage, applicability to many material combinations, easy integration into existing production lines, etc.

  19. Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01

    The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

  20. Evaluation of gasification and gas-cleanup processes for use in molten-carbonate fuel-cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Vidt, E.J.; Jablonski, G.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

    1981-12-01

    This interim report satisfies the Task B requirement to define process configurations for systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants. The configurations studied include entrained, fluidized-bed, gravitating-bed, and molten salt gasifiers, both air and oxygen blown. Desulfurization systems utilizing wet scrubbing processes, such as Selexol and Rectisol II, and dry sorbents, such as iron oxide and dolomite, were chosen for evaluation. Cleanup systems not chosen by DOE's MCFC contractors, General Electric and United Technologies, Inc., for their MCFC power plant work by virtue of the resource requirements of those systems for commercial development were chosen for detailed study in Tasks C and D of this contract. Such systems include Westinghouse fluidized-bed gasification, air and oxygen blown, Rockwell molten carbonate air-blown gasification, METC iron oxide desulfurization, and dolomitic desulfurization. In addition, for comparison, gasification systems such as the Texaco entrained and the British Gas/Lurgi slagging units, along with wet scrubbing by Rectisol II, have also been chosen for detailed study.

  1. Emerging flue-gas cleanup technologies for combined control of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Markussen, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    Enactment of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, as well as passage of legislation at the state level has raised the prospect of more stringent nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission regulations and has fueled research and development efforts on a number technologies for the combined control of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and NO{sub x}. The integrated removal of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a single system can offer significant advantages over the use of several separate processes, including such factors as reduced system complexity, better operability, and lower costs. This paper reviews the status of a number of integrated flue-gas-cleanup systems that have reached a significant stage of development, focusing on post-combustion processes that have been tested or are ready for testing at the pilot scale or larger. A brief process description, a summary of the development status and performance achieved to date, pending commercialization issues, and process economics (when available) are given for each technology.

  2. Does further clean-up reduce the matrix enhancement effect in gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in food?

    PubMed

    Schenck, F J; Lehotay, S J

    2000-01-28

    Sample extracts of apples, peas, green beans, oranges, raspberries, clementines, carrots, and wheat obtained using the Food and Drug Administration (acetone extraction) and Canadian Pest Management Regulatory Agency (acetonitrile extraction) multiresidue methods for pesticides were subjected to clean-up using different solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the matrix enhancement effect. The matrix enhancement effect is related to the blocking of active sites on the injector liner by matrix components, thereby increasing signal in the presence of matrix versus standards in solvent in which the pesticides themselves interact with the active sites. Graphitized carbon black (GCB) was often used in combination with various anion-exchange SPE cartridges. The extracts were then spiked with organophosphorus insecticides. These process standards were then compared to standards in acetone of the same concentration using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection or ion trap mass spectrometric detection. Sample matrix enhancement varied from little to no effect for some pesticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos, malathion) to >200% in the case of certain susceptible pesticides. The GCB removed color components but showed little effect in reducing matrix enhancement by itself. The anion-exchange cartridges in combination with GCB or not, substantially reduced the matrix enhancement effect but did not eliminate it. PMID:10677079

  3. Facilitated transport ceramic membranes for high-temperature gas cleanup. Final report, February 1990--April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.; Minford, E.; Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.; Hart, B.A.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing high temperature, high pressure, facilitated transport ceramic membranes to control gaseous contaminants in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Meeting this objective requires that the contaminant gas H{sub 2}S be removed from an IGCC gas mixture without a substantial loss of the other gaseous components, specifically H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. As described above this requires consideration of other, nonconventional types of membranes. The solution evaluated in this program involved the use of facilitated transport membranes consisting of molten mixtures of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salts immobilized in a microporous ceramic support. To accomplish this objective, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Golden Technologies Company Inc., and Research Triangle Institute worked together to develop and test high temperature facilitated membranes for the removal of H{sub 2}S from IGCC gas mixtures. Three basic experimental activities were pursued: (1) evaluation of the H{sub 2}S chemistry of a variety of alkali and alkaline earth carbonate salt mixtures; (2) development of microporous ceramic materials which were chemically and physically compatible with molten carbonate salt mixtures under IGCC conditions and which could function as a host to support a molten carbonate mixture and; (3) fabrication of molten carbonate/ceramic immobilized liquid membranes and evaluation of these membranes under conditions approximating those found in the intended application. Results of these activities are presented.

  4. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S.

    1992-09-24

    This investigation is concerned with the separation of gas mixtures using a novel concept of rapid pressure swing absorption (RAPSAB) of gas in a stationary absorbent liquid through gas-liquid interfaces immobilized in the pore mouths of hydrophobic microporous membranes. The process is implemented in a module well-packed with hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membranes. Before we proceed to RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents, it is necessary to make an effort to compare experimental results with those predicted by the models. The only model developed so far involved a type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) for which limited data were acquired earlier. A number of experiments have, therefore, been conducted in this mode to characterize the absorption part of the cycle. A new and more compact module (Module No. 5) was made using 840 fibers and a teflon casing inside the stainless steel shell to exactly define the fiber packing density. This allows an exact calculation of Happel's free surface radius. Experiments were carried out using a CO[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture of around 10% CO[sub 2] and balanced N[sub 2] using both modules 4 and 5 over a wide range of absorption times.

  5. Engineering analyses for evaluation of gasification and gas-cleanup processes for use in molten-carbonate fuel-cell power plants. Task C

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, J.R.; Vidt, E.J.

    1982-02-01

    This report satisfies the Task C requirement for DOE contract DE-AC21-81MC16220 to provide engineering analyses of power systems utilizing coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants. The process information and data necessary for this study were extracted from sources in the public domain, including reports from DOE, EPRI, and EPA; work sponsored in whole or in part by Federal agencies; and from trade journals, MCFC developers, and manufacturers. The computer model used by Westinghouse, designated AHEAD, is proprietary and so is not provided in this report. The engineering analyses provide relative power system efficiency data for ten gasifier/gas cleanup fuel supply systems, including air- and oxygen-blown gasification, hot and cold desulfurization, and a range of MCFC operating pressure from 345 kPaa (50 psia) to 2069 kPaa (300 psia).

  6. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  7. Development of Metallic Filters for Hot Gas Cleanup in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Gleeson, B.; Terpstra, R.L.

    2002-09-19

    Alternative alloys derived from the wide array of aerospace superalloys will be developed for hot gas filtration to improve on both ceramic filters and ''first-generation'' iron aluminide metallic filter materials. New high performance metallic filters should offer the benefits of non-brittle mechanical behavior at all temperatures, including ambient temperature, and improved resistance to thermal fatigue compared to ceramic filter elements, thus improving filter reliability. A new powder processing approach also will be established that results in lightweight metallic filters with high permeability and weldability for enhanced capability for filter system manufacturing.

  8. Reactive Carbon from Life Support Wastes for Incinerator Flue Gas Cleanup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, J. W.; Pisharody, S.; Moran, M. J.; Wignarajah, K.; Shi, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO(sub x) to nitrogen has also been observed.

  9. The use of rapid turnaround heated headspace/gas chromatography to support regulatory soil cleanup standards

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, J.; Evans, C.; Francoeur, T.L.; Guerra, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper addresses the use of rapid turnaround, heated headspace/gas chromatography (GC) to support a soil remediation project in the state of New Jersey. In the past, rapid turnaround, heated head space/GC procedures have been used primarily as a screening tool to delineate areas of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination on-site. For this project, the heated headspace/GC method was the primary analytical tool used to support a large soil remediation project. This paper reviews the project goals, presents analytical protocol, presents internal quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), evaluates laboratory split data, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of this rapid turnaround method.

  10. Reactive carbon from life support wastes for incinerator flue gas cleanup-System Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark J.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Xu, X.H.; Shi, Yao; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2002-05-14

    This paper presents the results from a joint research initiative between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National lab. The objective of the research is to produce activated carbon from life support wastes and to use the activated carbon to adsorb and chemically reduce the NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} contained in incinerator flue gas. Inedible biomass waste from food production is the primary waste considered for conversion to activated carbon. Results to date show adsorption of both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} in activated carbon made from biomass. Conversion of adsorbed NO{sub x} to nitrogen has also been observed.

  11. Estimating the gas and dye quantities for modified tracer technique measurements of stream reaeration coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Measuring the reaeration coefficient of a stream with a modified tracer technique has been accomplished by injecting either ethylene or ethylene and propane together and a rhodamine-WT dye solution into the stream. The movement of the tracers through the stream reach after injection is described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. The peak concentrations of the tracers at the downstream end of the reach depend on the concentrations of the tracers in the stream at the injection site, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, the mean water velocity, the length of the reach, and the duration of the injection period. The downstream gas concentrations also depend on the gas desorption coefficients of the reach. The concentrations of the tracer gases in the stream at the injection site depend on the flow rates of the gases through the injection diffusers, the efficiency of the gas absorption process, and the stream discharge. The concentration of dye in the stream at the injection site depends on the flow rate of the dye solution, the concentration of the dye solution, and the stream discharge. Equations for estimating the gas flow rates, the quantities of the gases, the dye concentration, and the quantity of dye together with procedures for determining the variables in these equations are presented. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Desulfurization of fuel gases in fluidized bed gasification and hot fuel gas cleanup systems

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Farber, G.; Pruzansky, J.; Yoo, H.J.; McGauley, P.

    1983-08-26

    A problem with the commercialization of fluidized bed gasification is that vast amounts of spent sorbent are generated if the sorbent is used on a once-through basis, especially if high sulfur coals are burned. The requirements of a sorbent for regenerative service in the FBG process are: (1) it must be capable of reducing the sulfur containing gas concentration of the FBG flue gas to within acceptable environmental standards; (2) it must not lose its reactivity on cyclic sulfidation and regeneration; (3) it must be capable of regeneration with elimination of substantially all of its sulfur content; (4) it must have good attrition resistance; and, (5) its cost must not be prohibitive. It has now been discovered that calcium silicate pellets, e.g., Portland cement type III pellets meet the criteria aforesaid. Calcium silicate removes COS and H/sub 2/S according to the reactions given to produce calcium sulfide silicate. The sulfur containing product can be regenerated using CO/sub 2/ as the regenerant. The sulfur dioxide can be conveniently reduced to sulfur with hydrogen or carbon for market or storage. The basic reactions in the process of this invention are the reactions with calcium silicate given in the patent. A convenient and inexpensive source of calcium silicate is Portland cement. Portland cement is a readily available, widely used construction meterial.

  13. Hot-gas cleanup for molten carbonate fuel cells-dechlorination and soot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D.; Gelb, A.; Lord, G.; Simons, G.

    1984-01-01

    Two separate aspects of hot-gas conditioning for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) were investigated: potential high temperature chloride sorbent materials were screened and tested and carbon deposition on MCFC components was studied experimentally to determine guidelines for maximizing MCFC efficiency while avoiding carbon fouling. Natural minerals containing sodium carbonate were identified as the most promising candidates for economical removal of chlorides from coal gasifier effluents at temperatures of about 800 K (980 F). The mineral Shortite was tested in a fixed bed and found to perform remarkably well with no calcination. Measurements showed that carbon deposition can occur in the equilibrium carbon free region because of the relative rates of the relevant reactions. On all surfaces tested, the Boudouard carbon formation reaction is much faster than the water-gas shift reaction which is much faster than the methanation reaction. This means that the normal practice of adding steam to prevent carbon formation will only succeed if flows are slow enough for the water shift reaction to go substantially to completion. More direct suppression of carbon formation can be achieved by CO2 addition through anode recycle to force the Boudouard reaction backward.

  14. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Environmental Science)

    1993-01-29

    The theoretical model for the absorption part of a particular type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) (see Technical Progress Report No. 7) has been developed. The numerical simulations of the model compare well with the experimental results presented in the last report (Technical Progress Report No. 7). A number of experiments were carried out also for Mode 2 type of operation by varying the time for initial pressurization of the hollow fiber module as well as the total absorption time. These were done to provide a basis for comparison with the theoretical model to be developed later. We have initiated RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents such as 19.5 % aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) for the absorption of C0[sub 2] from a C0[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture. Six experiments were carried out using Mode 3 type of operation and a C0[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture containing 9.9% CO, and balance N[sub 2]. Excellent purification was obtained. No C0[sub 2] was observed in the purified high pressure gas outlet for absorption time of up to 14 seconds; the purified high pressure gas flow rate was also considerable. Module No. 5 was used for all experiments. The details of the module are given in Technical Progress Report No. 7.

  15. Spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse gas abundance of urban streams: The role of urban infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsStreams and rivers are significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions globally. Water quality and watershed management, are likely to influence GHG emissions regionally. In urban-impacted watersheds, increased nitrogen loading, organic matter, and war...

  16. Apparatus for removal of particulate matter from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peyton L.; Morse, John C.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the removal of particulate matter from the gaseous product stream of an entrained flow coal gasifier which apparatus includes an initial screen, an intermediate screen which is aligned with the direction of flow of the gaseous product stream and a final screen transversely disposed to the flow of gaseous product and which apparatus is capable of withstanding at least a pressure differential of about 10 psi (68.95 kPa) or greater at the temperatures of the gaseous product stream.

  17. Flow regions of granules in Dorfan Impingo filter for gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, J.T.; Smid, J.; Hsiau, S.S.; Tsai, S.S.; Chou, C.S.

    1999-07-01

    Inside a two-dimensional model of the louvered Dorfan Impingo panel with transparent front and rear walls the flow region of filter granules without gas cross flow were observed. The white PE beads were used as filter granules. Colored PE beads served as tracers. Filter granules were discharged and circulated to the bed. The flow rate of filter medium was controlled by the belt conveyor. The image processing system including a Frame Grabber and JVC videocamera was used to record the granular flow. Every image of motion was digitized and stored in a file. The flow patterns and the quasi-stagnant zones history in the moving granular bed were evaluated. The experiment showed fast central moving region (flowing core) of filter granules and quasi-stagnant zones close to louver walls.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A CALCIUM-BASED SORBENT FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K. Constant

    1999-03-31

    The preparation and testing of potential sorbents for removing H{sub 2}S and COS from hot coal gas continued. Two preparation methods received the most consideration. Both methods involve pelletizing powders in a revolving drum under moist conditions followed either by heat treatment or steam curing to harden the pellets, depending on the particle bonding mechanism. One method was used to pelletize mixtures of calcium carbonate and either alumina or a calcium aluminate cement in a single step. Another method was used to pelletize powdered limestone in an initial step followed by the application of a coating consisting of both limestone and a hydraulic cement in a second step. By employing this method, an especially promising material was produced consisting of a limestone core surrounded by a shell consisting initially of 80 wt.% limestone and 20% wt.% calcium aluminate cement. The best material exhibited both an acceptable crushing strength and adsorption capacity for H{sub 2}S.

  19. Method for removal and stabilization of mercury in mercury-containing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Broderick, Thomas E.

    2005-09-13

    The present invention is directed to a process and apparatus for removing and stabilizing mercury from mercury-containing gas streams. A gas stream containing vapor phase elemental and/or speciated mercury is contacted with reagent, such as an oxygen-containing oxidant, in a liquid environment to form a mercury-containing precipitate. The mercury-containing precipitate is kept or placed in solution and reacts with one or more additional reagents to form a solid, stable mercury-containing compound.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Streaming Gas Core Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic instability of a streaming fluid jet (radius R0) ambient with streaming liquid is studied to the axisymmetric (m{=}0) and the non-axisymmetric (m{≥slant}1) disturbances (m is the azimuthal wavenumber). When the surface tension effect is suppressed; the jet is stable to all m{≥slant}0 for all wavelengths. In the absence of the magnetic field; the model is stable to all m{≥slant}1 for all wavelengths and also stable to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is equal to or shorter than 2π R0. While it is unstable only to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is longer than 2π R0. The streaming has a destabilizing effect. If the magnetic fields are sufficiently high, so that the Alfvén wave velocities are greater than the streaming velocities of the two fluids; the jet is stable against all disturbances and vice versa.

  1. A stream-based methane monitoring approach for evaluating groundwater impacts associated with unconventional gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Stolp, Bert J; Kimball, Briant A; Susong, David D; Marston, Thomas M; Gardner, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Gaining streams can provide an integrated signal of relatively large groundwater capture areas. In contrast to the point-specific nature of monitoring wells, gaining streams coalesce multiple flow paths. Impacts on groundwater quality from unconventional gas development may be evaluated at the watershed scale by the sampling of dissolved methane (CH4 ) along such streams. This paper describes a method for using stream CH4 concentrations, along with measurements of groundwater inflow and gas transfer velocity interpreted by 1-D stream transport modeling, to determine groundwater methane fluxes. While dissolved ionic tracers remain in the stream for long distances, the persistence of methane is not well documented. To test this method and evaluate CH4 persistence in a stream, a combined bromide (Br) and CH4 tracer injection was conducted on Nine-Mile Creek, a gaining stream in a gas development area in central Utah. A 35% gain in streamflow was determined from dilution of the Br tracer. The injected CH4 resulted in a fivefold increase in stream CH4 immediately below the injection site. CH4 and δ(13) CCH4 sampling showed it was not immediately lost to the atmosphere, but remained in the stream for more than 2000 m. A 1-D stream transport model simulating the decline in CH4 yielded an apparent gas transfer velocity of 4.5 m/d, describing the rate of loss to the atmosphere (possibly including some microbial consumption). The transport model was then calibrated to background stream CH4 in Nine-Mile Creek (prior to CH4 injection) in order to evaluate groundwater CH4 contributions. The total estimated CH4 load discharging to the stream along the study reach was 190 g/d, although using geochemical fingerprinting to determine its source was beyond the scope of the current study. This demonstrates the utility of stream-gas sampling as a reconnaissance tool for evaluating both natural and anthropogenic CH4 leakage from gas reservoirs into groundwater and surface water

  2. Hot gas cleanup using ceramic cross flow membrane filters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliberti, D.F.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1983-12-01

    The single unresolved technical issue in the commercialization of pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PPBC) for electric power production is the hot gas cleaning problem. In this technology, high-temperature and -pressure (HTHP), dust-laden flue gases from the combustor must be cleaned enough to reduce expansion turbine blade erosion to an economically acceptable level. Additionally, the level of particulate emission must be compatible with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for environmental acceptability. The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a wide range of research and development programs directed at the solution of this problem. These programs were divided into two classifications, one dealing with more advanced concepts where testing was to be done at relatively large scale and a second group of less advanced, novel concepts where the testing was to be carried out at a bench scale. The cross-flow ceramic membrane filter program described in this report is a member of the small-scale, novel concept group.

  3. Integrated Warm Gas Multicontaminant Cleanup Technologies for Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir; Sharma, Pradeepkumar; Albritton, Johnny; Jamal, Aqil

    2010-09-30

    One of the key obstacles for the introduction of commercial gasification technology for the production of power with Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants or the production of value added chemicals, transportation fuels, and hydrogen has been the cost of these systems. This situation is particularly challenging because the United States has ample coal resources available as raw materials and effective use of these raw materials could help us meet our energy and transportation fuel needs while significantly reducing our need to import oil. One component of the cost of these systems that faces strong challenges for continuous improvement is removing the undesirable components present in the syngas. The need to limit the increase in cost of electricity to < 35% for new coal-based power plants which include CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration addresses both the growing social concern for global climate change resulting from the emission of greenhouse gas and in particular CO{sub 2} and the need to control cost increases to power production necessary to meet this social objective. Similar improvements to technologies for trace contaminants are getting similar pressure to reduce environmental emissions and reduce production costs for the syngas to enable production of chemicals from coal that is cost competitive with oil and natural gas. RTI, with DOE/NETL support, has been developing sorbent technologies that enable capture of trace contaminants and CO{sub 2} at temperatures above 400 °F that achieve better capture performance, lower costs and higher thermal efficiency. This report describes the specific work of sorbent development for mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), cadmium (Cd), and phosphorous (P) and CO{sub 2} removal. Because the typical concentrations of Hg, As, Se, Cd, and P are less than 10 ppmv, the focus has been on single-use sorbents with sufficient capacity to ensure replacement costs are cost effective. The research in this

  4. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  5. Design and test of an exhaust gas clean-up system for power plants using high sulphur content fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.N.

    1980-10-10

    This experimental program, initially designated to study an exhaust gas cleanup and water recovery system for a Cheng Cycle Dual-Fluid (CCDF) turbine power plant using sulfur rich fuels, has shown the potential of a general Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system applicable to utility and industrial boilers as well. The process was studied both theoretically and experimentaly. Experiments were performed using a bench scale (25k equivalent) apparatus and a pilot scale (1Mw equivalent) apparatus. Data obtained indicated the IPT process potentially can out-perform the conventional FGD process with significant cost savings.

  6. Stream macroinvertebrate communities across a gradient of natural gas development in the Fayetteville Shale.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica; Austin, Bradley J; Inlander, Ethan; Gallipeau, Cory; Evans-White, Michelle A; Entrekin, Sally

    2015-10-15

    Oil and gas extraction in shale plays expanded rapidly in the U.S. and is projected to expand globally in the coming decades. Arkansas has doubled the number of gas wells in the state since 2005 mostly by extracting gas from the Fayetteville Shale with activity concentrated in mixed pasture-deciduous forests. Concentrated well pads in close proximity to streams could have adverse effects on stream water quality and biota if sedimentation associated with developing infrastructure or contamination from fracturing fluid and waste occurs. Cumulative effects of gas activity and local habitat conditions on macroinvertebrate communities were investigated across a gradient of gas well activity (0.2-3.6 wells per km(2)) in ten stream catchments in spring 2010 and 2011. In 2010, macroinvertebrate density was positively related to well pad inverse flowpath distance from streams (r=0.84, p<0.001). Relatively tolerant mayflies Baetis and Caenis (r=0.64, p=0.04), filtering hydropsychid caddisflies (r=0.73, p=0.01), and chironomid midge densities (r=0.79, p=0.008) also increased in streams where more well pads were closer to stream channels. Macroinvertebrate trophic structure reflected environmental conditions with greater sediment and primary production in streams with more gas activity close to streams. However, stream water turbidity (r=0.69, p=0.02) and chlorophyll a (r=0.89, p<0.001) were the only in-stream variables correlated with gas well activities. In 2011, a year with record spring flooding, a different pattern emerged where mayfly density (p=0.74, p=0.01) and mayfly, stonefly, and caddisfly richness (r=0.78, p=0.008) increased in streams with greater well density and less silt cover. Hydrology and well pad placement in a catchment may interact to result in different relationships between biota and catchment activity between the two sample years. Our data show evidence of different macroinvertebrate communities expressed in catchments with different levels of gas

  7. Method and apparatus for transport, introduction, atomization and excitation of emission spectrum for quantitative analysis of high temperature gas sample streams containing vapor and particulates without degradation of sample stream temperature

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, David E.; Hass, William J.

    1989-05-30

    A sample transport, sample introduction, and flame excitation system for spectrometric analysis of high temperature gas streams which eliminates degradation of the sample stream by condensation losses.

  8. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  9. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  10. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Myers, R.B.; Yagiela, A.S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member. 3 figs.

  11. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Robert B.; Yagiela, Anthony S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member.

  12. An experimental study of NO{sub x} recycle in the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Q.; Haslbeck, J.L.; Neal, L.G.

    1993-03-01

    NO{sub x} recycle represents one part of the NOXSO process. This process can remove 90% of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} simultaneously from flue gas by using a fluidized bed of sorbent. Spent sorbent is regenerated by treatment at high temperatures with a reducing gas. Adsorbed NO{sub x} is evolved on heating the sorbent to a regeneration temperature. The concentrated stream of NO{sub x} produced is returned to the boiler with the combustion air and reduced in the flame, which is called NO{sub x} recycle. The concept of NO{sub x} recycle has been experimentally evaluated at the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). NO{sub x} destruction has been demonstrated on a 500 lb/hr pulverized coal combustor and a 1.7 MMBtu/hr tunnel furnace combustor firing both natural gas and coal-water slurry. The NO{sub x} recycle experimental study discussed in this report and performed on Babcock & Wilcox (B&W)`s six MMBtu/hr Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) is a pilot-scale test. The objective is to provide further fundamental understanding and necessary information for the NOXSO full-scale demonstration at Ohio Edison`s Niles Power Plant which uses the same type of cyclone burners. The experimental testing included injection of NO, NO{sub x} and different combinations of NO/NO{sub 2} with tile primary air (PA) and secondary air (SA) to the combustor. Results are consistent with earlier test data obtained on PETC`s facility and will be used for the design of the NOXSO commercial demonstration plant at Niles.

  13. Validation of one-step cleanup and separation method of polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from atmospheric gas- and particle-phase samples.

    PubMed

    Yenisoy-Karakaş, Serpil; Gaga, Eftade O

    2013-10-15

    A one-step cleanup method is described for the determination of PAHs, PCBs and OCPs in air (gas and particulate phase) samples. Analytes were extracted from ambient air samples using soxhlet extraction with a solvent mixture of dichloromethane and petroleum ether (1:4) for 24h. They were concentrated, separated and fractionated on a florisil and alumina column. The amounts of florisil (1g or 2g) with/without alumina were tested in the cleanup column. The study systematically investigated the effects of solvent types, and the amounts of florisil and alumina, on the performance of the cleanup process. The first fraction was eluted with 25 mL hexane, and analyzed for PCBs. The second fraction was collected via 40 mL hexane-ethyl acetate (1:1) solvent mixture, and analyzed for OCPs and PAHs. The optimized method yielded average recoveries between 88% and 99% for PCBs; 56% and 118% for PAHs; and 51% and 128% for OCPs. Other validation parameters were also investigated, such as MDL, LOQ, linear range, sensitivity (r(2)). An oven-program optimization and adjustment of GC-MS were performed. For internal quality control, surrogate recoveries and field blanks values were calculated. External calibration curves were prepared for PAHs, and internal calibration curves were preferred for OCP and PCBs. PMID:24054572

  14. Investigating the Diffuse Ionized Gas in the Magellanic Stream with Mapped WHAM Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Hernandez, Mike

    2016-01-01

    We present early stages of an Hα survey of the Magellanic Stream using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM). While the neutral component of the Stream may extend 200° across the sky (Nidever et al. 2010), its ionized gas has not yet been studied in detail. Fox et al. 2014 find that the tidal debris in the Magellanic System contains twice as much ionized gas as neutral and may extend 30° away from the H I emission. However, such absorption-line studies are not sensitive to the overall morphology of the ionized gas. Using targeted Hα emission observations of the Magellanic Stream, Barger et al. 2015 find that although the warm ionized gas tracks the neutral gas, it often spans a few degrees away from the H I emission at slightly offset velocities. Using WHAM's unprecedented sensitivity to diffuse emission (~ 10s of mR) and its velocity resolution (12 km/s) to isolate Stream emission, we are now conducting the first full Hα survey of its ionized component. Here we present early results, including spatial and kinematic comparisons to the well-established neutral profile of the Stream. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  15. The Role of Penetrating Gas Streams in Setting the Dynamical State of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, E.; Dekel, A.; Birnboim, Y.; Kravtsov, A.; Nagai, D.

    2016-06-01

    We utilize cosmological simulations of 16 galaxy clusters at redshifts z = 0 and z = 0.6 to study the effect of inflowing streams on the properties of the X-ray emitting intracluster medium. We find that the mass accretion occurs predominantly along streams that originate from the cosmic web and consist of heated gas. Clusters that are unrelaxed in terms of their X-ray morphology are characterized by higher mass inflow rates and deeper penetration of the streams, typically into the inner third of the virial radius. The penetrating streams generate elevated random motions, bulk flows and cold fronts. The degree of penetration of the streams may change over time such that clusters can switch from being unrelaxed to relaxed over a time-scale of several Gyrs.

  16. The role of penetrating gas streams in setting the dynamical state of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, E.; Dekel, A.; Birnboim, Y.; Kravtsov, A.; Nagai, D.

    2016-09-01

    We utilize cosmological simulations of 16 galaxy clusters at redshifts z = 0 and z = 0.6 to study the effect of inflowing streams on the properties of the X-ray emitting intracluster medium. We find that the mass accretion occurs predominantly along streams that originate from the cosmic web and consist of heated gas. Clusters that are unrelaxed in terms of their X-ray morphology are characterized by higher mass inflow rates and deeper penetration of the streams, typically into the inner third of the virial radius. The penetrating streams generate elevated random motions, bulk flows and cold fronts. The degree of penetration of the streams may change over time such that clusters can switch from being unrelaxed to relaxed over a time-scale of several giga years.

  17. Heat Transfer to Bodies in a High-speed Rarified-Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation to determine the equilibrium temperature and heat-transfer coefficients for transverse cylinders in a high-speed stream of rarefied gas measured over a range of Knudsen numbers (ratio of molecular-mean-free path to cylinder diameter) from 0.025 to 11.8 and for Mach numbers from 2.0 to 3.3. The range of free-stream Reynolds numbers was from 0.28 to 203. The models tested were 0.0010-, 0.0050-, 0.030-, 0.051-, 0.080-, and 0.126-inch -diameter cylinders held normal to the stream.

  18. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, L.; Patel, C.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degrees} to 850{degrees}C. To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  19. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  20. Process for recovery of sulfur values from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, W.G.; Arbo, J.C.; Gryka, G.E.

    1991-10-15

    This patent describes a method for recovering sulfur. It comprises contacting a gas containing SO{sub 2} in a gas contacting zone with a lean solution containing about a 1.0 to about 3.5 molar solution of potassium citrate at a pH from about 4.5-7.0 to form a rich solution containing from about 40 to about 160 grams per liter of SO{sub 2}; containing the rich solution with a gas containing H{sub 2}S in a reaction zone at a temperature above the melting point of sulfur to form liquid sulfur and a lean solution; removing the lean solution from the reaction zone; recovering the sulfur from the lean solution after the solution has contacted the H{sub 2}S; and passing the lean solution to the gas contacting zone to contract SO{sub 2}.

  1. Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    2008-01-01

    A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

  2. Potential flue gas impurities in carbon dioxide streams separated from coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener; Y. Jeffery Yang

    2009-06-15

    This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO{sub 2} stream separated from a CO{sub 2} control unit for a different combination of air pollution control devices and different flue gas compositions. Specifically, the levels of acid gases and mercury vapor were estimated for the monoethanolamine (MEA)-based absorption process on the basis of published performance parameters of existing systems. Among the flue gas constituents considered, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is known to have the most adverse impact on MEA absorption. When a flue gas contains 3000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) SO{sub 2} and a wet flue gas desulfurization system achieves its 95% removal, approximately 2400 parts per million by weight (ppmw) SO{sub 2} could be included in the separated CO{sub 2} stream. In addition, the estimated concentration level was reduced to as low as 135 ppmw for the SO{sub 2} of less than 10 ppmv in the flue gas entering the MEA unit. Furthermore, heat-stable salt formation could further reduce the SO{sub 2} concentration below 40 ppmw in the separated CO{sub 2} stream. In this study, it is realized that the formation rates of heat-stable salts in MEA solution are not readily available in the literature and are critical to estimating the levels and compositions of flue gas impurities in sequestered CO{sub 2} streams. In addition to SO{sub 2}, mercury, and other impurities in separated CO{sub 2} streams could vary depending on pollutant removal at the power plants and impose potential impacts on groundwater. Such a variation and related process control in the upstream management of carbon separation have implications for groundwater protection at carbon sequestration sites and warrant necessary considerations in overall sequestration planning, engineering, and management. 63 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Regulation of ice stream flow through subglacial formation of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsborrow, Monica; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Patton, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the flow of ice streams and outlet glaciers are a primary control on ice sheet stability, yet comprehensive understanding of the key processes operating at the ice-bed interface remains elusive. Basal resistance is critical, especially sticky spots--localized zones of high basal traction--for maintaining force balance in an otherwise well-lubricated/high-slip subglacial environment. Here we consider the influence of subglacial gas-hydrate formation on ice stream dynamics, and its potential to initiate and maintain sticky spots. Geophysical data document the geologic footprint of a major palaeo-ice-stream that drained the Barents Sea-Fennoscandian ice sheet approximately 20,000 years ago. Our results reveal a ~250 km2 sticky spot that coincided with subsurface shallow gas accumulations, seafloor fluid expulsion and a fault complex associated with deep hydrocarbon reservoirs. We propose that gas migrating from these reservoirs formed hydrates under high-pressure, low-temperature subglacial conditions. The gas hydrate desiccated, stiffened and thereby strengthened the subglacial sediments, promoting high traction--a sticky spot--that regulated ice stream flow. Deep hydrocarbon reservoirs are common beneath past and contemporary glaciated areas, implying that gas-hydrate regulation of subglacial dynamics could be a widespread phenomenon.

  4. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

  5. Superamphiphobic Silicon-Nanowire-Embedded Microsystem and In-Contact Flow Performance of Gas and Liquid Streams.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Ren, Wurong; Kim, Jin-Oh; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hao; Sharma, Siddharth; Faustini, Marco; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-26

    Gas and liquid streams are invariably separated either by a solid wall or by a membrane for heat or mass transfer between the gas and liquid streams. Without the separating wall, the gas phase is present as bubbles in liquid or, in a microsystem, as gas plugs between slugs of liquid. Continuous and direct contact between the two moving streams of gas and liquid is quite an efficient way of achieving heat or mass transfer between the two phases. Here, we report a silicon nanowire built-in microsystem in which a liquid stream flows in contact with an underlying gas stream. The upper liquid stream does not penetrate into the lower gas stream due to the superamphiphobic nature of the silicon nanowires built into the bottom wall, thereby preserving the integrity of continuous gas and liquid streams, although they are flowing in contact. Due to the superamphiphobic nature of silicon nanowires, the microsystem provides the best possible interfacial mass transfer known to date between flowing gas and liquid phases, which can achieve excellent chemical performance in two-phase organic syntheses. PMID:26738843

  6. Multiresidue analysis of 58 pesticides in bean products by disposable pipet extraction (DPX) cleanup and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziang; Li, Yanjie; Liu, Xiaochen; Li, Xuesheng; Zhou, Li; Pan, Canping

    2012-05-16

    A method based on disposable pipet extraction (DPX) sample cleanup and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection by selected ion monitoring (GC/MS-SIM) was established for 58 targeted pesticide residues in soybean, mung bean, adzuki bean and black bean. Samples were extracted with acetonitrile and concentrated (nitrogen gas flow) prior to being aspirated into DPX tubes. Cleanup procedure was achieved in a simple DPX-Qg tube. Matrix-matched calibrations were analyzed, and the limits of quantification (LOQ) of this method ranged from 0.01 mg kg(-1) to 0.1 mg kg(-1) for all target compounds. Coefficients of determination of the linear ranges were between 0.9919 and 0.9998. Recoveries of fortified level 0.02 mg kg(-1) on soybean, mung bean, adzuki bean and black bean were 70.2-109.6%, 69.1-119.0%, 69.1-119.8%, and 69.0-120.8%, respectively, for all studied pesticides. Moreover, pesticide risk assessment for all the detected residues in 178 market samples at Beijing market area was conducted. A maximum 0.958% of ADI (acceptable daily intake) for NESDI (national estimated daily intake) and 55.1% of ARfD (acute reference dose) for NESTI (national estimated short-term intake) indicated low diet risk of these products. PMID:22394480

  7. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1981-01-06

    A process for the removal of H/sub 2/S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO/sub 2/ at temperatures between 250* and 450* F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H/sub 2/, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H/sub 2/S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO, CS/sub 2/, SO/sub 3/ and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H/sub 2/S and subsequently removing the H/sub 2/S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  8. Process for removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Hansford, R.C.; Hass, R.H.

    1982-01-19

    A process for the removal of H2S from a feed gas, and the production of sulfur therefrom, is effected by oxidation with oxygen and/or SO2 at temperatures between 250 and 450/sup 0/F. The oxidation is conducted in the presence of an extremely stable oxidation catalyst comprising an oxide and/or sulfide of vanadium supported on a non-alkaline porous refractory oxide. Sulfur deposition and consequent catalyst deactivation are prevented by maintaining the partial pressure of free sulfur in the oxidation reactor below that necessary for condensation. H2, CO, and light hydrocarbons present in the feed gas are not oxidized. Typical uses of the process include the removal of H2S and the production of sulfur from sour natural gases or gases obtained from the gasification of coal. Feed gases which contain SO2 and H2S in mole ratios greater than 5, or which contain other gaseous sulfur compounds such as CO CS2, SO3 and mercaptans, can be desulfurized by hydrogenating all of such sulfur components to H2S and subsequently removing the H2S from the hydrogenated feed gas by the oxidation process of the invention. This hydrogenation-oxidation combination is especially contemplated for the desulfurization of claus tail gases and stack gas effluents.

  9. An optical gas temperature probe for high temperature fossil fuel process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.; Cook, R.L.; Lineberry, J.T.; Litchford, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Reported here are the results of a feasibility study of a modular optical gas temperature probe for direct measurement of gas temperature in fossil-fueled combustion streams. A probe based upon the spectroscopic technique of line reversal would be superior to currently available gas temperature technology. The study concluded that a modular form of the line reversal optical temperature probe is feasible and, as such. the probe should be a commercially viable product with potential economic benefits from improved monitoring and control of utility furnaces. Such a probe will have the capability of making direct measurements of gas temperature in hot (>1500 K) process streams of coal combustion systems and large-scale power plant facilities.

  10. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-08-07

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  11. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  12. Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Liquid or Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latzko, H.

    1944-01-01

    The,theory of heat.transfer from a solid body to a liquid stream could he presented previously** only with limiting assumptions about the movement of the fluid (potential flow, laminar frictional flow). (See references 1, 2, and 3). For turbulent flow, the most important practical case, the previous theoretical considerations did not go beyond dimensionless formulas and certain conclusions as to the analogy between the friction factor and the unit thermal conductance, (See references 4, 5, 6, and 7,) In order to obtain numerical results, an experimental treatment of the problem was resorted to, which gave rise to numerous investigations because of the importance of this problem in many branches of technology. However, the results of these investigations frequently deviate from one another. The experimental results are especially dependent upon the overall dimensions and the specific proportions of the equipment. In the present work, the attempt will be made to develop systematically the theory of the heat transfer and of the dependence of the unit thermal conductance upon shape and dimensions, using as a basis the velocity distribution for turbulent flow set up by Prandtl and Von Karman.

  13. Development of a fluid friction control valve for pressure letdown in hot dirty gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Novack, M.

    1990-09-01

    Control valves required for pressure letdown service in future commercial coal conversion plants will be subjected to severe service at a temperature and pressure as high as 1800{degree}F and 800 psig, respectively, in a gaseous environment leading to valve erosion and corrosion. This report describes the design and development of a fluid friction control valve (FFCV) for these severe pressure reduction applications. The FFCV is designed to dissipate friction-induced energy losses uniformly over an extended surface flow path, and thus eliminate pressure reduction taking place in a single-step process. This important feature of the FFCV, by which the fluid mixture velocity is significantly reduced, has the potential of minimizing or even eliminating the problems associated with conventional-type control valves. The component parts of the FFCV exposed to the hot gas flow stream were fabricated from Inconel Alloy 625, a high strength nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy used in high temperature corrosive environments. The FFCV underwent combined parametric and endurance tests at temperatures and pressures of up to 1500 F and 1000 psig, respectively, at gas stream flowrates of up to 100 lb/hr. To simulate abrasive ash/char particulate as found in conversion plant gas streams, three forms of silica powders were used. Over the course of 53 test runs, the FFCV was subjected to a cumulative endurance test duration of 164 hours, of which 55 hours were with silica particulate in the gas stream. During these tests the FFCV maintained its structural integrity and operated without clogging or jamming. Upon completion of testing, examination of the internal valve surfaces exposed to the gas stream showed no discernable erosion. 1 ref., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  15. Process for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, H.S.

    1987-02-03

    A process is described for simultaneous removal of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0 to 125 F approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO[sub 2] remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO[sub x] remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO[sub 2] plus NO[sub x] is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO[sub 2] and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO[sub x]. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] from the gas stream and acid recovery. 4 figs.

  16. Process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A process for simultaneous removal of SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from a gas stream that includes flowing the gas stream to a spray dryer and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 content of the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x content of the gas stream with ZnO by contacting the gas stream with a spray of an aqueous ZnO slurry; controlling the gas outlet temperature of the spray dryer to within the range of about a 0.degree. to 125.degree. F. approach to the adiabatic saturation temperature; flowing the gas, unreacted ZnO and absorbed SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the spray dryer to a fabric filter and collecting any solids therein and absorbing a portion of the SO.sub.2 remaining in the gas stream and a portion of the NO.sub.x remaining in the gas stream with ZnO; and controlling the ZnO content of the aqueous slurry so that sufficient unreacted ZnO is present in the solids collected in the fabric filter to react with SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x as the gas passes through the fabric filter whereby the overall feed ratio of ZnO to SO.sub.2 plus NO.sub.x is about 1.0 to 4.0 moles of ZnO per of SO.sub.2 and about 0.5 to 2.0 moles of ZnO per mole of NO.sub.x. Particulates may be removed from the gas stream prior to treatment in the spray dryer. The process further allows regeneration of ZnO that has reacted to absorb SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x from the gas stream and acid recovery.

  17. Stream Vulnerability to Widespread and Emergent Stressors: A Focus on Unconventional Oil and Gas.

    PubMed

    Entrekin, Sally A; Maloney, Kelly O; Kapo, Katherine E; Walters, Annika W; Evans-White, Michelle A; Klemow, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple stressors threaten stream physical and biological quality, including elevated nutrients and other contaminants, riparian and in-stream habitat degradation and altered natural flow regime. Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development is one emerging stressor that spans the U.S. UOG development could alter stream sedimentation, riparian extent and composition, in-stream flow, and water quality. We developed indices to describe the watershed sensitivity and exposure to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and computed a vulnerability index from these two scores across stream catchments in six productive shale plays. We predicted that catchment vulnerability scores would vary across plays due to climatic, geologic and anthropogenic differences. Across-shale averages supported this prediction revealing differences in catchment sensitivity, exposure, and vulnerability scores that resulted from different natural and anthropogenic environmental conditions. For example, semi-arid Western shale play catchments (Mowry, Hilliard, and Bakken) tended to be more sensitive to stressors due to low annual average precipitation and extensive grassland. Catchments in the Barnett and Marcellus-Utica were naturally sensitive from more erosive soils and steeper catchment slopes, but these catchments also experienced areas with greater UOG densities and urbanization. Our analysis suggested Fayetteville and Barnett catchments were vulnerable due to existing anthropogenic exposure. However, all shale plays had catchments that spanned a wide vulnerability gradient. Our results identify vulnerable catchments that can help prioritize stream protection and monitoring efforts. Resource managers can also use these findings to guide local development activities to help reduce possible environmental effects. PMID:26397727

  18. Stream Vulnerability to Widespread and Emergent Stressors: A Focus on Unconventional Oil and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Entrekin, Sally A.; Maloney, Kelly O.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Walters, Annika W.; Evans-White, Michelle A.; Klemow, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple stressors threaten stream physical and biological quality, including elevated nutrients and other contaminants, riparian and in-stream habitat degradation and altered natural flow regime. Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development is one emerging stressor that spans the U.S. UOG development could alter stream sedimentation, riparian extent and composition, in-stream flow, and water quality. We developed indices to describe the watershed sensitivity and exposure to natural and anthropogenic disturbances and computed a vulnerability index from these two scores across stream catchments in six productive shale plays. We predicted that catchment vulnerability scores would vary across plays due to climatic, geologic and anthropogenic differences. Across-shale averages supported this prediction revealing differences in catchment sensitivity, exposure, and vulnerability scores that resulted from different natural and anthropogenic environmental conditions. For example, semi-arid Western shale play catchments (Mowry, Hilliard, and Bakken) tended to be more sensitive to stressors due to low annual average precipitation and extensive grassland. Catchments in the Barnett and Marcellus-Utica were naturally sensitive from more erosive soils and steeper catchment slopes, but these catchments also experienced areas with greater UOG densities and urbanization. Our analysis suggested Fayetteville and Barnett catchments were vulnerable due to existing anthropogenic exposure. However, all shale plays had catchments that spanned a wide vulnerability gradient. Our results identify vulnerable catchments that can help prioritize stream protection and monitoring efforts. Resource managers can also use these findings to guide local development activities to help reduce possible environmental effects. PMID:26397727

  19. Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion and Pre-Combustion Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Robinson, C.; Stevens, R.W.

    2007-08-01

    A novel liquid impregnated solid sorbent was developed for CO2 removal in the temperature range of ambient to 60 °C for both fixed bed and fluidized bed reactor applications. The sorbent is regenerable at 60-80 °C. Multi-cycle tests conducted in an atmospheric bench scale reactor with simulated flue gas demonstrated that the sorbent retains its CO2 sorption capacity with CO2 removal efficiency of about 99%. A second, novel solid sorbent containing mixture of alkali earth and alkali compounds was developed for CO2 removal at 200-315 °C from high pressure gas streams (i.e., suitable for IGCC systems). The sorbent showed very high capacity for CO2 removal from gas streams containing 28% CO2 at 200 °C and 11.2 atm during lab-scale flow reactor tests as well as regenerability at 375 °C.

  20. Calculation of supersonic stream parameters of a real gas from measurable quantities using FORTRAN 4 routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Sets of routines are presented that calculate such real-gas supersonic stream properties as velocity, density, enthalpy, entropy, and isentropic exponent. Two alternative sets of measurements are assumed: (1) stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and the pressure on the surface of a static-pressure wedge; or (2) pressure and temperature in a plenum upstream of a supersonic nozzle and the stagnation pressure at the exit of this nozzle. The routines are applicable to any gas whose properties are known. Explicit routines are presented for determining these properties for air, nitrogen, oxygen, normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, helium, argon, steam, methane, and natural gas.

  1. In-cell clean-up pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination of hydrophobic persistent and emerging organic pollutants in coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2016-01-15

    The main goal of this work was to develop, optimize and validate a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 97 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organophosphorus flame retardants, and several types of pesticides in marine sediment samples. Extraction and cleanup were integrated into the same step using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with in-cell clean-up (1g of alumina). The extraction was performed using dichloromethane at 100 °C, 1500 psi and 3 extraction cycles (5 min per cycle). Extracts were derivatized with N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) to improve the signal and sensitivity of some target compounds (i.e., triclosan, 2-hydroxybenzophenone). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Under optimal conditions, the optimized protocol showed good recovery percentages (70-100%), linearity (>0.99) and limits of detection below 1 ng g(-1) for all compounds. Finally, the method was applied to the analysis of sediment samples from different coastal areas from Andalusia (Spain), where occurrence and distribution of emerging contaminants in sediments is very scarce. Twenty five compounds out of 98 were detected in all samples, with the endocrine disruptor nonylphenol and the fragrance galaxolide showing the highest concentrations, up to 377.6 ng g(-1) and 237.4 ng g(-1), respectively. PMID:26747688

  2. Automated Multiplug Filtration Cleanup for Pesticide Residue Analyses in Kiwi Fruit (Actinidia chinensis) and Kiwi Juice by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuhong; Zhang, Jingru; He, Yining; Han, Yongtao; Zou, Nan; Li, Yanjie; Chen, Ronghua; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-08-10

    To reduce labor-consuming manual operation workload in the cleanup steps, an automated multiplug filtration cleanup (m-PFC) method for QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extracts was developed. It could control the volume and speed of pulling and pushing cycles accurately. In this study, m-PFC was based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) mixed with primary-secondary amines (PSA) and anhydrous magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) in a packed column for analysis of pesticide residues followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. It was validated by analyzing 33 pesticides in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice matrices spiked at two concentration levels of 10 and 100 μg/kg. Salts, sorbents, m-PFC procedure, 4 mL of automated pulling and pushing volume, 6 mL/min automated pulling speed, and 8 mL/min pushing speed were optimized for each matrix. After optimization, spike recoveries were within 71-120% and <20% RSD for all analytes in kiwi fruit and kiwi juice. Matrix-matched calibrations were performed with the coefficients of determination >0.99 between concentration levels of 10 and 1000 μg/kg. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of pesticide residues in market samples. PMID:26809284

  3. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  4. Potential flue gas impurities in carbon dioxide streams separated from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Keener, Tim C; Yang, Y Jeffery

    2009-06-01

    For geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This study estimated the flue gas impurities to be included in the CO2 stream separated from a CO2 control unit for a different combination of air pollution control devices and different flue gas compositions. Specifically, the levels of acid gases and mercury vapor were estimated for the monoethanolamine (MEA)-based absorption process on the basis of published performance parameters of existing systems. Among the flue gas constituents considered, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is known to have the most adverse impact on MEA absorption. When a flue gas contains 3000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) SO2 and a wet flue gas desulfurization system achieves its 95% removal, approximately 2400 parts per million by weight (ppmw) SO2 could be included in the separated CO2 stream. In addition, the estimated concentration level was reduced to as low as 135 ppmw for the SO2 of less than 10 ppmv in the flue gas entering the MEA unit. Furthermore, heat-stable salt formation could further reduce the SO2 concentration below 40 ppmw in the separated CO2 stream. In this study, it is realized that the formation rates of heat-stable salts in MEA solution are not readily available in the literature and are critical to estimating the levels and compositions of flue gas impurities in sequestered CO2 streams. In addition to SO2, mercury, and other impurities in separated CO2 streams could vary depending on pollutant removal at the power plants and impose potential impacts on groundwater. Such a variation and related process control in the upstream management of carbon separation have implications for groundwater protection at carbon sequestration sites and warrant necessary considerations in overall sequestration planning

  5. The energy and greenhouse-gas implications of internet video streaming in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehabi, Arman; Walker, Ben; Masanet, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The rapid growth of streaming video entertainment has recently received attention as a possibly less energy intensive alternative to the manufacturing and transportation of digital video discs (DVDs). This study utilizes a life-cycle assessment approach to estimate the primary energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions associated with video viewing through both traditional DVD methods and online video streaming. Base-case estimates for 2011 video viewing energy and CO2(e) emission intensities indicate video streaming can be more efficient than DVDs, depending on DVD viewing method. Video streaming benefits from relatively more efficient end-user devices than DVD viewing, though much of that savings is lost when accounting for the additional energy from network data transmission. Video streaming appears distinctly favorable when compared against any DVD viewing that includes consumer driving, which significantly increases the energy and CO2(e) emissions per viewing hour. Total US 2011 video viewing required about 192 PJ of primary energy and emitted about 10.5 billion kg of CO2(e). Shifting all 2011 DVD viewing to video streaming reduces the total primary energy use to about 162 PJ and the CO2(e) emissions to about 8.6 billion kg, representing a savings equivalent to the primary energy used to meet the electricity demand of nearly 200 000 US households each year. Sensitivity analysis indicates that results are most influenced by the end-user DVD player power demand, data transmission energy, and consumer travel for store DVDs. Data center energy use—both operational and embodied within the IT equipment—account for <1% of the total video streaming energy use. Results from this study indicate that designers and policy makers should focus on the efficiency of end-user devices and network transmission energy to curb future increases in energy use from the proliferation of video streaming.

  6. Stream measurements locate thermogenic methane fluxes in groundwater discharge in an area of shale-gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Grieve, Paul L; Hynek, Scott A; Brantley, Susan L; Solomon, D Kip; Risser, Dennis W

    2015-04-01

    The environmental impacts of shale-gas development on water resources, including methane migration to shallow groundwater, have been difficult to assess. Monitoring around gas wells is generally limited to domestic water-supply wells, which often are not situated along predominant groundwater flow paths. A new concept is tested here: combining stream hydrocarbon and noble-gas measurements with reach mass-balance modeling to estimate thermogenic methane concentrations and fluxes in groundwater discharging to streams and to constrain methane sources. In the Marcellus Formation shale-gas play of northern Pennsylvania (U.S.A.), we sampled methane in 15 streams as a reconnaissance tool to locate methane-laden groundwater discharge: concentrations up to 69 μg L(-1) were observed, with four streams ≥ 5 μg L(-1). Geochemical analyses of water from one stream with high methane (Sugar Run, Lycoming County) were consistent with Middle Devonian gases. After sampling was completed, we learned of a state regulator investigation of stray-gas migration from a nearby Marcellus Formation gas well. Modeling indicates a groundwater thermogenic methane flux of about 0.5 kg d(-1) discharging into Sugar Run, possibly from this fugitive gas source. Since flow paths often coalesce into gaining streams, stream methane monitoring provides the first watershed-scale method to assess groundwater contamination from shale-gas development. PMID:25786038

  7. Development of silver impregnated alumina for iodine separation from off-gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    An inorganic iodine adsorbent, silver impregnated alumina (AgA), has been developed to separate iodine effectively from off-gas streams of nuclear facilities and to decrease the volume of waste (spent adsorbent). Iodine removal efficiency was improved at relatively high humidity by using alumina carrier with two different pore diameters. Waste volume reduction was achieved by impregnating relatively large amounts of silver into the alumina pores. The developed adsorbent was tested first with simulated off-gas streams under various experimental conditions and finally with actual off-gas streams of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant. The decontamination factor (DF) was about 100 with the AgA bed depth of 2cm at 70% relative humidity, which was a DF one order higher than that when AgA with one pore size was used. Iodine adsorption capacity was checked by passing excess iodine into the AgA bed. Values were about 0.12 and 0.35 g-I/cm`-AgA bed for 10 and 24wt% silver impregnated AgA, respectively. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the applicability of the developed AgA to the off-gas treatment system of nuclear facilities.

  8. Removal of VOCs from humidified gas streams using activated carbon cloth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Rood, M.J.; Larson, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of relative humidity (RH) on the adsorption of soluble (acetone) and insoluble (benzene) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with activated carbon cloths (ACC). A gravimetric balance was used in conjunction with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer to determine the individual amounts of water and VOC adsorbed on an ACC sample. RH values from 0 to 90% and organic concentrations from 350 to 1000 ppmv were examined. The presence of water vapor in the gas-stream along with acetone (350 and 500 ppmv) had little effect on the adsorption capacity of acetone even at 90% RH. Water vapor in the gas stream had little effect on the adsorption capacity of benzene (500 ppmv) until about 65% RH, when a rapid decrease resulted in the adsorption capacity of benzene with increasing RH. This RH was also about where capillary condensation of water vapor occurs within ACC pores. Water vapor condenses within the ACC pores, making them unavailable for benzene adsorption. Increasing benzene concentration can have a significant effect on the amount of water vapor adsorbed. At 86% RH and 500 ppmv, 284 mg/g water was adsorbed, while at 86% RH and 1000 ppmv, only 165 mg/g water was adsorbed. Water vapor was more inhibitory for benzene adsorption as benzene concentration in the gas stream decreased. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  10. Hot gas cleanup using solid supported molten salt for integrated coal gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Topical report, October 1982-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyke, S.E.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Roberts, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories is developing a solid supported molten salt (SSMS) hot gas cleanup process for integrated coal gasification/molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plants. Exploratory and demonstration experiments have been completed to select a salt composition and evaluate its potential for simultaneous hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) removal under the conditions projected for the MCFC plants. Results to date indicate that equilibrium capacity and removal efficiencies may be adequate for one step H/sub 2/S and HCl removal. Regeneration produced a lower H/sub 2/S concentration than expected, but one from which sulfur could be recovered. Bench scale experiments will be designed to confirm laboratory results, check carbonyl sulfide removal, refine dual cycle (sulfide-chloride) regeneration techniques and obtain data for engineering/economic evaluation and scale-up. 8 references, 24 figures, 7 tables.