Science.gov

Sample records for gas tracer studies

  1. Field and numerical studies of tracer gas transport and surface gas tranfer in laterally uniform, partially stratified estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for determination of reaeration rates in natural waterbodies are reviewed. The tracer gas technique for reaeration rate determination offers many advantages over other existing methods and is widely used in rivers and streams. The tracer gas method seems to be the most promising of available techniques for estuarine reaeration rate determination. The two-dimensional late-rally averaged equations describing flow and transport in estuaries are derived and discussed. A laterally averaged numerical model of estaurine hydrodynamics and transport is modified so that tracer gas releases may be simulated. Field studies conducted as a part of the study are described. Two dye releases were made in the upper Houston Ship Channel; two dye tracer gas releases were later made in the same region. The data from these studies are presented and analyzed. Mechanical mixing by shipping traffic proved to be the predominant mixing mechanism and a hindrance to further studies at that site. An intensive field study was conducted in the Colorado River estuary. Field data included velocities, salinity profiles, water surface elevations, and dye concentration data from three dye releases. The data from this study are used to calibrate and test the numerical model of estuarine tracer gas transport.

  2. Perfluorocarbon Gas Tracer Studies to Support Risk Assessment Modeling of Critical Infrastructure Subjected to Terrorist Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry M.; Heiser, John H.; Watson, Tom; Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-05-06

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., urban canyons. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York Citys (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  3. PERFLUOROCARBON GAS TRACER STUDIES TO SUPPORT RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; HEISER, J.; WATSON, T.; ALLWINE, K.J.; FLAHERTY, J.E.

    2006-05-06

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., ''urban canyons''. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City's (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  4. Evaluation of leakage from a metal machining center using tracer gas methods: a case study.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, W A; Earnest, G S; Mickelsen, R L; Mead, K R; D'Arcy, J B

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of engineering controls in reducing worker exposure to metalworking fluids, an evaluation of an enclosure for a machining center during face milling was performed. The enclosure was built around a vertical metal machining center with an attached ventilation system consisting of a 25-cm diameter duct, a fan, and an air-cleaning filter. The evaluation method included using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas to determine the ventilation system's flow rate and capture efficiency, a respirable aerosol monitor (RAM) to identify aerosol leak locations around the enclosure, and smoke tubes and a velometer to evaluate air movement around the outside of the enclosure. Results of the tracer gas evaluation indicated that the control system was approximately 98% efficient at capturing tracer gas released near the spindle of the machining center. This result was not significantly different from 100% efficiency (p = 0.2). The measured SF6 concentration when released directly into the duct had a relative standard deviation of 2.2%; whereas, when releasing SF6 at the spindle, the concentration had a significantly higher relative standard deviation of 7.8% (p = 0.016). This increased variability could be due to a cyclic leakage at a small gap between the upper and lower portion of the enclosure or due to cyclic stagnation. Leakage also was observed with smoke tubes, a velometer, and an aerosol photometer. The tool and fluid motion combined to induce a periodic airflow in and out of the enclosure. These results suggest that tracer gas methods could be used to evaluate enclosure efficiency. However, smoke tubes and aerosol instrumentation such as optical particle counters or aerosol photometers also need to be used to locate leakage from enclosures. PMID:10635544

  5. A pilot study of the behavior of gas- and particle-phase ETS tracers in residences

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara; Dod, Raymond; Chang, Gee-Min; Sextro, Richard

    2002-02-01

    Our previous study of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in a three-room environmental chamber showed that smoking history significantly influenced inter-room ETS transport, particularly of gas-phase nicotine. We conducted a three-home pilot study where smoking was limited to one room. Single-smoker residences were monitored during five one-week periods while the smoker participated in a smoking cessation program. Nicotine traced ETS particles were detected reliably in the smoking rooms (SRs) and unreliably in the non-smoking rooms (NSRs). On average, the ventilation- and volume-normalized smoking rate, 0.1 Cigarette-h{sup -1} m{sup -3}, added about 17 and 4 {micro}g m{sup -3} of ETS particles into the SR and NSR, while average nicotine concentration increases were 2 and 0.06 {micro}g m{sup -3}, respectively. Thus, nicotine tracers may underestimate ETS particle exposure in a NSR (e.g., a child's bedroom) by a factor of 2 to 8. In other words, ETS exposure predicted from nicotine concentrations could be almost an order of magnitude lower than actual exposure.

  6. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in background concentrations to allow for increased sensitivity. PMID:25175285

  7. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 feet/minute) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust air flows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in background concentrations to allow for increased sensitivity. PMID:25175285

  8. ANALYSIS OF ESTUARINE TRACER-GAS TRANSPORT AND DESORPTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    The riverine tracer-gas technique provides a direct, reach-averaged measure of gas exchange, is fairly simple to implement, and is widely accepted for determining reaeration-rate coefficients in rivers. The method, however, is not directly applicable to flows having vertical density gradients. Consequently, studies were undertaken to develop and evaluate methods for obtaining surface-exchange coefficients from estuarine tracer-gas data. Reasonable estimates of the desorption coefficient (within 50 percent of the correct value) were obtained when an analytical solution of the transport equation was compared with data from a numerically simulated continuous release of tracer gas.

  9. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Srgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ?60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ?(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ?(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ?(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere. PMID:24954648

  10. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 86%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices. PMID:26148643

  11. Tracer gas diffusion sampling test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1993-10-01

    Efforts are under way to employ active and passive vapor extraction to remove carbon tetrachloride from the soil in the 200 West Area an the Hanford Site as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action. In the active approach, a vacuum is applied to a well, which causes soil gas surrounding the well to be drawn up to the surface. The contaminated air is cleaned by passage through a granular activated carbon bed. There are questions concerning the radius of influence associated with application of the vacuum system and related uncertainties about the soil-gas diffusion rates with and without the vacuum system present. To address these questions, a series of tracer gas diffusion sampling tests is proposed in which an inert, nontoxic tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), will be injected into a well, and the rates of SF{sub 6} diffusion through the surrounding soil horizon will be measured by sampling in nearby wells. Tracer gas tests will be conducted at sites very near the active vacuum extraction system and also at sites beyond the radius of influence of the active vacuum system. In the passive vapor extraction approach, barometric pressure fluctuations cause soil gas to be drawn to the surface through the well. At the passive sites, the effects of barometric ``pumping`` due to changes in atmospheric pressure will be investigated. Application of tracer gas testing to both the active and passive vapor extraction methods is described in the wellfield enhancement work plan (Rohay and Cameron 1993).

  12. Natural and artificial nobel gas hydrologic tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, G.B.

    1994-06-01

    Noble gas isotopes provide opportunities for ground water tracing. Both naturally occurring tracers and artificially injected tracers can be used. The equilibration of water with the earth`s atmosphere records the temperature and atmospheric pressure during ground water recharge. This temperature/pressure record can be used to distinguish cold recharge from warmer recharge with a resolution of 1-2 C temperature and 500m in altitude. The radioactive decay of U and Th produce large concentrations of 4He in old ground water and this 4He signature can be useful in tracing the small addition of old water (>10,000 yr.) to young water (<100 yr.). The decay of 3H present either form nuclear testing or cosmic ray interactions leads to detectable amounts of 3He in young ground water (<50 yr.). By measuring both 3H and 3He, the mean age of the 3H in the water can be calculated. In addition to these natural tracers, isotopically enriched noble gas isotopes are readily available at low cost and can be used an non-hazardous water tracers. This inert, persistent, and harmless tracing technique can used in many situations at a cost of about one dollar per million gallons of water traced.

  13. Contaminated vadose zone characterization using partitioning gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, G.A. Jr.; McKinney, D.C.; Pope, G.A.; Rouse, B.A.; Deeds, N.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes laboratory research conducted to investigate the performance of partitioning tracers for the detection of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in vadose zones. Once evaluated, the tracers may be used for volume estimation of NAPLs and remediation performance assessment of vadose zones. These laboratory studies used glass chromatography columns packed with: (1) Ottawa sand; and then (2) in a separate experiment, soil extracted from the Chemical Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories. The columns were prepared in a manner that resulted in a three-phase system of air, water, and NAPL in the columns. Conservative and partitioning gas tracers were injected into the columns, and their elution concentrations were analyzed. The method of moments was used to estimate partition coefficients between the air and NAPL phases for each of the tracers. The partition coefficients and retardation factors, also estimated during the study, are used to select appropriate tracers for NAPL detection. This research identified several suitable perfluorocarbon tracers and demonstrated the feasibility of using partitioning tracers as a tool for NAPL detection in the vadose zone.

  14. Following Footsteps: ECD Tracer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smale, Jim, Editor

    2002-01-01

    This document consists of the single 2002 issue of The Bernard van Leer Foundation's "Early Childhood Matters," a periodical addressed to practitioners in the field of early childhood education and including information on projects funded by the Foundation. Articles in this issue focus on early childhood development tracer studies of former

  15. Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoffersen, A.R.; Gadgil, A.J.; Lorenzetti, D.M.

    2004-05-01

    Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume.

  16. Effective Dynamics of a Tracer Particle Interacting with an Ideal Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert, Dirk-Andr; Frhlich, Jrg; Pickl, Peter; Pizzo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    We study a system consisting of a heavy quantum particle, called the tracer particle, coupled to an ideal gas of light Bose particles, the ratio of masses of the tracer particle and a gas particle being proportional to the gas density. All particles have non-relativistic kinematics. The tracer particle is driven by an external potential and couples to the gas particles through a pair potential. We compare the quantum dynamics of this system to an effective dynamics given by a Newtonian equation of motion for the tracer particle coupled to a classical wave equation for the Bose gas. We quantify the closeness of these two dynamics as the mean-field limit is approached (gas density ). Our estimates allow us to interchange the thermodynamic with the mean-field limit.

  17. Comparison of modelled and measured tracer gas concentrations during the Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.L.; Cohn, R.D.; Seilkop, S.K.; Draxler, R.R.; Heffter, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The 24-hour surface concentrations of several perfluorocarbon tracer gases measured during the 1987 Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX) provided a unique continental-scale data set with which to evaluate long-range transport and diffusion models. One such model, a multilayer Lagrangian model, was evaluated in the ANATEX Model Evaluation Study (AMES) by comparing distributions and time series of calculated and measured tracer concentrations at bands of sampling sites nearly equidistant from one of the two tracer release sites and by computing spatial differences in the concentration-weighted centroids of 20, 24-hour tracer footprints or composite plumes. The results for this model indicated that it overemphasized the effects of the stronger upper-level winds. In spite of the bias in transport speed, the distributions of the calculated and measured concentrations were quite similar.

  18. Dissolved gas and isotopic tracers of denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; McNab, W W; Carle, S F; Cey, B D

    2008-02-28

    We present results from field studies in California (USA) where tritium-helium age dating is used in conjunction with major gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}), noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), and stable isotopes ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) in order to document nitrate loading and denitrification associated with confined animal agricultural operations and septic systems. Preliminary results show that in-field extraction of the full suite of dissolved gases will be possible using a new Gas Extraction System under development to augment the current Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry techniques. Ascribing observed groundwater nitrate levels to specific current and past land use practices is often complicated by uncertainty in groundwater age and the degree and locus of dentrification. Groundwater age dating at dairy field sites using the {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He method indicates that the highest nitrate concentrations (150-260 mg/L-NO3) occur in waters with apparent ages of <5 yrs, whereas older waters contain excess N{sub 2} from saturated zone denitrification [1]. At a residential septic system site in Livermore, CA, waters with young apparent ages (<1 yr) proximal to leach line drainage have lower nitrate concentrations and elevated nitrate {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 18}O values consistent with denitrification, but little evidence for excess N{sub 2}, indicating that denitrification is occurring in the unsaturated zone. Degassing of groundwater can complicate efforts to calculate travel times [2] and to quantify denitrification. Degassed groundwater underlying dairy operations is formed by two distinct mechanisms: (1) recharge of manure lagoon water affected by biogenic gas ebullition [3] and (2) saturated zone denitrification producing N{sub 2} gas above solubility in groundwater. Gas loss due to both mechanisms is evident in the concentrations of noble gases and major gases in dairy groundwater samples.

  19. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Radon, CO2 and CH4 as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies - comparative theoretical evaluation of the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Paschke, A.

    2015-05-01

    The applicability of radon as environmental tracer in groundwater/surface water interaction studies has been documented in a considerable number of publications. In some of these reports it has also been suggested to validate the radon based results by using CO2 and CH4 as supplementary tracers. The on-site measurement of the three gaseous parameters relies on their extraction from the water followed by the measurement of their concentration by means of mobile gas-in-air detectors. Since most related practical applications require the recording of time series, a continuous extraction of the gases from (e.g.) a permanently pumped water stream is necessary. A precondition for the sound combined interpretation of the resulting time series is that the individual temporal responses of the extracted gas-in-air concentrations to instantaneously changing gas-in-water concentrations are either identical or in reproducible relation to each other. The aim of our theoretical study was the comparison of the extraction behavior of the three gaseous solutes with focus on the individual temporal responses to changing gas-in-water concentrations considering in particular the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics. We could show that the overall mass transfer coefficients of radon, CO2 and CH4 result in a virtually similar temporal response to aqueous concentration changes, thus confirming the straightforward combined measurement/utilization of the dissolved gases as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies.

  1. Impact of Salinity on the Air-Water Partition Coefficient of Gas Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Pope, Gary A.; Evans, John C.; Cameron, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The use of a gas partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) has been proposed as a standard approach to the measurement of field-scale vadose zone water saturation fractions. The accuracy of the saturation measurement is largely dependent on the determination of the air-water partitioning coefficient, K, of the tracers; however, in practice, K is also strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the water. In this study, column tests were conducted to investigate the impact of salinity on tracer partitioning coefficients for two promising gas phase candidate tracers, dibromomethane and dimethylether. Sodium thiosulfate was used as a salinity surrogate. The dynamic K values of the two partitioning tracers were measured for sodium thiosulfate concentrations between 0% and 36% by weight. Methane was used as the non-partitioning tracer for all experiments. K values were found to decrease significantly with increasing sodium thiosulfate concentration. Similar correlations between K values and sodium thiosulfate concentration were found for both of the partitioning tracers tested.

  2. Estimation of uncertainty in tracer gas measurement of air change rates.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Atsushi; Okuizumi, Yumiko; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Simple and economical measurement of air change rates can be achieved with a passive-type tracer gas doser and sampler. However, this is made more complex by the fact many buildings are not a single fully mixed zone. This means many measurements are required to obtain information on ventilation conditions. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of tracer gas measurement of air change rate in n completely mixed zones. A single measurement with one tracer gas could be used to simply estimate the air change rate when n = 2. Accurate air change rates could not be obtained for n ≥ 2 due to a lack of information. However, the proposed method can be used to estimate an air change rate with an accuracy of <33%. Using this method, overestimation of air change rate can be avoided. The proposed estimation method will be useful in practical ventilation measurements. PMID:21318005

  3. Estimation of Uncertainty in Tracer Gas Measurement of Air Change Rates

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Atsushi; Okuizumi, Yumiko; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Simple and economical measurement of air change rates can be achieved with a passive-type tracer gas doser and sampler. However, this is made more complex by the fact many buildings are not a single fully mixed zone. This means many measurements are required to obtain information on ventilation conditions. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of tracer gas measurement of air change rate in n completely mixed zones. A single measurement with one tracer gas could be used to simply estimate the air change rate when n = 2. Accurate air change rates could not be obtained for n ≥ 2 due to a lack of information. However, the proposed method can be used to estimate an air change rate with an accuracy of <33%. Using this method, overestimation of air change rate can be avoided. The proposed estimation method will be useful in practical ventilation measurements. PMID:21318005

  4. Estimating fracture spacing from natural tracers in shale-gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; McKenna, S. A.; Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.

    2012-12-01

    Resource appraisal and long-term recovery potential of shale gas relies on the characteristics of the fracture networks created within the formation. Both well testing and analysis of micro-seismic data can provide information on fracture characteristics, but approaches that directly utilize observations of gas transport through the fractures are not well-developed. We examine transport of natural tracers and analyze the breakthrough curves (BTC's) of these tracers with a multi-rate mass transfer (MMT) model to elucidate fracture characteristics. The focus here is on numerical simulation studies to determine constraints on the ability to accurately estimate fracture network characteristics as a function of the diffusion coefficients of the natural tracers, the number and timing of observations, the flow rates from the well, and the noise in the observations. Traditional tracer testing approaches for dual-porosity systems analyze the BTC of an injected tracer to obtain fracture spacing considering a single spacing value. An alternative model is the MMT model where diffusive mass transfer occurs simultaneously over a range of matrix block sizes defined by a statistical distribution (e.g., log-normal, gamma, or power-law). The goal of the estimation is defining the parameters of the fracture spacing distribution. The MMT model has not yet been applied to analysis of natural in situ natural tracers. Natural tracers are omnipresent in the subsurface, potentially obviating the needed for introduced tracers, and could be used to improve upon fracture characteristics estimated from pressure transient and decline curve production analysis. Results of this study provide guidance for data collection and analysis of natural tracers in fractured shale formations. Parameter estimation on simulated BTC's will provide guidance on the necessary timing of BTC sampling in field experiments. The MMT model can result in non-unique or nonphysical parameter estimates. We address this with Bayesian estimation approaches that can define uncertainty in estimated parameters as a posterior probability distribution. We will also use Bayesian estimation to examine model identifiability (e.g., selecting between parametric distributions of fracture spacing) from various BTC's. Application of the MMT model to natural tracers and hydraulic fractures in shale will require extension of the model to account for partitioning of the tracers between multiple phases and different mass transfer behavior in mixed gas-liquid (e.g., oil or groundwater rich) systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Evaluating Gas-Phase Transport And Detection Of Noble Gas Signals From Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Chemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, C. R.; Hunter, S. L.; Sun, Y.; Wagoner, J. L.; Ruddle, D.; Anderson, G.; Felske, D.; Myers, K.; Zucca, J. J.; Emer, D. F.; Townsend, M.; Drellack, S.; Chipman, V.; Snelson, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) involved detonating 1 kiloton of chemical explosive in a subsurface cavity which also contained bottles of tracer gases (ref 1). That experiment provided an improved understanding of transport processes relevant to the detection of noble gas signals at the surface emanating from a clandestine underground nuclear explosion (UNE). As an alternative to performing large chemical detonations to simulate gas transport from UNEs, we have developed a test bed for subsurface gas transport, sampling and detection studies using a former UNE cavity. The test bed site allows for the opportunity to evaluate pathways to the surface created by the UNE as well as possible transport mechanisms including barometric pumping and cavity pressurization (ref 2). With the test bed we have monitored long-term chemical tracers as well as newly injected tracers. In order to perform high temporal resolution tracer gas monitoring, we have also developed a Subsurface Gas Smart Sampler (SGSS) which has application during an actual On Site Inspection (OSI) and is available for deployment in OSI field exercises planned for 2014. Deployment of five SGSS at the remote test bed has provided unparalleled detail concerning relationships involving tracer gas transport to the surface, barometric fluctuations and temporal variations in the natural radon concentration. We anticipate that the results of our tracer experiments will continue to support the development of improved noble gas detection technology for both OSI and International Monitoring System applications. 1. C.R. Carrigan et al., 1996, Nature, 382, p. 528. 2. Y. Sun and C.R. Carrigan, 2012, Pure Appl. Geophys., DOI 10.1007/s00024-012-0514-4.

  6. [Tracer gas evaluations of local exhaust hood performance].

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2007-09-01

    A local exhaust hood is one of the most commonly used controls for harmful contaminants in the working environment. In Japan, the performance of a hood is evaluated by hood velocity measurements, and administrative performance requirements for hoods are provided as control velocities by the Japanese Industrial Safety and Health Law. However, it is doubtful whether the control velocity would be the most suitable velocity for any industrial hood since the control velocity is not substantiated by actual measurements of the containment ability of each hood. In order to examine the suitability of the control velocity as a performance requirement, a hood performance test by the tracer gas method, using carbon dioxide (CO(2)), was conducted with an exterior type hood in a laboratory. In this study, as an index of the hood performance, capture efficiency defined as the ratio of contaminant quantity captured by the hood to the total generated contaminant quantity, was determined by measuring the CO(2) concentrations. When the assumptive capture point of the contaminant was located at a point 30 cm from the hood opening, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of less than the current control velocity. Without cross draft, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s (corresponding to 40% of the control velocity) at the capture point. Reduction of the suction velocity to 0.2 m/s caused an 80% decrease in exhaust flow rate. The effect of cross draft, set at 0.3 m/s, on the capture efficiency differed according to its direction. When the direction of the cross draft was normal to the hood centerline, the effect was not recognized and a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s. A cross draft from a worker's back (at an angle of 45 degrees to the hood centerline) did not affect the capture efficiency, either. When the cross draft blew at an angle of 135 degrees to the hood centerline, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.4 m/s. The reduction of suction velocity would beneficially reduce running costs of local exhaust hoods and air conditioning. Effective and economical exhaustion would be achieved if the minimum velocity obtained by the tracer gas method were to be substituted for the excessive control velocity. PMID:17938560

  7. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fang, Min

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  8. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  9. Analysis of volatile-phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at depth; barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature, and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been observed. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. New Tracers of Gas Migration in the Continental Crust

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, Mark D.

    2015-11-03

    Noble gases are exceptional tracers in continental settings due to the remarkable isotopic variability between the mantle, crust, and atmosphere, and because they are inert. Due to systematic variability in physical properties, such as diffusion, solubility, and production rates, the combination of helium, neon, and argon provides unique but under-utilized indices of gas migration. Existing noble gas data sets are dominated by measurements of gas and fluid phases from gas wells, ground waters and hot springs. There are very few noble gas measurements from the solid continental crust itself, which means that this important reservoir is poorly characterized. The central goal of this project was to enhance understanding of gas distribution and migration in the continental crust using new measurements of noble gases in whole rocks and minerals from existing continental drill cores, with an emphasis on helium, neon, argon. We carried out whole-rock and mineral-separate noble gas measurements on Precambrian basement samples from the Texas Panhandle. The Texas Panhandle gas field is the southern limb of the giant Hugoton-Panhandle oil and gas field; it has high helium contents (up to ~ 2 %) and 3He/4He of 0.21 (± 0.03) Ra. Because the total amount of helium in the Panhandle gas field is relatively well known, crustal isotopic data and mass balance calculations can be used to constrain the ultimate source rocks, and hence the helium migration paths. The new 3He/4He data range from 0.03 to 0.11 Ra (total), all of which are lower than the gas field values. There is internal isotopic heterogeneity in helium, neon, and argon, within all the samples; crushing extractions yield less radiogenic values than melting, demonstrating that fluid inclusions preserve less radiogenic gases. The new data suggest that the Precambrian basement has lost significant amounts of helium, and shows the importance of measuring helium with neon and argon. The 4He/40Ar values are particularly useful in demonstrating helium loss because all the data falls well below the production ratio.

  11. COMPARISON OF MODELLED AND MEASURED TRACER GAS CONCENTRATIONS DURING THE ACROSS NORTH AMERICA TRACER EXPERIMENT (ANATEX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 24-hour surface concentrations of several perfluorocarbon tracer gases measured during the 1987 Across North America Tracer Experiment (ANATEX) provided a unique continental-scale data set with which to evaluate long-range transport and diffusion models. One such model, a mul...

  12. Gas transport in firn: multiple-tracer characterisation and model intercomparison for NEEM, Northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Martinerie, P.; Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Trudinger, C. M.; Witrant, E.; Rosen, J. L.; Orsi, A. J.; Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Steele, L. P.; Hogan, C.; Laube, J. C.; Sturges, W. T.; Levchenko, V. A.; Smith, A. M.; Levin, I.; Conway, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P. M.; Kawamura, K.; Jenk, T. M.; White, J. W. C.; Sowers, T.; Schwander, J.; Blunier, T.

    2011-05-01

    Compacted snow (firn) preserves a continuous record of atmospheric composition up to a century back in time. Firn air transport modeling is essential for interpretation of firn gas records. Each site needs to be characterised individually through a tuning procedure, in which the effective diffusivity at each depth is adjusted to optimise the agreement between modeled and measured mixing ratios of a selected reference gas (usually CO2). We present the characterisation of the NEEM site, Northern Greenland (77.45 N 51.06 W), where an ensemble of ten reference tracers is used to constrain the diffusivity reconstruction. By analysing uncertainties in both data and the reference gas atmospheric histories, we can objectively assign weights to each of the gases used for the model tuning, and define a root mean square criterion that is minimised in the tuning. Each tracer constrains the firn profile differently through its unique atmospheric history and free air diffusivity, making our multiple-tracer characterisation method a clear improvement over the commonly used single-tracer tuning. Six firn air transport models are tuned to the NEEM site; all models successfully reproduce the data within a 1? Gaussian distribution. The modern day ?age, i.e. the difference between gas age and ice age, is calculated to be 182 8 yr. We find evidence that diffusivity does not vanish completely in the firn lock-in zone, as is commonly assumed. We further present the first intercomparison study of firn air models, where we introduce diagnostic scenarios designed to probe specific aspects of the model physics. Our results show that there are major differences in the way the models handle advective transport. Furthermore diffusive fractionation of isotopes in the firn is poorly constrained by the models, which has consequences for attempts to reconstruct the isotopic composition of trace gases back in time using firn air and ice core records.

  13. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  14. A continuous fast-response dual-tracer analyzer for halogenated atmospheric tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rydock, J.P.; Lamb, B.K.

    1994-10-01

    An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single halogenated atmospheric tracer studies. A two-channel flow system was implemented consisting of an alumina cartridge in one channel and a glass beads cartridge of equal flow resistance in the second channel. The alumina passes only sulfur hexafluoride, while the glass beads pass both SF6 and the perfluoroarbon tracer. The SF6 is quantified directly from the electron capture detector (ECD) signal in the alumina channel, and the perfluorocarbon concentration is obtained from the difference of the ECD responses in the two channels. The dual-tracer analyzer is field portable for mobile operations or fixed-location monitoring, has a response time of 1.2 s, and has limits of detection of about 15 pptv for SF6 and 10 pptv for perfluoro-methylcyclohexane, which was the principal perfluorocarbon tracer used in this study. The present instrument configuration, which requires periodic purging of the adsorbent trap, can obtain continuous measurements for a 10-15-min segment in every half hour of operation. Dual-tracer data from a field demonstration test are presented.

  15. Dissolved gas dynamics in wetland soils: Root-mediated gas transfer kinetics determined via push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Matthew C.; Pal, David S.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2015-09-01

    Gas transfer processes are fundamental to the biogeochemical and water quality functions of wetlands, yet there is limited knowledge of the rates and pathways of soil-atmosphere exchange for gases other than oxygen and methane (CH4). In this study, we use a novel push-pull technique with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) as dissolved gas tracers to quantify the kinetics of root-mediated gas transfer, which is a critical efflux pathway for gases from wetland soils. This tracer approach disentangles the effects of physical transport from simultaneous reaction in saturated, vegetated wetland soils. We measured significant seasonal variation in first-order gas exchange rate constants, with smaller spatial variations between different soil depths and vegetation zones in a New Jersey tidal marsh. Gas transfer rates for most biogeochemical trace gases are expected to be bracketed by the rate constants for SF6 and He, which ranged from ˜10-2 to 2 × 10-1 h-1 at our site. A modified Damköhler number analysis is used to evaluate the balance between biochemical reaction and root-driven gas exchange in governing the fate of environmental trace gases in rooted, anaerobic soils. This approach confirmed the importance of plant gas transport for CH4, and showed that root-driven transport may affect nitrous oxide (N2O) balances in settings where N2O reduction rates are slow.

  16. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T

    2012-02-01

    Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences. PMID:21996285

  17. Generation of ethylene tracer by noncatalytic pyrolysis of natural gas at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Ruch, R.; Coleman, D.; Benson, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    There is a critical need within the pipeline gas industry for an inexpensive and reliable technology to generate an identification tag or tracer that can be added to pipeline gas to identify gas that may escape and improve the deliverability and management of gas in underground storage fields. Ethylene is an ideal tracer, because it does not exist naturally in the pipeline gas, and because its physical properties are similar to the pipeline gas components. A pyrolysis process, known as the Tragen process, has been developed to continuously convert the ???2%-4% ethane component present in pipeline gas into ethylene at common pipeline pressures of 800 psi. In our studies of the Tragen process, pyrolysis without steam addition achieved a maximum ethylene yield of 28%-35% at a temperature range of 700-775 ??C, corresponding to an ethylene concentration of 4600-5800 ppm in the product gas. Coke deposition was determined to occur at a significant rate in the pyrolysis reactor without steam addition. The ?? 13C isotopic analysis of gas components showed a ?? 13C value of ethylene similar to ethane in the pipeline gas, indicating that most of the ethylene was generated from decomposition of the ethane in the raw gas. However, ?? 13C isotopic analysis of the deposited coke showed that coke was primarily produced from methane, rather than from ethane or other heavier hydrocarbons. No coke deposition was observed with the addition of steam at concentrations of > 20% by volume. The dilution with steam also improved the ethylene yield. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  18. Tracer Developments: Results of Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Bentley, H.; Moore, J.N.; Veggeberg, S.

    1986-01-21

    Tracers can be used to monitor the movement of groundwaters and geothermal fluids and they can be used as a reference to quantify changes in fluid chemistry as a result of injection. Despite their potential importance to the geothermal operator, very few tracers are presently available and of those that are, little is known about their stability or behavior at the elevated temperatures that typify resources capable of electric power generation. During the past two years the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in tracer research and testing, largely through the DOE Injection Research Program. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of these laboratory and field investigations.

  19. Verification of subsurface barrier integrity using perfluorocarbon gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.M.; GIBBS,B.; SENUM,G.; SCHWARTZ,M.; HOPKINGS,T.; HEISER,J.

    1998-03-01

    Use of perfluorocarbon (PFT) gaseous tracers shows promise as an excellent means of demonstrating subsurface barrier integrity. The PFT technology has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory to evaluate the colloidal silica (CS) barrier installed during the summer of 1997. This program involved two separate experimental phases. In the first phase, PFTs were injected into the native soil for a period of one day in the region adjacent to the proposed location of the CS barrier. The information was used to confirm that diffusion is the rate controlling transport mechanism and measure in-situ diffusion coefficients for the tracers in the native soil. This information is useful in interpreting data from the second phase of this study. In addition, the monitoring data was used to estimate the leak (injection) location. In the second phase, PFTs were injected into the region contained by the CS barrier and data have been collected to evaluate the performance of the barrier. In the experiment three unique PFTs were injected with the aim of increasing the resolution of leak detection. Two regions which provided essentially no added resistance to flow as compared to the native soil were detected in the bulk of the CS barrier.

  20. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  1. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  2. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  3. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  4. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  5. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  6. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  7. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

    2011-04-15

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air water partitioning and water soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

  8. Calculation of substrate turnover rate in stable isotope tracer studies.

    PubMed

    Tserng, K Y; Kalhan, S C

    1983-09-01

    The determination of substrate turnover rate with stable isotope-labeled compounds has advantages of being safe and applicable in the study of children and pregnant women. Currently, a majority of these studies has been performed with primed constant-rate infusion technique. The isotope enrichment of the substrate in the plasma is measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The turnover rate is then calculated from steady-state kinetics. A number of different equations have been used by various investigators for this purpose. Based on theoretical consideration and experimental data, it is concluded that the equation P = [(1/E) - 1] I or P = (y/x) I should be used for a correct turnover rate calculation, where P is turnover rate in mumol X kg-1, E the isotope enrichment, I the infusion rate in mumol X kg-1 X min-1, and y/x the mole ratio of tracee to tracers. A GCMS standard curve constructed from isotope enrichment versus isotope peak abundance should be used for the former equation, whereas a standard curve constructed from mole ratio (x/y) versus isotope ratio should be used for the latter equation. Interchange of standard curves or use of other equations will produce erroneous turnover rate. This is especially significant when a low enriched isotope-labeled compound is used as a tracer. PMID:6614168

  9. Nitrous oxide as a tracer gas in the ASHRAE 110-1995 Standard.

    PubMed

    Burke, Martin; Wong, Larry; Gonzales, Ben A; Knutson, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 110 provides a quantitative method for testing the performance of laboratory fume hoods. Through release of a known quantity (4.0 Lpm) of a tracer gas, and subsequent monitoring of the tracer gas concentration in the "breathing zone" of a mannequin positioned in front of the hood, this method allows for evaluation of laboratory hood performance. Standard 110 specifies sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) as the tracer gas; however, suitable alternatives are allowed. Through three series of performance tests, this analysis serves to investigate the use of nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternate tracer gas for hood performance testing. Single gas tests were performed according to ASHRAE Standard 110-1995 with each tracer gas individually. These tests showed identical results using an acceptance criterion of AU 0.1 with the sash half open, nominal 18 inches (0.46m) high, and the face velocity at a nominal 60 fpm (0.3m/s). Most data collected in these single gas tests, for both tracer gases, were below the minimum detection limit, thus two dual gas tests were developed for simultaneous sampling of both tracer gases. Dual gas dual ejector tests were performed with both tracer gases released simultaneously through two ejectors, and the concentration measured with two detectors using a common sampling probe. Dual gas single ejector tests were performed with both tracer gases released though a single ejector, and the concentration measured in the same manner as the dual gas dual ejector tests. The dual gas dual ejector tests showed excellent correlation, with R typically greater than 0.9. Variance was observed in the resulting regression line for each hood, likely due to non-symmetry between the two challenges caused by variables beyond the control of the investigators. Dual gas single ejector tests resulted in exceptional correlation, with R>0.99 typically for the consolidated data, with a slope of 1.0. These data indicate equivalent results for ASHRAE 110 performance testing using either SF6 or N2O, indicating N2O as an applicable alternate tracer gas. PMID:24283334

  10. Gas transport in firn: multiple-tracer characterisation and model intercomparison for NEEM, Northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Martinerie, P.; Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Trudinger, C. M.; Witrant, E.; Rosen, J. L.; Orsi, A. J.; Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Steele, L. P.; Hogan, C.; Laube, J. C.; Sturges, W. T.; Levchenko, V. A.; Smith, A. M.; Levin, I.; Conway, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Lang, P. M.; Kawamura, K.; Jenk, T. M.; White, J. W. C.; Sowers, T.; Schwander, J.; Blunier, T.

    2012-05-01

    Air was sampled from the porous firn layer at the NEEM site in Northern Greenland. We use an ensemble of ten reference tracers of known atmospheric history to characterise the transport properties of the site. By analysing uncertainties in both data and the reference gas atmospheric histories, we can objectively assign weights to each of the gases used for the depth-diffusivity reconstruction. We define an objective root mean square criterion that is minimised in the model tuning procedure. Each tracer constrains the firn profile differently through its unique atmospheric history and free air diffusivity, making our multiple-tracer characterisation method a clear improvement over the commonly used single-tracer tuning. Six firn air transport models are tuned to the NEEM site; all models successfully reproduce the data within a 1? Gaussian distribution. A comparison between two replicate boreholes drilled 64 m apart shows differences in measured mixing ratio profiles that exceed the experimental error. We find evidence that diffusivity does not vanish completely in the lock-in zone, as is commonly assumed. The ice age- gas age difference (?age) at the firn-ice transition is calculated to be 182+3-9 yr. We further present the first intercomparison study of firn air models, where we introduce diagnostic scenarios designed to probe specific aspects of the model physics. Our results show that there are major differences in the way the models handle advective transport. Furthermore, diffusive fractionation of isotopes in the firn is poorly constrained by the models, which has consequences for attempts to reconstruct the isotopic composition of trace gases back in time using firn air and ice core records.

  11. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that acti...

  12. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  13. Gas-partitioning tracer test to quantify trapped gas during recharge.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Solomon, D Kip; Perkins, Kim S; Ellett, Kevin M

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved helium and bromide tracers were used to evaluate trapped gas during an infiltration pond experiment. Dissolved helium preferentially partitioned into trapped gas bubbles, or other pore air, because of its low solubility in water. This produced observed helium retardation factors of as much as 12 relative to bromide. Numerical simulations of helium breakthrough with both equilibrium and kinetically limited advection/dispersion/retardation did not match observed helium concentrations. However, better fits were obtained by including a decay term representing the diffusive loss of helium through interconnected, gas-filled pores. Calculations indicate that 7% to more than 26% of the porosity beneath the pond was filled with gas. Measurements of laboratory hydraulic properties indicate that a 10% decrease in saturation would reduce the hydraulic conductivity by at least one order of magnitude in the well-sorted sandstone, but less in the overlying soils. This is consistent with in situ measurements during the experiment, which show steeper hydraulic gradients in sandstone than in soil. Intrinsic permeability of the soil doubled during the first six months of the experiment, likely caused by a combination of dissolution and thermal contraction of trapped gas. Managers of artificial recharge basins may consider minimizing the amount of trapped gas by using wet, rather than dry, tilling to optimize infiltration rates, particularly in well-sorted porous media in which reintroduced trapped gas may cause substantial reductions in permeability. Trapped gas may also inhibit the amount of focused infiltration that occurs naturally during ephemeral flood events along washes and playas. PMID:15318781

  14. Estimating the gas and dye quantities for modified tracer technique measurements of stream reaeration coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Measuring the reaeration coefficient of a stream with a modified tracer technique has been accomplished by injecting either ethylene or ethylene and propane together and a rhodamine-WT dye solution into the stream. The movement of the tracers through the stream reach after injection is described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. The peak concentrations of the tracers at the downstream end of the reach depend on the concentrations of the tracers in the stream at the injection site, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, the mean water velocity, the length of the reach, and the duration of the injection period. The downstream gas concentrations also depend on the gas desorption coefficients of the reach. The concentrations of the tracer gases in the stream at the injection site depend on the flow rates of the gases through the injection diffusers, the efficiency of the gas absorption process, and the stream discharge. The concentration of dye in the stream at the injection site depends on the flow rate of the dye solution, the concentration of the dye solution, and the stream discharge. Equations for estimating the gas flow rates, the quantities of the gases, the dye concentration, and the quantity of dye together with procedures for determining the variables in these equations are presented. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Dense molecular gas tracers in high mass star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jing-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the FCRAO observations that mapped HCN (1–0), CS (2–1), HNC (1–0) and HCO+ (1–0) in ten high-mass star forming cores associated with water masers. We present velocity integrated intensity maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers identify areas with similar properties in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than those of HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high-mass star forming regions, and find that most of the cores agree with the model that photodominated regions dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to an X-ray dominated region.

  16. Dense molecular gas tracers in high mass star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jing-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the FCRAO observations that mapped HCN (10), CS (21), HNC (10) and HCO+ (10) in ten high-mass star forming cores associated with water masers. We present velocity integrated intensity maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers identify areas with similar properties in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than those of HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high-mass star forming regions, and find that most of the cores agree with the model that photodominated regions dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to an X-ray dominated region.

  17. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  18. A comprehensive study of the analysis and economic benefits of radioactive tracer engineered simulation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.; Robinson, B.M.; Voneiff, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    Hydraulic Fracturing is an important technology to enhance production from tight gas reservoirs. Several techniques have been utilized to attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing treatments. One technique, radioactive tracers, is currently used on over 15 % of the stimulation treatments performed in the U.S. With proper materials, design, and execution, tracers can be used to locate the presence and concentration of proppant at the wellbore in order to evaluate vertical and radial proppant distribution. A comprehensive study of over 100 fracture treatments has been completed in which radioactive tracers were used along with production logs, stress logs, post-fracturing completion reports, and production history to analyze completion effectiveness in four different reservoirs. Additionally, an economic benefit model was constructed to evaluate the benefit/cost ratio of applying the technology.

  19. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter estimates made.

  20. Mid Infrared H2 lines- a new direct tracer for total molecular gas content in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, John-David T.

    2016-01-01

    Robust knowledge of the molecular hydrogen (H2) gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. Since H2 is not readily observable in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), the molecular gas content has traditionally been inferred using indirect tracers like carbon-monoxide (CO), dust emission, gamma ray interactions, and star formation efficiency. Physical processes resulting in enhancement and reduction of these indirect tracers can result in misleading estimates of molecular gas masses. My dissertation work is based on devising a new temperature power law distribution model for warm H2, a direct tracer, to calculate the total molecular gas mass in galaxies. The model parameters are estimated using mid infrared (MIR) H2 rotational line fluxes, obtained from IRS- Spitzer (InfraRed Spectrograph- Spitzer) instrument, and the model can be extrapolated to a suitable lower temperature to recover the total molecular gas mass. The power law model is able to recover the dark molecular gas, undetected by CO, in low metallicity galaxies. Using the power law model in the coming era of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with the high sensitivity MIR Instrument (MIRI) spectrograph we will be able to understand the properties of molecular gas at low and high redshifts.

  1. Measuring self-pollution in school buses using a tracer gas technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrentz, Eduardo; Fitz, Dennis R.; Pankratz, David V.; Sabin, Lisa D.; Colome, Steven D.; Fruin, Scott A.; Winer, Arthur M.

    A potentially important, but inadequately studied, source of children's exposure to pollutants during school bus commutes is the introduction of a bus's own exhaust into the passenger compartment. We developed and applied a method to determine the amount of a bus's own exhaust penetrating into the cabin in a study of six in-use school buses over a range of routes, roadway types, fuels, and emission control technologies. A tracer gas, SF 6, was metered into the bus's exhaust system using a mass flow controller whose flow rate was logged by a data acquisition system and processed with the concurrent real-time pollutant measurement data. At the same time, the SF 6 concentration inside the bus was measured using an AeroVironment CTA-1000 continuous analyzer connected to a series of solenoids that switched the sample inlet between the front and rear of the bus cabin. To account for a baseline drift of the CTA-1000, SF 6-free air was also drawn through a line located outside at the front of the bus. Although this third sample line generally provided a reference zero value, it also showed that under certain wind conditions (i.e., wind from the rear) when the bus was stopped and was idling, significant amounts of the bus's own exhaust reached this location at the front of the bus. Self-pollution, the percentage of a bus's own exhaust that can be found inside its cabin, was a function of bus type and age, and a strong function of window position (i.e., open or closed). We estimated up to 0.3% of the air inside the cabin was from the bus's own exhaust in older buses, approximately 10 times the percentage observed for newer buses, and 25% of the black carbon concentration variance was explained by the buses' self-pollution. Analysis of the tracer gas concentrations provided a powerful tool for identifying potentially high-exposure conditions.

  2. A Tracer Study of Lebanese Upper Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Dallal, Kamel; Rizkallah, George; Rabah, Jihan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data arising from a tracer study of 90 terminating Beirut upper secondary school students. Nearly all the students intended to transit to university, about half of them to science and technology programmes, and subsequently did so. Median anticipated earnings upon graduation were realistic, but a lack of information or guidance

  3. TRACER STUDY OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERACTIONS IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rates of sediment bioturbation and advective exchange of water across the sediment-water interface in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island were studied by radioactive tracer experiments. The 'biological pumping rate' of water across the interface (.7 + or - .3 cc/sq cm day) was calcula...

  4. Studies of thunderstorm transport processes with aircraft using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, A.G.; Smith, P.L.; Stith, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Instrumented aircraft can provide in situ measurements of winds and turbulence useful for studying transport and dispersion in clouds. Using inert artificial gases as tracers, and fast response analyzers on aircraft, time-resolved observations of transport and dispersion have been obtained. Examples are shown of these types of observations in and around cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmn, Gema; Quinton, John N.; Nearing, Mark A.; Mabit, Lionel; Girldez, Juan V.; Gmez, Jos A.

    2013-04-01

    The quest for alternative methods of soil losses assessment, due to water erosion to complement and enhance existing methods has directed attention to the use of tracing approaches because of the additional information they provide, such as sediment source identification, tracking of sediment movement across the landscape at various temporal and spatial scales and soil erosion rates. For these reasons, the utility and robustness of sediment tracing approaches using a wide range of substances and soil properties have been evaluated in numerous studies. A comprehensive literature review on tracing approaches used in water erosion studies was carried out in June 2011 using the Web of Science database and as search terms in the title or as keywords: "erosion AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracking". The search excluded reviews and tillage and/or wind erosion studies. Only studies that used tracers to make a determination of water erosion or sedimentation rates, or in some cases relative erosion contribution, were considered in this study, and were further refined by manually checking that the articles corresponded to experiments involving sediment studies using tracers, as defined within the context of this review. Five distinct groups of tracing approaches were identified: fallout radionuclides, rare earth elements, soil magnetism and magnetic substances, other tracers, and sediment fingerprinting techniques. This abstract presents a synthesis of the current approaches of each of the tracing techniques identified in assessing soil erosion and sediment redistribution and a summary with the commonalities and differences between the approaches and identifying research gaps and future trends.

  6. Radon as a natural tracer for gas transport within uranium waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Chagas, E G L; Abreu, C B; Dias, D C S; Lopez, D; Guerreiro, E T Z; Alberti, H L C; Braz, M L; Branco, O; Fleming, P

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has been identified as the main cause for outflow of acid water and radioactive/non-radioactive contaminants. AMD encompasses pyrites oxidation when water and oxygen are available. AMD was identified in uranium waste rock piles (WRPs) of Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil-Caldas facility (Brazilian uranium mine), resulting in high costs for water treatment. AMD reduction is the main challenge, and scientific investigation has been conducted to understand oxygen and water transportation within WRPs, where 222Rn is used as natural tracer for oxygen transportation. The study consists of soil radon gas mapping in the top layer of WRP4 using active soil gas pumping, radon adsorption in active charcoal and 222Rn determination using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A sampling network of 71 points was built where samples were collected at a depth of 40 cm. Soil radon gas concentration ranged from 33.7 to 1484.2 kBq m(-3) with mean concentration of 320.7±263.3 kBq m(-3). PMID:24729565

  7. Tracer study of proximity and recirculation effects on exposure risk in an airliner cabin.

    PubMed

    Rydock, James P

    2004-02-01

    There is continuing concern about whether and to what extent airliner cabins represent an increased risk of transmission of airborne infectious disease. The purpose of this study was to examine through a simple experiment the relative importance of close proximity and partial recirculation of cabin air on the potential risk of disease transmission. Results are presented from measurements of instantaneous point source dispersion in a cabin on a commercial airline flight. A small amount of tracer gas was released as a puff in the passenger cabin of a wide body jet at cruise altitude. Tracer gas samples were taken manually in the period immediately after the release by two technicians sitting 2 m and 30 m forward of the release point in the cabin. The maximum tracer concentration observed at the 2 m sampling point occurred at 5 s after the release and was a factor of 500 greater than the maximum observed at the 30 m sampling point, which occurred 6.5 min after the release. The integrated tracer exposure at the 2 m location was approximately a factor of 30 greater than at the 30 m location. Assuming risk of transmission is proportional to dose, then the results support the hypotheses that infectious diseases are transmitted primarily between people sitting in close proximity to each other in an aircraft cabin and that partial recirculation of ventilation air in the cabin has a negligible impact on occupants' risk of exposure. PMID:14960054

  8. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  9. Fluorescence imaging of natural gas/air mixing without tracers added

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazenwadel, J.; Koban, W.; Kunzelmann, T.; Schulz, C.

    2001-09-01

    Odor markers present in natural gas are shown to be useful tracers for imaging of the gas/air mixing progress in technical burner applications. Since tetrahydrothiophene (THT) is commonly used to odor mark natural gas, it is a `natural' compound present in a wide range of technical combustion systems. The spectroscopic properties of this compound are investigated in static cell experiments giving the background for quantitative interpretation of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of THT in isothermal systems. The technique is used to characterize the mixing process of the isothermal and the combusting flow in a technical scale turbulent burner.

  10. Determination of water saturation using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2013-05-01

    Water saturation is an important indicator of contaminant distribution and plays a governing role in contaminant transport within the vadose zone. Understanding the water saturation distribution is critical for both remediation and contaminant flux monitoring in unsaturated environments. In this work we propose and demonstrate a method of remotely determining water saturation levels using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse bulk electrical conductivity measurements. The theoretical development includes the partitioning chemistry for the tracers we demonstrate (ammonia and carbon dioxide), as well as a review of the petrophysical relationship governing how these tracers influence bulk conductivity. We also investigate methods of utilizing secondary information provided by electrical conductivity breakthrough magnitudes induced by the tracers. We test the method on clean, well characterized, intermediate-scale sand columns under controlled conditions. Results demonstrate the capability to predict partitioning coefficients and accurately monitor gas breakthrough curves along the length of the column according to the corresponding electrical conductivity response, leading to accurate water saturation estimates. This work is motivated by the need to develop effective characterization and monitoring techniques for contaminated deep vadose zone environments, and provides a proof-of-concept toward uniquely characterizing and monitoring water saturation levels at the field scale and in three-dimensions using electrical resistivity tomography.

  11. Subcutaneous infusion and capillary "finger stick" sampling of stable isotope tracer in metabolic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic studies utilizing stable isotope tracer in humans have typically used intravenous tracer infusions and venous blood sampling. These studies explore subcutaneous infusion of isotope and "finger stick" capillary blood sampling to measure glucose turnover. Five subjects received simultaneous ...

  12. Assessment of steady-state propane-gas tracer method for determining reaeration coefficients, Chenango River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Steadfast, D.A.; Jirka, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in a meandering 9.6-km reach of the Chenango River, New York, to assess the feasibility of a two-dimensional steady-state propane-gas tracer method as a means of estimating in situ reaeration coefficients. It is concluded that the method, which combines an instantaneous release of dye tracer with a long duration release of propane gas tracer, is very feasible for determining gas-desorption coefficients and wind effects in a wide river. However, the method does not appear to be ready for immediate operational applications. (USGS)

  13. The Horsehead Nebula: a template for extragalactic high density tracers studies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratier, P.; Pety, J.; Gerin, M.; Montillaud, J.; Guzman, V.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Horsehead Nebula, thanks to its proximity (1'' = 0.002 pc) and simple geometry is a perfect benchmark case to study the interplay between structure and chemistry in PDRs (Photon Dominated Regions). Our past studies of many tracers enabled us to obtain a clear picture of the density and temperature structure of the region. The presence of a steep density gradient (from less than 10^3 cm-3 to 10^5 cm-3 in less than 10'' = 0.02 pc) allows to probe different environments, from far-UV photon-dominated regions to shielded cold gas, in less than 50''. With the increased sensitivity available, extragalactic observations of gas tracers other than CO such as HCN, HNC, HCO^+ become more common. These observations are used in the extragalactic context to probe the density of the interstellar medium, to identify the heating mechanisms : FUV photons --- related to starburst phenomena, whose interaction with the ISM can be understood using PDR models ) or X rays --- related to AGN, using XDR models ---, and to probe star formation using specific molecular lines as tracers of embedded star forming regions. Nevertheless these observations are of low linear resolution and the details of the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium are smeared by averaging over different environments. We will study how the understanding of these tracers in well known Galactic environments, such as the Horsehead PDR, can help the interpretation of extragalactic observations. We present high resolution multiline observations of HCN, HNC, CN and HCO^+ by the IRAM PdBI and 30m telescope instruments. We study the emission line ratios of these different molecules with the objective of comparing these high resolution observations of a well characterized Galactic region to extragalactic observations of the same tracers. Among the questions raised are : What is the importance of hyperfine anomalies in understanding the HCN and HNC observations? Can HCN be used as a tracer of star formation at subpc/pc scales? Is the HNC/HCN ratio a tracer of PDR? Are the HCO^+/HCN and HCO^+/HNC ratios good probes of density?

  14. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  15. Hanford facilities tracer study report (315 Water Treatment Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Ambalam, T.

    1995-04-14

    This report presents the results and findings of a tracer study to determine contact time for the disinfection process of 315 Water Treatment Facility that supplies sanitary water for the 300 Area. The study utilized fluoride as the tracer and contact times were determined for two flow rates. Interpolation of data and short circuiting effects are also discussed. The 315 Water Treatment Facility supplies sanitary water for the 300 Area to various process and domestic users. The Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR), outlined in the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments enacted by the EPA in 1989 and regulated by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) in Section 246-290-600 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), stipulates filtration and disinfection requirements for public water systems under the direct influence of surface water. The SWTR disinfection guidelines require that each treatment system achieves predetermined inactivation ratios. The inactivation by disinfection is approximated with a measure called CxT, where C is the disinfectant residual concentration and T is the effective contact time of the water with the disinfectant. The CxT calculations for the Hanford water treatment plants were derived from the total volume of the contact basin(s). In the absence of empirical data to support CxT calculations, the DOH determined that the CxT values used in the monthly reports for the water treatment plants on the Hanford site were invalid and required the performance of a tracer study at each plant. In response to that determination, a tracer study will be performed to determine the actual contact times of the facilities for the CxT calculations.

  16. Dense gas tracers and star formation laws: Multi-transition CS survey in nearby active star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Gao, Yu; Henkel, Christian; Zhao, Yinghe; Wang, JunZhi; Menten, Karl M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies on star formation indicate that stars, especially massive stars, are predominantly formed in dense molecular cores. We have performed a survey of multiple transitions of CS (from J=1-0 to 7-6), and HCN/HCO+ J=4-3 in nearby star-forming galaxies, including normal spirals, starburst, and ULIRGs. We find linear correlations between the luminosities of LIR and L'gas for all dense gas tracers across eight magnitudes of IR luminosity (LIR from 104 Lsun to 1012 Lsun), on scales from entire galaxies to Galactic dense cores. Irrespective of the critical density of a specific transition, dense molecular gas is universally related in a linear way to star forming activities for self-gravitationally bound gas systems.

  17. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  18. Tracer microrheology study of a hydrophobically modified comblike associative polymer.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Ahmed A; Amin, Samiul; van Zanten, John H; Khan, Saad A

    2015-04-01

    The viscoelastic properties of associative polymers are important not only for their use as rheology modifiers but also to understand their complex structure in aqueous media. In this study, the dynamics of comblike hydrophobically modified alkali swellable associative (HASE) polymers are probed using diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) based tracer microrheology. DWS-based tracer microrheology accurately probes the dynamics of HASE polymers, and the extracted microrheological moduli versus frequency profile obtained from this technique closely matches that obtained from rotational rheometry measurements. Quantitatively, however, the moduli extracted from DWS-based tracer microrheology measurements are slightly higher than those obtained using rotational rheometry. The creep compliance, elastic modulus, and relaxation time concentration scaling behavior exhibits a power-law dependence. The length scale associated with the elastic to glassy behavior change is obtained from the time-dependent diffusion coefficient. The Zimm-Rouse type scaling is recovered at high frequencies but shows a concentration effect switching from Zimm to more Rouse-like behavior at higher concentrations. PMID:25775221

  19. Gas dispersion in volume-cycled tube flow. II. Tracer bolus experiments.

    PubMed

    Gaver, D P; Solway, J; Punjabi, N; Elad, D; Grotberg, J B; Gavriely, N

    1992-01-01

    We present a new method for rapid measurement of local gas dispersion in volume-cycled tube flow. After a small bolus of tracer gas (argon) was injected into the oscillating flow, the time-averaged effective diffusion coefficient (mean value of Deff/D) for axial transport of a tracer gas is evaluated from local argon concentration measurements taken by a mass spectrometer. Two methods are presented for the evaluation of mean value of Deff/D from the concentration measurements: one uses all the sampled data, and the other uses only the local peaks of the concentration. Experiments were conducted in two tubes (radius = 0.85 or 1.0 cm) over a range of frequencies (0.42 less than or equal to f less than or equal to 8.5 Hz) and tidal volumes (7 less than or equal to VT less than or equal to 48 ml). The experimental results show very good agreement with the theoretical predictions of Elad et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 312-320, 1992). In the absence of oscillations (static fluid), the resulting mean value of Deff/D converges to that of molecular diffusion. We also show that concentration data may be acquired at any radial or axial position, not necessarily at the tracer gas injection point, and the resulting mean value of Deff/D is independent of the spatial position of the sampling catheter. This method is of similar accuracy and is substantially faster than previous methods for measuring gas dispersion in oscillatory flows. The rapidity of these measurements may permit this method to be used for the in vivo assessment of gas transport properties within the pulmonary system. PMID:1537733

  20. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  1. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1991-12-31

    Studies continued on organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization project. Tracers studied include benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. The main focus of the work performed during the time period from 07/01/91 to 12/31/91 has been the continuation of (1) LC-MS optimization for tracer identification, (2) batch sorption and degradation studies, (3) neoprene tubing evaluation studies, and (4) soil column evaluation of tracer compounds. All of these areas of research (except perhaps the neoprene tubing evaluation) are ongoing and will continue throughout the coming year.

  2. Tracer test for the measurement of gas diffusion and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation in soil.

    PubMed

    Van De Steene, Joke; Hhener, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    During soil bioremediation, the diffusion of oxygen into the soil is an important prerequisite for aerobic biodegradation, and the decrease of petroleum products is the ultimate goal. Both processes need to be monitored. The aim of this work was to develop a gas tracer test that yields information on both, gas diffusion and residual saturation with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unsaturated soil heaps. One conservative tracer (methane) and 4 partitioning gas tracers (diethylether, methyl tert-butyl ether, chloroform and n-heptane) were injected as vapors into laboratory columns filled with unsaturated sand with increasing NAPL saturation. Breakthrough curves of gaseous compounds were measured at two points and compared to analytical solutions of an analytical diffusive-reactive transport equation. By fitting of methane data, robust results for effective diffusivity (tortuosity) were obtained. NAPL saturation was most accurately measured by the moderately water soluble tracers (ethers and chloroform). The hydrophobic tracer n-heptane did not partition into water-immersed NAPL. An easy and accurate way to assess air-NAPL partitioning constants from gas chromatography retention times is furthermore reported. It is concluded that gas tracer tests have the potential for measuring two important properties in soil bioremediation systems easily and quickly. PMID:18977508

  3. INTERPRETATION OF TRACER SURFACE DIFFUSION EXPERIMENTS ON UO{sub 2} ROLES OF GAS AND SOLID TRANSPORT PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, D.R.

    1980-06-01

    The spreading of a tracer from an enriched needle source which contacts the surface of a depleted pellet sink is analyzed rigorously. It is shown that volume diffusion in both the needle and the pellet need to be considered because only by this process is sufficient radioactivity accumulated for measurement after the anneal. Parasitic gas phase processes are of two types-evaporative loss of solid if a flowing gas is used, or molecular diffusion from enriched portions of the surface to depleted zones if the couple is in a closed vessel with a stagnant gas. A complete numerical solution including surface diffusion, solid diffusion, evaporative loss and contact resistance is applied to the UO{sub 2} tracer study of Marlowe and Kazanoff at 1915 C. Based upon UO{sub 2} evaporation experiments, the analysis shows that the evaporative loss effect is not important in these experiments. The UO{sub 2} surface diffusion coefficient deduced from analysis of these data is 0.2{+-} 0.1 cm{sup 2)/s at 1915{degrees}C., which is 10{sup 4} times larger than that predicted by extrapolation of values obtained by mass transfer techniques.

  4. DISSOCIATION OF SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TRACER GAS IN THE PRESENCE OF AN INDOOR COMBUSTION SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an odorless, non-toxic, and inert compound, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the most widely used tracer gases in indoor air quality studies in both controlled and uncontrolled environments. This compound may be subject to hydrolysis under elevated temperature to form acidi...

  5. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, A. A.; Baffa, O.; Oliveira, R. B.

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions.

  6. Recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Xie, Xingjun; Beck, Warren; Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Studies of cosmogenic 10Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of 10Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make 10Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as 10Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes 10Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using 10Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  7. In-situ characterization of soil-water content using gas-phase partitioning tracer tests: field-scale evaluation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jason M; Brusseau, Mark L

    2003-07-15

    Field-scale tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the gas-phase partitioning tracer method for in-situ measurement of soil-water content. The tracer tests were conducted before and after a controlled infiltration event to evaluate performance at two water contents. Nonpartitioning (sulfur hexafluoride) and water-partitioning (difluoromethane) tracers were injected into the test zone, and their effluent breakthrough curves were analyzed using the method of moments to calculate retardation factors for difluoromethane. Soil-water contents estimated using the tracer data were compared to soil-water contents obtained independently using gravimetric core analysis, neutron scattering, and bore-hole ground penetrating radar. For the test conducted under drier soil conditions, the soil-water content estimated from the tracer test was identical to the independently measured values of 8.6% (equivalent to water saturation of 23%). For the test conducted under wetter soil conditions, the tracer test derived soil-water content was 81% of the independently measured values of 12.2% (equivalent to water saturation of 32%). The reduced efficacy at the higher soil-water content may reflectthe impact of advective and/ or diffusive mass transfer constraints on gas-phase transport. The results presented herein indicate that the partitioning tracer method is an effective technique to measure soil-water content at the field scale, especially for sites with moderate to low soil-water contents. PMID:12901662

  8. A Rapid, Low-Cost Method to Determine Travel Times at Managed Aquifer Recharge Operations Using Noble Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.; Halliwell, M.; Hillegonds, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is a key component for the sustainable use of surface water and groundwater in the arid western U.S. When recycled water is a recharge water source, subsurface residence time, required for bacteria and virus deactivation, is best verified by application of an extrinsic tracer. Desirable tracer properties include: no real or perceived health risk, inexpensive even for a large volume of tagged water, large dynamic range, efficient introduction, convenient sampling methods, and rapid, low-cost analysis. We have developed and tested a dissolved noble gas tracer technique ideally suited for tracing large water volumes at managed aquifer recharge facilities. In an application of the method at a water district's facilities in the San Francisco Bay area, Xenon was introduced into a 106 m3 pond over a period of 7 days using a 300 m length of gas-permeable silicone tubing. Samples from the pond, near-field shallow monitoring wells, and production wells about 400 m from the recharge pond were analyzed for dissolved Xe by noble gas membrane inlet mass spectrometry (NGMIMS). The NGMIMS uses a syringe pump, gas-permeable membrane inlet, and quadrupole residual gas analyzer for measurement of noble gas concentrations. Samples are collected in VOA vials, and analysis can be carried out in real-time, with a measurement uncertainty of about 5% for Xe. Tracer first appeared in a production well 136 days after starting the tracer introduction at 0.7% (C/C0) of the peak pond xenon concentration. The cost of the tracer is about US650/106 m3 water, and the NGMIMS was assembled with parts totaling approximately US50,000, making application of the tracer method feasible for most managed aquifer recharge projects. This project is part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program.

  9. Atmospheric noble gases as tracers of biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katherine L.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.; Kipfer, Rolf; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric noble gases (NGs) were used to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in a shallow unconfined aquifer impacted by a crude oil spill, near Bemidji, MN. Concentrations of 3,4He, 20,22Ne, 36,40Ar, Kr, and Xe were determined for gas- and aqueous-phase samples collected from the vadose and saturated zones, respectively. Systematic elemental fractionation of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe with respect to air was observed in both of these hydrogeologic zones. Within the vadose zone, relative ratios of Ne and Ar to Kr and Xe revealed distinct process-related trends when compared to corresponding ratios for air. The degree of NG deviation from atmospheric concentrations generally increased with greater atomic mass (i.e., ΔXe > ΔKr > ΔAr > ΔNe), indicating that Kr and Xe are the most sensitive NG tracers in the vadose zone. Reactive transport modeling of the gas data confirms that elemental fractionation can be explained by mass-dependent variations in diffusive fluxes of NGs opposite to a total pressure gradient established between different biogeochemical process zones. Depletion of atmospheric NGs was also observed within a methanogenic zone of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation located below the water table. Solubility normalized NG abundances followed the order Xe > Kr > Ar > Ne, which is indicative of dissolved NG partitioning into the gas phase in response to bubble formation and possibly ebullition. Observed elemental NG ratios of Ne/Kr, Ne/Xe, Ar/Xe, and Kr/Xe and a modeling analysis provide strong evidence that CH4 generation below the water table caused gas exsolution and possibly ebullition and carbon transfer from groundwater to the vadose zone. These results suggest that noble gases provide sensitive tracers in biologically active unconfined aquifers and can assist in identifying carbon cycling and transfer within the vadose zone, the capillary fringe, and below the water table.

  10. Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured During the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Allwine, Eugene J.

    2007-12-01

    An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma during the summer of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from downtown tracer gas release locations. These profiles indicated that the urban landscape was very effective in mixing the plume vertically. The height of the plume centerline (as determined by the maximum concentration over the depth of the measurements) for any specific 30 min period varied over the 65 m measurement range. Most of the variations in tracer concentration observed in the profile time series were related to changes in wind direction as opposed to changes in turbulence. As a simple analysis tool for emergency response, maximum normalized concentration curves were developed with 5-minute averaged measurements. These curves give the maximum concentration (normalized by the release rate) that would be observed as a function of downwind distance in an urban area. The 5-min data resulted in greater concentrations than predicted with a simple Gaussian plume model. However, the curve compared well with results from a computational fluid dynamics simulation. This dispersion dataset is a valuable asset not only for refining air quality models, but also for developing new tools for emergency response personnel in the event of a toxic release.

  11. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. Methods This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452) and never-recruited peers (N=191) who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005–06); immediately afterwards (T2; 2006–07); and at present (T3; 2010). Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Results Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program. PMID:23095403

  12. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 to -7.24 for ? 18O value, while the ?D value was ranged from -57.86 to -50.98 . The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  13. Study of gastric emptying using a ferromagnetic tracer.

    PubMed

    Benmair, Y; Dreyfuss, F; Fischel, B; Frei, E H; Gilat, T

    1977-11-01

    A new ferromagnetic method for the measurement of gastric emptying is described. An inert tracer, magnesium ferrite, is added to a test meal. Its amount in the stomach is then measured at regular intervals by an external transducer using its ferromagnetic properties. The method is noninvasive and devoid of radiation exposure. The magnetic fields used are harmless. The feasibility, reliability, and reproducibility of the method are described. Gastric emptying was studied in 61 subjects. The shape of the gastric emptying curve conformed best to an exponential function. The mean half-time of gastric emptying was 49 +/- 17.4 min. In this limited series age and sex did not affect gastric emptying. PMID:332577

  14. IMPURITY AND TRACER DIFFUSION STUDIES IN MAGNESIUM AND ITS ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Sohn, Yong Ho; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Klimov, Mikhail; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) approach for optimizing processing routes for Mg-alloys requires reliable thermodynamic and diffusion databases. We are developing an impurity and tracer diffusion database using both stable and unstable isotopes for Mg and its alloys. In this study, Al impurity diffusion in pure polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) was examined using the thin film method. Approximately 500 nm thick Al films were deposited on in-situ RF plasma-cleaned polycrystalline Mg by DC magnetron sputtering from pure Al (99.9%) targets. Specimens were then diffusion annealed at 300, 350 and 400 C in quartz capsules that were evacuated to 10-8 Torr and backfilled with Ar-H2 mixtures. Concentration profile of Al diffusion profiles into single phase Mg was determined by depth-profiling technique using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The Al impurity diffusion coefficients were determined as a function of temperature

  15. A parameter identifiability study of two chalk tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, S. A.; Butler, A. P.; Atkinson, T. C.; Kachi, S.; Ward, R. S.

    2006-08-01

    As with most fractured rock formations, Chalk is highly heterogeneous. Therefore, meaningful estimates of model parameters must be obtained at a scale comparable with the process of concern. These are frequently obtained by calibrating an appropriate model to observed concentration-time data from radially convergent tracer tests (RCTT). Arguably, an appropriate model should consider radially convergent dispersion (RCD) and Fickian matrix diffusion. Such a model requires the estimation of at least four parameters. A question arises as to whether or not this level of model complexity is supported by the information contained within the calibration data. Generally modellers have not answered this question due to the calibration techniques employed. A dual-porosity model with RCD was calibrated to two tracer test datasets from different UK Chalk aquifers. A multivariate sensitivity analysis, which assumed only a priori upper and lower bounds for each model parameter, was undertaken. Rather than looking at measures of uncertainty, the shape of the multivariate objective function surface was used to determine whether a parameter was identifiable. Non-identifiable parameters were then removed and the procedure was repeated until all remaining parameters were identifiable. It was found that the single fracture model (SFM) (which ignores mechanical dispersion) obtained the best mass recovery, excellent model performance and best parameter identifiability in both the tests studied. However, there was no objective evidence suggesting that mechanical dispersion was negligible. Moreover, the SFM (with just two parameters) was found to be good at approximating the Single Fracture Dispersion Model SFDM (with three parameters) when different, and potentially erroneous parameters, were used. Overall, this study emphasises the importance of adequate temporal sampling of breakthrough curve data prior to peak concentrations, to ensure adequate characterisation of mechanical dispersion processes, and continued monitoring afterwards, to ensure adequate characterisation of fracture spacing (where possible), when parameterising dual-porosity solute transport models.

  16. Effect of release rate of the SF(6) tracer on methane emission estimates based on ruminal and breath gas samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Koolaard, J; Rochette, Y; Clark, H; Jouany, J P; Pinares-Patiño, C S

    2012-03-01

    The release rate (RR) of sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) gas from permeation tube in the rumen appears to be positively related with methane (CH(4)) emissions calculated using the SF(6) tracer technique. Gas samples of breath and ruminal headspace were collected simultaneously in order to evaluate the hypothesis that transactions of SF(6) in the rumen are the source for this relationship. Six non-lactating dairy cows fitted with rumen cannulae were subdivided into two groups and randomly assigned to a two-period crossover design to permeation tubes with low RR (LRR = 1.577 mg/day) or two-times higher RR (HRR = 3.147 mg/day) RR. The cows were fed limited amounts of maize silage (80% ad libitum) split into two meals (40% at 0800 h and 60% at 1600 h). Each period consisted of 3-day gas sampling. Immediately before the morning feed and then each hour over 8 h, ruminal gas samples (50 ml) were withdrawn through the cannula fitted with stoppers to prevent opening. Simultaneously, 8-h integrated breath gas samples were collected over the same period. Ratios of concentration of CH(4)/SF(6), CO(2)/SF(6) and CO(2)/CH(4) and emission estimates of CH(4) and CO(2) were calculated for each sample source using the SF(6) tracer technique principles. The LRR treatment yielded higher (P < 0.001) ruminal CH(4)/SF(6) (by 1.79 times) and CO(2)/SF(6) (by 1.90 times) ratios than the HRR treatment; however, these differences were lower than the 2.0 times difference expected from the RR between the LRR and HRR. Consequently, the LRR treatment was associated with lower (P < 0.01) ruminal emissions of CH(4) over the 8-h collection period than with the HRR treatment (+11%), a difference also confirmed by the breath samples (+11%). RR treatments did not differ (P = 0.53) in ruminal or breath CO(2) emissions; however, our results confirm that the SF(6) tracer seems inappropriate for CO(2) emissions estimation in ruminants. Irrespective of the RR treatment, breath samples yielded 8% to 9% higher CH(4) emission estimates than the ruminal samples (P = 0.01). The relationship between rumen and breath sources for CH(4) emissions was better for LRR than for HRR treatment, suggesting that tracer performance decreases with the highest RR of SF(6) tested in our study (3.1 mg/day). A hypothesis is discussed with regard to the mechanism responsible for the relationship between RR and CH(4) emission estimates. The use of permeation tubes with small range in RR is recommended in animal experiments to decrease variability in CH(4) emission estimates using the SF(6) tracer technique. PMID:22436232

  17. GEOMETRIC OFFSETS ACROSS SPIRAL ARMS IN M51: NATURE OF GAS AND STAR FORMATION TRACERS

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Melissa; Koda, Jin; Egusa, Fumi

    2013-02-15

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star-forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and H{alpha} emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or non-ordered offsets have been found using the H I 21 cm and 24 {mu}m emissions, possible evidence against gas flow through spiral arms, and thus against the conventional density-wave theory with a stationary spiral pattern. The goal of this paper is to understand the cause of this discrepancy. We investigate potential causes by repeating those previous measurements using equivalent data, methods, and parameters. We find offsets consistent with the previous measurements and conclude that the difference of gas tracers, i.e., H I versus CO, is the primary cause. The H I emission is contaminated significantly by the gas photodissociated by recently formed stars and does not necessarily trace the compressed gas, the precursor of star formation. The H I gas and star-forming regions coincide spatially and tend to show small offsets. We find mostly positive offsets with substantial scatter between CO and H{alpha}, suggesting that gas flow through spiral arms (i.e., density wave) though the spiral pattern may not necessarily be stationary.

  18. Aligning Higher Education to Workforce Needs in Liberia: A Tracer Study of University Graduates in Liberia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flomo, John S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the congruence between higher education and the labor market from the perspectives of college graduates in Liberia. It specifically examined the alignment of the skills college students acquire in college to Liberia's labor market. The study employed a Tracer Study quantitative research methodology. Tracer study as a

  19. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1990-12-31

    Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

  20. The project MOHAVE tracer study: study design, data quality, and overview of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mark C.

    In the winter and summer of 1992, atmospheric tracer studies were conducted in support of project MOHAVE, a visibility study in the southwestern United States. The primary goal of project MOHAVE is to determine the effects of the Mohave power plant and other sources upon visibility at Grand Canyon National Park. Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were released from the Mohave power plant and other locations and monitored at about 30 sites. The tracer data are being used for source attribution analysis and for evaluation of transport and dispersion models and receptor models. Collocated measurements showed the tracer data to be of high quality and suitable for source attribution analysis and model evaluation. The results showed strong influences of channeling by the Colorado River canyon during both winter and summer. Flow from the Mohave power plant was usually to the south, away from the Grand Canyon in winter and to the northeast, toward the Grand Canyon in summer. Tracer released at Lake Powell in winter was found to often travel downstream through the entire length of the Grand Canyon. Data from summer tracer releases in southern California demonstrated the existence of a convergence zone in the western Mohave Desert.

  1. Hanford facilities tracer study report (315 Water Treatment Facility). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ambalam, T.

    1995-05-01

    Reported are the results and findings of a tracer study to determine contact time for the disinfection process of 315 Water Treatment Facility at 300 Area. The study utilized fluoride as the tracer and contact times were determined for two flow rates. Interpolation of data and short circuiting effects are also discussed.

  2. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T. . E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-07-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

  3. FORMALDEHYDE AND TRACER GAS TRANSFER BETWEEN AIRSTREAMS IN ENTHALPY-TYPE AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W. J.; Pedersen, B. S.; Hekmat, D.; Chant, R. E.; Kaboli, H.

    1984-07-01

    Enthalpy exchangers are frequently employed to transfer heat and water between the supply and exhaust airstreams of mechanical ventilation systems. Concern has been expressed that some indoor-generated air pollutants, especially formaldehyde, may be transferred between airstreams by this type of heat exchanger and, thus, returned to the indoor space. This paper describes an experimental study in which the formaldehyde, tracer gas, and water vapor transfer rates in two enthalpy exchangers were measured. The first exchanger uses a crossflow core fabricated from a treated paper. The core of the second heat exchanger is a rotating heat wheel coated with lithium chloride. To reduce the transfer of gases by air leakage each core was installed in a specially fabricated case. Only 5% to 8% of the two tracer gases and 7% to 15% of the formaldehyde injected into the exhaust airstream was transferred to the supply airstream. Therefore, formaldehyde transfer between airstreams by processes other than air leakage does not seriously compromise the performance of these enthalpy exchangers. Theoretical calculations indicate, however, that the transfer of water vapor between airstreams in enthalpy exchangers can significantly diminish their ability to lower indoor formaldehyde concentrations because of the positive coupling between indoor humidity and the emission rates of formaldehyde from building materials.

  4. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD <6.3%) and good accuracy, in which the relative deference between the data measured by the HS-GC method and the reference method were within 6.0%. The HS-GC method is simple and particularly suitable for measuring the solubility of LVLOs at elevated temperatures. This approach should be of special interest to those concerned about the impact of the presence of low-volatility organic liquids in waters of environmental and biological systems. PMID:26850316

  5. Fructose metabolism in humans - what isotopic tracer studies tell us.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sam Z; Empie, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Fructose consumption and its implications on public health are currently under study. This work reviewed the metabolic fate of dietary fructose based on isotope tracer studies in humans. The mean oxidation rate of dietary fructose was 45.0%??10.7 (mean??SD) in non-exercising subjects within 3-6?hours and 45.8%??7.3 in exercising subjects within 2-3?hours. When fructose was ingested together with glucose, the mean oxidation rate of the mixed sugars increased to 66.0%??8.2 in exercising subjects. The mean conversion rate from fructose to glucose was 41%??10.5 (mean??SD) in 3-6?hours after ingestion. The conversion amount from fructose to glycogen remains to be further clarified. A small percentage of ingested fructose (<1%) appears to be directly converted to plasma TG. However, hyperlipidemic effects of larger amounts of fructose consumption are observed in studies using infused labeled acetate to quantify longer term de novo lipogenesis. While the mechanisms for the hyperlipidemic effect remain controversial, energy source shifting and lipid sparing may play a role in the effect, in addition to de novo lipogenesis. Finally, approximately a quarter of ingested fructose can be converted into lactate within a few of hours. The reviewed data provides a profile of how dietary fructose is utilized in humans. PMID:23031075

  6. Fructose metabolism in humans what isotopic tracer studies tell us

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fructose consumption and its implications on public health are currently under study. This work reviewed the metabolic fate of dietary fructose based on isotope tracer studies in humans. The mean oxidation rate of dietary fructose was 45.0%??10.7 (mean??SD) in non-exercising subjects within 36?hours and 45.8%??7.3 in exercising subjects within 23?hours. When fructose was ingested together with glucose, the mean oxidation rate of the mixed sugars increased to 66.0%??8.2 in exercising subjects. The mean conversion rate from fructose to glucose was 41%??10.5 (mean??SD) in 36?hours after ingestion. The conversion amount from fructose to glycogen remains to be further clarified. A small percentage of ingested fructose (<1%) appears to be directly converted to plasma TG. However, hyperlipidemic effects of larger amounts of fructose consumption are observed in studies using infused labeled acetate to quantify longer term de novo lipogenesis. While the mechanisms for the hyperlipidemic effect remain controversial, energy source shifting and lipid sparing may play a role in the effect, in addition to de novo lipogenesis. Finally, approximately a quarter of ingested fructose can be converted into lactate within a few of hours. The reviewed data provides a profile of how dietary fructose is utilized in humans. PMID:23031075

  7. An Assessment of steady-state propane-gas tracer method for reaeration coefficients, Cowaselon Creek, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yotsukura, N.; Stedfast, D.A.; Draper, R.E.; Brutsaert, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three tests were conducted in a straight 5.2-km reach of the Cowaselon Creek, Canastota, New York, in order to assess feasibility of the steady-state propane-gas tracer method as a means of estimating in situ reaeration coefficients. It is concluded that the steady-state method, which combines as instantaneous injection of dye tracer with a long-duration injection of propane tracer, is an operationally feasible field technique and provides a very reliable means of determining the propane desorption coefficient in steady-channel flow. The effect of wind shear on propane desorption coefficients was not detected in any tests, apparently due to the sheltering effect of high banks. The reaeration coefficient is estimated by applying a conversion factor determined from laboratory experiments to the gas desorption coefficient. (USGS)

  8. Double tracer gas single-breath washout: reproducibility in healthy subjects and COPD.

    PubMed

    Husemann, Kim; Berg, Nina; Engel, Jennifer; Port, Johannes; Joppek, Christoph; Tao, Ziran; Singer, Florian; Schulz, Holger; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The applicability and interpretation of inert tracer gas washout tests is hampered by the lack of feasible protocols and reproducibility data. We assessed feasibility, variability and reproducibility of a new easy to perform double tracer gas (DTG) single-breath washout (SBW) test and compared this with conventional nitrogen washouts. In 40 healthy nonsmokers and 20 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we performed three N2 vital capacity SBWs, three N2 multiple-breath washouts and three tidal DTG-SBW tests. Follow-up was after 1 week, 1 month and 6 months. Main outcomes were the lung clearance index (LCI) (N2 multiple-breath washout), slope of phase III (dN2) (N2 vital capacity SBW) and slope of phase III (SIIIDTG) (DTG-SBW). In healthy subjects, mean±sd LCI at baseline was 6.94±0.61, dN2 0.99±0.42% N2 per litre and SIIIDTG -0.206±0.108 g·mol(-1)·L(-1). In COPD, LCI and dN2 were significantly higher (LCI 12.23±2.67, dN2 7.43±5.38% N2 per litre; p<0.001) and SIIIDTG significantly steeper (-0.653±0.428 g·mol(-1)·L(-1), p<0.001). Reproducibility was high for main outcome parameters: the intraclass correlation coefficient over 6 months was 0.77 (0.86 in COPD) for LCI, 0.82 (0.89) for dN2 and 0.83 (0.93) for SIIIDTG. The tidal DTG-SBW is a reproducible test in healthy and COPD subjects that seems attractive for use in routine clinical settings. PMID:25102960

  9. Near-Road Mulltipollutant Profiles: Association between Volatile Organic Compounds and a Tracer Gas Surrogate Near a Busy Highway

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research characterizes associations between multiple pollutants in the near-road environment attributed to a roadway line source. It also examines the use of a tracer gas as a surrogate of mobile source pollutants. Air samples were collected in summa canisters along a 300 m ...

  10. Application of a tracer gas challenge with a human subject to investigate factors affecting the performance of laboratory fume hoods.

    PubMed

    Altemose, B A; Flynn, M R; Sprankle, J

    1998-05-01

    The results of a "user" tracer gas test were applied to investigate the effects of various parameters on hood containment ability and to evaluate accepted methods to classify hood performance. This user tracer gas test was performed with a human subject standing in front of the hood. Based on the data collected, face velocity, its variability, and cross drafts are important in determining hood leakage. Results indicate that the temporal variability of face velocity may deserve as much consideration as its spatial variability, a parameter more traditionally recognized as being important. The data collected indicate that hoods with horizontally sliding sash doors perform better with the doors positioned to provide a center opening rather than when all of the doors are pushed to one side. The observed smoke patterns suggest that this trend is caused by the location and instability of vortices formed along the perimeter edge when all doors are pushed to one side. The results of manikin tracer gas tests and the user tracer gas test are inconsistent, suggesting that more research is needed to determine how best to evaluate whether a hood protects its users. PMID:9858975

  11. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  12. Multiple-tracer TESPEL injection for studying impurity behaviour in a magnetically confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Shigeru; Tamura, Naoki; Suzuki, Chihiro; Muto, Sadatsugu; Funaba, Hisamichi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2012-06-01

    A new diagnostic method with tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection with multiple tracers is developed to study impurity behaviour in a magnetically confined plasma. If a pellet contains multiple tracers, it becomes possible to compare the behaviour of different impurities simultaneously under the same plasma conditions. We injected a TESPEL into the Large Helical Device mainly with triple tracers: vanadium (V), manganese (Mn) and cobalt (Co). The Li-like lines in the vacuum ultraviolet range and the K? lines in the soft x-ray range from these tracers are simultaneously observed with a time resolution of 50 ms. As the charges of the nuclei of intrinsic impurities, chromium (Cr) and iron (Fe), are in between those of the tracers, the behaviour of Cr and Fe can be studied quantitatively by knowing the number of tracer particles and also by comparing the emission intensity change due to the electron temperature change. It is observed that the tracer impurities remain in the plasma core region when the plasma density is higher than 5 1019 m-3. It is also observed that the intrinsic impurities cannot enter the core region when the plasma density is higher than the same level, although the two phenomena appear to be independent.

  13. 13N as a tracer for studying glutamate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2010-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes studies my associates and I carried out that are relevant to the topic of the present volume [i.e. glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)] using radioactive 13N (t 9.96 min) as a biological tracer. These studies revealed the previously unrecognized rapidity with which nitrogen is exchanged among certain metabolites in vivo. For example, our work demonstrated that a) the t for conversion of portal vein ammonia to urea in the rat liver is ~1011 sec, despite the need for five enzyme-catalyzed steps and two mitochondrial transport steps, b) the residence time for ammonia in the blood of anesthetized rats is ?78 sec, c) the t for incorporation of blood-borne ammonia into glutamine in the normal rat brain is <3 sec, and d) equilibration between glutamate and aspartate nitrogen in rat liver is extremely rapid (seconds), a reflection of the fact that the components of the hepatic aspartate aminotransferase reaction are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Our work emphasizes the importance of the GDH reaction in rat liver as a conduit for dissimilating or assimilating ammonia as needed. In contrast, our work shows that the GDH reaction in rat brain appears to operate mostly in the direction of ammonia production (dissimilation). The importance of the GDH reaction as an endogenous source of ammonia in the brain and the relation of GDH to the brain glutamine cycle is discussed. Finally, our work integrates with the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study brain ammonia uptake and brain glutamine, respectively, in normal individuals and in patients with liver disease or other diseases associated with hyperammonemia. PMID:21108979

  14. TRACER DISPERSION STUDIES FOR HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments were conducted at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Test & Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, to quantify longitudinal dispersion of a sodium fluoride tracer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe and ductile iron pipe under laminar, tr...

  15. ACROSS NORTH AMERICA TRACER EXPERIMENT (ANATEX) MODEL EVALUATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three perfluorocarbon tracer gases were released at 2.5-day or 5.0-day intervals from two sites in central North America and sampled for 24-h periods at 77 surface sites. he source-receptor distances ranged from less than 30 km to 3,000 km. he data were used to evaluate the long-...

  16. Study of North Atlantic ventilation using transient tracers. Doctoral Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Doney, S.C.

    1991-08-01

    Tritium, (3)He, and chlorofluorocarbon distributions in the North Atlantic provide constraints on the ventilation time-scales for the thermocline and abyssal water. A new model function based on a factor analysis of the WMO/IAEA precipitation data set is developed for predicting the spatial and temporal patterns of bomb-tritium in precipitation. Model atmospheric and advective tritium inputs to the North Atlantic are compared with the observed bomb-tritium inventories calculated from the 1972 GEOSECS and 1981-1983 TTO data sets. The observed growth of bomb-tritium levels in the deep North Atlantic are used, along with the tracer gradients ((3)H and (3)He) in the Deep Western Boundary Current, to estimate abyssal ventilation rates and boundary current recirculation. The surface boundary conditions for different transient tracers are found to profoundly effect thermocline ventilation rates estimates. Tracers that equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, such as (3)He and the CFCs, have faster apparent ventilation rates and are more appropriate for estimating oxygen utilization rates than tracers that are reset slowly in the surface ocean (e.g. (3)H and (14)C). The chlorofluorocarbon data for a new section in the eastern North Atlantic are presented and used to illustrate the ventilation time-scales for the major water masses in the region. (Copyright (c) Scott C. Doney, 1991.)

  17. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interest in the use of sediment tracers as a complementary tool to traditional water soil erosion or deposition measurements or assessment has increased due to the additional information they may provide such as sediment source identification and tracking of sediment movement over the landscape ...

  18. Application of multitracer technology to petroleum reservoir studies. [Perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: Improve the assessment of the character of petroleum reservoirs using tracer technology for the monitoring and improvement of EOR techniques, specifically, (a) to apply the presently available multitracer perfluorocarbon tracer (PFI) technology to the study of petroleum reservoirs in characterizing reservoir bulk subsurface flow transport and dispersion rates; and (b) to demonstrate that PFTs with differing physical properties will interact with differing rates of adsorption and dispersion within such reservoirs, from which may be inferred difference in the character and/or extent of petroleum in those reservoirs. Develop additional tracers, and tracer injection, sampling and analyses methodologies for use in petroleum reservoir characterization experiments. Develop a data base of petroleum transport and dispersion properties from tracer experiments for use by modellers for developing, validating and extending petroleum reservoirs models used for characterizing petroleum reservoirs. Technical progress is discussed according to the three ongoing field experiments at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC).

  19. Analysis techniques for tracer studies of oxidation. M. S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis techniques to obtain quantitative diffusion data from tracer concentration profiles were developed. Mass balance ideas were applied to determine the mechanism of oxide growth and to separate the fraction of inward and outward growth of oxide scales. The process of inward oxygen diffusion with exchange was theoretically modelled and the effect of lattice diffusivity, grain boundary diffusivity and grain size on the tracer concentration profile was studied. The development of the tracer concentration profile in a growing oxide scale was simulated. The double oxidation technique was applied to a FeCrAl-Zr alloy using 0-18 as a tracer. SIMS was used to obtain the tracer concentration profile. The formation of lacey oxide on the alloy was discussed. Careful consideration was given to the quality of data required to obtain quantitative information.

  20. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  1. Enhancing the activation of silicon carbide tracer particles for PEPT applications using gas-phase deposition of alumina at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdesueiro, D.; Garcia-Triñanes, P.; Meesters, G. M. H.; Kreutzer, M. T.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.; Seville, J. P. K.; van Ommen, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    We have enhanced the radio-activation efficiency of SiC (silicon carbide) particles, which by nature have a poor affinity towards 18F ions, to be employed as tracers in studies using PEPT (Positron Emission Particle Tracking). The resulting SiC-Al2O3 core-shell structure shows a good labelling efficiency, comparable to γ-Al2O3 tracer particles, which are commonly used in PEPT. The coating of the SiC particles was carried at 27±3 °C and 1 bar in a fluidized bed reactor, using trimethylaluminium and water as precursors, by a gas phase technique similar to atomic layer deposition. The thickness of the alumina films, which ranged from 5 to 500 nm, was measured by elemental analysis and confirmed with FIB-TEM (focused ion beam - transmission electron microscope), obtaining consistent results from both techniques. By depositing such a thin film of alumina, properties that influence the hydrodynamic behaviour of the SiC particles, such as size, shape and density, are hardly altered, ensuring that the tracer particle shows the same flow behaviour as the other particles. The paper describes a general method to improve the activation efficiency of materials, which can be applied for the production of tracer particles for many other applications too.

  2. Green River air quality model development: meteorological and tracer data, July/August 1982 field study in Brush Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Lee, R.N.; Orgill, M.M.; Zak, B.D.

    1984-06-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a 3-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The objective of the field experiments was to obtain data to evaluate a model, called VALMET, developed at PNL to predict dispersion of air pollutants released from an elevated stack located within a deep mountain valley in the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period. Three tracer experiments were conducted in the valley during the 2-week period. In these experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was released from a height of approximately 100 m, beginning before sunrise and continuing until the nocturnal down-valley winds reversed several hours after sunrise. Dispersion of the sulfur hexafluoride after release was evaluated by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations in ambient air samples taken from sampling devices operated within the valley up to about 8 km down valley from the source. An instrumented research aircraft was also used to measure concentrations in and above the valley. Tracer samples were collected using a network of radio-controlled bag sampling stations, two manually operated gas chromatographs, a continuous SF/sub 6/ monitor, and a vertical SF/sub 6/ profiler. In addition, basic meteorological data were collected during the tracer experiments. Frequent profiles of vertical wind and temperature structure were obtained with tethered balloons operated at the release site and at a site 7.7 km down the valley from the release site. 10 references, 63 figures, 50 tables.

  3. Prediction of radiation doses from therapy using tracer studies with iodine-131-labeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; Yuan, Aina ||||

    1996-12-01

    Tracer pharmacokinetic studies are often used in treatment planning for radionuclide therapy including radioimmunotherapy. This study evaluates the validity of using tracer studies to predict radiation doses from therapy with the same radiolabeled antibody. Quantitative imaging and blood radioactivity were used to obtain the pharmacokinetics and radiation doses that were delivered to the total body, blood, marrow, lungs, liver, kidneys, thyroid, spleen and tumors. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  5. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  6. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  7. Glass mixing theory and tracer study results from the SF-10 run

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.W.; Routt, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    A general, partial differential equation governing glass mixing in the Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) was derived and a solution obtained based upon certain simplifying assumptions. Tracer studies were then conducted in the SFCM during the SF-10 run to test the theory and characterize glass mixing in this melter. Analysis of the tracer data shows that glass mixing in the SFCM can be explained by use of a model of two, well-mixed tanks in series.

  8. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  9. Using biofuel tracers to study alternative combustion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, J. H.; Flowers, D. L.; Buchholz, B. A.; Dibble, R. W.

    2007-06-01

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and engines is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO2 emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions and higher noise. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions. However, relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic due to economic constraints and difficult due to the emerging PM standards. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K inhibits NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to improve our combustion modeling.

  10. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  11. Adaptation of the perfluorocarbon tracer technology for aqueous-phase studies in subsurface applications

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Goodrich, R.W.; Wilson, R.; Dietz, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology as developed by the Tracer Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory can be easily adapted for use as in aqueous-phase tracer studies in subsurface hydrological applications. The advantages of the PFT technology in this application is that it is a multi-tracer technology, up to 5 or 6 PFTs may be used in an experiment, the PFTs are completely non-toxic and inert, the PFTs can be detected to 4 orders greater sensitivity than fluorescent dyes. The disadvantages are that the PFTs are only sparingly soluble in water and are also volatile. They are minimized by the PFT deployment and sampling methodologies which are given in this report. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2006-02-14

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

  13. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Source apportionment of wintertime gas-phase and particle-phase air pollutants using organic compounds as tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    2000-05-01

    Two chemical mass balance receptor models are developed which can determine the source contributions to atmospheric pollutant concentrations using organic compounds as tracers. The first model uses particle-phase organic compounds to apportion the primary source contribution to atmospheric fine particulate organic carbon concentrations and fine particle mass concentrations. The second receptor model simultaneously uses both volatile gas-phase hydrocarbon and particle-phase organic compounds as tracers to determine source contributions to non-methane organic gases in the atmosphere. Both models are applied to data collected in California's San Joaquin Valley during two severe wintertime air pollution episodes. Source contributions to fine particle air quality are calculated for two urban sites, Fresno and Bakersfield, and one background site, Kern Wildlife Refuge. Primary particle emissions from hardwood combustion, softwood combustion, diesel engines, meat cooking, and gasoline-powered motor vehicles contribute on average 79% of the airborne fine particle organic compound mass at the urban sites during both episodes with smaller but still measurable contributions from fine particle road dust and natural gas combustion aerosol. Anthropogenic primary particle sources contribute less than 10% of the fine particle mass concentration at the background site. The combined gas-phase and particle-phase organic compound receptor model shows that gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust and gasoline vapors are the largest contributors to nonmethane organic gases concentrations followed by natural gas leakage. Smaller but statistically significant contributions to organic vapors from wood combustion, meat cooking, and diesel exhaust also are quantified.

  16. Multiple tracer study in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan: 1. Residence time estimation based on multiple environmental tracers and lumped parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwaya, Koki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi; Mizuno, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A multiple tracer study was conducted in the coastal plain of Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan. To accomplish reliable estimates of groundwater residence time, multiple tracer approach, employing both gaseous and nongaseous environmental tracers, and lumped parameter models (LPMs) were applied in combination. Environmental tracers including 3H, 3H/3He, 36Cl, and SF6 were analyzed and compared with values estimated from LPMs to select the most appropriate tracer and models to describe groundwater flow regime in the study area. Time series of 36Cl/Cl input in the study area were reconstructed and used in the LPMs. From comparison of the analyzed and modeled results, an index of 3H/3He was selected as the most appropriate for investigation of the study area. The relationship between the 3H/3He index and 36Cl/Cl indicated reliability of the 3H/3He index, but 36Cl/Cl values of the samples were lower than the models. This discrepancy was caused by underestimation of Cl- concentration of recharging water in the calculation of 36Cl/Cl input. SF6 mixing ratios of the samples were slightly higher than the models and it suggested involvement of terrigenic SF6. Three well groups, northern Shimonuma wells (NSW), southern Shimonuma wells (SSW), and Hamasato wells (HW), were respectively consistent with exponential piston flow model (EPM), binary mixing model (BMM), and exponential mixing model (EMM). Relational expressions between the 3H/3He index and mean residence time or mixing fraction of young groundwater (assumed to contain no tritiogenic 3He) with old groundwater (all 3H decayed to tritiogenic 3He) were obtained based on the models. The mean residence time determined from the 3H/3He index and the expressions were 19-78 years for NSW and 1-648 years for HW. The mixing fraction of young groundwater was less than 10% at all SSW. Nongaseous tracers, including 36Cl are not influenced by factors specific for gaseous tracers, such as excess air and degassing. Analyses of multiple tracers, including both gaseous and nongaseous tracers, and comparison using LPMs were effective to show plausibility of the estimated residence time, and they contributed to understanding of groundwater flow regime in the study area.

  17. Tracer Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, H.; Motomura, S.; Kamino, S.; Enomoto, S.

    In radioactive tracer technique, radioactive nuclides are used to follow the behavior of elements or chemical species in chemical and other processes. This is realized by means of radioactivity measurement. In 1913, Hevesy and Paneth succeeded in determining the extremely low solubility of lead salts by using naturally occurring 210Pb as a radioactive tracer. As various radioactive nuclides became artificially available, this technique has been widely employed in studies of chemical equilibrium and reactions as well as in chemical analysis. It is also an essential technique in biochemical, biological, medical, geological, and environmental studies. Medical diagnosis and industrial process control are the fields of its most important practical application. In this chapter, fundamental ideas concerning radioactive tracers will be described followed by their application with typical examples. Detailed description on their application to life sciences and medicine is given in Vol. 4.

  18. Tracer-based quantification of individual frac discharge in single-well multiple-frac backflow: sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Within the deep-geothermal research project at GroßSchönebeck in the NE German Basin, targeting volcanic rocks (Lower Rotliegend) and siliciclastics (Upper Rotliegend) in the Lower Permian by means of a well doublet with several screening intervals between 3815 and 4247 m b.s.l., several artificial fractures with different geometric and hydraulic characteristics were created at each well, aiming to increase reservoir performance [1], [2]. It could not be told a priori which of the various fracturing treatments was to prove as most promising in terms of future reservoir productivity. At the intended-production well (GS-4), one large-area waterfrac was created in the low-permeability volcanic rocks, and two gel-proppant fractures in selected sandstone layers. Each fracturing treatment was accompanied by the injection of a water-dissolved tracer slug, followed by a defined volume of tracer-free ('chaser') fluid [3]. Each frac received a different species of a sulfonated aromatic acid salt, as a conservative water tracer. During subsequent backflow tests (either gas-based lifting, or production by means of a downhole submersible pump), each frac can contribute a certain (more or less constant) amount to the measured total discharge (also depending on whether and when each frac 'starts' contributing, and which effective aperture and area it actually 'manifests' during the process). Since these individual-frac discharge amounts cannot be measured directly, it was endeavoured to indirectly determine ('resolve') them from tracer signals as detectable in the overall backflow discharge. Therefore, we need to examine how these tracer signals depend on local discharge values and on local hydrogeologic parameters (matrix porosity, permeability distribution; frac transmissivity, thickness, effective area and aperture), and to what extent hydrogeological uncertainty will impede the inversion of local discharge values. To this end, a parameter sensitivity study was conducted on a simplified flow and tracer transport model (using FEOW and assuming Darcian flow within the matrix, Hagen-Poiseuille flow within the waterfrac, and either D or H-P flow within the gel-proppant fracs), whose main findings are: (1) late tracer signals are almost independent on matrix porosity, permeability distribution, frac area (length), thickness and effective aperture, while being highly sensitive to local discharge values; 'late' means a backflow or production volume at least fivefold the injected chaser volume; (2a) early tracer signals (concentration 'peak' intervals) may exhibit slight 'acceleration' and 'damping' with increasing matrix porosity or increasing frac aperture (a 'paradoxical' behaviour which is not really surprising for single-well 'push-then-backflow' tests, actually owing to flow-field dispersion[4]), and (2b) a non-monotonous response to varying frac area, being almost insensitive to frac area as long as the linear-flow regime prevails against the radial-flow regime (effects of the latter only becoming visible at very low frac areas); (2c) the effects of these various factors on early-time tracer signals are not unambiguously discernible from each other, and this ambiguity would persist even if frac-resolved (in-situ) discharge metering were feasible. For each of the three fracs (k=1,2,3), a 'type-curve' set Ck(Q,t) (parametrized by discharge values Q) can be generated. Since every frac received a different tracer, tracer signals measured within the overall backflow will differ from individual-frac type-curves by mere dilution (no 'superposition'). Type-curve dilution by factor Qk/Qtotal can be compared to measured tracer concentrations in the total discharge, ck(ti), (i = 1, ..., no. of tracer samplings). From a formal point of view, the unknown discharge values Qk can be determined as the solution of a linear optimization task subject to the constraint Q1 + Q2 + Q3 = Qtotal (the latter being a measured value). It is recommendable to perform 'optimization' manually, rather than by resorting to automated solutions provided by some linear programming software. The first items to inspect are the late-time height and slope of measured tracer signal 'tailings': their height yields a first approximation to dilution factors, and thus a first estimate for Qk, while late-time consistency of observed tailing slopes can be taken as indicative of the applicability of model presuppositions. To be noted, dilution factors associated with individual fracs can vary with time, since a steady-state discharge pattern might not be reached simultaneously at all fracs. The paper also discusses some reasons why early-time tracer signals are generally unsuited for frac discharge inversion. References: [1] Blöcher M G, Zimmermann G, Moeck I, Brandt W, Hassanzadegan A, Magri F (2010) 3D numerical modeling of hydrothermal processes during the lifetime of a deep geothermal reservoir. Geofluids, 10, 406-421. [2] Zimmermann G, Blöcher G, Reinicke A, Brandt W (2011) Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system - Concepts and field results. Tectonophysics, 503, 146-154. [3] http://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/pdf/IGAstandard/SGW/2007/ghergut.pdf [4] http://pangea.stanford.edu/ERE/pdf/IGAstandard/SGW/2013/Ghergut3.pdf ; ~Ghergut5.pdf Acknowledgements: Tracer tests at the GroßSchönebeck site were conducted with financial and operational support from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and from the Helmholtz Research Centre GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam. Modelling work was conducted within the 'gebo' project ('Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling', www.gebo-nds.de), funded by the Lower-Saxonian government and by Baker Hughes (Celle), Germany.

  19. DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AS A TRACER OF GAS MASS IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Brent A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam; Galametz, Maud; Bolatto, Alberto; Hunt, Leslie; Dale, Daniel; Calzetti, Daniela; Croxall, Kevin; Kennicutt, Robert Jr.

    2015-01-20

    We use a sample of 36 galaxies from the KINGFISH (Herschel IR), HERACLES (IRAM CO), and THINGS (Very Large Array H I) surveys to study empirical relations between Herschel infrared (IR) luminosities and the total mass of the interstellar gas (H{sub 2} + H I). Such a comparison provides a simple empirical relationship without introducing the uncertainty of dust model fitting. We find tight correlations, and provide fits to these relations, between Herschel luminosities and the total gas mass integrated over entire galaxies, with the tightest, almost linear, correlation found for the longest wavelength data (SPIRE 500). However, we find that accounting for the gas-phase metallicity (affecting the dust to gas ratio) is crucial when applying these relations to low-mass, and presumably high-redshift, galaxies. The molecular (H{sub 2}) gas mass is found to be better correlated with the peak of the IR emission (e.g., PACS160), driven mostly by the correlation of stellar mass and mean dust temperature. When examining these relations as a function of galactocentric radius, we find the same correlations, albeit with a larger scatter, up to a radius of r ∼ 0.7 r {sub 25} (containing most of a galaxy's baryonic mass). However, beyond that radius, the same correlations no longer hold, with increasing gas (predominantly H I) mass relative to the infrared emission. The tight relations found for the bulk of the galaxy's baryonic content suggest that total gas masses of disk-like (non-merging/ULIRG) galaxies can be inferred from far-infrared continuum measurements in situations where only the latter are available, e.g., in ALMA continuum observations of high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Results of Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Jeanette

    2006-02-23

    This is the final report detailing the analyses performed under ORD-FY04-011 "Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies." The work was performed under the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC28-04RW12232. This task provided method development and analytical support for the Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Concentrations of tracers, as well as major anions and cations, were reported for samples provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). Samples were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Samples were analyzed and controlled according to Implementing Procedures (IP's) written and approved in accordance with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) approved Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program.

  1. Study of stability zone influences and tracer patterns from the 1987 ANATEX (Across North America Tracer Experiment) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.M.; Gifford, F.A.; Hoard, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we will show preliminary results which appear to connect much of the hit and miss behavior of the surface tracer samples to large scale stability zones 100 to 1000 km wide. With these wintertime stability effects in mind, we have done the best we can to characterize the observed overall tracer patterns as well as individual tracer releases. This type of survey information is important to numerical model development. Diagnostic models often have difficulty reproducing surface plume concentrations where transport over stable layers have occurred. Prognostic models can, in theory, model effects of strong stable layers. However, these models would have great difficulty predicting large scale stable regions such as those observed during ANATEX. Also, though these models have ways of budging in synoptic wind fields, temperature observations are presently ignored. This is because if both wind and temperature observations are forced too strongly into the model, conflicting results may be produced. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Engineering task plan for determining breathing rates in singleshell tanks using tracer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-04-02

    The testing of single shell tanks to determine breathing rates. Inert tracer gases helium, and sulfur hexafluoride will be injected into the tanks AX-103, BY-105, C-107 and U-103. Periodic samples will be taken over a three month interval to determine actual headspace breathing rates.

  3. Tracers of wood smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.

    Smoke from wood burning is a significant source of air pollution in many parts of the world. When several sources simultaneously cause air pollution, it is often difficult to determine how much comes from wood burning. Wood smoke has unique chemical characteristics that can be used as indicators, including elemental composition, particularly potassium and chlorine, the ratios of organic and elemental carbon, and gases such as methyl chloride. This paper deals with formulating and applying the chemical mass balance approach incorporating both gas- and aerosol-phase tracers to a study carried out at Olympia-Lacey in Washington. In this study, three types of tracers were measured simultaneously and used to estimate wood smoke pollution during Winter, namely elemental composition and organic carbon in the particle phase and methyl chloride in the gas phase. The results from the different tracers are found to be in agreement. The air pollution at the study site was dominated by wood smoke mostly from low-temperature combustion (about 80%), with additional but smaller contributions from oil furnaces (15%), automobiles (4%) and occasionally from other nearby sources.

  4. The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.; Rieksts, G. A.; Palmer, R. F.; Gillis, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium-22 has been studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with Na-22, which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The Na-22 not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high, but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The Na-22 tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  5. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1994-12-31

    The bromide anion has been used extensively as a tracer for mapping the flow of groundwater. It has proven to be both a safe and reliable groundwater tracer. The goal in this study is to find several tracing compounds with characteristics similar to the bromide anion to be used in multiple well tracing tests. Four groups of fluorinated organic acids were selected as candidates for groundwater tracers. These groups include fluorinated benzoic acids (FBA), fluorinated salicylic acids (FSA), fluorinated toluic acids (FTA), and fluorinated cinnamic acids (FCA). These compounds have been shown to move readily with the flow of water and do not adsorb to soil. They are also non-toxic. In this study, the retention of the fluorinated organic acids on to a soil column is compared to that of the bromide ion. The time required for the elution of each analyte from the soil column is measured using a UV-Vis detector. The soils consist of the light, medium, and dark tuffs used in the batch study. The work performed during this quarter consists of the continuation of the batch studies for the fluorinated benzoic acids and column studies for several potential tracer compounds.

  6. In vitro study of PET tumor tracers at normal and elevated media glucose levels

    SciTech Connect

    Torizuka, T.; Clavo, A.C.; Wahl, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    FDG uptake in tumors is decreased by hyperglycemia. Little is known about the effect of hyperglycemia on non-FDG PET tracer uptake in tumors. This study was designed to determine if PET tumor tracers are affected by chronic exposure of tumor cells to high media glucose levels. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma (HTB77IP3) cells normally grown at 100 mg/dl of glucose were grown in media with 100 or 300 mg/dl of glucose. At 20, 26 and 38 days after initial culture (6-7 days after subculture), uptakes of 3H-labeled FDG, Thymidine (Thy), Methionine (Met) and Leucine (Leu) into the cells (n=4) were determined at the same glucose level as growth media. Tracer uptake per 1 million cells was measured after a 60 min uptake period. Presented are percentage of tracer uptake of cells grown at 300 mg/dl of glucose relative to uptake of cells grown at 100 mg/dl of glucose (mean {plus_minus} SD of 20, 26, and 38 days culture). Paired t-tests were used to compare tracer uptake of cells grown and assayed at both glucose levels. P values <0.05 were considered significant. FDG uptake of cells grown and assayed at 300 mg/dl of glucose was significantly decreased, compared with uptake of cells grown and assayed at 100 mg/dl of glucose. By contrast, uptake of Thy, Met and Leu were not different between cells grown and assayed at 100 or 300 mg/dl of glucose. These results indicate that tumor uptake of Thy, Met and Leu do not depend on media glucose level and suggest that these tracers labeled with C-11 are suitable for hyperglycemic patients, in whom tumor FDG uptake is expected to be impaired.

  7. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  8. Is atomic carbon a good tracer of molecular gas in metal-poor galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of molecular hydrogen (H2) in metal-rich galaxies, but is known to become ineffective in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies. Atomic carbon has been suggested as a superior tracer of H2 in these metal-poor systems, but its suitability remains unproven. To help us to assess how well atomic carbon traces H2 at low metallicity, we have performed a series of numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds that cover a wide range of different metallicities. Our simulations demonstrate that in star-forming clouds, the conversion factor between [C I] emission and H2 mass, XCI, scales approximately as XCI ∝ Z-1. We recover a similar scaling for the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, but find that at this point in the evolution of the clouds, XCO is consistently smaller than XCI, by a factor of a few or more. We have also examined how XCI and XCO evolve with time. We find that XCI does not vary strongly with time, demonstrating that atomic carbon remains a good tracer of H2 in metal-poor systems even at times significantly before the onset of star formation. On the other hand, XCO varies very strongly with time in metal-poor clouds, showing that CO does not trace H2 well in starless clouds at low metallicity.

  9. USING CONTINUOUS MONITORS FOR CONDUCTING TRACER STUDIES IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of online monitors for conducting a distribution system tracer study is proving to be an essential tool to accurately understand the flow dynamics in a distribution system. In a series of field testing sponsored by U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Greater ...

  10. Effect of tidal phase on solute flushing from a strait: SF6 tracer study in the East River, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplow, T.; Schlosser, P.; Ho, D. T.

    2003-12-01

    Flow in the East River, a 25 km tidal strait connecting Long Island Sound with New York Harbor, is driven by a tidal phase lag between the two ends of the strait. The direction and rate of solutes transported in the strait, including natural materials as well as anthropogenic contaminants, has important implications for the environmental management of Long Island Sound and other fragile local ecosystems. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is a successful deliberate tracer for rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas. It is non-reactive, inexpensive, and offers an extremely low detection limit. High-resolution transport studies of complex coastal and estuarine areas up to 100 km2, and lasting up to two weeks, have recently been achieved using a boat-mounted SF6 measurement system with a sampling interval of 1 min and a detection limit of 1 x 10-14 mol L-1. In June 2003, two injections of 6.2 mol sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were made 8 days apart in the East River to study residual circulation and rates of solute dissipation at different states of the tide. Both injections were made at the same location, but the first injection occurred at the slack before flood (northward flow), and the second injection occurred at the slack before ebb (southward flow). Tidally synchronized surveys of the SF6 tracer patch were made by boat for 7 days following the flood injection and for 5 days following the ebb injection. For the flood and ebb injections, respectively, mean displacement of the center of tracer mass within the East River, a proxy for residual circulation, was northward at 0.31 +/- 0.35 and 1.5 +/- 1.0 km day-1, mean fractional tracer loss due to tidal flushing was 0.32 +/- 0.06 day-1 and 0.52 +/- 0.10 day-1, and mean residence time was 2.6 +/- 0.4 days and 1.3 +/- 0.6 days. These tracer loss rates include a small correction for air-water gas exchange, which was estimated by a combination of previously established relationships between gas transfer velocity and wind speeds, river flow velocities, and rain rates. Residual circulation appeared to have little impact on tracer fate, while the state of the tide at the time of injection had a large impact. Tracer injected on the ebb tide dissipated more rapidly, indicating a large differential between the mixing power at the two ends of the strait. (In the case of the East River, New York Harbor offered more rapid mixing than Long Island Sound). These results suggest that tidal phasing of contaminant discharges in a strait of this kind (where the tidal excursion is comparable to the length of the strait) has the potential to reduce ecological impacts, by increasing flushing rates and directing a greater fraction of solutes away from ecologically sensitive areas.

  11. Effects of submesoscale turbulence on ocean tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine M.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-01-01

    Ocean tracers such as carbon dioxide, nutrients, plankton, and oil advect, diffuse, and react primarily in the oceanic mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the spatial distributions of these tracers due to turbulent stirring, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic fronts and eddies and small-scale three-dimensional turbulence are simultaneously active. In this study, a large eddy simulation spanning horizontal scales from 20 km down to 5 m is used to examine the effects of multiscale turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers from interior and sea-surface sources. The simulation includes the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined in order to understand the respective impacts of small-scale and submesoscale motions on tracer transport. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields and statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and the results detail how tracer mixing depends on air-sea tracer flux rate, tracer release depth, and flow regime. Although vertical fluxes of buoyancy by submesoscale eddies compete with mixing by Langmuir turbulence, vertical fluxes of tracers are often dominated by Langmuir turbulence, particularly for tracers that are released near the mixed-layer base or that dissolve rapidly through the surface, even in regions with pronounced submesoscale activity. Early in the evolution of some tracers, negative eddy diffusivities occur co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities or other submesoscale phenomenon may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  12. A State Space Transformation Can Yield Identifiable Models for Tracer Kinetic Studies with Enrichment Data

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishnan, Janak D.

    2012-01-01

    Tracer studies are analyzed almost universally by multicompartmental models where the state variables are tracer amounts or activities in the different pools. The model parameters are rate constants, defined naturally by expressing fluxes as fractions of the source pools. We consider an alternative state space with tracer enrichments or specific activities as the state variables, with the rate constants redefined by expressing fluxes as fractions of the destination pools. Although the redefinition may seem unphysiological, the commonly computed fractional synthetic rate actually expresses synthetic flux as a fraction of the product mass (destination pool). We show that, for a variety of structures, provided the structure is linear and stationary, the model in the enrichment state space has fewer parameters than that in the activities state space, and is hence better both to study identifiability and to estimate parameters. The superiority of enrichment modeling is shown for structures where activity model unidentifiability is caused by multiple exit pathways; on the other hand, with a single exit pathway but with multiple untraced entry pathways, activity modeling is shown to be superior. With the present-day emphasis on mass isotopes, the tracer in human studies is often of a precursor, labeling most or all entry pathways. It is shown that for these tracer studies, models in the activities state space are always unidentifiable when there are multiple exit pathways, even if the enrichment in every pool is observed; on the other hand, the corresponding models in the enrichment state space have fewer parameters and are more often identifiable. Our results suggest that studies with labeled precursors are modeled best with enrichments. PMID:20195911

  13. Numerical Simulations and Tracer Studies as a Tool to Support Water Circulation Modeling in Breeding Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The article presents a proposal of a method for computer-aided design and analysis of breeding reservoirs in zoos and aquariums. The method applied involves the use of computer simulations of water circulation in breeding pools. A mathematical model of a pool was developed, and a tracer study was carried out. A simplified model of two-dimensional flow in the form of a biharmonic equation for the stream function (converted into components of the velocity vector) was adopted to describe the flow field. This equation, supplemented by appropriate boundary conditions, was solved numerically by the finite difference method. Next, a tracer migration equation was solved, which was a two-dimensional advection-dispersion equation describing the unsteady transport of a non-active, permanent solute. In order to obtain a proper solution, a tracer study (with rhodamine WT as a tracer) was conducted in situ. The results of these measurements were compared with numerical solutions obtained. The results of numerical simulations made it possible to reconstruct water circulation in the breading pool and to identify still water zones, where water circulation was impeded.

  14. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer studies is critically discussed, where special emphasis is set on evaluating different data processing strategies on the example of enriched stable Sr isotopes.1 The analytical key parameters such as blank (Kr, Sr and Rb), variation of the natural Sr isotopic composition in the sample, mass bias, interferences (Rb) and total combined uncertainty are considered. A full metrological protocol for data processing using IPD is presented based on data gained during two transgenerational marking studies of fish, where the transfer of a Sr isotope double spike (84Sr and 86Sr) from female spawners of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and brown trout (Salmo trutta f.f.)2 to the centre of the otoliths of their offspring was studied by (LA)-MC-ICP-MS. 1J. Irrgeher, A. Zitek, M. Cervicek and T. Prohaska, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 193-200. 2A. Zitek, J. Irrgeher, M. Kletzl, T. Weismann and T. Prohaska, Fish. Manage. Ecol., 2013, 20, 654-361.

  15. Integrating retrieved cloud information with model simulation to extend usability of tracer gas retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Q.; Prinn, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have explored the possibility of using retrieved cloud information to extend the usability of trace gas concentration retrievals from satellites, since choosing only cloud-free retrievals might lead to a bias in their source-sink estimates using inverse modeling, i.e. the geographic locations of cloud-free or cloudy regions and trace gas source or sink regions might be correlated. We used methane retrievals (IMAP) and cloud retrievals (FRESCO) from SCIAMACHY as an example for this study, and assumed agreement between 3D model simulations (MATCH) and cloud-free satellite retrievals as a proxy for defining usability of satellite data. We found that when the pixel is very cloudy (f>0.7), the model simulation, which is integrated with retrieved cloud top height and cloud fraction data, yields similar agreement with observations as obtained with cloud-free pixels (f=0). The addition of cloudy pixel data significantly extends the spatial and temporal coverage of methane retrievals that can be used in source and sink studies. We also tried to overlay the MODIS aerosol retrievals with SCIAMACHY methane data to test the impact of aerosols on trace gas retrievals. Since these two retrievals are somewhat orthogonal, i.e. stronger MODIS aerosol signals over the ocean, and stronger SCIAMACHY methane signals over the land, we have not found a significant correlation between these two retrievals. Other possible reasons for this result could be the different passing times of the two satellites and the wave length differences of the two retrievals.

  16. Radio-tracer techniques for the study of flow in saturated porous materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skibitzke, H.E.; Chapman, H.T.; Robinson, G.M.; McCullough, Richard A.

    1961-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine the feasibility of using a radioactive substance as a tracer in the study of microscopic flow in a saturated porous solid. A radioactive tracer was chosen in preference to dye or other chemical in order to eliminate effects of the tracer itself on the flow system such as those relating to density, viscosity and surface tension. The porous solid was artificial "sandstone" composed of uniform fine grains of sand bonded together with an epoxy adhesive. The sides of the block thus made were sealed with an epoxy coating compound to insure water-tightness. Because of the chemical inertness of the block it was possible to use radioactive phosphorus (P32). Ion-exchange equilibrium was created between the block and nonradioactive phosphoric acid. Then a tracer tagged with P32 was injected into the block in the desired geometric configuration, in this case, a line source. After equilibrium in isotopic exchange was reached between the block and the line source, the block was rinsed, drained and sawn into slices. It was found that a quantitative analysis of the flow system may be made by assaying the dissected block. ?? 1961.

  17. Sample site selection for tracer studies applying a unidirectional circulatory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The optimal arterial or venous sites for infusion and sampling during isotopic tracer studies have not been established. This study determined the relationship of plasma and tissue enrichment (E) when isotopes were infused in an artery and sampled from a vein (av mode) or infused in a vein and sampled from an artery (va mode). Adult dogs were given primed constant infusions of (3-/sup 13/C)lactate, (1-/sup 13/C)leucine, and /sup 14/C-labeled bicarbonate. Simultaneous samples were drawn from the vena cava, aortic arch, and breath. Tissue samples were removed from skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, and gut. Breath samples were analyzed for /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by liquid scintillation counting and plasma isotopic enrichments of (/sup 13/C)lactate, (/sup 13/C)leucine, and alpha-(/sup 13/C)ketoisocaproate (KIC) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. By using the va mode, the plasma E for lactate and leucine were 30-40% above tissue E. The av mode provided an accurate reflection of tissue E for lactate, which equilibrates rapidly with tissues, and a reasonable estimate for leucine, which exchanges more slowly. The isotopic enrichment of plasma KIC more directly reflected tissue leucine E than did plasma leucine E, and KIC enrichment was insensitive to sampling site. We also evaluated theoretically a circulatory model that predicts venous isotopic enrichments when the va mode is used. We conclude that the av mode is optimal but that the problems arising from use of the va mode can be overcome by use of a metabolic product (i.e., KIC) or by calculation of venous specific activity with our circulatory mode.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  19. Using Tracer Experiments To Study Phosphorus Transfer From Soil To Overland Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, T.; Stamm, C.; Schaerer, M.; Sinaj, S.; Frossard, E.; Fluehler, H.

    Diffuse phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land contribute to the eutrophication of surface water bodies in Switzerland. Grassland soils in areas of high animal stock densities are often prone to high P losses due to over-fertilization and a strong accumu- lation of P in the topsoil. In order to understand the effects of management practices and remediation measures on P transfer into runoff water at a small scale it is impor- tant to localize the sources of this phosphorus within the soil profile and to describe the water flows within the topsoiloverland flow system. We are studying the effects of remediation measures on P availability in the soil and on P concentrations in overland flow in a field experiment. We are using tracer exper- iments to examine the mixing behavior of water applied with a sprinkling device onto the soil surface with pre-event soil water and to trace the contribution of those two water sources to overland flow. Two plots were pre-irrigated with a solution of KBr in order to label the soil solu- tion. After a few days of equilibration, two fluorescent dyes were applied to different areas of the plots at a constant rate of 40 mm h-1. Surface runoff was analyzed for tracer concentrations. Small soil monoliths (0.35 * 0.25 *0.20 m3) were excavated and the tracer distribution within the blocks was mapped using a digital camera, optical filters, and tracer specific excitation light source. This tracing technique allowed for independent mapping of the distribution of two simultaneously applied tracers. The experiments demonstrated heterogenous infiltration of the dyes, negligible lat- eral translocation of the dyes within the soil, minimal transfer of the pre-applied Br- into overland flow, early breakthrough of the dye tracers in overland flow which was independent of the tracers sorption properties and a recovery of the dyes that corre- sponded to the runoff ratio. In all, the experiments indicate a very restricted interac- tion between surface applied sprinkling water recovered in overland flow with the soil. However, dissolved reactive P concentrations (DRP) in overland flow from the same plots were high (0.51.5 mg DRP L-1). These findings indicate that fast desorption processes within a thin topsoil layer with high P availability, rather than outflow of P-enriched pre-event soil solution control P concentrations in overland flow.

  20. Experimental design for estimating parameters of rate-limited mass transfer: Analysis of stream tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Tracer experiments are valuable tools for analyzing the transport characteristics of streams and their interactions with shallow groundwater. The focus of this work is the design of tracer studies in high-gradient stream systems subject to advection, dispersion, groundwater inflow, and exchange between the active channel and zones in surface or subsurface water where flow is stagnant or slow moving. We present a methodology for (1) evaluating and comparing alternative stream tracer experiment designs and (2) identifying those combinations of stream transport properties that pose limitations to parameter estimation and therefore a challenge to tracer test design. The methodology uses the concept of global parameter uncertainty analysis, which couples solute transport simulation with parameter uncertainty analysis in a Monte Carlo framework. Two general conclusions resulted from this work. First, the solute injection and sampling strategy has an important effect on the reliability of transport parameter estimates. We found that constant injection with sampling through concentration rise, plateau, and fall provided considerably more reliable parameter estimates than a pulse injection across the spectrum of transport scenarios likely encountered in high-gradient streams. Second, for a given tracer test design, the uncertainties in mass transfer and storage-zone parameter estimates are strongly dependent on the experimental Damkohler number, DaI, which is a dimensionless combination of the rates of exchange between the stream and storage zones, the stream-water velocity, and the stream reach length of the experiment. Parameter uncertainties are lowest at DaI values on the order of 1.0. When DaI values are much less than 1.0 (owing to high velocity, long exchange timescale, and/or short reach length), parameter uncertainties are high because only a small amount of tracer interacts with storage zones in the reach. For the opposite conditions (DaI >> 1.0), solute exchange rates are fast relative to stream-water velocity and all solute is exchanged with the storage zone over the experimental reach. As DaI increases, tracer dispersion caused by hyporheic exchange eventually reaches an equilibrium condition and storage-zone exchange parameters become essentially nonidentifiable.

  1. Comparison of the perfluorocarbon and tracer gas decay methods for assessing infiltration rates in residents

    SciTech Connect

    Schaap, L.; Leaderer, B.P.; Renes, S.; Verstraelen, H.; Tosun, T.; Dietz, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    The passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technique for determining air infiltration rates into homes and buildings was evaluated in an environmental chamber. The impact of sampler orientation at a constant ventilation rate and a constant temperature, of variable ventilation rate at a constant temperature, and of variable temperature at a constant ventilation rate were evaluated. The average relative standard deviation of 16 paired samplers deployed in experiment 1 was +- 1.9% +- 1.0% indicating good reproducibility of the passive sampling rate and sample analysis. No impact of sampler orientation with respect to low air velocities (<0.2 m/s) present in houses is expected. The passive samplers accurately measured the average tracer concentration as compared with calculations based on the known source strength (CO/sub 2/ decays) and the measured ventilation rate under conditions of a 3-fold variation in ventilation rates (experiment 2). Temperature cycling differences of 8/sup 0/C (experiment 3) did not produce a bias in the PFT determined ventilation rate. The PFT technique is applicable to the expected range of condition in homes and buildings. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Application of a tracer methodology to study solute transport with overland flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaci, S.; Biron, P.; Richard, P.; Boulegue, J.; Schipman, A. J.; Vanderva, J. P.; Gaudet, J. P.; Esteves, M.; Bariac, T.

    2003-04-01

    The distribution of water arriving on the soil between overland flow and infiltration is a key question for the progression of knowledge of hydrological and erosive operation at the slope scale or at the catchment scale. Flows in the soil and surface formations have a major influence on the cycle of water in the ecosystems, like in particular those of the pollutants. To reconstitute the history and the origin of the transported substances, it is necessary to take into account the flow of water. The use of non interactive tracers makes it possible on the basis of identification of the sources contributing to the flow (rain, soil water...). These tracers, which do not interact with the soil matrix, have concentrations which vary under the effect of dilutions and concentrations during their transfer. The rainwater with a chemical composition sufficiently differentiated compared to water from the other "sources" of the system, will thus have its composition modified during the transfer because of the mixture with older water in the soil. Within the framework of this subject, our objective is to improve the use of tracer methodology to study overland flow. We have privileged a field investigation based on the comportment of a small plot during simulated rainfall. In order to circumvent the problem of geochemical variability of natural rainfall, the approach consists to work under simulated rainfall. Three consecutives simulations were performed with different chemical (anionic tracers most commonly used and Rhenium) and isotopic (180, ^2H) characteristic to ensure a measurable difference between overland flow samples. The temporal evolution of overland flow concentrations show different comportment between tracers (time to reach the stationary state, dilution effect with soil water). Sources and sinks effects have been identified and quantified for the different solute tested.

  3. TRACER STUDY OF VERTICAL EXCHANGE BY CUMULUS CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exchange of material by convective cloud processes between the mixed layer and the overlying free troposphere is examined. The paper describes results of a field experiment that was conducted in Lexington, Kentucky during the period from July 20 to August 24, 1983 to study th...

  4. TRACER STUDIES OF TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION IN CUMULI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from a study of the transport and transformation of pollutants are reported. irborne measurements near Champaign, llinois and Milwaukee, Wisconsin were made during the summers of 1990 and 1992. easurements of the aerosol size distribution, wind, turbulence, cloud micr...

  5. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  6. Characterization of crushed tuff for the evaluation of the fate of tracers in transport studies in the unsaturated zone

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Raymond, R.; Bish, D.L.; Gladney, E.S.; Lopez, E.A.

    1987-03-01

    Results of field-scale (caisson) transport studies under unsaturated moisture and steady and nonsteady flow conditions indicate variability and a lack of conservation of mass in solute transport. The tuff materials used in that study were analyzed for the presence of tracers and of freshly precipitated material to help explain the variability and lack of conservation of mass. Selected tuff samples were characterized by neutron activation analysis for tracer identification, by x-ray diffraction for mineral identification, by petrographic analysis for identification of freshly precipitated material, and by x-ray fluorescence analysis for identification of major and trace elements. The results of these analyses indicate no obvious presence of freshly precipitated material that would retard tracer movement. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of sorbing and nonsorbing tracers on the tuff at some locations (even cesium at the 415-cm depth) and not at others suggests variability in transport. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  8. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  9. A Mathematical Modeling Study of Tracer Mixing in a Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model based on a water model was developed to study the tracer mixing in a single strand tundish. The mixing behavior of black ink and KCl solution was simulated by a mixed composition fluid model, and the data were validated by water modeling results. In addition, a model that solves the scalar transport equation (STE) without any physical properties of the tracer was studied and the results were compared to predictions using the density-coupled model. Furthermore, the mixing behaviors of different amounts of KCl tracers were investigated. Before the model was established, KCl tracer properties such as the KCl molecule diffusion (KMD), the water molecule self-diffusion (WSD) in KCl solution, and the KCl solution viscosity (KV) were evaluated. The RTD curve of 250 mL KCl for the KMD case was closer to the water modeling results than that of the case implemented with only density. Moreover, the ensemble average deviation of the RTD curves of the cases implemented with KMD + WSD, KMD + KV, and KMD + WSD + KV to the KMD case is less than 0.7 pct. Thus, the water self-diffusion and KV were neglected, while the KCl density and KMD were implemented in the current study. The flow pattern of black ink was similar to the STE result i.e., the fluid flowed upwards toward the top surface and formed a large circulating flow at the outlet nozzle. The flow behavior of the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases exhibited a strong tendency to sink to the tundish bottom, and subsequently flow through the holes in the dam. Thereafter, it propagated toward the outlet nozzle. Regarding the KCl tracer amount, the tracer concentration propagated to the outlet nozzle much faster for the larger amount case than for the smaller amount cases. However, the flow pattern for the 50 mL KCl case was somewhat different. The fluid propagated to the top surface which acted like black ink during the initial injection, and subsequently the fluid flowed throughout the holes at a much slower pace. The breakthrough time and peak concentration of RTD curves of model predictions and water modeling results showed a good agreement (all difference within 12.5 pct) for the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases.

  10. A Mathematical Modeling Study of Tracer Mixing in a Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2014-09-01

    A mathematical model based on a water model was developed to study the tracer mixing in a single strand tundish. The mixing behavior of black ink and KCl solution was simulated by a mixed composition fluid model, and the data were validated by water modeling results. In addition, a model that solves the scalar transport equation (STE) without any physical properties of the tracer was studied and the results were compared to predictions using the density-coupled model. Furthermore, the mixing behaviors of different amounts of KCl tracers were investigated. Before the model was established, KCl tracer properties such as the KCl molecule diffusion (KMD), the water molecule self-diffusion (WSD) in KCl solution, and the KCl solution viscosity (KV) were evaluated. The RTD curve of 250 mL KCl for the KMD case was closer to the water modeling results than that of the case implemented with only density. Moreover, the ensemble average deviation of the RTD curves of the cases implemented with KMD + WSD, KMD + KV, and KMD + WSD + KV to the KMD case is less than 0.7 pct. Thus, the water self-diffusion and KV were neglected, while the KCl density and KMD were implemented in the current study. The flow pattern of black ink was similar to the STE result i.e., the fluid flowed upwards toward the top surface and formed a large circulating flow at the outlet nozzle. The flow behavior of the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases exhibited a strong tendency to sink to the tundish bottom, and subsequently flow through the holes in the dam. Thereafter, it propagated toward the outlet nozzle. Regarding the KCl tracer amount, the tracer concentration propagated to the outlet nozzle much faster for the larger amount case than for the smaller amount cases. However, the flow pattern for the 50 mL KCl case was somewhat different. The fluid propagated to the top surface which acted like black ink during the initial injection, and subsequently the fluid flowed throughout the holes at a much slower pace. The breakthrough time and peak concentration of RTD curves of model predictions and water modeling results showed a good agreement (all difference within 12.5 pct) for the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases.

  11. A tracer study in an Alaskan gravel beach and its implications on the persistence of the Exxon Valdez oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Boufadel, Michel C

    2011-06-01

    Despite great efforts including bioremediation, the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spills persist in many gravel beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA. To explore this mystery, a lithium tracer study was conducted along two transects on one of these beaches. The tracer injections and transports were successfully simulated using the 2-dimensional numerical model MARUN. The tracer stayed much longer in the oil-persisting, right transect (facing landwand) than in the clean, left transect. If the tracer is approximately regarded as oils, oils in the upper layer would have more opportunities to enter the lower layer in the right transect than in the left one. This may qualitatively explain the oil persistence within the right transect. When the tracer is regarded as nutrients, the long stay of nutrients within the right transect implies that the oil persistence along the right transect was not due to the lack of nutrients during the bioremediation. PMID:21492883

  12. Nitrate turnover in a peat soil under drained and rewetted conditions: results from a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Russow, Rolf; Tauchnitz, Nadine; Spott, Oliver; Mothes, Sibylle; Bernsdorf, Sabine; Meissner, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Under natural conditions, peatlands are generally nitrate-limited. However, recent concerns about an additional N input into peatlands by atmospheric N deposition have highlighted the risk of an increased denitrification activity and hence the likelihood of a rise of emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the turnover of added nitrate in a drained and a rewetted peatland using a [(15)N]nitrate-bromide double-tracer method. The double-tracer method allows a separation between physical effects (dilution, dispersion and dislocation) and microbial and chemical nitrate transformation by comparing with the conservative Br(-) tracer. In the drained peat site, low NO3(-) consumption rates have been observed. In contrast, NO3(-) consumption at the rewetted peat site rises rapidly to about 100% within 4 days after tracer application. Concomitantly, the (15)N abundances of nitrite and ammonium in soil water increased and lead to the conclusion that, besides commonly known NO3(-) reduction to nitrite (i.e. denitrification), a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has simultaneously taken place. The present study reveals that increasing NO3(-) inputs into rewetted peatlands via atmospheric deposition results in a rapid NO3(-) consumption, which could lead to an increase in N2O emissions into the atmosphere. PMID:24313368

  13. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  14. Flow optimization study of a batch microfluidics PET tracer synthesizing device

    PubMed Central

    Elizarov, Arkadij M.; Meinhart, Carl; van Dam, R. Michael; Huang, Jiang; Daridon, Antoine; Heath, James R.; Kolb, Hartmuth C.

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical modeling and experimental studies of flow optimization inside a batch microfluidic micro-reactor used for synthesis of human-scale doses of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracers. Novel techniques are used for mixing within, and eluting liquid out of, the coin-shaped reaction chamber. Numerical solutions of the general incompressible Navier Stokes equations along with time-dependent elution scalar field equation for the three dimensional coin-shaped geometry were obtained and validated using fluorescence imaging analysis techniques. Utilizing the approach presented in this work, we were able to identify optimized geometrical and operational conditions for the micro-reactor in the absence of radioactive material commonly used in PET related tracer production platforms as well as evaluate the designed and fabricated micro-reactor using numerical and experimental validations. PMID:21072595

  15. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method

    PubMed Central

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Hroux, M ; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-01-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER1z). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER2z). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER2z and AER1z estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER2z was higher than AER1z. Overall, the AER1z estimates underestimated AER2z by approximately 16% (IQR: 532%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. PMID:25399878

  16. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method.

    PubMed

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Hroux, M ; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-12-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER1z ). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER2z ). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER2z and AER1z estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER2z was higher than AER1z . Overall, the AER1z estimates underestimated AER2z by approximately 16% (IQR: 5-32%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. PMID:25399878

  17. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  18. Diffusion of oxygen tracer into deuterium-gas-baked IrOx/Pb(Zr,TiO3)Pt capacitors and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3Pt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. S.; Kurihara, K.; Haneda, H.

    2005-11-01

    Deuterium gas (D2) ambient heat treatment of ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin-film capacitors with a top electrode of iridium oxide and a bottom electrode of platinum showed significant polarization loss when baked at 200 C at a pressure of 5 Torr. The D2 gas treatment of the capacitors partially reduced the iridium oxide (IrOx, where x is 1tracer (18O2) gases which recovered the ferroelectric properties and the D concentration in the PZT decreased to the detection level of 1017 at./cm3. The oxygen tracer concentration was highest in the IrOx film and much lower in the PZT. Comparison of the oxygen tracer SIMS profiles of the PZT annealed in tracer oxygen or preannealed in oxygen followed by oxygen tracer annealing showed little difference in the calculated PZT oxygen tracer diffusion coefficient of 510-15 cm2/s. If the PZT was reduced by the D2 gas, an increase in the oxygen diffusion coefficient would be expected as has been proposed in the literature, but this was not observed experimentally. These results indicate that the loss of polarization in the PZT capacitor is primarily due to the inhibition of ferroelectric domain switching by possible formation of [OD-].

  19. Mineral imbalances in farm animals and their study and diagnosis with isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Underwood, E J

    1976-12-01

    Twenty-two mineral elements are known to be essential for animal life. These are calcium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, sodium, chlorine, magnesium, iron, iodine, copper, manganese, zinc, cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, chromium, tin, vanadium, fluorine, silicon, nickel and arsenic. Naturally occurring and man-made dietary imbalances of many of these elements and their interactions with other minerals are described and their functions and requirements by farm animals are outlined. The nature and importance of metabolic interactions among the mineral elements are discussed and the important concept stressed that there is no single minimum requirement or safe tolerance of a particular mineral, but a series of such minimum requirements and safe tolerances depending on the extent to which other minerals with which it interacts is present or absent from the diet. Radioactive tracer elements are shown to be of great value in the determination of mineral nutrient availability to the animal and for following mineral metabolic movements in the body. They are also shown to have considerable potential for the diagnosis of mineral imbalances. Various in vivo and in vitro techniques, involving both radioactive and stable tracers developed for the early diagnosis of mineral deficiencies are described and the strengths and weaknesses of such techniques in comparison with standard biochemical tests, are discussed. The need for further critical studies with isotopic tracers in the detection and diagnosis of mineral imbalances is emphasized. The main types of biochemical criteria used in the diagnosis of mineral deficiencies and excesses are given, with appropriate examples of their use. PMID:797391

  20. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; HunterJr., Jerry; Sohn, Yong Ho; Coffey, Kevin; Murch, Prof. Graeme; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

  1. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S.; Bruce Warmack, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Hunter, Jerry L.; Sohn, Yongho; Coffey, Kevin R.; Murch, Graeme E.; Belova, Irina V.

    2014-09-23

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627° C (523 900 K).

  2. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S.; Bruce Warmack, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Bala; Hunter, Jerry L.; Sohn, Yongho; Coffey, Kevin R.; Murch, Graeme E.; Belova, Irina V.

    2014-09-23

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-highmore » vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627° C (523 900 K).« less

  3. Isotopic analysis and multi tracer tests to study groundwater circulation in a landslide in Southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pera, Sebastian; Marzocchi, Roberto; Bronzini, Simona

    2014-05-01

    Understanding groundwater circulation in landslides is often necessary to assess their dynamics and forecast movements. Fontana landslide is placed in Canton Ticino, its main body is constituted by gneiss, that is covered by moraine and other deposits related to the mass movements like debris flows and, rock fall. Gneiss that originally has low hydraulic conductivity increases their aquifer properties due to weathering and fracture presence. In fact several springs are present in across the landslide some of them having discharge up to 1 m3 S-1. To study groundwater circulation in the landslide body, a multi tracer test was designed and water samples taken. 3 tracers (Naphtionate, Sulphorhodamine B and Uranine) were injected underground. Injection mass was calculated by using EHTD (EPA, 2003), 2 field fluorimeters were placed in springs considered to be the main water discharge of the system for continuous monitoring. Other springs with smaller discharge scattered along the landslide body were monitored by using charcoal bags. Water samples also were taken for chemical and stable isotopes analysis. The tracers' presence was also monitored in the river crossing the area collecting surface flow from snowmelt and springs. Even if the landslide has a small area, isotopic composition of water from springs shows clear differences. All samples plot close to the local meteoric water line, and an altitude effect is visible. Chemical composition is relatively uniform however some differences can also be seen. Concerning tracers the only that arrived at monitored points was uranine, and it was detected in the charcoal bags. Considering tracer concentration in ppm, in the charcoal and travel times to restitution points was possible to have conceptual model for groundwater flow across the landslide. Circulation is rapid and recharge controlled by snowmelt in spring and precipitation in late spring to autumn. Snow accumulates at the top of the landslide where an elongated topographic basin is present filled by blocks infiltrates and feed the springs located at lower altitude but close to the basin. Those springs not originally considered for discharge monitoring, are draining the water from the basin and could be better correlated to landslide movement, respect to other springs with similar discharge rates but farther from the concentrated infiltration area represented by the topographic basin.

  4. Temporal and spatial variability of noble gas tracers in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taka; Hamme, Roberta C.; Emerson, Steve

    2011-08-01

    We develop a numerical model of dissolved argon and neon in the global ocean as a tool to investigate the physical processes controlling their saturation states in the upper ocean of the North Pacific. The distribution of argon and neon is simulated using the time-varying, three-dimensional circulation fields determined by the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Oceans (ECCO) project from 1992 to 2008. The model is in overall agreement with limited observational data from the subpolar and subtropical North Pacific using a relatively low vertical diffusivity. Temporal variability in argon saturation is enhanced in the surface ocean, dominated by diffusive gas exchange coupled to air-sea heat fluxes. This variability in surface argon saturation is significantly correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index (El Nio) in the tropics and to the North Pacific Index in midlatitudes. Using sensitivity experiments, we find that the mean state of argon saturation in the ventilated thermocline is characterized by a mutual compensation between mixing-induced supersaturation and sea level pressure and heat-flux-induced undersaturation. Neon distributions exhibit a stronger influence from bubble-mediated gas fluxes that is partially compensated by the effect of sea level pressure variation. Our result demonstrates the important role of air-sea interaction and ocean mixing in controlling the mean state of the dissolved noble gases and highlights the importance of diffusive gas exchange coupled to air-sea heat fluxes in controlling temporal variability, with implications for using noble gas measurements to derive estimates of diapycnal diffusivity in the subtropical thermocline.

  5. New tracers identify hydraulic fracturing fluids and accidental releases from oil and gas operations.

    PubMed

    Warner, N R; Darrah, T H; Jackson, R B; Millot, R; Kloppmann, W; Vengosh, A

    2014-11-01

    Identifying the geochemical fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs has important applications for assessing hydrocarbon resource recovery, environmental impacts, and wastewater treatment and disposal. Here, we report for the first time, novel diagnostic elemental and isotopic signatures (B/Cl, Li/Cl, δ11B, and δ7Li) useful for characterizing hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFF) and distinguishing sources of HFFF in the environment. Data from 39 HFFFs and produced water samples show that B/Cl (>0.001), Li/Cl (>0.002), δ11B (25-31‰) and δ7Li (6-10‰) compositions of HFFF from the Marcellus and Fayetteville black shale formations were distinct in most cases from produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can be used to quantify small fractions (∼0.1%) of HFFF in contaminated fresh water and likely be applied universally to trace HFFF in other basins. The novel environmental application of this diagnostic isotopic tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine treatment facility in Pennsylvania and an accidental spill site in West Virginia. We hypothesize that the boron and lithium are mobilized from exchangeable sites on clay minerals in the shale formations during the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF. PMID:25327769

  6. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Dong, Dillon; Leroy, Adam K.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J.; Helou, George; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jrgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L.

    2015-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. Both images achieve an angular resolution of ?2?, allowing us to map radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of ?90 pc. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each H ii region; the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz additionally becomes both increasingly negative and positive away from the H ii region peaks, indicating an increase of non-thermal emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emission from the J=1\\to 0 transitions of HCN and HCO+. The peaks of dense molecular gas traced by these two spectral lines are spatially offset from the peaks of the continuum emission for both extranuclear star-forming regions, indicating that our data reach an angular resolution at which one can spatially distinguish sites of recent star formation from the sites of future star formation. Finally, we find trends of decreasing dense gas fraction and velocity dispersion with increasing star formation efficiency among the regions observed, indicating that the dynamical state of the dense gas, rather than its abundance, plays a more significant role in the star formation process.

  7. A rapid method for the measurement of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), and Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr) in hydrologic tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    2010-01-01

    A rapid headspace method for the simultaneous laboratory determination of intentionally introduced hydrologic tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr), and other halocarbons in water and gases is described. The high sensitivity of the procedure allows for introduction of minimal tracer mass (a few grams) into hydrologic systems with a large dynamic range of analytical detection (dilutions to 1:108). Analysis times by gas chromatography with electron capture detector are less than 1 min for SF6; about 2 min for SF6 and SF5CF3; and 4 min for SF6, SF5CF3, and Halon 1211. Many samples can be rapidly collected, preserved in stoppered septum bottles, and analyzed at a later time in the laboratory. Examples are provided showing the effectiveness of the gas tracer test studies in varied hydrogeological settings.

  8. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations. PMID:26906600

  9. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrck, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates. PMID:26150069

  10. Using trees to remediate tritium contaminated groundwater: a modeling and tracer study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Karin, Theodora

    2004-01-01

    Rebel, Karin, T. 2004. Using trees to remediate tritium contaminated groundwater: a modeling and tracer study. Ph.D Dissertation. Cotnell University. Ithaca, New York. 174 pp. Abstract: We have developed a spatially explicit model of water and tritium fluxes in the vadose zone in order to simulate water uptake and subsurface lateral movement in coniferous and mixed hardwood - coniferous forests on Coastal Plain soils of the southern United States. These Coastal Plain soils are characteristically sand overlying slowly permeable clays found at depths of 30 to 200 cm, and can form temporarily saturated, unconfined aquifers. Ten hectares of the modeled watershed was periodically irrigated with tritium enriched water. We used the tritium enriched water as a tracer to validate the model. The model was used to optimize irrigation, to evaluate the amount of tritium entering the atmosphere due to evapotranspiration and to quantify water and tritium fluxes in texture contrast soils. Using tritium as a tracer, we have studied how tree species and canopy position effect water and solutes uptake from different parts of the soil profile. We clipped branches to obtain leaf water from over-and understory laurel oak (Quercus Laurifolia) and over- and understory pine (Pinus elliottii and Pinus taeda), which was then analyzed for tritium. We found that for early successional trees (Pinus spp.) and trees in the overstory proportionally more water was taken up from deeper in the soil compared to the hardwoods or trees in the understory, which took up proportionally more water from the soil surface. These differences are important for understanding competition for resources within a forest and in predicting the hydrologic response to forest management practices such as thinning.

  11. Field Studies of Streamflow Generation Using Natural and Injected Tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate [Rn]{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and {sup 222}Rn volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of [Rn]{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach. The method was first applied to a 34 m stream reach at Bickford during baseflow; results suggested that {ge} 70% of the lateral inflow could be considered vadose zone water (water which had been in a saturated zone for less than a few days), and the remainder ''soil groundwater'' or ''saturated zone water'' (which had a longer residence time in a soil saturated zone). The method was then applied to two stream reaches on the West Fork of Walker Branch over a wide range of flow conditions; four springs were also investigated. It was found that springwater and inflow to the stream could be viewed as a mixture of water from three end members: the two defined at Bickford (vadose zone water and soil groundwater) and a third (bedrock groundwater) to account for the movement of water through fractured dolomite bedrock. Calcium was used as a second naturally-occurring tracer to distinguish bedrock groundwater from the other two end members. The behavior indicated by the three-end-member mixing model (e.g., increased importance of the two soil end members with increasing flow, and the differences between the stream reaches and among some of the springs) were consistent with a wide variety of environmental observations, including temperature and flow variations at springs, water table responses, the general lack of saturated zones on hillslopes and even near the stream in some places, and the importance of water movement through bedrock.

  12. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  13. Using tracer technique to study the flow behavior of surfactant foam.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin; Chou, Feng-Chih; Cheng, Shin-Jen

    2009-07-30

    Surfactant foam was used to remove absorbed hydrocarbons from soils. The nature and extent of the foam pathway decide the efficiency of this technology. The characteristics and behavior of foam flow are difficult to visually observe. In this study, laboratory sandbox experiments were performed to estimate the flow behavior of surfactant foam and thus elucidate the properties and flow behavior of surfactant foam. To quantitatively determine the distribution of foam and evaluate accurately the flow field of foam in the soil, this study designed a special technique, applying micro-scale iron powder as a tracer. The foam generated with 4% (w/v) mixed solution of Span 60 and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) showed an excellent stability and quality, which made it particularly apt for this study. The results indicated that the foam flows through the zone above the clay planes and also flows through the zone between the clay planes. The heterogeneous sand does not inhibit the invasion of foam flow. Moreover, the results of tracer tests and photographs of the foam distributions in sandbox were identical in the behavior of foam flow. This knowledge is valuable for providing insight into the foam remediation of contaminated soil. PMID:19157697

  14. Using a Coupled Surface water/ Groundwater Model to Study Heat as a Tracer in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Hatch, C. E.; Letcher, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    Heat as a tracer has proven to be an effective method for quantifying groundwater - surface water interactions. However, there remains a lack of controlled, experimental data to assess fundamental aspects of heat transport in porous media. There may be a disconnect between field and model-based studies, because: 1) model results have yet to be tested against data from controlled laboratory experiments, and 2) there are often too many variables in field studies to be thoroughly modeled without simplification. This study is comprised of a three-dimensional transient numerical model of heat flow through a porous media coupled with steady state fluid flow using COMSOL Multiphysics. Pressure and temperature outputs are compared to data measured in a laboratory flume. The 3D model enables exploration of the effects of oblique flow paths through a stream bed and/or banks with a (stream) surface water upper boundary on diurnal temperature records. By imposing known flow or temperature gradients in any direction, we can analyze the effects of these diverse gradients on the veracity of current heat as a tracer methods (which assume unidirectional flow) as well as develop valid error statistics for these methods in the presence of non-vertical flow.

  15. SF6 Tracer Release Study: A Contaminant Fate Study in Newtown Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, P. J.; Ho, D. T.; Peter, S.; Simpson, H. J.; Flores, S.; Dugan, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    Newtown Creek is a 5.5km creek that discharges into the East River, a 25km strait connecting Long Island Sound to the north and the New York Harbor to the south. Surface runoff dominates the freshwater input into the creek, for natural tributaries no longer exist. The areas directly adjacent to the creek are highly industrialized, and New York City's largest Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) discharges directly into creek. In August 2004, we injected sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) into Newtown creek to study the fate of oil seeping into the creek from an underground oil spill and the fate of nutrient rich effluent from the WPCP. We monitored SF6 in Newtown Creek, the East River, and the Upper Bay of New York Harbor for 7 consecutive days following the injection in order to investigate the spreading patterns and transport mechanics of waters exiting the creek, and to determine the ultimate fate of the contaminants/solutes originating in Newtown Creek. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements were collected simultaneously with SF6 measurements. A strong DO gradient exists in the creek, where waters in the upper reaches are anoxic. We use SF6 data to calculate mean residence times for Newtown Creek waters. SF6 was detected above background concentrations approximately 15km to the south of the creek at the Verrazano Bridge only 1 day after the tracer injection. By combining the movements of the SF6 distribution, the position of the oxygen gradient, and the residence time of Newtown Creek water, we can determine a lower boundary for oxygen consumption rates.

  16. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  17. Gas-phase naphthalene concentration data recovery in ambient air and its relevance as a tracer of sources of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Navazo, Marino; de Blas, Maite; Durana, Nieves; Alonso, Lucio; Iza, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Despite the toxicity of naphthalene and the fact that it is a precursor of atmospheric photooxidants and secondary aerosol, studies on ambient gas-phase naphthalene are generally scarce. Moreover, as far as we are concerned, this is the first published one using long-term hourly ambient gas-phase naphthalene concentrations. In this work, it has been also demonstrated the usefulness of ambient gas-phase naphthalene to identify major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in complex scenarios. Initially, in order to identify main benzene emission sources, hourly ambient measurements of 60 VOC were taken during a complete year together with meteorological data in an urban/industrial area. Later, due to the observed co-linearity of some of the emissions, a procedure was developed to recover naphthalene concentration data from recorded chromatograms to use it as a tracer of the combustion and distillation of petroleum products. The characteristic retention time of this compound was determined comparing previous GC-MS and GC-FID simultaneous analysis by means of relative retention times, and its concentration was calculated by using relative response factors. The obtained naphthalene concentrations correlated fairly well with ethene (r = 0.86) and benzene (r = 0.92). Besides, the analysis of daily time series showed that these compounds followed a similar pattern, very different from that of other VOC, with minimum concentrations at day-time. This, together with the results from the assessment of the meteorological dependence pointed out a coke oven as the major naphthalene and benzene emitting sources in the study area.

  18. Using WRF with Water Vapor Tracers to Study the Moisture Sources for the North American Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Hu, H.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Monsoon (NAM) accounts for approximately 70% of the total annual precipitation in northwest Mexico, and 40-50% of annual precipitation in the Southwestern US. Until recently, the broad consensus about the sources for NAM precipitation was that the Gulf of California and eastern tropical Pacific contributed to moisture at lower levels (below 850mb) and the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea at upper levels. However, using an analytical 2D Lagrangian model (the DRM) we have recently shown that approximately 40% of the moisture that contributes to NAM precipitation is of terrestrial origin. However, the DRM cannot provide information about the vertical structure of moisture as it assumes a well-mixed atmosphere. To alleviate this problem, in this work we use the weather research forecast (WRF) model with the recently added capability of water vapor tracers, to study the moisture sources of NAM precipitation and their vertical structure. We find that the Gulf of California contributes to low-level moisture and the Gulf of Mexico contributes to upper-level moisture, as previously hypothesized. However, we also show the important role of regional moisture recycling from the NAM region at lower levels and upper level moisture from eastern Mexico that has crossed the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain chain. The tracers provide a very detailed picture of the complex moisture transport processes in the NAM region.

  19. Dual tracer autoradiographic study with thallium-201 and radioiodinated fatty acid in cardiomyopathic hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of myocardial scintigraphy with radioiodinated 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in cardiomyopathy, quantitative dual tracer autoradiographic study with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed in 27 cardiomyopathic Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters and eight normal hamsters. Furthermore, 16 Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters aged 21 days were divided into verapamil-treated (during 70 days) and control groups (respectively, n = 8), and autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated an uncoupling of /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions and a regional heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution in cardiomyopathic hamsters aged more than 2 mo, while normal hamsters showed only mild heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution without an uncoupling of tracers. Age-matched comparison between normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters (5-8 mo old) demonstrated that a difference between their (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions are more marked than that between their /sup 201/Tl distributions. Furthermore, (/sup 125/I)BMIPP visualized effects of verapamil on cardiomyopathy more distinctly than did /sup 201/Tl. In conclusion, myocardial imaging with (/sup 123/I)BMIPP could be useful for investigating cardiomyopathy and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in patients with cardiomyopathy.

  20. Investigation of Contaminant Transport and Dispersion in New York Harbor by a High Resolution SF6 Tracer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplow, T.; Schlosser, P.; Ho, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has been used successfully as a deliberate tracer for rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas, due to its inert nature, non-toxicity, and extremely low detection limit. An automated, high-resolution SF6 measurement system mounted on a boat was recently developed for several projects on the Hudson River. The system has a sampling interval of two minutes and a detection limit of 1 x 10-14 mol L-1. Real-time data visualization enables revisions of sampling strategy during the experiment. A single injection has allowed observation of advection rates, dispersion processes, and air-water gas exchange for up to two weeks, and longer experiments are possible. This equipment, with minor modifications, was applied to New York Harbor in July 2002. New York Harbor is one of the busiest seaports in the United States, processing nearly \\100 billion in cargo each year. Most of the shipping facilities are located in Newark Bay (approximately 15 km^{2}) or in two adjacent channels: the Kill van Kull (6 km long) and the Arthur Kill (20 km long). Newark Bay, which is mostly saline, is fed by the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, both of which flow through heavily industrialized areas. Ultimately, these waters drain through the Kills to Raritan Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Due to a combination of point sources, runoff, wastewater treatment plants, and emissions from the shipping industry, Newark Bay and the Kills receive a large volume and variety of contaminants, including petroleum, heavy metals, PCBs, and dioxins. In addition, much of the area is subject to ongoing and extensive navigational dredging, causing widespread re-suspension of previously deposited contaminants. A small quantity (ca. 2 mols) of SF_{6}$ was injected into northern Newark Bay to investigate the spreading of water throughout the Bay, the Kills, and the tidal portions of the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers. The tracer was successfully monitored across most of this area for 12 consecutive days. Most measurements were taken at a depth of 1 m, with deeper profiles at certain locations. Numerous CTD casts were made to examine the halocline and thermocline at different points. The study period coincided with relatively dry and calm conditions. The data suggest rapid initial dispersion, both laterally and vertically, driven by the tides. However, flushing of the area as a whole was slow during the study period. After two weeks, the tracer persisted throughout Newark Bay, the Kills, and the lower reaches of the rivers. Bulk seaward advection was weak, although a considerable quantity of tracer found its way out of the Kills due to tidal action, whereupon it was heavily diluted in Raritan Bay or Upper New York Bay. Overall, the study enables prediction of available response time for certain contamination events, while also providing critical validation data for computational fluid dynamics models of this area.

  1. Long-range (CAPTEX (Cross-APpalachian Tracer EXperiment)) and complex terrain (ASCOT (Atmospheric Studies of COmplex Terrain)) perfluorocarbon tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffter, J.L.; Yamada, T.; Dietz, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology, consisting of tracers, samplers, and analytical equipment, has been deployed in numerous meteorological experiments for the verification of long-range and complex terrain transport and dispersion models. The CAPTEX (Cross-APpalachain Tracer EXperiment) ''83 was conducted from mid-September through October 1983, in which seven 3-h tracer releases (5 from Dayton, Ohio, and 2 from Sudbury, Ontario) were made of a single PFT. Ground sampling occurred at 80 sites in the northeastern US and southeastern Canada at distances of 300 to 1100 km from the release sites, with a total of 3000 samples collected. Seven aircraft gathered 1600 crosswind and vertical spiral samples at distance of 200 to 900 km from the release sites. Peak ground concentrations of over 30 times background and peak aircraft values of over 150 times background were measured at the most distant sites; some typical results are shown. The branching atmospheric trajectory (BAT) long-range transport was described. The model-calculated maximum ground level PFT concentrations were compared with the measured concentration isopleths as well as through the use of scatter diagrams of concentrations, spatial errors, and frequency of space- and time-averaged concentrations. The average spatial error found for each of the 7 releases ranged from 1.3/sup 0/ to 1.7/sup 0/ lat. The crosswind standard deviations of aircraft traverses at 600 to 800 km downwind varied from 12 to 20 km which corresponded to 1.0/sup 0/ to 1.6/sup 0/ lat., indicating that the model was accurate to within one standard deviation of the real-time tracer profiles. On average, for the 7 runs, 50% of the model-calculated concentrations were within a factor of 20 of the observations, indicating that, in general, 1/sup 0/ lat. shifts can easily cause order-of-magnitude changes in observed concentrations.

  2. Visual Interhemispheric and Striate-Extrastriate Cortical Connections in the Rabbit: A Multiple Tracer Study

    PubMed Central

    Andelin, Adrian K.; Bruning, David J.; Felleman, Daniel J.; Olavarria, Jaime F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in rabbits identified an array of extrastriate cortical areas anatomically connected with V1 but did not describe their internal topography. To address this issue, we injected multiple anatomical tracers into different regions in V1 of the same animal and analyzed the topography of resulting extrastriate labeled fields with reference to the patterns of callosal connections and myeloarchitecture revealed in tangential sections of the flattened cortex. Our results extend previous studies and provide further evidence that rabbit extrastriate areas resemble the visual areas in rats and mice not only in their general location with respect to V1 but also in their internal topography. Moreover, extrastriate areas in the rabbit maintain a constant relationship with myeloarchitectonic borders and features of the callosal pattern. These findings highlight the rabbit as an alternative model to rats and mice for advancing our understanding of cortical visual processing in mammals, especially for projects benefiting from a larger brain. PMID:26435850

  3. Tracer simulation study of potential solute movement in Port Royal Sound, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Cummings, T. Ray

    1972-01-01

    A tracer study was conducted in Port Royal Sound to simulate the movement and ultimate pattern of concentration of a solute continuously injected into the flow. A total of 750 pounds of Rhodamine WT dye was injected by boat during a period of 24.8 hours in a line across the Colleton River. During the following 43 days, samples of water were taken at selected points in the sound, and the concentration of dye in the samples was determined by fluorometric analysis. The data obtained in the field study were used with theoretical models to compute the ultimate pattern of concentration of nonconservative and conservative solutes for a hypothetical continuous injection at the site on the Colleton River.

  4. Evaluation of the ERP dispersion model using Darlington tracer-study data. Report No. 90-200-K

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    In this study, site-boundary atmospheric dilution factors calculated by the atmospheric dispersion model used in the ERP (Emergency Response Planning) computer code were compared to data collected during the Darlington tracer study. The purpose of this comparison was to obtain estimates of model uncertainty under a variety of conditions. This report provides background on ERP, the ERP dispersion model and the Darlington tracer study. Model evaluation techniques are discussed briefly, and the results of the comparison of model calculations with the field data are presented and reviewed.

  5. A tracer study of ventilation in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postlethwaite, C. F.; Rohling, E. J.; Jenkins, W. J.; Walker, C. F.

    2005-06-01

    During the Circulation Research in East Asian Marginal Seas (CREAMS) summer cruises in 1999, a suite of samples was collected for tracer analysis. Oxygen isotopes combined with tritium-helium ventilation timescales and noble gas measurements give unique insights into the ventilation of water masses in the Japan/East Sea (JES). In particular, noble gases and oxygen isotopes are indicators of brine rejection, which may assist in explaining the recent changes observed in the ventilation of the JES. Oxygen isotope data presented here indicate that both thermally driven convection and brine rejection have played significant roles in deep-water formation but that brine rejection is unlikely to be a significant contributor at the moment. A 6-box ventilation model of the JES, calibrated with tritium and helium-3 measurements, performed better when a significant decrease of dense-water formation rates in the mid-1960s was incorporated. However, the model calculations suggest that Japan Sea Intermediate Water formation is still occurring. Subduction of sea-ice melt water may be a significant ventilation mechanism for this water mass, based on an argon saturation minimum at the recently ventilated salinity minimum in the northwestern sector of the JES. The salinity and oxygen isotope budgets imply a potential bottom-water formation rate of 3.970.8910 12 m 3 yr -1 due to brine rejection, which could account for a time averaged fraction of between 25% and 35% of the ventilation of subsurface water formation in the JES.

  6. On the characteristics of the wet deposition process using radon as a tracer gas.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Liu H; Daisuke K; Motokiyo M; Hirao S; Moriizumi J; Yamazawa H

    2014-07-01

    A quantitatively characterised atmospheric process can provide important information on a variety of atmospheric models and help one to understand the deposition process in the atmosphere. In this study, the total activity concentrations of 214Pb and 214Bi and the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb in collected rain samples were measured by two-inch well-type NaI(Tl) detectors. Observed precipitations were classified by the origins of their air mass (continental/maritime) and their meteorological conditions (cold/warm front, high/low pressure). The result shows that (1) when the air mass passed over the continent of Asia 5 d prior to the precipitation, the activity concentration of radon decay products in the rainwater tended to be higher than when the air mass passed over from the Pacific Ocean; (2) higher activity concentrations were more frequently observed in precipitations accompanied with a cold front than warm/stationary front; (3) in general, the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb decrease with increase in rain intensity.

  7. On the characteristics of the wet deposition process using radon as a tracer gas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Daisuke, Kondo; Motokiyo, Matsuda; Hirao, Shigekazu; Moriizumi, Jun; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    A quantitatively characterised atmospheric process can provide important information on a variety of atmospheric models and help one to understand the deposition process in the atmosphere. In this study, the total activity concentrations of 214Pb and 214Bi and the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb in collected rain samples were measured by two-inch well-type NaI(Tl) detectors. Observed precipitations were classified by the origins of their air mass (continental/maritime) and their meteorological conditions (cold/warm front, high/low pressure). The result shows that (1) when the air mass passed over the continent of Asia 5 d prior to the precipitation, the activity concentration of radon decay products in the rainwater tended to be higher than when the air mass passed over from the Pacific Ocean; (2) higher activity concentrations were more frequently observed in precipitations accompanied with a cold front than warm/stationary front; (3) in general, the activity ratios of 214Bi/214Pb decrease with increase in rain intensity. PMID:24714112

  8. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.

    1991-10-01

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  9. Accounting for Dispersion and time-dependent Input Signals during Gas Tracer Tests and their Effect on the Estimation of Reaeration, Respiration and Photosynthesis in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Julia; Osenbrck, Karsten; Olaf, Cirpka

    2015-04-01

    The variation of dissolved oxygen (DO) in streams, are caused by a number of processes, of which respiration and primary production are considered to be the most important ones (Odum, 1956; Staehr et al., 2012). Measuring respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams based on recorded time series of DO requires good knowledge on the reaeration fluxes at the given locations. For this, gas tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration coefficients determined from the observed decrease in gas concentration along the stretch (Genereux and Hemond, 1990): ( ) --1- -cup- k2 = t2 - t1 ln Rcdown (1) with the gas concentrations measured at an upstream location, cup[ML-3], and a downstream location, cdown. t1[T] andt2 [T] denote the measurement times at the two locations and R [-] represents the recovery rate which can also be obtained from conservative tracer data. The typical procedure for analysis, however, contains a number of assumptions, as it neglects dispersion and does not take into account possible fluctuations of the input signal. We derive the influence of these aspects mathematically and illustrate them on the basis of field data obtained from a propane gas tracer test. For this, we compare the reaeration coefficients obtained from approaches with dispersion and/or a time-dependent input signals to the standard approach. Travel times and travel time distributions between the different measurement stations are obtained from a simultaneously performed conservative tracer test with fluorescein. In order to show the carry-over effect to metabolic rates, we furthermore estimate respiration and photosynthesis rates from the calculated reaeration coefficients and measured oxygen data. This way, we are able to show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and the impact of the time-dependent input concentration cannot be disregarded either. When estimated reaeration rates are used to calculate respiration and photosynthesis from measured oxygen data, these effects carry over, leading to higher respiration rates for higher reaeration. References: Genereux, D. P., & Hemond, H. F. (1990). Naturally-Occurring Rn-222 as a Tracer for Streamflow Generation - Steady-State Methodology and Field Example. Water Resources Research, 26(12), 3065-3075. doi: Doi 10.1029/Wr026i012p03065 Odum, H. T. (1956). Primary production in flowing waters. Limnol. Oceanogr, 1(2), 102-117. Staehr, P. A., Testa, J. M., Kemp, W. M., Cole, J. J., Sand-Jensen, K., & Smith, S. V. (2012). The metabolism of aquatic ecosystems: history, applications, and future challenges. Aquatic Sciences, 74(1), 15-29. doi: DOI 10.1007/s00027-011-0199-2

  10. The suitability of [11C]-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan as a tracer for serotonin synthesis: studies with dual administration of [11C] and [14C] labeled tracer.

    PubMed

    Shoaf, S E; Carson, R E; Hommer, D; Williams, W A; Higley, J D; Schmall, B; Herscovitch, P; Eckelman, W C; Linnoila, M

    2000-02-01

    The tracer [11C]-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan (alphaMTP) has been used to measure brain serotonin synthesis rates with positron emission tomography (PET). To address questions about the accuracy of the kinetic model, [14C]alphaMTP was used to directly measure conversion to [14C]-alpha-methyl-serotonin (alphaM5HT) in monkeys that had been previously studied with PET and [11C]alphaMTP. Four male, fasted, isoflurane-anesthetized rhesus monkeys were studied with [11C]alphaMTP and PET. Immediately after the initial 3-hour scan, a second dose of [11C]alphaMTP was coinjected with 1 mCi of [14C]alphaMTP, and additional PET data were collected. Approximately 90 minutes after the second alphaMTP administration, the animals were killed with an overdose of phenobarbital, and brain samples from 21 regions were taken and analyzed by HPLC. Minimal conversion of alphaMTP to alphaM5HT occurred; HPLC analysis of 14C radioactivity showed that greater than 96% of the total counts were in fractions corresponding to the alphaMTP peak. Brain concentrations of serotonin, tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and alphaMTP also were determined fluorometrically using external quantification. Patlak plots generated from PET images acquired over 3 hours showed no time period of linear increase, and final slopes were not significantly different from zero, consistent with the finding of minimal conversion to [14C]alphaM5HT. These data indicate that in the 3-hour period after injection, [11C]alphaMTP is acting predominantly as a tracer of tryptophan uptake, not serotonin synthesis. PMID:10698060

  11. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-05-12

    A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective enhancement of diffusion. Tailing in BTCs for sorbing tracers may provide adequate sensitivity for quantifying the fracture-matrix interface area. We discuss requirements for tracer sorption and present considerations for designing a tracer test that would determine fracture-matrix interface area.

  12. Conducting Graduate Tracer Studies for Quality Assurance in East African Universities: A Focus on Graduate Students Voices on Quality Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badiru, Egesah Omar; Wahome, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a guide for graduate trace studies (GTS) to be adopted by universities and other higher education institutions (HEIs) in East Africa. Their essential role notwithstanding, graduate tracer studies present viable opportunities through which quality assurance (QA) can be institutionalized and mainstreamed in…

  13. Trends of radionuclide sorption by estuarine sediments. Experimental studies using 133Ba as a tracer.

    PubMed

    Barros, H; Laissaoui, A; Abril, J M

    2004-02-01

    Sediments play an important (but still poorly understood) role in the dispersion and final fate of radionuclides and other hazardous materials in aquatic systems. Adopting an experimental point of view, the present work deals with the transfer of a radioactive tracer from water to sediments. Sediments and waters were sampled in the Odiel and Tinto estuaries (South-West Spain) with anthropogenic-enhanced 226Ra concentrations. 133Ba was used as a tracer since it is a gamma emitter and a good analogue of the environmental behaviour of 226Ra. Laboratory experiments have been carried out to quantify the uptake kinetics of 133Ba by sediments in aqueous suspensions and by sediment cores under a water column at rest. Depth distributions of 133Ba in sediments have been studied with different contact times and using sediment samples with different grain sizes. The results reveal an important and fast uptake by suspended sediments (up to 40% in 10 min with a 20 g l(-1) suspension) and sediment cores (up to 70% in a few minutes). The kinetics of the uptake by suspended sediments could be reasonably described by a model of two parallel and reversible reactions followed by a weakly-reversible reaction. The total uptake and the rate of reaction decreased with the increment of grain size. Furthermore, uptake following diffusion through the interstitial water was hardly detectable beyond 1 cm depth. For the case with more experimental results, the depth distribution could be reasonably described by the analytical solution based on the use of an effective diffusion coefficient (4.2 x 10(-12) m2 s(-1)) and the measured intrinsic distribution coefficient (kd = 63 +/- 6 l kg(-1)). PMID:14967515

  14. A tracer study of the transport of coastal water from the English Channel through the German Bight to the Kattegat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgaard, H.; Herrmann, J.; Salomon, J. C.

    1995-11-01

    The transport of coastal water from the English Channel along the French, Belgian, Netherlands, German and Danish coasts into the Kattegat has been studied utilizing a conservative radioactive tracer, 99Tc, discharged from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague in northwest France. It is estimated that ~ 10% of the la Hague (English Channel) discharge and ~ 2% of the Sellafield (Irish Sea) discharge is transferred to the Kattegat. The high proportion of La Hague discharges in the Kattegat indicates the effect of long distance coastal water transport on the pollutant balance in interior Danish waters. It is probable that contaminant discharges to the coastal current occurring closer to Denmark than La Hague are transported to the Kattegat in greater proportions than 10%. It is concluded, that the rare radionuclide 99Tc is an extremely valuable tracer for inflow of European coastal water to the Kattegat, as the tracer results add a genuine supplement to existing knowledge based on classical oceanographic data.

  15. Predictive value of tracer studies for /sup 131/I treatment in hyperthyroid cats

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.; Hays, M.T.

    1988-02-01

    In 76 cats with hyperthyroidism, peak thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptakes and effective half-lives were determined after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I. In 6 additional hyperthyroid cats, only peak thyroidal uptakes after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I were determined. Good correlation was found between peak thyroidal uptakes of tracer and therapeutic /sup 131/I; however, only fair correlation was observed between effective half-lives. In 79% of the cats, the effective half-life for therapeutic /sup 131/I was longer than that for tracer /sup 131/I. After administration of therapeutic activity of /sup 131/I, monoexponential and biphasic decay curves were observed in 51 and 16 cats, respectively. Using therapeutic kinetic data, radiation doses to the thyroid gland were calculated retrospectively on the basis of 2 methods for determining the activity of /sup 131/I administered: (1) actual administration of tracer-compensated activity and (2) hypothetic administration of uniform activity (3 mCi). Because of the good predictive ability of tracer kinetic data for the therapeutic kinetic data, the tracer-compensated radiation doses came significantly (P = 0.008) closer to the therapeutic goal than did the uniform-activity doses. In addition, the use of tracer kinetic information reduced the extent of the tendency for consistently high uniform-activity doses. A manual method for acquiring tracer kinetic data was developed and was an acceptable alternative to computerized techniques. Adoption of this method gives individuals and institutions with limited finances the opportunity to characterize the iodine kinetics in cats before proceeding with administration of therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I.

  16. The Fischa-Dagnitz spring, Southern Vienna Basin: a multi tracer time series study re-assessing earlier conceptual assumptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckow, Axel; Gerber, Christoph; Kralik, Martin; Sltenfuss, Jrgen; Purtschert, Roland

    2013-04-01

    The gravel aquifer of the Southern Vienna Basin is a very important backup drinking water resource for the city of Vienna. A discharge location, the Fischa-Dagnitz spring in the Southern Vienna Basin, Austria, was re-investigated in 2011, five years after the gas exchange tracer test published in (Stolp et al., 2010), and sampled for stable isotopes 18O/2H, tritium, 3He, SF6 and 85Kr (Gerber et al., 2012). Additionally, new tritium time series data (Davis et al., 1967), previously not considered in Stolp et al. (2010), were included. These show a higher and earlier tritium peak of >300 TU in 1965 in the discharge of the Fischa-Dagnitz spring as compared to 221 TU in 1972 considered in Stolp et al. (2010). The new 3He, SF6 and 85Kr gas tracer data from 2011 confirm the earlier finding for 3He of Stolp et al. (2010) and indicate a more recent equilibration with the atmosphere than the water bound tracers 18O, 2H and tritium. A new modelling attempt using the Lumpy code (Suckow, 2012) confirmed the discrepancy between the tritium data and the gaseous tracers 3He, SF6 and 85Kr. No steady-state combination of local recharge (represented by an exponential model) and Schwarza river infiltration flowing through the gravel aquifer (represented by a parallel dispersion model) can equally well explain both the tritium time series and the gas tracer results. A revised conceptual model proposes that a pinching of the aquifer at unconformities in the gravel body or a fault zone known in the gravel body forces groundwater along the flow path closer to the surface and exposes it to the atmosphere. This would tend to reset the "dating" clock for the gaseous tracers 3He, SF6 and 85Kr, which can equilibrate quickly with the atmosphere, but not for tritium, which marks the transport behaviour of the water itself. These findings are of importance also for other multi-tracer assessments of groundwater movement in phreatic aquifer systems. References: Davis, G.H., Payne, B.R., Dincer, T., Florkowski, T., Gattinger, T., 1967. Seasonal Variations in the Tritium Content of Groundwaters of the Vienna Basin, Austria, Isotope Hydrology 1967. IAEA, Vienna, Austria, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, pp. 451-473. Gerber, C., Purtschert, R., Kralik, M., Humer, F., Sltenfuss, J., Darling, G.W., Gooddy, D., 2012. Suitability and potential of environmental tracers for base-flow determination in streams: EGU2012-14066, EGU 12. European Geosciences Union, Vienna Stolp, B.J., Solomon, D.K., Suckow, A., Vitvar, T., Rank, D., Aggarwal, P.K., Han, L.-F., 2010. Age dating base flow at springs and gaining streams using helium-3 and tritium: Fischa-Dagnitz system, southern Vienna Basin, Austria. Water Resources Research 46. Suckow, A., 2012. Lumpy - an interactive Lumped Parameter Modeling code based on MS Access and MS Excel., EGU 12. European Geosciences Union, Vienna

  17. AIRBORNE LIDAR MONITORING OF FLUORESCENT DYE PARTICLES AS A TRACER TO CHARACTERIZE TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using airborne lidar to observe the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent dye particle (FDP) tracers in long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion studies has been successfully demonstrated in field experiments conducted in the North East U.S. duri...

  18. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their

  19. The Voices of Their Childhood: Families and Early Years' Practitioners Developing Emancipatory Methodologies through a Tracer Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, Margy; Arnold, Cath; Lawrence, Penny; Peerless, Sally

    2012-01-01

    The Pen Green Tracer Study questions the difference we may or may not have made to children's lives. An initial cohort of young people, now aged between 11-20, revisited their nursery in 2010. Their stories prompted discussion on parental involvement and advocacy within the education system, key worker attachment, and children's sense of self. Our…

  20. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  1. Hydrocarbon precombusting catalyst survey and optimization for perfluorocarbon tracer analysis in subsurface tracer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Cote, E.A.; D'Ottavio, T.W.; Dietz, R.N.

    1989-05-01

    The extension of the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology, as developed for atmospheric dispersion and transport studies to petroleum reservoir characterization studies, required the development of a more robust catalyst to remove analysis interferents caused by the adsorption of 5 liter hydrocarbon reservoir gas samples containing PFT onto carbonaceous adsorbent samplers. Two approaches were studied: (1) replacement of the present internal laboratory PFT analysis system catalyst with a more effective catalyst and, if this was not viable, (2) development of an external preprocessing catalyst train, to significantly reduce the hydrocarbon levels in the sample, without affecting the perfluorocarbon tracers. 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Myelinated nerve fibres and the fate of lanthanum tracer: an in vivo study.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, M L; Shorer, Z; Ghabriel, M N; Allt, G

    1984-01-01

    The permeability of the marginal tight junctional system of myelin was tested in the rat employing the electron-dense tracer lanthanum nitrate. Lanthanum was either included in the fixative used for vascular perfusion (at a concentration of 20 mM) or was microinjected in vivo into the sural or tibial nerve (5, 10 and 20 mM). After 5-60 minutes, the microinjected nerves were fixed either by immersion or vascular perfusion. Lanthanum tracer was present in the intraperiod line gap of myelin, irrespective of the mode of application of the tracer, the method of fixation or the time of exposure to lanthanum. However, the tracer was present more extensively when included in the fixative compared with in vivo microinjection. Internodally, lanthanum was usually restricted to the inner, or more commonly, the outer lamellae of larger fibres, while all lamellae were usually penetrated by tracer in smaller fibres. Paranodally, compact myelin was more extensively penetrated. The periaxonal space (between axon and Schwann cell) was readily accessible to tracer. It is concluded that the marginal tight junctional system of myelin is apparently of the 'leaky' type and is permeable to ions. The findings have implications for the electrophysiology and pathophysiology of the myelinated nerve fibre. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6368509

  3. A comparison of selected organic tracers for quantitative scalar imaging in the gas phase via laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Stephan; Goschütz, Martin; Kaiser, Sebastian A.; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2014-10-01

    This paper compares three of the tracers most commonly used for laser-induced fluorescence in gaseous flows, toluene, naphthalene, and acetone. Additionally, anisole (methoxybenzene, CH3OC6H5) is included in the comparison. Each tracer is employed to image the scalar field in the same nonreacting transient impinging turbulent jet. The jet fluid is seeded with tracer vapor in a bubbler, excitation is at 266 nm, and both air and nitrogen are used as bath gases. Measured signals are compared to theoretical predictions based on fluorescence quantum yield, absorption cross-section, and vapor pressure. We find that anisole shows the highest total signal intensity of all investigated species, while naphthalene features the highest signal per molecule. Acetone has the advantage of being insensitive to quenching by oxygen and that its fluorescence is partly at visible wavelengths. In addition to this volatility-limited scenario at room temperature, we also compare the expected relative signals for elevated temperatures and for a hypothetical case in which the amount of admissible tracer seeding is limited.

  4. Diatoms as a tracer of hydrological connectivity: the Oak Creek case study (Oregon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marta; Martínez-Carreras, Nuria; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The vast heterogeneity and complexity of rainfall-runoff transformation processes expresses itself in a multitude of water sources and flowpaths - ultimately resulting in the well-known intricacy of hydrological connectivity. Pioneering work of Pfister et al. (2009) conducted in the Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg, semi-oceanic climate) demonstrated the potential for diatoms (unicellular, eukaryotic algae) to be used as a tracer of hydrological connectivity. Diatoms originating from terrestrial habitats had been shown to be systematically flushed from the riparian areas into the stream during storm events. Here, we present a study conducted in the Oak Creek(0.17 km2, Oregon, Mediterranean climate), characterised by a large riparian area. Our first working hypothesis (H1) stipulates that diatoms are an ubiquitous tracer of fast hydrological flowpaths. The second hypothesis (H2) states that the riparian area is the major reservoir of terrestrial diatoms that contributes to the flushing process during rainfall events. A winter rainfall-runoff event was monitored in March 2012. Diatom samples were collected from soil, moss, epipelon and streamwater in order to characterise the communities along the hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) continuum. Diatoms in each sample were also assigned to different wetness categories (according to Van Dam et al., 1994). The catchment was instrumented with an ISCO automatic streamwater sampler and the samples were analysed for conductivity, 18O, 2H, chemical elements and presence/abundance of diatoms belonging to different wetness categories. Our results show that the percentage of diatom species originating from habitats located outside of the stream evolves along the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph. This observation confirms the event-related flushing of diatoms from terrestrial habitats to the stream and, consequently, the potential for diatoms to be used for the detection of hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum (H1). Moreover, almost no strictly terrestrial diatoms were found in the stream during the event, indicating the majority of the diatoms (identified as aerophytic) being exported from the riparian area (H2).

  5. A simulation study on superparamagnetic nanoparticle based multi-tracer tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Batra, Akash; Jain, Shray; Ye, Clark; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in biomedical sensing, detection, therapeutics, and diagnostics due to their unique magnetic response under different driving fields. In this letter, we report a multi-tracer tracking method that uses different kinds of MNPs as magnetic tracers along with two alternating magnetic fields that can be potentially used to build magnetic-based flow cytometry. By applying two driving fields at frequency f H and f L to MNPs, the response signal is measured at the combinatorial frequencies such as f H 2 f L (3rd harmonics), f H 4 f L (5th harmonics), f H 6 f L (7th harmonics), and so on. Each MNP has its own signature of phase and amplitude, and it is possible to differentiate individual MNPs in a mixture. We theoretically demonstrated colorizing up to 4-MNP tracers in one mixture with an error rate lower than 10%. The performance of multi-tracer imaging can be optimized by increasing the driving field frequency, choosing MNPs with higher saturation magnetization, and using MNP tracers with more centralized size distribution.

  6. A benthic lander for tracer studies in the sea bed: in situ measurements of sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeff, Oliver; Nhr Glud, Ronnie; Gundersen, Jens; Holby, Ola; Jrgensen, Bo Barker

    1998-11-01

    A new benhic lander for in situ tracer studies to a water depth of 6000 m is presented. This instrument allows in situ injections of radiolabeled sulfate into six enclosed sediment cores to determine sulfate reduction rates to 60 cm sediment depth. In order to correct for possible artifacts caused by decompression and rise in ambient water temperature during ascent and recovery of the instrument, one set of three cores was incubated in situ for 20 h, whereas another set was injected shortly before the ascent. The turnover of sulfate in the latter was subtracted from the first set to calculate the true in situ rates. This approach was tested in the laboratory on sediment cores from a coastal marine sediment. The results of a deployment at 155 m in the Gotland Basin, Baltic Sea, are presented. Sulfate reduction rates were measured to a sediment depth of 40 cm both in situ by the lander and in parallel onboard the ship. Results of in situ and laboratory incubations match well, showing slightly higher rates in the laboratory cores, especially in the deeper sediment strata.

  7. A study of positrons from Soviet nuclear powered satellites as tracers for magnetospheric research

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    Two Soviet satellites carrying nuclear reactors operated in circular 790 km orbits (65{degree} inclination) in 1987 and 1988. Positrons generated in the satellites' surfaces by the intense reactor gamma radiation escaped and were trapped for periods of minutes to hours in the geomagnetic field. These positrons have been observed on many occasions by gamma ray sensors on the SMM satellite (in 500 km orbit) which identify the positrons by the 511 keV gamma rays created when they annihilate in the satellite surface. The SMM detector provides a time resolution of 64 milliseconds. It has recorded positron rise-times of less than 0.5 second (corresponding to about 1 positron gyroradius) on many occasions as it encounters the low-L edge of positrons injected by the Soviet satellites as far as half-way around the earth. We are studying the potential of these sharply defined positron shells as magnetospheric tracers and as a means for examining particle diffusion and loss processes. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The Santa Monica Basin Tracer Experiment - A study of diapycnal and isopycnal mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledwell, James R.; Watson, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    Cross isopycnal (diapycnal) and lateral mixing and stirring below the sill of Santa Monica Basin were studied by releasing two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorodecalin, as close as possible to an isopycnal surface and measuring their subsequent dispersion. The target for the release was a potential temperature surface at about 790 m depth, roughly 100 m above the bottom and 50 m below the sill. Three surveys, performed immediately after, about 7 weeks after, and about 6 months after the release, showed that the time scales for lateral stirring and mixing in the basin were between 2 and 5 months. The diapycnal diffusivity for the whole period was found to be 0.29 + or - 0.06 sq cm/s near the injection surface, where the buoyancy frequency was about 1.1 cph. This estimate may include some mixing in the turbulent boundary layer near the walls of the basin. The best estimate for the diapycnal diffusivity in the basin interior is 0.25 + or - 0.08 sq cm/s.

  9. Dual-tracer scintigraphy and subtraction studies in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sostre, S.; Villagra, D.; Morales, N.E.; Rivera, J.V.

    1988-02-15

    Dual tracer scintigraphy (DTS) (technetium 99m (/sup 99m/Tc) sulfur colloid and gallium 67 citrate (67-gallium citrate)) of the liver and computer subtraction studies (SS) were performed in 26 patients subsequently proven to have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 32 patients with cirrhosis and focal defects on the colloid scan, with no evidence for HCC after a complete evaluation and a 2-year follow-up period. Both DTS and SS had a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 90.6% for HCC. There were three false positive cases (9.4%), two of which were occult abscesses. The predictive value of a positive test was 89% and that of a negative test was 97%. The smallest tumor detected measured 2 cm in diameter and was only visualized with the SS. In the clinical setting, when HCC is suspected (a situation in which tumors are usually larger than 2 cm and the pretest probability of disease is between 20% and 60%) the DTS and SS is an excellent test for the diagnosis or exclusion of HCC. It does not appear to have a role in screening programs.

  10. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S., III; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (318 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg Nha-1yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  11. The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

    1991-01-01

    Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

  12. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  13. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site characterization study; Progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1993-08-01

    This report is in two parts one for the fluorinated benzoic acids and one for the fluorinated aliphatic acids. The assumptions made in the report regarding the amount of tracer that will be used, dilution of the tracer during the test and the length of exposure (if any) to individuals drinking the water were made by the authors. These assumptions must really come from the USGS hydrologists in charge of the c-well tracer testing program. Accurate estimates of dilution of the tracer during the test are also important because of solubility limitations of some of the tracers. Three of the difluorobenzoic acids have relatively low solubilities and may not be usable if the dilution estimates are large. The toxicologist that reviewed the document agreed with our conclusion that the fluorinated benzoic and toluic acids do not represent a health hazard if used under the conditions as outlined in the report. We are currently testing 15 of these compounds, and if even if three difluorobenzoic acids cannot be used because of solubility limitations we will still have 12 tracers. The toxicologist felt that the aliphatic fluorinated acids potentially present more of a health risk than the aromatic. This assessment was based on the fact of a known allergic response to halothane anesthetic. This risk, although minimal, is known and he felt that was enough reason to recommend against their use. The authors feel that the toxicologists interpretation of this risk was overly conservative, however, we will not go against his recommendation at this time for the following reasons. First, without the aliphatic compounds we still have 12 to 15 fluorinated aromatic acids which, should be enough for the c-well tests. Second, to get a permit to use aliphatic compounds would undoubtedly require a hearing which could be quite lengthy.

  14. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  15. Implantation of Miniosmotic Pumps and Delivery of Tract Tracers to Study Brain Reorganization in Pathophysiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H.; Carballo, Jeismar; Longart, Marines; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment in animal models of cerebral disease imposes the problem of repeated injection protocols that may induce stress in animals and result in impermanent tissue levels of the drug. Additionally, drug delivery to the brain is delicate due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), thus significantly reducing intracerebral concentrations of selective drugs after systemic administration. Therefore, a system that allows both constant drug delivery without peak levels and circumvention of the BBB is in order to achieve sufficiently high intracerebral concentrations of drugs that are impermeable to the BBB. In this context, miniosmotic pumps represent an ideal system for constant drug delivery at a fixed known rate that eludes the problem of daily injection stress in animals and that may also be used for direct brain delivery of drugs. Here, we describe a method for miniosmotic pump implantation and post operatory care that should be given to animals in order to successfully apply this technique. We embed the aforementioned experimental paradigm in standard procedures that are used for studying neuroplasticity within the brain of C57BL6 mice. Thus, we exposed animals to 30 min brain infarct and implanted with miniosmotic pumps connected to the skull via a cannula in order to deliver a pro-plasticity drug. Behavioral testing was done during 30 days of treatment. After removal the animals received injections of anterograde tract tracers to analyze neuronal plasticity in the chronic phase of recovery. Results indicated that neuroprotection by the delivered drug was accompanied with increase in motor fibers crossing the midline of the brain at target structures. The results affirm the value of these techniques for drug administration and brain plasticity studies in modern neuroscience. PMID:26863287

  16. Subsurface barrier integrity verification using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.; Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Senum, G.

    1996-12-01

    Subsurface barriers are an extremely promising remediation option to many waste management problems. Gas phase tracers include perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT`s) and chlorofluorocarbon tracers (CFC`s). Both have been applied for leak detection in subsurface systems. The focus of this report is to describe the barrier verification tests conducted using PFT`s and analysis of the data from the tests. PFT verification tests have been performed on a simulated waste pit at the Hanford Geotechnical facility and on an actual waste pit at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The objective of these tests were to demonstrate the proof-of-concept that PFT technology can be used to determine if small breaches form in the barrier and for estimating the effectiveness of the barrier in preventing migration of the gas tracer to the monitoring wells. The subsurface barrier systems created at Hanford and BNL are described. The experimental results and the analysis of the data follow. Based on the findings of this study, conclusions are offered and suggestions for future work are presented.

  17. SEDIMENT REWORKING AND TRANSPORT IN EASTERN LAKE SUPERIOR: IN SITU RARE EARTH ELEMENT TRACER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the prnfundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-...

  18. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrille, C.; Nel, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI) were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  19. Comparison of [11C]cocaine binding at tracer and pharmacological doses of baboon brain: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that cocaine (C) binds to both high and low affinity sites on the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have previously characterized the binding of tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine (C*)to a high affinity site on the DAT. To assess if in vivo C also binds to low affinity sites we used PET to compare binding of tracer doses (17.8{plus_minus}12.2 {mu}g C) of C* to pharmacological doses (8 mg of C coadministered with C*). Sixteen paired studies were done to assess test/retest variability, specific versus non specific binding and to characterize binding profile. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of C* (5-8 mCi) for 50 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the transport constant between plasma and tissue (K1) and to obtain the distribution volume (DV). The ratio of the DV in striatum (ST) to that in cerebellum (CB) (which corresponds to Bmax/Kd-1) was used as model parameter. Peak brain uptake of C* was significantly higher for tracer than for pharmacological doses (0.041 versus 0.033 % dose/cc), as were the values for K1 (1.07{plus_minus}0.21 versus 0.68{plus_minus}0.26 (t=3.0 p<0.01)). Repeated measures were reproducible for tracer ({plus_minus}2%) and pharmacological doses of C* ({plus_minus}4%). Tracer dose C* showed highest binding and slowest clearance in ST which was reduced by C (0.5-2.0 mg/kg iv, -25 to -30%) and by drugs that inhibit DAT (2mg/kg nomifensine - 21%, 0.5 mg/kg methylphenidate -12%) and was increased by serotonin transporter inhibitors (5HT-Ti) (2 mg/kg citalopram +11%, 0.5 mg/kg fluoxetine +6%) and not changed by NE transporter inhibitors (0.5 mg/kg desipramine or 2 mg/kg tomoxetine). The increase with (5HT-Ti) may reflect neurotransmitter interactions or changes in bioavailability. At pharmacological doses C* showed homogeneous distribution and was not changed by C nor by any of the above drugs.

  20. A 15N Tracer Study of Nitrate Retention in a Third-Order Stream Flowing Through Different Land Use Conditions, Willamette Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Johnson, S. L.; Ashkenas, L. R.; Gregory, S. V.; Irvin, C.

    2005-05-01

    We conducted 15NO3- tracer studies in three reaches of Oak Creek, a third-order stream in the Willamette Valley, Oregon, in summer 2003 as part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment II (LINX II). Nitrate-nitrogen uptake length was longest (960 m) in a forested reach (discharge = 7.5 L s-1), and declined to 670 m in an agricultural reach (5.5 L s-1) and 570 m in an urban reach (3.9 L s-1), corresponding to differences in discharge among reaches. When uptake rates were corrected for stream velocity and depth, nitrate-nitrogen uptake velocity declined from the forest (0.22 mm min-1) to the agricultural (0.19 mm min-1) and urban (0.13 mm min-1) reaches. Denitrification, determined through 15N2 and 15N2O gas production following tracer additions, was not detectable in the forest but accounted for 2 and 5% of nitrate-nitrogen uptake in agricultural and urban reaches, respectively. Other sinks for retained nitrate-nitrogen varied among the reaches. In the forest, allochthonous organic matter had the highest biomass-specific uptake. In the agricultural and urban reaches, autotrophic components played increasingly important roles in nitrate retention. Collectively, these results indicate significant shifts in retention pathways of nitrate-nitrogen in response to adjacent land use practices along this stream.

  1. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Johnston, H.S.

    1992-02-01

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of K{sub zz} and K{sub yy} through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of K{sub yy} than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970.

  2. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J. ); Johnston, H.S. )

    1992-02-01

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of K[sub zz] and K[sub yy] through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of K[sub yy] than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970.

  3. Utilizing Mass Measurements in Tracer Studies A Systematic Approach to Efficient Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishnan, Janak D.

    2008-01-01

    Tracer enrichment data are fitted by multicompartmental models to estimate rate constants and fluxes or transport rates. In apolipoprotein turnover studies, mass measurements are also available, e.g., apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels in VLDL, IDL and LDL, and are often essential to calculate some of the rate constants. The usual method to use mass measurements is to estimate pool masses along with rate constants. A systematic alternative approach is developed to use flux balances around pools to express some rate constants in terms of the other rate constants and the measured masses. The resulting reduction in the number of parameters to be estimated makes the modeling more efficient. In models that would be unidentifiable without mass measurements, the usual approach and the proposed approach yield identical results. In a simple two-pool model, the number of unknown parameters is reduced from four to two. In a published 5-pool model for apoB kinetics with three mass measurements, the number of parameters is reduced from 12 to 9. With m mass measurements, the number of responses to be fitted and the number of parameters to be estimated are each reduced by m, a simplification by 1/4 to 1/3 in a typical pool model. Besides a proportionate reduction in computational effort, there is a further benefit since the dimensionality of the problem is also decreased significantly, which means ease of convergence and a smaller likelihood of suboptimal solutions. While our approach is conceptually straightforward, the dependencies get considerably more complex with increasing model size. To generate dependency definitions automatically, a web-accessible program is available at http://biomath.info/poolfit/constraints. PMID:18640385

  4. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  5. 40K-40Ca systematics as a Tracer of Silicate Weathering: A Himalayan case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Jesse; Caro, Guillaume; France-Lanord, Christian

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the use of the 40K-40Ca system as a tracer to better quantify the contributions of silicate and carbonate lithologies in the dissolved load of major Himalayan rivers. Previous work using Sr isotopes as a proxy for silicate weathering has been complicated by the redistribution of radiogenic 87Sr between silicate and carbonate lithologies, particularly in the Lesser Himalaya, where dolomites exhibit 87Sr/86Sr ratios as high as 0.85. The 40Ca signature of carbonates, on the other hand, appears to be remarkably resistant to metamorphism and dolomitization [1]. It was therefore anticipated that the 40K-40Ca system could circumvent issues associated with such secondary events, and yield more robust constraints on the relative contribution of silicate vs. carbonate lithologies in dissolved river loads. The main difficulty in applying the 40K-40Ca decay scheme as a tracer lies in the analytical precision required to measure small variations (~1 ?-unit) on the large 40Ca isotope (96.9%). This difficulty can now be overcome using the Finnigan Triton TIMS, which allows measurements of the 40Ca/44Ca ratio with external precision of 0.35 ?-unit in multidynamic mode. Using this method, we generated high-precision 40Ca data on carbonates/dolomites, bedload sediments, dissolved load, and clay samples originating from and representing the main litho-tectonic units of the Himalaya. Our results show that metamorphosed dolomites from the Lesser Himalaya (LH) exhibit no radiogenic 40Ca excess despite highly variable 87Sr/86Sr signatures (0.73-0.85). Thus, all Himalayan carbonates appear to be characterized by a homogeneous ?40Ca=0. In contrast, silicate material is radiogenic, with ?40Ca averaging +1 in the Tethyan Sedimentary Series (TSS), +1.6 in the High Himalaya crystalline (HHC) and +4 ?-units in the LH. Results obtained from a series of 35 Himalayan rivers (including the Brahmaputra, Ganga and its main tributaries) show that ?40Ca in the dissolved load is significantly influenced by silicate weathering, with ?40Ca ranging from +0.1 in rivers draining carbonate dominated catchments to +1.6 ?-units in rivers draining predominantly gneissic catchments of the High Himalaya. No simple relation exists between 87Sr and 40Ca systematics, which likely reflects the decoupling of Rb-Sr and K-Ca systems in LH dolomites. In contrast, 40Ca signatures correlate well with proxies of carbonate weathering such as Ca/Na or Mg/Na ratios. Overall, our results indicate that the 40Ca signature of Himalayan rivers primarily reflects the lithological nature of their erosional source, and highlight the significant contribution of HHC gneisses to the dissolved calcium budget of the Ganga and Brahmaputra. [1] Caro et al. (2010) EPSL 296, 124-132

  6. Collisional decoherence of a tracer particle moving in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kamleitner, Ingo

    2010-11-15

    We study decoherence of the external degree of freedom of a tracer particle moving in a one-dimensional dilute Boltzmann gas. We find that phase averaging is the dominant decoherence effect, rather than information exchange between tracer and gas particles. While a coherent superposition of two wave packets with different mean positions quickly turns into a mixed state, it is demonstrated that such superpositions of different momenta are robust to phase averaging, until the two wave packets acquire a different position due to the different velocity of each wave packet.

  7. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in FracturedReservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-02

    The transport of chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is strongly affected by the fracture-matrix interfacial area. In a vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir, this area can be estimated by inert gas tracer tests, where gas diffusion between the fracture and matrix causes the tracer breakthrough curve (BTC) to have a long tail determined by the interfacial area. For water-saturated conditions, recent studies suggest that sorbing solute tracers can also generate strong tails in BTCs that may allow a determination of the fracture-matrix interfacial area. To theoretically explore such a useful phenomenon, this paper develops an analytical solution for BTCs in slug-tracer tests in a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows that increased sorption should have the same effect on BTCs as an increase of the diffusion coefficient. The solution is useful for understanding transport mechanisms, verifying numerical codes, and for identifying appropriate chemicals as tracers for the characterization of fractured reservoirs.

  8. Tracer and hydrometric study of preferential flow in large undisturbed soil cores from the Georgia Piedmont, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntosh, Janice; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Peters, Norman E.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the temporal patterns of tracer throughput in the outflow of large (30 cm diameter by 38 cm long) undisturbed cores from the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. Tracer breakthrough was affected by soil structure and rainfall intensity. Two rainfall intensities (20 and 40 mm hr-1) for separate Cl- and Br- amended solutions were applied to two cores (one extracted from a hillslope soil and one extracted from a residual clay soil on the ridge). For both low and high rainfall intensity experiments, preferential flow occurred in the clay core, but not in the hillslope core. The preferential flow is attributed to well-developed interpedal macrochannels that are commonly found in structured clay soils, characteristic of the ridge site. However, each rainfall intensity exceeded the matrix infiltration capacity at the top of the hillslope core, but did not exceed the matrix infiltration capacity at the middle and bottom of the hillslope core and at all levels in the clay core. Localized zones of saturation created when rainfall intensity exceeds the matrix infiltration capacity may cause water and tracer to overflow from the matrix into macrochannels, where preferential flow occurs to depth in otherwise unsaturated soil. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Compartmental Modeling and Dosimetry of in Vivo Metabolic Studies of Leucine and Three Secretory Proteins in Humans Using Radioactive Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Vaidehi

    1995-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models provide a systematic means of looking at biological systems. Radioactive tracer kinetic studies open a unique window to study complex tracee systems such as protein metabolism in humans. This research deals with compartmental modeling of tracer kinetic data on leucine and apolipoprotein metabolism obtained using an endogenous tritiated leucine tracer administered as a bolus, and application of compartmental modeling techniques for dosimetric evaluation of metabolic studies of radioiodinated apolipoproteins. Dr. Waldo R. Fisher, Department of Medicine, was the coordinating research supervisor and the work was carried out in his laboratory. A compartmental model for leucine kinetics in humans has been developed that emphasizes its recycling pathways which were examined over two weeks. This model builds on a previously published model of Cobelli et al, that analyzed leucine kinetic data up to only eight hours. The proposed model includes different routes for re-entry of leucine from protein breakdown into plasma accounting for proteins which turn over at different rates. This new model successfully incorporates published models of three secretory proteins: albumin, apoA-I, and VLDL apoB, in toto thus increasing its validity and utility. The published model of apoA-I, based on an exogenous radioiodinated tracer, was examined with data obtained using an endogenous leucine tracer using compartmental techniques. The analysis concludes that the major portion of apoA-I enters plasma by a fast pathway but the major fraction of apoA-I in plasma resides with a second slow pathway; further the study is suggestive of a precursor-product relationship between the two plasma apoA-I pools. The possible relevance of the latter suggestion to the aberrant kinetics of apoA-I in Tangier disease is discussed. The analysis of apoA-II data resulted in similar conclusions. A methodology for evaluating the dosimetry of radioiodinated apolipoproteins by combining kinetic models of iodine and apolipoprotein metabolism has been developed. Residence times for source organs, whole body, thyroid, bladder, and red bone marrow obtained with this analysis, were used to calculate the cumulated activities and thus doses arising from these organs. The influence of the duration of the thyroid blocking period using stable iodine on the dose to the thyroid has been demonstrated.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging study of extracellular fluid tracer movement in brains of immature rats with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Shoesmith, C L; Buist, R; Del Bigio, M R

    2000-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is associated with brain compression and accumulation of neurotransmitter waste products in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. We postulated that the extracellular compartment is compressed and specifically hypothesized that extracellular fluid tracer movement through brain would differ between control and hydrocephalic rats. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was injected into the cerebral cortex of 4-week-old rats, 7-11 days after induction of hydrocephalus by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. The movement of this soluble paramagnetic compound was followed over successive timed intervals from 20 min to 180 min with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Non-hydrocephalic controls exhibited greater spread of the tracer and greater change in T1-weighted signal intensity in the ipsilateral cortex than hydrocephalic animals. Hydrocephalic animals exhibited preferential accumulation of tracer in edematous white matter. Gd-DTPA penetrated the lateral ventricles within 30 min in both control and hydrocephalic rats. The results suggest that there is a relative impairment of extracellular fluid movement through the cerebral cortex of young hydrocephalic rats. PMID:10672588

  11. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a refrigerant introduced in the 1940's, with atmospheric mixing ratios increasing through the 1990s to the present value of ≈230 pptv. HFC-134a is typically is used as a chlorine-free replacement for CFC-12, finding use in air-condition systems and as an inert aerosol blowing agent, with a mixing ratio that has increased from <1 in 1994 to ≈75 pptv at present (2013). Their unique atmospheric histories and chemistry compared to CFCs makes these compounds interesting age tracer candidates, particularly in situations where multiple tracers enhance interpretive value. For instance, inclusion in lumped parameter mixing models and in situations where SF6 or the CFCs are present in elevated concentrations from non-atmospheric sources such that they cannot be used for dating purposes. Analysis of standards, air equilibrated water, and blanks suggests the GC-AED system is capable of detecting concentrations ≈200 fM (HCFC-22) and ≈100 fM (HFC-134a), corresponding to piston flow ages of 54 and 18 yr, respectively, with a typical uncertainty of ≈1 yr. Preliminary comparisons with CFC and SF6 analyses show general agreement between the techniques (within a few years), and ongoing intercomparison studies will be discussed.

  12. Radioactive tracers and the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Buchanan, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The most widely used tracer for the study of the heart muscle is thallium-201. The principal advantage of radioactive tracers in the study of the heart is that they tell us about regional as well as an overall function. In some cases a regional abnormality may be detected before the overall function of the heart is impaired.

  13. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and 2HH2O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Goode, Daniel J.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Lancombe, Pierre J.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in 2H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the δ13C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the δ2H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H2 gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE + VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average 13C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the BA was intensive only in wells where an amendment was distributed during injection, it is necessary to adequately distribute the amendments throughout the fractured rock to achieve substantial bioremediation. The slowdown in BA effect after a year is due to some extend to the decrease abundant of appropriate microbes, but more likely the decreased concentration of electron donor.

  14. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and HH?O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    Rvsz, Kinga M; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D; Tiedeman, Claire R; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Goode, Daniel J; Shapiro, Allen M; Voytek, Mary A; Lacombe, Pierre J; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the ?C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the ?H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H? gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE+VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the BA was intensive only in wells where an amendment was distributed during injection, it is necessary to adequately distribute the amendments throughout the fractured rock to achieve substantial bioremediation. The slowdown in BA effect after a year is due to some extend to the decrease abundant of appropriate microbes, but more likely the decreased concentration of electron donor. PMID:24270158

  15. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and 2HH2O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rvsz, Kinga M.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Goode, Daniel J.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in 2H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the ?13C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the ?2H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H2 gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE + VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average 13C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the BA was intensive only in wells where an amendment was distributed during injection, it is necessary to adequately distribute the amendments throughout the fractured rock to achieve substantial bioremediation. The slowdown in BA effect after a year is due to some extend to the decrease abundant of appropriate microbes, but more likely the decreased concentration of electron donor.

  16. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J. G.; Garrison, V. H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers - Sr, Nd and Pb - to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6N, 8.0W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3N, 60.5W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7N, 64.6W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and atmospheric transport.

  17. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and atmospheric transport.

  18. Preliminary Results from a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of vigorous hydrothermal circulation. A mixture of tracers was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327, as part of a 24-hour pumping experiment. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from this hole and three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. The array of holes is located on 3.5 M.y. old seafloor, and oriented N20E, subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge, 100 km to the west. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was injected at a concentration of 0.0192 mol/min, with fluid pumping rate of 6.7 L/s for 20.2 h, resulting in a mean concentration of 47.6 ?M and 23.3 mol of SF6 being added to crustal fluids. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps attached to the wellheads of several long-term, subseafloor observatories (CORKs). These samples were recovered from the seafloor using a remotely-operated vehicle in 2011 and 2013. Analyses of SF6 concentrations in samples recovered in 2011 indicate the first arrival of SF6 in Hole 1301A, 550 m south of the injection Hole 1362B, ~265 days after injection. This suggests that the most rapid lateral transport of gas (at the leading edge of the plume) occurred at ~2 m/day. Samples recovered in 2013 should provide a more complete breakthrough curve, allowing assessment of the mean lateral transport rate. Additional insights will come from analysis of metal salts and particle tracers injected contemporaneously with the SF6, the cross-hole pressure response to injection and a two-year fluid discharge experiment. Additional wellhead samples will be collected in Summer 2014, as will downhole osmosamplers deployed in perforated casing within the upper ocean crust in Holes 1362A and 1362B.

  19. Multiple tracer study in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan: 2. Depletion of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) estimated using 3H/3He index and lumped parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwaya, Koki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi; Mizuno, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The conservativeness of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12, CFC-11, and CFC-113) in an environment rich in organic carbon was evaluated using multiple tracer analyses and lumped parameter models (LPMs). Wells on a coastal plain in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan, were studied. The CFC concentrations in groundwater from 22 wells were measured, converted into atmospheric mixing ratios (CARs), and compared with estimated ratios (EARs) obtained from 3H/3He values and LPMs. The degree of CFC depletion was expressed as the percentage of the CAR relative to the EAR, and was less than 43% for CFC-12 and 28% for CFC-11 (but one well had unusual values). CFC-113 was depleted more than the other CFCs, and could not be detected in most wells. The CFC depletion mechanisms were different in each of the three well groups. Groundwater of northern Shimonuma wells (NSW) was oxic and oxidative, so CFC depletion in the NSW could be attributed to sorption by organic carbon in the lignite and peat in the aquifers. Groundwater of southern Shimonuma wells (SSW) was anoxic and reductive. The northerly SSW are supplied from the aquifer that supplies the most of the NSW, so CFC depletion in the SSW was caused by degradation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, in addition to sorption by lignite in the northerly SSW. Gas stripping, contamination from a local source, and methane interfering with the CFC analysis were found in groundwater of Hamasato wells (HW). One well of HW was not affected by these problems, but the CFCs were depleted by microbial degradation. Assuming that the CFC depletion mechanisms follow first-order reaction kinetics, reaction rate constants of 2.7 y-1 for CFC-12 and 2.8 y-1 for CFC-11 were estimated. Microbial degradation, sorption, gas stripping of CFCs, and methane formation processes are enhanced in environments rich in organic carbon. Special attention is required when CFCs are used as transient tracers in such environments. The combination of multiple tracer analysis and LPMs allowed the degree of CFC depletion to be effectively quantified and the applicability of CFCs in groundwater flow systems to be evaluated.

  20. The Numerical Simulation of a Tracer-Release Field Project to Study Motion within the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, D. W.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Buckley, R.; Parker, M.; Kurzeja, R.; Duarte, H. F.; Zhang, G.; Durden, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the University of Georgia (UGA), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) conducted a regional tracer experiment to study the nocturnal behavior of CO2 in the vicinity of an instrumented tall tower during two nights on May 11th and 12th, 2009. The experiment consisted of a release of five perfluorocarbon tracer (PFTs) compounds in twelve unique locations in Aiken County, South Carolina. Intensive meteorological measurements including in-situ turbulence were made in conjunction with the release and sampling of the PFTs. A 300m tower was also used to collect data from higher levels, allowing us to determine the extent to which the tracer was mixed vertically. Lagrangian plume simulations performed during the experiment demonstrated transport over distances of >8 km, and correlated well with in situ sampling. The area was characterized by heavy vegetation cover, and carbon dioxide concentrations were also monitored in an effort to determine how respiration and advection affect CO2 levels in the stable layer. Tracer release locations were carefully selected via a fine-scale mesoscale modeling study of similar nights. The purpose of these experiments was to provide data that will be used to increase the understanding of the terrestrial carbon budget, especially with respect to nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) phenomena such as low level jets and breaking gravity waves. Using these data, a simulation of the motion of the tracer within the boundary layer was developed using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model coupled to a tracer model. The RAMS model was also coupled to the Simple Biosphere (SiB) vegetation model, which allowed for the simulation of the release of carbon dioxide into the NBL. The simulation results are used to validate the NBL hypothesis of CO2 monitoring, by which the release of CO2 can be correlated with the accumulation of CO2 in the boundary layer beneath a stable lid, which impedes vertical mixing. This is done with both the tracer, in which the release rate is known and no advection occurs, and for CO2, in which the release rate is not known and for which advection of CO2 must be accounted. The high resolution of the simulation allows us to resolve the small-scale motions within the NBL, which are important to nocturnal transport. Flux data from the tall tower were studied to learn more about the eddy transport, and also to detect the occurrence of transport events in which the CO2 and H2O values experience a sudden increase. A wavelet analysis is also applied, and reveals the existence of eddy activity dominated by eddies of diameter 90-240m.

  1. Effects of resolution and model physics on tracer transports in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rind, D.; Lerner, J.; Jonas, J.; McLinden, C.

    2007-05-01

    We explore the dependency of general circulation model tracer transports on model physics and horizontal and vertical resolution. We use NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E at 4 5 with 20 and 23 layers and the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 at 4 5 with 23 and 53 layers and at 2 2.5 with 53 and 102 layers. The online tracers employed are CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11, SF6, 222Rn, bomb 14C, and O3. Model experiments are done two ways: with specified stratospheric ozone or with the stratospheric ozone tracer used for atmospheric radiation calculations. The results show that when model physics produces greater precipitation over land in the Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon region, as occurs in Model 3, the associated dynamics (stronger Hadley cell) and subgrid-scale transports lead to faster and more realistic interhemispheric transport. Increased vertical resolution results in some increase in vertical mixing between the boundary layer and upper troposphere, due to both convective and synoptic-scale influences. A better resolved boundary layer does not result in higher surface concentrations, as the influence of various processes (convection, turbulence, rainfall) contribute in different ways. Transport into, within, and out of the stratosphere is faster (less realistic) with the coarser resolution models as wave forcing generates a stronger residual circulation. It is also faster in Model E as a result of its larger parameterized orographic gravity wave drag; the latter also results in a more "leaky" stratospheric tropical pipe. Horizontal resolution in this range by itself has minimal impact on most transports (although for active chemical tracers, photochemistry has been shown to be resolution-dependent). In contrast, finer vertical resolution leads to faster interhemispheric transport, slower mixing into and out of the stratosphere, and greater age of stratospheric air. When both resolutions are increased, the largest changes are seen. The interactive stratospheric ozone tracer, without an ozone hole parameterization, produced (as expected) greater ozone values than observations in the lower stratosphere. The associated temperature warming of a few degrees Celsius increased atmospheric stability and altered the tropospheric wave forcing of the Brewer Dobson circulation such that the stratospheric age of air increased by some 30%. This large sensitivity has implications for past and future stratospheric circulations and for the ability of climate perturbations to affect the stratosphere.

  2. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  3. Radioisotope tracer studies in the NASA Skylab ethothermic brazing experiment M-552

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.; Adair, H. L.; Kobisk, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first use of radioisotope tracer for mapping flow patterns during brazing of metal components in a space environment (near-zero gravity) proved successful. A nickel ferrule was brazed to a nickel tube with Lithobraze BT (71.8% Ag, 28% Cu, 0.2% Li) which contained a trace amount of radioactive Ag-110. Mapping of the flow of the braze alloy in the annulus formed between the tube and the concentric ferrule was determined by counting the radiation intensity as a function of position in the braze joint. Significant information concerning the thermal history of the braze was determined.

  4. A tracer method to study unidirectional fluxes of lithium. Application to frog skin.

    PubMed

    Thellier, M; Hartmann, A; Lassalles, J P; Garrec, J P

    1980-05-23

    We describe a new tracer method to measure unidirectional fluxes of Li+ despite the lack of any utilizable radioisotope of lithium. This method uses the purified stable isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, detected with an ion-probe microanalyser. The accuracy is comparable to that obtained for other ions (e.g., Na+) with radiotracers. The method has been applied to frog skin with both faces bathed in a 20% lithium/80% sodium medium. Sodium and lithium unidirectional fluxes have been measured simultaneously. The results are consistent with lithium being actively pumped, the outflux of lithium being, however, much larger than that of sodium. PMID:6966512

  5. Diffusion of oxygen tracer into deuterium-gas-baked IrO{sub x}/Pb(Zr,TiO{sub 3})Pt capacitors and Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}Pt films

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.S.; Kurihara, K.; Haneda, H.

    2005-11-01

    Deuterium gas (D{sub 2}) ambient heat treatment of ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) thin-film capacitors with a top electrode of iridium oxide and a bottom electrode of platinum showed significant polarization loss when baked at 200 deg. C at a pressure of 5 Torr. The D{sub 2} gas treatment of the capacitors partially reduced the iridium oxide (IrO{sub x}, where x is 1tracer ({sup 18}O{sub 2}) gases which recovered the ferroelectric properties and the D concentration in the PZT decreased to the detection level of 10{sup 17} at./cm{sup 3}. The oxygen tracer concentration was highest in the IrO{sub x} film and much lower in the PZT. Comparison of the oxygen tracer SIMS profiles of the PZT annealed in tracer oxygen or preannealed in oxygen followed by oxygen tracer annealing showed little difference in the calculated PZT oxygen tracer diffusion coefficient of 5x10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/s. If the PZT was reduced by the D{sub 2} gas, an increase in the oxygen diffusion coefficient would be expected as has been proposed in the literature, but this was not observed experimentally. These results indicate that the loss of polarization in the PZT capacitor is primarily due to the inhibition of ferroelectric domain switching by possible formation of [OD{sup -}].

  6. DENSE GAS TRACERS IN PERSEUS: RELATING THE N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, AND DUST CONTINUUM PROPERTIES OF PRE- AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen; Rosolowsky, Erik; Tafalla, Mario

    2010-03-10

    We investigate 35 prestellar cores and 36 protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud. We find a very tight correlation between the physical parameters describing the N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} gas. Both the velocity centroids and the line widths of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} correlate much better than either species correlates with CO, as expected if the nitrogen-bearing species are probing primarily the dense core gas where the CO has been depleted. We also find a tight correlation in the inferred abundance ratio between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and para-NH{sub 3} across all cores, with N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}) = 22 +- 10. We find a mild correlation between NH{sub 3} (and N{sub 2}H{sup +}) column density and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum derived H{sub 2} column density for prestellar cores, N(p-NH{sub 3})/N(H{sub 2}) {approx}10{sup -8}, but do not find a fixed ratio for protostellar cores. The observations suggest that in the Perseus molecular cloud the formation and destruction mechanisms for the two nitrogen-bearing species are similar, regardless of the physical conditions in the dense core gas. While the equivalence of N{sub 2}H{sup +} and NH{sub 3} as powerful tracers of dense gas is validated, the lack of correspondence between these species and the (sub)millimeter dust continuum observations for protostellar cores is disconcerting and presently unexplained.

  7. Warm gas TVC design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, S. B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A warm gas thrust vector control system was studied to optimize the injection geometry for a specific engine configuration, and an injection valve was designed capable of meeting the base line requirements. To optimize injection geometry, studies were made to determine the performance effects of varying injection location, angle, port size, and port configuration. Having minimized the injection flow rate required, a warm gas valve was designed to handle the required flow. A direct drive hydraulic servovalve capable of operating with highly contaminated hydraulic fluid was designed. The valve is sized to flow 15 gpm at 3000 psia and the direct drive feature is capable of applying a spool force of 200 pounds. The baseline requirements are the development of 6 deg of thrust vector control utilizing 2000 F (total temperature) gas for 180 seconds on a 1.37 million pound thrust engine burning LOX and RP-1 at a chamber pressure of 250 psia with a 155 inch long conical nozzle having a 68 inch diameter throat and a 153 inch diameter exit.

  8. Study of sediment movement in an irrigated maize-cotton system combining rainfall simulations, sediment tracers and soil erosion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Laguna, Ana; Cañasveras, Juan Carlos; Boulal, Hakim; Barrón, Vidal; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Although soil erosion is one of the main threats to agriculture sustainability in many areas of the world, its processes are difficult to measure and still need a better characterization. The use of iron oxides as sediment tracers, combined with erosion and mixing models opens up a pathway for improving the knowledge of the erosion and redistribution of soil, determining sediment sources and sinks. In this study, magnetite and a multivariate mixing model were used in rainfall simulations at the micro-plot scale to determine the source of the sediment at different stages of a furrow-ridge system both with (+T) and without (-T) wheel tracks. At a plot scale, magnetite, hematite and goethite combined with two soil erosion models based on the kinematic wave approach were used in a sprinkler irrigation test to study trends in sediment transport and tracer dynamics along furrow lengths under a wide range of scenarios. In the absence of any stubble cover, sediment contribution from the ridges was larger than the furrow bed one, almost 90%, while an opposite trend was observed with stubble, with a smaller contribution from the ridge (32%) than that of the bed, at the micro-plot trials. Furthermore, at a plot scale, the tracer concentration analysis showed an exponentially decreasing trend with the downstream distance both for sediment detachment along furrows and soil source contribution from tagged segments. The parameters of the distributed model KINEROS2 have been estimated using the PEST Model to obtain a more accurate evaluation. Afterwards, this model was used to simulate a broad range of common scenarios of topography and rainfall from commercial farms in southern Spain. Higher slopes had a significant influence on sediment yields while long furrow distances allowed a more efficient water use. For the control of runoff, and therefore soil loss, an equilibrium between irrigation design (intensity, duration, water pattern) and hydric needs of the crops should be defined in order to establish a sustainable management strategy.

  9. Groundwater age structure and palaeo hydrogeology over a 500 kyr time scale revealed from Krypton 81and a multiple tracer study: Great Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, A. J.; Purtschert, R.; Jiang, W.; Lu, Z.; Tosaki, Y.; Fulton, S.; Wohling, D.; Shand, P.; Broder, L.; Aeschbach, W.; Rousseau=Gueutin, P.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the most comprehensive set of krypton -81 data to be analysed so far. Our study site is on the western margin of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). The study area is focused on the western margin of the GAB between the Finke River system in the Northern Territory and the iconic Dalhousie springs in South Australia. This represents the direction of groundwater flow from recharge to discharge through the Dalhousie spring complex. Because of its vast size and the potential for large regional flow systems to occur, the GAB has been considered an ideal basin to test emerging groundwater dating techniques such as Cl-36 and He-4. However both of these techniques are subjected to large degrees of uncertainty, as they require a detailed understanding of different sources and sinks of these two isotopes. Contrasting this Kr-81 is considered to be an ideal tracer as it contains only one source, the atmosphere with no or at most minimal sub surface production. For the first time we have provided a comprehensive suite of analyse not only of Cl-36, He-4, C-14, Ar-39, stable isotopes of the water molecule and noble gases but also, Kr-85 and Kr-81. Our results indicate a spectrum of 'groundwater ages' ranging from modern as indicated by thermonuclear C-14 and Ar-39 up to hundreds of thousands of years as indicated by Kr-81, Cl-36 and He-4. The data set indicates a wide range of stable isotopes of the water molecule as well as variability in noble gas recharge temperatures that suggest that not only has this region been subjected to changes in climate in the recharge zone but also testaments to a changes in the dominate direction of rainfall indicated by a change in recharge mechanism at the beginning of the Holocene. As suggested previously this groundwater flow transect may represent an ideal 'type section' for testing new and emerging environmental tracers in hydrogeology.

  10. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  11. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. ); Harris, B.R. Jr. ); DeRose, W.E. ); Ottaviani, W.L. )

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  12. Sediment reworking and transport in eastern lake superior: In-situ rare-earth element tracer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Krezoski, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Considerable attention has been focused on understanding modes and rates of post-depositional sediment reworking in the Great Lakes with the result that virtually all theoretical models describing particle dynamics or reconstructing the history of pollutant input in the lakes include surficial sediment reworking terms. A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the profundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-capture cross-section REE, was added at a concentration 30,000 greater than found naturally in the lake sediments. After 23 days the study site was reoccupied and eleven submersible-taken punch cores were collected from within and around the labeled area. Verticle core sections were then examined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. These results demonstrate the utility of in-situ tracer studies at profundal depths and suggest that longer-term studies will permit accurate measurement of post-depositional redistribution processes at the sediment-water interface of freshwater and marine environments.

  13. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  14. The potential of silica encapsulated DNA magnetite microparticles (SiDNAMag) for multi-tracer studies in subsurface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willem Foppen, Jan; Bogaard, Thom; van Osnabrugge, Bart; Puddu, Michela; Grass, Robert

    2015-04-01

    With tracer experiments, knowledge on solute transport, travel times, flow pathways, source areas, and linkages between infiltration and exfiltration zones in subsurface hydrological studies can be obtained. To overcome the well-known limitations of artificial tracers, we report here the development and application of an inexpensive method to produce large quantities of environmentally friendly 150-200 nm microparticles composed of a magnetite core to which small fragments of synthetic 80 nt ssDNA were adsorbed, which were then covered by a layer of inert silica (acronym: SiDNAMag). The main advantages of using DNA are the theoretically unlimited amount of different DNA tracers and the low DNA detection limit using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR); the main advantage of the silica layer is to prevent DNA decay, while the magnetite core facilitates magnetic separation, recovery and up-concentration. In 10 cm columns of saturated quartz sand, we first injected NaCl, a conservative salt tracer, and measured the breakthrough. Then, we injected SiDNAMag suspended in water of known composition, harvested the SiDNAMag in column effluent samples, and measured the DNA concentration via qPCR after dissolving the SiDNAMag. The results indicated that the timing of the rising limb of the DNA breakthrough curve, the plateau phase and the falling limb were identical to the NaCl breakthrough curve. However, the relative maximum DNA concentration reached during the plateau phase was around 0.3, indicating that around 70% of the SiDNAMag mass was retained in the column. From these results we inferred that SiDNAMag was not retarded and therefore not subject to equilibrium sorption. Instead, first order irreversible kinetic attachment appeared to be the dominant retention mechanism. Based on our results, we speculate that, despite significant retention, due to the low DNA detection limit and the possibility of magnetic up-concentration, the use of SiDNAMag is a very promising technique to determine complex flow patterns, travel times, and flow pathways in many different subsurface hydrological applications.

  15. TRACER EMISSIONS INFERRED FROM A BACKWARD LAGRANGIAN STOCHASTIC DISPERSION MODEL: A VALIDATION STUDY.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dispersion model is a useful tool for estimating gas emissions, and compared with other techniques, it has the benefit of experimental simplicity, flexibility in the type and location of the gas concentration measurement, and applicability (in principle) even in disturbed flow conditions. The bac...

  16. Feasibility study of silver iodide smoke as an atmospheric dispersion tracer for Rocky Flats Plant site, July 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.

    1986-09-22

    At Rocky Flats Plant, we developed a technique that employs the release of silver iodide (AgI) smoke as a very economical tracer for air dispersion around the Plant. In an emergency, the AgI smoke would trace a contaminant plume over long distances, in real time, to guide emergency response. To test this technique, we experimented with first releasing AgI smoke particles, then tracking them up to 50 km from the Plant by vehicle and aircraft under various typical weather conditions. Able to detect single AgI particles as small as 0.01 ..mu..m in real time, a portable cloud chamber operated on either a pickup truck or a small aircraft. For both procedures, a simple smoke generator operating unattended produced up to 1 x 10/sup 15/ particles/g of AgI. Ground tracking of the smoke (1) showed the influence on dispersion by the midday shift from downslope to upslope flow during stable conditions and (2) provided an interesting case study of a nearby thunderstorm as a transient effect. Aerial tracking during eight flights covered a wide range of meteorological conditions. Convective flow often lofted the smoke completely off the ground before it left the Plant boundary. During inversion conditions, the tracer remained within 100 m of the ground.

  17. Studies of skeletal tracer kinetics. IV. Optimum time delay for Tc-99m(Sn) methylene disphosphonate bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Makler, P T; Charkes, N D

    1980-07-01

    The kinetics of the skeletal tracer Tc-99m(Sn)methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) were studied in four older patients without significant bony disease by means of compartmental analysis. Solution of the model was obtained by digital computer techniques. Tracer concentrations for "target" and "background" areas (to reflect "bone" and "soft-tissue" regions) as time functions were generated for three different imaging criteria: counting rate, a figure of merit, and contrast. The figure of merit reached a maximum early in the second hour after dose administration, but contrast was found to attain a plateau at 6 hr. Either of these criteria is in accord with recommendations in the literature for optimal imaging delay time with Tc-MDP. Bone biopsy in one patient was in good agreement with the model's prediction. Compartmental analysis provides an objective method for determining the optimal imaging delay time, depending on the criterion chosen. The method can be used for any radiopharmaceutical if the compartmental model is known and can be solved. PMID:7391837

  18. Studies of skeletal tracer kinetics IV. Optimum time delay for Tc-99m(Sn) methylene disphosphonate bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Makler, P.T. Jr.; Charkes, N.D.

    1980-07-01

    The kinetics of the skeletal tracer Tc-99m(Sn)methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) were studied in four older patients without significant bony disease by means of compartmental analysis. Solution of the model was obtained by digital computer techniques. Tracer concentrations for target and background areas (to reflect bone and soft-tissue regions) as time functions were generated for three different imaging criteria: counting rate, a figure of merit, and contrast. The figure of merit reached a maximum early in the second hour after dose administration, but contrast was found to attain a plateau at 6 h. Either of these criteria is in accord with recommendations in the literature for otpimal imaging delay time with Tc-MDP. Bone biopsy in one patient was in good agreement with the model's prediction. Compartmental analysis provides an objective method for determining the optimal imaging delay time, depending on the criterion chosen. The method can be used for any radiopharmaceutical if the compartmental model is known and can be solved.

  19. Oxygen tracer diffusion in single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.; Halloran, John W.; Cooper, Alfred R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients are determined in single-crystal alumina samples with differing dopant levels using the gas-exchange technique. The diffusion direction is parallel to the c-axis and the ambient PO2 is 1 atm (100,000 Pa) for all experiments except a single run with a low PO2, approximately 10 to the -15th atm (10 to the -10th Pa) produced by a CO/CO2 mixture. The diffusion is insensitive to both impurities and ambient PO2. The insensitivities are discussed in terms of point-defect clustering. Prior tracer studies are compared and discussed.

  20. A study of the accuracy of neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been performed to determine the accuracy of neutrally buoyant and near neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air. Theoretical, computational, and experimental results are presented to evaluate the dynamics of bubble trajectories and factors affecting their ability to trace flow-field streamlines. The equation of motion for a single bubble was obtained and evaluated using a computational scheme to determine the factors which affect a bubble's trajectory. A two-dimensional experiment was also conducted to experimentally determine bubble trajectories in the stagnation region of NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 deg angle of attack using a commercially available helium bubble generation system. Physical properties of the experimental bubble trajectories were estimated using the computational scheme. These properties included the density ratio and diameter of the individual bubbles. the helium bubble system was then used to visualize and document the flow field about a 30 deg swept semispan wing with simulated glaze ice. Results were compared to Navier-Stokes calculations and surface oil flow visualization. The theoretical and computational analysis have shown that neutrally buoyant bubbles will trace even the most complex flow patterns. Experimental analysis revealed that the use of bubbles to trace flow patterns should be limited to qualitative measurements unless care is taken to ensure neutral buoyancy. This is due to the difficulty in the production of neutrally buoyant bubbles.

  1. A new experimental approach for studying tracer diffusion through partially-saturated Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoye, S.; Puente, C.; Coelho, D.

    2009-04-01

    It is expected that unsaturated conditions could prevail for about a hundred thousand years in the very first meters of the argillaceous rocks hosting a high-level radioactive waste repository. Such phenomenon would originate at first from the gallery ventilation during the operational phase (for about the first hundred years) and then from hydrogen production linked to the canister corrosion. One key point that has to be estimated concerns the impact of such desaturation on the migration velocity of radionuclides through the clayey rock. This paper presents an original approach allowing us to make tracers diffuse through partially-saturated Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (saturation degree ranging from 80% to 100%). The suctions are generated by the process of osmosis, whereby samples are separated from solutions highly-concentrated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) by semi-permeable membranes which are permeable to all but PEG. First of all, we determined the PEG concentrations necessary to obtain the right suction values and in the meantime, the duration of the hydrous treatment before reaching the osmotic equilibrium in the rock samples. Finally, we compared results obtained from through-diffusion experiments carried out on rock samples displaying various saturation degrees (suction varying from 0 to 9 MPa).

  2. The use of tracer gases to determine dust dispersion patterns and ventilation parameters in a mineral processing plant.

    PubMed

    Grenier, M G; Hardcastle, S G; Kunchur, G; Butler, K

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted in a fluorspar milling plant to assess the effectiveness of tracer gases as a reliable supplement to conventional air-monitoring and ventilation measurements. In the course of this study, a tracer gas was used as a surrogate substance to analyze the direction and the rate of spread of contaminants from various potential dust production points in the plant. Time-weighted average and continuous mineral dust concentrations were measured in several areas of the plant; these results were compared and correlated with steady-state tracer gas concentrations in the mill. Time-weighted average dust concentrations varied between 0.18 and 0.57 mg/m3 for total dust and 0.04 and 0.20 mg/m3 for quartz respirable dust, depending on the location. Correlation of these values with steady-state tracer gas concentrations yielded linear relationships with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.95 and 0.87, respectively, for total and quartz dust. Results from this study, therefore, indicate that tracer gases may help model the spread of airborne respirable dust from point sources. These tracer gas releases also allowed the simultaneous quantitative determination of air residence times and contaminant clearance times from the building. Hence, tracer gases will help industrial hygienists obtain useful data with respect to building ventilation. PMID:1605111

  3. Depth-resolved water column spectral absorption of sunlight by phytoplankon during the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange (SOGasEx) Lagrangian tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.

    2008-12-01

    Optical measurements made during gas exchange tracer experiments in the Southern Ocean, Atlantic sector near 51S, 38W from March-April 2008 (SOGasEx) were used to develop daily integrated depth- resolved PAR absorbed by phytoplankton. Particulate and phytoplankton pigment spectral absorption coefficients (ap and aph), and methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a concentrations (chl-a) from discrete samples within and below the upper mixed layer (40 stations) were combined with data from optical casts where chlorophyll-a and cdom fluorescence and PAR scalar irradiance were measured (11 stations), PAR Kd was measured from a buoy free of ship shadow for 0-5m (11 stations), and Wetlabs AC-9 whole water absorption coefficients to 150m were measured (14 stations, with 3 in common with fluorescence data) to estimate depth-resolved values for both total spectral absorption and spectral PAR irradiance. By combining depth-adjusted spectral absorption of phytoplankton pigments (aph) with depth-adjusted PAR spectral irradiance we estimated depth-resolved daily PAR irradiance absorbed by photosynthetic pigments. These data can be compared with time-integrated primary production measurements conducted on deck where solar exposure or lamp exposure was modified to simulate a range of depths. Such a synthesis should improve our estimates of depth-integrated daily primary production, and ultimately contribute to refining estimates of carbon export rates to be incorporated into a carbon budget and CO2 air-sea flux models for the SOGasEx experiments.

  4. A forward analysis on the applicability of tracer breakthrough profiles in revealing the pore structure of tight gas sandstone and carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmani, Ayaz; Mehmani, Yashar; Prodanović, Maša.; Balhoff, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    We explore tracer breakthrough profiles (TBP) as a macroscopic property to infer the pore-space topology of tight gas sandstone and carbonate rocks at the core scale. The following features were modeled via three-dimensional multiscale networks: microporosity within dissolved grains and pore-filling clay, cementation in the absence and presence of microporosity (each classified into uniform, pore-preferred, and throat-preferred modes), layering, vug, and microcrack inclusion. A priori knowledge of the extent and location of each process was assumed to be known. With the exception of an equal importance of macropores and pore-filling micropores, TBPs show little sensitivity to the fraction of micropores present. In general, significant sensitivity of the TBPs was observed for uniform and throat-preferred cementation. Layering parallel to the fluid flow direction had a considerable impact on TBPs whereas layering perpendicular to flow did not. Microcrack orientations seemed of minor importance in affecting TBPs. This article was corrected on 9 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  5. Tracer dating and ocean ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, G.; Sarmiento, J.L. )

    1990-06-15

    The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on difficult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. The authors use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. The authors define an idealized ventilation age tracer that is conservative with respect to mixing, and they explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters.

  6. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated concentration of Halon-1301, which indicates absence of local anthropogenic or geologic sources (contamination), despite some samples showing CFC contamination. We found agreement of 71% of mean age estimates with ages inferred from tritium and SF6 within +/- 2 years, for samples where direct age comparison could be made. The remaining sites showed reduced concentrations of Halon-1301 along with reduced concentrations of CFCs. The reasons for this need to be further assessed, but are likely caused by sorption or degradation of Halon-1301. Further Halon-1301 studies are planned covering various hydrogeologic situations, land use practises, and redox conditions to evaluate the potential of Halon-1301 as groundwater tracer, and to elucidate the causes for reduced Halon-1301 concentrations. Acknowledgements Greater Wellington Regional Council, especially S. Tidswell, is thanked for support and organisation of the sampling of the groundwater wells. This study is part of a PhD supported by GNS Science as part of the Smart Aquifer Characterization program funded by the New Zealand Ministry for Science and Innovation (http://www.smart-project.info/). References Beyer, M., van der Raaij, R., Morgenstern, U., Jackson, B. (2014) Potential groundwater age tracer found: Halon-1301 (CF3Br), as previously identified as CFC-13 (CF3Cl), Water Resources Research. Busenberg, E. and Plummer, L.N. (2008) Dating groundwater with trifluoromethyl sulfurpentafluoride (SF5CF3), sulfurhexafluoride (SF6), CF3Cl (CFC-13) & CF2CL2 (CFC-12), Water Resources Research 44

  7. VOXEL-LEVEL MAPPING OF TRACER KINETICS IN PET STUDIES: A STATISTICAL APPROACH EMPHASIZING TISSUE LIFE TABLES1

    PubMed Central

    OSullivan, Finbarr; Muzi, Mark; Mankoff, David A.; Eary, Janet F.; Spence, Alexander M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Most radiotracers used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scanning act in a linear time-invariant fashion so that the measured time-course data are a convolution between the time course of the tracer in the arterial supply and the local tissue impulse response, known as the tissue residue function. In statistical terms the residue is a life table for the transit time of injected radiotracer atoms. The residue provides a description of the tracer kinetic information measurable by a dynamic PET scan. Decomposition of the residue function allows separation of rapid vascular kinetics from slower blood-tissue exchanges and tissue retention. For voxel-level analysis, we propose that residues be modeled by mixtures of nonparametrically derived basis residues obtained by segmentation of the full data volume. Spatial and temporal aspects of diagnostics associated with voxel-level model fitting are emphasized. Illustrative examples, some involving cancer imaging studies, are presented. Data from cerebral PET scanning with 18F fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 15O water (H2O) in normal subjects is used to evaluate the approach. Cross-validation is used to make regional comparisons between residues estimated using adaptive mixture models with more conventional compartmental modeling techniques. Simulations studies are used to theoretically examine mean square error performance and to explore the benefit of voxel-level analysis when the primary interest is a statistical summary of regional kinetics. The work highlights the contribution that multivariate analysis tools and life-table concepts can make in the recovery of local metabolic information from dynamic PET studies, particularly ones in which the assumptions of compartmental-like models, with residues that are sums of exponentials, might not be certain. PMID:25392718

  8. Developing a method to track oil and gas produced water discharges in estuarine systems using salinity as a conservative tracer.

    PubMed

    Woodall, D W; Gambrell, R P; Rabalais, N N; Delaune, R D

    2001-11-01

    Produced water is a high salinity by-product resulting from oil and gas production. Disposal methods include surface water discharge from a point source. The current field method used for fate and effect determinations in open water estuarine systems involves extending a compass oriented transect (COT) from the point source discharge--a method designed for a uniform offshore environment that might be inappropriate for the hydrologic and geomorphologic complexities found in estuarine systems. Research was conducted in a canal and a small, semi-enclosed bay to observe effluent behaviour and to determine if salinity could be used to track the effluent. A salinity/conductivity/temperature (SCT) probe measured water properties within 1 cm of the sediment surface and identified a thin, bottom salinity plume that would have gone undetected by conventional instruments. The plume flowed across the sediment surface and towards greater depths. Plume-affected sampling stations exhibited higher levels of sediment contaminant indicators (SCIs) and indicated that station location could affect impact conclusions. PMID:11763224

  9. Modeling and interpretation of two-phase flow and tracer studies from a subbituminous coal seam in the San Juan basin of New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, H.E.; Travis, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Field and modeling studies were performed to characterize two-phase flow within the natural cleat structure of an upper Cretaceous subbituminous coal seam. A two borehole pattern with open completion was used in a study of dewatering and tracer residence time distribution. Air was pumped into a five meter thick seam located about 170 meters below the surface. Krypton 85 was used as the airborne tracer. Air inflow and air and water production rates and tracer arrival times were monitored. The field tests were simulated with a two-phase, three component, porous flow code. Results showed that the air inflow and air and water outflow rates and breakthrough times could not be modeled assuming a uniform darcy-type permeability. The use of a pressure dependent permeability did provide, however, a much better match with the field data.

  10. Evaluation of a Thermodynamically Based Soil Microbial Decomposition Model Based on a 13c Tracer Study in Arctic Tundra Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Machmuller, M. B.; Lynch, L.

    2014-12-01

    The incorporation of explicit representation of biological complexity in soil carbon decomposition models may improve our ability to accurately predict terrestrial carbon-climate feedbacks. A new generation of microbe-explicit soil decomposition models (MEMs) are being developed that represent soil biological complexity, but only a few take into account detailed biotic and abiotic components and competitive interactions in the complex soil system. In view of this, we have developed a thermodynamically based MEM with a detailed component network (polymeric organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, microbes, extracellular enzymes, and mineral surfaces), in which competitive interactions and microbial metabolism are modeled using Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and Dynamic Energy Budget theory, respectively. The model behavior has been tested and is qualitatively consistent with many empirical studies, but further evaluation of the model with field or lab experimental data in specific ecosystems is needed. Stable carbon isotope (13C) tracer experiments provide a means to directly evaluate soil carbon dynamics simulated by MEMs. In this study, we further develop the model to explicitly account for different carbon isotopes, including 13C and 14C. Isotopic fractionations in soil decomposition processes, including soil organic matter transformations and microbial metabolism, are considered. The 13C signals of different soil components derived from a 13C tracer experiment in Arctic tundra soils are used to test the model behavior and identify needed parametric and structural improvements. Our modeling and data comparison identify several key mechanisms that need to be included in MEMs. Finally, we present an analysis of the relative benefits and costs of additional complexity in MEMs compared to traditional pool-based modeling structures.

  11. Metropolitan tracer experiment (METREX). Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, R.R.

    1985-10-01

    Several perfluorocarbon gas tracers were released at regular intervals for 1 year just outside of the metropolitan Washington, DC area. Continuous 8-h samples were collected at a central downtown site and two adjacent suburban locations. Monthly air samples were collected at 93 sites throughout the region at urban, suburban, and rural locations. Meteorological measurements were made on 5 towers instrumented for the experiment. The collected data can be used to quantify the errors from various dispersion-modeling techniques as well as study the influence of an urban area on the dispersion of pollutants.

  12. A field tracer study of attenuation of atrazine, hexazinone and procymidone in a pumice sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Pang, L; Close, M E

    2001-12-01

    A field tracer experiment, simulating point source contamination, was conducted to investigate attenuation and transport of atrazine, hexazinone and procymidone in a volcanic pumice sand aquifer. Preliminary laboratory incubation tests were also carried out to determine degradation rates. Field transport of the pesticides was observed to the significant under non-equilibrium conditions. Therefore, a two-region/two-site non-equilibrium transport model, N3DADE, was used for analysis of the field data. A lump reduction rate constant was used in this paper to encompass all the irreversible reduction processes (e.g. degradation, irreversible adsorption, complexation and filtration for the pesticides adsorbed into particles and colloids) which are assumed to follow a first-order rate law. Results from the field experiment suggest that (a) hexazinone was the most mobile (retardation factor R = 1.4) and underwent least mass reduction; (b) procymidone was the least mobile (R = 9.26) and underwent the greatest mass reduction; (c) the mobility of atrazine (R = 4.45) was similar to that of rhodamine WT (R = 4.10). Hence, rhodamine WT can be used to delimit the appearance of atrazine in pumice sand groundwater. Results from the incubation tests suggest that (a) hexazinone was degraded only in the mixture of groundwater and aquifer material (degradation rate constant = 4.36 x 10(-3) day-1); (b) procymidone was degraded not only in the mixture of groundwater and aquifer material (rate constant = 1.12 x 10(-2) day-1) but also in the groundwater alone (rate constant = 2.79 x 10(-2) and-1); (c) atrazine was not degraded over 57 days incubation in either the mixture of aquifer material and groundwater or the groundwater alone. Degradation rates measured in the batch tests were much lower than the total reduction rates. This suggests that not only degradation but also other irreversible processes are important in attenuating pesticides under field conditions. Hence, the use of laboratory-determined degradation rates could underestimate reduction of pesticides in field conditions. PMID:11802602

  13. Study of ketone body kinetics in children by a combined perfusion of /sup 13/C and /sup 2/H3 tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Bougneres, P.F.; Ferre, P.

    1987-11-01

    Ketone body kinetics were quantified in six children (3-5 yr old), who were fasted for 13-22 h, by a combined perfusion of (3-/sup 13/C)acetoacetate ((/sup 13/C)AcAc) and D-(-)-beta-(4,4,4-/sup 2/H3)hydroxybutyrate (beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results were analyzed according to the single-pool (combined enrichments) or the two-accessible pools models. After 20-22 h of fasting, ketone body turnover rate was 30-50 mumol.kg-1.min-1, a rate achieved after several days of fasting in adults. At low ketosis, acetoacetate was the ketone body preferentially synthesized de novo and utilized irreversibly. When ketosis increased, acetoacetate irreversible disposal was not enhanced, since it was largely converted into beta-OHB, whereas beta-OHB irreversible disposal was very much increased. The single-pool and two-pool models gave similar ketone body turnover rates when (/sup 13/C)AcAc was the tracer, whereas the use of beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB gave some more divergent results, especially at low ketosis. These studies demonstrate that ketogenesis is very active in short-term fasted children and that the use of a combined infusion of (/sup 13/C)AcAc and beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB is a convenient way to give insight into individual ketone body kinetics.

  14. Kinetic measurements of bone mineral metabolism: The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    Sodium-22 was studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with (22)Na which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The (22)Na which is not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The (22)Na tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  15. Far-infrared study of tracers of oxygen chemistry in diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Heyminck, S.; Hübers, H. W.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Richter, H.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.; Winkel, B.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The chemistry of the diffuse interstellar medium rests upon three pillars: exothermic ion-neutral reactions ("cold chemistry"), endothermic neutral-neutral reactions with significant activation barriers ("warm chemistry"), and reactions on the surfaces of dust grains. While warm chemistry becomes important in the shocks associated with turbulent dissipation regions, the main path for the formation of interstellar OH and H2O is that of cold chemistry. Aims: The aim of this study is to observationally confirm the association of atomic oxygen with both atomic and molecular gas phases, and to understand the measured abundances of OH and OH+ as a function of the available reservoir of H2. Methods: We obtained absorption spectra of the ground states of OH, OH+ and O i with high-velocity resolution, with GREAT onboard SOFIA, and with the THz receiver at the APEX. We analyzed them along with ancillary spectra of HF and CH from HIFI. To deconvolve them from the hyperfine structure and to separate the blend that is due to various velocity components on the sightline, we fit model spectra consisting of an appropriate number of Gaussian profiles using a method combining simulated annealing with downhill simplex minimization. Together with HF and/or CH as a surrogate for H2, and H i λ21 cm data, the molecular hydrogen fraction fNH2 = N(H2)/(N(H) + 2N(H2)) can be determined. We then investigated abundance ratios as a function of fNH2. Results: The column density of O i is correlated at a high significance with the amount of available molecular and atomic hydrogen, with an atomic oxygen abundance of 3 × 10-4 relative to H nuclei. While the velocities of the absorption features of OH and OH+ are loosely correlated and reflect the spiral arm crossings on the sightline, upon closer inspection they display an anticorrespondence. The arm-to-interarm density contrast is found to be higher in OH than in OH+. While both species can coexist, with a higher abundance in OH than in OH+, the latter is found less frequently in absence of OH than the other way around, which is a direct consequence of the rapid destruction of OH+ by dissociative recombination when not enough H2 is available. This conjecture has been substantiated by a comparison between the OH/OH+ ratio with fNH2, showing a clear correlation. The hydrogen abstraction reaction chain OH+(H2,H)H2O+(H2,H)H3O+ is confirmed as the pathway for the production of OH and H2O. Our estimate of the branching ratio of the dissociative recombination of H3O+ to OH and H2O is confined within the interval of 84 to 91%, which matches laboratory measurements (74 to 83%). - A correlation between the linewidths and column densities of OH+ features is found to be significant with a false-alarm probability below 5%. Such a correlation is predicted by models of interstellar MHD turbulence. For OH the same correlation is found to be insignificant because there are more narrow absorption features. Conclusions: While it is difficult to assess the contributions of warm neutral-neutral chemistry to the observed abundances, it seems fair to conclude that the predictions of cold ion-neutral chemistry match the abundance patterns we observed.

  16. Atmospheric tracer monitoring and surface plume development at the ZERT pilot test in Bozeman, Montana, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Arthur; Strazisar, Brian; Rodney Diehl, J.; Veloski, Garret

    2010-03-01

    A controlled release of CO2 was conducted at a field site in Bozeman, Montana, USA in July of 2008 in a multi-laboratory study of near surface transport and detection technologies. The development of a subsurface CO2 plume near the middle packer section of the horizontal release was studied using soil-gas and surface flux measurements of CO2. A perfluorocarbon tracer was added to the CO2 released from this section of the horizontal well, and the development of atmospheric plumes of the tracer was studied under various meteorological conditions using horizontal and vertical grids of monitors containing sorbent material to collect the tracer. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using remote sensing for the ultra low level detection of atmospheric plumes of tracers as means to monitor the near surface leakage of sequestered CO2.

  17. SEAPORT LIQUID NATURAL GAS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    COOK,Z.

    1999-02-01

    The Seaport Liquid Natural Gas Study has attempted to evaluate the potential for using LNG in a variety of heavy-duty vehicle and equipment applications at the Ports of Los Angeles and Oakland. Specifically, this analysis has focused on the handling and transport of containerized cargo to, from and within these two facilities. In terms of containerized cargo throughput, Los Angeles and Oakland are the second and sixth busiest ports in the US, respectively, and together handle nearly 4.5 million TEUs per year. At present, the landside handling and transportation of containerized cargo is heavily dependent on diesel-powered, heavy-duty vehicles and equipment, the utilization of which contributes significantly to the overall emissions impact of port-related activities. Emissions from diesel units have been the subject of increasing scrutiny and regulatory action, particularly in California. In the past two years alone, particulate matter from diesel exhaust has been listed as a toxic air contaminant by CAM, and major lawsuits have been filed against several of California's largest supermarket chains, alleging violation of Proposition 65 statutes in connection with diesel emissions from their distribution facilities. CARE3 has also indicated that it may take further regulatory action relating to the TAC listing. In spite of these developments and the very large diesel emissions associated with port operations, there has been little AFV penetration in these applications. Nearly all port operators interviewed by CALSTART expressed an awareness of the issues surrounding diesel use; however, none appeared to be taking proactive steps to address them. Furthermore, while a less controversial issue than emissions, the dominance of diesel fuel use in heavy-duty vehicles contributes to a continued reliance on imported fuels. The increasing concern regarding diesel use, and the concurrent lack of alternative fuel use and vigorous emissions reduction activity at the Ports provide both the backdrop and the impetus for this study.

  18. Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M 83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, R.; Madden, S. C.; Galliano, F.; Wilson, C. D.; Kamenetzky, J.; Lee, M.-Y.; Schirm, M.; Hony, S.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spinoglio, L.; Cormier, D.; Glenn, J.; Maloney, P. R.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Rmy-Ruyer, A.; Baes, M.; Boselli, A.; Bournaud, F.; De Looze, I.; Hughes, T. M.; Panuzzo, P.; Rangwala, N.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the physical properties of the molecular and ionized gas, and their relationship to the star formation and dust properties in M 83, based on submillimeter imaging spectroscopy from within the central 3.5' (~4 kpc in diameter) around the starburst nucleus. The observations use the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The newly observed spectral lines include [CI] 370 ?m, [CI] 609 ?m, [NII] 205 ?m, and CO transitions from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12. Combined with previously observed J = 1-0 to J = 3-2 transitions, the CO spectral line energy distributions are translated to spatially resolved physical parameters, column density of CO, N(CO), and molecular gas thermal pressure, Pth, with a non-local thermal equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer model, RADEX. Our results show that there is a relationship between the spatially resolved intensities of [NII] 205 ?m and the surface density of the star formation rate (SFR), ?SFR. This relation, when compared to integrated properties of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), exhibits a different slope, because the [NII] 205 ?m distribution is more extended than the SFR. The spatially resolved [CI] 370 ?m, on the other hand, shows a generally linear relationship with ?SFR and can potentially be a good SFR tracer. Compared with the dust properties derived from broad-band images, we find a positive trend between the emissivity of CO in the J = 1-0 transition with the average intensity of interstellar radiation field (ISRF), ? U ?. This trend implies a decrease in the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, when ? U ? increases. We estimate the gas-to-dust mass ratios to be 77 33 within the central 2 kpc and 93 19 within the central 4 kpc of M 83, which implies a Galactic dust-to-metal mass ratio within the observed region of M 83. The estimated gas-depletion time for the M 83 nucleus is 1.13 0.6 Gyr, which is shorter than the values for nearby spiral galaxies found in the literature (~2.35 Gyr), most likely due to the young nuclear starbursts. A linear relationship between Pth and the radiation pressure generated by ? U ?, Prad, is found to be Pth ? 30 Prad, which signals that the ISRF alone is insufficient to sustain the observed CO transitions. The spatial distribution of Pth reveals a pressure gradient, which coincides with the observed propagationof starburst activities and the alignment of (possibly background) radio sources. We discover that the off-centered (from the optical nucleus) peak of the molecular gas volume density coincides well with a minimum in the relative aromatic feature strength, indicating a possible destruction of their carriers. We conclude that the observed CO transitions are most likely associated with mechanical heating processes that are directly or indirectly related to very recent nuclear starbursts. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. INL Tracer Interpretation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  20. Use of a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions in Holstein cows fed ad libitum or restricted

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique (SF**6) is a commonly used method for measuring CH**4 enteric emissions in ruminants. Studies using SF**6 have shown large variation in CH**4 emissions data, inconsistencies in CH**4 emissions across studies, and potential methodological errors. Therefore, th...

  1. An Analysis of Whole Body Tracer Kinetics in Dynamic PET Studies With Application to Image-Based Blood Input Function Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; O’Sullivan, Finbarr

    2014-01-01

    In a positron emission tomography (PET) study, the local uptake of the tracer is dependent on vascular delivery and retention. For dynamic studies the measured uptake time-course information can be best interpreted when knowledge of the time-course of tracer in the blood is available. This is certainly true for the most established tracers such as 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 15O-Water (H2O). Since direct sampling of blood as part of PET studies is increasingly impractical, there is ongoing interest in image-extraction of blood time-course information. But analysis of PET-measured blood pool signals is complicated because they will typically involve a combination of arterial, venous and tissue information. Thus, a careful appreciation of these components is needed to interpret the available data. To facilitate this process, we propose a novel Markov chain model for representation of the circulation of a tracer atom in the body. The model represents both arterial and venous time-course patterns. Under reasonable conditions equilibration of tracer activity in arterial and venous blood is achieved by the end of the PET study—consistent with empirical measurement. Statistical inference for Markov model parameters is a challenge. A penalized nonlinear least squares process, incorporating a generalized cross-validation score, is proposed. Random effects analysis is used to adaptively specify the structure of the penalty function based on historical samples of directly measured blood data. A collection of arterially sampled data from PET studies with FDG and H2O is used to illustrate the methodology. These data analyses are highly supportive of the overall modeling approach. An adaptation of the model to the problem of extraction of arterial blood signals from imaging data is also developed and promising preliminary results for cerebral and thoracic imaging studies with FDG and H2O are obtained. PMID:24770914

  2. Organotin persistence in contaminated marine sediments and porewaters: In situ degradation study using species-specific stable isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Furdek, Martina; Mikac, Nevenka; Bueno, Maite; Tessier, Emmanuel; Cavalheiro, Joana; Monperrus, Mathilde

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a comprehensive study of the persistence of butyltins and phenyltins in contaminated marine sediments and presents the first data on their degradation potentials in porewaters. The study's aim was to explain the different degradation efficiencies of organotin compounds (OTC) in contaminated sediments. The transformation processes of OTC in sediments and porewaters were investigated in a field experiment using species-specific, isotopically enriched organotin tracers. Sediment characteristics (organic carbon content and grain size) were determined to elucidate their influence on the degradation processes. The results of this study strongly suggest that a limiting step in OTC degradation in marine sediments is their desorption into porewaters because their degradation in porewaters occurs notably fast with half-lives of 9.2 days for tributyltin (TBT) in oxic porewaters and 2.9±0.1 and 9.1±0.9 days for dibutyltin (DBT) in oxic and anoxic porewaters, respectively. By controlling the desorption process, organic matter influences the TBT degradation efficiency and consequently defines its persistence in contaminated sediments, which thus increases in sediments rich in organic matter. PMID:26785215

  3. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the Upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    LeCain, G.D.

    1998-09-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) scientific study to evaluate the potential for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste in an unsaturated-zone desert environment. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has been conducting geologic and hydrologic studies of the potential repository site for the DOE. These studies are to quantify the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of Yucca Mountain and to conceptualize and model gas and liquid flow at the potential repository site. Single-hole and cross-hole air-injection and tracer testing was conducted in alcoves located in the underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) to quantify the permeability and porosity values of the fractured and unfractured volcanic rocks (tuff). The permeability and porosity of these tuffs control the movement of fluids in Yucca Mountain. Study of these parameters provides an understanding of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone, and the parameters can be used in unsaturated-zone numerical modeling to estimate fluid flux through the mountain. This report presents the results from air-injection and tracer testing conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon alcove (UTCA), the Bow Ridge Fault alcove (BRFA), and the upper Paintbrush contact alcove (UPCA) by the USGS from August 1994 through July 1996. The locations of the alcoves and their relations to the potential repository are shown in a figure.

  4. Study of Gas Solid Flow Characteristics in Cyclone Inlet Ducts of A300Mwe CFB Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Lu, X. F.; Lai, J.; Liu, H. Z.

    Gas solid flow characteristics in cyclone's inlet duct of a 300MW CFB boiler were studied in a cold circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental setup according to a 410t/h CFB boiler with a scale of 10?1. Tracer particles were adopted in the experiment and their motion trajectories in the two kinds of cyclone's inlet ducts were photographed by a high-speed camera. By analyzing the motion trajectories of tracer particles, acceleration performance of particle phases in the two inlet ducts was obtained. Results indicate that the acceleration performance of particles in the long inlet duct is better than that in the short inlet duct, but the pressure drop of the long inlet duct is higher. Meanwhile, under the same operating conditions, both the separation efficiency and the pressure drop of the cyclone are higher when the cyclone is connected with the long inlet duct. Figs 11, Tabs 4 and refs 10.

  5. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  6. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  7. Fluorescence characteristics of the fuel tracers triethylamine and trimethylamine for the investigation of fuel distribution in internal combustion engines.

    PubMed

    Lind, Susanne; Aßmann, Simon; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence based on fuel tracers like amines is a suitable measurement technique for mixing studies in internal combustion (IC) engines. Triethylamine has often been used in gasoline IC engines; however, no detailed fluorescence characterization for excitation at 263 or 266 nm is available. Trimethylamine (TMA) exhibits high potential as a gaseous fuel tracer but little information about TMA fluorescence is currently available. A picosecond laser source combined with a streak camera equipped with a spectrograph was used to determine the spectral fluorescence emission and fluorescence decay time of both tracers. The tracers were investigated at various temperatures and pressures in a calibration cell with nitrogen as bath gas. The results provide an in-depth understanding of the fluorescence characteristics of both tracers and allow assessment of their application to the investigation of fuel distribution in IC engines. PMID:26974612

  8. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (Md) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  9. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M; Scow, Kate M

    2013-11-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m 1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (M d) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  10. The Reanalysis for Stratospheric Trace-gas Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Li, Shuhua

    2002-01-01

    In order to re-examine trace gas transport in the middle atmosphere for the period May 1991 until April 1995, a "reanalysis" is being performed using an up-to-date version of the DAO's "GEOS" assimilation system. The Reanalysis for Stratospheric Trace-gas Studies (ReSTS) is intended to provide state-of-the-art estimates of the atmosphere during a period when the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite provided a high density of trace-gas observations, and when the aerosol loading from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo contaminated the lower stratosphere, at the same time performing a natural tracer transport experiment. This study will present the first results from ReSTS, focussing on the improvements over the meteorological analyses produced by the then-operational GEOS-1 data assimilation system; emphasis will be placed on the improved representations of physical processes between GEOS-1 and the current GEOS-4 systems, highlighting the transport properties of the datasets. Alongside the production of a comprehensive atmospheric dataset, important components of ReSTS include performing sensitivity studies to the formulation of the assimilation system (including the representation of physical processes in the GCM, such as feedbacks between ozone/aerosols and meteorology) and to the inclusion of additional data types (including limb-sounding temperature data alongside the TOVS observations). Impacts of some of these factors on the analyzed meteorology and transport will be discussed. Of particular interest are attempts to determine the relative importance of various steps in the assimilation process to the quality of the final analyses.

  11. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4 + movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring...

  12. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  13. The significance of d-isomers in stable isotope studies in humans is dependent on the age of the subject and the amino acid tracer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Chris; Rafii, Mahroukh; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul

    2010-01-01

    d-Amino acids (d-AAs) in stable isotope tracers may result in erroneous estimates of enrichment, particularly if urine is used as a surrogate for plasma enrichment. Previous studies suggest that a d-AA content of less than 0.2% will not result in significant error in studies with adult humans. To describe the effects of d-AA content of less than 0.2%, in 3 different AA tracers, on isotope enrichment in urine and plasma, arginine, proline, and phenylalanine (Phe) tracers were given enterally to human neonates. Enrichment was measured in urine and plasma using chiral chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The Phe tracer was also given parenterally to human neonates and enterally to children and adults to further characterize the d-AA effect. All isotopes had a confirmed d-AA content of less than 0.2%. Labeled d-arginine resulted in an overestimate for enrichment of 20% in plasma and 87% in urine. A smaller effect was seen for d-Phe, which resulted in a 5% overestimate for plasma and 40% in urine. d-Proline had no significant effect. Using the same Phe tracer, a developmental effect was found, with a reduction in the overestimate in children compared with infants and no effect on enrichment in adults. Investigators using commercially produced, stable isotope-labeled AAs need to be aware that there is no safe level of d contamination; a d-AA content less than 0.2% may result in significant overestimate for enrichment, even in plasma, for infants and children. This source of error can be avoided by the use of chiral chromatography. PMID:19709694

  14. Technical note: Can the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique be used to accurately measure enteric methane production from ruminally cannulated cattle?

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K A; Coates, T; Farr, B; McGinn, S M

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether using ruminally cannulated cattle affects the estimate of enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions when using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) tracer technique with samples taken from a head canister. Eleven beef cattle were surgically fitted with several types of ruminal cannula (2C, 3C, 3C+washer, 9C; Bar Diamond, Parma, ID). The 2C and 3C models (outer and inner flanges with opposite curvature) had medium to high leakage, whereas the 9C models (outer and inner flanges with the same curvature) provided minimum to moderate leakage of gas. A total of 48 cow-day measurements were conducted. For each animal, a permeation tube containing sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) was placed in the rumen, and a sample of air from around the nose and mouth was drawn through tubing into an evacuated canister (head canister). A second sample of air was collected from outside the rumen near the cannula into another canister (cannula canister). Background concentrations were also monitored. The methane (CH(4)) emission was estimated from the daily CH(4) and SF(6) concentrations in the head canister (uncorrected). The permeation SF(6) release rate was then partitioned based on the proportion of the SF(6) concentration measured in the head vs. the cannula canister. The CH(4) emissions at each site were calculated using the two release rates and the two CH(4):SF(6) concentration ratios. The head and cannula emissions were summed to obtain the total emission (corrected). The difference (corrected - uncorrected) in CH4 emission was attributed to the differences in CH(4):SF(6) ratio at the 2 exit locations. The proportions of CH(4) and SF(6) recovered at the head were greater (P < 0.001) for the 9C cannulas (64% and 66%) compared with the other cannulas, which were similar (P > 0.05; 2C, 6% and 4%; 3C, 17% and 15%; 3C+washer, 19% and 14%). Uncorrected CH(4) emissions were 10% of corrected emissions for 53% of the cow-day measurements. Only when more than 80% of the SF(6) escaped via the rumen did the difference between the uncorrected and corrected CH(4) emissions exceed 20%. We concluded that using cannulated cattle introduces more variability into the SF(6) technique used with a head canister, a technique that is already highly variable. Thus, use of cannulated animals is not recommended when using the SF(6) technique with head canister. However, if cannulated cattle are used, the cannulas need to be tight-fitting to minimize leakage, and large animal numbers are needed to overcome the additional variability. PMID:22408084

  15. Effects of trichloroacetic acid on the nitrogen metabolism of Pinus sylvestris--a 13C/15N tracer study.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christoph; Jung, Klaus; Schrmann, Gerrit

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) can be found in various environmental compartments like air, rain and plants all over the world. It is assumed that TCA is an atmospheric degradation product of volatile chloroorganic hydrocarbons. The herbicide effect of TCA in higher concentrations is well known, but not much is known about the phytotoxic effects in environmentally relevant concentrations. It can be shown in this study by using the 13C/15N stable isotope tracer technique that [13C]TCA is taken up by roots of two-year-old seedlings of Pinus sylvestris L. and transported into the needles. At the same time the effect of the substance on nitrogen metabolism can be analyzed by measuring the incorporation of 15NO3- into different nitrogen fractions of the plant. The more [13C]TCA incorporation, the higher the synthesis of 15N labelled amino acids and proteins is. These effects on the nitrogen metabolism are probably based on the activation of stress- and detoxification metabolism. It has to be assumed that there is an influence on N metabolism of Pinus sylvestris caused by the deposition of environmentally relevant TCA concentrations. PMID:11827283

  16. Short communication: Use of a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions in Holstein cows fed ad libitum or restricted.

    PubMed

    Dorich, C D; Varner, R K; Pereira, A B D; Martineau, R; Soder, K J; Brito, A F

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure enteric CH4 emissions using a new portable automated open-circuit gas quantification system (GQS) and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique (SF6) in midlactation Holstein cows housed in a tiestall barn. Sixteen cows averaging 176 34 d in milk, 40.7 6.1 kg of milk yield, and 685 49 kg of body weight were randomly assigned to 1 out of 2 treatments according to a crossover design. Treatments were (1) ad libitum (adjusted daily to yield 10% orts) and (2) restricted feed intake [set to restrict feed by 10% of baseline dry matter intake (DMI)]. Each experimental period lasted 22d, with 14 d for treatment adaptation and 8d for data and sample collection. A common diet was fed to the cows as a total mixed ration and contained 40.4% corn silage, 11.2% grass-legume haylage, and 48.4% concentrate on a dry matter basis. Spot 5-min measurements using the GQS were taken twice daily with a 12-h interval between sampling and sampling times advanced 2h daily to account for diurnal variation in CH4 emissions. Canisters for the SF6 method were sampled twice daily before milking with 4 local background gas canisters inside the barn analyzed for background gas concentrations. Enteric CH4 emissions were not affected by treatments and averaged 472 and 458 g/d (standard error of the mean = 18 g/d) for ad libitum and restricted intake treatments, respectively (data not shown). The GQS appears to be a reliable method because of the relatively low coefficients of variation (ranging from 14.1 to 22.4%) for CH4 emissions and a moderate relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.42) between CH4 emissions and DMI. The SF6 resulted in large coefficients of variation (ranging from 16.0 to 111%) for CH4 emissions and a poor relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.17) between CH4 emissions and DMI, likely because of limited barn ventilation and high background gas concentration. Research with improved barn ventilation systems or outdoors is warranted to further assess the GQS and SF6 methodologies. PMID:25660738

  17. Determination of traveltimes in the lower San Joaquin River basin, California, from dye-tracer studies during 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Biagtan, Rhoda N.

    1997-01-01

    Dye-tracer studies were done in the lower San Joaquin River Basin in February 1994, June 1994, and February 1995. Dye releases were made in the Merced River (February 1994), Salt Slough (June 1994), Tuolumne River (February 1995), and Dry Creek (February 1995). The traveltimes determined in the studies aided the interpretation of pesticide data collected during storm sampling and guided sample collection during a Lagrangian pesticide study. All three studies used rhodamine WT 20-percent dye solution, which was released as a slug in midstream. The mean traveltime determined in the dye studies were compared to estimates based on regression equations of mean stream velocity as a function of streamflow. Dye recovery, the ratio of the calculated dye load at downstream sites to the initial amount of dye released, was determined for the 1994 studies and a dye-dosage formula was evaluated for all studies. In the February 1994 study, mean traveltime from the Merced River at River Road to the San Joaquin River near Vernalis (46.8 river miles) was 38.5 hours, and to the Delta-Mendota Canal at Tracy pumps (84.3 river miles) was 90.4 hours. In the June 1994 study, mean traveltime from Salt Slough at Highway 165 to Vernalis (64.0 river miles) was 80.1 hours. In the February 1995 study, the mean traveltime from the Tuolumne River at Roberts Ferry to Vernalis (51.5 river miles) was 35.8 hours. For the 1994 studies, the regression equations provided suitable estimates of travel-time, with ratios of estimated traveltime to mean dye traveltime of 0.94 to 1.08. However, for the 1995 dye studies, the equations considerably underestimated traveltime, with ratios of 0.49 to 0.73.In the February 1994 study, 70 percent of the dye released was recovered at Vernalis and 35percent was recovered at the Delta-Mendota Canal at Tracy pumps. In the June 1994 study, recovery was 61 percent at Patterson, 43 percent just upstream of the Tuolumne River confluence, and 37 percent at Vernalis. The dye-dosage formula overestimated the dye required for a given downstream concentration for the 1994 studies by ratios of 1.07 to 2.12. The ratios for the February 1995 studies were 0.67 to 0.95 for the Tuolumne River and 1.21 for Dry Creek. In all studies, the estimates improved with length of dye study.

  18. The effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF6, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF6 and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  19. NOAA EPA Near-Roadway Sound Barrier Atmospheric Tracer Study 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    A roadway toxics dispersion study was conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory to document the effects on concentrations of roadway emissions behind a roadside sound barrier in various conditions of atmospheric stability. The key finding was that reduced concentrations were me...

  20. Coupling Cover Crops with Alternative Swine Manure Application Strategies: Manure-15N Tracer Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of rye cover crops with alternative liquid swine (Sus scrofa L.) manure application strategies may enhance retention of manure N in corn (Zea mays L.) - soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cropping systems. The objective of this study was to quantify uptake of manure derived-N by a rye (Seca...

  1. Doublet Tracer Testing in Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Johnson, S.E.; Horne, R.N.; Jackson, P.B.; Culver, G.G.

    1983-12-15

    A tracer test was carried out in a geothermal doublet system to study the injection behavior of a developed reservoir known to be fractured. The doublet produces about 320 gpm of 160 F water that is used for space heating and then injected; the wells are spaced 250 ft apart. Tracer breakthrough was observed in 2 hours and 45 minutes in the production well, indicating fracture flow. However, the tracer concentrations were low and indicated porous media flow; the tracers mixed with a reservoir volume much larger than a fracture.

  2. Study of the effects of the chaser in push-pull tracer tests by using temporal moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebig, Klaus; Zeilfelder, Sarah; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Marui, Atsunao; Scheytt, Traugott

    2015-04-01

    "Push-pull" tracer tests are a suitable tracer test method for hydrochemical charac-terization of an aquifer in a single-well setting (e.g. in deep geothermal systems). A known amount of selected solutes as conservative and reactive tracers is injected into the aquifer ("push") and afterwards extracted ("pull"). In many cases, a so-called "chaser", which is just original groundwater without any added solutes, is injected directly after the injection of the test solution. Its objective is to push the test solution out of the bore-hole into the aquifer and therefore to mini-mize the influence of the gravel pack on the shape of the breakthrough curve. The influence of the chaser on the tracer breakthrough curve is unknown so far. Also, the determination of the appropriate volume for the chaser is a difficult task if at all applied. A first experiment was conducted with the objective to compare three push-pull tests with similar injection volumes, two tests with and one without a chaser. Results show that the application of a chaser lowers the main peak concentration. However, it does not alter the tailing of the breakthrough curve nor does it have a negative in-fluence on tracer mass recovery. In a second experiment, a new method was developed to determine the optimal chaser volume by testing seven different chaser injection volumes combined with temporal moment analysis and comparison of the mean residence times of the in-jected tracer fluid. As a result, the application of a chaser is recommended, when reactions of injected solutes within the open well or the gravel pack should be avoided. If a chaser is used, the new method mentioned above can easily be used to determine the required chaser injection volume. The experiments were conducted at the Hamasato test site in Horonobe (Hokkaido, Japan).

  3. NPS Gas Gun for Planar Impact Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong Ho, Chien; Hixson, Robert

    2009-11-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) commissioned a Gas Gun for shock wave studies on 9^th October 2009, by performing the first experiment. The Gas Gun is the key element of NPS Shock Wave Research Program within the Physics Department, where well-characterized planar impacts are essential for obtaining high quality data, to characterize a solid material. This first experiment was very successful, and returned key data on the quality of the impact conditions created. The Gas Gun is designed by SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, and the NPS spent twelve months fabricating the components of the Gas Gun and six months assembling the Gas Gun. Three inch projectile are launched at velocities up to 0.5 km/s, creating high pressure and temperature states that can be used to characterize the fundamental response of relevant materials to dynamic loading. The projectile is launched from a `wrap around' gas breech where helium gas is pressurized to relatively low pressure. This gas is used to accelerate the projectile down a 3m barrel. Upon impact, the speed of the projectile and the flatness of the impact is measured, via a stepped circular pin array circuit. The next stage of development for the Gas Gun is to integrate a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR). The VISAR sees all the waves that flow through the target plate as a result of the impact. This is a key diagnostic for determining material properties under dynamic loading conditions.

  4. Isotope Tracers as Tools for Identifying Water Sources in Developing Regions: Case of Study in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, G.; Lazo, P.; Crespo, P.; Célleri, R.

    2014-12-01

    Páramo ecosystems are widely recognized for their high water regulation capacity and as the main source of runoff generation in the Andean region. Understanding the hydrological functioning of the fragile wet Andean páramo ecosystems is critical in the mountainous regions of South America given their high susceptibility to global and local stressors such as land use change and climate change and variability . Despite this, most of the basins in the Andean mountain range are still ungauged, resulting in a currently hindered hydrologic analysis of the water sources contributing to runoff generation in the high-elevation páramo ecosystems. To improve this situation and provide a baseline for future tracer-based hydrologic studies, the isotopic signature of water samples collected within the Zhurucay River experimental basin (7.53 km2) was analyzed. The study area is located in the southern Ecuador and stretches over an altitudinal range of 3200 and 3900 m a.s.l. Water samples in rainfall, streamflow, and soils were collected between May 2011 and May 2013. Streamflow hydrometric and isotopic information within the study site was collected using a nested monitoring system. The main soils in the study site are the Andosols mainly located in the steep slopes, and the Histosols (Andean páramo wetlands) predominantly located at the bottom of the valley. Results reveal that the Andosols drain the infiltrated rainfall water to the Histosols. The Histosols on their turn feed creeks and small rivers. Pre-event water stored in the Histosols is the primary source of runoff generation throughout the year. Defining the water sources contributing to runoff generation is the first step towards the establishment of scientifically-based programs of management and conservation of water resources in the Andean region; and the monitoring of isotopic information has proven useful to improve the understanding of the ecosystem's hydrologic behavior.

  5. Noble Gases as Mantle Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Porcelli, D.

    2003-12-01

    The study of the noble gases has been associated with some of the most illustrious names in experimental science, and some of the most profound discoveries. Fundamental advances in nuclear chemistry and physics - including the discovery of isotopes - have resulted from their study, earning Nobel Prizes for a number of early practitioners (Rutherford in 1908; Soddy in 1921; Aston in 1922) as well as for their discoverers (Ramsay and Rayleigh in 1904). Within the Earth Sciences, the noble gases found application soon after discovery - helium was used as a chronometer to estimate formation ages of various minerals (Strutt, 1908). In more recent times, the emphasis of noble gas research has shifted to include their exploitation as inert tracers of geochemical processes. In large part, this shift stems from the realization that primordial volatiles have been stored within the Earth since the time of planetary accretion and are still leaking to the surface today. In this introduction, we give a brief overview of the discovery of the noble gases and their continuing utility in the Earth Sciences, prior to setting into perspective the present contribution, which focuses on noble gases in the Earth's mantle.

  6. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  7. Studies of estuarine sediment dynamics using 137Cs from the Tjernobyl accident as a tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydsten, Lars; Jansson, Mats

    1989-03-01

    Sediment dynamics in the re River estuary in northern Sweden were studied by monitoring the turnover of particles associated with 137Cs in surface sediment and sediment traps during the period following the Tjernobyl accident in late April until late November 1986. River transported material was deposited in the estuary and then frequently redistributed due to resuspension-redeposition processes during the ice-free period. There was a slow net transport of particles out of the estuary which was delayed by at least one event with a significant particle redistribution to the inner part of the estuary. Wind and wave induced water dynamics are responsible for resuspension and transport of particles.

  8. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  9. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  10. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with greatly different Ca concentrations were used, but, in all cases, the condition [Ca] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] was met. A wide range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) was found for the calcite crystals, extending from 0.04 {+-} 0.13 to -1.34 {+-} 0.15 {per_thousand}, generally anticorrelating with the amount of Ca removed from the solution. The results show that {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) is a linear function of the saturation state of the solution with respect to calcite ({Omega}). The two parameters are very well correlated over a wide range in {Omega} for each solution with a given [Ca]. Solutions, which were vigorously stirred, showed a much smaller range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) and gave values of -0.42 {+-} 0.14 {per_thousand}, with the largest effect at low {Omega}. It is concluded that the diffusive flow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} into the immediate neighborhood of the crystal-solution interface is the rate-controlling mechanism and that diffusive transport of Ca{sup 2+} is not a significant factor. The data are simply explained by the assumptions that: (a) the immediate interface of the crystal and the solution is at equilibrium with {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) {approx} -1.5 {+-} 0.25 {per_thousand}, and (b) diffusive inflow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} causes supersaturation, thus precipitating Ca from the regions, exterior to the narrow zone of equilibrium. We consider this model to be a plausible explanation of the available data reported in the literature. The well-resolved but small and regular isotope fractionation shifts in Ca are thus not related to the diffusion of very large hydrated Ca complexes, but rather due to the ready availability of Ca in the general neighborhood of the crystal solution interface. The largest isotopic shift which occurs is a small equilibrium effect which is then subdued by supersaturation precipitation for solutions where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. It is shown that there is a clear temperature dependence of the net isotopic shifts, which is simply due to changes in {Omega}, due to the equilibrium 'constants' dependence on temperature, which changes the degree of saturation and hence the amount of isotopically unequilibrated Ca precipitated. The effects that are found in natural samples, therefore, will be dependent on the degree of diffusive inflow of carbonate species at or around the crystal-liquid interface in the particular precipitating system, thus limiting the equilibrium effect. The second study treats the problem of Sr isotopic changes in aquifer waters in carbonate terrains. It was found that while dolomite dissolution, calcite precipitation, and clay exchange may govern the bulk chemistry of such waters, the major source of Sr is from the dissolution of the minor phase anhydrite.

  11. Magnetofossils as tracers of oxygenation change: a case study from the stratified Pettaquamscutt River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. P.; Berounsky, V. M.; Chan, M. K.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Andrade Lima, E.; Kopp, R. E.; Cady, C.; Weiss, B. P.; Hesse, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MB) are motile organisms commonly found around the oxic-anoxic-interface (OAI) in sediments and stratified water columns. Magnetite and greigite crystals synthesized by MB intracellularly, termed magnetosomes, can be preserved in sediments as magnetofossils. Changes in OAI thickness (due to changes in temperature, clathrate dissociation & methane oxidation, organic carbon supply/oxidation, or sedimentation rate) would produce proportional changes in MB population and sedimentary magnetofossil concentration. While potentially useful as an oxygenation proxy, magnetofossil quantification techniques and variables controlling their preservation in sediments need to be better understood. Most prior work focused on cultured magnetite-MB and sediment mixtures while studies of greigite-MB (found just below the OAI in the sulfidic hypolimnion) is lacking because axenic cultures do not exist. To address these issues, we study wild magnetite- and greigite-MB from the seasonally stratified Pettaquamscutt River Estuary Upper Basin (RI, USA) as a function of water depth, d. Transmission electron microscope imaging of 21 MB (377 magnetosomes) revealed a complexity in wild MB not found in cultures. From d=3.9 m-7.0 m, live-cell assays confirmed the presence of multiple MB morphotypes, both north- (majority) and south-seeking (minority), and a few magnetic protists. Based on a previous microscopy study just 1.4 km south of Upper Basin (Bazylinski et al., 1995), magnetite-MB are expected for d<5.0 m, mix magnetite- and greigite-MB for 5.0 m6.0 m. Coercivity distributions for all depths are characterized by a small variance, reflecting uniformity in magnetosome size. Interestingly, despite changing from dominant magnetite to greigite-MB with increasing depth, the median coercivity remained largely unchanged. Median coercivity is therefore not diagnostic of magnetosome mineralogy. We also report ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) results. The first derivative of the absorption spectra for d<5.6 m typically present multiple low-field maxima, which is consistent with observations from magnetite-MB cultures. In contrast, only one maximum in the spectra was observed for 6.0 m

  12. Tracer study of batch sedimentation. [Resin beads - 45 and 62. mu. m in diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Bigot, P.C.; Lee, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    The initial particle-concentration profile in batch settling tests was assessed and determined to be uniform. Two sets of data for batch-settling tests using cobalt-57-traced ion-exchange resin beads (45 and 62 ..mu..m in diameter) were compared with existing theories and models. A single suspended-solids zone was observed in agreement with the predictions of Dixon; the Richardson-Zaki correlation predicted the settling velocity as a function of void fraction to within 5%. Studies with a bimodal particle-size distribution of equal fraction of 45- and 62-..mu..m particles showed that the larger particles settled at the same velocity as in a single-particle-size distribution but that the smaller ones settled slower than for a single-particle-size distribution at a given void fraction. The ratio of the settling velocity of the smaller particles in a bimodal-particle-size distribution u/sub b/ to the settling velocity of these particles in a single particle-size distribution u/sub s/ was correlated by raising to the (3.78 +- 0.47) power the effective void fraction of the resulting upper settling zone containing only the smaller particles.

  13. Simultaneous determination of glucose turnover, alanine turnover, and gluconeogenesis in human using a double stable-isotope-labeled tracer infusion and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, A.; Lecavalier, L.; Falardeau, P.; Chiasson, J.L.

    1985-12-01

    We have developed and validated a new method to measure simultaneously glucose turnover, alanine turnover, and gluconeogenesis in human, in steady and non-steady states, using a double stable-isotope-labeled tracer infusion and GC-MS analysis. The method is based on the concomitant infusion and dilution of D-(2,3,4,6,6-2H5)glucose and L-(1,2,3-13C3)alanine. The choice of the tracers was done on the basis of a minimal overlap between the ions of interest and those arising from natural isotopic abundances. Alanine was chosen as the gluconeogenic substrate because it is the major gluconeogenic amino acid extracted by the liver and, with lactate, constitutes the bulk of the gluconeogenic precursors. The method was validated by comparing the results obtained during simultaneous infusion of trace amounts of both stable isotope labeled compounds with the radioactive tracers (D-(3-3H)glucose and L-(1,2,3-14C3)alanine) in a normal and a diabetic subject; the radiolabeled tracers were used as the accepted reference procedure. A slight overestimation of glucose turnover (7.3 versus 6.8 in normal and 10.8 versus 9.2 mumol/kg min in diabetic subject) was noticed when the stable isotope-labeled tracers were used. For the basal turnover rate of alanine, similar values were obtained with both methods (6.2 mumol/kg min). For gluconeogenesis, higher values were observed in the basal state with the stable isotopes (0.42 versus 0.21 mumol/kg min); however, these differences disappeared in the postprandial period after the ingestion of a mixed meal. Despite those minor differences, the overall correlation with the reference method was excellent for glucose turnover (r = 0.87) and gluconeogenesis (r = 0.86).

  14. Nitrate retention and removal in Mediterranean streams with contrasting land uses: a 15N tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schiller, D.; Mart, E.; Riera, J. L.

    2008-08-01

    We used 15N-labelled nitrate (NO-3) additions to investigate nitrogen (N) cycling at the whole-reach scale in three Mediterranean streams subjected to contrasting land uses (i.e. forested, urban and agricultural). Our aim was to examine: i) the magnitude and relative importance of NO-3 retention (i.e. assimilatory uptake), and removal, (i.e. denitrification), ii) the relative contribution of the different primary uptake compartments to NO-3 retention, and iii) the regeneration, transformation and export pathways of the retained N. The concentration of NO-3 increased and that of dissolved oxygen (DO) decreased from the forested to the agricultural stream, with intermediate values in the urban stream. Standing stocks of primary uptake compartments were similar among streams and dominated by detritus compartments (i.e. fine and coarse benthic organic matter). In agreement, metabolism was net heterotrophic in all streams, although the degree of heterotrophy increased from the forested to the agricultural stream. The NO-3 uptake length decreased along this gradient, whereas the NO-3 mass-transfer velocity and the areal NO-3 uptake rate were highest in the urban stream. Denitrification was not detectable in the forested stream, but accounted for 9% and 68% of total NO-3 uptake in the urban and the agricultural stream, respectively. The relative contribution of detritus compartments to NO-3 assimilatory uptake was highest in the forested and lowest in the agricultural stream. In all streams, the retained N was rapidly transferred to higher trophic levels and regenerated back to the water column. Due to a strong coupling between regeneration and nitrification, most retained N was exported from the experimental reaches in the form of NO-3. This study evidences fast N cycling in Mediterranean streams. Moreover, results indicate that permanent NO-3 removal via denitrification may be enhanced over temporary NO-3 retention via assimilatory uptake in heterotrophic human-altered streams characterized by high NO-3 and low DO concentrations.

  15. Methylmercury effects on migratory behaviour in glass eels (Anguilla anguilla): an experimental study using isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Claveau, Julie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Jarry, Marc; Baudrimont, Magalie; Gonzalez, Patrice; Cavalheiro, Joana; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Bolliet, Valrie

    2015-05-01

    The effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on glass eels' propensity to migrate, mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems was investigated. Marine glass eels were first sorted in an experimental flume according to their response to dusk. Fish responding to the decrease in light intensity by ascending in the water column and moving with or against the flow were considered as having a high propensity to migrate (migrant). Glass eels still sheltering at the end of the 24 h catching period were considered as having a low propensity to migrate and were called non-migrant. Migrant and non-migrant glass eels were then individually tagged and exposed to isotopically enriched (201)MeHg (50 ng L(-1)) for 11 days. The effect of contamination was studied on muscle fibre structure, and the expression level of genes involved in mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems. To investigate the effect of MeHg on glass eel behaviour, migrant and non-migrant glass eels were sorted again and the bioaccumulation of (201)MeHg and its demethylation product ((201)Hg(II)) were determined for each individual. MeHg exposure increased activity in non-migrant glass eels but not migratory behaviour. Contamination affected mitochondrial structure and metabolism and suggests a higher oxidative stress and activation of antioxidative defence systems in non-migrant glass eels. Overall, our results suggest that exposure to MeHg might induce an increase in energy expenditure and a higher vulnerability to predation in non-migrant glass eels in the wild. PMID:25797033

  16. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  17. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  18. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N.; Mursenkova, Irina V.; Znamenskaya, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48????24?mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M??=??1.42.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M??=??1.21.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1?MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03????0.12 ?m. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves.

  19. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Baumann, R.; Schlager, H.

    2014-07-01

    A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS), specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum fr Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR). It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU), an adsorption tube sampler (ATS) and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purpose (here research vessel). PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA) in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP) was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne) near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS on board the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model, Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT), 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, respectively, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol-1) were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h), with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol-1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecasted position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecasted. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental set-up and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in this study.

  20. An airborne perfluorocarbon tracer system and its first application for a Lagrangian experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Baumann, R.; Schlager, H.

    2015-01-01

    A perfluorocarbon tracer system (PERTRAS), specifically designed for Lagrangian aircraft experiments, has been developed by the Deutsches Zentrum fr Luft- und Raumfahrt (German Aerospace Center, DLR). It consists of three main parts: a tracer release unit (RU), an adsorption tube sampler (ATS), and a tracer analytical system. The RU was designed for airborne tracer release experiments; meanwhile, it can be used on various platforms for different experimental purposes (here research vessel). PERTRAS was for the first time applied in the field campaign Stratospheric ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA) in November 2011. An amount of 8.8 kg perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP) was released aboard the research vessel Sonne (RV Sonne) near the operational site of this campaign, Miri, Malaysia, on 21 November. The tracer samples collected using the ATS onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon were analyzed in the laboratory using a thermal desorber-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) system. Guided by forecasts calculated with the Lagrangian model Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT), 64 tracer samples were collected onboard the Falcon approximately 5 and 25 h after the release, mostly with a time resolution of 1 min. Enhanced PMCP concentrations relative to ambient PMCP background values (mean: 6.62 fmol mol-1) were detected during three intersects of the fresh tracer plume (age 5 h), with a maximum value of 301.33 fmol mol-1. This indicates that the fresh tracer plume was successfully intercepted at the forecast position. During the second flight, 25 h after the release, the center of tracer plume was not detected by the sampling system due to a faster advection of the plume than forecast. The newly developed PERTRAS system has been successfully deployed for the first time. The instrumental setup and comparisons between the measurements and HYSPLIT simulations are presented in this study.

  1. Lanthanum tracer and freeze-fracture studies suggest that compartmentalisation of early bone matrix may be related to initial mineralisation.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, A M; Arana-Chavez, V E; Reid, A R; Katchburian, E

    1992-01-01

    In adult bone the calcified matrix and enclosed osteocytes are separated from the extracellular space by a continuous layer of bone lining cells. It thus appears that bone matrix is compartmentalised and, as such, may constitute a 'milieu intrieur' which is different from the general extracellular space. Since adult bone matrix is compartmentalised and matrix vesicles also form a microcompartment, it is conceivable that compartmentalisation, in early osteogenesis, may be a requirement for the initial events of the mineralisation process. We have therefore conducted an ultrastructural, tracer, and freeze-fracture study to determine the stage in which bone matrix becomes compartmentalised and also to find out whether there are tight junctions between osteoblasts. The results show that in early nonmineralised stages and in incipient mineralisation, lanthanum penetrates all intercellular spaces and the newly forming bone matrix which is rich in matrix vesicles and collagen. With the progression of mineralisation, when all matrix vesicles appear mineralised and calcification is 'spreading' to the surrounding matrix, lanthanum is restricted to intercellular spaces and conspicuous macular tight junctions are present between osteoblasts. We suggest that matrix vesicles act as microcompartments for calcification when the early bone matrix is in continuity with the surrounding extracellular space. In later stages, when lanthanum fails to penetrate the matrix, matrix vesicles may no longer be necessary because the bone matrix itself is compartmentalised, thus allowing for localised changes in composition that might favour mineral deposition. Images Figs 1-4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6-8 Fig. 9-11 Fig. 12 Figs. 13-15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Figs. 19-20 PMID:1295872

  2. Tracers in rainfall simulation experiments to study the onset of the wet season in Eastern Mediterranean limestone environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Jens

    2010-05-01

    The eastern Mediterranean rainfall regime is characterized by dry and hot summers and rainy cold winters. In this climate rocky limestone environments are regarded as major recharge zones due to (a) intensively enlarged fissures by solution weathering and (b) sparse vegetation and shallow soils which limit evapotranspiration losses. However, relatively little is known on hydrological processes during high magnitude rainstorms, which, at the beginning of the rainy season, may occur on both dry and wet soils. These conditions were investigated by a series of sprinkling experiments during two successive days. Rainfall was applied on large plots (143 and 180 m2) to include the variety of different terrain elements (rocky outcrops, bare soil, different vegetation). Sprinkling units were located at each corner of the plot and supplemented by additional ones to balance wind drift. This sprinkling set-up did not guarantee a uniform distribution of applied rainfall, as overlap of sprinkling areas could not be prevented. To assess the spatial rainfall distribution, a large number of totalizers was necessary. During two days of sprinkling these totalizers were regularly measured and spatially interpolated across the plot. The temporal rainfall distribution, a series of two high intensity storms on dry and wet soil, was observed by a tipping bucket raingauge. Tracers were added to the sprinkling water to obtain additional process insights. By end member mixing analysis the contribution of different water types (pre-sprinkling, first day, second day) could be quantified. The first plot was located on a steep rocky hillslope. Significantly different concentration of chloride, nitrate and sulfate in the sprinkling waters helped to identify first day's water in second day's runoff. Surface runoff was a combination of infiltration excess runoff from rocky portions of the plot and saturation excess runoff from areas covered by soil. Soil saturation was accelerated by lateral runoff from adjacent rocky areas. Once the plot was saturated, 80-90% of the applied rainfall became surface runoff. About 14% of the flow collected during the second day originated from water applied during the first day. Both water sources obviously mixed in saturated soil reservoirs and contributed in variable percentages to surface flow. The second plot was located above a karstic cave. Additionally to soil moisture and surface runoff, the drip response of cave stalactites was measured. This time electrical conductivity and bromide were used to study recharge processes, water origin and mixing inside a 28 m vadose zone. Bromide tracing allowed identification of quick direct flow paths. Under dry preconditions, 80 mm of artificial rainfall applied in less than seven hours was not enough to initiate significant downward water percolation. Most water was required to fill uppermost soil and rock storages. During the second day of sprinkling, higher water contents in soils and karst cavities facilitated piston flow effects and a more intense response of the cave drips. Both experiments yielded point estimates for seasonal thresholds of runoff generation and groundwater recharge. The filling of the unsaturated zone, including soil and rock storages, was found to be an important precondition for the onset of surface runoff and groundwater recharge. By mixing analysis, continuously applied tracers identified the dominating processes: saturation excess overland flow for runoff generation and piston flow for water percolation. Overall, a higher seasonal threshold for water percolation than for the generation of surface runoff was found.

  3. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  4. Combined use of tracer approach and numerical simulation to estimate groundwater recharge in an alluvial aquifer system: A case study of Nasunogahara area, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaping; Yamanaka, Tsutomu; Zhou, Xun; Tian, Fuqiang; Ma, Wenchao

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge in an alluvial aquifer system in the Nasunogahara area of Japan. Natural stable isotopes (18O, D) were considered as additional calibration targets in a numerical model. The reliability of the model outputs was further validated by comparing the results from the numerical simulation and an independent tracer approach. The results indicated that the calibrated model can effectively simulate the spatial and temporal characteristics of the contribution ratios of recharge sources to groundwater in the Nasunogahara area. However, the tracer approach (i.e., end member mixing analysis) provided more reliable results at point scale, particularly for the estimated contribution ratios of paddy field water. The precipitation in the Nasunogahara area is the major recharge source; its mean contribution ratio is 58% for a one-year period over the entire alluvial fan. River seepage is significant in the upstream area of the alluvial fan, and the contribution ratio of river waters along the river channels in the upstream area increases during the wet season. Paddy field water is a highly important recharge source in the midstream and downstream areas of the alluvial fan, and the contribution ratio of paddy field water obviously increases from dry season to wet season because of irrigation. This study demonstrates that combined use of the tracer approach and numerical simulation with stable isotopes as additional calibration targets can eliminate their respective limitations and can assist in better understanding the groundwater recharge mechanism in alluvial aquifer systems.

  5. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the wall force penetration region at different flow conditions. Shear stress results are utilized to calculate the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) between argon gas and FCC walls. The TMAC value is shown to he independent of the now properties and Knudsen number in all simulations. Velocity profiles show distinct deviations from the kinetic theory based solutions inside the wall force penetration depth, while they match the linearized Boltzmann equation solution outside these zones. Afterwards, surface effects are studied as a function of the surface-gas potential strength ratio (epsilon wf/epsilonff) for the shear driven argon gas flows in the early transition and tree molecular flow regimes. Results show that increased epsilonwf/epsilon ff results in increased gas density, leading towards monolayer adsorption on surfaces. The near wall velocity profile shows reduced gas slip, and eventually velocity stick with increased epsilonwf/epsilon ff. Similarly, using MD predicted shear stress values and kinetic theory, TMAC are calculated as a function of epsilonwf/epsilon ff and TMAC values are shown to be independent of the Knudsen number. Results indicate emergence of the wall force field penetration depth as an additional length scale for gas flows in nano-channels, breaking the dynamic similarity between rarefied and nano-scale gas flows solely based on the Knudsen and Mach numbers.

  6. Methodology Measuring Rare Earth Elements in High TDS Reservoir Brines Application as Natural Tracers in CCUS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Mcling, T. L.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, H.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years rare earth elements (REE) have been demonstrated to be useful natural tracers for geochemical processes in aqueous environments. The application of REE's to carbon dioxide utilization and storage (CCUS) could provide researchers with a sensitive, inexpensive tool for tracking the movement of CO2 and displaced formation brines. By definition, geologic reservoirs that have been deemed suitable for carbon capture and storage contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) greater than 10,000 ppm and often these formation brines exceed 75,000 ppm TDS. This high TDS water makes it very difficult to measure REE, which typically occur at part per trillion concentrations. Critical to the use of REE for CCUS studies is the development of a procedure, which allows for the pre-concentration of REE's across a wide range of water quality. Additionally, due to the large number of samples that will need analysis, any developed procedure must be inexpensive, reproducible, and quick to implement. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL's Center for Advance Energy Studies is developing REE pre-concentration procedures based on methods reported in the literature. While there are many REE pre-concentration procedures in the literature, our tests have shown these methods have difficulty at TDS greater than seawater (roughly 35,000 ppm TDS). Therefore, the ability to quantitatively measure REE's in formation brines with very high TDS has required the modification of an already developed procedure. After careful consideration and testing we selected methods modified after those described by Kingston et al., 1978 and Strachan et al., 1989 utilizing chelating media for very high TDS waters and ion-exchange media as detailed by Crock et al., 1984; Robinson et al., 1985; and Stetzenbach et al., 1994 for low TDS (<10,000 ppm TDS) waters. These modified procedures have been successfully tested in our laboratory and have proven effective in greatly reducing interfering monovalent and divalent cation concentrations (e.g. Ba) and enriching the REE up to 100X for analysis. The procedures are straightforward, inexpensive, and require little infrastructure, using only single chromatography columns with inexpensive, reusable, commercially available resins and wash chemicals. The procedures have been tested with synthetic brines and waters (up to 250,000 ppm TDS) and field water samples (up to 5,000 ppm TDS). Testing has produced data with REE capture efficiency exceeding 95%, while reducing interfering elements by more than 93%. Further method development and testing continues in preparation for brine analysis of waters from the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Kevin Dome Pilot Study and the University of Wyoming's Carbon Institutes Rock Springs Uplift.

  7. Losses in the fluorescent tracer used in hydrodynamic modeling of constructed wetlands studied by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plazas, Lucero; Rosero, Edison; Solarte, Efran; Sandoval, Jhon; Pea, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescent tracer trials are performed to obtain useful information for hydrodynamic modeling. Particularly they have been used in constructed wetlands, aimed for residual water treatment, in order to find residence time distribution for particles entering the system and, in general, to know the flux pattern. Nevertheless, it has been reported that some tracers, as Rhodamine WT, exhibit adsorption phenomena over the substrate. This situation has to be considered in the analysis of residence time distribution curves, taking into account advection-dispersion processes which are given by the diffusion modified equation. Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm; 35mW), was used to determine Rhodamine WT accumulated concentration. Through adsorption coefficients obtained experimentally, an advection - dispersion model for solute transport in a subsurface flow constructed wetland was evaluated. Including this phenomenon allows to optimize the model, and another important condition is added in the behavior prediction of these complex ecosystems.

  8. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multisample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  9. Application of water chemistry as a hydrological tracer in a volcano catchment area: A case study of the Tatun Volcano Group, North Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, water chemistry is successfully applied to elucidate hydrological processes through the use of natural tracers in a hydrological system. The concept of a natural tracer is principally based on water-rock interaction. In this case, a volcanic watershed in the Tatun Volcano Group is examined with the hydrochemistry of the Peihuang Creek system analyzed in terms of acidic hydrothermal water. The application of principal component analysis demonstrates that the hydrochemistry of Peihuang Creek is dominated by mixing among three end members, Lujiaoken seep water, Matsao seep water and shallow circulated water. Conservative ions, such as halogens, reveal that recharge of shallow circulated water with low ionic concentration is dominant in the mountain area and gradually becomes insignificant in the plains area. Rare earth elements also confirm this derivation. In addition, rare earth elements demonstrate parallel pattern along the tributaries, which implies that the fractionation of rare earth elements is not considerable and dilution is the major factor attenuating the concentrations of rare earth elements. Therefore, the constant slope of REE pattern allows for semi-quantitative estimation of mixing proportion of the two major tributaries. The results show that Lujiaoken Creek supplies about 50% of waters to the downstream Peihuang Creek. Comparing commonly used nature tracers, such as Cl- and environmental isotopes, this study demonstrates that rare earth elements have the advantage of very low background concentrations and easily defined sources if fractionation is not considerable. Under this circumstance, the calculation of water mixing is applicable.

  10. Measurement of absolute tracer concentrations in tissue sections by using digital imaging fluorescence microscopy. Application to the study of plasma protein uptake by the arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, P D; Winlove, C P; Parker, K H

    1994-02-01

    Digital imaging fluorescence microscopy (DIFM) of tissue sections was used to quantify uptake of labelled plasma proteins by the arterial wall. Several aspects of the measuring system were investigated so that absolute tracer concentrations and their local variation could be derived from digitized images. These investigations may be relevant to other studies employing DIFM. Nonlinearities were found to arise from offsets in the video digitizers, from background fluorescence and stray light within the microscope and from the transfer characteristics of the intensified CCD camera. Camera gain controls showed complex behaviour. Camera output fell substantially for several hours after switching on and was affected by room temperature. Large spatial variations in response were caused by the geometry of the microscope optics and by the image intensifier. However, the ratios between areas were not affected by light intensity or camera gain settings. Measured intensities were independent of the depth-wise location of fluorophores within tissue sections but they were affected by the emission from objects outside the measuring area. Photobleaching of tracer varied significantly over the range of excitation intensities and durations used but was not concentration dependent. Methods used to correct these effects and obtain a uniform, linear and constant relationship between concentration and grey level are described. Using the system and appropriate corrections, in vivo uptake of sulphorhodamine-B-labelled serum albumin by the rabbit aortic wall was investigated. Results obtained for the mean uptake of tracer and its local variation were quantitatively similar to those previously obtained with nonmicroscopic methods. PMID:8169950

  11. Effect of motion on tracer activity determination in CT attenuation corrected PET images: A lung phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Pevsner, Alex; Nehmeh, Sadek A.; Humm, John L.; Mageras, Gig S.; Erdi, Yusuf E.

    2005-07-15

    Respiratory motion is known to affect the quantitation of {sup 18}FDG uptake in lung lesions. The aim of the study was to investigate the magnitude of errors in tracer activity determination due to motion, and its dependence upon CT attenuation at different phases of the motion cycle. To estimate these errors we have compared maximum activity concentrations determined from PET/CT images of a lung phantom at rest and under simulated respiratory motion. The NEMA 2001 IEC body phantom, containing six hollow spheres with diameters 37, 28, 22, 17, 13, and 10 mm, was used in this study. To mimic lung tissue density, the phantom (excluding spheres) was filled with low density polystyrene beads and water. The phantom spheres were filled with {sup 18}FDG solution setting the target-to-background activity concentration ratio at 8:1. PET/CT data were acquired with the phantom at rest, and while it was undergoing periodic motion along the longitudinal axis of the scanner with a range of displacement being 2 cm, and a period of 5 s. The phantom at rest and in motion was scanned using manufacturer provided standard helical/clinical protocol, a helical CT scan followed by a PET emission scan. The moving phantom was also scanned using a 4D-CT protocol that provides volume image sets at different phases of the motion cycle. To estimate the effect of motion on quantitation of activities in six spheres, we have examined the activity concentration data for (a) the stationary phantom, (b) the phantom undergoing simulated respiratory motion, and (c) a moving phantom acquired with PET/4D-CT protocol in which attenuation correction was performed with CT images acquired at different phases of motion cycle. The data for the phantom at rest and in motion acquired with the standard helical/clinical protocol showed that the activity concentration in the spheres can be underestimated by as much as 75%, depending on the sphere diameter. We have also demonstrated that fluctuations in sphere's activity concentration from one PET/CT scan to another acquired with standard helical/clinical protocol can arise as a consequence of spatial mismatch between the sphere's location in PET emission and the CT data.

  12. Achievements and opportunities from ESF Research Networking Programme: Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes, and COST Action 639: Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeckx, P.; Rasse, D.; Jandl, R.

    2009-04-01

    One of the activities of the European Science Foundation (ESF, www.esf.org) is developing European scale Research Networking Programmes (RNPs). RNPs lay the foundation for nationally funded research groups to address major scientific and research infrastructure issues, in order to advance the frontiers of existing science. MOLTER (www.esf.org/molter or www.molter.no) is such an RNP. MOLTER stands for "Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes" aims at stimulating the use of isotopic and organic chemistry to study carbon stabilization and biogeochemistry in terrestrial ecosystems and soils in particular. The understanding of the formation, stabilization and decomposition of complex organic compounds in the environment is currently being revolutionized by advanced techniques in identification, quantification, and origin tracing of functional groups and individual molecules. MOLTER focuses on five major research themes: - Molecular composition and turnover time of soil organic matter; - Plant molecular structures as drivers of C stabilisation in soils; - Fire transformations of plant and soil molecular structures - Molecular markers in soils; - Dissolved organic molecules in soils: origin, functionality and transport. These research themes are covered via the following activities: - Organisation of international conferences; - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Organisation of summer schools for PhD students; - Short- and long-term exchange grants for scientists. MOLTER is supported by research funding or performing agencies from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The ESF is also the implementing agency of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology, www.cost.esf.org), one of the longest-running European instruments supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe. COST Action 639 "Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use" (BurnOut) (www.cost.esf.org/domains_actions/essem/Actions/changing_climate or bfw.ac.at/rz/bfwcms.web?dok=5906) BurnOut aims at improving the management of greenhouse gas emissions from European soils under different regimes of ecosystem disturbances and land-use change. This will allow the identification of soil and site conditions (hot spots) that are vulnerable to greenhouse gas emissions. The specific objectives are: - Identification of hot spots of greenhouse gas emissions from soils; - Identification of soil and site conditions that are vulnerable to GHG emissions; - Development of an advanced greenhouse gas reporting concept across different of land forms, land use and land use changes; - Communication of policy relevant GHG reporting concepts; Burnout covers the following activities: - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Short-term scientific visits for scientists. Participating countries in BurnOut are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, Russian Federation, and Bosnia Herzegovina. During this oral presentation, possible lines of cooperation, opportunities and recent achievements will be exemplified and the audience will be invited to contribute their views on these initiatives.

  13. Influence of tracer selection on protein synthesis rates at rest and postexercise in multiple human muscles.

    PubMed

    Harber, Matthew P; Dickinson, Jared M; Crane, Justin D; Trappe, Scott W; Trappe, Todd A

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this investigation was to assess the influence of tracer selection on mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR) at rest and postexercise during amino acid infusion in multiple human skeletal muscles. Fractional synthesis rate was measured before and 24 hours after 45 minutes of running using simultaneous infusion of [(2)H(5)]-phenylalanine (Phe) and [(2)H(3)]-leucine (Leu) coupled with muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis and soleus in aerobically trained men (n = 8; age, 26 2 years). Mixed muscle protein FSR was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with a standard curve using the enriched muscle tissue fluid as the precursor pool. To control for potential analytical differences between tracers, all samples and standards for both tracers were matched for m + 0 abundance. Tracer selection did not influence resting FSR for the vastus lateralis or soleus (P > .05). Fractional synthesis rate measured 24 hours postexercise was higher (P < .05) compared with rate at rest and was similar between tracers for the vastus lateralis (Phe, 0.110% 0.010%h(-1); Leu, 0.109% 0.005%h(-1)) and soleus (Phe, 0.123% 0.008%h(-1); Leu, 0.122% 0.005%h(-1)). These data demonstrate that tracer selection does not influence the assessment of resting or postexercise FSR, thereby supporting the use of both [(2)H(5)]-phenylalanine and [(2)H(3)]-leucine for the measurement of FSR in exercise-based studies of human skeletal muscle. PMID:20822780

  14. Gas geochemistry studies at the gas hydrate occurrence in the permafrost environment of Mallik (NWT, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Erzinger, J.; Zimmer, M.; Schicks, J.; Dahms, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present real-time mud gas monitoring data as well as results of noble gas and isotope investigations from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. Mud gas monitoring (extraction of gas dissolved in the drill mud followed by real-time analysis) revealed more or less complete gas depth profiles of Mallik 4L-38 and Mallik 5L-38 wells for N_2, O_2, Ar, He, CO_2, H_2, CH_4, C_2H_6, C_3H_8, C_4H10, and 222Rn; both wells are approx. 1150 m deep. Based on the molecular and and isotopic composition, hydrocarbons occurring at shallow depth (down to 400 m) are mostly of microbial origin. Below 400 m, the gas wetness parameter (CH_4/(C_2H_6 + C_3H_8)) and isotopes indicate mixing with thermogenic gas. Gas accumulation at the base of permafrost (650 m) as well as ?13C and helium isotopic data implies that the permafrost inhibits gas flux from below. Gas hydrate occurrence at Mallik is known in a depth between 890 m and 1100 m. The upper section of the hydrate bearing zone (890 m--920 m) consists predominantly of methane bearing gas hydrates. Between 920 m and 1050 m, concentration of C_2H_6, C_3H_8, and C_4H10 increases due to the occurrence of organic rich sediment layers. Below that interval, the gas composition is similar to the upper section of the hydrate zone. At the base of the hydrate bearing zone (1100 m), elevated helium and methane concentrations and their isotopic composition leads to the assumption that gas hydrates act as a barrier for gas migration from below. In mud gas samples from the hydrate zone, the concentrations of all noble gases are lower than in air. Using Ne as a tracer for air contamination, the air-normalized abundances of Ar, Ke and Xe in those samples increase with their mass. Non-atmospheric elemental ratios of the heavier noble gases are most possible the result of elemental fractionation during hydrate formation.

  15. Use of geochemical and isotope tracers to assess groundwater dependency of a terrestrial ecosystem: case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Anna J.; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Wachniew, Przemyslaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented study was aimed at better understanding of the functioning of groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem (GDTE) located in the south of Poland. The studied GDTE consists of a valuable forest stand (Niepolomice Forest) and associated wetland (Wielkie Bloto fen). It relies not only on shallow, unconfined aquifer but indirectly also on groundwater originating from the deeper confined aquifer, underlying the Quaternary cover and separated from it by an aquitard of variable thickness. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the contribution of groundwater to the water balance of the studied GDTE and thereby assess the potential risk to this system associated with intense exploitation of the deeper aquifer. The Wielkie Błoto fen area and the adjacent parts of Niepolomice Forest are drained by the Dluga Woda stream with 8.2 km2 of gauged catchment area. Hydrometric measurements, carried out on the Dluga Woda stream over two-year period (August 2011 - August 2013) were supplemented by chemical and isotope analyses of stream water, monitored on monthly basis. Physico-chemical parameters of the stream water (SEC, pH, Na content, Na/Cl molar ratio) and isotope tracers (deuterium, oxygen-18 and tritium) were used to quantify the expected contribution of groundwater seepage from the deeper aquifer to the water balance of the Dluga Woda catchment. The mean transit time of water through the catchment, derived from temporal variations of δ18O and tritium content in the Dluga Woda stream, was in the order of three months. This fast component of the total discharge of Dluga Woda stream is associated surface runoff and groundwater flow paths through the Quaternary cover. The slow component devoid of tritium and probably originated from the deeper Neogene aquifer is equal to approximately 30% of the total discharge. The relationships between the physico-chemical parameters of the stream water and the flow rate of Dluga Woda clearly indicate that the monitored parameters approach distinct values characteristic for groundwater in the deeper aquifer for the lowest discharge rates of the stream. These low flow rates are also accompanied by low tritium contents in the stream water. This collective evidence strongly suggest that discharge of Dluga Woda stream at low stands carries significant contribution of groundwater seeping from Neogene aquifer in the area of Wielkie Bloto fen. Modelling of long-term impact on the regional groundwater flow field of groundwater abstraction by the nearby cluster of water-supply wells suggests that temporal disappearance of stream flow during summer months may occur, with potentially severe consequences for the status of the studied GDTE. Acknowledgements. The study was supported by the GENESIS project funded by the European Commission 7FP (project contract 226536) and by statutory funds of the AGH University of Science and Technology (projects no. 11.11.220.01 and 11.11.140.026). References: Zurek A.J., Witczak S., Dulinski M., Wachniew P., Rozanski K., Kania J., Postawa A., Karczewski J., and Moscicki W.J.: Quantification of anthropogenic impact on groundwater dependent terrestrial ecosystem using geochemical and isotope tools combined with 3D flow and transport modeling, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 11, 9671-9713, 2014

  16. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  17. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  18. High upwind concentrations observed during an upslope tracer event

    SciTech Connect

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In February of 1991 the Rocky Flats Plant conducted twelve tracer experiments to validate an emergency response dispersion model known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985). Experimenters released 140 to 260 kilograms of inert tracer gas (sulfur hexafloride) from the plant over an 11 hour period. During each release, one hundred and sixty-five samples, most of which formed concentric rings of 8 and 16 km radius from the plant, recorded cumulative hourly concentrations of the tracer at one meter above ground level (AGL). Figure 1 contains a depiction of the sampler location, the terrain, and the meteorological stations available within the tracer study area. Brown (1991) describes the experimental setup in more detail. The subject of this paper is an event that occurred early in the fifth experiment, on February 9, 1991. In this experiment, tracer material released from 13:00 to 17:00 LST appeared both downwind and upwind of the source, with the highest concentrations upwind. During the fifth experiment, high pressure in Utah produced mostly sunny skis around Rocky Flats. For most of the day, one could find moderate (5 to 10 ms{sup {minus}1}) northerly (from the North) flow within the 700 to 500 mb level of the atmosphere (approximately 3000 to 5500 meters above Mean Sea Level (MSL)). Synoptic scale motions were isolated enough from the surface layer and heating was great enough to produce a 1 km deep upslope flow (flow from the East to the West) by late afternoon. The winds reversed and became downslope at approximately 17:30 LST.

  19. Selection of Actinide Chemical Analogues for WIPP Tests: Potential Nonradioactive Sorbing and Nonsorbing Tracers for Study of Ion Transport in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Spall; Robert Villarreal

    1998-08-01

    Chemical characteristics of the actinides (Th, U, Np, Pu, Am) have been studied relative to nonradioactive chemical elements that have similar characteristics in an attempt to identify a group of actinide chemical analogues that are nonradioactive. In general, the chemistries of the actinides, especially U, Np, Pu, and Am, are very complex and attempts to identify a single chemical analogue for each oxidation state were not successful. However, the rationale for selecting a group of chemical analogues that would mimic the actinides as a group is provided. The categorization of possible chemical analogues (tracers) with similar chemical properties was based on the following criteria. Categorization was studied according.

  20. Freeze-fracture study of the epidermal cells of a teleost with particular reference to intercellular junctions and permeability to tracer.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Sesso, A

    1979-01-01

    The plasmatic membranes, the intercellular junctions and the intercellular spaces of the epidermis of the fish Pimelodus maculatus were studied by freeze-fracture and by lanthanum methods. The observations has confirmed the presence of desmosomes. Gap junctions were not found and the tight junctions can be seen very rarely, arranged to form small discrete maculae. The finger-print pattern due to the microridges of the apical plasma membrane of the superficial cells was studied by direct replicas. The tracer penetrates all the intercellular epidermal spaces but failed to penetrate the dermis, suggesting the presence of a barrier at the dermo-epidermal level. PMID:574691

  1. Experimental study of the effect of test-well arrangement for partitioning interwell tracer test on the estimation of NAPL saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Kim, Y.; Yeo, I.; Yongcheol Kim, In Wook Yeo

    2011-12-01

    Partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) is a method to quantify and qualify a contaminated site with NAPLs through a degree of retardation of partitioning tracers compared to a conservative one. Although PITT is known to be a more effective method to measure the saturation of spatially-distributed NAPL contaminant than the point investigation method, the saturation estimation from PITT is reported to be underestimated due to various factors including heterogeneity of the media, adsorption, source zone NAPL architecture, and long tailing in breakthrough curves of partitioning tracers. Analytical description of PITT assumes that the injection-pumping well pair is on the line of ambient groundwater flow direction, but the test-well pair could easily be off the line in the field site, which could be another erroneous factor in analyzing PITT data. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of the angle of the test-well pair to ambient groundwater flow direction based on the result from PITT. The experiments were conducted in a small-scale 3D sandbox with dimensions of 0.5 m 0.4 m 0.15 m (LWH) of stainless steel. The surface is covered and sealed with a plexiglass plate to make the physical model a confined aquifer. Eight full-screened wells of Teflon material were installed along the perimeter of a 50 mm circle with 45 degree intervals in the middle of the physical model. Both ends of the sand box are connected to constant head reservoirs. The physical model was wet-packed with sieved and washed sand. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and bromide were used as the contaminant and the conservative tracer, respectively. Hexanol, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanol and 6-methyl-2-heptanol were used as partitioning tracers. Before the injection of TCE, a PITT was conducted to measure adsorption coefficient of partitioning tracers to the sand material. TCE of 4.5 mL, dyed with Sudan IV, was injected into the inner part of the circle of the wells. PITTs using the test-well pair parallel and with angles of 45 and 90 degrees to ambient flow direction were performed. Another PITT was conducted at an increased pumping rate with the test-well pair at a 45 degree angle to examine the effect of pumping rate. From the experiments, it was found that as the angles of the test-well pair to ambient groundwater flow direction increased, the estimated NAPL saturation decreased. Although the increase in pumping rate in this experiment reduces the effect of the obliqueness of the test-well arrangement, the effect of rate-limited transfer of partitioning tracers due to the increased pumping rate on the PITT should be examined in the interpretation. The results of these experiments revealed that the arrangement of the test-well pair is another controlling factor in performing and interpreting PITT in the field, in addition to the factors such as heterogeneity, source zone architecture, and tailing. Key words: PITT, test-well arrangement, ambient groundwater flow direction, NAPL saturation Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy of Korea. 11-3414

  2. Development of Kinetic Interface Sensitive Tracers (KIS-Tracer) for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injections into Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M.; Maier, F.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of captured CO2 into geological formations is recently one of the most promising technologies to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions into the earth's atmosphere. Deep saline aquifers are considered as the most potential sequestration sites of CO2 due to their huge storage capacities of several thousand Gt. Ongoing research deals mainly with the investigation of relevant physico-chemical processes, the fate of CO2 and the risk assessment during and after supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injections. The occurring processes at the interface between injected scCO2 and formation brine play a major role to evaluate the fate and behavior of scCO2 in the reservoir. This is because the interface represents a reactive zone where numerous physico-chemical processes like dissolution of scCO2 in water as well as dissolution and precipitation of minerals take place. In most cases it is desired to maximize the interface size to increase the storage efficiency. Therefore, knowledge on interface size and dynamics would allow the observation of plume spreading and the detection of mixing or fingering effects. In order to gain this information innovative tracers are necessary which are able to quantify the temporal and spatial development of scCO2/water interfaces. As a result, it may be possible to assess the storage efficiency and to optimize subsequent injections. Up to now, such time-dependent tracers for reservoir studies are not available and limited to equilibrium tracers (known as partitioning and interfacial tracers, respectively). Therefore, novel reactive tracers (KIS-Tracers) are developed to overcome this gap. The idea is to find suitable molecules which allow the implementation of a defined chemical reaction at the interface. Due to the known kinetic constants the change of interface size can be characterized over time. The new tracer is injected together with the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into a deep saline aquifer. Afterwards, the tracer adsorbs at the interface and undergoes hydrolysis in contact with water. As a consequence, two water soluble reaction products are formed and can be measured in the water phase over time. Here, the reaction kinetics is the rate-limiting step for the phase transfer and strongly dependents on reservoir properties, such as temperature and pH. Such tracer molecules must have the following properties: i) low polarity (high log KOW) to ensure high scCO2 solubility and to minimize distribution into the water phase; (ii) at least one highly water soluble reaction product, which does not do partitioning back into the scCO2 phase; (iii) low detection limit. On the basis of naphthalenesulfonic acid, an established geothermal tracer, different molecules with the desired properties were synthesized and tested in the laboratory. For studying the occurring processes at the interface under atmospheric pressure conditions the scCO2 was replaced with a non-polar organic solvent. The experiments were conducted in a static batch system with constant interfacial area as well as in a dynamic system with changing interface size. In parallel, a macroscopic model which couples mass transfer and reaction kinetics is developed to interpret the data. In conclusion, experiments indicate that the integration of hydrolysis kinetics is possible and even one of the reaction products may be used as additional partitioning tracer, i.e. for measuring the residual saturation.

  3. Effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system. Final technical report, 1 August 1986-31 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Ledwell, J.R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-11-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF/sub 6/, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF/sub 6/, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF/sub 6/ and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  4. Perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracer technology developments at Brookhaven is described, including the latest identified as well as available PFTs and air sampling and analysis tools, to demonstrate their utility in a number of different atmospheric tracer experiments as well as in other applications, and to provide food-for-thought on new ways in which the PFTs can be applied in other research objectives. All of the important tools are described, but emphasis is given to the latest developments in the technology.

  5. Dual-tracer background subtraction approach for fluorescent molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Holt, Robert W.; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse fluorescence tomography requires high contrast-to-background ratios to accurately reconstruct inclusions of interest. This is a problem when imaging the uptake of fluorescently labeled molecularly targeted tracers in tissue, which can result in high levels of heterogeneously distributed background uptake. We present a dual-tracer background subtraction approach, wherein signal from the uptake of an untargeted tracer is subtracted from targeted tracer signal prior to image reconstruction, resulting in maps of targeted tracer binding. The approach is demonstrated in simulations, a phantom study, and in a mouse glioma imaging study, demonstrating substantial improvement over conventional and homogenous background subtraction image reconstruction approaches.

  6. Stream velocity and dispersion characteristics determined by dye-tracer studies on selected stream reaches in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Karl K.

    1995-01-01

    Dye-tracer analyses were done in the Willamette River and nine tributaries of the Willamette River, from April 1992 to July 1993 during low to medium stream discharge conditions, to determine velocity and dispersion. These dye-tracer analyses provided information on time of arrival, peak concentration, and the occurrence and longevity of a constituent dissolved in streamflow at various discharges. The time of travel of the peak and leading and trailing edge of the dye cloud were determined for each stream segment and were related to discharge at an index location in each stream. On the basis of the dye-tracer measurements, an equation was developed to estimate the velocity of the peak of a solute cloud for unmeasured streams. The results of the dyetracer study on the Willamette River from river mile 161.2 to river mile 138.3 were compared with a previous study of the same river reach. The results of the comparison indicate that, since 1968, the discharge velocity relation has not changed in the streamflow range observed in this study. In order to identify dyedispersion characteristics of a conservative solute in each stream segment, a relation was developed between the elapsed time from injection to the unit-peak concentration of dye measured at each sampling location. A general equation was developed to estimate the peak concentration of dye at a given elapsed time. Channel characteristics and streamflow magnitude are known to effect dye dispersion; however, comparison of streams with apparently similar characteristics resulted in different unit-peak concentration values at various times after dye injection.

  7. Three-Dimensional Tracer Model Study of Atmospheric CO2 - Response to Seasonal Exchanges with the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, I.; Prentice, K.; Matthews, E.; Lerner, J.; Russell, G.

    1983-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer transport model is used to investigate the annual cycle of atmospheric CO2 concentration produced by seasonal exchanges with the terrestrial biosphere. The tracer model uses winds generated by a global general circulation model to advect and convect CO2; no explicit diffusion coefficients are employed. A biospheric exchange function constructed from a map of net primary productivity, and Azevedo's (1982) seasonality of CO2 uptake and release closely simulates the annual cycles at coastal stations. The results show that zonal homogeneity in surface CO2 concentrations can never be achieved at mid-latitudes where the time scale for zonal mixing is longer than the time scale for biospheric exchange. Analysis of the zonal mean balance in the lower troposphere reveals that atmospheric transport processes may alter the CO2 response to local biospheric exchanges by 50% or more. Hence year-to-year variation of the annual CO2 cycle may result from the natural variability of the atmospheric circulation as well as from changes in the sources and sinks.

  8. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  9. Dating of young groundwater using tritium and gaseous tracers (SF6, SF5CF3, CFC-12, H-1301): case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Bartyzel, Jakub; Dulinski, Marek; Kuc, Tadeusz; Sliwka, Ireneusz; Mochalski, Pawel; Kania, Jaroslaw; Witczak, Stanislaw

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater is an important source of potable water in many countries. While it covers ca. 50% of the global drinking water needs, in Europe this share is even higher, reaching approximately 70%. Nowadays, this strategic resource is at risk due to anthropogenic pollutants of various nature entering shallow aquifers. Proper management of groundwater resources requires thorough understanding of groundwater dynamics on time scales characteristic for the history of pollutant input to groundwater. The bomb-tritium has been used for several decades now as a tracer of choice to detect recent recharge and to quantify groundwater residence times on time scales extending from several years to several decades. The lumped-parameter modeling was the most often employed approach in this context. Since nowadays atmospheric concentrations of tritium are approaching natural levels in most parts of the world, the usage of this tracer has become more problematic. Therefore, there is a growing interest in alternative indicators of groundwater age in shallow aquifers. Anthropogenic trace gases present in the atmosphere, such as freons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), have been applied in numerous case studies as substitutes of tritium. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study aimed at quantifying mean residence time of groundwater in the recharge area of porous sandy aquifer system located in the southern Poland. The principal economic role of the aquifer, consisting of two water-bearing strata, is to provide potable water for public and private users. The yield of the aquifer is insufficient to meet all the needs and, as a consequence, licensing conflicts arise between water supply companies and industry on the amount of water available for safe exploitation. To quantify residence time distribution (RTD) functions of water parcels arriving at the production wells located in the recharge area of the aquifer, tritium along with several gaseous tracers was employed. Apart of well-established tracers such as SF6 and CFC-12, also other trace gases present in the atmosphere (SF5CF3 and H-1301) were tested as age indicators of young groundwater. Time series of tracer concentrations in the sampled boreholes were interpreted with the aid of lumped-parameter models. In parallel, the arrival times of tracers to the selected wells were calculated with the aid of 3D flow and transport model available for the studied groundwater system and compared with the RTD functions obtained from lumped-parameter modeling. Acknowledgements. Partial financial support of this work through GENESIS project (http:/www.thegenesisproject.eu) funded by the European Commission 7FP contract 226536 and through the funds from the Polish Ministry of Science and High Education (projects Nr. N N525 362637 and 11.11.220.01) is kindly acknowledged.

  10. Measuring magnesium, calcium and potassium isotope ratios using ICP-QMS with an octopole collision cell in tracer studies of nutrient uptake and translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Füllner, K; Seeling, U D; Fornalczyk, G; Kuhn, A J

    2008-01-01

    The ability of a quadrupole-based ICP-MS with an octopole collision cell to obtain precise and accurate measurements of isotope ratios of magnesium, calcium and potassium was evaluated. Hydrogen and helium were used as collision/reaction gases for ICP-MS isotope ratio measurements of calcium and potassium in order to avoid isobaric interference with the analyte ions from (mainly) argon ions 40Ar+ and argon hydride ions 40Ar1H+. Mass discrimination factors determined for the isotope ratios 25Mg/24Mg, 40Ca/44Ca and 39K/41K under optimized experimental conditions varied between 0.044 and 0.075. The measurement precisions for 25Mg/24Mg, 40Ca/44Ca and 39K/41K were found to be 0.09%, 0.43% and 1.4%, respectively. This analytical method that uses ICP-QMS with a collision cell to obtain isotope ratio measurements of magnesium, calcium and potassium was used in routine mode to characterize biological samples (nutrient solution and small amounts of digested plant samples). The mass spectrometric technique was employed to study the dynamics of nutrient uptake and translocation in barley plants at different root temperatures (10 degrees C and 20 degrees C) using enriched stable isotopes (25Mg, 44Ca and 41K) as tracers. For instance, the mass spectrometric results of tracer experiments demonstrated enhanced 25Mg and 44Ca uptake and translocation into shoots at a root temperature of 20 degrees C 24 h after isotope spiking. In contrast, results obtained from 41K tracer experiments showed the highest 41K contents in plants spiked at a root temperature of 10 degrees C. PMID:17962924

  11. Behavior of organophosphates and hydrophilic ethers during bank filtration and their potential application as organic tracers. A field study from the Oderbruch, Germany.

    PubMed

    Stepien, D K; Regnery, J; Merz, C; Pttmann, W

    2013-08-01

    The behavior of organophosphates and ethers during riverbank filtration and groundwater flow was assessed to determine their suitability as organic tracers. Four sampling campaigns were conducted at the Oderbruch polder, Germany to establish the presence of chlorinated flame retardants (TCEP, TCPP, TDCP), non-chlorinated plasticizers (TBEP, TiBP, TnBP), and hydrophilic ethers (1,4-dioxane, monoglyme, diglyme, triglyme, tetraglyme) in the Oder River, main drainage ditch, and anoxic aquifer. Selected parameters were measured in order to determine the hydro-chemical composition of both, river water and groundwater. The results of the study confirm that organophosphates (OPs) are more readily attenuated during bank filtration compared to ethers. Both in the river and the groundwater, TCPP was the most abundant OP with concentrations in the main drainage ditch ranging between 105 and 958 ng L(-1). 1,4-dioxane, triglyme, and tetraglyme demonstrated persistent behavior during bank filtration and in the anoxic groundwater. In the drainage ditch concentrations of 1,4-dioxane, triglyme, and tetraglyme ranged between 1090 and 1467 ng L(-1), 37 and 149 ng L(-1), and 496 and 1403 ng L(-1), respectively. A positive correlation was found for the inorganic tracer chloride with 1,4-dioxane and tetraglyme. These results confirm the possible application of these ethers as environmental organic tracers. Both inorganic and organic compounds showed temporal variability in the surface- and groundwater. Discharge of the river water, concentrations of analytes at the time of infiltration and attenuation were identified as factors influencing the variable amounts of the analytes in the surface and groundwater. These findings are also of great importance for the production of drinking water via bank filtration and natural and artificial groundwater recharge as the physicochemical properties of ethers create challenges in their removal. PMID:23644568

  12. CO, NOx and 13CO2 as tracers for fossil fuel CO2: results from a pilot study in Paris during winter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Janssen, C.; Lehman, S. J.; Mondelain, D.; Perrussel, O.; Ramonet, M.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Bousquet, P.

    2013-08-01

    Measurements of the mole fraction of the CO2 and its isotopes were performed in Paris during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign (January-February 2010). Radiocarbon (14CO2) measurements were used to identify the relative contributions of 77% CO2 from fossil fuel consumption (CO2ff from liquid and gas combustion) and 23% from biospheric CO2 (CO2 from the use of biofuels and from human and plant respiration: CO2bio). These percentages correspond to average mole fractions of 26.4 ppm and 8.2 ppm for CO2ff and CO2bio, respectively. The 13CO2 analysis indicated that gas and liquid fuel contributed 70% and 30%, respectively, of the CO2 emission from fossil fuel use. Continuous measurements of CO and NOx and the ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff derived from radiocarbon measurements during four days make it possible to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution over the entire campaign. The ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff are functions of air mass origin and exhibited daily ranges of 7.9 to 14.5 ppb ppm-1 and 1.1 to 4.3 ppb ppm-1, respectively. These ratios are consistent with different emission inventories given the uncertainties of the different approaches. By using both tracers to derive the fossil fuel CO2, we observed similar diurnal cycles with two maxima during rush hour traffic.

  13. A study of a radon gas scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Guiseppe, Vincente E.; Mei, Dongming

    2012-03-01

    Radon gas and its progeny are critical sources of background for low background experimental devices. The required reduction of radon levels in the air of the experimental area can typically be achieved with a radon scrubbing system. For testing purposes, a single column system has been built at USD to study the radon-adsorption properties of activated charcoal under different conditions. In this paper, we will demonstrate the working principle and test results.

  14. Experimental studies on a natural gas vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mitsunori; Ishizawa, Shizuo; Inada, Eiji; Idoguchi, Ryuichi; Sekiba, Toru

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents the results of several studies conducted on a natural gas vehicle. In one study of engine-out emissions performance, the exhaust emissions of the CNG engine were lower than those of the base gasoline engine. In another study of the conversion characteristics of three-way catalysts, it was found that the conversion efficiency of total hydrocarbons (THCs) was much lower in the lean-mixture region for the NGV. The reduced efficiency was traced to lower conversion and poor reactivity of low-end hydrocarbons and to a higher concentration of H2O. 12 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Tracer-based prediction of thermal reservoir lifetime: scope, limitations, and the role of thermosensitive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Licha, T.; Nottebohm, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal-lifetime prediction is a traditional endeavour of inter-well tracer tests conducted in geothermal reservoirs. Early tracer test signals (detectable within the first few years of operation) are expected to correlate with late-time production temperature evolutions ('thermal breakthrough', supposed to not occur before some decades of operation) of a geothermal reservoir. Whenever a geothermal reservoir can be described as a single-fracture system, its thermal lifetime will, ideally, be determined by two parameters (say, fracture aperture and porosity), whose inversion from conservative-tracer test signals is straightforward and non-ambiguous (provided that the tracer tests, and their interpretation, are performed in accordance to the rules of the art). However, as soon as only 'few more' fractures are considered, this clear-cut correlation is broken. A given geothermal reservoir can simultaneously feature a single-fracture behaviour, in terms of heat transport, and a multiple-fracture behaviour, in terms of solute tracer transport (or vice-versa), whose effective values of fracture apertures, spacings, and porosities are essentially uncorrelated between heat and solute tracers. Solute transport parameters derived from conservative-tracer tests will no longer characterize the heat transport processes (and thus temperature evolutions) taking place in the same reservoir. Parameters determining its thermal lifetime will remain 'invisible' to conservative tracers in inter-well tests. We demonstrate this issue at the example of a five-fracture system, representing a deep-geothermal reservoir, with well-doublet placement inducing fluid flow 'obliquely' to the fractures. Thermal breakthrough in this system is found to strongly depend on fracture apertures, whereas conservative-solute tracer signals from inter-well tests in the same system do not show a clear-cut correlation with fracture apertures. Only by using thermosensitive substances as tracers, a reliable correlation between (early) tracer signals and (later) thermal breakthrough can be re-established. Thus, thermosensitive tracers are indispensable for predicting thermal breakthrough, in such geothermal reservoirs whose 'hydrogeological personality' is given by a finite set of fractures, with flow occurring both across and along the fractures. In terms of the 'gebo benchmark-model' typology investigated by Hrdt et al. (2011) [http://eposters.agu.org/abstracts/models-of-geothermal-reservoirs-as-a-basis-for-interdisciplinary-cooperation/] , such systems combine flow and transport patterns of the 'petrothermal' type and of the so-called 'deep-aquifer' type: across the fractures, heat is travelling faster than conservative-solute tracers; along the fractures, conservative-solute tracers experience much less retardation by transversal exchange (matrix diffusion), than heat; fluid (and tracer) flow is not limited to the fractures; matrix flow yields essential contribution to prolonging the fluid (and tracer) residence time. Thermal lifetime results from the opposite effects of fracture aperture as an: advection-related parameter: fluid travel time increases with increasing fracture aperture advection-unrelated parameter: fracture - matrix exchange rate increases with decreasing fracture aperture, which accelerates transport across the fracture, but retards transport along the fracture. In conservative-solute tracer signals, all these fracture aperture effects on tracer transport are masked by the very long residence time associated with the matrix flow component. Thermosensitive tracers are able to 'magnify' the visibility of fracture aperture effects against matrix flow effects. Acknowledgment: This study benefits from thermosensitive-tracer research conducted within the projects Smart Tracers and LOGRO, funded by the German Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU, 0327579 and 0325111B) and by Energie Baden-Wrttemberg (EnBW).

  16. Studies of skeletal tracer kinetics. III. Tc-99m(Sn)methylenediphosphonate uptake in the canine tibia as a function of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Sagar, V V; Piccone, J M; Charkes, N D

    1979-12-01

    Experiments were performed in 14 dogs to study the effect of changes in bone blood flow on the tibial uptake of the skeletal tracer Tc-99m(Sn)methylenediphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP). Aortic blood was diverted through a pulsatile-flow pump in order to monitor and control femoral arterial blood flow. Tibial nutrient perfusion, as measured with labeled microspheres, paralleled the changes in arterial flow. We found that increments in bone blood flow up to four times normal produced only minimal augmentation of Tc-99m MDP uptake (mean = 33%), a markedly nonproportional relationship. The data points clustered about a predicted curve produced by perturbing the rate constants of a seven-compartment model obtained in normal dogs. These findings indicate that bone uptake of Tc-99m MDP is diffusion-limited, and they therefore cast doubt upon the validity of a method used for many years for estimating bone blood flow, the so-called skeletal tracer clearance technique. Nerve section, performed in 14 other dogs, augmented Tc-99m MDP uptake by about 50% at supranormal flows, suggesting a parallel-flow model of the microcirculation in bone, under sympathetic control. Such a model satisfactorily explains many scintigraphic findings in disease states. PMID:536792

  17. OH as a Tracer for Molecular Gas in the Galaxy: Line Ratios and Signatures of non-LTE Findings in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Philip; Allen, Ronald J.; Hogg, David E.

    2015-01-01

    While carrying out a blind survey of OH emission in a quiescent region towards the outer galaxy near l = 105 degrees, b = 1 degree using the Green Bank Telescope, we analyzed the ratios of the line strengths and identified several non-LTE emission sources in addition to the majority that were in LTE. The fact that the majority of OH features were in LTE ratios suggests that in general, OH can be a useful tracer for components of the molecular ISM that may not be traced by CO. However, the several non-LTE OH features observed demonstrate that such a blind survey can also be put to other uses. One of the non-LTE features was identified as a known OH-IR star, which we found could be easily identified with 1665 and 1667 MHz spectra alone, even though OH-IR stars are most prominent in 1612 MHz. We also identified several 1720 MHz masers features in the local ISM, which were found at adjacent positions in the sky along an arc shape. These masers are likely to be tracing a C-shock propagating through the local ISM, covering several survey positions.

  18. Use of tracers to measure flow within single microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, W.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Most techniques for making quantitative measurements of flow within single microvessels rely on tracers which are injected upstream of the microvessel and monitored noninvasively (e.g., optical densitometry) at selected sites along the microvessel. This study examines theoretically the measurement of average flow velocity (v) within individual microvessels from tracer flow data at monitoring sites. Starting with a fundamental convection-diffusion equation, the theory considers tracers which can distribute across both plasma and red cell phases. An integral analysis indicates that v = {delta} {zeta}/{delta} {tau}, where {delta} {zeta} is the distance between monitoring sites, and {delta} {tau} is the tracer transit or 'residence' time needed to traverse that distance. The residence time which arises explicitly requires measurement of the flow-weighted average tracer concentration at each monitoring site. Because noninvasive tracer measurements provide indices of the unweighted average tracer concentration, a velocity measurement error, {delta}({zeta}), arises, {delta}({zeta}) is quantified in relation to the axial location of the measurement site, the velocity profile, the tracer Peclet number, and the radial distribution of tracer at the vessel inlet. {Delta}({zeta}) does not vanish when tracer enters a microvessel with a radially uniform concentration profile, but does vanish past a critical distance, Lc, from the microvessel entrance. The critical distance can be estimated using Lc/d = 0.05(vd)/D (d. vessel diameter; v, average flow velocity; D, tracer diffusivity). Accordingly, tracer data can be used to quantify flow velocity within a microvessel provided the microvessel length allows for monitoring tracer flow beyond the estimated Lc value. This study serves as a necessary precursor to analyses of plasma-phase tracers used to measure microvascular plasma flow.

  19. Isotopic Tracer Study of Hydraulic Transfer Between Native Woody Shrubs and Associated Annual Crops Under Dry Conditions in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogie, Nathaniel; Bayala, Roger; Diedhiou, Ibrahima; Fogel, Marilyn; Dick, Richard; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2015-04-01

    Erratic precipitation at the beginning and end of the rainy season combined with short drought periods during the cropping season pose a major challenge for rain-fed agriculture and food security in the Sahel. Research has shown that intercropping annual crops with native evergreen woody shrubs in Senegal can greatly increase crop productivity. Hydraulic redistribution (HR), or the diurnal rewetting of dry soil by the pathway of the root system that extends into wetter soil has been found in many plants and climates worldwide. The HR pathway could be a factor in Senegal where water provided by shrubs aids crop growth during dry periods but this has not been confirmed. Therefore, the objective was to determine the ability of shrubs to provide water to millet plants using the deuterium tracer. Penisetum glaucum (Pearl Millet) was grown in association with the native woody shrub Guiera senegalensis under drip irrigation until 68 days after sowing, followed by a with holding of water during late flowering and early grain-filling stage. Within 10 days the soils in the stressed plots became extremely dry with water potentials ranging from -0.5 Mpa to -3.0 Mpa at 20cm depth. Twenty days after the initiation of water stress, vials of isotopically enriched deuterium tracer was sealed around cut roots of three separate shrubs at a depth of 1.0 m followed by sampling of aboveground tissue from injection shrubs and closely growing crop plants over a period of five days. Using cryogenic vacuum distillation, plant water samples were extracted from plant tissue. With lab work completed on two replications, a highly enriched deuterium signal was observed in the tissue water of the shrub beginning twelve hours after the injection. In the same replication thirty-six hours after the beginning of injection, a highly enriched pulse of deuterium in the crop growing directly adjacent to the injection shrub was observed. In a concurrent injection to a nearby shrub under much drier conditions, slight pulses of enrichment were found in the shrub and crop, though with much lower magnitudes. Although this was a simulated drought experiment, we were able to recreate conditions similar to those experienced at this site under rain-fed conditions, where the presence of drought is a constant threat at the beginning and the end of the season. These findings support the hypothesis that there is transfer of hydraulically lifted water from native woody shrubs to annual food crops in the region.

  20. Transfer rates of dissolved tracers through estuaries based on 228Ra: A study of Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turekian, K. K.; Tanaka, N.; Turekian, V. C.; Torgersen, T.; Deangelo, E. C.

    1996-06-01

    Using 228Ra (half-life = 5.7 y) we have determined the transfer rate of water as the carrier of tracers (dissolved substances) into Long Island Sound from its western boundary. The primary sampling was done in the summer of 1991, with additional sampling of surface waters in the winter and summer of 1992 and the summer of 1993. The ( 228Ra/ 226Ra) activity ratio was determined by ?-spectrometry of Mn-coated fibers through which sea water was passed. An independent measurement of 226Ra activity per liter of sea water via scintillation counting of 222Rn was made at each sampling site. Based on the 228Ra concentrations in Long Island Sound water, water from the western boundary (off Randalls Island near the connection of the East River with the sound) and shelf water entering the sound from the east together with the measured flux of 228Ra from Long Island Sound sediments, we can determine the transfer rate of water from the East River to Long Island Sound during the summer of 1991. This value was between 0.40 1014 l y -1 and 1.1 10 14 l y -1, depending on the 228Ra flux from sediments used. The corresponding residence time of water in Long Island sound was between 166 and 63 days.

  1. Novel and non-traditional use of stable isotope tracers to study metal bioavailability from natural particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Cain, Daniel J.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    We devised a novel tracing approach that involves enriching test organisms with a stable metal isotope of low natural abundance prior to characterizing metal bioavailability from natural inorganic particles. In addition to circumventing uncertainties associated with labeling natural particles and distinguishing background metals, the proposed "reverse labeling" technique overcomes many drawbacks inherent to using radioisotope tracers. Specifically, we chronically exposed freshwater snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) to synthetic water spiked with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu to increase the relative abundance of 65Cu in the snail’s tissues from 32% to >80%. The isotopically enriched snails were then exposed to benthic algae mixed with Cu-bearing Fe–Al particles collected from the Animas River (Colorado), an acid mine drainage impacted river. We used 63Cu to trace Cu uptake from the natural particles and inferred their bioavailability from calculation of Cu assimilation into tissues. Cu assimilation from these particles was 44%, indicating that 44% of the particulate Cu was absorbed by the invertebrate. This demonstrates that inorganic particulate Cu can be bioavailable. The reverse labeling approach shows great potential in various scientific areas such as environmental contamination and nutrition for addressing questions involving uptake of an element that naturally has multiple isotopes.

  2. Communication: Ab initio study of O{sub 4}H{sup +}: A tracer molecule in the interstellar medium?

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, George D.; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I.; Hernndez-Lamoneda, Ramn

    2014-08-28

    The structure and energetics of the protonated molecular oxygen dimer calculated via ab initio methods is reported. We find structures that share analogies with the eigen and zundel forms for the protonated water dimer although the symmetrical sharing of the proton is more prevalent. Analysis of different fragmentation channels show charge transfer processes which indicate the presence of conical intersections for various states including the ground state. An accurate estimate for the proton affinity of O{sub 4} leads to a significantly larger value (5.6 eV) than for O{sub 2} (4.4 eV), implying that the reaction H{sub 3}{sup +} + O{sub 4} ? O{sub 4}H{sup +} + H{sub 2} is exothermic by 28 Kcal/mol as opposed to the case of O{sub 2} which is nearly thermoneutral. This opens up the possibility of using O{sub 4}H{sup +} as a tracer molecule for oxygen in the interstellar medium.

  3. A Study of a Radon Gas Scrubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Schmitz, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente; Mei, Dongming

    2011-04-01

    Radon gas and its progeny are critical source of background for low background experimental devices. The required reduction of radon levels in air of the experimental area can typically be achieved with a radon scrubbing system. Various designs and techniques are commonly adopted in building a radon scrubber. For testing purpose, a single column system has been built at USD to study the radon-adsorption properties of activated charcoal. In this paper, we will demonstrate the working principle and test results. This work is supported by the NSF Grant PHY-0758120.

  4. DETECTION OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC TRACERS IN VEGETATION SMOKE SAMPLES BY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography
    (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of
    complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds
    which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC
    columns. The combination of this technique wit...

  5. Combined use of ?(13)C, ?(15)N, and ?(34)S tracers tostudy anaerobic bacterial processes in groundwater flow systems.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takahiro; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Tsushima, Akane; Shimada, Jun

    2014-05-01

    We present an approach for determining the major anaerobic bacterial processes in aquifers, using the combined stable isotope ratios of major elements (C, N, and S) as net recorders of the biogeochemical reactions. The Kumamoto groundwater is constituted of two major flow systems, A-A' and B-B', within 10(3)km-scale area. Previous study [Hosono, T., Tokunaga, T., Kagabu, M., Nakata, H., Orishikida, T., Lin, I-T., Shimada, J., 2013. The use of ?(15)N and ?(18)O tracers with an understanding of groundwater flow dynamics for evaluating the origins and attenuation mechanisms of nitrate pollution. Water Res. 47, 2661-2675.] investigated the nitrate sources and extent of denitrification using [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] tracers. In the present study, we studied a type of denitrification (heterogenic vs. autotrophic) and occurrence of sequential anaerobic processes along the flow systems with newly measured ?(13)CDIC and [Formula: see text] . In A-A' flow system, C, N, and S isotopic compositions did not change along the flow direction. However, in B-B' flow system significant sulfate reduction (with a maximum [Formula: see text] enrichment of +55) occurred along with denitrification (with a maximum [Formula: see text] enrichment of +38) as the groundwater flowed down-gradient. Depletions in [Formula: see text] (-8 maximum) were found only sporadically. These observations imply that autotrophic denitrification could occur in very limited parts of the study area. Moreover, the occurrence of methanogenic reactions was suggested by the enriched ?(13)CDIC signature (+8 maximum) at a denitrification hotspot. By characterizing C, N, and S isotope compositional changes in wide redox range (from aerobic oxidation of organic carbon, through denitrification, to sulfate reduction, until methanogenesis), we could develop the model of C, N, and S isotopic evolutional patterns under different redox scenarios. Proposed model is useful in obtaining a comprehensive understanding of the major anaerobic bacterial processes in aquifer systems, including distinguishing between heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification. PMID:24583520

  6. Past leaded gasoline emissions as a nonpoint source tracer in riparian systems: A study of river inputs to San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, C.E.; Bouse, R.; Flegal, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of lead in 1995-1998 river waters flowing into San Francisco Bay trace the washout of lead deposited in the drainage basin from leaded gasoline combustion. At the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers where they enter the Bay, the isotopic compositions of lead in the waters define a linear trend away from the measured historical compositions of leaded gas in California. The river waters are shifted away from leaded gasoline values and toward an isotopic composition similar to Sierra Nevadan inputs which became the predominant source of sedimentation in San Francisco Bay following the onset of hydraulic gold mining in 1853. Using lead isotopic compositions of hydraulic mine sediments and average leaded gasoline as mixing end members, we calculate that more than 50% of the lead in the present river water originated from leaded gasoline combustion. The strong adsorption of lead (log K(d) > 7.4) to particulates appears to limit the flushing of gasoline lead from the drainage basin, and the removal of that lead from the system may have reached an asymptotic limit. Consequently, gasoline lead isotopes should prove to be a useful nonpoint source tracer of the environmental distribution of particle- reactive anthropogenic metals in freshwater systems.

  7. Estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages of groundwater from selected sites: National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 2006-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Stephanie D.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Widman, Peggy K.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Wayland, Julian E.; Runkle, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    Piston-flow age dates were interpreted from measured concentrations of environmental tracers from 812 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program groundwater sites from 27 Study Units across the United States. The tracers of interest include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He). Tracer data compiled for this analysis were collected from 2006 to 2010 from groundwater wells in NAWQA studies, including: * Land-Use Studies (LUS, shallow wells, usually monitoring wells, located in recharge areas under dominant land-use settings), * Major-Aquifer Studies (MAS, wells, usually domestic supply wells, located in principal aquifers and representing the shallow drinking water supply), * Flow System Studies (FSS, networks of clustered wells located along a flowpath extending from a recharge zone to a discharge zone, preferably a shallow stream) associated with Land-Use Studies, and * Reference wells (wells representing groundwater minimally impacted by anthropogenic activities) also associated with Land-Use Studies. Tracer data were evaluated using documented methods and are presented as aqueous concentrations, equivalent atmospheric concentrations (for CFCs and SF6), and tracer-based piston-flow ages. Selected ancillary data, such as redox data, well-construction data, and major dissolved-gas (N2, O2, Ar, CH4, and CO2) data, also are presented. Recharge temperature was inferred using climate data (approximated by mean annual air temperature plus 1C [MAAT +1C]) as well as major dissolved-gas data (N2-Ar-based) where available. The N2-Ar-based temperatures showed significantly more variation than the climate-based data, as well as the effects of denitrification and degassing resulting from reducing conditions. The N2-Ar-based temperatures were colder than the climate-based temperatures in networks where recharge was limited to the winter months when evapotranspiration was reduced. The tracer-based piston-flow ages compiled in this report are provided as a consistent means of reporting the tracer data. The tracer-based piston-flow ages may provide an initial interpretation of age in cases in which mixing is minimal and may aid in developing a basic conceptualization of groundwater age in an aquifer. These interpretations are based on the assumption that tracer transport is by advection only and that no mixing occurs. In addition, it is assumed that other uncertainties are minimized, including tracer degradation, sorption, contamination, or fractionation, and that terrigenic (natural) sources of tracers, and spatially variable atmospheric tracer concentrations are constrained.

  8. Studies in skeletal tracer kinetics. V. Computer-simulated Tc-99m(Sn)MDP bone-scan changes in some systemic disorders: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Charkes, N.D.; Makler, P.T. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Using compartmental analysis techniques, we modeled the biodistribution of Tc-99m(Sn)methylene diphosphonate in humans on a computer, and by selectively perturbing appropriate rate constants, we simulated changes in contrast between bone and soft tissue in a number of systemic disorders. The model predicts low contrast in patients with moderate to marked edema, obesity, congestive heart failure, or decreased cardiac output states and high contrast with as little as 25% increase in bone avidity for the tracer. In acute renal failure without fluid-volume imbalance, image contrast should be normal. The model predicts greater contrast shortly after injection in patients with increased cardiac output, skeletal blood flow, or bone avidity; images made at these times would be indistinguishable. These simulations are in keeping with reports in the literature of bone images and bone-to-soft tissue ratios in many of these conditions, suggesting that modeling studies could play an important role in image interpretation.

  9. Studies in skeletal tracer kinetics. V: Computer-simulated Tc-99m (Sn)MDP bone-scan changes in some systemic disorders: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Charkes, N.D.; Makler, P.T. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Using compartmental analysis techniques, we modeled the biodistribution of Tc-99m(Sn)methylene diphosphonate in humans on a computer, and by selectively perturbing appropriate rate constants, we simulated changes in contrast between bone and soft tissue in a number of systemic disorders. The model predicts low contrast in patients with moderate to marked edema, obesity, congestive heart failure or decreased cardiac output states and high contrast with as little as 25% increase in bone avidity for the tracer. In acute renal failure without fluid-volume imbalance, image contrast should be normal. The model predicts greater contrast shortly after injection in patients with increased cardiac output, skeletal blood flow, or bone avidity; images made at these times would be indistinguishable. These simulations are in keeping with reports in the literature of bone images and bone-to-soft tissue ratios in many of these conditions, suggesting that modeling studies could play an important role image interpretation.

  10. Studies in skeletal tracer kinetics. V: Computer-simulated Tc-99m (Sn)MDP bone-scan changes in some systemic disorders: concise communication.

    PubMed

    Charkes, N D; Makler, P T

    1981-07-01

    Using compartmental analysis techniques, we modeled the biodistribution of Tc-99m(Sn)methylene diphosphonate in humans on a computer, and by selectively perturbing appropriate rate constants, we simulated changes in contrast between bone and soft tissue in a number of systemic disorders. The model predicts low contrast in patients with moderate to marked edema, obesity, congestive heart failure or decreased cardiac output states and high contrast with as little as 25% increase in bone avidity for the tracer. In acute renal failure without fluid-volume imbalance, image contrast should be normal. The model predicts greater contrast shortly after injection in patients with increased cardiac output, skeletal blood flow, or bone avidity; images made at these times would be indistinguishable. These simulations are in keeping with reports in the literature of bone images and bone-to-soft tissue ratios in many of these conditions, suggesting that modeling studies could play an important role image interpretation. PMID:6454764

  11. Kinetic studies of gas phase free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, C.; Reisler, H.

    1982-11-01

    Detailed studies of elementary unimolecular and bimolecular gas phase processes were carried out using the time resolved techniques of laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence. Bimolecular reactions of diatomic and triatomic carbon and the ethynyl radical with small polyatomic molecules were investigated, and rate coefficients and energy disposal into product degrees of freedom were determined. The study of unimolecular reactions induced by multiple photon excitation concentrated on simple bond fission reactions. Nascent rovibronic state distributions in the dissociation products of trifluoroacetonitrile were determined as a function of laser fluence and intensity. The rate of the unimolecular reaction of 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane was measured following dye laser excitation, and found to be faster than the rate deduced from thermal activation experiments.

  12. Evaluating short-term changes in recreational water quality during a hydrograph event using a combination of microbial tracers, environmental microbiology, microbial source tracking and hydrological techniques: a case study in Southwest Wales, UK.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Mark D; Kay, David; Watkins, John; Davies, Cheryl; Kay, Chris; Thomas, Rod; Porter, Jonathan; Stapleton, Carl M; Moore, Heather

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative assessment of multiple sources to short-term variations in recreational water quality, as indexed by faecal indicator organism (FIO) concentrations, is becoming increasingly important with adoption of modern water quality standards and catchment-based water quality management requirements (e.g. the EU Water Framework Directive, Article 11 'Programmes of Measures' and the US Clean Water Act, 'Total Maximum Daily Loads'). This paper describes a study combining microbial tracers, intensive FIO measurement, open channel hydrology and molecular microbial source tracking (MST) to enhance understanding of recreational water quality at Amroth in southwest Wales, UK. Microbial tracers were released from four stream inputs during a moderate hydrograph event. Tracers from two local streams impacted simultaneously with a period of maximum FIO concentrations at the near-shore compliance monitoring site. Connection between these inputs and this site were rapid (9-33 min). Water quality impairment from a more remote stream input followed, 12.85 h after tracer release, sustaining FIO concentrations above desired compliance levels. MST analysis showed dominance of ruminant Bacteroidales genetic markers, associated with agricultural pollution. This integration of tracers and MST offers additional information on the movement and individual sources causing water quality impairment. PMID:20630556

  13. Tracers in vascular casting resins enhance backscattering brightness.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Ganesan, Dhanalakshmi P

    2002-01-01

    Studying cast microvasculature with scanning electron microscopy has expanded our knowledge of many circulations, but need arises to determine the blood source of vascular beds that are supplied by two circulations. One way to do this is to mark the casting resin by adding a tracer compound that can be detected in the scanning electron microscope. A potential method of distinguishing different substances is to detect the backscattered electrons that are emitted from the tracer if the tracer is a heavier element, because heavier elements backscatter more electrons. To explore different tracers, we tested lead, titanium, iron, osmium, and uranium as solutions of different polarity and powders. The tracers were added to 1 ml of methyl methacrylate in log concentrations. Shrinkage, hardness, cast quality, and change in brightness from the tracer were compared with multivariate analysis at scanning electron microscopic working distances of 15 and 39 mm on carbon-coated and uncoated specimens. Several concentrations caused sedimentation of the tracer and prevented the resin from solidifying. Tetraethyl lead shortened the hardening time: uranyl acetate and osmium tetroxide prolonged it. Most tracers decreased shrinkage. When lead citrate and Reynolds solutions were removed, the brightness correlated with increasing atomic number, concentration of the tracer, and mean atomic number of the specimen (p <0.0001). The substances that increased contrast most were tetraethyl lead and uranium. Backscattering electron detection can distinguish methacrylate casts that have small amounts of heavier elements added to them, but an optimal tracer has not yet been established. PMID:12074492

  14. Neurotoxicity after intracarotid 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea administration in the rat: Hemodynamic changes studied by double-tracer autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahiro, S.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Diksic, M.; Mitsuka, S.; Sugimoto, S.; Feindel, W. )

    1991-07-01

    Changes in blood-brain (BBB) permeability and local cerebral blood flow after intracarotid administration of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) were examined quantitatively in rats with double-tracer autoradiography using (14C)alpha-amino-isobutyric acid and (18F)fluoroantipyrine. Forty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into four groups. The control group (Group 1) received 1 ml of 5% dextrose. The other three groups received three different doses of BCNU dissolved in 5% dextrose: Group 2 rats received 1 mg, Group 3 3 mg, and Group 4 10 mg. The tracer study was performed on Day 1 or Days 4 to 12 after intracarotid administration of BCNU. In 11 rats in Group 2, there were no changes of BBB permeability. Transient BBB permeability changes were seen in the striatum or hippocampus in 3 of the 5 rats (60%) in Group 3 within 24 hours. In 8 of 9 rats (89%) in the same group, late BBB permeability changes were observed in the hypothalamus with or without histological changes. BBB permeability changes were seen in all rats of Group 4. Focal increase of local cerebral blood flow on the infused side compared with the non-infused side of the brain was observed, although not at a significant level, in 5 of 25 rats examined with (18F)fluoroantipyrine. The results of BBB permeability and histological examinations and study of heterogenous distribution by (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose indicated that the ipsilateral subcortical structures such as the hypothalamus, amygdala, internal capsule, and caudate putamen have the highest incidence of neurotoxicity, which are closely related to histopathological damage seen in human BCNU leucoencephalopathy.

  15. Can Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography with the Dual Tracers Fluorine-18 Fluoroestradiol and Fluorodeoxyglucose Predict Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response of Breast Cancer? ----A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongyi; Sun, Yifei; Xue, Jing; Yao, Zhifeng; Xu, Junyan; Cheng, Jingyi; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Beiling; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Yingjian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the clinical value of dual tracers Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) 18F-fluoroestradiol (18F-FES) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in predicting neoadjuvant chemotherapy response (NAC) of breast cancer. Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, non-inflammatory, stage II and III breast cancer undergoing NAC were included. Before chemotherapy, they underwent both 18F-FES and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Surgery was performed after three to six cycles of chemotherapy. Tumor response was graded and divided into two groups: the responders and non-responders. We used the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) to qualify each primary lesion. Results Pathologic analysis revealed 10 patients were responders while the other 8 patients were non-responders. There was no statistical difference of SUVmax-FDG and tumor size between these two groups (P>0.05). On the contrary, SUVmax-FES was lower in responders (1.750.66 versus 4.421.14; U=5, P=0.002); and SUVmax-FES/FDG also showed great value in predicting outcome (0.160.06 versus 0.540.22; U=5, P=0.002). Conclusions Our study showed 18F-FES PET/CT might be feasible to predict response of NAC. However, whether the use of dual tracers 18F-FES and 18F-FDG has complementary value should be further studied. PMID:24205151

  16. A review of methods for modelling environmental tracers in groundwater: Advantages of tracer concentration simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnadge, Chris; Smerdon, Brian D.

    2014-11-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have been developed since the 1960s to interpret environmental tracer concentrations in groundwater flow systems. This review examines published studies of model-based environmental tracer interpretation, the progress of different modelling approaches, and also considers the value of modelling tracer concentrations directly rather than estimations of groundwater age. Based on citation metrics generated using the Web of Science and Google Scholar reference databases, the most highly utilised interpretation approaches are lumped parameter models (421 citations), followed closely by direct age models (220 citations). A third approach is the use of mixing cell models (99 citations). Although lumped parameter models are conceptually simple and require limited data, they are unsuitable for characterising the internal dynamics of a hydrogeological system and/or under conditions where large scale anthropogenic stresses occur within a groundwater basin. Groundwater age modelling, and in particular, the simulation of environmental tracer transport that explicitly accounts for the accumulation and decay of tracer mass, has proven to be highly beneficial in constraining numerical models. Recent improvements in computing power have made numerical simulation of tracer transport feasible. We argue that, unlike directly simulated ages, the results of tracer mass transport simulation can be compared directly to observations, without needing to correct for apparent age bias or other confounding factors.

  17. Seasonal variation of secondary organic aerosol tracers in Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, R.-Q.; Ding, X.; He, Q.-F.; Cong, Z.-Y.; Yu, Q.-Q.; Wang, X.-M.

    2015-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) affects the earth's radiation balance and global climate. High-elevation areas are sensitive to global climate change. However, at present, SOA origins and seasonal variations are understudied in remote high-elevation areas. In this study, particulate samples were collected from July 2012 to July 2013 at the remote Nam Co (NC) site, Central Tibetan Plateau and analyzed for SOA tracers from biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes and ?-caryophyllene) and anthropogenic (aromatics) precursors. Among these compounds, isoprene SOA (SOAI) tracers represented the majority (26.6 44.2 ng m-3), followed by monoterpene SOA (SOAM) tracers (0.97 0.57 ng m-3), aromatic SOA (SOAA) tracer (2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid, DHOPA, 0.25 0.18 ng m-3) and ?-caryophyllene SOA tracer (?-caryophyllenic acid, 0.09 0.10 ng m-3). SOAI tracers exhibited high concentrations in the summer and low levels in the winter. The similar temperature dependence of SOAI tracers and isoprene emission suggested that the seasonal variation of SOAI tracers at the NC site was mainly influenced by the isoprene emission. The ratio of high-NOx to low-NOx products of SOAI (2-methylglyceric acid to 2-methyltetrols) was highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, due to the influence of temperature and relative humidity. The seasonal variation of SOAM tracers was impacted by monoterpenes emission and gas-particle partitioning. During the summer to the fall, temperature effect on partitioning was the dominant process influencing SOAM tracers' variation; while the temperature effect on emission was the dominant process influencing SOAM tracers' variation during the winter to the spring. SOAM tracer levels did not elevate with increased temperature in the summer, probably resulting from the counteraction of temperature effects on emission and partitioning. The concentrations of DHOPA were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those reported in the urban regions of the world. Due to the transport of air pollutants from the adjacent Bangladesh and northeastern India, DHOPA presented relatively higher levels in the summer. In the winter when air masses mainly came from northwestern India, mass fractions of DHOPA in total tracers increased, although its concentrations declined. The SOA-tracer method was applied to estimate secondary organic carbon (SOC) from these four precursors. The annual average of SOC was 0.22 0.29 ?gC m-3, with the biogenic SOC (sum of isoprene, monoterpenes and ?-caryophyllene) accounting for 75 %. In the summer, isoprene was the major precursor with its SOC contributions of 81 %. In the winter when the emission of biogenic precursors largely dropped, the contributions of aromatic SOC increased. Our study implies that anthropogenic pollutants emitted in the Indian subcontinent could be transported to the TP and have an impact on SOC over the remote NC.

  18. Use of environmental tracers to study the chemical evolution of shallow ground water in a karst area of northern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G. ); Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E. )

    1993-03-01

    The pathways of shallow ground-water flow in poorly confined aquifer systems of northern FL are influenced by inflow to and outflow from numerous sinkhole lakes that are characteristic of the Sand Hills karst region. Ground-water samples were collected immediately upgradient and downgradient from Lake Barco at depths of 1.6--29 m below the water table from observation wells completed in the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate confining unit (icu), and the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples were also collected of rainfall, lake water, and ground water at a depth of 4.1 m beneath the lake bottom. The environmental tracers tritium and chlorofluorocarbons were used to estimate mean residence times of water and rates of chemical mass transfer along flow paths. Water samples collected from wells upgradient of the lake were oxic and had CFC-model recharge dates between 1971 and 1986. The content of delta H-2 and delta O-18 of water from the two aquifer systems and the icu was nearly identical to the isotopic composition of rainfall. Changes in the chemical composition of the ground water with depth were simulated by reacting rainfall with minerals and dissolved gases that exist in the hydrogeologic units. Ground-water samples collected from sites beneath and downgradient of the lake were anoxic, with measured concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane ranging from 0.02--0.58 mg/l and 0.30--6.1 mg/l, respectively. CFC-model recharge dates ranged from 1956 to 1983. The data indicated that ground water downgradient of the lake is being recharged by leakage of lake water. The chemical composition of ground water is influenced by the movement of lake water through reducing, organic-rich sediments accumulated at the bottom. Along the downgradient flow paths, the water chemistry evolves from the composition of lake water and is modified by subsequent reactions including reduction of sulfate and ferric iron, methanogenesis, and dissolution and precipitation of minerals.

  19. Tracer for circulation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, H.; Santos, S.; Wysong, R. D.

    1985-03-19

    An improved tracer particle is described comprising an ion exchange core having a polymer coating thereon, the coated ion exchange core having a reaction site capable of reacting with a compound containing an oxirane group, said coated ion exchange core having been treated with a compound containing an oxirane group to react with said coated ion exchange core causing an increase in mass of the tracer particle. Preferably, the ion exchange core is labelled with a radionuclide. These particles have improved characteristics including improved stability against leaching and improved handling properties. Such particles are useful in circulatory determinations involving the injection of the particles as a suspension in a physiologically acceptable carrier or medium into the circulatory system of animals.

  20. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeCain, Gary D.

    1998-01-01

    Air-injection and tracer testing were conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from August 1994 to July 1991. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. HST/COS detection of a Ne VIII absorber towards PG 1407+265: an unambiguous tracer of collisionally ionized hot gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Muzahid, S.; Narayanan, A.; Srianand, R.; Wakker, B. P.; Charlton, J. C.; Pathak, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the detection of Ne VIII in a zabs = 0.599 61 absorber towards the QSO PG1407+265 (zem= 0.94). Besides Ne VIII, absorption from H I Lyman series lines (H I λ1025-λ915), several other low (C II, N II, O II and S II), intermediate (C III, N III, N IV, O III, S IV and S V) and high (S VI, O VI and Ne VIII) ionization metal lines are detected. Disparity in the absorption line kinematics between different ions implies that the absorbing gas comprises of multiple ionization phases. The low and the intermediate ions (except S V) trace a compact (˜410 pc), metal-rich (Z ˜ Z⊙) and overdense (log nH ˜ -2.6) photoionized region that sustained star formation for a prolonged period. The high ions, Ne VIII and O VI, can be explained as arising in a low density (-5.3 ≤ log nH ≤ -5.0), metal-rich (Z ≳ Z⊙) and diffuse (˜180 kpc) photoionized gas. The S V, S VI and C IV [detected in the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) spectrum] require an intermediate photoionization phase with -4.2 < log nH < -3.5. Alternatively, a pure collisional ionization model, as used to explain the previous known Ne VIII absorbers, with 5.65 < log T < 5.72, can reproduce the S VI, O VI and Ne VIII column densities simultaneously in a single phase. However, even such models require an intermediate phase to reproduce any observable S V and/or C IV. Therefore, we conclude that when multiple phases are present, the presence of Ne VIII is not necessarily an unambiguous indication of collisionally ionized hot gas.

  2. A personal exposure study employing scripted activities and paths in conjunction with atmospheric releases of perfluorocarbon tracers in Manhattan, New York

    PubMed Central

    LIOY, PAUL J; VALLERO, DANIEL; FOLEY, GARY; GEORGOPOULOS, PANOS; HEISER, JOHN; WATSON, TOM; REYNOLDS, MICHAEL; DALOIA, JAMES; TONG, SAI; ISUKAPALLI, SASTRY

    2014-01-01

    A personal exposure study was conducted in New York City as part of the Urban Dispersion Program (UDP). It examined the contact of individuals with four harmless perflourocarbon tracers (PFT) released in Midtown Manhattan with approval by city agencies at separate locations, during two types of experiments, completed during each release period. Two continuous 1 h release periods separated by a 1.5 h ventilation time were completed on 3 October 2005. Stationary site and personal exposure measurements were taken during each period, and the first half hour after the release ended. Two types of scripted exposure activities are reported: Outdoor Source Scale, and Outdoor Neighborhood Scale; requiring 1- and 10-min duration samples, respectively. The results showed that exposures were influenced by the surface winds, the urban terrain, and the movements of people and vehicles typical in urban centers. The source scale exposure data indicated that local conditions significantly affected the distribution of each tracer, and consequently the exposures. The highest PFT exposures resulted from interaction of the scripted activities with local surface conditions. The range measured for 1- min exposures were large with measured values exceeding 5000 ppqv (parts per quadrillion by volume). The neighborhood scale measurements quantified exposures at distances up to seven blocks away from the release points. Generally, but not always, the PFT levels returned quickly to zero indicating that after cessation of the emissions the concentrations decrease rapidly, and reduce the intensity of local exposures. The near source and neighborhood personal exposure route results provided information to establish a baseline for determining how a release could affect both the general public and emergency responders, and evaluate the adequacy of re-entry or exit strategies from a local area. Finally, the data also show that local characteristics can produce hot spots. PMID:17505505

  3. Delineation and segmentation of cerebral tumors by mapping blood-brain barrier disruption with dynamic contrast-enhanced CT and tracer kinetics modeling-a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Yang, X; Lim, C C T; Vogl, T J; Koh, T S

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging is a promising approach for in vivo assessment of tissue microcirculation. Twenty patients with clinical and routine computed tomography (CT) evidence of intracerebral neoplasm were examined with DCE-CT imaging. Using a distributed-parameter model for tracer kinetics modeling of DCE-CT data, voxel-level maps of cerebral blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (vi) and intravascular mean transit time (t1) were generated. Permeability-surface area product (PS), extravascular extracellular blood volume (ve) and extraction ratio (E) maps were also calculated to reveal pathologic locations of tracer extravasation, which are indicative of disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). All maps were visually assessed for quality of tumor delineation and measurement of tumor extent by two radiologists. Kappa (kappa) coefficients and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to determine the interobserver agreement for each DCE-CT map. There was a substantial agreement for the tumor delineation quality in the F, ve and t1 maps. The agreement for the quality of the tumor delineation was excellent for the vi, PS and E maps. Concerning the measurement of tumor extent, excellent and nearly excellent agreement was achieved only for E and PS maps, respectively. According to these results, we performed a segmentation of the cerebral tumors on the base of the E maps. The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on manual segmentation of tumor in the E maps vs. the computer-assisted segmentation was excellent (kappa = 0.96, CI: 0.93-0.99). The interobserver agreement for the tumor extent quantification based on computer segmentation in the mean images and the E maps was substantial (kappa = 0.52, CI: 0.42-0.59). This study illustrates the diagnostic usefulness of parametric maps associated with BBB disruption on a physiology-based approach and highlights the feasibility for automatic segmentation of cerebral tumors. PMID:17701183

  4. Local and regional contributions to the atmospheric aerosol over Tel Aviv, Israel: a case study using elemental, ionic and organic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bim; Falkovich, Alla H.; Rudich, Yinon; Maenhaut, Willy; Guyon, Pascal; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    Changes in aerosol composition associated with a cold front passage were examined during a field experiment in Tel Aviv, Israel (2-15 Dec, 2000). In addition to monitoring aerosol scattering and optical thickness, aerosol samples were collected for detailed chemical analyses. Data were compared to simultaneous measurements made at Sde Boker, a semi-remote site in the Negev Desert, to help determine what changes were due to local pollution as opposed to regional phenomena. During the pre-frontal period (2-7 Dec) both sites were influenced by air masses containing a relatively high content of sulphate and dust, originating from neighbouring regions of the Middle East. A steady build-up of local pollution was then observed in Tel Aviv due to vehicular emissions/industrial activities, as indicated by increasing concentrations of black carbon, organic carbon, V, Cu, Ni, Zn, Br, Pb, NO 3- and PAHs. Identification of a number of organic biomass burning tracers (e.g., levoglucosan) indicates that smoke also contributed to the pollution build-up in Tel Aviv, while a range of sugars/sugar alcohols point to a microbial/bioaerosol component. Locally emitted pollutants tended to exhibit higher nighttime concentrations due to trapping of pollution under a nocturnal inversion. Fine aerosol iodine was the only element exhibiting higher daytime concentrations, hinting at a photochemical source. Post-frontal measurements (12-15 Dec) revealed a significant decrease in all pollutants due to dispersal of the haze by the cold front (8-9 Dec), with the air initially being dominated by marine aerosol. Concentrations of pollutants then began to increase, with backward trajectories indicating a possible contribution from Eastern Europe. Overall, the study identified a range of useful tracers for monitoring the contribution of different sources to the aerosol over Israel.

  5. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  6. Parametric study of gas entry into cemented wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.; Wiggins, M.L.

    1997-09-01

    A cement slurry is placed in a wellbore to harden into an impermeable mass that seals the annulus from fluid flow and protects the casing from corrosion for the life of the well. If fluid flow does occur in the form of gas migration, expensive remedial squeeze-cementing techniques are generally required. The objective of the work covered in this paper was to study the parameters that affect entry of gas into a cemented annulus. This research incorporated a detailed study of the factors that contribute to gas influx from the time of initial placement of the slurry, through the gelation or transition state of the slurry, to the set condition. On the basis of the understanding of the processes involved in gas entry, a simulator was developed that predicts the amount of gas that enters a cemented wellbore, and identifies the critical parameters that affect the gas entry. This study concerns itself with a portion of the gas flow problem: the entry of gas into a cemented annulus--and not with the flow of the gas up through the cement and the formation of a gas channel. This study will provide insight to the following questions. What cement properties are important to minimize gas entry? What role does fluid loss play in minimizing gas influx? What well parameters affect gas entry?

  7. N2O As A Tracer Of Antarctic Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Chan, K. R.; Strahan, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses use of natural N2O as tracer gas in effort to determine large-scale lower stratospheric air flows during 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Data essential to understanding motions of air into and out of southern polar vortex and "ozone hole". N2O chosen as tracer because it has purely tropospheric sources, has troposheric lifetime greater than 20 years, and has long chemical lifetime in lower stratosphere.

  8. Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

    2006-06-01

    A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

  9. Geologic studies of deep natural gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T. S., (Edited By); Kuuskraa, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995, the USGS estimated a mean resource of 114 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable natural gas in plays deeper than 15,000 feet/4,572 meters in onshore regions of the United States. This volume summarizes major conclusions of ongoing work. Chapters A and B address the areal extent of drilling and distribution of deep basins in the U.S. Chapter C summarizes distribution of deep sedimentary basins and potential for deep gas in the former Soviet Union. Chapters D and E are geochemical papers addressing source-rock issues and deep gas generation. Chapter F develops a probabilistic method for subdividing gas resources into depth slices, and chapter G analyzes the relative uncertainty of estimates of deep gas in plays in the Gulf Coast Region. Chapter H evaluates the mechanism of hydrogenation of deep, high-rank spent kerogen by water, with subsequent generation of methane-rich HC gas.

  10. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  11. Particle and tracer diffusion in complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koynov, Kaloian; Butt, Hans-Jrgen

    2013-02-01

    The diffusion of fluorescent tracers can be studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This powerful method offers the possibility to monitor very small tracers at low concentrations, down to single molecules. Furthermore it possesses a sub-femtoliter detection volume that can be precisely positioned in a heterogeneous environment to probe the local dynamics. Despite its great potential and high versatility in addressing the diffusion and transport properties in complex systems, FCS has been predominantly applied in molecular and cell biology. Here we present some applications that are more relevant for material and soft matter science. First, we study the diffusion of single tracers with molecular sizes in undiluted polymer systems. Next, the diffusion of small molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) in silica inverse opals is studied and correlated to the size and morphology of the inverse opals. Finally, we show how FCS can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles at water-oil interfaces.

  12. Determination of ketone body kinetics using a D-(-)-3-hydroxy(4,4,4-/sub 2/H/sup 3/)butyrate tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Bougneres, P.F.; Balasse, E.O.; Ferre, P.; Bier, D.M.

    1986-02-01

    In studies where D-(-)-3-hydroxy(4,4,4-/sub 2/H/sup 3/)butyrate is employed as isotopic tracer in vivo, we have described a selected ion monitoring, gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry micromethod which measures (/sub 2/H/sup 3/) tracer enrichment in 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate from 300-microliters blood samples. For plasma samples in the physiologic range, intra- and interassay precisions for each ketone averaged better than +/- 1% and +/- 2%, respectively. The use of the method was validated by comparing kinetic data obtained with the above tracer with simultaneous flux data obtained with conventional D-(-)-3-hydroxy(3-/sup 14/C)butyrate tracer in five fasted rats.

  13. The dispersion of atmospheric tracers in nocturnal drainage flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P. H.; Shearer, D. L.

    1989-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a series of perfluorocarbon tracer experiments that were carried out in the Brush Creek Valley in western Colorado under the auspices of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. The results indicate that tracers entrained within the valley's nocturnal drainage flows displayed well defined plumes that were not influenced significantly by the larger scale flows above this deep and narrow valley. Thus, the spatial distributions of the tracers were primarily governed by the structure of the drainage flows. None of the tracers released within the valley were detected in significant quantities on the adjoining meses or within the adjacent valleys prior to sunrise.

  14. Feasibility studies of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J.D.; Howes, R.I.; Hawkyard, I.R.; Fishlock, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Preliminary results obtained from a program of experimental and theoretical studies examining the uncertainties of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs are reported. In spite of high trapped-gas saturations (35 to 39%), further aggravated by an unusual type of hysteresis, recoveries of gas and liquids can be increased over those obtained under natural depletion.

  15. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater in karst environments tends to have difficulties to distinguish multiple flows if several sources of water are present. Skaistkalne vicinity faces with such situation where old groundwater, fresh groundwater and inflow from river Iecava occurs. Attempts were made to distinguish groundwater residence time of multiple components of water applying CFC and tritium dating techniques supplied by tracer test and numerical model of study area. Study area covers territory between two rivers Iecava and Memele with water level difference of 7 meters and horizontal distance of 2.2 kilometres between both. Study area consists of karst affected Devonian gypsum and carbonaceous rocks covered by Quaternary low to high permeable deposits. Confined groundwater at depth of 10-25 meters where analysed by CFC's and tritium. At this depth groundwater exhibits anoxic reducing environment that has caused degradation of CFC's at similar degree in all samples. Taking it into account, mean residence time based on CFC piston flow model is 22 - 42 years and 28 - 34 years based on binary mixing model. Tritium results show signs of incensement of groundwater residence time towards discharge area. CFC combined with tritium proved increased vertical velocity in middle part between the rivers likely caused by hydrogeological window in Quaternary deposits created by karst processes. Numerical model (Delina et al. 2012) was applied and calculations yielded groundwater flow velocity rate at 0.3 - 1 m/day in area between the rivers. Investigation of CFC data resulted in possible groundwater flow rate of at a minimum of 0.2 m/day although it's not applicable to all sampled wells due to specific hydrogeological conditions. Tracer test was made between the rivers in order to distinguish main water flow paths and flow velocity. Results showed that very high permeable conduits connect rivers and karst lakes with velocity rates of 800 - 1300 m/day. Complex investigation leads to conclude that three different sources of groundwater occur characterized by different flow velocity, recharge age and chemical composition. Although CFC's has been degraded, it is possible to use the results to distinguish groundwater different components and even to estimate groundwater flow velocity because of near located recharge and discharge areas. Tritium results doesn't show considerable variations along flow path with 6 TU in average confirming conclusions based on CFC's. Tracer test approve very high groundwater velocity zones in study area that supposedly doesn't mix with groundwater in matrix. References Delina A., Babre A., Popovs K., Sennikovs J., Grinberga B. 2012. Effects of karst processes on surface water and groundwater hydrology at Skaistkalne vicinity, Latvia. - Hydrology Research, 43(4), IWA Publishing, pp. 445-459, doi:10.2166/nh.2012.123. This study is supported by ERAF project Nr. 1013/00542DP/2.1.1.1.0/13/APIA/VIAA/007

  16. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine and Petroleum Geology 2010, 27, (6), 1157-1165.

  17. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-05

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications, both in terms of incorporation of technology into current products, as well as to an NGGT product. In summary, potential program costs are shown for development of the candidate systems along with the importance of future DOE enabling participation. Three main conclusions have been established via this study: (1) Rapid recent changes within the power generation regulatory environment and the resulting ''bubble'' of gas turbine orders has altered the timing and relative significance associated with the conclusions of the ADL study upon which the original DOE NGGT solicitation was based. (2) Assuming that the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity circa 2010, the top candidate system that meets or exceeds the DOE PRDA requirements was determined to be a hybrid aero-derivative/heavy duty concept. (3) An investment by DOE of approximately $23MM/year to develop NGGT technologies near/mid term for validation and migration into a reasonable fraction of the installed base of GE F-class products could be leveraged into $1.2B Public Benefit, with greatest benefits resulting from RAM improvements. In addition to the monetary Public Benefit, there is also significant benefit in terms of reduced energy consumption, and reduced power plant land usage.

  18. On the Interpretation of tracer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, Ibrahim; Horne, Roland N.; Brigham, William E.

    1994-01-20

    Recently, two new developments appeared in the literature on modelling flow and transport in heterogeneous systems. The first one is the use of two different concentration variables namely, the resident and flux concentrations, in tracer studies. The second one involves representing the heterogeneity by means of a frequency disribution function for immobile phase size. Based on these developments, this work involves a classification of the solutions of transport equation in heterogeneous systems. It also demonstrates interpretation of tracer experiments in such systems. Distinguishing between the resident and flux concentration variables prevents the inconsistencies between theoretical solutions and actual conditions of experiments and hence, allows correct interpretation of tracer return profiles. Representing heterogeneities by means of frequency distribution functions allows representing matrix blocks of various sizes likely to exist in a fractured reservoir.

  19. Cumulus cloud transport of transient tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidel, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for including cumulus cloud transport, rainout of water soluble gases, and aqueous phase chemistry into gas phase photochemical models. Cloud populations are represented as ensemble distributions of individual clouds of various heights. An individual cloud is represented as a one-dimensional, steady state plume with height-independent radius entraining air from the boundary of the cloud. The model is applied to several hypothetical atmospheric tracers to show how clouds may affect the tropospheric distributions of ozone, NO(y), SO2, peroxyacetylnitrate, hydrocarbons, and other gases. Although the numerical experiments were based on cloud mass fluxes from diagnostic studies in the tropics and thus are not representative of the entire globe, it was found that an increasing mixing ratio with height in the free troposphere can be produced for some gases with only a surface source when clouds are present. This suggests that some reactive tropospheric species with primarily surface sources may play a somewhat more important role in tropospheric chemistry than is presently believed depending on the global distribution of cloud mass fluxes. Deficiencies in existing photochemical models due to the way clouds are typically treated are discussed.

  20. Tracer Diffusion and Unidirectional Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Peter F.; Taylor, Aubrey E.; Solomon, A. K.

    1967-01-01

    Available experimental data have been utilized to examine the effects of cross-coefficients on tracer diffusion and on the estimation of unidirectional fluxes from observations on tracer flow. In free solution or in a nonselective membrane, the interaction between the flows of tracer and the unlabelled substance are small at concentrations of biological interest for the nonelectrolytes urea, alanine, and ?-alanine, and for sodium and chloride ions. Under these conditions, measurement of tracer flow can be used to predict flow of the bulk substance to an accuracy of a few per cent. PMID:19211003

  1. Study of tropospheric CO and O3 enhancement episode over Indonesia during Autumn 2006 using the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers (MOZART-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shuchita; Sheel, Varun

    2013-03-01

    An intense biomass burning event occurred over Indonesia in Autumn of 2006. We study the impact of this event on the free tropospheric abundances of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) using MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution In The Troposphere) observations, ozonesonde measurements and 3D chemistry transport model MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers). MOPITT observations showed an episode of enhanced CO in the free troposphere over the Indonesian region during October-November 2006. This feature is reproduced well by MOZART. The model mass diagnostics identifies the source of enhanced CO mixing ratio in the free troposphere (100-250 ppbv) as due to convective processes. The implication of the fire plume on the vertical distribution of O3 over Kuala Lumpur has been studied. The tropospheric O3 increased over this location by 10-25 ppbv during Autumn 2006 as compared to Autumn 2005 and 2007. The MOZART model simulation significantly underestimated this tropospheric O3 enhancement. The model is run both with and without Indonesian biomass burning emissions to estimate the contribution of fire emission in CO and O3 enhancement. Biomass burning emission is found to be responsible for an average increase in CO by 104 56 ppbv and O3 by 5 1 ppbv from surface to 100 hPa range. The model results also showed that biomass burning and El Nio related dynamical changes both contributed (4 ppbv-12 ppbv) to the observed increase in tropospheric O3 over the Indonesian region during Autumn 2006.

  2. VAPOR-PHASE TRANSPORT OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN AN INTERMEDIATE-SCALE VADOSE-ZONE SYSTEM: RETENTION PROCESSES AND TRACER-BASED PREDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Carlson, Tyson D.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase miscible-displacement experiments were conducted using a large weighing lysimeter to evaluate retention processes for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water-unsaturated (vadoze-zone) systems, and to test the utility of gas-phase tracers for predicting VOC retardation. Trichloroethene (TCE) served as a model VOC, while trichlorofluoromethane (CFM) and heptane were used as partitioning tracers to independently characterize retention by water and the air-water interface, respectively. Retardation factors for TCE ranged between 1.9 and 3.5, depending on water content. The results indicate that dissolution into the bulk water was the primary retention mechanism for TCE under all conditions studied, contributing approximately two thirds of the total measured retention. Accumulation at the air-water interface comprised a significant fraction of the observed retention for all experiments, with an average contribution of approximately 24%. Sorption to the solid phase contributed approximately 10% to retention. Water contents and air-water interfacial areas estimated based on the CFM and heptane tracer data, respectively, were similar to independently measured values. Retardation factors for TCE predicted using the partitioning-tracer data were in reasonable agreement with the measured values. These results suggest that gas-phase tracer tests hold promise for characterizing the retention and transport of VOCs in the vadose-zone. PMID:23333418

  3. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  4. Gas release and conductivity modification studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of gas clouds produced by releases from orbital velocity in either a point release or venting mode is described by the modification of snowplow equations valid in an intermediate altitude regime. Quantitative estimates are produced for the time dependence of the radius of the cloud, the average internal energy, the translational velocity, and the distance traveled. The dependence of these quantities on the assumed density profile, the internal energy of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats is examined. The new feature is the inclusion of the effect of the large orbital velocity. The resulting gas cloud models are used to calculate the characteristics of the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity enhancements that would be produced by the release of barium thermite at orbital velocity in either the point release or venting modes as a function of release altitude and chemical payload weight.

  5. Fluid dynamic studies on scattering aerosol and its generation for application as tracer particles in supersonic flow measurements utilizing laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Hoyle, B. D.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental study on the particle-fluid interactions of scattering aerosols was performed using monodisperse aerosols of different particle sizes for the application of laser Doppler velocimeters in subsonic turbulence measurements. Particle response was measured by subjecting the particles to an acoustically excited oscillatory fluid velocity field and by comparing the ratio of particle velocity amplitude to the fluid velocity amplitude as a function of particle size and the frequency of oscillation. Particle velocity was measured by using a differential laser Doppler velocimeter. The test aerosols were fairly monodisperse with a mean diameter that could be controlled over the size range from 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Experimental results on the generation of a fairly monodisperse aerosol of solid particles and liquid droplets and on the aerosol response in the frequency range 100 Hz to 100 kHz are presented. It is indicated that a unit density spherical scatterer of 0.3 micron-diameter would be an optimum choice as tracer particles for subsonic air turbulence measurements.

  6. Impacts of Wood Additions on Dissolved and Particulate Nutrient Retention in an Agriculturally Impacted Stream: A Multi-Tracer Injection Study at Whatawhata, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J. D.; Wright-Stow, A.; Nagels, J.; Quinn, J.; Franklin, P.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Wood is a key component in forested streams, playing an important ecological and physical role in creating step-pool profiles, enhancing habitat heterogeneity, retaining organic matter, and changing water velocity. Wood additions can increase surface water-groundwater exchange, increasing in-stream residence times by slowing water velocities and providing high depositional areas for fine particles (i.e. particulate nutrients C, N, P). Thus, wood additions may create biogeochemical hotspots in streams that allow greater potential for local nutrient cycling and processing. The objectives of this research were to determine if added wood enhances in-stream heterogeneity, results in more complex flow paths, increases natural retention of further organic matter and changes geomorphic characteristics of the stream reach. We conducted a conservative solute and fluorescent fine particle tracer injection study in an agriculturally impacted stream with emplaced wood additions to estimate in-stream retention times in the Whatawhata catchment, North Island of New Zealand. Although similar solute peak concentrations were observed at the different in-stream sampling sites, increased retention was observed near to the wood. Both fine particle deposition and retention time was increased near the emplaced log. Fine particles were also analyzed in situ in sediment and biofilms on cobbles throughout the stream reach following the injection. A direct positive correlation was observed between cobble biofilm biomass and particle accumulation within this retention area. In general, the addition of wood to these agriculturally impacted streams enhanced hydraulic complexity and increased the retention of solute and fine particles.

  7. Study the gas sensing properties of boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Feng, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: We synthesized boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) on silicon substrate. We analyzed gas sensing properties of BNNSs-based gas-sensor device. CH{sub 4} gas is used to measure gas-sensing properties of the device. Quick response and recovery time of the device is recorded. BNNSs showed excellent sensitivity to the working gas. - Abstract: In the present communication, we report on the synthesis of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and study of their gas sensing properties. BNNSs are synthesized by irradiating pyrolytic hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) target using CO{sub 2} laser pulses. High resolution transmission electron microscopic measurements (HRTEM) revealed 2-dientional honeycomb crystal lattice structure of BNNSs. HRTEM, electron diffraction, XRD and Raman scattering measurements clearly identified h-BN. Gas sensing properties of synthesized BNNSs were analyzed with prototype gas sensor using methane as working gas. A systematic response curve of the sensor is recorded in each cycle of gas in and out; suggesting excellent sensitivity and high performance of BNNSs-based gas-sensor.

  8. The random walk of tracers through river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    River catchments play critical roles in regional economies and in the global economy. In addition, rivers carry large volumes of nutrients, pollutants, and several other forms of tracers into the ocean. An intricate system of pathways and channels, both on the surface and in the subsurface of catchments, allows rivers to carry large volumes of tracers. However, scientists do not yet fully understand how pollutants and other tracers travel through the intricate web of channels in the catchment areas of rivers. In a new study, Cvetkovic et al show that the travel path of tracers through channels can be modeled as a random walk, which is mathematically similar to the path an animal would trace when foraging. Previous studies have applied the random walk approach to understand the behavior of fluids flowing through aquifers and soils but not to model the transport mechanism of tracers that travel passively with water flowing through catchments.

  9. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  10. Development of a mobile tracer correlation method for assessment of air emissions from landfills and other area sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Green, Roger B.; Hater, Gary R.; Swan, Nathan D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2015-02-01

    A standardized version of a mobile tracer correlation measurement method was developed and used for assessment of methane emissions from 15 landfills in 56 field deployments from 2009 to 2013. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and acetylene tracer gas, this method has potential implementation and cost advantages over other mobile tracer correlation approaches. The field deployment, data acquisition and analysis procedures, and a range of use conditions are discussed. To test real-world method application, the field studies were conducted by engineering technician-level personnel under randomly-encountered daytime atmospheric conditions. A total of 1876 mobile tracer correlation measurement transects were attempted over 131 field sampling days. Of these, 1366 transect (73%) were successfully completed and passed basic data acceptance criteria as valid measurement attempts. Invalid data were caused primarily by equipment failures, transect execution errors, or poor plume transport conditions. Valid transects were further analyzed using signal-to-noise ratio, plume correlation, and emission rate difference method quality indicators described here. Encountered scenarios that can result in high emission measurement uncertainty or bias are discussed in term of these indicators. Reasonable values for the acceptance levels of the method quality indicators that help protect against method errors and reduce measurement noise are discussed. The application of a default indicator set to the valid data yield 456 transects (33%) that pass data acceptance criteria. Transects that fail were associated with insufficient advected plume transport, poor correlation between the tracer and source plumes, and potential emissions pooling conditions.

  11. Assessment of zinc loading in an acid rock drainage alpine catchment using a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, C. M.; McKnight, D. M.; Todd, A.

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal low flow conditions in acid rock drainage (ARD) streams result in increased acidity and metal ion concentrations - changes that have been shown to become more pronounced with longer dry periods. These resulting increases in acidity and metals concentrations may pose an increasing danger to aquatic ecosystems and drinking water supplies. For example, in many ARD-impacted mountain streams, fish populations are not self-sustaining. The study site in the Upper Snake River watershed in Colorado is an alpine catchment impacted by acid rock drainage thought to originate from the natural weathering of pyrite whereas the main stem of the Snake River and its other tributaries are impacted by accelerated ARD resulting from historic mining activities. Because concentrations toxic to aquatic life persist well downstream of the ARD inputs, dissolved zinc is the primary metal of concern in this study. A compilation of historic data from the Snake River Watershed during the low flow months of September and October indicates that zinc concentrations have increased four-fold over the past 30 years. We hypothesize that this increase is due to changes in groundwater flow patterns caused by climate change and associated earlier peak snowmelt (by 2-3 weeks), resulting in lower stream flows and drier soils in late summer. The observed increase in background metals concentrations has implications for mitigation of former mining sites. A synoptic study to identify discrete surface water sources of zinc loading indicated a significant input from a tributary on the north side of the catchment. Zinc concentrations here measured an order of magnitude higher than in the main stem of the stream, and were correlated with increases in sulfate, hardness, and total metals, supporting our contention that increasing zinc concentrations are driven by the acceleration of ARD in the watershed. The current research further investigates sources of metal-rich inflows to the tributary using a tracer injection study with synoptic sampling.

  12. High temperature heat exchanger studies for applications to gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, June Kee; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Kui Soon

    2009-12-01

    Growing demand for environmentally friendly aero gas-turbine engines with lower emissions and improved specific fuel consumption can be met by incorporating heat exchangers into gas turbines. Relevant researches in such areas as the design of a heat exchanger matrix, materials selection, manufacturing technology, and optimization by a variety of researchers have been reviewed in this paper. Based on results reported in previous studies, potential heat exchanger designs for an aero gas turbine recuperator, intercooler, and cooling-air cooler are suggested.

  13. A wind tunnel study of gaseous tracer dispersion in the convective boundary layer capped by a temperature inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovich, E.; Thter, J.

    Results are presented from wind tunnel simulations of gaseous pollutant dispersion in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) capped by a temperature inversion. The experiments were performed in the thermally stratified wind tunnel of the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. In the tunnel, the case of horizontally evolving, sheared CBL is reproduced. This distinguishes the employed experimental setup from the preceding laboratory and numerical CBL dispersion studies. The diffusive and mixing properties of turbulence in the studied CBL case have been found to be essentially dependent on the stage of the CBL evolution. Effects of the point source elevation on the horizontal variability of the concentration field, and on the ground level concentration as function of distance from the source have been investigated. The applicability of bottom-up/top-down diffusion concept in the simulated CBL case has been evaluated. The influence of surface wind shear and capping inversion strength on the pollutant dispersion and turbulent exchange across the CBL top has been demonstrated. The imposed positive shear across the inversion has been identified as inhibitor of the CBL growth. Comparisons of concentration patterns from the wind tunnel with water tank data are presented.

  14. Determination of the source of bioavailable Sr using ??Sr/??Sr tracers: a case study of hot pepper and rice.

    PubMed

    Song, Byeong-Yeol; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Hyung Seon; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2014-09-24

    The geographical origin of agricultural products has been intensively studied, but links between agricultural products and the environments are poorly established. Soils, water (streamwater and groundwater), and plants (hot pepper, Capsicum annuum; and rice, Oryza sativa) were collected from all regions of South Korea and measured Sr isotope ratios ((87)Sr/(86)Sr). Sequential leaching of soil showed that Sr in the exchangeable and carbonate fractions (bioavailable) had a lower (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio than that in the silicate fraction, consistent with a low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio in the plant. Although the bedrock-soil-water-plant system is closely linked, statistical analysis indicated that (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of the plant showed the greatest agreement with those of water and the exchangeable fraction of soil. This study is the first report of (87)Sr/(86)Sr isoscapes in South Korea and first demonstrates that the agricultural product is strongly linked with the exchangeable fraction of soil and water. PMID:25186083

  15. Radioactive tracers as a tool for the study of in situ meiofaunal-microbial trophic interactions in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods of delivering labeled substrates to natural cores of sediments were compared. Slurried sediments disrupted the sedimentary structure and significantly altered uptake of labeled substrates by copepod species. Thus, disruption of sedimentary structure can significantly alter microbial-meiofaunal interactions and influence the results of grazing studies. The ({sup 3}H)-thymidine technique for measuring bacterial production was evaluated. The metabolic fate of labeled thymidine in a coastal marine sediment was not consistent with assumptions necessary for measuring bacterial production or its consumption by meiofauna. Microautoradiography was used to demonstrate the sedimentary microalgae and heterotrophic bacteria can be selectively labeled with ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate and labeled organic substrates, respectively. A study was performed to determine if radioactivity measured in copepods from grazing experiments was the result of ingestion of labeled microorganisms or the result of uptake by non-feeding processes. Uptake of label by copepods from ({sup 14}C)-bicarbonate was due almost exclusively to grazing on microalgae. Uptake of label by copepods from ({sup 14}C)-acetate, however, resulted from activity by epicuticular bacteria and was not due to ingestion of labeled bacteria.

  16. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and tracer gas concentrations while another measured the nitrous oxide concentration. We present the performance of these instruments at different waste treatment facilities (waste water treatment plants, composting facilities, sludge mineralization beds, anaerobic digesters and landfills) in Denmark, and discuss the strengths and limitations of the method of the method for quantifying methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the different sources. Furthermore, we have measured the methane emissions from 10 landfills with emission rates ranging from 5 to 135 kg/h depending on the age, state, content and aftercare of the landfill. In addition, we have studied 3 waste water treatment plants, and found nitrous oxide emission of 200 to 700 g/h from the aeration tanks and a total methane emission ranging from 2 to 15 kg/h, with the primary emission coming from the sludge treatment. References Galle, B., Samuelsson, J., Svensson, B.H., and Börjesson, G. (2001). Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using a time correlation tracer method based on FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Environmental Science & Technology 35 (1), 21-25 Scheutz, C., Samuelsson, J., Fredenslund, A. M., and Kjeldsen, P. (2011). Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique. Waste Management, 31(5), 1009-17 Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, R.B. Alley, T. Berntsen, N.L. Bindoff, Z. Chen, A. Chidthaisong, J.M. Gregory, G.C. Hegerl, M. Heimann, B. Hewitson, B.J. Hoskins, F. Joos, J. Jouzel, V. Kattsov, U. Lohmann, T.Matsuno, M. Molina, N. Nicholls, J.Overpeck, G. Raga, V. Ramaswamy, J. Ren, M. Rusticucci, R. Somerville, T.F. Stocker, P. Whetton, R.A.Wood and D. Wratt, 2007: Technical Summary. In: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

  17. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes in aqueous systems using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1999-02-01

    This research program has moved ahead with success in several areas. The isotopic composition of osmium in seawater and in some rivers was directly determined for the first time. The concentration of osmium was first estimated in both seawater and rivers. A major effort was directed toward the transport of the U,Th series nuclides in a watershed in Sweden. A serious effort was directed at developing a transport model for the U,Th series nuclides in aquifers. A detailed study of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th dating of a cave in Israel was carried out collaboratively. The Os-Re fractionation between silicate and sulfide melts were determined in MORB basalts and glasses and the isotopic composition of Os was measured in sulfide samples.

  18. A prospective randomised study comparing oral 13C-bicarbonate tracer technique versus indirect calorimetry for measurement of energy expenditure in adults

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Sherif; Cui, Helen; Wright, Jeff W; Jackson, Sarah; Macdonald, Ian A; Lobo, Dileep N

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Accurate assessment of energy expenditure (EE) is important in guiding nutritional therapy but current methods are unsatisfactory. This study compared the oral 13C-bicarbonate tracer (BT) technique using the IRIS® system (Wagner, Germany) against indirect calorimetry (IC, ventilated-hood) to measure CO2 output (VCO2) and thus estimate EE. Methods Ten overnight-fasted healthy male volunteers were randomised to studies at rest or mild exercise in a crossover manner. During each study BT-IRIS® and IC were used simultaneously to measure VCO2 and thus EE. Participants ingested a drink labelled with 50mg 13C-bicarbonate and breath samples were collected every 5 min for 180 min and analysed using IRIS®. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between the two techniques in measurements of VCO2 (L/day) and estimates of EE (kJ/day). Results Mean ± SE age and BMI of participants were 21.1 ± 1.1 yrs and 23.6 ± 0.6 kg/m2. Both at rest and exercise, there was small bias but overall poor agreement between the two techniques as evident by the wide 95% limits of agreement in measurements of VCO2 and EE: rest VCO2 (bias 1.4, SD 93, 95% limits of agreement −180 to 183), rest EE (−8.3, 1830, −3595 to 3578), exercise VCO2 (49.3, 66.1, −80.4 to 178.9) and exercise EE (1083, 1944, −2727 to 4893). Furthermore, there was also evidence of systematic error in these measurements. Conclusion Prior to clinical application, further optimisation of the BT-IRIS® system should be undertaken, given the poor agreement with IC in measuring VCO2 and estimating EE. PMID:24834380

  19. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modelling and the results of tracer studies in the mesoscale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Wenninger, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we developed a catchment hydrological model which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making for better management of the Migina Catchment (257.4 km2). The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Center - the Hydrologic Modelling System) (version 3.5) was used with its soil moisture accounting, unit hydrograph, liner reservoir (for baseflow) and Muskingum-Cunge (river routing) methods. We used rainfall data from 12 stations and streamflow data from 5 stations, which were collected as part of this study over a period of 2 years (May 2009 and June 2011). The catchment was divided into five sub-catchments. The model parameters were calibrated separately for each sub-catchment using the observed streamflow data. Calibration results obtained were found acceptable at four stations with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency index (NS) of 0.65 on daily runoff at the catchment outlet. Due to the lack of sufficient and reliable data for longer periods, a model validation was not undertaken. However, we used results from tracer-based hydrograph separation from a previous study to compare our model results in terms of the runoff components. The model performed reasonably well in simulating the total flow volume, peak flow and timing as well as the portion of direct runoff and baseflow. We observed considerable disparities in the parameters (e.g. groundwater storage) and runoff components across the five sub-catchments, which provided insights into the different hydrological processes on a sub-catchment scale. We conclude that such disparities justify the need to consider catchment subdivisions if such parameters and components of the water cycle are to form the base for decision making in water resources planning in the catchment.

  20. Kinetic analysis of the metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 tracer [(18)F]FPEB in bolus and bolus-plus-constant-infusion studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jenna M; Lim, Keunpoong; Labaree, David; Lin, Shu-Fei; McCarthy, Timothy J; Seibyl, John P; Tamagnan, Gilles; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; Ding, Yu-Shin; Morris, Evan D

    2013-04-01

    [(18)F]FPEB is a positron emission tomography tracer which, in preclinical studies, has shown high specificity and selectivity toward the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). It possesses the potential to be used in human studies to evaluate mGluR5 function in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and Fragile X syndrome. To define optimal scan methodology, healthy human subjects were scanned for 6 hours following either a bolus injection (n=5) or bolus-plus-constant-infusion (n=5) of [(18)F]FPEB. Arterial blood samples were collected and parent fraction measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the metabolite-corrected plasma input function. Time activity curves were extracted from 13 regions and fitted by various models to estimate V(T) and BPND. [(18)F]FPEB was well fitted by the two-tissue compartment model, MA1 (t*=30), and MRTM (using cerebellum white matter as a reference). Highest V(T) values were observed in the anterior cingulate and caudate, and lowest V(T) values were observed in the cerebellum and pallidum. For kinetic modeling studies, VT and BPND were estimated from bolus or bolus-plus-constant-infusion scans as short as 90 minutes. Bolus-plus-constant-infusion of [(18)F]FPEB reduced intersubject variability in V(T) and allowed equilibrium analysis to be completed with a 30-minute scan, acquired 90-120 minutes after the start of injection. PMID:23250105

  1. Little study sees large growth in Asian natural gas market

    SciTech Connect

    O'Driscoll, M.

    1993-06-03

    Power capacity additions in Asia will at least triple by 2010, and Arthur D. Little Inc. predicts natural gas can pick up a good 15 percent of that market. The study predicts Asia potentially will need 720 gigawatts of new power generation by 2010, of which 15 percent may be gas-based. This represents a market three times the size of the US market in the same period, and would require more than $1 trillion in investment to finance the power generation projects alone. Six forces are driving new market opportunities for natural gas in Asia, and have set the stage for major investments in Asian gas-based power generation. They are: New technologies; growing environmental pressures; privatization; alternative energy pricing; gas availability; and continued economic growth. Japan, South Korea and Taiwan already have large, well-established markets for both gas and power that provide minimal opportunities for foreign investment. But the rest of Asia - specifically, India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, Bangladesh and Myanmar - is still relatively undeveloped, the study said, and gas is emerging as an energy import substitute or export earner. The study found those countries will turn increased environmental awareness and concern into legislation as their economic prosperity grows, leading to a higher future value for natural gas relative to other fuels. Stricter emissions standards will favor gas over diesel, fuel oil and coal.

  2. Trans-Caspian gas pipeline feasibility study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This study, conducted by Enron Engineering and Construction Company, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study provides detailed information concerning natural gas demand in Turkey and Southern Europe. The purpose of the study is to estimate the rate at which new gas can be absorbed in the Turkish market and be re-exported to the markets in Europe, as well as to forecast Turkish natural gas demand for the period up to 2020. The study also evaluates gas demand and pricing for the market in the 2002--2005 time frame. This is Volume 1 of a 3-volume report, and is divided into the following sections: (1) Task A: Gas Sales; (2) Task B: Initial Economic Screening; (3) Task D: Project Cost Analysis.

  3. Partitioning and kinetics of methylmercury among organs in captive mink (Neovison vison): A stable isotope tracer study.

    PubMed

    Evans, R Douglas; Hickie, Brendan; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Wang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Despite the importance of methylmercury (MeHg) as a neurotoxin, we have relatively few good data on partitioning and kinetics of MeHg among organs, particularly across the blood-brain barrier, for mammals that consume large quantities of fish. The objective of this study was to determine the partition coefficients between blood and brain, liver and kidney and fur for MeHg under steady-state conditions and to measure the half-lives for MeHg in these organs. Captive mink (Neovison vison) were fed a diet enriched with two stable isotopes of Hg, Me(199)Hg and Me(201)Hg for a period of 60 days. After a period of 10 days the diet was changed to contain only Me(201)Hg so that, between days 10 and 60, we were able to measure both uptake and elimination rates from blood, brain, liver kidney and fur. Liver and kidney response was very rapid, closely following changes in blood concentrations but there was a small lag time between peak blood concentrations and peak brain concentrations. Half-lives for MeHg were 15.4, 10.2 and 13.4 days for brain, liver and kidney, respectively. There was no measurable conversion of the MeHg to inorganic Hg (IHg) in the brain over the 60 day period, unlike in liver and kidney. PMID:26855415

  4. Using predictive uncertainty analysis to optimise tracer test design and data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Ilka; Moore, Catherine; Post, Vincent; Wolf, Leif; Martens, Evelien; Prommer, Henning

    2014-07-01

    Tracer injection tests are regularly-used tools to identify and characterise flow and transport mechanisms in aquifers. Examples of practical applications are manifold and include, among others, managed aquifer recharge schemes, aquifer thermal energy storage systems and, increasingly important, the disposal of produced water from oil and shale gas wells. The hydrogeological and geochemical data collected during the injection tests are often employed to assess the potential impacts of injection on receptors such as drinking water wells and regularly serve as a basis for the development of conceptual and numerical models that underpin the prediction of potential impacts. As all field tracer injection tests impose substantial logistical and financial efforts, it is crucial to develop a solid a-priori understanding of the value of the various monitoring data to select monitoring strategies which provide the greatest return on investment. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of linear predictive uncertainty analysis (i.e. “data worth analysis”) to quantify the usefulness of different tracer types (bromide, temperature, methane and chloride as examples) and head measurements in the context of a field-scale aquifer injection trial of coal seam gas (CSG) co-produced water. Data worth was evaluated in terms of tracer type, in terms of tracer test design (e.g., injection rate, duration of test and the applied measurement frequency) and monitoring disposition to increase the reliability of injection impact assessments. This was followed by an uncertainty targeted Pareto analysis, which allowed the interdependencies of cost and predictive reliability for alternative monitoring campaigns to be compared directly. For the evaluated injection test, the data worth analysis assessed bromide as superior to head data and all other tracers during early sampling times. However, with time, chloride became a more suitable tracer to constrain simulations of physical transport processes, followed by methane. Temperature data was assessed as the least informative of the solute tracers. However, taking costs of data acquisition into account, it could be shown that temperature data when used in conjunction with other tracers was a valuable and cost-effective marker species due to temperatures low cost to worth ratio. In contrast, the high costs of acquisition of methane data compared to its muted worth, highlighted methanes unfavourable return on investment. Areas of optimal monitoring bore position as well as optimal numbers of bores for the investigated injection site were also established. The proposed tracer test optimisation is done through the application of common use groundwater flow and transport models in conjunction with publicly available tools for predictive uncertainty analysis to provide modelers and practitioners with a powerful yet efficient and cost effective tool which is generally applicable and easily transferrable from the present study to many applications beyond the case study of injection of treated CSG produced water.

  5. Nitrate retention and removal in Mediterranean streams bordered by contrasting land uses: a 15N tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schiller, D.; Mart, E.; Riera, J. L.

    2009-02-01

    We used 15N-labelled nitrate (NO3-) additions to investigate pathways of nitrogen (N) cycling at the whole-reach scale in three stream reaches with adjacent forested, urban and agricultural land areas. Our aim was to explore among-stream differences in: (i) the magnitude and relative importance of NO3- retention (i.e. assimilatory uptake) and removal (i.e. denitrification), (ii) the relative contribution of the different primary uptake compartments to NO3- retention, and (iii) the regeneration, transformation and export pathways of the retained N. Streams varied strongly in NO3- concentration, which was highest in the agricultural stream and lowest in the forested stream. The agricultural stream also showed the lowest dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and discharge. Standing stocks of primary uptake compartments were similar among streams and dominated by detritus compartments (i.e. fine and coarse benthic organic matter). Metabolism was net heterotrophic in all streams, although the degree of heterotrophy was highest in the agricultural stream. The NO3- uptake length was shortest in the agricultural stream, intermediate in the urban stream, and longest in the forested stream. Conversely, the NO3- mass-transfer velocity and the areal NO3- uptake rate were highest in the urban stream. Denitrification was not detectable in the forested stream, but accounted for 9% and 68% of total NO3- uptake in the urban and the agricultural stream, respectively. The relative contribution of detritus compartments to NO3- assimilatory uptake was greatest in the forested and lowest in the agricultural stream. In all streams, the retained N was rapidly regenerated back to the water column. Due to a strong coupling between regeneration and nitrification, most retained N was exported from the experimental reaches in the form of NO3-. This study provides evidence of fast in-stream N cycling, although the relative importance of N retention and removal varied considerably among streams. Results suggest that permanent NO3- removal via denitrification may be enhanced over temporary NO3- retention via assimilatory uptake in heterotrophic human-altered streams characterized by high NO3- and low DO concentrations.

  6. Nitrogen isotope tracers of high-temperature fluid-rock interactions: Case study of the Catalina Schist, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Gray E.

    1997-09-01

    Nitrogen isotope data for metasomatized rocks, veins, and pegmatites in the Catalina Schist subduction zone metamorphic complex allow futher characterization of complex, high-P/T metasomatic proceses and evaluation of the scales of isotopic equilibration and fluid transport during subduction-zone metamorphism. Throughout the Catalina Schist, N resides predominantly as NH 4+ in white mica, which occurs in nearly all bulk compositions (i.e., metasedimentary, metamafic and, to a lesser extent, metaultramafic mlange) at all grades. Within each metamorphic unit of the Catalina Schist (ranging in grade from lawsonite-albite to amphibolite facies), ? 15N values of mica in metasomatized metamafic and metaultramafic rocks are consistent with the metasomatic addition of N from nearby, devolatilizing metasedimentary rocks into the initially N-poor mafic and ultramafic rocks. Within each unit, uniformity of mica ? 15N in metasomatized rocks relative to the ? 15N of metasedimentary rocks in the same unit implies mixing of N from nearby, heterogeneous metasedimentary sources, perhaps producing fluids with unifrom ? 15N at up to the kilometer scale. However, the trend in ? 15N of metasedimentary sources, with increasing metamorphic grade is inconsistent with larger scale up-temperature transfer of fluid (in this case, N 2-bearing) in the Catalina Schist paleosubduction zone; such flow (at scales of up to tens of kilometers) has been inferred through previous oxygen isotope study. Nitrogen isotope compositions are instead believed to have been controlled at a more local scale than the O isotope systematics, due to the more rock-dominated fluid-rock mass balance for N. The ? 15N of muscovite in leucosomes and pegmatites in amphibolite-grade metasedimentary exposures matches that of muscovite in metasedimentary hosts, implying minimal N-isotope fractionation during migmatization processes and possible transfer of metasedimentary N-isotope signatures in silicate melts. These results illustrate the potential of the N-isotope system to yield valuable information regarding fluid-rock interactions in the crust and mantle. The data for the Catalina Schist demonstrate the ability of N isotopes to trace the transfer of sediment-derived C sbnd O sbnd H sbnd S sbnd N fluids and silicate melts, and show the expected benefit of the N-isotope system in having a differing fluid-rock mass balance, relative to the more commonly used stable isotope systems, that can yield unique constraints in quantitative models of crustal fluid processes.

  7. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  8. Hydroxy fatty acids in remote marine aerosols as microbial tracers: Long term study on ?-hydroxy fatty acids from the remote marine Island, Chichi-Jima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the long-range atmospheric transport of microbial aerosols from Southeast Asia to the western North Pacific, marine aerosols were collected at a remote Island, Chichi-Jima on a biweekly basis during 1990-1993. These samples were investigated for the atmospheric abundances of hydroxy fatty acids (OH FAs). ?-OH FAs are the major structural components of endotoxins in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) whereas w-OH FAs are present in cell walls of higher plants. Thus, we tested the applicability of the ?-OH FAs (C10-C18) and ?-OH FAs (C16-C26) to assess the Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and contribution of terrestrial higher plants, respectively. The average concentrations of ?- and ?-OH FAs show pronounced seasonal variability with spring maximum (~301 ng/m-3 and ~ 272 ng/m-3, respectively). The concentrations of total OH FAs increased in winter/spring and decreased in summer/autumn, except for 1992-93. This seasonal trend can be interpreted by the atmospheric transport of microbial soil dust and higher plant metabolites from the Asian continent during winter/spring, when westerly winds dominate over the western North Pacific. The even carbon predominance of ?- and ?-OH FAs (80 and 74 % of total) in marine aerosols could be explained by their significant contribution from GNB and terrestrial higher plants. These results have implications towards assessing the bacterial transport in the continental outflows. This study also confirms that ?-OH FAs can be used as bacterial tracers in ambient aerosol samples.Keywords: ?- and ?-hydroxy fatty acids, terrestrial biomarkers, marine aerosols, GC-MS

  9. Water budgets of Italian and Dutch gravel pit lakes: a study using a fen as a natural evaporation pan, stable isotopes and conservative tracer modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form where the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. Their presence changes the drainage patterns, water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. We have studied the water budget of two gravel pit lakes systems using stable H and O isotopes of water as well as conservative tracer (Cl) modeling. The Dutch gravel pit lakes are a fluvial fresh water system of 70 lakes along the Meuse River and the Italian gravel pit lakes are a brackish system along the Adriatic coast. Surface water evaporation from the gravel pit lakes is larger than the actual evapotranspiration of the grass land and forests that were replaced. The ratio of evaporation to total flow into the Dutch lakes was determined by using a Fen as a natural evaporation pan: the isotope content of the Tuspeel Fen, filled with rain water and sampled in a dry and warm summer period (August 2012), is representative for the limiting isotopic enrichment under local hydro meteorological conditions. The Local Evaporation line (LEL) was determined δ2 H = 4.20 δ 18O - 14.10 (R² = 0.99) and the ratio of total inflow to evaporation for three gravel pit lakes were calculated to be 22.6 for the De Lange Vlieter lake used for drinking water production, 11.3 for the Boschmolen Lake and 8.9 for the Anna's Beemd lake showing that groundwater flow is much larger than evaporation. The Italian gravel pit lakes are characterized by high salinity (TDS = 4.6-12.3 g L-1). Stable isotope data show that these latter gravel pit lakes are fed by groundwater, which is a mix between fresh Apennine River water and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. The local evaporation line is determined: δ2H = 5.02 δ18O - 10.49. The ratio of total inflow to evaporation is 5. Conservative tracer modeling indicates that the chloride concentration in the Italian gravel pit lakes stabilizes after a short period of rapid increase, because water leaving the lake via groundwater flow, driven by the drainage system, removes part of the Cl that accumulates in the lake due to evapo-concentration. Under climate change, rising sea levels and continuing land subsidence as well as increasing precipitation would increase the need for drainage which would enhance groundwater flow through the lake. The resulting steady-state Cl concentration of the lakes could become less than the current Cl concentration. This effect would be larger than increasing evapo- concentration. Both gravel pit lake systems have a large flux of groundwater into and out of the lakes driven by evaporation and (artificial) drainage with important consequences for the water- and hydrochemical budgets of the whole watershed and in particular on freshwater quantity and groundwater salinity.

  10. Single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Rust, Thomas C; Hoffman, John M

    2013-01-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET aims to image two or more tracers in a single scan, simultaneously characterizing multiple aspects of physiology and function without the need for repeat imaging visits. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, constraints on the kinetic behavior of each tracer are applied to recover individual-tracer measures from the multi-tracer PET signal. The ability to rapidly and reliably image both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) would provide complementary measures of tumor metabolism and proliferative activity, with important applications in guiding oncologic treatment decisions and assessing response. However, this tracer combination presents one of the most challenging dual-tracer signal-separation problemsboth tracers have the same radioactive half-life, and the injection delay is short relative to the half-life and tracer kinetics. This work investigates techniques for single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor imaging, characterizing the performance of recovering static and dynamic imaging measures for each tracer from dual-tracer datasets. Simulation studies were performed to characterize dual-tracer signal-separation performance for imaging protocols with both injection orders and injection delays of 1060 min. Better performance was observed when FLT was administered first, and longer delays before administration of FDG provided more robust signal-separation and recovery of the single-tracer imaging measures. An injection delay of 30 min led to good recovery (R > 0.96) of static image values (e.g. SUV), Knet, and K1 as compared to values from separate, single-tracer time-activity curves. Recovery of higher order rate parameters (k2, k3) was less robust, indicating that information regarding these parameters was harder to recover in the presence of statistical noise and dual-tracer effects. Performance of the dual-tracer FLT(0 min)+FDG(32 min) technique was further evaluated using PET/CT imaging studies in five patients with primary brain tumors where the data from separate scans of each tracer were combined to synthesize dual-tracer scans with known single-tracer components; results demonstrated similar dual-tracer signal recovery performance. We conclude that rapid dual-tracer FLT+FDG tumor imaging is feasible and can provide quantitative tumor imaging measures comparable to those from conventional separate-scan imaging. PMID:23296314

  11. Single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rust, Thomas C.; Hoffman, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET aims to image two or more tracers in a single scan, simultaneously characterizing multiple aspects of physiology and function without the need for repeat imaging visits. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, constraints on the kinetic behavior of each tracer are applied to recover individual-tracer measures from the multi-tracer PET signal. The ability to rapidly and reliably image both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) would provide complementary measures of tumor metabolism and proliferative activity, with important applications in guiding oncologic treatment decisions and assessing response. However, this tracer combination presents one of the most challenging dual-tracer signal-separation problems—both tracers have the same radioactive half-life, and the injection delay is short relative to the half-life and tracer kinetics. This work investigates techniques for single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor imaging, characterizing the performance of recovering static and dynamic imaging measures for each tracer from dual-tracer datasets. Simulation studies were performed to characterize dual-tracer</