Science.gov

Sample records for gas tracer studies

  1. Field and numerical studies of tracer gas transport and surface gas tranfer in laterally uniform, partially stratified estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques for determination of reaeration rates in natural waterbodies are reviewed. The tracer gas technique for reaeration rate determination offers many advantages over other existing methods and is widely used in rivers and streams. The tracer gas method seems to be the most promising of available techniques for estuarine reaeration rate determination. The two-dimensional late-rally averaged equations describing flow and transport in estuaries are derived and discussed. A laterally averaged numerical model of estaurine hydrodynamics and transport is modified so that tracer gas releases may be simulated. Field studies conducted as a part of the study are described. Two dye releases were made in the upper Houston Ship Channel; two dye tracer gas releases were later made in the same region. The data from these studies are presented and analyzed. Mechanical mixing by shipping traffic proved to be the predominant mixing mechanism and a hindrance to further studies at that site. An intensive field study was conducted in the Colorado River estuary. Field data included velocities, salinity profiles, water surface elevations, and dye concentration data from three dye releases. The data from this study are used to calibrate and test the numerical model of estuarine tracer gas transport.

  2. PERFLUOROCARBON GAS TRACER STUDIES TO SUPPORT RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; HEISER, J.; WATSON, T.; ALLWINE, K.J.; FLAHERTY, J.E.

    2006-05-06

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., ''urban canyons''. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City's (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  3. Perfluorocarbon Gas Tracer Studies to Support Risk Assessment Modeling of Critical Infrastructure Subjected to Terrorist Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry M.; Heiser, John H.; Watson, Tom; Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-05-06

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., “urban canyons”. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City’s (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  4. Evaluation of leakage from a metal machining center using tracer gas methods: a case study.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, W A; Earnest, G S; Mickelsen, R L; Mead, K R; D'Arcy, J B

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of engineering controls in reducing worker exposure to metalworking fluids, an evaluation of an enclosure for a machining center during face milling was performed. The enclosure was built around a vertical metal machining center with an attached ventilation system consisting of a 25-cm diameter duct, a fan, and an air-cleaning filter. The evaluation method included using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas to determine the ventilation system's flow rate and capture efficiency, a respirable aerosol monitor (RAM) to identify aerosol leak locations around the enclosure, and smoke tubes and a velometer to evaluate air movement around the outside of the enclosure. Results of the tracer gas evaluation indicated that the control system was approximately 98% efficient at capturing tracer gas released near the spindle of the machining center. This result was not significantly different from 100% efficiency (p = 0.2). The measured SF6 concentration when released directly into the duct had a relative standard deviation of 2.2%; whereas, when releasing SF6 at the spindle, the concentration had a significantly higher relative standard deviation of 7.8% (p = 0.016). This increased variability could be due to a cyclic leakage at a small gap between the upper and lower portion of the enclosure or due to cyclic stagnation. Leakage also was observed with smoke tubes, a velometer, and an aerosol photometer. The tool and fluid motion combined to induce a periodic airflow in and out of the enclosure. These results suggest that tracer gas methods could be used to evaluate enclosure efficiency. However, smoke tubes and aerosol instrumentation such as optical particle counters or aerosol photometers also need to be used to locate leakage from enclosures. PMID:10635544

  5. A pilot study of the behavior of gas- and particle-phase ETS tracers in residences

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara; Dod, Raymond; Chang, Gee-Min; Sextro, Richard

    2002-02-01

    Our previous study of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in a three-room environmental chamber showed that smoking history significantly influenced inter-room ETS transport, particularly of gas-phase nicotine. We conducted a three-home pilot study where smoking was limited to one room. Single-smoker residences were monitored during five one-week periods while the smoker participated in a smoking cessation program. Nicotine traced ETS particles were detected reliably in the smoking rooms (SRs) and unreliably in the non-smoking rooms (NSRs). On average, the ventilation- and volume-normalized smoking rate, 0.1 Cigarette-h{sup -1} m{sup -3}, added about 17 and 4 {micro}g m{sup -3} of ETS particles into the SR and NSR, while average nicotine concentration increases were 2 and 0.06 {micro}g m{sup -3}, respectively. Thus, nicotine tracers may underestimate ETS particle exposure in a NSR (e.g., a child's bedroom) by a factor of 2 to 8. In other words, ETS exposure predicted from nicotine concentrations could be almost an order of magnitude lower than actual exposure.

  6. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 feet/minute) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust air flows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in background concentrations to allow for increased sensitivity. PMID:25175285

  7. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in background concentrations to allow for increased sensitivity. PMID:25175285

  8. ANALYSIS OF ESTUARINE TRACER-GAS TRANSPORT AND DESORPTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    The riverine tracer-gas technique provides a direct, reach-averaged measure of gas exchange, is fairly simple to implement, and is widely accepted for determining reaeration-rate coefficients in rivers. The method, however, is not directly applicable to flows having vertical density gradients. Consequently, studies were undertaken to develop and evaluate methods for obtaining surface-exchange coefficients from estuarine tracer-gas data. Reasonable estimates of the desorption coefficient (within 50 percent of the correct value) were obtained when an analytical solution of the transport equation was compared with data from a numerically simulated continuous release of tracer gas.

  9. Novel tracer method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher J; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    Gaseous nitrous acid (HONO), the protonated form of nitrite, contributes up to ?60% to the primary formation of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is a key oxidant in the degradation of most air pollutants. Field measurements and modeling studies indicate a large unknown source of HONO during daytime. Here, we developed a new tracer method based on gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to measure the 15N relative exceedance, ?(15N), of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye, purified by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In the optimal working range of ?(15N)=0.2-0.5, the relative standard deviation of ?(15N) is <4%. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method was applied to measure HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15) labeled urea. The identification of HO15NO from soil with 15N urea addition confirmed biogenic emissions of HONO from soil. The method enables a new approach of studying the formation pathways of HONO and its role for atmospheric chemistry (e.g., ozone formation) and environmental tracer studies on the formation and conversion of gaseous HONO or aqueous NO2- as part of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g., in the investigation of fertilization effects on soil HONO emissions and microbiological conversion of NO2- in the hydrosphere. PMID:24954648

  10. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 8±6%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices. PMID:26148643

  11. Tracer gas diffusion sampling test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1993-10-01

    Efforts are under way to employ active and passive vapor extraction to remove carbon tetrachloride from the soil in the 200 West Area an the Hanford Site as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action. In the active approach, a vacuum is applied to a well, which causes soil gas surrounding the well to be drawn up to the surface. The contaminated air is cleaned by passage through a granular activated carbon bed. There are questions concerning the radius of influence associated with application of the vacuum system and related uncertainties about the soil-gas diffusion rates with and without the vacuum system present. To address these questions, a series of tracer gas diffusion sampling tests is proposed in which an inert, nontoxic tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), will be injected into a well, and the rates of SF{sub 6} diffusion through the surrounding soil horizon will be measured by sampling in nearby wells. Tracer gas tests will be conducted at sites very near the active vacuum extraction system and also at sites beyond the radius of influence of the active vacuum system. In the passive vapor extraction approach, barometric pressure fluctuations cause soil gas to be drawn to the surface through the well. At the passive sites, the effects of barometric ``pumping`` due to changes in atmospheric pressure will be investigated. Application of tracer gas testing to both the active and passive vapor extraction methods is described in the wellfield enhancement work plan (Rohay and Cameron 1993).

  12. Natural and artificial nobel gas hydrologic tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, G.B.

    1994-06-01

    Noble gas isotopes provide opportunities for ground water tracing. Both naturally occurring tracers and artificially injected tracers can be used. The equilibration of water with the earth`s atmosphere records the temperature and atmospheric pressure during ground water recharge. This temperature/pressure record can be used to distinguish cold recharge from warmer recharge with a resolution of 1-2 C temperature and 500m in altitude. The radioactive decay of U and Th produce large concentrations of 4He in old ground water and this 4He signature can be useful in tracing the small addition of old water (>10,000 yr.) to young water (<100 yr.). The decay of 3H present either form nuclear testing or cosmic ray interactions leads to detectable amounts of 3He in young ground water (<50 yr.). By measuring both 3H and 3He, the mean age of the 3H in the water can be calculated. In addition to these natural tracers, isotopically enriched noble gas isotopes are readily available at low cost and can be used an non-hazardous water tracers. This inert, persistent, and harmless tracing technique can used in many situations at a cost of about one dollar per million gallons of water traced.

  13. Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoffersen, A.R.; Gadgil, A.J.; Lorenzetti, D.M.

    2004-05-01

    Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume.

  14. Preliminary Investigation of Tracer Gas Reaeration Method for Shallow Bays 

    E-print Network

    Baker, Sarah H.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate estimates of surface exchange rates for volatile pollutants in bays are needed to allow predictions of pollutant movement and retention time. The same types of estimates can be used to calculate reaeration rates. The tracer gas technique...

  15. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Impact of Salinity on the Air-Water Partition Coefficient of Gas Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Pope, Gary A.; Evans, John C.; Cameron, Richard J.

    2005-09-01

    The use of a gas partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) has been proposed as a standard approach to the measurement of field-scale vadose zone water saturation fractions. The accuracy of the saturation measurement is largely dependent on the determination of the air-water partitioning coefficient, K, of the tracers; however, in practice, K is also strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the water. In this study, column tests were conducted to investigate the impact of salinity on tracer partitioning coefficients for two promising gas phase candidate tracers, dibromomethane and dimethylether. Sodium thiosulfate was used as a salinity surrogate. The dynamic K values of the two partitioning tracers were measured for sodium thiosulfate concentrations between 0% and 36% by weight. Methane was used as the non-partitioning tracer for all experiments. K values were found to decrease significantly with increasing sodium thiosulfate concentration. Similar correlations between K values and sodium thiosulfate concentration were found for both of the partitioning tracers tested.

  17. Estimating fracture spacing from natural tracers in shale-gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; McKenna, S. A.; Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.

    2012-12-01

    Resource appraisal and long-term recovery potential of shale gas relies on the characteristics of the fracture networks created within the formation. Both well testing and analysis of micro-seismic data can provide information on fracture characteristics, but approaches that directly utilize observations of gas transport through the fractures are not well-developed. We examine transport of natural tracers and analyze the breakthrough curves (BTC's) of these tracers with a multi-rate mass transfer (MMT) model to elucidate fracture characteristics. The focus here is on numerical simulation studies to determine constraints on the ability to accurately estimate fracture network characteristics as a function of the diffusion coefficients of the natural tracers, the number and timing of observations, the flow rates from the well, and the noise in the observations. Traditional tracer testing approaches for dual-porosity systems analyze the BTC of an injected tracer to obtain fracture spacing considering a single spacing value. An alternative model is the MMT model where diffusive mass transfer occurs simultaneously over a range of matrix block sizes defined by a statistical distribution (e.g., log-normal, gamma, or power-law). The goal of the estimation is defining the parameters of the fracture spacing distribution. The MMT model has not yet been applied to analysis of natural in situ natural tracers. Natural tracers are omnipresent in the subsurface, potentially obviating the needed for introduced tracers, and could be used to improve upon fracture characteristics estimated from pressure transient and decline curve production analysis. Results of this study provide guidance for data collection and analysis of natural tracers in fractured shale formations. Parameter estimation on simulated BTC's will provide guidance on the necessary timing of BTC sampling in field experiments. The MMT model can result in non-unique or nonphysical parameter estimates. We address this with Bayesian estimation approaches that can define uncertainty in estimated parameters as a posterior probability distribution. We will also use Bayesian estimation to examine model identifiability (e.g., selecting between parametric distributions of fracture spacing) from various BTC's. Application of the MMT model to natural tracers and hydraulic fractures in shale will require extension of the model to account for partitioning of the tracers between multiple phases and different mass transfer behavior in mixed gas-liquid (e.g., oil or groundwater rich) systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Multimodel analysis of anisotropic diffusive tracer-gas transport in a deep arid unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Christopher T.; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Andraski, Brian J.; Striegl, Robert G.; Stonestrom, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Gas transport in the unsaturated zone affects contaminant flux and remediation, interpretation of groundwater travel times from atmospheric tracers, and mass budgets of environmentally important gases. Although unsaturated zone transport of gases is commonly treated as dominated by diffusion, the characteristics of transport in deep layered sediments remain uncertain. In this study, we use a multimodel approach to analyze results of a gas-tracer (SF6) test to clarify characteristics of gas transport in deep unsaturated alluvium. Thirty-five separate models with distinct diffusivity structures were calibrated to the tracer-test data and were compared on the basis of Akaike Information Criteria estimates of posterior model probability. Models included analytical and numerical solutions. Analytical models provided estimates of bulk-scale apparent diffusivities at the scale of tens of meters. Numerical models provided information on local-scale diffusivities and feasible lithological features producing the observed tracer breakthrough curves. The combined approaches indicate significant anisotropy of bulk-scale diffusivity, likely associated with high-diffusivity layers. Both approaches indicated that diffusivities in some intervals were greater than expected from standard models relating porosity to diffusivity. High apparent diffusivities and anisotropic diffusivity structures were consistent with previous observations at the study site of rapid lateral transport and limited vertical spreading of gas-phase contaminants. Additional processes such as advective oscillations may be involved. These results indicate that gases in deep, layered unsaturated zone sediments can spread laterally more quickly, and produce higher peak concentrations, than predicted by homogeneous, isotropic diffusion models.

  19. Dual-gas tracers for subsurface characterization and NAPL detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Peurrung, L.M.; Mendoza, D.P.; Pillay, G.

    1994-11-01

    Effective design of in situ remediation technologies often requires an understanding of the mass transfer limitations that control the removal of contaminants from the soil. In addition, the presence of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in soils will affect the ultimate success or failure of remediation processes. Knowing the location of NAPLs within the subsurface is critical to designing the most effective remediation approach. This work focuses on demonstrating that gas tracers can detect the location of the NAPLs in the subsurface and elucidating the mass transfer limitations associated with the removal of contaminants from soils.

  20. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fang, Min

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  1. Uncertainties in gas exchange parameterization during the SAGE dual-tracer experiment

    E-print Network

    Ho, David

    Uncertainties in gas exchange parameterization during the SAGE dual-tracer experiment Murray J s t r a c t A dual tracer experiment was carried out during the SAGE experiment using the inert tracers out during SAGE, and showed no significant difference in transfer velocities using QuikSCAT winds

  2. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  3. Fine Root Production and Mortality From 15N Tracer Studies

    E-print Network

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Fine Root Production and Mortality From 15N Tracer Studies (and some other stuff on soil 13C Root Production and Mortality · Mass balance 15N tracer method (Hendricks et al., 1997) Labeling soil plots with enriched 15N Temporal measurements · mass of N in fine root structural pool (mi and mf) · 15

  4. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  5. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  6. Dissolved gas dynamics in wetland soils: Root-mediated gas transfer kinetics determined via push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Matthew C.; Pal, David S.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2015-09-01

    Gas transfer processes are fundamental to the biogeochemical and water quality functions of wetlands, yet there is limited knowledge of the rates and pathways of soil-atmosphere exchange for gases other than oxygen and methane (CH4). In this study, we use a novel push-pull technique with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) as dissolved gas tracers to quantify the kinetics of root-mediated gas transfer, which is a critical efflux pathway for gases from wetland soils. This tracer approach disentangles the effects of physical transport from simultaneous reaction in saturated, vegetated wetland soils. We measured significant seasonal variation in first-order gas exchange rate constants, with smaller spatial variations between different soil depths and vegetation zones in a New Jersey tidal marsh. Gas transfer rates for most biogeochemical trace gases are expected to be bracketed by the rate constants for SF6 and He, which ranged from ˜10-2 to 2 × 10-1 h-1 at our site. A modified Damköhler number analysis is used to evaluate the balance between biochemical reaction and root-driven gas exchange in governing the fate of environmental trace gases in rooted, anaerobic soils. This approach confirmed the importance of plant gas transport for CH4, and showed that root-driven transport may affect nitrous oxide (N2O) balances in settings where N2O reduction rates are slow.

  7. Generation of ethylene tracer by noncatalytic pyrolysis of natural gas at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Ruch, R.; Coleman, D.; Benson, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    There is a critical need within the pipeline gas industry for an inexpensive and reliable technology to generate an identification tag or tracer that can be added to pipeline gas to identify gas that may escape and improve the deliverability and management of gas in underground storage fields. Ethylene is an ideal tracer, because it does not exist naturally in the pipeline gas, and because its physical properties are similar to the pipeline gas components. A pyrolysis process, known as the Tragen process, has been developed to continuously convert the ???2%-4% ethane component present in pipeline gas into ethylene at common pipeline pressures of 800 psi. In our studies of the Tragen process, pyrolysis without steam addition achieved a maximum ethylene yield of 28%-35% at a temperature range of 700-775 ??C, corresponding to an ethylene concentration of 4600-5800 ppm in the product gas. Coke deposition was determined to occur at a significant rate in the pyrolysis reactor without steam addition. The ?? 13C isotopic analysis of gas components showed a ?? 13C value of ethylene similar to ethane in the pipeline gas, indicating that most of the ethylene was generated from decomposition of the ethane in the raw gas. However, ?? 13C isotopic analysis of the deposited coke showed that coke was primarily produced from methane, rather than from ethane or other heavier hydrocarbons. No coke deposition was observed with the addition of steam at concentrations of > 20% by volume. The dilution with steam also improved the ethylene yield. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  8. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  9. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  10. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  11. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  12. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  13. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

    2011-04-15

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air – soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air – water partitioning and water – soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

  14. A laboratory study for tracer tomography based on arrival time inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauchler, R.

    2012-12-01

    Investigation methods that allow for the characterization of transport subsurface properties, for example, characterization of the continuity of preferential transport paths or the presence of barriers are of great interest for the prediction of solute transport in the subsurface. The conventional way to determine transport parameters are tracer tests. Similar to the concept of hydraulic tomography the significance of tracer test results could be greatly increased with respect to spatial resolution of the estimated transport parameters by injecting and monitoring the tracer at different locations to produce a pattern of crossing transport paths. In this study I propose a tracer tomographic laboratory study performed at hard rocks in three-dimensions. The investigated fractured sandstone sample is characterized by significant matrix permeability. In comparison to low permeable hard rocks such as granite and gneiss, fractured porous media shows significant flow and transport within the matrix. The laboratory transport experiments are conducted using a gas flow and gas tracer technique that enables the generation of various flow field patterns via adjustable boundary conditions. In total 51 gas tracer (helium) tests were performed by changing the injection and monitoring position after each test. For the inversion of the tracer breakthrough curve an existing asymptotic approach based on the transformation of the transport equation into a form of the eikonal equation were applied. The uncertainty was assessed with singular value decomposition of the trajectory density matrix. The applied inversion technique allowed for the three-dimensional reconstruction of the interstitial velocity with a high resolution. The three-dimensional interstitial velocity distribution shows clearly that the transport is dominated by the matrix while the fractures show no evident influence.

  15. Estimation of road traffic emission factors from a long term tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belalcazar, Luis Carlos; Fuhrer, Oliver; Ho, Minh Dung; Zarate, Erika; Clappier, Alain

    2009-12-01

    Road traffic emissions, one of the largest source categories in megacity inventories, are highly uncertain. It is essential to develop methodologies to reduce these uncertainties to manage air quality more effectively. In this paper, we propose a methodology to estimate road traffic emission factors (EFs) from a tracer experiment and from roadside pollutants measurements. We emitted continuously during about 300 non-consecutive hours a passive tracer from a finite line source placed on one site of an urban street. At the same time, we measured continuously the resulting tracer concentrations at the other side of the street with a portable on-line gas chromatograph. We used n-propane contained in commercial liquid petroleum gas (LPG) as a passive tracer. Propane offers several advantages to traditional tracers (SF6, N2O, CFCs): low price, easily available, non-reactive, negligible global warming potential, and easy to detect with commercial on-line gas chromatographs. The tracer experiment was carried out from January to March 2007 in a busy street of Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Traffic volume, weather information and pollutant concentrations were also measured at the measurement site. We used the results of the tracer experiment to calculate the dilution factors and afterwards we used these dilution factors, the traffic counts and the pollutant concentrations to estimate the EFs. The proposed method assumes that the finite emission line represents the emission produced by traffic in the full area of the street and therefore there is an error associated to this assumption. We use the Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) model MISKAM to calculate this error and to correct the HCMC EFs. EFs for 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NO are reported here. A comparison with available studies reveals that most of the EFs estimated here are within the range of EFs reported in other studies.

  16. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that acti...

  17. Study of ISM tracers in galaxies

    E-print Network

    V. Casasola; L. Piovan; G. Galletta; D. Bettoni; E. Merlin

    2006-12-05

    We collected data for two samples of normal and interacting galaxies for a total of 2953 galaxies having fluxes in one or more of the following wavebands: FIR, 21 cm line, CO(1-0) lines and soft X-ray. The large set of data obtained allowed us to revisit some of the already known relations between the different tracers of the interstellar medium (ISM), such as the link between the FIR flux and the CO line emission, the relation between X-ray emission and the blue or FIR luminosity. The relation lacking from observations for early-type galaxies has been discussed and explained in detail in the frame of a suitable theoretical model, obtained by coupling chemo-dynamical N-body simulations with a dusty spectrophotometric code of population synthesis.

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  19. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  20. A Tracer Study of Lebanese Upper Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Dallal, Kamel; Rizkallah, George; Rabah, Jihan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data arising from a tracer study of 90 terminating Beirut upper secondary school students. Nearly all the students intended to transit to university, about half of them to science and technology programmes, and subsequently did so. Median anticipated earnings upon graduation were realistic, but a lack of information or guidance…

  1. Studies of thunderstorm transport processes with aircraft using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, A.G.; Smith, P.L.; Stith, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Instrumented aircraft can provide in situ measurements of winds and turbulence useful for studying transport and dispersion in clouds. Using inert artificial gases as tracers, and fast response analyzers on aircraft, time-resolved observations of transport and dispersion have been obtained. Examples are shown of these types of observations in and around cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  2. TRACER STUDY OF SEDIMENT-WATER INTERACTIONS IN ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rates of sediment bioturbation and advective exchange of water across the sediment-water interface in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island were studied by radioactive tracer experiments. The 'biological pumping rate' of water across the interface (.7 + or - .3 cc/sq cm day) was calcula...

  3. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Quinton, John N.; Nearing, Mark A.; Mabit, Lionel; Giráldez, Juan V.; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    The quest for alternative methods of soil losses assessment, due to water erosion to complement and enhance existing methods has directed attention to the use of tracing approaches because of the additional information they provide, such as sediment source identification, tracking of sediment movement across the landscape at various temporal and spatial scales and soil erosion rates. For these reasons, the utility and robustness of sediment tracing approaches using a wide range of substances and soil properties have been evaluated in numerous studies. A comprehensive literature review on tracing approaches used in water erosion studies was carried out in June 2011 using the Web of Science database and as search terms in the title or as keywords: "erosion AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracking". The search excluded reviews and tillage and/or wind erosion studies. Only studies that used tracers to make a determination of water erosion or sedimentation rates, or in some cases relative erosion contribution, were considered in this study, and were further refined by manually checking that the articles corresponded to experiments involving sediment studies using tracers, as defined within the context of this review. Five distinct groups of tracing approaches were identified: fallout radionuclides, rare earth elements, soil magnetism and magnetic substances, other tracers, and sediment fingerprinting techniques. This abstract presents a synthesis of the current approaches of each of the tracing techniques identified in assessing soil erosion and sediment redistribution and a summary with the commonalities and differences between the approaches and identifying research gaps and future trends.

  4. [Determination of tracer gas contents in sediment pore water of gas hydrate area by two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Yang, Qunhui; Ji, Fuwu; Zhou, Huaiyang; Xue, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional gas chromatographic instrument was established by the capillary flow technology (Deans Switch) and two columns (PoraPLOT Q and Molsieve 5A) and three detectors (pulsed discharge helium ionization detector, flame photometric detector and thermal conductivity detector). The instrument can be used to measure tracer gases simultaneously including hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The detection limits of the hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were 0.51, 0.17, 82 and 0.08 micromol/mol, and the calibration curves presented good linear relationships in the range of 2-1030, 0.6-501, 120-10500 and 0.2- 49.1 micromol/mol, respectively. The relative standard deviations were less than 10% for the measurements of ten standard gases. By this method, the tracer gases in the sediment pore water of gas hydrate area in South China Sea had been detected. This method is simple, sensitive, and suitable for on-board detection. Compared with the usual methods for measuring tracer gases, the amount of a sample necessary is reduced greatly. It is useful for the survey of gas hydrate and hydrothermal resources below sea floor and for the research of dissolved gases in the ocean. PMID:21574403

  5. Subcutaneous infusion and capillary "finger stick" sampling of stable isotope tracer in metabolic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic studies utilizing stable isotope tracer in humans have typically used intravenous tracer infusions and venous blood sampling. These studies explore subcutaneous infusion of isotope and "finger stick" capillary blood sampling to measure glucose turnover. Five subjects received simultaneous ...

  6. Tracer Applications of Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Geosciences

    E-print Network

    Lu, Z -T; Smethie, W M; Sturchio, N C; Fischer, T P; Kennedy, B M; Purtschert, R; Severinghaus, J P; Solomon, D K; Tanhua, T; Yokochi, R

    2013-01-01

    The noble gas radionuclides, including 81Kr (half-life = 229,000 yr), 85Kr (11 yr), and 39Ar (269 yr), possess nearly ideal chemical and physical properties for studies of earth and environmental processes. Recent advances in Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a laser-based atom counting method, have enabled routine measurements of the radiokrypton isotopes, as well as the demonstration of the ability to measure 39Ar in environmental samples. Here we provide an overview of the ATTA technique, and a survey of recent progress made in several laboratories worldwide. We review the application of noble gas radionuclides in the geosciences and discuss how ATTA can help advance these fields, specifically determination of groundwater residence times using 81Kr, 85Kr, and 39Ar; dating old glacial ice using 81Kr; and an 39Ar survey of the main water masses of the oceans, to study circulation pathways and estimate mean residence times. Other scientific questions involving deeper circulation of fluids in the Earth's crust ...

  7. Tracer study of proximity and recirculation effects on exposure risk in an airliner cabin.

    PubMed

    Rydock, James P

    2004-02-01

    There is continuing concern about whether and to what extent airliner cabins represent an increased risk of transmission of airborne infectious disease. The purpose of this study was to examine through a simple experiment the relative importance of close proximity and partial recirculation of cabin air on the potential risk of disease transmission. Results are presented from measurements of instantaneous point source dispersion in a cabin on a commercial airline flight. A small amount of tracer gas was released as a puff in the passenger cabin of a wide body jet at cruise altitude. Tracer gas samples were taken manually in the period immediately after the release by two technicians sitting 2 m and 30 m forward of the release point in the cabin. The maximum tracer concentration observed at the 2 m sampling point occurred at 5 s after the release and was a factor of 500 greater than the maximum observed at the 30 m sampling point, which occurred 6.5 min after the release. The integrated tracer exposure at the 2 m location was approximately a factor of 30 greater than at the 30 m location. Assuming risk of transmission is proportional to dose, then the results support the hypotheses that infectious diseases are transmitted primarily between people sitting in close proximity to each other in an aircraft cabin and that partial recirculation of ventilation air in the cabin has a negligible impact on occupants' risk of exposure. PMID:14960054

  8. Dense Molecular Gas Tracers in High Mass Star Formation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongjun

    2015-08-01

    We report the FCRAO mapping observations of HCN (1-0), CS (2-1), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in ten high-mass star-forming cores associated with water masers. We present the contour maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers trace similar area in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high- mass star-forming regions, and find that most of cores agree with the model that a photo- dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to a X-ray-dominated region (XDR).

  9. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter estimates made.

  10. Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate

    E-print Network

    Fehn, Udo

    Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate systems and fore arc fluids of Geochemical Exploration Oct. 2004 #12;Abstract The strong association of iodine with organic material and the presence of the cosmogenic radioisotope 129 I make the iodine isotopic system useful in tracing and dating

  11. Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks 

    E-print Network

    Cummings, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    handler on and again with the air handler off indicates whether duct leaks exist. In many cases, it is possible to determine the leak flow rate. A second part of the test, determining the return leak fraction by comparing the tracer gas concentration...

  12. New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil elemental and isotopic signatures (B/Cl, Li/Cl, 11 B, and 7 Li) useful for characterizing hydraulic

  13. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  14. Mid Infrared H2 lines- a new direct tracer for total molecular gas content in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togi, Aditya; Smith, John-David T.

    2016-01-01

    Robust knowledge of the molecular hydrogen (H2) gas distribution is necessary to understand star formation in galaxies. Since H2 is not readily observable in the cold interstellar medium (ISM), the molecular gas content has traditionally been inferred using indirect tracers like carbon-monoxide (CO), dust emission, gamma ray interactions, and star formation efficiency. Physical processes resulting in enhancement and reduction of these indirect tracers can result in misleading estimates of molecular gas masses. My dissertation work is based on devising a new temperature power law distribution model for warm H2, a direct tracer, to calculate the total molecular gas mass in galaxies. The model parameters are estimated using mid infrared (MIR) H2 rotational line fluxes, obtained from IRS- Spitzer (InfraRed Spectrograph- Spitzer) instrument, and the model can be extrapolated to a suitable lower temperature to recover the total molecular gas mass. The power law model is able to recover the dark molecular gas, undetected by CO, in low metallicity galaxies. Using the power law model in the coming era of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) with the high sensitivity MIR Instrument (MIRI) spectrograph we will be able to understand the properties of molecular gas at low and high redshifts.

  15. Tracer microrheology study of a hydrophobically modified comblike associative polymer.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Ahmed A; Amin, Samiul; van Zanten, John H; Khan, Saad A

    2015-04-01

    The viscoelastic properties of associative polymers are important not only for their use as rheology modifiers but also to understand their complex structure in aqueous media. In this study, the dynamics of comblike hydrophobically modified alkali swellable associative (HASE) polymers are probed using diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) based tracer microrheology. DWS-based tracer microrheology accurately probes the dynamics of HASE polymers, and the extracted microrheological moduli versus frequency profile obtained from this technique closely matches that obtained from rotational rheometry measurements. Quantitatively, however, the moduli extracted from DWS-based tracer microrheology measurements are slightly higher than those obtained using rotational rheometry. The creep compliance, elastic modulus, and relaxation time concentration scaling behavior exhibits a power-law dependence. The length scale associated with the elastic to glassy behavior change is obtained from the time-dependent diffusion coefficient. The Zimm-Rouse type scaling is recovered at high frequencies but shows a concentration effect switching from Zimm to more Rouse-like behavior at higher concentrations. PMID:25775221

  16. Radon as a natural tracer for gas transport within uranium waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Chagas, E G L; Abreu, C B; Dias, D C S; Lopez, D; Guerreiro, E T Z; Alberti, H L C; Braz, M L; Branco, O; Fleming, P

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has been identified as the main cause for outflow of acid water and radioactive/non-radioactive contaminants. AMD encompasses pyrites oxidation when water and oxygen are available. AMD was identified in uranium waste rock piles (WRPs) of Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil-Caldas facility (Brazilian uranium mine), resulting in high costs for water treatment. AMD reduction is the main challenge, and scientific investigation has been conducted to understand oxygen and water transportation within WRPs, where 222Rn is used as natural tracer for oxygen transportation. The study consists of soil radon gas mapping in the top layer of WRP4 using active soil gas pumping, radon adsorption in active charcoal and 222Rn determination using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A sampling network of 71 points was built where samples were collected at a depth of 40 cm. Soil radon gas concentration ranged from 33.7 to 1484.2 kBq m(-3) with mean concentration of 320.7±263.3 kBq m(-3). PMID:24729565

  17. Assessment of Contaminant Transport in Waterways Around Major Population Centers by Deliberately Gas Tracer Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, D. T.; Schlosser, P.; Schmieder, P.; Caplow, T.

    2005-12-01

    Pollution of water through leakage, catastrophic or climate-induced release of toxic chemicals, sewage, and fertilizer threaten the health of human inhabited areas. In order to assess pathways and mixing of such substances, small amounts of the inert gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at strategically chosen points in New York Harbor, the East River, the Houston Ship Channel, and the Stockton Deep Water Channel. Subsequently, the tracer movement was mapped for 7 to 10 days in near real-time mode. The results of these experiments revealed advective pathways, mixing patterns, exchange between individual subdomains of the water bodies, and mean residence times of substances in the system. These experiments demonstrated that the SF6 tracer technique could be used to examine persistent or emerging events that could affect human health.

  18. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1991-12-31

    Studies continued on organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization project. Tracers studied include benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. The main focus of the work performed during the time period from 07/01/91 to 12/31/91 has been the continuation of (1) LC-MS optimization for tracer identification, (2) batch sorption and degradation studies, (3) neoprene tubing evaluation studies, and (4) soil column evaluation of tracer compounds. All of these areas of research (except perhaps the neoprene tubing evaluation) are ongoing and will continue throughout the coming year.

  19. Use of tracers in materials-holdup study

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1983-01-01

    Holdup measurements of special nuclear materials in large processing facilities offer considerable challenges to conventional nondestructive-assay techniques. The use of judiciously chosen radioactive tracers offer a unique method of overcoming this difficulty. Three examples involving the use of /sup 46/Sc and fission products from activated uranium in large-scale experimental studies of uranium holdup are discussed. A justification for the method and its advantages along with examples of successful applications of this technique for large-sale experimental studies are presented.

  20. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  1. Evaluation of Partitioning Gas Tracer Tests for Measuring Water in Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Han, B.; Jafarpour, Y.; Gallagher, V. N.; Chiu, P. C.; Fluman, D. A.; Vasuki, N. C.; Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Cohen, K. K.

    2003-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. An important issue in the operation of bioreactor landfills is knowing how much water to add and where to add it. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. We are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. We report the results from laboratory and field tests designed to evaluate the partitioning gas tracer test within an anaerobic landfill operated by the Delaware Solid Waste Authority. Vertical wells were installed within the landfill to inject and extract tracer gases. Gas flow and tracer gas movement in the solid waste were controlled by the landfill's existing gas collection system, which included vertical wells installed throughout the landfill through which a vacuum was applied. The results from this test are reported along with an overview of a similar test planned for the bioreactor landfill cells operated by the Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works.

  2. Determination of water saturation using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2013-05-01

    Water saturation is an important indicator of contaminant distribution and plays a governing role in contaminant transport within the vadose zone. Understanding the water saturation distribution is critical for both remediation and contaminant flux monitoring in unsaturated environments. In this work we propose and demonstrate a method of remotely determining water saturation levels using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse bulk electrical conductivity measurements. The theoretical development includes the partitioning chemistry for the tracers we demonstrate (ammonia and carbon dioxide), as well as a review of the petrophysical relationship governing how these tracers influence bulk conductivity. We also investigate methods of utilizing secondary information provided by electrical conductivity breakthrough magnitudes induced by the tracers. We test the method on clean, well characterized, intermediate-scale sand columns under controlled conditions. Results demonstrate the capability to predict partitioning coefficients and accurately monitor gas breakthrough curves along the length of the column according to the corresponding electrical conductivity response, leading to accurate water saturation estimates. This work is motivated by the need to develop effective characterization and monitoring techniques for contaminated deep vadose zone environments, and provides a proof-of-concept toward uniquely characterizing and monitoring water saturation levels at the field scale and in three-dimensions using electrical resistivity tomography.

  3. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  4. Assessment of steady-state propane-gas tracer method for determining reaeration coefficients, Chenango River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Steadfast, D.A.; Jirka, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in a meandering 9.6-km reach of the Chenango River, New York, to assess the feasibility of a two-dimensional steady-state propane-gas tracer method as a means of estimating in situ reaeration coefficients. It is concluded that the method, which combines an instantaneous release of dye tracer with a long duration release of propane gas tracer, is very feasible for determining gas-desorption coefficients and wind effects in a wide river. However, the method does not appear to be ready for immediate operational applications. (USGS)

  5. Dense gas tracers and star formation laws: Multi-transition CS survey in nearby active star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Gao, Yu; Henkel, Christian; Zhao, Yinghe; Wang, JunZhi; Menten, Karl M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies on star formation indicate that stars, especially massive stars, are predominantly formed in dense molecular cores. We have performed a survey of multiple transitions of CS (from J=1-0 to 7-6), and HCN/HCO+ J=4-3 in nearby star-forming galaxies, including normal spirals, starburst, and ULIRGs. We find linear correlations between the luminosities of LIR and L'gas for all dense gas tracers across eight magnitudes of IR luminosity (LIR from 104 Lsun to 1012 Lsun), on scales from entire galaxies to Galactic dense cores. Irrespective of the critical density of a specific transition, dense molecular gas is universally related in a linear way to star forming activities for self-gravitationally bound gas systems.

  6. Recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Xie, Xingjun; Beck, Warren; Kong, Xianghui; Xian, Feng; Du, Yajuan; Wu, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Studies of cosmogenic 10Be in Chinese loess began about twenty-five years ago and since then a number of research groups worldwide have contributed to a firm understanding of the production, transport, deposition and storage of 10Be in loess. The essential characteristics that make 10Be a useful isotopic tracer in loess, include: (1) dominant atmospheric production directly linked to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field; (2) climate-dependent deposition; and (3) subsequent immobility, so that as 10Be accumulates in a loess profile its stratigraphic integrity is preserved. This fact, combined with very high deposition rates in loess on the Chinese Loess Plateau, makes 10Be an especially valuable continental archive of paleoclimate and paleomagnetism, complementing marine and ice-core records. Here we provide in particular the most recent progress of 10Be tracer studies in Chinese loess, including the determination of the correct age of the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity reversal at 780 ± 3 ka B.P., in accord with marine and ice records, and quantitative reconstruction of 130-ka paleoprecipitation using 10Be from Chinese loess profiles.

  7. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, A. A.; Baffa, O.; Oliveira, R. B.

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions.

  8. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  9. Reintegration of child soldiers in Burundi: a tracer study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substantial attention and resources are aimed at the reintegration of child soldiers, yet rigorous evaluations are rare. Methods This tracer study was conducted among former child soldiers (N=452) and never-recruited peers (N=191) who participated in an economic support program in Burundi. Socio-economic outcome indicators were measured retrospectively for the period before receiving support (T1; 2005–06); immediately afterwards (T2; 2006–07); and at present (T3; 2010). Participants also rated present functional impairment and mental health indicators. Results Participants reported improvement on all indicators, especially economic opportunity and social integration. At present no difference existed between both groups on any of the outcome indicators. Socio-economic functioning was negatively related with depression- and, health complaints and positively with intervention satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrates promising reintegration trajectories of former child soldiers after participating in a support program. PMID:23095403

  10. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for ? 18O value, while the ?D value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  11. DISSOCIATION OF SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TRACER GAS IN THE PRESENCE OF AN INDOOR COMBUSTION SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an odorless, non-toxic, and inert compound, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the most widely used tracer gases in indoor air quality studies in both controlled and uncontrolled environments. This compound may be subject to hydrolysis under elevated temperature to form acidi...

  12. Studies of impurity migration in TEXTOR by local tracer injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, A.; Wienhold, P.; Borodin, D.; Björkas, C.; van Hoey, O.; Matveev, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.; Laengner, M.; Ohya, K.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Tracer experiments have been carried out by injection 13C marked methane through test limiters exposed to the scrape-off-layer in TEXTOR. The influence of impact energy and flux on depositing 13C species has been studied. One experiment has been performed with biased test limiter (-300 V) in order to increase energy of positively charged ions and the other one with 10 times reduced 13CH4 injection rate compared to previously used injection rate. Biasing of the test limiter increases the resulting 13C deposition by a factor of ˜6 - post-mortem analysis yields a 13C deposition efficiency of ˜1.7% compared to ˜0.3% without biasing. Reducing the injection rate increases 13C deposition efficiency to ˜0.7%, which is more than two times larger compared to experiments with previously used injection rate. ERO modelling shows that enhanced re-erosion of redeposits is still necessary to reproduce measured 13C deposition efficiencies.

  13. INTERPRETATION OF TRACER SURFACE DIFFUSION EXPERIMENTS ON UO{sub 2} ROLES OF GAS AND SOLID TRANSPORT PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, D.R.

    1980-06-01

    The spreading of a tracer from an enriched needle source which contacts the surface of a depleted pellet sink is analyzed rigorously. It is shown that volume diffusion in both the needle and the pellet need to be considered because only by this process is sufficient radioactivity accumulated for measurement after the anneal. Parasitic gas phase processes are of two types-evaporative loss of solid if a flowing gas is used, or molecular diffusion from enriched portions of the surface to depleted zones if the couple is in a closed vessel with a stagnant gas. A complete numerical solution including surface diffusion, solid diffusion, evaporative loss and contact resistance is applied to the UO{sub 2} tracer study of Marlowe and Kazanoff at 1915° C. Based upon UO{sub 2} evaporation experiments, the analysis shows that the evaporative loss effect is not important in these experiments. The UO{sub 2} surface diffusion coefficient deduced from analysis of these data is 0.2{+-} 0.1 cm{sup 2)/s at 1915{degrees}C., which is 10{sup 4} times larger than that predicted by extrapolation of values obtained by mass transfer techniques.

  14. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1990-12-31

    Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

  15. A Rapid, Low-Cost Method to Determine Travel Times at Managed Aquifer Recharge Operations Using Noble Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.; Halliwell, M.; Hillegonds, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is a key component for the sustainable use of surface water and groundwater in the arid western U.S. When recycled water is a recharge water source, subsurface residence time, required for bacteria and virus deactivation, is best verified by application of an extrinsic tracer. Desirable tracer properties include: no real or perceived health risk, inexpensive even for a large volume of tagged water, large dynamic range, efficient introduction, convenient sampling methods, and rapid, low-cost analysis. We have developed and tested a dissolved noble gas tracer technique ideally suited for tracing large water volumes at managed aquifer recharge facilities. In an application of the method at a water district's facilities in the San Francisco Bay area, Xenon was introduced into a 106 m3 pond over a period of 7 days using a 300 m length of gas-permeable silicone tubing. Samples from the pond, near-field shallow monitoring wells, and production wells about 400 m from the recharge pond were analyzed for dissolved Xe by noble gas membrane inlet mass spectrometry (NGMIMS). The NGMIMS uses a syringe pump, gas-permeable membrane inlet, and quadrupole residual gas analyzer for measurement of noble gas concentrations. Samples are collected in VOA vials, and analysis can be carried out in real-time, with a measurement uncertainty of about 5% for Xe. Tracer first appeared in a production well 136 days after starting the tracer introduction at 0.7% (C/C0) of the peak pond xenon concentration. The cost of the tracer is about US650/106 m3 water, and the NGMIMS was assembled with parts totaling approximately US50,000, making application of the tracer method feasible for most managed aquifer recharge projects. This project is part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program.

  16. A study of solute transport mechanisms using rare earth element tracers and artificial rainstorms on snow

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    and Susan Taylor1,5 Abstract. Rare earth element (REE) tracers and three artificial rain-on-snow stormsA study of solute transport mechanisms using rare earth element tracers and artificial rainstorms on snow Xiahong Feng,1 James W. Kirchner,2 Carl E. Renshaw,1 Randall S. Osterhuber,3 Bjo¨rn Klaue,4

  17. IAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    IAEA-CN-80/66 ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER AND CLIMATE STUDIES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT T Avenue West, Waterloo ON N2L 3G1, CANADA 1 also: Isotope Hydrology Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, AUSTRIA Abstract ISOTOPE TRACERS IN GLOBAL WATER

  18. Project definition study for the National Biomedical Tracer Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roozen, K.

    1995-02-15

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has conducted a study of the proposed National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). In collaboration with General Atomics, RUST International, Coleman Research Corporation (CRC), IsoMed, Ernst and Young and the advisory committees, they have examined the issues relevant to the NBTF in terms of facility design, operating philosophy, and a business plan. They have utilized resources within UAB, CRC and Chem-Nuclear to develop recommendations on environmental, safety and health issues. The Institute of Medicine Panel`s Report on Isotopes for Medicine and the Life Sciences took the results of prior workshops further in developing recommendations for the mission of the NBTF. The IOM panel recommends that the NBTF accelerator have the capacity to accelerate protons to 80 MeV and a minimum of 750 microamperes of current. The panel declined to recommend a cyclotron or a linac. They emphasized a clear focus on research and development for isotope production including target design, separation chemistry and generator development. The facility needs to emphasize education and training in its mission. The facility must focus on radionuclide production for the research and clinical communities. The formation of a public-private partnership resembling the TRIUMF-Nordion model was encouraged. An advisory panel should assist with the NBTF operations and prioritization.

  19. Hourly Measurement of the Concentration and Gas-Particle Partitioning of Oxygenated Organic Tracers in Ambient Aerosol: First Results from Berkeley, CA and Rural Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L.; Chan, A.; Worton, D. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Hourly and bi-hourly time-resolved measurements of organic tracer compounds in ambient aerosols have been successfully used to elucidate sources and formation pathways of atmospheric particulate matter. Here we extend the Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SVTAG), a custom in-situ instrument that collects, desorbs, and analyzes ambient aerosol and semi-volatile compounds with hourly time resolution, to include on-line derivatization and a second, parallel collection cell that provides simultaneous collection of both particle-phase and particle-plus-gas-phase organic compounds. By introducing a silylating agent upon desorption, SVTAG can measure highly oxygenated compounds that are not easily detected using traditional gas chromatography including most of the previously reported oxygenated tracers for biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol. The use of a pair of matched collection cells with parallel sampling and serial analysis provides direct gas-particle partitioning information. One cell collects the total organic fraction of compounds with volatilities lower than a C13 hydrocarbon, while the other cell samples through an activated carbon denuder to selectively remove the gas-phase components. Taken together these provide a direct measurement of gas-particle partitioning to yield a check on classical absorption based partitioning theory while deviations from this theory provide constraints on other driving factors in aerosol formation chemistry, such as oligomerization, salt formation, and acidity. We present here the capabilities and utility of the dual cell SVTAG with derivatization, with chemical insights gained from initial tests on ambient Berkeley air and the first results from a rural site in Alabama obtained during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Tracers for varying isoprene oxidation pathways are used to explore the influence of anthropogenic emissions; concentrations of 2-methyltetrols and 2-methyl glyceric acid provide constraints on the relative importance of NOx and HO2 as the fate of the alkylperoxy (RO2) radical. Measuring these and other known biogenic tracers with hourly time resolution yields detailed diurnal variability patterns of these compounds, elucidating formation timescales and pathways. Gas-particle partitioning of these biogenic oxygenated compounds, as well as oxygenated tracers common in urban environments, are found in many cases to be well-modeled by absorptive partitioning theory. However, for many compounds, the particle-phase fraction is greatly under-predicted by simple absorption. Several commonly used biogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers that are typically considered to exist primarily in the particle phase, such as 2-methyltetrols, are shown to be 20-80% in the gas phase.

  20. 13N as a tracer for studying glutamate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2010-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes studies my associates and I carried out that are relevant to the topic of the present volume [i.e. glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)] using radioactive 13N (t½ 9.96 min) as a biological tracer. These studies revealed the previously unrecognized rapidity with which nitrogen is exchanged among certain metabolites in vivo. For example, our work demonstrated that a) the t½ for conversion of portal vein ammonia to urea in the rat liver is ~10–11 sec, despite the need for five enzyme-catalyzed steps and two mitochondrial transport steps, b) the residence time for ammonia in the blood of anesthetized rats is ?7–8 sec, c) the t½ for incorporation of blood-borne ammonia into glutamine in the normal rat brain is <3 sec, and d) equilibration between glutamate and aspartate nitrogen in rat liver is extremely rapid (seconds), a reflection of the fact that the components of the hepatic aspartate aminotransferase reaction are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Our work emphasizes the importance of the GDH reaction in rat liver as a conduit for dissimilating or assimilating ammonia as needed. In contrast, our work shows that the GDH reaction in rat brain appears to operate mostly in the direction of ammonia production (dissimilation). The importance of the GDH reaction as an endogenous source of ammonia in the brain and the relation of GDH to the brain glutamine cycle is discussed. Finally, our work integrates with the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study brain ammonia uptake and brain glutamine, respectively, in normal individuals and in patients with liver disease or other diseases associated with hyperammonemia. PMID:21108979

  1. Analysis techniques for tracer studies of oxidation. M. S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis techniques to obtain quantitative diffusion data from tracer concentration profiles were developed. Mass balance ideas were applied to determine the mechanism of oxide growth and to separate the fraction of inward and outward growth of oxide scales. The process of inward oxygen diffusion with exchange was theoretically modelled and the effect of lattice diffusivity, grain boundary diffusivity and grain size on the tracer concentration profile was studied. The development of the tracer concentration profile in a growing oxide scale was simulated. The double oxidation technique was applied to a FeCrAl-Zr alloy using 0-18 as a tracer. SIMS was used to obtain the tracer concentration profile. The formation of lacey oxide on the alloy was discussed. Careful consideration was given to the quality of data required to obtain quantitative information.

  2. Study of North Atlantic ventilation using transient tracers. Doctoral Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Doney, S.C.

    1991-08-01

    Tritium, (3)He, and chlorofluorocarbon distributions in the North Atlantic provide constraints on the ventilation time-scales for the thermocline and abyssal water. A new model function based on a factor analysis of the WMO/IAEA precipitation data set is developed for predicting the spatial and temporal patterns of bomb-tritium in precipitation. Model atmospheric and advective tritium inputs to the North Atlantic are compared with the observed bomb-tritium inventories calculated from the 1972 GEOSECS and 1981-1983 TTO data sets. The observed growth of bomb-tritium levels in the deep North Atlantic are used, along with the tracer gradients ((3)H and (3)He) in the Deep Western Boundary Current, to estimate abyssal ventilation rates and boundary current recirculation. The surface boundary conditions for different transient tracers are found to profoundly effect thermocline ventilation rates estimates. Tracers that equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, such as (3)He and the CFCs, have faster apparent ventilation rates and are more appropriate for estimating oxygen utilization rates than tracers that are reset slowly in the surface ocean (e.g. (3)H and (14)C). The chlorofluorocarbon data for a new section in the eastern North Atlantic are presented and used to illustrate the ventilation time-scales for the major water masses in the region. (Copyright (c) Scott C. Doney, 1991.)

  3. TRACER DISPERSION STUDIES FOR HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments were conducted at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Test & Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, to quantify longitudinal dispersion of a sodium fluoride tracer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe and ductile iron pipe under laminar, tr...

  4. GEOMETRIC OFFSETS ACROSS SPIRAL ARMS IN M51: NATURE OF GAS AND STAR FORMATION TRACERS

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Melissa; Koda, Jin; Egusa, Fumi

    2013-02-15

    We report measurements of geometric offsets between gas spiral arms and associated star-forming regions in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. These offsets are a suggested measure of the star formation timescale after the compression of gas at spiral arm entry. A surprising discrepancy, by an order of magnitude, has been reported in recent offset measurements in nearby spiral galaxies. Measurements using CO and H{alpha} emission find large and ordered offsets in M51. On the contrary, small or non-ordered offsets have been found using the H I 21 cm and 24 {mu}m emissions, possible evidence against gas flow through spiral arms, and thus against the conventional density-wave theory with a stationary spiral pattern. The goal of this paper is to understand the cause of this discrepancy. We investigate potential causes by repeating those previous measurements using equivalent data, methods, and parameters. We find offsets consistent with the previous measurements and conclude that the difference of gas tracers, i.e., H I versus CO, is the primary cause. The H I emission is contaminated significantly by the gas photodissociated by recently formed stars and does not necessarily trace the compressed gas, the precursor of star formation. The H I gas and star-forming regions coincide spatially and tend to show small offsets. We find mostly positive offsets with substantial scatter between CO and H{alpha}, suggesting that gas flow through spiral arms (i.e., density wave) though the spiral pattern may not necessarily be stationary.

  5. An Assessment of steady-state propane-gas tracer method for reaeration coefficients, Cowaselon Creek, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yotsukura, N.; Stedfast, D.A.; Draper, R.E.; Brutsaert, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Three tests were conducted in a straight 5.2-km reach of the Cowaselon Creek, Canastota, New York, in order to assess feasibility of the steady-state propane-gas tracer method as a means of estimating in situ reaeration coefficients. It is concluded that the steady-state method, which combines as instantaneous injection of dye tracer with a long-duration injection of propane tracer, is an operationally feasible field technique and provides a very reliable means of determining the propane desorption coefficient in steady-channel flow. The effect of wind shear on propane desorption coefficients was not detected in any tests, apparently due to the sheltering effect of high banks. The reaeration coefficient is estimated by applying a conversion factor determined from laboratory experiments to the gas desorption coefficient. (USGS)

  6. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  7. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T. . E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-07-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

  8. Green River air quality model development: meteorological and tracer data, July/August 1982 field study in Brush Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Lee, R.N.; Orgill, M.M.; Zak, B.D.

    1984-06-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a 3-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The objective of the field experiments was to obtain data to evaluate a model, called VALMET, developed at PNL to predict dispersion of air pollutants released from an elevated stack located within a deep mountain valley in the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period. Three tracer experiments were conducted in the valley during the 2-week period. In these experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was released from a height of approximately 100 m, beginning before sunrise and continuing until the nocturnal down-valley winds reversed several hours after sunrise. Dispersion of the sulfur hexafluoride after release was evaluated by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations in ambient air samples taken from sampling devices operated within the valley up to about 8 km down valley from the source. An instrumented research aircraft was also used to measure concentrations in and above the valley. Tracer samples were collected using a network of radio-controlled bag sampling stations, two manually operated gas chromatographs, a continuous SF/sub 6/ monitor, and a vertical SF/sub 6/ profiler. In addition, basic meteorological data were collected during the tracer experiments. Frequent profiles of vertical wind and temperature structure were obtained with tethered balloons operated at the release site and at a site 7.7 km down the valley from the release site. 10 references, 63 figures, 50 tables.

  9. Air pollution tracer studies in the lower atmosphere. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of tracers to study lower atmospheric air pollution movements. Citations discuss project descriptions and results, techniques, and tracer materials. Tracer movement from nuclear power plants, industrial stacks, and urban areas is discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Near-Road Mulltipollutant Profiles: Association between Volatile Organic Compounds and a Tracer Gas Surrogate Near a Busy Highway

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research characterizes associations between multiple pollutants in the near-road environment attributed to a roadway line source. It also examines the use of a tracer gas as a surrogate of mobile source pollutants. Air samples were collected in summa canisters along a 300 m ...

  11. The Critical Density and the Effective Excitation Density of Commonly Observed Molecular Dense Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Yancy L.

    2015-03-01

    The optically thin critical densities and the effective excitation densities to produce a 1 K km/s (or 0.818 Jy km/s ) spectral line are tabulated for 12 commonly observed dense gas molecular tracers. The dependence of the critical density and effective excitation density on physical assumptions (i.e., gas kinetic temperature and molecular column density) is analyzed. Critical densities for commonly observed dense gas transitions in molecular clouds (i.e., HCN 1-0, HCO+ 1-0, N2H+ 1-0) are typically 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than effective excitation densities because the standard definitions of critical density do not account for radiative trapping and 1 K km/s lines are typically produced when radiative rates out of the upper energy level of the transition are faster than collisional depopulation. The use of effective excitation density has a distinct advantage over the use of critical density in characterizing the differences in density traced by species such as NH3, HCO+, N2H+, and HCN, as well as their isotopologues; but, the effective excitation density has the disadvantage that it is undefined for transitions when Eu/k?Tk, for low molecular column densities, and for heavy molecules with complex spectra (i.e., CH3CHO).

  12. Glass mixing theory and tracer study results from the SF-10 run

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.W.; Routt, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    A general, partial differential equation governing glass mixing in the Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) was derived and a solution obtained based upon certain simplifying assumptions. Tracer studies were then conducted in the SFCM during the SF-10 run to test the theory and characterize glass mixing in this melter. Analysis of the tracer data shows that glass mixing in the SFCM can be explained by use of a model of two, well-mixed tanks in series.

  13. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  14. Enhancing the activation of silicon carbide tracer particles for PEPT applications using gas-phase deposition of alumina at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdesueiro, D.; Garcia-Triñanes, P.; Meesters, G. M. H.; Kreutzer, M. T.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Parker, D. J.; Seville, J. P. K.; van Ommen, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    We have enhanced the radio-activation efficiency of SiC (silicon carbide) particles, which by nature have a poor affinity towards 18F ions, to be employed as tracers in studies using PEPT (Positron Emission Particle Tracking). The resulting SiC-Al2O3 core-shell structure shows a good labelling efficiency, comparable to ?-Al2O3 tracer particles, which are commonly used in PEPT. The coating of the SiC particles was carried at 27±3 °C and 1 bar in a fluidized bed reactor, using trimethylaluminium and water as precursors, by a gas phase technique similar to atomic layer deposition. The thickness of the alumina films, which ranged from 5 to 500 nm, was measured by elemental analysis and confirmed with FIB-TEM (focused ion beam - transmission electron microscope), obtaining consistent results from both techniques. By depositing such a thin film of alumina, properties that influence the hydrodynamic behaviour of the SiC particles, such as size, shape and density, are hardly altered, ensuring that the tracer particle shows the same flow behaviour as the other particles. The paper describes a general method to improve the activation efficiency of materials, which can be applied for the production of tracer particles for many other applications too.

  15. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  16. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2006-02-14

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

  17. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  18. Multiple tracer study in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan: 1. Residence time estimation based on multiple environmental tracers and lumped parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwaya, Koki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi; Mizuno, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A multiple tracer study was conducted in the coastal plain of Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan. To accomplish reliable estimates of groundwater residence time, multiple tracer approach, employing both gaseous and nongaseous environmental tracers, and lumped parameter models (LPMs) were applied in combination. Environmental tracers including 3H, 3H/3He, 36Cl, and SF6 were analyzed and compared with values estimated from LPMs to select the most appropriate tracer and models to describe groundwater flow regime in the study area. Time series of 36Cl/Cl input in the study area were reconstructed and used in the LPMs. From comparison of the analyzed and modeled results, an index of 3H/3He was selected as the most appropriate for investigation of the study area. The relationship between the 3H/3He index and 36Cl/Cl indicated reliability of the 3H/3He index, but 36Cl/Cl values of the samples were lower than the models. This discrepancy was caused by underestimation of Cl- concentration of recharging water in the calculation of 36Cl/Cl input. SF6 mixing ratios of the samples were slightly higher than the models and it suggested involvement of terrigenic SF6. Three well groups, northern Shimonuma wells (NSW), southern Shimonuma wells (SSW), and Hamasato wells (HW), were respectively consistent with exponential piston flow model (EPM), binary mixing model (BMM), and exponential mixing model (EMM). Relational expressions between the 3H/3He index and mean residence time or mixing fraction of young groundwater (assumed to contain no tritiogenic 3He) with old groundwater (all 3H decayed to tritiogenic 3He) were obtained based on the models. The mean residence time determined from the 3H/3He index and the expressions were 19-78 years for NSW and 1-648 years for HW. The mixing fraction of young groundwater was less than 10% at all SSW. Nongaseous tracers, including 36Cl are not influenced by factors specific for gaseous tracers, such as excess air and degassing. Analyses of multiple tracers, including both gaseous and nongaseous tracers, and comparison using LPMs were effective to show plausibility of the estimated residence time, and they contributed to understanding of groundwater flow regime in the study area.

  19. Results of Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Jeanette

    2006-02-23

    This is the final report detailing the analyses performed under ORD-FY04-011 "Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies." The work was performed under the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC28-04RW12232. This task provided method development and analytical support for the Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Concentrations of tracers, as well as major anions and cations, were reported for samples provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). Samples were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Samples were analyzed and controlled according to Implementing Procedures (IP's) written and approved in accordance with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) approved Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program.

  20. An evaluation of the estimation of road traffic emission factors from tracer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belalcazar, Luis Carlos; Clappier, Alain; Blond, Nadège; Flassak, Thomas; Eichhorn, Joachim

    2010-10-01

    Road traffic emission factors (EFs) are one of the main sources of uncertainties in emission inventories; it is necessary to develop methods to reduce these uncertainties to manage air quality more efficiently. Recently an alternative method has been proposed to estimate the EFs. In that work the emission factors were estimated from a long term tracer study developed in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) Vietnam. A passive tracer was continuously emitted from a finite line source placed in one side of an urban street canyon. Simultaneously, the resulting tracer concentrations were monitored at the other side of the street. The results of this experiment were used to calculate the dispersion factors and afterwards, these dispersion factors were used to estimate the EFs. In this paper we use the Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) model WinMISKAM to critically evaluate the proposed methodology. In a first step, we use the results of the tracer study to validate the CFD model. Results show that the model is able to simulate quite well the tracer dispersion in most of the cases. The model is then used to evaluate the effect of varying the source configuration and to correct the EFs. A comparison with available studies shows that the corrected EFs are within the range of the EFs reported in other studies. Finally, the CFD model is used to find a source configuration that better represents the vehicle emissions and that may be used in future studies to estimate the EFs more accurately. Results show that a 200 m line placed in the center of the street would represent very well the vehicle emissions. This work shows that it is possible to accurately estimate the EFs from tracer studies.

  1. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Study of stability zone influences and tracer patterns from the 1987 ANATEX (Across North America Tracer Experiment) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.M.; Gifford, F.A.; Hoard, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we will show preliminary results which appear to connect much of the hit and miss behavior of the surface tracer samples to large scale stability zones 100 to 1000 km wide. With these wintertime stability effects in mind, we have done the best we can to characterize the observed overall tracer patterns as well as individual tracer releases. This type of survey information is important to numerical model development. Diagnostic models often have difficulty reproducing surface plume concentrations where transport over stable layers have occurred. Prognostic models can, in theory, model effects of strong stable layers. However, these models would have great difficulty predicting large scale stable regions such as those observed during ANATEX. Also, though these models have ways of budging in synoptic wind fields, temperature observations are presently ignored. This is because if both wind and temperature observations are forced too strongly into the model, conflicting results may be produced. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  4. The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.; Rieksts, G. A.; Palmer, R. F.; Gillis, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium-22 has been studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with Na-22, which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The Na-22 not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high, but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The Na-22 tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  5. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1994-12-31

    The bromide anion has been used extensively as a tracer for mapping the flow of groundwater. It has proven to be both a safe and reliable groundwater tracer. The goal in this study is to find several tracing compounds with characteristics similar to the bromide anion to be used in multiple well tracing tests. Four groups of fluorinated organic acids were selected as candidates for groundwater tracers. These groups include fluorinated benzoic acids (FBA), fluorinated salicylic acids (FSA), fluorinated toluic acids (FTA), and fluorinated cinnamic acids (FCA). These compounds have been shown to move readily with the flow of water and do not adsorb to soil. They are also non-toxic. In this study, the retention of the fluorinated organic acids on to a soil column is compared to that of the bromide ion. The time required for the elution of each analyte from the soil column is measured using a UV-Vis detector. The soils consist of the light, medium, and dark tuffs used in the batch study. The work performed during this quarter consists of the continuation of the batch studies for the fluorinated benzoic acids and column studies for several potential tracer compounds.

  6. Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine processes studies

    E-print Network

    Editorial Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine processes studies Four radium isotopes, decay products of the 238 U­232 Th­235 U series radionuclides, occur/2 =1600 years). Begin- ning with the GEOSECS program of the late 1960s­ early 1970s, these radium isotopes

  7. USING CONTINUOUS MONITORS FOR CONDUCTING TRACER STUDIES IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of online monitors for conducting a distribution system tracer study is proving to be an essential tool to accurately understand the flow dynamics in a distribution system. In a series of field testing sponsored by U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Greater ...

  8. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum of propane over ZrO2-supported MoOx catalysts. Competitive reactions of C3H6 and CH3 13 CH2CH3 showed combustion of propene, or by direct combustion of propane. A mixture of C3H8 and C3D8 undergoes oxidative

  9. Numerical Simulations and Tracer Studies as a Tool to Support Water Circulation Modeling in Breeding Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The article presents a proposal of a method for computer-aided design and analysis of breeding reservoirs in zoos and aquariums. The method applied involves the use of computer simulations of water circulation in breeding pools. A mathematical model of a pool was developed, and a tracer study was carried out. A simplified model of two-dimensional flow in the form of a biharmonic equation for the stream function (converted into components of the velocity vector) was adopted to describe the flow field. This equation, supplemented by appropriate boundary conditions, was solved numerically by the finite difference method. Next, a tracer migration equation was solved, which was a two-dimensional advection-dispersion equation describing the unsteady transport of a non-active, permanent solute. In order to obtain a proper solution, a tracer study (with rhodamine WT as a tracer) was conducted in situ. The results of these measurements were compared with numerical solutions obtained. The results of numerical simulations made it possible to reconstruct water circulation in the breading pool and to identify still water zones, where water circulation was impeded.

  10. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer studies is critically discussed, where special emphasis is set on evaluating different data processing strategies on the example of enriched stable Sr isotopes.1 The analytical key parameters such as blank (Kr, Sr and Rb), variation of the natural Sr isotopic composition in the sample, mass bias, interferences (Rb) and total combined uncertainty are considered. A full metrological protocol for data processing using IPD is presented based on data gained during two transgenerational marking studies of fish, where the transfer of a Sr isotope double spike (84Sr and 86Sr) from female spawners of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and brown trout (Salmo trutta f.f.)2 to the centre of the otoliths of their offspring was studied by (LA)-MC-ICP-MS. 1J. Irrgeher, A. Zitek, M. Cervicek and T. Prohaska, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 193-200. 2A. Zitek, J. Irrgeher, M. Kletzl, T. Weismann and T. Prohaska, Fish. Manage. Ecol., 2013, 20, 654-361.

  11. Radio-tracer techniques for the study of flow in saturated porous materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skibitzke, H.E.; Chapman, H.T.; Robinson, G.M.; McCullough, Richard A.

    1961-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine the feasibility of using a radioactive substance as a tracer in the study of microscopic flow in a saturated porous solid. A radioactive tracer was chosen in preference to dye or other chemical in order to eliminate effects of the tracer itself on the flow system such as those relating to density, viscosity and surface tension. The porous solid was artificial "sandstone" composed of uniform fine grains of sand bonded together with an epoxy adhesive. The sides of the block thus made were sealed with an epoxy coating compound to insure water-tightness. Because of the chemical inertness of the block it was possible to use radioactive phosphorus (P32). Ion-exchange equilibrium was created between the block and nonradioactive phosphoric acid. Then a tracer tagged with P32 was injected into the block in the desired geometric configuration, in this case, a line source. After equilibrium in isotopic exchange was reached between the block and the line source, the block was rinsed, drained and sawn into slices. It was found that a quantitative analysis of the flow system may be made by assaying the dissected block. ?? 1961.

  12. Tracer-based quantification of individual frac discharge in single-well multiple-frac backflow: sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Within the deep-geothermal research project at GroßSchönebeck in the NE German Basin, targeting volcanic rocks (Lower Rotliegend) and siliciclastics (Upper Rotliegend) in the Lower Permian by means of a well doublet with several screening intervals between 3815 and 4247 m b.s.l., several artificial fractures with different geometric and hydraulic characteristics were created at each well, aiming to increase reservoir performance [1], [2]. It could not be told a priori which of the various fracturing treatments was to prove as most promising in terms of future reservoir productivity. At the intended-production well (GS-4), one large-area waterfrac was created in the low-permeability volcanic rocks, and two gel-proppant fractures in selected sandstone layers. Each fracturing treatment was accompanied by the injection of a water-dissolved tracer slug, followed by a defined volume of tracer-free ('chaser') fluid [3]. Each frac received a different species of a sulfonated aromatic acid salt, as a conservative water tracer. During subsequent backflow tests (either gas-based lifting, or production by means of a downhole submersible pump), each frac can contribute a certain (more or less constant) amount to the measured total discharge (also depending on whether and when each frac 'starts' contributing, and which effective aperture and area it actually 'manifests' during the process). Since these individual-frac discharge amounts cannot be measured directly, it was endeavoured to indirectly determine ('resolve') them from tracer signals as detectable in the overall backflow discharge. Therefore, we need to examine how these tracer signals depend on local discharge values and on local hydrogeologic parameters (matrix porosity, permeability distribution; frac transmissivity, thickness, effective area and aperture), and to what extent hydrogeological uncertainty will impede the inversion of local discharge values. To this end, a parameter sensitivity study was conducted on a simplified flow and tracer transport model (using FEOW and assuming Darcian flow within the matrix, Hagen-Poiseuille flow within the waterfrac, and either D or H-P flow within the gel-proppant fracs), whose main findings are: (1) late tracer signals are almost independent on matrix porosity, permeability distribution, frac area (length), thickness and effective aperture, while being highly sensitive to local discharge values; 'late' means a backflow or production volume at least fivefold the injected chaser volume; (2a) early tracer signals (concentration 'peak' intervals) may exhibit slight 'acceleration' and 'damping' with increasing matrix porosity or increasing frac aperture (a 'paradoxical' behaviour which is not really surprising for single-well 'push-then-backflow' tests, actually owing to flow-field dispersion[4]), and (2b) a non-monotonous response to varying frac area, being almost insensitive to frac area as long as the linear-flow regime prevails against the radial-flow regime (effects of the latter only becoming visible at very low frac areas); (2c) the effects of these various factors on early-time tracer signals are not unambiguously discernible from each other, and this ambiguity would persist even if frac-resolved (in-situ) discharge metering were feasible. For each of the three fracs (k=1,2,3), a 'type-curve' set Ck(Q,t) (parametrized by discharge values Q) can be generated. Since every frac received a different tracer, tracer signals measured within the overall backflow will differ from individual-frac type-curves by mere dilution (no 'superposition'). Type-curve dilution by factor Qk/Qtotal can be compared to measured tracer concentrations in the total discharge, ck(ti), (i = 1, ..., no. of tracer samplings). From a formal point of view, the unknown discharge values Qk can be determined as the solution of a linear optimization task subject to the constraint Q1 + Q2 + Q3 = Qtotal (the latter being a measured value). It is recommendable to perform 'optimization' manually, rather than by resorting to automated solutions provided by some linea

  13. Engineering task plan for determining breathing rates in singleshell tanks using tracer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-04-02

    The testing of single shell tanks to determine breathing rates. Inert tracer gases helium, and sulfur hexafluoride will be injected into the tanks AX-103, BY-105, C-107 and U-103. Periodic samples will be taken over a three month interval to determine actual headspace breathing rates.

  14. Using Tracer Experiments To Study Phosphorus Transfer From Soil To Overland Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, T.; Stamm, C.; Schaerer, M.; Sinaj, S.; Frossard, E.; Fluehler, H.

    Diffuse phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land contribute to the eutrophication of surface water bodies in Switzerland. Grassland soils in areas of high animal stock densities are often prone to high P losses due to over-fertilization and a strong accumu- lation of P in the topsoil. In order to understand the effects of management practices and remediation measures on P transfer into runoff water at a small scale it is impor- tant to localize the sources of this phosphorus within the soil profile and to describe the water flows within the topsoil­overland flow system. We are studying the effects of remediation measures on P availability in the soil and on P concentrations in overland flow in a field experiment. We are using tracer exper- iments to examine the mixing behavior of water applied with a sprinkling device onto the soil surface with pre-event soil water and to trace the contribution of those two water sources to overland flow. Two plots were pre-irrigated with a solution of KBr in order to label the soil solu- tion. After a few days of equilibration, two fluorescent dyes were applied to different areas of the plots at a constant rate of 40 mm h-1. Surface runoff was analyzed for tracer concentrations. Small soil monoliths (0.35 * 0.25 *0.20 m3) were excavated and the tracer distribution within the blocks was mapped using a digital camera, optical filters, and tracer specific excitation light source. This tracing technique allowed for independent mapping of the distribution of two simultaneously applied tracers. The experiments demonstrated heterogenous infiltration of the dyes, negligible lat- eral translocation of the dyes within the soil, minimal transfer of the pre-applied Br- into overland flow, early breakthrough of the dye tracers in overland flow which was independent of the tracers sorption properties and a recovery of the dyes that corre- sponded to the runoff ratio. In all, the experiments indicate a very restricted interac- tion between surface applied sprinkling water recovered in overland flow with the soil. However, dissolved reactive P concentrations (DRP) in overland flow from the same plots were high (0.5­1.5 mg DRP L-1). These findings indicate that fast desorption processes within a thin topsoil layer with high P availability, rather than outflow of P-enriched pre-event soil solution control P concentrations in overland flow.

  15. Experimental design for estimating parameters of rate-limited mass transfer: Analysis of stream tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Tracer experiments are valuable tools for analyzing the transport characteristics of streams and their interactions with shallow groundwater. The focus of this work is the design of tracer studies in high-gradient stream systems subject to advection, dispersion, groundwater inflow, and exchange between the active channel and zones in surface or subsurface water where flow is stagnant or slow moving. We present a methodology for (1) evaluating and comparing alternative stream tracer experiment designs and (2) identifying those combinations of stream transport properties that pose limitations to parameter estimation and therefore a challenge to tracer test design. The methodology uses the concept of global parameter uncertainty analysis, which couples solute transport simulation with parameter uncertainty analysis in a Monte Carlo framework. Two general conclusions resulted from this work. First, the solute injection and sampling strategy has an important effect on the reliability of transport parameter estimates. We found that constant injection with sampling through concentration rise, plateau, and fall provided considerably more reliable parameter estimates than a pulse injection across the spectrum of transport scenarios likely encountered in high-gradient streams. Second, for a given tracer test design, the uncertainties in mass transfer and storage-zone parameter estimates are strongly dependent on the experimental Damkohler number, DaI, which is a dimensionless combination of the rates of exchange between the stream and storage zones, the stream-water velocity, and the stream reach length of the experiment. Parameter uncertainties are lowest at DaI values on the order of 1.0. When DaI values are much less than 1.0 (owing to high velocity, long exchange timescale, and/or short reach length), parameter uncertainties are high because only a small amount of tracer interacts with storage zones in the reach. For the opposite conditions (DaI >> 1.0), solute exchange rates are fast relative to stream-water velocity and all solute is exchanged with the storage zone over the experimental reach. As DaI increases, tracer dispersion caused by hyporheic exchange eventually reaches an equilibrium condition and storage-zone exchange parameters become essentially nonidentifiable.

  16. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  17. Application of a tracer methodology to study solute transport with overland flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaci, S.; Biron, P.; Richard, P.; Boulegue, J.; Schipman, A. J.; Vanderva, J. P.; Gaudet, J. P.; Esteves, M.; Bariac, T.

    2003-04-01

    The distribution of water arriving on the soil between overland flow and infiltration is a key question for the progression of knowledge of hydrological and erosive operation at the slope scale or at the catchment scale. Flows in the soil and surface formations have a major influence on the cycle of water in the ecosystems, like in particular those of the pollutants. To reconstitute the history and the origin of the transported substances, it is necessary to take into account the flow of water. The use of non interactive tracers makes it possible on the basis of identification of the sources contributing to the flow (rain, soil water...). These tracers, which do not interact with the soil matrix, have concentrations which vary under the effect of dilutions and concentrations during their transfer. The rainwater with a chemical composition sufficiently differentiated compared to water from the other "sources" of the system, will thus have its composition modified during the transfer because of the mixture with older water in the soil. Within the framework of this subject, our objective is to improve the use of tracer methodology to study overland flow. We have privileged a field investigation based on the comportment of a small plot during simulated rainfall. In order to circumvent the problem of geochemical variability of natural rainfall, the approach consists to work under simulated rainfall. Three consecutives simulations were performed with different chemical (anionic tracers most commonly used and Rhenium) and isotopic (180, ^2H) characteristic to ensure a measurable difference between overland flow samples. The temporal evolution of overland flow concentrations show different comportment between tracers (time to reach the stationary state, dilution effect with soil water). Sources and sinks effects have been identified and quantified for the different solute tested.

  18. DUST CONTINUUM EMISSION AS A TRACER OF GAS MASS IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Brent A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam; Galametz, Maud; Bolatto, Alberto; Hunt, Leslie; Dale, Daniel; Calzetti, Daniela; Croxall, Kevin; Kennicutt, Robert Jr.

    2015-01-20

    We use a sample of 36 galaxies from the KINGFISH (Herschel IR), HERACLES (IRAM CO), and THINGS (Very Large Array H I) surveys to study empirical relations between Herschel infrared (IR) luminosities and the total mass of the interstellar gas (H{sub 2} + H I). Such a comparison provides a simple empirical relationship without introducing the uncertainty of dust model fitting. We find tight correlations, and provide fits to these relations, between Herschel luminosities and the total gas mass integrated over entire galaxies, with the tightest, almost linear, correlation found for the longest wavelength data (SPIRE 500). However, we find that accounting for the gas-phase metallicity (affecting the dust to gas ratio) is crucial when applying these relations to low-mass, and presumably high-redshift, galaxies. The molecular (H{sub 2}) gas mass is found to be better correlated with the peak of the IR emission (e.g., PACS160), driven mostly by the correlation of stellar mass and mean dust temperature. When examining these relations as a function of galactocentric radius, we find the same correlations, albeit with a larger scatter, up to a radius of r ? 0.7 r {sub 25} (containing most of a galaxy's baryonic mass). However, beyond that radius, the same correlations no longer hold, with increasing gas (predominantly H I) mass relative to the infrared emission. The tight relations found for the bulk of the galaxy's baryonic content suggest that total gas masses of disk-like (non-merging/ULIRG) galaxies can be inferred from far-infrared continuum measurements in situations where only the latter are available, e.g., in ALMA continuum observations of high-redshift galaxies.

  19. Characterization of crushed tuff for the evaluation of the fate of tracers in transport studies in the unsaturated zone

    SciTech Connect

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Raymond, R.; Bish, D.L.; Gladney, E.S.; Lopez, E.A.

    1987-03-01

    Results of field-scale (caisson) transport studies under unsaturated moisture and steady and nonsteady flow conditions indicate variability and a lack of conservation of mass in solute transport. The tuff materials used in that study were analyzed for the presence of tracers and of freshly precipitated material to help explain the variability and lack of conservation of mass. Selected tuff samples were characterized by neutron activation analysis for tracer identification, by x-ray diffraction for mineral identification, by petrographic analysis for identification of freshly precipitated material, and by x-ray fluorescence analysis for identification of major and trace elements. The results of these analyses indicate no obvious presence of freshly precipitated material that would retard tracer movement. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of the nonsorbing tracers (bromide and iodide) suggest the retention of these tracers in immobile water. The presence of sorbing and nonsorbing tracers on the tuff at some locations (even cesium at the 415-cm depth) and not at others suggests variability in transport. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  1. Sample site selection for tracer studies applying a unidirectional circulatory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The optimal arterial or venous sites for infusion and sampling during isotopic tracer studies have not been established. This study determined the relationship of plasma and tissue enrichment (E) when isotopes were infused in an artery and sampled from a vein (av mode) or infused in a vein and sampled from an artery (va mode). Adult dogs were given primed constant infusions of (3-/sup 13/C)lactate, (1-/sup 13/C)leucine, and /sup 14/C-labeled bicarbonate. Simultaneous samples were drawn from the vena cava, aortic arch, and breath. Tissue samples were removed from skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, and gut. Breath samples were analyzed for /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by liquid scintillation counting and plasma isotopic enrichments of (/sup 13/C)lactate, (/sup 13/C)leucine, and alpha-(/sup 13/C)ketoisocaproate (KIC) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. By using the va mode, the plasma E for lactate and leucine were 30-40% above tissue E. The av mode provided an accurate reflection of tissue E for lactate, which equilibrates rapidly with tissues, and a reasonable estimate for leucine, which exchanges more slowly. The isotopic enrichment of plasma KIC more directly reflected tissue leucine E than did plasma leucine E, and KIC enrichment was insensitive to sampling site. We also evaluated theoretically a circulatory model that predicts venous isotopic enrichments when the va mode is used. We conclude that the av mode is optimal but that the problems arising from use of the va mode can be overcome by use of a metabolic product (i.e., KIC) or by calculation of venous specific activity with our circulatory mode.

  2. TRACER STUDIES OF TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION IN CUMULI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from a study of the transport and transformation of pollutants are reported. irborne measurements near Champaign, llinois and Milwaukee, Wisconsin were made during the summers of 1990 and 1992. easurements of the aerosol size distribution, wind, turbulence, cloud micr...

  3. TRACER STUDY OF VERTICAL EXCHANGE BY CUMULUS CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exchange of material by convective cloud processes between the mixed layer and the overlying free troposphere is examined. The paper describes results of a field experiment that was conducted in Lexington, Kentucky during the period from July 20 to August 24, 1983 to study th...

  4. Using noble gas tracers to estimate residual CO2 saturation in the field: results from the CO2CRC Otway residual saturation and dissolution test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Residual CO2 saturation is a critically important parameter in CO2 storage as it can have a large impact on the available secure storage volume and post-injection CO2 migration. A suite of single-well tests to measure residual trapping was conducted at the Otway test site in Victoria, Australia during 2011. One or more of these tests could be conducted at a prospective CO2 storage site before large-scale injection. The test involved injection of 150 tonnes of pure carbon dioxide followed by 454 tonnes of CO2-saturated formation water to drive the carbon dioxide to residual saturation. This work presents a brief overview of the full test sequence, followed by the analysis and interpretation of the tests using noble gas tracers. Prior to CO2 injection krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) tracers were injected and back-produced to characterise the aquifer under single-phase conditions. After CO2 had been driven to residual the two tracers were injected and produced again. The noble gases act as non-partitioning aqueous-phase tracers in the undisturbed aquifer and as partitioning tracers in the presence of residual CO2. To estimate residual saturation from the tracer test data a one-dimensional radial model of the near-well region is used. In the model there are only two independent parameters: the apparent dispersivity of each tracer and the residual CO2 saturation. Independent analysis of the Kr and Xe tracer production curves gives the same estimate of residual saturation to within the accuracy of the method. Furthermore the residual from the noble gas tracer tests is consistent with other measurements in the sequence of tests.

  5. A Mathematical Modeling Study of Tracer Mixing in a Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model based on a water model was developed to study the tracer mixing in a single strand tundish. The mixing behavior of black ink and KCl solution was simulated by a mixed composition fluid model, and the data were validated by water modeling results. In addition, a model that solves the scalar transport equation (STE) without any physical properties of the tracer was studied and the results were compared to predictions using the density-coupled model. Furthermore, the mixing behaviors of different amounts of KCl tracers were investigated. Before the model was established, KCl tracer properties such as the KCl molecule diffusion (KMD), the water molecule self-diffusion (WSD) in KCl solution, and the KCl solution viscosity (KV) were evaluated. The RTD curve of 250 mL KCl for the KMD case was closer to the water modeling results than that of the case implemented with only density. Moreover, the ensemble average deviation of the RTD curves of the cases implemented with KMD + WSD, KMD + KV, and KMD + WSD + KV to the KMD case is less than 0.7 pct. Thus, the water self-diffusion and KV were neglected, while the KCl density and KMD were implemented in the current study. The flow pattern of black ink was similar to the STE result i.e., the fluid flowed upwards toward the top surface and formed a large circulating flow at the outlet nozzle. The flow behavior of the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases exhibited a strong tendency to sink to the tundish bottom, and subsequently flow through the holes in the dam. Thereafter, it propagated toward the outlet nozzle. Regarding the KCl tracer amount, the tracer concentration propagated to the outlet nozzle much faster for the larger amount case than for the smaller amount cases. However, the flow pattern for the 50 mL KCl case was somewhat different. The fluid propagated to the top surface which acted like black ink during the initial injection, and subsequently the fluid flowed throughout the holes at a much slower pace. The breakthrough time and peak concentration of RTD curves of model predictions and water modeling results showed a good agreement (all difference within 12.5 pct) for the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases.

  6. A Mathematical Modeling Study of Tracer Mixing in a Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2014-09-01

    A mathematical model based on a water model was developed to study the tracer mixing in a single strand tundish. The mixing behavior of black ink and KCl solution was simulated by a mixed composition fluid model, and the data were validated by water modeling results. In addition, a model that solves the scalar transport equation (STE) without any physical properties of the tracer was studied and the results were compared to predictions using the density-coupled model. Furthermore, the mixing behaviors of different amounts of KCl tracers were investigated. Before the model was established, KCl tracer properties such as the KCl molecule diffusion (KMD), the water molecule self-diffusion (WSD) in KCl solution, and the KCl solution viscosity (KV) were evaluated. The RTD curve of 250 mL KCl for the KMD case was closer to the water modeling results than that of the case implemented with only density. Moreover, the ensemble average deviation of the RTD curves of the cases implemented with KMD + WSD, KMD + KV, and KMD + WSD + KV to the KMD case is less than 0.7 pct. Thus, the water self-diffusion and KV were neglected, while the KCl density and KMD were implemented in the current study. The flow pattern of black ink was similar to the STE result i.e., the fluid flowed upwards toward the top surface and formed a large circulating flow at the outlet nozzle. The flow behavior of the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases exhibited a strong tendency to sink to the tundish bottom, and subsequently flow through the holes in the dam. Thereafter, it propagated toward the outlet nozzle. Regarding the KCl tracer amount, the tracer concentration propagated to the outlet nozzle much faster for the larger amount case than for the smaller amount cases. However, the flow pattern for the 50 mL KCl case was somewhat different. The fluid propagated to the top surface which acted like black ink during the initial injection, and subsequently the fluid flowed throughout the holes at a much slower pace. The breakthrough time and peak concentration of RTD curves of model predictions and water modeling results showed a good agreement (all difference within 12.5 pct) for the 100, 150, and 250 mL KCl cases.

  7. Stable water isotopes as tracers in studies of lacustrine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jörg; Pöschke, Franziska; Meinikmann, Karin; Rudnick, Sebastian; Périllon, Cécile; Elmarami, Hatem; Massmann, Gudrun; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Different tracers are used in ecohydrology to study transport processes across groundwater-surface water interfaces. The stable water isotopes oxygen-18 and deuterium as parts of the water molecule are close to perfect tracers since their behavior in aquifers is quite conservative. Isotopic signatures of groundwater and surface water differ due to the impact of evaporation on lake water. Stable isotope measurements are nowadays orders of magnitude cheaper, faster, and easier due to the recent development of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Based on that analytical progress, we suggest a much broader use and highlight a number of promising ecohydrological applications in studies of lacustrine groundwater discharge. For example, they might be used to clearly distinguish between in- and exfiltration zones of lakes, to identify temporal fluctuations of in- and exfiltration, but also to identify sampling artifacts due to short circuits during sampling with lakebed piezometers.

  8. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: an ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; Lis, D. C.; de Luca, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Black, J. H.; Bell, T. A.; Boulanger, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Coutens, A.; Dartois, E.; Ka?mierczak, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Geballe, T. R.; Giesen, T.; Godard, B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gry, C.; Gupta, H.; Hennebelle, P.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Ko?os, R.; Kre?owski, J.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Menten, K. M.; Monje, R.; Mookerjea, B.; Pearson, J.; Perault, M.; Persson, C. M.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Stutzki, J.; Teyssier, D.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Caux, E.; Güsten, R.; Hatch, W. A.; Klein, T.; Mehdi, I.; Morris, P.; Ward, J. S.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1-0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF absorption. Within the uncertainties, we find that the abundance of HF with respect to H2 is consistent with the theoretical prediction that HF is the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine for these clouds. Thus, hydrogen fluoride has the potential to become an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen, and provides a sensitive probe of clouds of small H2 column density. Indeed, the observations of hydrogen fluoride reported here reveal the presence of a low column density diffuse molecular cloud along the W51 sight line, at an LSR velocity of ~24 km s-1, that had not been identified in molecular absorption line studies prior to the launch of Herschel. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  10. National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). Project definition study: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.

    1995-02-15

    This report describes a five-year plan for the construction and commissioning of a reliable and versatile NBTF facility for the production of high-quality, high-yield radioisotopes for research, biomedical, and industrial applications. The report is organized in nine sections providing, in consecutive order, responses to the nine questions posed by the U.S. Department of Energy in its solicitation for the NBTF Project Definition Study. In order to preserve direct correspondence (e.g., Sec. 3 = 3rd item), this Introduction is numbered {open_quotes}0.{close_quotes} Accelerator and facility designs are covered in Section 1 (Accelerator Design) and Section 2 (Facility Design). Preliminary estimates of capital costs are detailed in Section 3 (Design and Construction Costs). Full licensing requirements, including federal, state, and local ordinances, are discussed in Section 4 (Permits). A plan for the management of hazardous materials to be generated by NBTF is presented in Section 5 (Waste Management). An evaluation of NBTF`s economic viability and its potential market impact is detailed in Section 6(Business Plan), and is complemented by the plans in Section 7 (Operating Plan) and Section 8 (Radioisotope Plan). Finally, a plan for NBTF`s research, education, and outreach programs is presented in Section 9 (Research and Education Programs).

  11. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H.; Mulholland, P.

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  12. STRATEGIES FOR QUANTIFYING PET IMAGING DATA FROM TRACER STUDIES OF BRAIN RECEPTORS AND ENZYMES.

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.

    2001-04-02

    A description of some of the methods used in neuroreceptor imaging to distinguish changes in receptor availability has been presented in this chapter. It is necessary to look beyond regional uptake of the tracer since uptake generally is affected by factors other than the number of receptors for which the tracer has affinity. An exception is the infusion method producing an equilibrium state. The techniques vary in complexity some requiring arterial blood measurements of unmetabolized tracer and multiple time uptake data. Others require only a few plasma and uptake measurements and those based on a reference region require no plasma measurements. We have outlined some of the limitations of the different methods. Laruelle (1999) has pointed out that test/retest studies to which various methods can be applied are crucial in determining the optimal method for a particular study. The choice of method will also depend upon the application. In a clinical setting, methods not involving arterial blood sampling are generally preferred. In the future techniques for externally measuring arterial plasma radioactivity with only a few blood samples for metabolite correction will extend the modeling options of clinical PET. Also since parametric images can provide information beyond that of ROI analysis, improved techniques for generating such images will be important, particularly for ligands requiring more than a one-compartment model. Techniques such as the wavelet transform proposed by Turkheimer et al. (2000) may prove to be important in reducing noise and improving quantitation.

  13. Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation mechanisms from measured gas/particle partitioning of specific organic tracer compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Kreisberg, Nathan M; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Weber, Robin J; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A; Russell, Lynn M; Markovic, Milos Z; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G; Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2013-04-16

    In situ measurements of organic compounds in both gas and particle phases were made with a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG) instrument. The gas/particle partitioning of phthalic acid, pinonaldehyde, and 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone is discussed in detail to explore secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation mechanisms. Measured fractions in the particle phase (f(part)) of 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone were similar to those expected from the absorptive gas/particle partitioning theory, suggesting that its partitioning is dominated by absorption processes. However, f(part) of phthalic acid and pinonaldehyde were substantially higher than predicted. The formation of low-volatility products from reactions of phthalic acid with ammonia is proposed as one possible mechanism to explain the high f(part) of phthalic acid. The observations of particle-phase pinonaldehyde when inorganic acids were fully neutralized indicate that inorganic acids are not required for the occurrence of reactive uptake of pinonaldehyde on particles. The observed relationship between f(part) of pinonaldehyde and relative humidity suggests that the aerosol water plays a significant role in the formation of particle-phase pinonaldehyde. Our results clearly show it is necessary to include multiple gas/particle partitioning pathways in models to predict SOA and multiple SOA tracers in source apportionment models to reconstruct SOA. PMID:23448102

  14. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; HunterJr., Jerry; Sohn, Yong Ho; Coffey, Kevin; Murch, Prof. Graeme; Belova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

  15. Integrating retrieved cloud information with model simulation to extend usability of tracer gas retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Q.; Prinn, R.

    2007-12-01

    We have explored the possibility of using retrieved cloud information to extend the usability of trace gas concentration retrievals from satellites, since choosing only cloud-free retrievals might lead to a bias in their source-sink estimates using inverse modeling, i.e. the geographic locations of cloud-free or cloudy regions and trace gas source or sink regions might be correlated. We used methane retrievals (IMAP) and cloud retrievals (FRESCO) from SCIAMACHY as an example for this study, and assumed agreement between 3D model simulations (MATCH) and cloud-free satellite retrievals as a proxy for defining usability of satellite data. We found that when the pixel is very cloudy (f>0.7), the model simulation, which is integrated with retrieved cloud top height and cloud fraction data, yields similar agreement with observations as obtained with cloud-free pixels (f=0). The addition of cloudy pixel data significantly extends the spatial and temporal coverage of methane retrievals that can be used in source and sink studies. We also tried to overlay the MODIS aerosol retrievals with SCIAMACHY methane data to test the impact of aerosols on trace gas retrievals. Since these two retrievals are somewhat orthogonal, i.e. stronger MODIS aerosol signals over the ocean, and stronger SCIAMACHY methane signals over the land, we have not found a significant correlation between these two retrievals. Other possible reasons for this result could be the different passing times of the two satellites and the wave length differences of the two retrievals.

  16. Isotopic analysis and multi tracer tests to study groundwater circulation in a landslide in Southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pera, Sebastian; Marzocchi, Roberto; Bronzini, Simona

    2014-05-01

    Understanding groundwater circulation in landslides is often necessary to assess their dynamics and forecast movements. Fontana landslide is placed in Canton Ticino, its main body is constituted by gneiss, that is covered by moraine and other deposits related to the mass movements like debris flows and, rock fall. Gneiss that originally has low hydraulic conductivity increases their aquifer properties due to weathering and fracture presence. In fact several springs are present in across the landslide some of them having discharge up to 1 m3 S-1. To study groundwater circulation in the landslide body, a multi tracer test was designed and water samples taken. 3 tracers (Naphtionate, Sulphorhodamine B and Uranine) were injected underground. Injection mass was calculated by using EHTD (EPA, 2003), 2 field fluorimeters were placed in springs considered to be the main water discharge of the system for continuous monitoring. Other springs with smaller discharge scattered along the landslide body were monitored by using charcoal bags. Water samples also were taken for chemical and stable isotopes analysis. The tracers' presence was also monitored in the river crossing the area collecting surface flow from snowmelt and springs. Even if the landslide has a small area, isotopic composition of water from springs shows clear differences. All samples plot close to the local meteoric water line, and an altitude effect is visible. Chemical composition is relatively uniform however some differences can also be seen. Concerning tracers the only that arrived at monitored points was uranine, and it was detected in the charcoal bags. Considering tracer concentration in ppm, in the charcoal and travel times to restitution points was possible to have conceptual model for groundwater flow across the landslide. Circulation is rapid and recharge controlled by snowmelt in spring and precipitation in late spring to autumn. Snow accumulates at the top of the landslide where an elongated topographic basin is present filled by blocks infiltrates and feed the springs located at lower altitude but close to the basin. Those springs not originally considered for discharge monitoring, are draining the water from the basin and could be better correlated to landslide movement, respect to other springs with similar discharge rates but farther from the concentrated infiltration area represented by the topographic basin.

  17. A novel $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr tracer method for characterizing xenon gas and cryogenic distillation systems

    E-print Network

    Rosendahl, S; Brown, E; Cristescu, I; Fieguth, A; Huhmann, C; Lebeda, O; Levy, C; Murra, M; Schneider, S; Vénos, D; Weinheimer, C

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive isomer $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr has many properties that make it very useful for various applications. Its low energy decay products, like conversion, shake-off and Auger electrons as well as X- and $\\gamma$-rays are used for calibration purposes in neutrino mass experiments and direct dark matter detection experiments. Thanks to the short half-life of 1.83 h and the decay to the ground state $^{83}$Kr, one does not risk contamination of any low-background experiment with long- lived radionuclides. In this paper, we present two new applications of $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr. It can be used as a radioactive tracer in noble gases to characterize the particle flow inside of gas routing systems. A method of doping $^{83\\mathrm{m}}$Kr into xenon gas and its detection, using special custom-made detectors, based on a photomultiplier tube, is described. This technique has been used to determine the circulation speed of gas particles inside of a gas purification system for xenon. Furthermore, 83m Kr can be used to...

  18. Using trees to remediate tritium contaminated groundwater: a modeling and tracer study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Karin, Theodora

    2004-01-01

    Rebel, Karin, T. 2004. Using trees to remediate tritium contaminated groundwater: a modeling and tracer study. Ph.D Dissertation. Cotnell University. Ithaca, New York. 174 pp. Abstract: We have developed a spatially explicit model of water and tritium fluxes in the vadose zone in order to simulate water uptake and subsurface lateral movement in coniferous and mixed hardwood - coniferous forests on Coastal Plain soils of the southern United States. These Coastal Plain soils are characteristically sand overlying slowly permeable clays found at depths of 30 to 200 cm, and can form temporarily saturated, unconfined aquifers. Ten hectares of the modeled watershed was periodically irrigated with tritium enriched water. We used the tritium enriched water as a tracer to validate the model. The model was used to optimize irrigation, to evaluate the amount of tritium entering the atmosphere due to evapotranspiration and to quantify water and tritium fluxes in texture contrast soils. Using tritium as a tracer, we have studied how tree species and canopy position effect water and solutes uptake from different parts of the soil profile. We clipped branches to obtain leaf water from over-and understory laurel oak (Quercus Laurifolia) and over- and understory pine (Pinus elliottii and Pinus taeda), which was then analyzed for tritium. We found that for early successional trees (Pinus spp.) and trees in the overstory proportionally more water was taken up from deeper in the soil compared to the hardwoods or trees in the understory, which took up proportionally more water from the soil surface. These differences are important for understanding competition for resources within a forest and in predicting the hydrologic response to forest management practices such as thinning.

  19. Field Studies of Streamflow Generation Using Natural and Injected Tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Genereux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate [Rn]{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and {sup 222}Rn volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of [Rn]{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach. The method was first applied to a 34 m stream reach at Bickford during baseflow; results suggested that {ge} 70% of the lateral inflow could be considered vadose zone water (water which had been in a saturated zone for less than a few days), and the remainder ''soil groundwater'' or ''saturated zone water'' (which had a longer residence time in a soil saturated zone). The method was then applied to two stream reaches on the West Fork of Walker Branch over a wide range of flow conditions; four springs were also investigated. It was found that springwater and inflow to the stream could be viewed as a mixture of water from three end members: the two defined at Bickford (vadose zone water and soil groundwater) and a third (bedrock groundwater) to account for the movement of water through fractured dolomite bedrock. Calcium was used as a second naturally-occurring tracer to distinguish bedrock groundwater from the other two end members. The behavior indicated by the three-end-member mixing model (e.g., increased importance of the two soil end members with increasing flow, and the differences between the stream reaches and among some of the springs) were consistent with a wide variety of environmental observations, including temperature and flow variations at springs, water table responses, the general lack of saturated zones on hillslopes and even near the stream in some places, and the importance of water movement through bedrock.

  20. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  1. Estimation of bias with the single-zone assumption in measurement of residential air exchange using the perfluorocarbon tracer gas method.

    PubMed

    Van Ryswyk, K; Wallace, L; Fugler, D; MacNeill, M; Héroux, M È; Gibson, M D; Guernsey, J R; Kindzierski, W; Wheeler, A J

    2015-12-01

    Residential air exchange rates (AERs) are vital in understanding the temporal and spatial drivers of indoor air quality (IAQ). Several methods to quantify AERs have been used in IAQ research, often with the assumption that the home is a single, well-mixed air zone. Since 2005, Health Canada has conducted IAQ studies across Canada in which AERs were measured using the perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gas method. Emitters and detectors of a single PFT gas were placed on the main floor to estimate a single-zone AER (AER1z ). In three of these studies, a second set of emitters and detectors were deployed in the basement or second floor in approximately 10% of homes for a two-zone AER estimate (AER2z ). In total, 287 daily pairs of AER2z and AER1z estimates were made from 35 homes across three cities. In 87% of the cases, AER2z was higher than AER1z . Overall, the AER1z estimates underestimated AER2z by approximately 16% (IQR: 5-32%). This underestimate occurred in all cities and seasons and varied in magnitude seasonally, between homes, and daily, indicating that when measuring residential air exchange using a single PFT gas, the assumption of a single well-mixed air zone very likely results in an under prediction of the AER. PMID:25399878

  2. Using a Coupled Surface water/ Groundwater Model to Study Heat as a Tracer in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Hatch, C. E.; Letcher, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    Heat as a tracer has proven to be an effective method for quantifying groundwater - surface water interactions. However, there remains a lack of controlled, experimental data to assess fundamental aspects of heat transport in porous media. There may be a disconnect between field and model-based studies, because: 1) model results have yet to be tested against data from controlled laboratory experiments, and 2) there are often too many variables in field studies to be thoroughly modeled without simplification. This study is comprised of a three-dimensional transient numerical model of heat flow through a porous media coupled with steady state fluid flow using COMSOL Multiphysics. Pressure and temperature outputs are compared to data measured in a laboratory flume. The 3D model enables exploration of the effects of oblique flow paths through a stream bed and/or banks with a (stream) surface water upper boundary on diurnal temperature records. By imposing known flow or temperature gradients in any direction, we can analyze the effects of these diverse gradients on the veracity of current heat as a tracer methods (which assume unidirectional flow) as well as develop valid error statistics for these methods in the presence of non-vertical flow.

  3. A rapid method for the measurement of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), and Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr) in hydrologic tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    2010-01-01

    A rapid headspace method for the simultaneous laboratory determination of intentionally introduced hydrologic tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), trifluoromethyl sulfur pentafluoride (SF5CF3), Halon 1211 (CF2ClBr), and other halocarbons in water and gases is described. The high sensitivity of the procedure allows for introduction of minimal tracer mass (a few grams) into hydrologic systems with a large dynamic range of analytical detection (dilutions to 1:108). Analysis times by gas chromatography with electron capture detector are less than 1 min for SF6; about 2 min for SF6 and SF5CF3; and 4 min for SF6, SF5CF3, and Halon 1211. Many samples can be rapidly collected, preserved in stoppered septum bottles, and analyzed at a later time in the laboratory. Examples are provided showing the effectiveness of the gas tracer test studies in varied hydrogeological settings.

  4. Dual tracer autoradiographic study with thallium-201 and radioiodinated fatty acid in cardiomyopathic hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of myocardial scintigraphy with radioiodinated 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in cardiomyopathy, quantitative dual tracer autoradiographic study with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed in 27 cardiomyopathic Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters and eight normal hamsters. Furthermore, 16 Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters aged 21 days were divided into verapamil-treated (during 70 days) and control groups (respectively, n = 8), and autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated an uncoupling of /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions and a regional heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution in cardiomyopathic hamsters aged more than 2 mo, while normal hamsters showed only mild heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution without an uncoupling of tracers. Age-matched comparison between normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters (5-8 mo old) demonstrated that a difference between their (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions are more marked than that between their /sup 201/Tl distributions. Furthermore, (/sup 125/I)BMIPP visualized effects of verapamil on cardiomyopathy more distinctly than did /sup 201/Tl. In conclusion, myocardial imaging with (/sup 123/I)BMIPP could be useful for investigating cardiomyopathy and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in patients with cardiomyopathy.

  5. Using WRF with Water Vapor Tracers to Study the Moisture Sources for the North American Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Hu, H.

    2014-12-01

    The North American Monsoon (NAM) accounts for approximately 70% of the total annual precipitation in northwest Mexico, and 40-50% of annual precipitation in the Southwestern US. Until recently, the broad consensus about the sources for NAM precipitation was that the Gulf of California and eastern tropical Pacific contributed to moisture at lower levels (below 850mb) and the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea at upper levels. However, using an analytical 2D Lagrangian model (the DRM) we have recently shown that approximately 40% of the moisture that contributes to NAM precipitation is of terrestrial origin. However, the DRM cannot provide information about the vertical structure of moisture as it assumes a well-mixed atmosphere. To alleviate this problem, in this work we use the weather research forecast (WRF) model with the recently added capability of water vapor tracers, to study the moisture sources of NAM precipitation and their vertical structure. We find that the Gulf of California contributes to low-level moisture and the Gulf of Mexico contributes to upper-level moisture, as previously hypothesized. However, we also show the important role of regional moisture recycling from the NAM region at lower levels and upper level moisture from eastern Mexico that has crossed the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain chain. The tracers provide a very detailed picture of the complex moisture transport processes in the NAM region.

  6. Visual Interhemispheric and Striate-Extrastriate Cortical Connections in the Rabbit: A Multiple Tracer Study

    PubMed Central

    Andelin, Adrian K.; Bruning, David J.; Felleman, Daniel J.; Olavarria, Jaime F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in rabbits identified an array of extrastriate cortical areas anatomically connected with V1 but did not describe their internal topography. To address this issue, we injected multiple anatomical tracers into different regions in V1 of the same animal and analyzed the topography of resulting extrastriate labeled fields with reference to the patterns of callosal connections and myeloarchitecture revealed in tangential sections of the flattened cortex. Our results extend previous studies and provide further evidence that rabbit extrastriate areas resemble the visual areas in rats and mice not only in their general location with respect to V1 but also in their internal topography. Moreover, extrastriate areas in the rabbit maintain a constant relationship with myeloarchitectonic borders and features of the callosal pattern. These findings highlight the rabbit as an alternative model to rats and mice for advancing our understanding of cortical visual processing in mammals, especially for projects benefiting from a larger brain. PMID:26435850

  7. Temporal and spatial variability of noble gas tracers in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taka; Hamme, Roberta C.; Emerson, Steve

    2011-08-01

    We develop a numerical model of dissolved argon and neon in the global ocean as a tool to investigate the physical processes controlling their saturation states in the upper ocean of the North Pacific. The distribution of argon and neon is simulated using the time-varying, three-dimensional circulation fields determined by the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Oceans (ECCO) project from 1992 to 2008. The model is in overall agreement with limited observational data from the subpolar and subtropical North Pacific using a relatively low vertical diffusivity. Temporal variability in argon saturation is enhanced in the surface ocean, dominated by diffusive gas exchange coupled to air-sea heat fluxes. This variability in surface argon saturation is significantly correlated to the Southern Oscillation Index (El Niño) in the tropics and to the North Pacific Index in midlatitudes. Using sensitivity experiments, we find that the mean state of argon saturation in the ventilated thermocline is characterized by a mutual compensation between mixing-induced supersaturation and sea level pressure and heat-flux-induced undersaturation. Neon distributions exhibit a stronger influence from bubble-mediated gas fluxes that is partially compensated by the effect of sea level pressure variation. Our result demonstrates the important role of air-sea interaction and ocean mixing in controlling the mean state of the dissolved noble gases and highlights the importance of diffusive gas exchange coupled to air-sea heat fluxes in controlling temporal variability, with implications for using noble gas measurements to derive estimates of diapycnal diffusivity in the subtropical thermocline.

  8. New tracers identify hydraulic fracturing fluids and accidental releases from oil and gas operations.

    PubMed

    Warner, N R; Darrah, T H; Jackson, R B; Millot, R; Kloppmann, W; Vengosh, A

    2014-11-01

    Identifying the geochemical fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs has important applications for assessing hydrocarbon resource recovery, environmental impacts, and wastewater treatment and disposal. Here, we report for the first time, novel diagnostic elemental and isotopic signatures (B/Cl, Li/Cl, ?11B, and ?7Li) useful for characterizing hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFF) and distinguishing sources of HFFF in the environment. Data from 39 HFFFs and produced water samples show that B/Cl (>0.001), Li/Cl (>0.002), ?11B (25-31‰) and ?7Li (6-10‰) compositions of HFFF from the Marcellus and Fayetteville black shale formations were distinct in most cases from produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can be used to quantify small fractions (?0.1%) of HFFF in contaminated fresh water and likely be applied universally to trace HFFF in other basins. The novel environmental application of this diagnostic isotopic tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine treatment facility in Pennsylvania and an accidental spill site in West Virginia. We hypothesize that the boron and lithium are mobilized from exchangeable sites on clay minerals in the shale formations during the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF. PMID:25327769

  9. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.

    1991-10-01

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  10. Hydrological Tracer Studies at a DOE IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Williams, K. H.; Berman, E. S.; Conrad, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Research activities at the Department of Energy Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado, have demonstrated that uranium can successfully be removed from groundwater through stimulation of indigenous metal-reducing bacteria, such as members of the Geobacteraceae. While such removal strategies may be effective over short timescales, the large inventory of uranium sorbed to aquifer sediments contributes to a diffuse and widespread contaminant plume at the Rifle site, leading to persistent uranium contamination of groundwater. Complicating the long-term plume behavior are seasonal changes in aquifer properties (e.g. fluctuating water levels, variations in dissolved oxygen and organic carbon, etc.) that accompany snowmelt and elevated river stage in the Colorado River. As the impact of such changes on contaminant behavior at Rifle is poorly understood, development of novel methods, such as isotopic techniques, is warranted to better constrain aquifer flow properties and resolve surface water-groundwater interactions that may influence long-term uranium mobility. In addition to floodplain scale (ca. 10 hectare) studies of uranium mobility, ongoing research at Rifle is investigating coupled approaches to desorb and reductively immobilize pools of sorbed and aqueous uranium. Performed as part of the “Super 8” field experiment (2010), a variety of conservative and non-conservative chemical compounds were injected into the Rifle aquifer to assess transport properties and quantify rates of reductive immobilization of uranium under different alkalinity conditions. Conservative tracers included sodium bromide (20mM), deuterium (500‰), and O-18 (25‰), whereas reactive amendments included sodium bicarbonate (50mM) and sodium acetate (6mM); the latter two were designed to enhance desorption of uranium from sediments and stimulate the activity of uranium-reducing microorganisms, respectively. The need to introduce the reactive amendments at different times and locations necessitated the use of distinct conservative tracers to delineate the spatial distribution of the injected plumes within the aquifer as a function time. Here we report on the field measurements of groundwater stable isotopes and bromide concentrations during the injection experiments. The data indicate differences in groundwater transport pathways as a function of injection and highlight the value of using multiple conservation tracers to resolve overlapping injection source terms.

  11. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates. PMID:26150069

  12. Formaldehyde as a Tracer of Extragalactic Molecular Gas I. Para-H_2CO Emission From M 82

    E-print Network

    S. Mühle; E. R. Seaquist; C. Henkel

    2007-08-13

    Using the IRAM 30-m telescope and the 15-m JCMT, we explore the value of para-formaldehyde (p-H_2CO) as a tracer of density and temperature of the molecular gas in external galaxies. The target of our observations are the lobes of the molecular ring around the center of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxy M 82. It is shown that p-H_2CO provides one of the rare direct molecular thermometers. Reproducing the measured line intensities with a large velocity gradient (LVG) model, we find densities of n_H2 ~ 7 10^3 cm^-3 and kinetic temperatures of T_kin ~ 200 K. The derived kinetic temperature is significantly higher than the dust temperature or the temperature deduced from ammonia (NH_3) lines, but our results agree well with the properties of the high-excitation component seen in CO. We also present the serendipitous discovery of the 4_2 - 3_1 line of methanol (CH_3OH) in the northeastern lobe, which shows -- unlike CO and H_2CO -- significantly different line intensities in the two lobes.

  13. Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in anExperimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFDPredictions

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, Buvaneswari; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Sohn, MichaelD.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Price, Phillip N.; Wood, Emily E.; Sextro,Richard G.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions using a steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model with experimental data on airflow and pollutant dispersion under mixed-convection conditions in a 7 x 9 x 11m high experimental facility. The Rayleigh number, based on height, was O(10{sup 11}) and the atrium was mechanically ventilated. We released tracer gas in the atrium and measured the spatial distribution of concentrations; we then modeled the experiment using four different levels of modeling detail. The four computational models differ in the choice of temperature boundary conditions and the choice of turbulence model. Predictions from a low-Reynolds-number k-{var_epsilon} model with detailed boundary conditions agreed well with the data using three different model-measurement comparison metrics. Results from the same model with a single temperature prescribed for each wall also agreed well with the data. Predictions of a standard k-{var_epsilon} model were about the same as those of an isothermal model; neither performed well. Implications of the results for practical applications are discussed.

  14. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  15. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Dong, Dillon; Leroy, Adam K.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J.; Helou, George; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L.

    2015-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. Both images achieve an angular resolution of ?2?, allowing us to map radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of ?90 pc. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each H ii region; the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz additionally becomes both increasingly negative and positive away from the H ii region peaks, indicating an increase of non-thermal emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emission from the J=1\\to 0 transitions of HCN and HCO+. The peaks of dense molecular gas traced by these two spectral lines are spatially offset from the peaks of the continuum emission for both extranuclear star-forming regions, indicating that our data reach an angular resolution at which one can spatially distinguish sites of recent star formation from the sites of future star formation. Finally, we find trends of decreasing dense gas fraction and velocity dispersion with increasing star formation efficiency among the regions observed, indicating that the dynamical state of the dense gas, rather than its abundance, plays a more significant role in the star formation process.

  16. A tracer study of ventilation in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postlethwaite, C. F.; Rohling, E. J.; Jenkins, W. J.; Walker, C. F.

    2005-06-01

    During the Circulation Research in East Asian Marginal Seas (CREAMS) summer cruises in 1999, a suite of samples was collected for tracer analysis. Oxygen isotopes combined with tritium-helium ventilation timescales and noble gas measurements give unique insights into the ventilation of water masses in the Japan/East Sea (JES). In particular, noble gases and oxygen isotopes are indicators of brine rejection, which may assist in explaining the recent changes observed in the ventilation of the JES. Oxygen isotope data presented here indicate that both thermally driven convection and brine rejection have played significant roles in deep-water formation but that brine rejection is unlikely to be a significant contributor at the moment. A 6-box ventilation model of the JES, calibrated with tritium and helium-3 measurements, performed better when a significant decrease of dense-water formation rates in the mid-1960s was incorporated. However, the model calculations suggest that Japan Sea Intermediate Water formation is still occurring. Subduction of sea-ice melt water may be a significant ventilation mechanism for this water mass, based on an argon saturation minimum at the recently ventilated salinity minimum in the northwestern sector of the JES. The salinity and oxygen isotope budgets imply a potential bottom-water formation rate of 3.97±0.89×10 12 m 3 yr -1 due to brine rejection, which could account for a time averaged fraction of between 25% and 35% of the ventilation of subsurface water formation in the JES.

  17. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-05-12

    A key parameter governing the performance and life-time of a Hot Fractured Rock (HFR) reservoir is the effective heat transfer area between the fracture network and the matrix rock. We report on numerical modeling studies into the feasibility of using tracer tests for estimating heat transfer area. More specifically, we discuss simulation results of a new HFR characterization method which uses surface-sorbing tracers for which the adsorbed tracer mass is proportional to the fracture surface area per unit volume. Sorption in the rock matrix is treated with the conventional formulation in which tracer adsorption is volume-based. A slug of solute tracer migrating along a fracture is subject to diffusion across the fracture walls into the adjacent rock matrix. Such diffusion removes some of the tracer from the fluid in the fractures, reducing and retarding the peak in the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the tracer. After the slug has passed the concentration gradient reverses, causing back-diffusion from the rock matrix into the fracture, and giving rise to a long tail in the BTC of the solute. These effects become stronger for larger fracture-matrix interface area, potentially providing a means for estimating this area. Previous field tests and modeling studies have demonstrated characteristic tailing in BTCs for volatile tracers in vapor-dominated reservoirs. Simulated BTCs for solute tracers in single-phase liquid systems show much weaker tails, as would be expected because diffusivities are much smaller in the aqueous than in the gas phase, by a factor of order 1000. A much stronger signal of fracture-matrix interaction can be obtained when sorbing tracers are used. We have performed simulation studies of surface-sorbing tracers by implementing a model in which the adsorbed tracer mass is assumed proportional to the fracture-matrix surface area per unit volume. The results show that sorbing tracers generate stronger tails in BTCs, corresponding to an effective enhancement of diffusion. Tailing in BTCs for sorbing tracers may provide adequate sensitivity for quantifying the fracture-matrix interface area. We discuss requirements for tracer sorption and present considerations for designing a tracer test that would determine fracture-matrix interface area.

  18. Predictive value of tracer studies for /sup 131/I treatment in hyperthyroid cats

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.; Hays, M.T.

    1988-02-01

    In 76 cats with hyperthyroidism, peak thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptakes and effective half-lives were determined after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I. In 6 additional hyperthyroid cats, only peak thyroidal uptakes after administration of tracer and therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I were determined. Good correlation was found between peak thyroidal uptakes of tracer and therapeutic /sup 131/I; however, only fair correlation was observed between effective half-lives. In 79% of the cats, the effective half-life for therapeutic /sup 131/I was longer than that for tracer /sup 131/I. After administration of therapeutic activity of /sup 131/I, monoexponential and biphasic decay curves were observed in 51 and 16 cats, respectively. Using therapeutic kinetic data, radiation doses to the thyroid gland were calculated retrospectively on the basis of 2 methods for determining the activity of /sup 131/I administered: (1) actual administration of tracer-compensated activity and (2) hypothetic administration of uniform activity (3 mCi). Because of the good predictive ability of tracer kinetic data for the therapeutic kinetic data, the tracer-compensated radiation doses came significantly (P = 0.008) closer to the therapeutic goal than did the uniform-activity doses. In addition, the use of tracer kinetic information reduced the extent of the tendency for consistently high uniform-activity doses. A manual method for acquiring tracer kinetic data was developed and was an acceptable alternative to computerized techniques. Adoption of this method gives individuals and institutions with limited finances the opportunity to characterize the iodine kinetics in cats before proceeding with administration of therapeutic activities of /sup 131/I.

  19. AIRBORNE LIDAR MONITORING OF FLUORESCENT DYE PARTICLES AS A TRACER TO CHARACTERIZE TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using airborne lidar to observe the three-dimensional distribution of fluorescent dye particle (FDP) tracers in long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion studies has been successfully demonstrated in field experiments conducted in the North East U.S. duri...

  20. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

  1. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  2. Alma observations of nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various agn energetic contributions using dense gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, using HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 4-3 lines, of six nearby luminous infrared galaxies with various energetic contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from previous infrared spectroscopy. These lines are very effective for probing the physical properties of high-density molecular gas around the hidden energy sources in the nuclear regions of these galaxies. We find that HCN to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratios tend to be higher in AGN-important galaxies than in starburst-dominated regions, as was seen at the J = 1-0 transition, while there is no clear difference in the HCN-to-HNC J = 4-3 flux ratios among observed sources. A galaxy with a starburst-type infrared spectral shape and very large molecular line widths shows a high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio, which could be due to turbulence-induced heating. We propose that enhanced HCN J = 4-3 emission relative to HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 could be used to detect more energetic activity than normal starbursts, including deeply buried AGNs, in dusty galaxy populations.

  3. Tracer diffusion in colloidal gels

    E-print Network

    Sujin Babu; Jean Christophe Gimel; Taco Nicolai

    2007-05-09

    Computer simulations were done of the mean square displacement (MSD) of tracer particles in colloidal gels formed by diffusion or reaction limited aggregation of hard spheres. The diffusion coefficient was found to be determined by the volume fraction accessible to the spherical tracers ($\\phi_a$) independent of the gel structure or the tracer size. In all cases, critical slowing down was observed at $\\phi_a\\approx 0.03$ and was characterized by the same scaling laws reported earlier for tracer diffusion in a Lorentz gas. Strong heterogeneity of the MSD was observed at small $\\phi_a$ and was related to the size distribution of pores.

  4. Separation of Emitted and Photochemical Formaldehyde in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using a Statistical Analysis and a New Pair of Gas-phase Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Samuelsson, J.; Mellqvist, J.; Galle, B.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.

    2004-12-01

    In urban air, the presence of formaldehyde (HCHO) is the result of direct emissions from mobile sources (primary HCHO) and of its production by photochemical oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere (secondary HCHO). HCHO is a known carcinogen, and is further capable to jump-start photochemical smog formation. Pollution control strategies require deconvolution of the amounts of HCHO formed from primary and secondary sources. To separate primary, secondary and background HCHO, a statistical regression analysis of the time series of HCHO from pairs of gas-phase tracer molecules was undertaken. Carbon monoxide (CO) was used as tracer for primary sources; Two different species were compared as tracers for secondary HCHO: glyoxal (CHOCHO) and ozone (O3). These time series were measured at the field campaign supersite located at the National Center for Environmental Research and Training (CENICA) in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MCMA-2003 campaign. In addition, background HCHO measurements were performed outside the city. Correlation coefficients were highest for the CHOCHO-CO tracer pair, indicating that CHOCHO is a better tracer for secondary sources than O3, used previously for this purpose. Results of the analysis are presented for the pre-Easter, Easter week and post-Easter periods. Further, the effect of temperature on the primary and secondary HCHO sources is assessed. On a 24-hour average basis, secondary sources dominate over primary sources. However, during sunrise, when HCHO acts as a radical source to jump-start photochemistry, a significant amount of the HCHO is associated with primary emissions.

  5. Reaeration coefficients of six streams in New York; a comparison of results obtained by a hydrocarbon-gas tracer method with those obtained by radioactive tracers and predictive equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stedfast, D.A.; Draper, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Stream-reaeration measurements were made in selected reaches on six streams in New York State from 1978 to 1981 with hydrocarbon-gas and dye tracers. The sites were Canadaigua Outlet near Canadaigua, Oswego River at Fulton, Hudson River at Fort Miller, Cayadutta Creek near Johnstown, Chenango River near Morrisville, and Payne Brook near Hamilton. The reaches represent a wide range of discharge, water-surface slope, velocity, and streambed composition. Flows ranged from less than 2 cu ft/sq on the Chenango River to 4,100 cu ft/sq on the Hudson River, and water-surface slope within the reaches ranged from less than 1 foot/mile on the Hudson and Oswego Rivers to more than 50 ft/mi on Cayadutta Creek. The corresponding stream-reaeration coefficients ranged from 0.77 units/day for one reach on Canadaigua Outlet to 52 units/day on Cayadutta Creek. The reaeration coefficients for Canadaigua Outlet compared well with those obtained on the same reach 10 years earlier by radioactive tracers. Comparison of measured reaeration coefficients with those calculated from 10 predictive equations based on stream-channel characteristics yielded mean errors that range from 51% to 103%. No single equation gave reliable accuracy for all stream reaches. (USGS)

  6. Accounting for Dispersion and time-dependent Input Signals during Gas Tracer Tests and their Effect on the Estimation of Reaeration, Respiration and Photosynthesis in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Julia; Osenbrück, Karsten; Olaf, Cirpka

    2015-04-01

    The variation of dissolved oxygen (DO) in streams, are caused by a number of processes, of which respiration and primary production are considered to be the most important ones (Odum, 1956; Staehr et al., 2012). Measuring respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams based on recorded time series of DO requires good knowledge on the reaeration fluxes at the given locations. For this, gas tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration coefficients determined from the observed decrease in gas concentration along the stretch (Genereux and Hemond, 1990): ( ) --1- -cup- k2 = t2 - t1 ln Rcdown (1) with the gas concentrations measured at an upstream location, cup[ML-3], and a downstream location, cdown. t1[T] andt2 [T] denote the measurement times at the two locations and R [-] represents the recovery rate which can also be obtained from conservative tracer data. The typical procedure for analysis, however, contains a number of assumptions, as it neglects dispersion and does not take into account possible fluctuations of the input signal. We derive the influence of these aspects mathematically and illustrate them on the basis of field data obtained from a propane gas tracer test. For this, we compare the reaeration coefficients obtained from approaches with dispersion and/or a time-dependent input signals to the standard approach. Travel times and travel time distributions between the different measurement stations are obtained from a simultaneously performed conservative tracer test with fluorescein. In order to show the carry-over effect to metabolic rates, we furthermore estimate respiration and photosynthesis rates from the calculated reaeration coefficients and measured oxygen data. This way, we are able to show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and the impact of the time-dependent input concentration cannot be disregarded either. When estimated reaeration rates are used to calculate respiration and photosynthesis from measured oxygen data, these effects carry over, leading to higher respiration rates for higher reaeration. References: Genereux, D. P., & Hemond, H. F. (1990). Naturally-Occurring Rn-222 as a Tracer for Streamflow Generation - Steady-State Methodology and Field Example. Water Resources Research, 26(12), 3065-3075. doi: Doi 10.1029/Wr026i012p03065 Odum, H. T. (1956). Primary production in flowing waters. Limnol. Oceanogr, 1(2), 102-117. Staehr, P. A., Testa, J. M., Kemp, W. M., Cole, J. J., Sand-Jensen, K., & Smith, S. V. (2012). The metabolism of aquatic ecosystems: history, applications, and future challenges. Aquatic Sciences, 74(1), 15-29. doi: DOI 10.1007/s00027-011-0199-2

  7. Diatoms as a tracer of hydrological connectivity: the Oak Creek case study (Oregon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marta; Martínez-Carreras, Nuria; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The vast heterogeneity and complexity of rainfall-runoff transformation processes expresses itself in a multitude of water sources and flowpaths - ultimately resulting in the well-known intricacy of hydrological connectivity. Pioneering work of Pfister et al. (2009) conducted in the Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg, semi-oceanic climate) demonstrated the potential for diatoms (unicellular, eukaryotic algae) to be used as a tracer of hydrological connectivity. Diatoms originating from terrestrial habitats had been shown to be systematically flushed from the riparian areas into the stream during storm events. Here, we present a study conducted in the Oak Creek(0.17 km2, Oregon, Mediterranean climate), characterised by a large riparian area. Our first working hypothesis (H1) stipulates that diatoms are an ubiquitous tracer of fast hydrological flowpaths. The second hypothesis (H2) states that the riparian area is the major reservoir of terrestrial diatoms that contributes to the flushing process during rainfall events. A winter rainfall-runoff event was monitored in March 2012. Diatom samples were collected from soil, moss, epipelon and streamwater in order to characterise the communities along the hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) continuum. Diatoms in each sample were also assigned to different wetness categories (according to Van Dam et al., 1994). The catchment was instrumented with an ISCO automatic streamwater sampler and the samples were analysed for conductivity, 18O, 2H, chemical elements and presence/abundance of diatoms belonging to different wetness categories. Our results show that the percentage of diatom species originating from habitats located outside of the stream evolves along the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph. This observation confirms the event-related flushing of diatoms from terrestrial habitats to the stream and, consequently, the potential for diatoms to be used for the detection of hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum (H1). Moreover, almost no strictly terrestrial diatoms were found in the stream during the event, indicating the majority of the diatoms (identified as aerophytic) being exported from the riparian area (H2).

  8. Sinks for nitrogen inputs in terrestrial ecosystems: a meta-analysis of 15N tracer field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templer, P.H.; Mack, M.C.; Chapin, F. S., III; Christenson, L.M.; Compton, J.E.; Crook, H.D.; Currie, W.S.; Curtis, C.J.; Dail, D.B.; D'Antonio, C. M.; Emmett, B.A.; Epstein, H.E.; Goodale, C.L.; Gundersen, P.; Hobbie, S.E.; Holland, K.; Hooper, D.U.; Hungate, B.A.; Lamontagne, S.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Osenberg, C.W.; Perakis, S.S.; Schleppi, P.; Schimel, J.; Schmidt, I.K.; Sommerkorn, M.; Spoelstra, J.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Zak, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition and the ability of terrestrial ecosystems to store carbon (C) depend in part on the amount of N retained in the system and its partitioning among plant and soil pools. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies at 48 sites across four continents that used enriched 15N isotope tracers in order to synthesize information about total ecosystem N retention (i.e., total ecosystem 15N recovery in plant and soil pools) across natural systems and N partitioning among ecosystem pools. The greatest recoveries of ecosystem 15N tracer occurred in shrublands (mean, 89.5%) and wetlands (84.8%) followed by forests (74.9%) and grasslands (51.8%). In the short term (15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N recovery was negatively correlated with fine-root and soil 15N natural abundance, and organic soil C and N concentration but was positively correlated with mean annual temperature and mineral soil C:N. In the longer term (3–18 months after 15N tracer application), total ecosystem 15N retention was negatively correlated with foliar natural-abundance 15N but was positively correlated with mineral soil C and N concentration and C: N, showing that plant and soil natural-abundance 15N and soil C:N are good indicators of total ecosystem N retention. Foliar N concentration was not significantly related to ecosystem 15N tracer recovery, suggesting that plant N status is not a good predictor of total ecosystem N retention. Because the largest ecosystem sinks for 15N tracer were below ground in forests, shrublands, and grasslands, we conclude that growth enhancement and potential for increased C storage in aboveground biomass from atmospheric N deposition is likely to be modest in these ecosystems. Total ecosystem 15N recovery decreased with N fertilization, with an apparent threshold fertilization rate of 46 kg N·ha-1·yr-1 above which most ecosystems showed net losses of applied 15N tracer in response to N fertilizer addition.

  9. The Santa Monica Basin Tracer Experiment - A study of diapycnal and isopycnal mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledwell, James R.; Watson, Andrew J.

    1991-01-01

    Cross isopycnal (diapycnal) and lateral mixing and stirring below the sill of Santa Monica Basin were studied by releasing two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorodecalin, as close as possible to an isopycnal surface and measuring their subsequent dispersion. The target for the release was a potential temperature surface at about 790 m depth, roughly 100 m above the bottom and 50 m below the sill. Three surveys, performed immediately after, about 7 weeks after, and about 6 months after the release, showed that the time scales for lateral stirring and mixing in the basin were between 2 and 5 months. The diapycnal diffusivity for the whole period was found to be 0.29 + or - 0.06 sq cm/s near the injection surface, where the buoyancy frequency was about 1.1 cph. This estimate may include some mixing in the turbulent boundary layer near the walls of the basin. The best estimate for the diapycnal diffusivity in the basin interior is 0.25 + or - 0.08 sq cm/s.

  10. Dual-tracer scintigraphy and subtraction studies in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sostre, S.; Villagra, D.; Morales, N.E.; Rivera, J.V.

    1988-02-15

    Dual tracer scintigraphy (DTS) (technetium 99m (/sup 99m/Tc) sulfur colloid and gallium 67 citrate (67-gallium citrate)) of the liver and computer subtraction studies (SS) were performed in 26 patients subsequently proven to have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 32 patients with cirrhosis and focal defects on the colloid scan, with no evidence for HCC after a complete evaluation and a 2-year follow-up period. Both DTS and SS had a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 90.6% for HCC. There were three false positive cases (9.4%), two of which were occult abscesses. The predictive value of a positive test was 89% and that of a negative test was 97%. The smallest tumor detected measured 2 cm in diameter and was only visualized with the SS. In the clinical setting, when HCC is suspected (a situation in which tumors are usually larger than 2 cm and the pretest probability of disease is between 20% and 60%) the DTS and SS is an excellent test for the diagnosis or exclusion of HCC. It does not appear to have a role in screening programs.

  11. Sediments as tracers for transport and deposition processes in peri-alpine lakes: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, Maurizio; Toffolon, Marco; Lucarelli, Corrado; Serafini, Michele

    2011-12-01

    SummaryThe benthic sediment fingerprint is analysed in the small peri-alpine lake Levico (Trentino, Italy) to identify the causes of recurrent phenomena of turbidity peaks, particularly evident in a littoral region of the water body. In order to study the sediment transport processes, we exploit the fact that the sediment supply from the major tributary has a specific chemical composition, which differs from that of the nearby lake basin. Three elements (Fe, Al, K) have been used as tracers to identify the source and the deposition patterns of tributary sediments, and another typical element, Si, has been critically analysed because of its dual (allochthonous and autochthonous) origin. Several samples of the benthic material have been analysed using SEM-EDS, and the results of the sedimentological characterisation have been compared with the patterns of sediment accumulation at the bed of the lake obtained using a three-dimensional numerical model, in response to the tributary supply under different external forcing and stratification conditions. The coupled use of field measurements and numerical results suggests that the turbidity phenomena are strongly related to the deposition of the sediments supplied by the tributary stream, and shows that it is possible to reconstruct the process of local transport when the tributary inflow is chemically specific.

  12. A simulation study on superparamagnetic nanoparticle based multi-tracer tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Batra, Akash; Jain, Shray; Ye, Clark; Liu, Jinming; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in biomedical sensing, detection, therapeutics, and diagnostics due to their unique magnetic response under different driving fields. In this letter, we report a multi-tracer tracking method that uses different kinds of MNPs as magnetic tracers along with two alternating magnetic fields that can be potentially used to build magnetic-based flow cytometry. By applying two driving fields at frequency f H and f L to MNPs, the response signal is measured at the combinatorial frequencies such as f H ± 2 f L (3rd harmonics), f H ± 4 f L (5th harmonics), f H ± 6 f L (7th harmonics), and so on. Each MNP has its own signature of phase and amplitude, and it is possible to differentiate individual MNPs in a mixture. We theoretically demonstrated colorizing up to 4-MNP tracers in one mixture with an error rate lower than 10%. The performance of multi-tracer imaging can be optimized by increasing the driving field frequency, choosing MNPs with higher saturation magnetization, and using MNP tracers with more centralized size distribution.

  13. The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

    1991-01-01

    Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

  14. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  15. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site characterization study; Progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1993-08-01

    This report is in two parts one for the fluorinated benzoic acids and one for the fluorinated aliphatic acids. The assumptions made in the report regarding the amount of tracer that will be used, dilution of the tracer during the test and the length of exposure (if any) to individuals drinking the water were made by the authors. These assumptions must really come from the USGS hydrologists in charge of the c-well tracer testing program. Accurate estimates of dilution of the tracer during the test are also important because of solubility limitations of some of the tracers. Three of the difluorobenzoic acids have relatively low solubilities and may not be usable if the dilution estimates are large. The toxicologist that reviewed the document agreed with our conclusion that the fluorinated benzoic and toluic acids do not represent a health hazard if used under the conditions as outlined in the report. We are currently testing 15 of these compounds, and if even if three difluorobenzoic acids cannot be used because of solubility limitations we will still have 12 tracers. The toxicologist felt that the aliphatic fluorinated acids potentially present more of a health risk than the aromatic. This assessment was based on the fact of a known allergic response to halothane anesthetic. This risk, although minimal, is known and he felt that was enough reason to recommend against their use. The authors feel that the toxicologists interpretation of this risk was overly conservative, however, we will not go against his recommendation at this time for the following reasons. First, without the aliphatic compounds we still have 12 to 15 fluorinated aromatic acids which, should be enough for the c-well tests. Second, to get a permit to use aliphatic compounds would undoubtedly require a hearing which could be quite lengthy.

  16. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  17. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrille, C.; Néel, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI) were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  18. Comparison of [11C]cocaine binding at tracer and pharmacological doses of baboon brain: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that cocaine (C) binds to both high and low affinity sites on the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have previously characterized the binding of tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine (C*)to a high affinity site on the DAT. To assess if in vivo C also binds to low affinity sites we used PET to compare binding of tracer doses (17.8{plus_minus}12.2 {mu}g C) of C* to pharmacological doses (8 mg of C coadministered with C*). Sixteen paired studies were done to assess test/retest variability, specific versus non specific binding and to characterize binding profile. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of C* (5-8 mCi) for 50 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the transport constant between plasma and tissue (K1) and to obtain the distribution volume (DV). The ratio of the DV in striatum (ST) to that in cerebellum (CB) (which corresponds to Bmax/Kd-1) was used as model parameter. Peak brain uptake of C* was significantly higher for tracer than for pharmacological doses (0.041 versus 0.033 % dose/cc), as were the values for K1 (1.07{plus_minus}0.21 versus 0.68{plus_minus}0.26 (t=3.0 p<0.01)). Repeated measures were reproducible for tracer ({plus_minus}2%) and pharmacological doses of C* ({plus_minus}4%). Tracer dose C* showed highest binding and slowest clearance in ST which was reduced by C (0.5-2.0 mg/kg iv, -25 to -30%) and by drugs that inhibit DAT (2mg/kg nomifensine - 21%, 0.5 mg/kg methylphenidate -12%) and was increased by serotonin transporter inhibitors (5HT-Ti) (2 mg/kg citalopram +11%, 0.5 mg/kg fluoxetine +6%) and not changed by NE transporter inhibitors (0.5 mg/kg desipramine or 2 mg/kg tomoxetine). The increase with (5HT-Ti) may reflect neurotransmitter interactions or changes in bioavailability. At pharmacological doses C* showed homogeneous distribution and was not changed by C nor by any of the above drugs.

  19. SEDIMENT REWORKING AND TRANSPORT IN EASTERN LAKE SUPERIOR: IN SITU RARE EARTH ELEMENT TRACER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rare earth element (REE) tracer pellet was deployed at the floor of the Ile Parisienne basin of eastern Lake Superior to measure representative sediment reworking and transport processes in the benthic boundary layer of the prnfundal Great Lakes. Samarium oxide, a high neutron-...

  20. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Johnston, H.S.

    1992-02-01

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of K{sub zz} and K{sub yy} through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of K{sub yy} than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970.

  1. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J. ); Johnston, H.S. )

    1992-02-01

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of K[sub zz] and K[sub yy] through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of K[sub yy] than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970.

  2. Utilizing Mass Measurements in Tracer Studies – A Systematic Approach to Efficient Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Ramakrishnan, Janak D.

    2008-01-01

    Tracer enrichment data are fitted by multicompartmental models to estimate rate constants and fluxes or transport rates. In apolipoprotein turnover studies, mass measurements are also available, e.g., apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels in VLDL, IDL and LDL, and are often essential to calculate some of the rate constants. The usual method to use mass measurements is to estimate pool masses along with rate constants. A systematic alternative approach is developed to use flux balances around pools to express some rate constants in terms of the other rate constants and the measured masses. The resulting reduction in the number of parameters to be estimated makes the modeling more efficient. In models that would be unidentifiable without mass measurements, the usual approach and the proposed approach yield identical results. In a simple two-pool model, the number of unknown parameters is reduced from four to two. In a published 5-pool model for apoB kinetics with three mass measurements, the number of parameters is reduced from 12 to 9. With m mass measurements, the number of responses to be fitted and the number of parameters to be estimated are each reduced by m, a simplification by 1/4 to 1/3 in a typical pool model. Besides a proportionate reduction in computational effort, there is a further benefit since the dimensionality of the problem is also decreased significantly, which means ease of convergence and a smaller likelihood of suboptimal solutions. While our approach is conceptually straightforward, the dependencies get considerably more complex with increasing model size. To generate dependency definitions automatically, a web-accessible program is available at http://biomath.info/poolfit/constraints. PMID:18640385

  3. 40K-40Ca systematics as a Tracer of Silicate Weathering: A Himalayan case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Jesse; Caro, Guillaume; France-Lanord, Christian

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the use of the 40K-40Ca system as a tracer to better quantify the contributions of silicate and carbonate lithologies in the dissolved load of major Himalayan rivers. Previous work using Sr isotopes as a proxy for silicate weathering has been complicated by the redistribution of radiogenic 87Sr between silicate and carbonate lithologies, particularly in the Lesser Himalaya, where dolomites exhibit 87Sr/86Sr ratios as high as 0.85. The 40Ca signature of carbonates, on the other hand, appears to be remarkably resistant to metamorphism and dolomitization [1]. It was therefore anticipated that the 40K-40Ca system could circumvent issues associated with such secondary events, and yield more robust constraints on the relative contribution of silicate vs. carbonate lithologies in dissolved river loads. The main difficulty in applying the 40K-40Ca decay scheme as a tracer lies in the analytical precision required to measure small variations (~1 É?-unit) on the large 40Ca isotope (96.9%). This difficulty can now be overcome using the Finnigan Triton TIMS, which allows measurements of the 40Ca/44Ca ratio with external precision of 0.35 É?-unit in multidynamic mode. Using this method, we generated high-precision 40Ca data on carbonates/dolomites, bedload sediments, dissolved load, and clay samples originating from and representing the main litho-tectonic units of the Himalaya. Our results show that metamorphosed dolomites from the Lesser Himalaya (LH) exhibit no radiogenic 40Ca excess despite highly variable 87Sr/86Sr signatures (0.73-0.85). Thus, all Himalayan carbonates appear to be characterized by a homogeneous É?40Ca=0. In contrast, silicate material is radiogenic, with É?40Ca averaging +1 in the Tethyan Sedimentary Series (TSS), +1.6 in the High Himalaya crystalline (HHC) and +4 É?-units in the LH. Results obtained from a series of 35 Himalayan rivers (including the Brahmaputra, Ganga and its main tributaries) show that É?40Ca in the dissolved load is significantly influenced by silicate weathering, with É?40Ca ranging from +0.1 in rivers draining carbonate dominated catchments to +1.6 É?-units in rivers draining predominantly gneissic catchments of the High Himalaya. No simple relation exists between 87Sr and 40Ca systematics, which likely reflects the decoupling of Rb-Sr and K-Ca systems in LH dolomites. In contrast, 40Ca signatures correlate well with proxies of carbonate weathering such as Ca/Na or Mg/Na ratios. Overall, our results indicate that the 40Ca signature of Himalayan rivers primarily reflects the lithological nature of their erosional source, and highlight the significant contribution of HHC gneisses to the dissolved calcium budget of the Ganga and Brahmaputra. [1] Caro et al. (2010) EPSL 296, 124-132

  4. Subsurface barrier integrity verification using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.; Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Senum, G.

    1996-12-01

    Subsurface barriers are an extremely promising remediation option to many waste management problems. Gas phase tracers include perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT`s) and chlorofluorocarbon tracers (CFC`s). Both have been applied for leak detection in subsurface systems. The focus of this report is to describe the barrier verification tests conducted using PFT`s and analysis of the data from the tests. PFT verification tests have been performed on a simulated waste pit at the Hanford Geotechnical facility and on an actual waste pit at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The objective of these tests were to demonstrate the proof-of-concept that PFT technology can be used to determine if small breaches form in the barrier and for estimating the effectiveness of the barrier in preventing migration of the gas tracer to the monitoring wells. The subsurface barrier systems created at Hanford and BNL are described. The experimental results and the analysis of the data follow. Based on the findings of this study, conclusions are offered and suggestions for future work are presented.

  5. Laboratory characterization of non-aqueous phase liquid/tracer interaction in support of a vadose zone partitioning interwell tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Neil E.; McKinney, Daene C.; Pope, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant characterization is important for successful remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the unsaturated zone. A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) can provide a good estimate of average subsurface NAPL saturations. Screening experiments were completed in the laboratory to evaluate several gas tracers for a PITT study to be completed in the vadose zone at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, NM. Four perfluorocarbon tracers were found to be suitable for this PITT. Further laboratory column studies were completed using contaminated field soil to measure the partition coefficients between the tracers and the NAPL. The results from the column studies showed that the air/NAPL tracer partition coefficients ranged from 8.8±0.6 to 71±3. This range of partition coefficients is suitable for detection of NAPL saturations in the field of 0.002 to 0.14.

  6. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  7. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, ?2H and ?18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a refrigerant introduced in the 1940's, with atmospheric mixing ratios increasing through the 1990s to the present value of ?230 pptv. HFC-134a is typically is used as a chlorine-free replacement for CFC-12, finding use in air-condition systems and as an inert aerosol blowing agent, with a mixing ratio that has increased from <1 in 1994 to ?75 pptv at present (2013). Their unique atmospheric histories and chemistry compared to CFCs makes these compounds interesting age tracer candidates, particularly in situations where multiple tracers enhance interpretive value. For instance, inclusion in lumped parameter mixing models and in situations where SF6 or the CFCs are present in elevated concentrations from non-atmospheric sources such that they cannot be used for dating purposes. Analysis of standards, air equilibrated water, and blanks suggests the GC-AED system is capable of detecting concentrations ?200 fM (HCFC-22) and ?100 fM (HFC-134a), corresponding to piston flow ages of 54 and 18 yr, respectively, with a typical uncertainty of ?1 yr. Preliminary comparisons with CFC and SF6 analyses show general agreement between the techniques (within a few years), and ongoing intercomparison studies will be discussed.

  8. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S. J. G.; Garrison, V. H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers - Sr, Nd and Pb - to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and atmospheric transport.

  9. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and atmospheric transport.

  10. Multiple tracer study in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan: 2. Depletion of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) estimated using 3H/3He index and lumped parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwaya, Koki; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakata, Kotaro; Tomioka, Yuichi; Mizuno, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The conservativeness of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12, CFC-11, and CFC-113) in an environment rich in organic carbon was evaluated using multiple tracer analyses and lumped parameter models (LPMs). Wells on a coastal plain in Horonobe, northern Hokkaido, Japan, were studied. The CFC concentrations in groundwater from 22 wells were measured, converted into atmospheric mixing ratios (CARs), and compared with estimated ratios (EARs) obtained from 3H/3He values and LPMs. The degree of CFC depletion was expressed as the percentage of the CAR relative to the EAR, and was less than 43% for CFC-12 and 28% for CFC-11 (but one well had unusual values). CFC-113 was depleted more than the other CFCs, and could not be detected in most wells. The CFC depletion mechanisms were different in each of the three well groups. Groundwater of northern Shimonuma wells (NSW) was oxic and oxidative, so CFC depletion in the NSW could be attributed to sorption by organic carbon in the lignite and peat in the aquifers. Groundwater of southern Shimonuma wells (SSW) was anoxic and reductive. The northerly SSW are supplied from the aquifer that supplies the most of the NSW, so CFC depletion in the SSW was caused by degradation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, in addition to sorption by lignite in the northerly SSW. Gas stripping, contamination from a local source, and methane interfering with the CFC analysis were found in groundwater of Hamasato wells (HW). One well of HW was not affected by these problems, but the CFCs were depleted by microbial degradation. Assuming that the CFC depletion mechanisms follow first-order reaction kinetics, reaction rate constants of 2.7 y-1 for CFC-12 and 2.8 y-1 for CFC-11 were estimated. Microbial degradation, sorption, gas stripping of CFCs, and methane formation processes are enhanced in environments rich in organic carbon. Special attention is required when CFCs are used as transient tracers in such environments. The combination of multiple tracer analysis and LPMs allowed the degree of CFC depletion to be effectively quantified and the applicability of CFCs in groundwater flow systems to be evaluated.

  11. Radioisotope tracer studies in the NASA Skylab ethothermic brazing experiment M-552

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.; Adair, H. L.; Kobisk, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The first use of radioisotope tracer for mapping flow patterns during brazing of metal components in a space environment (near-zero gravity) proved successful. A nickel ferrule was brazed to a nickel tube with Lithobraze BT (71.8% Ag, 28% Cu, 0.2% Li) which contained a trace amount of radioactive Ag-110. Mapping of the flow of the braze alloy in the annulus formed between the tube and the concentric ferrule was determined by counting the radiation intensity as a function of position in the braze joint. Significant information concerning the thermal history of the braze was determined.

  12. Study of sediment movement in an irrigated maize-cotton system combining rainfall simulations, sediment tracers and soil erosion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Laguna, Ana; Cañasveras, Juan Carlos; Boulal, Hakim; Barrón, Vidal; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena; Giráldez, Juan Vicente; Gómez, José Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Although soil erosion is one of the main threats to agriculture sustainability in many areas of the world, its processes are difficult to measure and still need a better characterization. The use of iron oxides as sediment tracers, combined with erosion and mixing models opens up a pathway for improving the knowledge of the erosion and redistribution of soil, determining sediment sources and sinks. In this study, magnetite and a multivariate mixing model were used in rainfall simulations at the micro-plot scale to determine the source of the sediment at different stages of a furrow-ridge system both with (+T) and without (-T) wheel tracks. At a plot scale, magnetite, hematite and goethite combined with two soil erosion models based on the kinematic wave approach were used in a sprinkler irrigation test to study trends in sediment transport and tracer dynamics along furrow lengths under a wide range of scenarios. In the absence of any stubble cover, sediment contribution from the ridges was larger than the furrow bed one, almost 90%, while an opposite trend was observed with stubble, with a smaller contribution from the ridge (32%) than that of the bed, at the micro-plot trials. Furthermore, at a plot scale, the tracer concentration analysis showed an exponentially decreasing trend with the downstream distance both for sediment detachment along furrows and soil source contribution from tagged segments. The parameters of the distributed model KINEROS2 have been estimated using the PEST Model to obtain a more accurate evaluation. Afterwards, this model was used to simulate a broad range of common scenarios of topography and rainfall from commercial farms in southern Spain. Higher slopes had a significant influence on sediment yields while long furrow distances allowed a more efficient water use. For the control of runoff, and therefore soil loss, an equilibrium between irrigation design (intensity, duration, water pattern) and hydric needs of the crops should be defined in order to establish a sustainable management strategy.

  13. Groundwater age structure and palaeo hydrogeology over a 500 kyr time scale revealed from Krypton 81and a multiple tracer study: Great Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, A. J.; Purtschert, R.; Jiang, W.; Lu, Z.; Tosaki, Y.; Fulton, S.; Wohling, D.; Shand, P.; Broder, L.; Aeschbach, W.; Rousseau=Gueutin, P.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the most comprehensive set of krypton -81 data to be analysed so far. Our study site is on the western margin of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB). The study area is focused on the western margin of the GAB between the Finke River system in the Northern Territory and the iconic Dalhousie springs in South Australia. This represents the direction of groundwater flow from recharge to discharge through the Dalhousie spring complex. Because of its vast size and the potential for large regional flow systems to occur, the GAB has been considered an ideal basin to test emerging groundwater dating techniques such as Cl-36 and He-4. However both of these techniques are subjected to large degrees of uncertainty, as they require a detailed understanding of different sources and sinks of these two isotopes. Contrasting this Kr-81 is considered to be an ideal tracer as it contains only one source, the atmosphere with no or at most minimal sub surface production. For the first time we have provided a comprehensive suite of analyse not only of Cl-36, He-4, C-14, Ar-39, stable isotopes of the water molecule and noble gases but also, Kr-85 and Kr-81. Our results indicate a spectrum of 'groundwater ages' ranging from modern as indicated by thermonuclear C-14 and Ar-39 up to hundreds of thousands of years as indicated by Kr-81, Cl-36 and He-4. The data set indicates a wide range of stable isotopes of the water molecule as well as variability in noble gas recharge temperatures that suggest that not only has this region been subjected to changes in climate in the recharge zone but also testaments to a changes in the dominate direction of rainfall indicated by a change in recharge mechanism at the beginning of the Holocene. As suggested previously this groundwater flow transect may represent an ideal 'type section' for testing new and emerging environmental tracers in hydrogeology.

  14. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and ²HH?O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    Révész, Kinga M; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D; Tiedeman, Claire R; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Goode, Daniel J; Shapiro, Allen M; Voytek, Mary A; Lacombe, Pierre J; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in ²H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the ?¹³C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the ?²H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H? gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE+VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average ¹³C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the BA was intensive only in wells where an amendment was distributed during injection, it is necessary to adequately distribute the amendments throughout the fractured rock to achieve substantial bioremediation. The slowdown in BA effect after a year is due to some extend to the decrease abundant of appropriate microbes, but more likely the decreased concentration of electron donor. PMID:24270158

  15. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and 2HH2O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Goode, Daniel J.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Lancombe, Pierre J.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in 2H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the ?13C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the ?2H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H2 gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE + VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average 13C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the BA was intensive only in wells where an amendment was distributed during injection, it is necessary to adequately distribute the amendments throughout the fractured rock to achieve substantial bioremediation. The slowdown in BA effect after a year is due to some extend to the decrease abundant of appropriate microbes, but more likely the decreased concentration of electron donor.

  16. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  17. The potential of silica encapsulated DNA magnetite microparticles (SiDNAMag) for multi-tracer studies in subsurface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willem Foppen, Jan; Bogaard, Thom; van Osnabrugge, Bart; Puddu, Michela; Grass, Robert

    2015-04-01

    With tracer experiments, knowledge on solute transport, travel times, flow pathways, source areas, and linkages between infiltration and exfiltration zones in subsurface hydrological studies can be obtained. To overcome the well-known limitations of artificial tracers, we report here the development and application of an inexpensive method to produce large quantities of environmentally friendly 150-200 nm microparticles composed of a magnetite core to which small fragments of synthetic 80 nt ssDNA were adsorbed, which were then covered by a layer of inert silica (acronym: SiDNAMag). The main advantages of using DNA are the theoretically unlimited amount of different DNA tracers and the low DNA detection limit using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR); the main advantage of the silica layer is to prevent DNA decay, while the magnetite core facilitates magnetic separation, recovery and up-concentration. In 10 cm columns of saturated quartz sand, we first injected NaCl, a conservative salt tracer, and measured the breakthrough. Then, we injected SiDNAMag suspended in water of known composition, harvested the SiDNAMag in column effluent samples, and measured the DNA concentration via qPCR after dissolving the SiDNAMag. The results indicated that the timing of the rising limb of the DNA breakthrough curve, the plateau phase and the falling limb were identical to the NaCl breakthrough curve. However, the relative maximum DNA concentration reached during the plateau phase was around 0.3, indicating that around 70% of the SiDNAMag mass was retained in the column. From these results we inferred that SiDNAMag was not retarded and therefore not subject to equilibrium sorption. Instead, first order irreversible kinetic attachment appeared to be the dominant retention mechanism. Based on our results, we speculate that, despite significant retention, due to the low DNA detection limit and the possibility of magnetic up-concentration, the use of SiDNAMag is a very promising technique to determine complex flow patterns, travel times, and flow pathways in many different subsurface hydrological applications.

  18. Please cite this article in press as: Gilfillan, S.M.V., et al., He and Ne as tracers of natural CO2 migration up a fault from a deep reservoir. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.08.008

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    of Greenhouse Gas Control journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc He and Ne as tracers of natural CO2Please cite this article in press as: Gilfillan, S.M.V., et al., He and Ne as tracers of natural CO2 migration up a fault from a deep reservoir. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j

  19. Feasibility study of silver iodide smoke as an atmospheric dispersion tracer for Rocky Flats Plant site, July 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, G.

    1986-09-22

    At Rocky Flats Plant, we developed a technique that employs the release of silver iodide (AgI) smoke as a very economical tracer for air dispersion around the Plant. In an emergency, the AgI smoke would trace a contaminant plume over long distances, in real time, to guide emergency response. To test this technique, we experimented with first releasing AgI smoke particles, then tracking them up to 50 km from the Plant by vehicle and aircraft under various typical weather conditions. Able to detect single AgI particles as small as 0.01 ..mu..m in real time, a portable cloud chamber operated on either a pickup truck or a small aircraft. For both procedures, a simple smoke generator operating unattended produced up to 1 x 10/sup 15/ particles/g of AgI. Ground tracking of the smoke (1) showed the influence on dispersion by the midday shift from downslope to upslope flow during stable conditions and (2) provided an interesting case study of a nearby thunderstorm as a transient effect. Aerial tracking during eight flights covered a wide range of meteorological conditions. Convective flow often lofted the smoke completely off the ground before it left the Plant boundary. During inversion conditions, the tracer remained within 100 m of the ground.

  20. H 21cm emission as a tracer of gas during the evolution from protoplanetary to debris disks

    E-print Network

    I. Kamp; W. Freudling; J. N. Chengalur

    2007-01-09

    We present models for the HI 21 cm emission from circumstellar disks and use them to convert observed upper limits on the HI 21 cm flux to limits on the total disk gas mass. The upper limits we use come from earlier Australia Telescope Compact Array observations of the debris disk around beta Pictoris as well as fresh Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope observations of HD135344, LkCa 15 and HD163296. Our observations and models span a range of disk types, from young proto-planetary disks to old debris disks. The models self-consistently calculate the gas chemistry (H/H2 balance) and the thermal structure of UV irradiated disks. Atomic hydrogen production is dominated by UV irradiation in transition phase objects as well as debris disks, but for very young disks, HI production by stellar X-rays (which we do not account for) is important. We use a simple radiative transfer approach to convert the model disk parameters into predicted HI 21 cm line maps and spectral profiles. This allows a direct comparison of the observations to the model. We find that the HI traces the disk surface layers, and that the Hi emission, if detected, could be used to study the e ects of irradiation and evaporation, in addition to the kinematics of the disk. Our models cover massive protoplanetary disks, transition phase disks and dusty debris disks. In massive protoplanetary disks, UV produced HI constitutes less than 0.5% of the total disk mass, while X-rays clearly dominate the chemistry and thus the HI production. For the two such disks that we have observed, viz. those around LkCa 15 and HD163296, the predicted 21 cm flux is below the current detection limit. On the other hand, transition phase disks at distances of 100 pc have predicted 21 cm fluxes that are close to the detection limit.... (abstract abbreviated)

  1. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  2. OTEC gas-desorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Golshani, A.

    1981-01-01

    OTEC gas desorption studies were initiated with the goal of mitigating these effects and were carried out in four areas: (1) vacuum deaeration in a packed column, (2) deaeration in a barometric water intake system, (3) noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression, and (4) OTEC deaeration subsystems' analysis. Laboratory experiments to date have completed the vacuum deaeration test of three different kinds of packings, barometric intake deaeration experiments, and a series of hydraulic air compression tests. Preliminary analyses based on the experimental data have shown that, as compared to the previous baseline study, reduction both in deaerator cost and pumping power can be realized with a combination of barometric intake and packed column deaeration. The design and operation of the gas desorption test loop, experimental and computer simulation results obtained, and an analysis of OTEC deaeration subsystem design based on the test results and their implication on OTEC open-cycle power systems are presented.

  3. Kinetic studies of acetate in freshwater sediments: Use of stable isotopic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordijk, C. A.; Kamminga, H.; Cappenberg, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of acetate uptake in the sediment of Lake Vechten, a meso-eutrophic, monomictic freshwater lake, was investigated by monitoring the disappearance of deuterated acetate tracers. Steep acetate concentration gradients were observed in the top cm when the sediment was analyzed at the millimeter scale. The gradients revealed not only the dynamic nature of the acetate pools but also indicated substantial mass transport between sediment layers. Acetate uptake could conveniently be modeled using first order reaction kinetics. Uptake rates ranged from 30 ?M day -1 (winter) to 546 ?M day -1 (early spring) in the sulfidogenic horizon (2 cm) and from 30 ?M day -1 (winter) to 1176 ?M day -1 (late summer) in the methanogenic horizon (5 cm). The integrated acetate uptake rate in the top 7 cm was 39.8 ± 20 (2 × SE) mmol acetate m -2 day -1 during early spring. More than 40% of the total acetate pool was reversibly adsorbed in oxic sediment slurries. The presence of hydrous Fe(III) oxides appeared to determine the occurrence of acetate adsorption.

  4. Diapycnal flow through the Georges Bank Tidal Front: A Dye Tracer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Robert W.; Ho, Cheng

    A fluorescent dye tracer, Fluorescein, injected into the bottom mixed layer at the seaward edge of the tidal front on Georges Bank has provided the first quantitative measurement of an on-bank diapycnal Lagrangian flow through the front. From the warming of the dye patch, 2.5 × 10-6 °C/s and 7.8 × 10-6 °C/s on the south flank and northeast peak respectively, as it passed through the frontal temperature gradient we infer an on-bank flow of 1.9 cm/s on the south flank and 3.2 cm/s on the northeast peak. The heat flux required for this warming is predominantly due to vertical mixing within the tidal front. These observations further demonstrate the utility of direct Lagrangian measurements and provide quantitative estimates of the cross-frontal exchange on Georges Bank, the focus of the U.S GLOBEC Northwest Atlantic/Georges Bank Phase III program.

  5. A new experimental approach for studying tracer diffusion through partially-saturated Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoye, S.; Puente, C.; Coelho, D.

    2009-04-01

    It is expected that unsaturated conditions could prevail for about a hundred thousand years in the very first meters of the argillaceous rocks hosting a high-level radioactive waste repository. Such phenomenon would originate at first from the gallery ventilation during the operational phase (for about the first hundred years) and then from hydrogen production linked to the canister corrosion. One key point that has to be estimated concerns the impact of such desaturation on the migration velocity of radionuclides through the clayey rock. This paper presents an original approach allowing us to make tracers diffuse through partially-saturated Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (saturation degree ranging from 80% to 100%). The suctions are generated by the process of osmosis, whereby samples are separated from solutions highly-concentrated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) by semi-permeable membranes which are permeable to all but PEG. First of all, we determined the PEG concentrations necessary to obtain the right suction values and in the meantime, the duration of the hydrous treatment before reaching the osmotic equilibrium in the rock samples. Finally, we compared results obtained from through-diffusion experiments carried out on rock samples displaying various saturation degrees (suction varying from 0 to 9 MPa).

  6. A study of the accuracy of neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been performed to determine the accuracy of neutrally buoyant and near neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air. Theoretical, computational, and experimental results are presented to evaluate the dynamics of bubble trajectories and factors affecting their ability to trace flow-field streamlines. The equation of motion for a single bubble was obtained and evaluated using a computational scheme to determine the factors which affect a bubble's trajectory. A two-dimensional experiment was also conducted to experimentally determine bubble trajectories in the stagnation region of NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 deg angle of attack using a commercially available helium bubble generation system. Physical properties of the experimental bubble trajectories were estimated using the computational scheme. These properties included the density ratio and diameter of the individual bubbles. the helium bubble system was then used to visualize and document the flow field about a 30 deg swept semispan wing with simulated glaze ice. Results were compared to Navier-Stokes calculations and surface oil flow visualization. The theoretical and computational analysis have shown that neutrally buoyant bubbles will trace even the most complex flow patterns. Experimental analysis revealed that the use of bubbles to trace flow patterns should be limited to qualitative measurements unless care is taken to ensure neutral buoyancy. This is due to the difficulty in the production of neutrally buoyant bubbles.

  7. Automatic alignment of renal DCE-MRI image series for improvement of quantitative tracer kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikic, Darko; Sourbron, Steven; Feng, Xinxing; Michaely, Henrik J.; Khamene, Ali; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Tracer kinetic modeling with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and the quantification of the kinetic parameters are active fields of research which have the potential to improve the measurement of renal function. However, the strong coronal motion of the kidney in the time series inhibits an accurate assessment of the kinetic parameters. Automatic motion correction is challenging due to the large movement of the kidney and the strong intensity changes caused by the injected bolus. In this work, we improve the quantification results by a template matching motion correction method using a gradient-based similarity measure. Thus, a tedious manual motion correction is replaced by an automatic procedure. The only remaining user interaction is reduced to a selection of a reference slice and a coarse manual segmentation of the kidney in this slice. These steps do not present an overhead to the interaction needed for the assessment of the kinetic parameters. In order to achieve reliable and fast results, we constrain the degrees of freedom for the correction method as far as possible. Furthermore, we compare our method to deformable registration using the same similarity measure. In all our tests, the presented template matching correction was superior to the deformable approach in terms of reliability, leading to more accurate parameter quantification. The evaluation on 10 patient data series with 180-230 images each demonstrate that the quantitative analysis by a two-compartment model can be improved by our method.

  8. Tracer dating and ocean ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, G.; Sarmiento, J.L. )

    1990-06-15

    The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on difficult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. The authors use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. The authors define an idealized ventilation age tracer that is conservative with respect to mixing, and they explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters.

  9. Oxygen tracer diffusion in single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, James D.; Halloran, John W.; Cooper, Alfred R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients are determined in single-crystal alumina samples with differing dopant levels using the gas-exchange technique. The diffusion direction is parallel to the c-axis and the ambient PO2 is 1 atm (100,000 Pa) for all experiments except a single run with a low PO2, approximately 10 to the -15th atm (10 to the -10th Pa) produced by a CO/CO2 mixture. The diffusion is insensitive to both impurities and ambient PO2. The insensitivities are discussed in terms of point-defect clustering. Prior tracer studies are compared and discussed.

  10. Modeling and interpretation of two-phase flow and tracer studies from a subbituminous coal seam in the San Juan basin of New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, H.E.; Travis, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Field and modeling studies were performed to characterize two-phase flow within the natural cleat structure of an upper Cretaceous subbituminous coal seam. A two borehole pattern with open completion was used in a study of dewatering and tracer residence time distribution. Air was pumped into a five meter thick seam located about 170 meters below the surface. Krypton 85 was used as the airborne tracer. Air inflow and air and water production rates and tracer arrival times were monitored. The field tests were simulated with a two-phase, three component, porous flow code. Results showed that the air inflow and air and water outflow rates and breakthrough times could not be modeled assuming a uniform darcy-type permeability. The use of a pressure dependent permeability did provide, however, a much better match with the field data.

  11. VOXEL-LEVEL MAPPING OF TRACER KINETICS IN PET STUDIES: A STATISTICAL APPROACH EMPHASIZING TISSUE LIFE TABLES1

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Finbarr; Muzi, Mark; Mankoff, David A.; Eary, Janet F.; Spence, Alexander M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Most radiotracers used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scanning act in a linear time-invariant fashion so that the measured time-course data are a convolution between the time course of the tracer in the arterial supply and the local tissue impulse response, known as the tissue residue function. In statistical terms the residue is a life table for the transit time of injected radiotracer atoms. The residue provides a description of the tracer kinetic information measurable by a dynamic PET scan. Decomposition of the residue function allows separation of rapid vascular kinetics from slower blood-tissue exchanges and tissue retention. For voxel-level analysis, we propose that residues be modeled by mixtures of nonparametrically derived basis residues obtained by segmentation of the full data volume. Spatial and temporal aspects of diagnostics associated with voxel-level model fitting are emphasized. Illustrative examples, some involving cancer imaging studies, are presented. Data from cerebral PET scanning with 18F fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 15O water (H2O) in normal subjects is used to evaluate the approach. Cross-validation is used to make regional comparisons between residues estimated using adaptive mixture models with more conventional compartmental modeling techniques. Simulations studies are used to theoretically examine mean square error performance and to explore the benefit of voxel-level analysis when the primary interest is a statistical summary of regional kinetics. The work highlights the contribution that multivariate analysis tools and life-table concepts can make in the recovery of local metabolic information from dynamic PET studies, particularly ones in which the assumptions of compartmental-like models, with residues that are sums of exponentials, might not be certain. PMID:25392718

  12. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated concentration of Halon-1301, which indicates absence of local anthropogenic or geologic sources (contamination), despite some samples showing CFC contamination. We found agreement of 71% of mean age estimates with ages inferred from tritium and SF6 within +/- 2 years, for samples where direct age comparison could be made. The remaining sites showed reduced concentrations of Halon-1301 along with reduced concentrations of CFCs. The reasons for this need to be further assessed, but are likely caused by sorption or degradation of Halon-1301. Further Halon-1301 studies are planned covering various hydrogeologic situations, land use practises, and redox conditions to evaluate the potential of Halon-1301 as groundwater tracer, and to elucidate the causes for reduced Halon-1301 concentrations. Acknowledgements Greater Wellington Regional Council, especially S. Tidswell, is thanked for support and organisation of the sampling of the groundwater wells. This study is part of a PhD supported by GNS Science as part of the Smart Aquifer Characterization program funded by the New Zealand Ministry for Science and Innovation (http://www.smart-project.info/). References Beyer, M., van der Raaij, R., Morgenstern, U., Jackson, B. (2014) Potential groundwater age tracer found: Halon-1301 (CF3Br), as previously identified as CFC-13 (CF3Cl), Water Resources Research. Busenberg, E. and Plummer, L.N. (2008) Dating groundwater with trifluoromethyl sulfurpentafluoride (SF5CF3), sulfurhexafluoride (SF6), CF3Cl (CFC-13) & CF2CL2 (CFC-12), Water Resources Research 44

  13. A pilot study of the feasibility of long-term human bone balance during perimenopause using a 41Ca tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, S. K.; Prior, J.; Gelbart, Z.; Johnson, R. R.; Lentle, B. C.; Paul, M.

    2007-06-01

    The mechanisms governing calcium fluxes during bone remodeling processes in perimenopausal women are poorly known. Despite higher, albeit erratic, estradiol levels in perimenopause, spine bone loss is greater than during the first five years past the final menstrual flow when estradiol becomes low. Understanding changes during this dynamic transition are important to prevent fragility fractures in midlife and older women. The exploration of long-lived 41Ca (T1/2 = 1.04 × 105 yrs) tracer measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) leads to the possibility of monitoring bone remodeling balance. With this new technology, we explored a pilot long-term feasibility study of bone health by measuring the 41Ca trace element in urine for six years from premenopausal to later perimenopausal phases in one midlife woman. We measured bone mineral density in parallel.

  14. The use of tracer gases to determine dust dispersion patterns and ventilation parameters in a mineral processing plant.

    PubMed

    Grenier, M G; Hardcastle, S G; Kunchur, G; Butler, K

    1992-06-01

    A study was conducted in a fluorspar milling plant to assess the effectiveness of tracer gases as a reliable supplement to conventional air-monitoring and ventilation measurements. In the course of this study, a tracer gas was used as a surrogate substance to analyze the direction and the rate of spread of contaminants from various potential dust production points in the plant. Time-weighted average and continuous mineral dust concentrations were measured in several areas of the plant; these results were compared and correlated with steady-state tracer gas concentrations in the mill. Time-weighted average dust concentrations varied between 0.18 and 0.57 mg/m3 for total dust and 0.04 and 0.20 mg/m3 for quartz respirable dust, depending on the location. Correlation of these values with steady-state tracer gas concentrations yielded linear relationships with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.95 and 0.87, respectively, for total and quartz dust. Results from this study, therefore, indicate that tracer gases may help model the spread of airborne respirable dust from point sources. These tracer gas releases also allowed the simultaneous quantitative determination of air residence times and contaminant clearance times from the building. Hence, tracer gases will help industrial hygienists obtain useful data with respect to building ventilation. PMID:1605111

  15. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. ); Harris, B.R. Jr. ); DeRose, W.E. ); Ottaviani, W.L. )

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  16. Evaluation of a Thermodynamically Based Soil Microbial Decomposition Model Based on a 13c Tracer Study in Arctic Tundra Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Tang, J.; Riley, W. J.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Machmuller, M. B.; Lynch, L.

    2014-12-01

    The incorporation of explicit representation of biological complexity in soil carbon decomposition models may improve our ability to accurately predict terrestrial carbon-climate feedbacks. A new generation of microbe-explicit soil decomposition models (MEMs) are being developed that represent soil biological complexity, but only a few take into account detailed biotic and abiotic components and competitive interactions in the complex soil system. In view of this, we have developed a thermodynamically based MEM with a detailed component network (polymeric organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, microbes, extracellular enzymes, and mineral surfaces), in which competitive interactions and microbial metabolism are modeled using Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and Dynamic Energy Budget theory, respectively. The model behavior has been tested and is qualitatively consistent with many empirical studies, but further evaluation of the model with field or lab experimental data in specific ecosystems is needed. Stable carbon isotope (13C) tracer experiments provide a means to directly evaluate soil carbon dynamics simulated by MEMs. In this study, we further develop the model to explicitly account for different carbon isotopes, including 13C and 14C. Isotopic fractionations in soil decomposition processes, including soil organic matter transformations and microbial metabolism, are considered. The 13C signals of different soil components derived from a 13C tracer experiment in Arctic tundra soils are used to test the model behavior and identify needed parametric and structural improvements. Our modeling and data comparison identify several key mechanisms that need to be included in MEMs. Finally, we present an analysis of the relative benefits and costs of additional complexity in MEMs compared to traditional pool-based modeling structures.

  17. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for the quantification of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the vadose zone: Performance evaluation for heterogeneous NAPL distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    A partitioning tracer test based on gas-phase diffusion in the vadose zone yields estimates of the residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation. The present paper investigates this technique further by studying diffusive tracer breakthrough curves in the vadose zone for a heterogeneous NAPL distribution. Tracer experiments were performed in a lysimeter with a horizontal layer of artificial kerosene embedded in unsaturated sand. Tracer disappearance curves at the injection point and tracer breakthrough curves at some distance from the injection point were measured inside and outside of the NAPL layer. A numerical code was used to generate independent model predictions based on the physicochemical sand, NAPL, and tracer properties. The measured and modeled tracer breakthrough curves were in good agreement confirming the validity of important modeling assumptions such as negligible sorption of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracers to the uncontaminated sand and their fast reversible partitioning between the soil air and the NAPL phase. Subsequently, the model was used to investigate different configurations of NAPL contamination. The experimental and model results show that the tracer disappearance curves of a single-well diffusive partitioning tracer test (DPTT) are dominated by the near-field presence of NAPL around the tip of the soil gas probe. In contrast, breakthrough curves of inter-well tracer tests reflect the NAPL saturation in between the probes, although there is no unique interpretation of the tracer signals if the NAPL distribution is heterogeneous. Numerical modeling is useful for the planning of a DPTT application. Simulations suggest that several cubic meters of soil can be investigated with a single inter-well partitioning tracer test of 24-hour duration by placing the injection point in the center of the investigated soil volume and probes at up to 1 m distance for the monitoring of gaseous tracers.

  18. Astrochemistry of Sub-Millimeter Sources in Orion: Studying the Variations of Molecular Tracers with Changing Physical Conditions

    E-print Network

    Johnstone, D; Van Dishoeck, E F; Johnstone, Doug; Boonman, Annemieke M. S.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. van

    2003-01-01

    Cornerstone molecules (CO, H_2CO, CH_3OH, HCN, HNC, CN, CS, SO) were observed toward seven sub-millimeter bright sources in the Orion molecular cloud in order to quantify the range of conditions for which individual molecular line tracers provide physical and chemical information. Five of the sources observed were protostellar, ranging in energetics from 1 - 500L_sun, while the other two sources were located at a shock front and within a photodissociation region (PDR). Statistical equilibrium calculations were used to deduce from the measured line strengths the physical conditions within each source and the abundance of each molecule. In all cases except the shock and the PDR, the abundance of CO with respect to H_2 appears significantly below (factor of ten) the general molecular cloud value of 10^-4. {Formaldehyde measurements were used to estimate a mean temperature and density for the gas in each source. Evidence was found for trends between the derived abundance of CO, H_2CO, CH_3OH, and CS and the energ...

  19. Kinetic measurements of bone mineral metabolism: The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    Sodium-22 was studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with (22)Na which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The (22)Na which is not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The (22)Na tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  20. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  1. Sulfur Hexafluoride Tracer Dispersion within Cherry Orchard

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Sulfur Hexafluoride Tracer Dispersion within Cherry Orchard Zeyuan Chen, S. Edburg, and B. Lamb-GAPS to measure sulfur hexafluoride: an inert gas that is not commonly found in ambient air and is easily

  2. GREEN RIVER AIR QUALITY MODEL DEVELOPMENT: METEOROGICAL AND TRACER DATA-FIELD STUDY IN BRUSH VALLEY, COLORADO, JULY-AUGUST, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    Special meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a three-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The experiments were conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as p...

  3. Study of ketone body kinetics in children by a combined perfusion of /sup 13/C and /sup 2/H3 tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Bougneres, P.F.; Ferre, P.

    1987-11-01

    Ketone body kinetics were quantified in six children (3-5 yr old), who were fasted for 13-22 h, by a combined perfusion of (3-/sup 13/C)acetoacetate ((/sup 13/C)AcAc) and D-(-)-beta-(4,4,4-/sup 2/H3)hydroxybutyrate (beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results were analyzed according to the single-pool (combined enrichments) or the two-accessible pools models. After 20-22 h of fasting, ketone body turnover rate was 30-50 mumol.kg-1.min-1, a rate achieved after several days of fasting in adults. At low ketosis, acetoacetate was the ketone body preferentially synthesized de novo and utilized irreversibly. When ketosis increased, acetoacetate irreversible disposal was not enhanced, since it was largely converted into beta-OHB, whereas beta-OHB irreversible disposal was very much increased. The single-pool and two-pool models gave similar ketone body turnover rates when (/sup 13/C)AcAc was the tracer, whereas the use of beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB gave some more divergent results, especially at low ketosis. These studies demonstrate that ketogenesis is very active in short-term fasted children and that the use of a combined infusion of (/sup 13/C)AcAc and beta-(/sup 2/H3)OHB is a convenient way to give insight into individual ketone body kinetics.

  4. Far-infrared study of tracers of oxygen chemistry in diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesemeyer, H.; Güsten, R.; Heyminck, S.; Hübers, H. W.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Richter, H.; Simon, R.; Stutzki, J.; Winkel, B.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The chemistry of the diffuse interstellar medium rests upon three pillars: exothermic ion-neutral reactions ("cold chemistry"), endothermic neutral-neutral reactions with significant activation barriers ("warm chemistry"), and reactions on the surfaces of dust grains. While warm chemistry becomes important in the shocks associated with turbulent dissipation regions, the main path for the formation of interstellar OH and H2O is that of cold chemistry. Aims: The aim of this study is to observationally confirm the association of atomic oxygen with both atomic and molecular gas phases, and to understand the measured abundances of OH and OH+ as a function of the available reservoir of H2. Methods: We obtained absorption spectra of the ground states of OH, OH+ and O i with high-velocity resolution, with GREAT onboard SOFIA, and with the THz receiver at the APEX. We analyzed them along with ancillary spectra of HF and CH from HIFI. To deconvolve them from the hyperfine structure and to separate the blend that is due to various velocity components on the sightline, we fit model spectra consisting of an appropriate number of Gaussian profiles using a method combining simulated annealing with downhill simplex minimization. Together with HF and/or CH as a surrogate for H2, and H i ?21 cm data, the molecular hydrogen fraction fNH2 = N(H2)/(N(H) + 2N(H2)) can be determined. We then investigated abundance ratios as a function of fNH2. Results: The column density of O i is correlated at a high significance with the amount of available molecular and atomic hydrogen, with an atomic oxygen abundance of 3 × 10-4 relative to H nuclei. While the velocities of the absorption features of OH and OH+ are loosely correlated and reflect the spiral arm crossings on the sightline, upon closer inspection they display an anticorrespondence. The arm-to-interarm density contrast is found to be higher in OH than in OH+. While both species can coexist, with a higher abundance in OH than in OH+, the latter is found less frequently in absence of OH than the other way around, which is a direct consequence of the rapid destruction of OH+ by dissociative recombination when not enough H2 is available. This conjecture has been substantiated by a comparison between the OH/OH+ ratio with fNH2, showing a clear correlation. The hydrogen abstraction reaction chain OH+(H2,H)H2O+(H2,H)H3O+ is confirmed as the pathway for the production of OH and H2O. Our estimate of the branching ratio of the dissociative recombination of H3O+ to OH and H2O is confined within the interval of 84 to 91%, which matches laboratory measurements (74 to 83%). - A correlation between the linewidths and column densities of OH+ features is found to be significant with a false-alarm probability below 5%. Such a correlation is predicted by models of interstellar MHD turbulence. For OH the same correlation is found to be insignificant because there are more narrow absorption features. Conclusions: While it is difficult to assess the contributions of warm neutral-neutral chemistry to the observed abundances, it seems fair to conclude that the predictions of cold ion-neutral chemistry match the abundance patterns we observed.

  5. A forward analysis on the applicability of tracer breakthrough profiles in revealing the pore structure of tight gas sandstone and carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmani, Ayaz; Mehmani, Yashar; Prodanovi?, Maša.; Balhoff, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    We explore tracer breakthrough profiles (TBP) as a macroscopic property to infer the pore-space topology of tight gas sandstone and carbonate rocks at the core scale. The following features were modeled via three-dimensional multiscale networks: microporosity within dissolved grains and pore-filling clay, cementation in the absence and presence of microporosity (each classified into uniform, pore-preferred, and throat-preferred modes), layering, vug, and microcrack inclusion. A priori knowledge of the extent and location of each process was assumed to be known. With the exception of an equal importance of macropores and pore-filling micropores, TBPs show little sensitivity to the fraction of micropores present. In general, significant sensitivity of the TBPs was observed for uniform and throat-preferred cementation. Layering parallel to the fluid flow direction had a considerable impact on TBPs whereas layering perpendicular to flow did not. Microcrack orientations seemed of minor importance in affecting TBPs. This article was corrected on 9 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  6. Galaxy Zoo: dust lane early-type galaxies are tracers of recent, gas-rich minor mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, Stanislav S.; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris; Crockett, R. Mark; Silk, Joseph; Sarzi, Marc; Schawinski, Kevin; Bamford, Steven P.; Edmondson, Edd

    2012-06-01

    We present the second of two papers concerning the origin and evolution of local early-type galaxies exhibiting dust features. We use optical and radio data to examine the nature of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in these objects, and compare these with a carefully constructed control sample. We find that dust lane early-type galaxies are much more likely to host emission-line AGN than the control sample galaxies. Moreover, there is a strong correlation between radio and emission-line AGN activity in dust lane early types, but not the control sample. Dust lane early-type galaxies show the same distribution of AGN properties in rich and poor environments, suggesting a similar triggering mechanism. By contrast, this is not the case for early types with no dust features. These findings strongly suggest that dust lane early-type galaxies are starburst systems formed in gas-rich mergers. Further evidence in support of this scenario is provided by enhanced star formation and black hole accretion rates in these objects. Dust lane early types therefore represent an evolutionary stage between starbursting and quiescent galaxies. In these objects, the AGN has already been triggered but has not as yet completely destroyed the gas reservoir required for star formation. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 250 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo 2 project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at .

  7. Astrochemistry of Sub-Millimeter Sources in Orion: Studying the Variations of Molecular Tracers with Changing Physical Conditions

    E-print Network

    Doug Johnstone; Annemieke M. S. Boonman; Ewine F. van Dishoeck

    2003-10-06

    Cornerstone molecules (CO, H_2CO, CH_3OH, HCN, HNC, CN, CS, SO) were observed toward seven sub-millimeter bright sources in the Orion molecular cloud in order to quantify the range of conditions for which individual molecular line tracers provide physical and chemical information. Five of the sources observed were protostellar, ranging in energetics from 1 - 500L_sun, while the other two sources were located at a shock front and within a photodissociation region (PDR). Statistical equilibrium calculations were used to deduce from the measured line strengths the physical conditions within each source and the abundance of each molecule. In all cases except the shock and the PDR, the abundance of CO with respect to H_2 appears significantly below (factor of ten) the general molecular cloud value of 10^-4. {Formaldehyde measurements were used to estimate a mean temperature and density for the gas in each source. Evidence was found for trends between the derived abundance of CO, H_2CO, CH_3OH, and CS and the energetics of the source, with hotter sources having higher abundances.} Determining whether this is due to a linear progression of abundance with temperature or sharp jumps at particular temperatures will require more detailed modeling. The observed methanol transitions require high temperatures (T>50 K), and thus energetic sources, within all but one of the observed protostellar sources. The same conclusion is obtained from observations of the CS 7-6 transition. Analysis of the HCN and HNC 4-3 transitions provides further support for high densities n> 10^7 cm^-3 in all the protostellar sources.

  8. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the Upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    LeCain, G.D.

    1998-09-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) scientific study to evaluate the potential for geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste in an unsaturated-zone desert environment. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has been conducting geologic and hydrologic studies of the potential repository site for the DOE. These studies are to quantify the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of Yucca Mountain and to conceptualize and model gas and liquid flow at the potential repository site. Single-hole and cross-hole air-injection and tracer testing was conducted in alcoves located in the underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) to quantify the permeability and porosity values of the fractured and unfractured volcanic rocks (tuff). The permeability and porosity of these tuffs control the movement of fluids in Yucca Mountain. Study of these parameters provides an understanding of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone, and the parameters can be used in unsaturated-zone numerical modeling to estimate fluid flux through the mountain. This report presents the results from air-injection and tracer testing conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon alcove (UTCA), the Bow Ridge Fault alcove (BRFA), and the upper Paintbrush contact alcove (UPCA) by the USGS from August 1994 through July 1996. The locations of the alcoves and their relations to the potential repository are shown in a figure.

  9. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M; Scow, Kate M

    2013-11-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m 1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (M d) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  10. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (Md) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  11. Determination of traveltimes in the lower San Joaquin River basin, California, from dye-tracer studies during 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Biagtan, Rhoda N.

    1997-01-01

    Dye-tracer studies were done in the lower San Joaquin River Basin in February 1994, June 1994, and February 1995. Dye releases were made in the Merced River (February 1994), Salt Slough (June 1994), Tuolumne River (February 1995), and Dry Creek (February 1995). The traveltimes determined in the studies aided the interpretation of pesticide data collected during storm sampling and guided sample collection during a Lagrangian pesticide study. All three studies used rhodamine WT 20-percent dye solution, which was released as a slug in midstream. The mean traveltime determined in the dye studies were compared to estimates based on regression equations of mean stream velocity as a function of streamflow. Dye recovery, the ratio of the calculated dye load at downstream sites to the initial amount of dye released, was determined for the 1994 studies and a dye-dosage formula was evaluated for all studies. In the February 1994 study, mean traveltime from the Merced River at River Road to the San Joaquin River near Vernalis (46.8 river miles) was 38.5 hours, and to the Delta-Mendota Canal at Tracy pumps (84.3 river miles) was 90.4 hours. In the June 1994 study, mean traveltime from Salt Slough at Highway 165 to Vernalis (64.0 river miles) was 80.1 hours. In the February 1995 study, the mean traveltime from the Tuolumne River at Roberts Ferry to Vernalis (51.5 river miles) was 35.8 hours. For the 1994 studies, the regression equations provided suitable estimates of travel-time, with ratios of estimated traveltime to mean dye traveltime of 0.94 to 1.08. However, for the 1995 dye studies, the equations considerably underestimated traveltime, with ratios of 0.49 to 0.73.In the February 1994 study, 70 percent of the dye released was recovered at Vernalis and 35percent was recovered at the Delta-Mendota Canal at Tracy pumps. In the June 1994 study, recovery was 61 percent at Patterson, 43 percent just upstream of the Tuolumne River confluence, and 37 percent at Vernalis. The dye-dosage formula overestimated the dye required for a given downstream concentration for the 1994 studies by ratios of 1.07 to 2.12. The ratios for the February 1995 studies were 0.67 to 0.95 for the Tuolumne River and 1.21 for Dry Creek. In all studies, the estimates improved with length of dye study.

  12. Use of a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions in Holstein cows fed ad libitum or restricted

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique (SF**6) is a commonly used method for measuring CH**4 enteric emissions in ruminants. Studies using SF**6 have shown large variation in CH**4 emissions data, inconsistencies in CH**4 emissions across studies, and potential methodological errors. Therefore, th...

  13. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonium (NH4 +) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4 + movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring...

  14. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; [sup 238]U-[sup 230]Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  15. Isotope Tracers as Tools for Identifying Water Sources in Developing Regions: Case of Study in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, G.; Lazo, P.; Crespo, P.; Célleri, R.

    2014-12-01

    Páramo ecosystems are widely recognized for their high water regulation capacity and as the main source of runoff generation in the Andean region. Understanding the hydrological functioning of the fragile wet Andean páramo ecosystems is critical in the mountainous regions of South America given their high susceptibility to global and local stressors such as land use change and climate change and variability . Despite this, most of the basins in the Andean mountain range are still ungauged, resulting in a currently hindered hydrologic analysis of the water sources contributing to runoff generation in the high-elevation páramo ecosystems. To improve this situation and provide a baseline for future tracer-based hydrologic studies, the isotopic signature of water samples collected within the Zhurucay River experimental basin (7.53 km2) was analyzed. The study area is located in the southern Ecuador and stretches over an altitudinal range of 3200 and 3900 m a.s.l. Water samples in rainfall, streamflow, and soils were collected between May 2011 and May 2013. Streamflow hydrometric and isotopic information within the study site was collected using a nested monitoring system. The main soils in the study site are the Andosols mainly located in the steep slopes, and the Histosols (Andean páramo wetlands) predominantly located at the bottom of the valley. Results reveal that the Andosols drain the infiltrated rainfall water to the Histosols. The Histosols on their turn feed creeks and small rivers. Pre-event water stored in the Histosols is the primary source of runoff generation throughout the year. Defining the water sources contributing to runoff generation is the first step towards the establishment of scientifically-based programs of management and conservation of water resources in the Andean region; and the monitoring of isotopic information has proven useful to improve the understanding of the ecosystem's hydrologic behavior.

  16. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  17. A study of solute redistribution and transport in seasonal snowpack using natural and artificial tracers

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    of natural and artificial solutes in snow through the processes of snow deposition, snow- pack metamorphismA study of solute redistribution and transport in seasonal snowpack using natural and artificial Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, Box 810, Soda Springs, CA 95728, United States Received 8 October 2007

  18. Study of the effects of the chaser in push-pull tracer tests by using temporal moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebig, Klaus; Zeilfelder, Sarah; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Marui, Atsunao; Scheytt, Traugott

    2015-04-01

    "Push-pull" tracer tests are a suitable tracer test method for hydrochemical charac-terization of an aquifer in a single-well setting (e.g. in deep geothermal systems). A known amount of selected solutes as conservative and reactive tracers is injected into the aquifer ("push") and afterwards extracted ("pull"). In many cases, a so-called "chaser", which is just original groundwater without any added solutes, is injected directly after the injection of the test solution. Its objective is to push the test solution out of the bore-hole into the aquifer and therefore to mini-mize the influence of the gravel pack on the shape of the breakthrough curve. The influence of the chaser on the tracer breakthrough curve is unknown so far. Also, the determination of the appropriate volume for the chaser is a difficult task if at all applied. A first experiment was conducted with the objective to compare three push-pull tests with similar injection volumes, two tests with and one without a chaser. Results show that the application of a chaser lowers the main peak concentration. However, it does not alter the tailing of the breakthrough curve nor does it have a negative in-fluence on tracer mass recovery. In a second experiment, a new method was developed to determine the optimal chaser volume by testing seven different chaser injection volumes combined with temporal moment analysis and comparison of the mean residence times of the in-jected tracer fluid. As a result, the application of a chaser is recommended, when reactions of injected solutes within the open well or the gravel pack should be avoided. If a chaser is used, the new method mentioned above can easily be used to determine the required chaser injection volume. The experiments were conducted at the Hamasato test site in Horonobe (Hokkaido, Japan).

  19. SEAPORT LIQUID NATURAL GAS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    COOK,Z.

    1999-02-01

    The Seaport Liquid Natural Gas Study has attempted to evaluate the potential for using LNG in a variety of heavy-duty vehicle and equipment applications at the Ports of Los Angeles and Oakland. Specifically, this analysis has focused on the handling and transport of containerized cargo to, from and within these two facilities. In terms of containerized cargo throughput, Los Angeles and Oakland are the second and sixth busiest ports in the US, respectively, and together handle nearly 4.5 million TEUs per year. At present, the landside handling and transportation of containerized cargo is heavily dependent on diesel-powered, heavy-duty vehicles and equipment, the utilization of which contributes significantly to the overall emissions impact of port-related activities. Emissions from diesel units have been the subject of increasing scrutiny and regulatory action, particularly in California. In the past two years alone, particulate matter from diesel exhaust has been listed as a toxic air contaminant by CAM, and major lawsuits have been filed against several of California's largest supermarket chains, alleging violation of Proposition 65 statutes in connection with diesel emissions from their distribution facilities. CARE3 has also indicated that it may take further regulatory action relating to the TAC listing. In spite of these developments and the very large diesel emissions associated with port operations, there has been little AFV penetration in these applications. Nearly all port operators interviewed by CALSTART expressed an awareness of the issues surrounding diesel use; however, none appeared to be taking proactive steps to address them. Furthermore, while a less controversial issue than emissions, the dominance of diesel fuel use in heavy-duty vehicles contributes to a continued reliance on imported fuels. The increasing concern regarding diesel use, and the concurrent lack of alternative fuel use and vigorous emissions reduction activity at the Ports provide both the backdrop and the impetus for this study.

  20. Study of Gas Solid Flow Characteristics in Cyclone Inlet Ducts of A300Mwe CFB Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Lu, X. F.; Lai, J.; Liu, H. Z.

    Gas solid flow characteristics in cyclone's inlet duct of a 300MW CFB boiler were studied in a cold circulating fluidized bed (CFB) experimental setup according to a 410t/h CFB boiler with a scale of 10?1. Tracer particles were adopted in the experiment and their motion trajectories in the two kinds of cyclone's inlet ducts were photographed by a high-speed camera. By analyzing the motion trajectories of tracer particles, acceleration performance of particle phases in the two inlet ducts was obtained. Results indicate that the acceleration performance of particles in the long inlet duct is better than that in the short inlet duct, but the pressure drop of the long inlet duct is higher. Meanwhile, under the same operating conditions, both the separation efficiency and the pressure drop of the cyclone are higher when the cyclone is connected with the long inlet duct. Figs 11, Tabs 4 and refs 10.

  1. Isotope Tracer Studies of Diffusion in Sillicates and of Geological Transport Processes Using Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, Gerald J

    2008-07-31

    The objectives were directed toward understanding the transport of chemical species in nature, with particular emphasis on aqueous transport in solution, in colloids, and on particles. Major improvements in measuring ultra-low concentrations of rare elements were achieved. We focused on two areas of studies: (1) Field, laboratory, and theoretical studies of the transport and deposition of U, Th isotopes and their daughter products in natural systems; and (2) Study of calcium isotope fractionation effects in marine carbonates and in carbonates precipitated in the laboratory, under controlled temperature, pH, and rates of precipitation. A major study of isotopic fractionation of Ca during calcite growth from solution has been completed and published. It was found that the isotopic shifts widely reported in the literature and attributed to biological processes are in fact due to a small equilibrium fractionation factor that is suppressed by supersaturation of the solution. These effects were demonstrated in the laboratory and with consideration of the solution conditions in natural systems, where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. The controlling rate is not the diffusion of Ca, as was earlier proposed, but rather the rate of supply of [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] ions to the interface. This now opens the issues of isotopic fractionation of many elements to a more physical-chemical approach. The isotopic composition of Ca {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) in calcite crystals has been determined relative to that in the parent solutions by TIMS using a double spike. Solutions were exposed to an atmosphere of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, provided by the decomposition of (NH4)2CO3. Alkalinity, pH, and concentrations of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 2} in solution were determined. The procedures permitted us to determine {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) over a range of pH conditions, with the associated ranges of alkalinity. Two solutions with greatly different Ca concentrations were used, but, in all cases, the condition [Ca] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] was met. A wide range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) was found for the calcite crystals, extending from 0.04 {+-} 0.13 to -1.34 {+-} 0.15 {per_thousand}, generally anticorrelating with the amount of Ca removed from the solution. The results show that {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) is a linear function of the saturation state of the solution with respect to calcite ({Omega}). The two parameters are very well correlated over a wide range in {Omega} for each solution with a given [Ca]. Solutions, which were vigorously stirred, showed a much smaller range in {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) and gave values of -0.42 {+-} 0.14 {per_thousand}, with the largest effect at low {Omega}. It is concluded that the diffusive flow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} into the immediate neighborhood of the crystal-solution interface is the rate-controlling mechanism and that diffusive transport of Ca{sup 2+} is not a significant factor. The data are simply explained by the assumptions that: (a) the immediate interface of the crystal and the solution is at equilibrium with {Delta}({sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca) {approx} -1.5 {+-} 0.25 {per_thousand}, and (b) diffusive inflow of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} causes supersaturation, thus precipitating Ca from the regions, exterior to the narrow zone of equilibrium. We consider this model to be a plausible explanation of the available data reported in the literature. The well-resolved but small and regular isotope fractionation shifts in Ca are thus not related to the diffusion of very large hydrated Ca complexes, but rather due to the ready availability of Ca in the general neighborhood of the crystal solution interface. The largest isotopic shift which occurs is a small equilibrium effect which is then subdued by supersaturation precipitation for solutions where [Ca{sup 2+}] >> [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}] + [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}]. It is shown that there is a clear temperature dependence of the net isotopic shifts, which is simply due to changes in {Omega}

  2. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1?m) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5?m), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5?m) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15?m). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  3. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  4. Methylmercury effects on migratory behaviour in glass eels (Anguilla anguilla): an experimental study using isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Claveau, Julie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Jarry, Marc; Baudrimont, Magalie; Gonzalez, Patrice; Cavalheiro, Joana; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Bolliet, Valérie

    2015-05-01

    The effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on glass eels' propensity to migrate, mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems was investigated. Marine glass eels were first sorted in an experimental flume according to their response to dusk. Fish responding to the decrease in light intensity by ascending in the water column and moving with or against the flow were considered as having a high propensity to migrate (migrant). Glass eels still sheltering at the end of the 24 h catching period were considered as having a low propensity to migrate and were called non-migrant. Migrant and non-migrant glass eels were then individually tagged and exposed to isotopically enriched (201)MeHg (50 ng L(-1)) for 11 days. The effect of contamination was studied on muscle fibre structure, and the expression level of genes involved in mitochondrial activity and antioxidative defence systems. To investigate the effect of MeHg on glass eel behaviour, migrant and non-migrant glass eels were sorted again and the bioaccumulation of (201)MeHg and its demethylation product ((201)Hg(II)) were determined for each individual. MeHg exposure increased activity in non-migrant glass eels but not migratory behaviour. Contamination affected mitochondrial structure and metabolism and suggests a higher oxidative stress and activation of antioxidative defence systems in non-migrant glass eels. Overall, our results suggest that exposure to MeHg might induce an increase in energy expenditure and a higher vulnerability to predation in non-migrant glass eels in the wild. PMID:25797033

  5. Constraining North Atlantic circulation with transient tracer observations

    E-print Network

    Li, Xingwen, 1968-

    2003-01-01

    The capability of transient tracers to constrain the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic is explored. Study of an idealized tracer shows that inferences of circulation properties from transient state distributions are ...

  6. Laminar segregation of GABAergic neurons in the avian nucleus isthmi pars magnocellularis: a retrograde tracer and comparative study.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Macarena; Fernández, Sara; Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Wylie, Douglas R; Mpodozis, Jorge; Karten, Harvey J; Marín, Gonzalo

    2013-06-01

    The isthmic complex is part of a visual midbrain circuit thought to be involved in stimulus selection and spatial attention. In birds, this circuit is composed of the nuclei isthmi pars magnocellularis (Imc), pars parvocellularis (Ipc), and pars semilunaris (SLu), all of them reciprocally connected to the ipsilateral optic tectum (TeO). The Imc conveys heterotopic inhibition to the TeO, Ipc, and SLu via widespread ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic axons that allow global competitive interactions among simultaneous sensory inputs. Anatomical studies in the chick have described a cytoarchitectonically uniform Imc nucleus containing two intermingled cell types: one projecting to the Ipc and SLu and the other to the TeO. Here we report that in passerine species, the Imc is segregated into an internal division displaying larger, sparsely distributed cells, and an external division displaying smaller, more densely packed cells. In vivo and in vitro injections of neural tracers in the TeO and the Ipc of the zebra finch demonstrated that neurons from the external and internal subdivisions project to the Ipc and the TeO, respectively, indicating that each Imc subdivision contains one of the two cell types hodologically defined in the chick. In an extensive survey across avian orders, we found that, in addition to passerines, only species of Piciformes and Rallidae exhibited a segregated Imc, whereas all other groups exhibited a uniform Imc. These results offer a comparative basis to investigate the functional role played by each Imc neural type in the competitive interactions mediated by this nucleus. PMID:23124899

  7. Study of DNAPL Pool Morphology Using X-ray Attenuation to Evaluate Limitations of Partitioning Tracer Method in Complex Entrapment Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Moreno-Barbero, E.; Hill, E. H.

    2003-12-01

    Characterization of sites contaminated with organic waste chemicals that are in the form of DNAPLs (dense non-aqueous phase liquids) still remains a major challenge in the implementation of remediation schemes. The Partition Interwell Tracer Technique (PITT) has been proposed and used as a non-intrusive method for the estimation of total mass of DNAPL in source zones. PITT uses a suite of chemical tracers that are injected into the source zone and the tracer breakthrough curves that are retarded by the tracer partitioning into the entrapped DNAPL are analyzed to determine the average saturation. In existing methods, PITT data are analyzed assuming local equilibrium exists between phases. This assumption may not be applicable at heterogeneous sites that produce complex entrapment architecture that contains high saturation pools. The groundwater flows around pools due to the reduced aqueous relative permeability caused by entrapment. Bypassing water may reduce the contact between the tracer solution and the NAPL and saturation will be underestimated. However, discernable partitioning of tracer may occur in the transition zone of the pool where the saturation of DNAPL varies from full to residual. The purpose of this research is to study the morphology of DNAPL pools and evaluate under what conditions the PITT limits the mass estimate within a pool. As rate limited behavior is expected within the transition zone, PITT under of rate limited partitioning was evaluated. X-ray attenuation provides an effective way to non-destructively measure the saturation distribution of DNAPLs in the laboratory. The high accuracy and the resolution of this technique allows for the measurement of the spatila distribution of saturation within DNAPL pools. Based on experiments that involved the creation of pools with known volumes of DNAPL in a test cell, errors were evaluated by comparing estimates obtained from PITT and the x-ray measurements. The experimental data in conjunction with model analysis were used to make a determination of limitations of PITT technique for characterization of DNAPL source zones where a significant fraction may be entrapped in the form of high-saturation pools.

  8. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  9. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  10. The Reanalysis for Stratospheric Trace-gas Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Li, Shuhua

    2002-01-01

    In order to re-examine trace gas transport in the middle atmosphere for the period May 1991 until April 1995, a "reanalysis" is being performed using an up-to-date version of the DAO's "GEOS" assimilation system. The Reanalysis for Stratospheric Trace-gas Studies (ReSTS) is intended to provide state-of-the-art estimates of the atmosphere during a period when the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite provided a high density of trace-gas observations, and when the aerosol loading from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo contaminated the lower stratosphere, at the same time performing a natural tracer transport experiment. This study will present the first results from ReSTS, focussing on the improvements over the meteorological analyses produced by the then-operational GEOS-1 data assimilation system; emphasis will be placed on the improved representations of physical processes between GEOS-1 and the current GEOS-4 systems, highlighting the transport properties of the datasets. Alongside the production of a comprehensive atmospheric dataset, important components of ReSTS include performing sensitivity studies to the formulation of the assimilation system (including the representation of physical processes in the GCM, such as feedbacks between ozone/aerosols and meteorology) and to the inclusion of additional data types (including limb-sounding temperature data alongside the TOVS observations). Impacts of some of these factors on the analyzed meteorology and transport will be discussed. Of particular interest are attempts to determine the relative importance of various steps in the assimilation process to the quality of the final analyses.

  11. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N.; Mursenkova, Irina V.; Znamenskaya, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48??×??24?mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M??=??1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M??=??1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1?MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03??±??0.12 ?m. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves.

  12. The effect of wind and currents on gas exchange in an estuarine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.; Bopp, R.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a non-volatile tracer to use in gas exchange experiments in laterally unconfined systems and to study applications of deliberate tracers in limnology and oceanography. Progress was made on both fronts but work on the development of the non-volatile tracer proved to be more difficult and labor intensive that anticipated so no field experiments using non-volatile tracers was performed as yet. In the search for a suitable non-volatile tracer for an ocean scale gas exchange experiment a tracer was discovered which does not have the required sensitivity for a large scale experiment, but is very easy to analyze and will be well suited for smaller experiments such as gas exchange determinations on rivers and streams. Sulfur hexafluoride, SF6, was used successfully as a volatile tracer along with tritium as a non-volatile tracer to study gas exchange rates from a primary stream. This is the first gas exchange experiment in which gas exchange rates were determined on a head water stream where significant groundwater input occurs along the reach. In conjunction with SF6, Radon-222 measurements were performed on the groundwater and in the stream. The feasibility of using a combination of SF6 and radon is being studied to determine groundwater inputs and gas exchange of rates in streams with significant groundwater input without using a non-volatile tracer.

  13. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation observed was located just below the gas-water contact. The open-system dynamic model showed that the hydrates were basically uniformly distributed in a homogeneous porous media at a constant gas migration rate. However, if the gas migration rate was extremely low, the hydrates will tend to concentrate at the bottom of water zone (i.e. at the first contact of the water and the flowed gas) and finally blocked the vertical flow of gas. The models we designed can be scaled up to a field scale, and the research findings from this study can be contributed to the dispersion analysis of an in-situ hydrate reservoir.

  14. Methodology Measuring Rare Earth Elements in High TDS Reservoir Brines Application as Natural Tracers in CCUS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Mcling, T. L.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, H.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years rare earth elements (REE) have been demonstrated to be useful natural tracers for geochemical processes in aqueous environments. The application of REE's to carbon dioxide utilization and storage (CCUS) could provide researchers with a sensitive, inexpensive tool for tracking the movement of CO2 and displaced formation brines. By definition, geologic reservoirs that have been deemed suitable for carbon capture and storage contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) greater than 10,000 ppm and often these formation brines exceed 75,000 ppm TDS. This high TDS water makes it very difficult to measure REE, which typically occur at part per trillion concentrations. Critical to the use of REE for CCUS studies is the development of a procedure, which allows for the pre-concentration of REE's across a wide range of water quality. Additionally, due to the large number of samples that will need analysis, any developed procedure must be inexpensive, reproducible, and quick to implement. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL's Center for Advance Energy Studies is developing REE pre-concentration procedures based on methods reported in the literature. While there are many REE pre-concentration procedures in the literature, our tests have shown these methods have difficulty at TDS greater than seawater (roughly 35,000 ppm TDS). Therefore, the ability to quantitatively measure REE's in formation brines with very high TDS has required the modification of an already developed procedure. After careful consideration and testing we selected methods modified after those described by Kingston et al., 1978 and Strachan et al., 1989 utilizing chelating media for very high TDS waters and ion-exchange media as detailed by Crock et al., 1984; Robinson et al., 1985; and Stetzenbach et al., 1994 for low TDS (<10,000 ppm TDS) waters. These modified procedures have been successfully tested in our laboratory and have proven effective in greatly reducing interfering monovalent and divalent cation concentrations (e.g. Ba) and enriching the REE up to 100X for analysis. The procedures are straightforward, inexpensive, and require little infrastructure, using only single chromatography columns with inexpensive, reusable, commercially available resins and wash chemicals. The procedures have been tested with synthetic brines and waters (up to 250,000 ppm TDS) and field water samples (up to 5,000 ppm TDS). Testing has produced data with REE capture efficiency exceeding 95%, while reducing interfering elements by more than 93%. Further method development and testing continues in preparation for brine analysis of waters from the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Kevin Dome Pilot Study and the University of Wyoming's Carbon Institutes Rock Springs Uplift.

  15. A study on the effect of inlet turbulence on gas mixing for single point aerosol sampling 

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Anand

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency of certain mixing elements in achieving conditions suited for single point sampling is evaluated. Experimental measurements of velocity and tracer gas concentration are taken to determine the same. Readings ...

  16. Field Characterization of Reservoir Flow Paths Using Miscible and Immiscible Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, R. C.; Freifeld, B. M.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S. M.; Phelps, T. J.; McCallum, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 into deep, brine-filled reservoirs may be used to slow the effect that greenhouse gas emissions have on global warming. During injection, the large contrast in fluid densities and viscosities causes immiscible displacement of the brine by CO2, resulting in a two-phase system. We performed a series of tracer tests during the Frio CO2 sequestration pilot program to study immiscible and miscible fluid displacement through the Frio sandstone, a deep saline reservoir located beneath the Gulf Coast Region of Texas. A two-well tracer test was initially performed to evaluate miscible fluid displacement in the single-phase, brine-filled reservoir. A dipole flow field was first established by pumping brine from a well penetrating the reservoir and then injecting it back into the same formation using a second well. A tracer, added to the injected water and monitored at the pumping well, allowed us to evaluate interwell travel times and tracer-breakthrough curves. These results are compared to CO2 travel times and gas-tracer-breakthrough curves obtained from immiscible displacement of brine by CO2, collected during a subsequent single-well CO2 flood (radial divergence test). CO2 breakthrough was faster than model predictions, and sweep efficiencies were relatively small, suggesting that gas movement occurred along preferential pathways. Estimates of formation dispersivity, porosity-thickness products and brine saturation provide further insight into the nature of these pathways.

  17. Short communication: Use of a portable, automated, open-circuit gas quantification system and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions in Holstein cows fed ad libitum or restricted.

    PubMed

    Dorich, C D; Varner, R K; Pereira, A B D; Martineau, R; Soder, K J; Brito, A F

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to measure enteric CH4 emissions using a new portable automated open-circuit gas quantification system (GQS) and the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique (SF6) in midlactation Holstein cows housed in a tiestall barn. Sixteen cows averaging 176 ± 34 d in milk, 40.7 ± 6.1 kg of milk yield, and 685 ± 49 kg of body weight were randomly assigned to 1 out of 2 treatments according to a crossover design. Treatments were (1) ad libitum (adjusted daily to yield 10% orts) and (2) restricted feed intake [set to restrict feed by 10% of baseline dry matter intake (DMI)]. Each experimental period lasted 22d, with 14 d for treatment adaptation and 8d for data and sample collection. A common diet was fed to the cows as a total mixed ration and contained 40.4% corn silage, 11.2% grass-legume haylage, and 48.4% concentrate on a dry matter basis. Spot 5-min measurements using the GQS were taken twice daily with a 12-h interval between sampling and sampling times advanced 2h daily to account for diurnal variation in CH4 emissions. Canisters for the SF6 method were sampled twice daily before milking with 4 local background gas canisters inside the barn analyzed for background gas concentrations. Enteric CH4 emissions were not affected by treatments and averaged 472 and 458 g/d (standard error of the mean = 18 g/d) for ad libitum and restricted intake treatments, respectively (data not shown). The GQS appears to be a reliable method because of the relatively low coefficients of variation (ranging from 14.1 to 22.4%) for CH4 emissions and a moderate relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.42) between CH4 emissions and DMI. The SF6 resulted in large coefficients of variation (ranging from 16.0 to 111%) for CH4 emissions and a poor relationship (coefficient of determination = 0.17) between CH4 emissions and DMI, likely because of limited barn ventilation and high background gas concentration. Research with improved barn ventilation systems or outdoors is warranted to further assess the GQS and SF6 methodologies. PMID:25660738

  18. Experimental study of the effect of test-well arrangement for partitioning interwell tracer test on the estimation of NAPL saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Kim, Y.; Yeo, I.; Yongcheol Kim, In Wook Yeo

    2011-12-01

    Partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) is a method to quantify and qualify a contaminated site with NAPLs through a degree of retardation of partitioning tracers compared to a conservative one. Although PITT is known to be a more effective method to measure the saturation of spatially-distributed NAPL contaminant than the point investigation method, the saturation estimation from PITT is reported to be underestimated due to various factors including heterogeneity of the media, adsorption, source zone NAPL architecture, and long tailing in breakthrough curves of partitioning tracers. Analytical description of PITT assumes that the injection-pumping well pair is on the line of ambient groundwater flow direction, but the test-well pair could easily be off the line in the field site, which could be another erroneous factor in analyzing PITT data. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of the angle of the test-well pair to ambient groundwater flow direction based on the result from PITT. The experiments were conducted in a small-scale 3D sandbox with dimensions of 0.5 m × 0.4 m × 0.15 m (LWH) of stainless steel. The surface is covered and sealed with a plexiglass plate to make the physical model a confined aquifer. Eight full-screened wells of Teflon material were installed along the perimeter of a 50 mm circle with 45 degree intervals in the middle of the physical model. Both ends of the sand box are connected to constant head reservoirs. The physical model was wet-packed with sieved and washed sand. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and bromide were used as the contaminant and the conservative tracer, respectively. Hexanol, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanol and 6-methyl-2-heptanol were used as partitioning tracers. Before the injection of TCE, a PITT was conducted to measure adsorption coefficient of partitioning tracers to the sand material. TCE of 4.5 mL, dyed with Sudan IV, was injected into the inner part of the circle of the wells. PITTs using the test-well pair parallel and with angles of 45 and 90 degrees to ambient flow direction were performed. Another PITT was conducted at an increased pumping rate with the test-well pair at a 45 degree angle to examine the effect of pumping rate. From the experiments, it was found that as the angles of the test-well pair to ambient groundwater flow direction increased, the estimated NAPL saturation decreased. Although the increase in pumping rate in this experiment reduces the effect of the obliqueness of the test-well arrangement, the effect of rate-limited transfer of partitioning tracers due to the increased pumping rate on the PITT should be examined in the interpretation. The results of these experiments revealed that the arrangement of the test-well pair is another controlling factor in performing and interpreting PITT in the field, in addition to the factors such as heterogeneity, source zone architecture, and tailing. Key words: PITT, test-well arrangement, ambient groundwater flow direction, NAPL saturation Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy of Korea. 11-3414

  19. Single-well tracer test sensitivity w. r. to hydrofrac and matrix parameters (case study for the Horstberg site in the N-German Sedimentary Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Holzbecher, E.; Jung, R.; Sauter, M.; Tischner, T.

    2012-04-01

    At the geothermal pilot site Horstberg in the N-German Sedimentary Basin, a complex field experiment program was conducted (2003-2007) by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) together with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences (GGA), aimed at evaluating the performance of innovative technologies for heat extraction, for direct use, from a single geothermal well[1],[2]. The envisaged single-well operation schemes comprised inter-layer circulation through a large-area hydrofrac (whose successful creation could thus be demonstrated), and single-screen 'huff-puff' in suitable (stimulated) layers, seated in sandstone-claystone formations in 3-4 km depth, with temperatures exceeding 160 ° C. Relying on Horstberg tracer-test data, we analyze heat and solute tracer transport in three characteristic hydraulic settings: (A) single-screen, multi-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at lower well-screen in low-permeability sandstone layer ('Detfurth'), from which hydrofrac propagation (through several adjacent layers) was initiated; (B) single-screen, single-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at upper well-screen within a more permeable sandstone layer ('Solling'); (C) inter-layer vertical push through above-mentioned hydrofrac, with spiking at well-screen of A, and sampling at well-screen of B. Owing to drill-hole deviation, the hydraulically-induced frac will, in its vertical propagation, reach the upper sandstone layer in a certain horizontal distance X from the upper well-screen, whose value turns out to be the major controlling parameter for the system's thermal lifetime under operation scheme C (values of X below ~8 m leading to premature thermal breakthrough, with the minimum-target rate of fluid turnover; however, the injection pressure required for maintaining the target outflow rate will also increase with X, which renders scheme C uneconomical, or technically-infeasible, when X exceeds ~15 m). Tracer signals in C are, as well, sensitive w. r. to X, but the effects of increasing X, upon tracer signals, are largely indistinguishable from those of increasing Solling porosity. Further numerical simulations of heat and solute tracer transport in above-named test settings reveal significant disparities between parameter sensitivities attainable in the same kind of test (A, B) conducted at different layers, as well as between solute concentration and temperature signal sensitivities w. r. to transport parameters in one and the same test (C). Why? - Test A features fracture flow, and dual-continuum transport, whereas test B features single-continuum flow and transport (within the host rock, with negligible losses to the hydrofrac). Flow is rapid in test A (being fracture-dominated), but slow in test B (being confined to the host rock). In test C, fluid first flows through the hydrofrac mainly, next it 'must' flow through the upper sandstone; heat transport is dominated by matrix diffusion across the hydrofrac (along which it thus experiences strong retardation), whereas solute transport is dominated by matrix micro-fissure and intra-particle diffusion within the upper sandstone (where it experiences strong retardation). We examine the implications of these findings upon the inversion of transport-effective hydrofrac parameters from measured tracer signals, and upon the tracer-based predictability of the system's thermal lifetime under different operation schemes. [1]http://www.geothermal-energy.org/pdf/IGAstandard/SGW/2005/jung.pdf [2]http://www.geothermal-energy.org/pdf/IGAstandard/WGC/2010/2272.pdf Acknowledgement: This study is funded by MWK Niedersachsen (Lower-Saxony's Science and Culture Ministry) and by Baker Hughes (Celle) within task units 'G6' and 'G7' of the Collaborative Research Project 'gebo' (Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling).

  20. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  1. Development of Kinetic Interface Sensitive Tracers (KIS-Tracer) for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injections into Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M.; Maier, F.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of captured CO2 into geological formations is recently one of the most promising technologies to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions into the earth's atmosphere. Deep saline aquifers are considered as the most potential sequestration sites of CO2 due to their huge storage capacities of several thousand Gt. Ongoing research deals mainly with the investigation of relevant physico-chemical processes, the fate of CO2 and the risk assessment during and after supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injections. The occurring processes at the interface between injected scCO2 and formation brine play a major role to evaluate the fate and behavior of scCO2 in the reservoir. This is because the interface represents a reactive zone where numerous physico-chemical processes like dissolution of scCO2 in water as well as dissolution and precipitation of minerals take place. In most cases it is desired to maximize the interface size to increase the storage efficiency. Therefore, knowledge on interface size and dynamics would allow the observation of plume spreading and the detection of mixing or fingering effects. In order to gain this information innovative tracers are necessary which are able to quantify the temporal and spatial development of scCO2/water interfaces. As a result, it may be possible to assess the storage efficiency and to optimize subsequent injections. Up to now, such time-dependent tracers for reservoir studies are not available and limited to equilibrium tracers (known as partitioning and interfacial tracers, respectively). Therefore, novel reactive tracers (KIS-Tracers) are developed to overcome this gap. The idea is to find suitable molecules which allow the implementation of a defined chemical reaction at the interface. Due to the known kinetic constants the change of interface size can be characterized over time. The new tracer is injected together with the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into a deep saline aquifer. Afterwards, the tracer adsorbs at the interface and undergoes hydrolysis in contact with water. As a consequence, two water soluble reaction products are formed and can be measured in the water phase over time. Here, the reaction kinetics is the rate-limiting step for the phase transfer and strongly dependents on reservoir properties, such as temperature and pH. Such tracer molecules must have the following properties: i) low polarity (high log KOW) to ensure high scCO2 solubility and to minimize distribution into the water phase; (ii) at least one highly water soluble reaction product, which does not do partitioning back into the scCO2 phase; (iii) low detection limit. On the basis of naphthalenesulfonic acid, an established geothermal tracer, different molecules with the desired properties were synthesized and tested in the laboratory. For studying the occurring processes at the interface under atmospheric pressure conditions the scCO2 was replaced with a non-polar organic solvent. The experiments were conducted in a static batch system with constant interfacial area as well as in a dynamic system with changing interface size. In parallel, a macroscopic model which couples mass transfer and reaction kinetics is developed to interpret the data. In conclusion, experiments indicate that the integration of hydrolysis kinetics is possible and even one of the reaction products may be used as additional partitioning tracer, i.e. for measuring the residual saturation.

  2. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  3. Dating of young groundwater using tritium and gaseous tracers (SF6, SF5CF3, CFC-12, H-1301): case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanski, Kazimierz; Bartyzel, Jakub; Dulinski, Marek; Kuc, Tadeusz; Sliwka, Ireneusz; Mochalski, Pawel; Kania, Jaroslaw; Witczak, Stanislaw

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater is an important source of potable water in many countries. While it covers ca. 50% of the global drinking water needs, in Europe this share is even higher, reaching approximately 70%. Nowadays, this strategic resource is at risk due to anthropogenic pollutants of various nature entering shallow aquifers. Proper management of groundwater resources requires thorough understanding of groundwater dynamics on time scales characteristic for the history of pollutant input to groundwater. The bomb-tritium has been used for several decades now as a tracer of choice to detect recent recharge and to quantify groundwater residence times on time scales extending from several years to several decades. The lumped-parameter modeling was the most often employed approach in this context. Since nowadays atmospheric concentrations of tritium are approaching natural levels in most parts of the world, the usage of this tracer has become more problematic. Therefore, there is a growing interest in alternative indicators of groundwater age in shallow aquifers. Anthropogenic trace gases present in the atmosphere, such as freons (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), have been applied in numerous case studies as substitutes of tritium. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study aimed at quantifying mean residence time of groundwater in the recharge area of porous sandy aquifer system located in the southern Poland. The principal economic role of the aquifer, consisting of two water-bearing strata, is to provide potable water for public and private users. The yield of the aquifer is insufficient to meet all the needs and, as a consequence, licensing conflicts arise between water supply companies and industry on the amount of water available for safe exploitation. To quantify residence time distribution (RTD) functions of water parcels arriving at the production wells located in the recharge area of the aquifer, tritium along with several gaseous tracers was employed. Apart of well-established tracers such as SF6 and CFC-12, also other trace gases present in the atmosphere (SF5CF3 and H-1301) were tested as age indicators of young groundwater. Time series of tracer concentrations in the sampled boreholes were interpreted with the aid of lumped-parameter models. In parallel, the arrival times of tracers to the selected wells were calculated with the aid of 3D flow and transport model available for the studied groundwater system and compared with the RTD functions obtained from lumped-parameter modeling. Acknowledgements. Partial financial support of this work through GENESIS project (http:/www.thegenesisproject.eu) funded by the European Commission 7FP contract 226536 and through the funds from the Polish Ministry of Science and High Education (projects Nr. N N525 362637 and 11.11.220.01) is kindly acknowledged.

  4. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  5. Behavior of organophosphates and hydrophilic ethers during bank filtration and their potential application as organic tracers. A field study from the Oderbruch, Germany.

    PubMed

    Stepien, D K; Regnery, J; Merz, C; Püttmann, W

    2013-08-01

    The behavior of organophosphates and ethers during riverbank filtration and groundwater flow was assessed to determine their suitability as organic tracers. Four sampling campaigns were conducted at the Oderbruch polder, Germany to establish the presence of chlorinated flame retardants (TCEP, TCPP, TDCP), non-chlorinated plasticizers (TBEP, TiBP, TnBP), and hydrophilic ethers (1,4-dioxane, monoglyme, diglyme, triglyme, tetraglyme) in the Oder River, main drainage ditch, and anoxic aquifer. Selected parameters were measured in order to determine the hydro-chemical composition of both, river water and groundwater. The results of the study confirm that organophosphates (OPs) are more readily attenuated during bank filtration compared to ethers. Both in the river and the groundwater, TCPP was the most abundant OP with concentrations in the main drainage ditch ranging between 105 and 958 ng L(-1). 1,4-dioxane, triglyme, and tetraglyme demonstrated persistent behavior during bank filtration and in the anoxic groundwater. In the drainage ditch concentrations of 1,4-dioxane, triglyme, and tetraglyme ranged between 1090 and 1467 ng L(-1), 37 and 149 ng L(-1), and 496 and 1403 ng L(-1), respectively. A positive correlation was found for the inorganic tracer chloride with 1,4-dioxane and tetraglyme. These results confirm the possible application of these ethers as environmental organic tracers. Both inorganic and organic compounds showed temporal variability in the surface- and groundwater. Discharge of the river water, concentrations of analytes at the time of infiltration and attenuation were identified as factors influencing the variable amounts of the analytes in the surface and groundwater. These findings are also of great importance for the production of drinking water via bank filtration and natural and artificial groundwater recharge as the physicochemical properties of ethers create challenges in their removal. PMID:23644568

  6. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multisample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  7. Achievements and opportunities from ESF Research Networking Programme: Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes, and COST Action 639: Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeckx, P.; Rasse, D.; Jandl, R.

    2009-04-01

    One of the activities of the European Science Foundation (ESF, www.esf.org) is developing European scale Research Networking Programmes (RNPs). RNPs lay the foundation for nationally funded research groups to address major scientific and research infrastructure issues, in order to advance the frontiers of existing science. MOLTER (www.esf.org/molter or www.molter.no) is such an RNP. MOLTER stands for "Natural molecular structures as drivers and tracers of terrestrial C fluxes" aims at stimulating the use of isotopic and organic chemistry to study carbon stabilization and biogeochemistry in terrestrial ecosystems and soils in particular. The understanding of the formation, stabilization and decomposition of complex organic compounds in the environment is currently being revolutionized by advanced techniques in identification, quantification, and origin tracing of functional groups and individual molecules. MOLTER focuses on five major research themes: - Molecular composition and turnover time of soil organic matter; - Plant molecular structures as drivers of C stabilisation in soils; - Fire transformations of plant and soil molecular structures - Molecular markers in soils; - Dissolved organic molecules in soils: origin, functionality and transport. These research themes are covered via the following activities: - Organisation of international conferences; - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Organisation of summer schools for PhD students; - Short- and long-term exchange grants for scientists. MOLTER is supported by research funding or performing agencies from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. The ESF is also the implementing agency of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology, www.cost.esf.org), one of the longest-running European instruments supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe. COST Action 639 "Greenhouse gas budget of soils under changing climate and land use" (BurnOut) (www.cost.esf.org/domains_actions/essem/Actions/changing_climate or bfw.ac.at/rz/bfwcms.web?dok=5906) BurnOut aims at improving the management of greenhouse gas emissions from European soils under different regimes of ecosystem disturbances and land-use change. This will allow the identification of soil and site conditions (hot spots) that are vulnerable to greenhouse gas emissions. The specific objectives are: - Identification of hot spots of greenhouse gas emissions from soils; - Identification of soil and site conditions that are vulnerable to GHG emissions; - Development of an advanced greenhouse gas reporting concept across different of land forms, land use and land use changes; - Communication of policy relevant GHG reporting concepts; Burnout covers the following activities: - Organisation of specific topical workshops; - Short-term scientific visits for scientists. Participating countries in BurnOut are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, Russian Federation, and Bosnia Herzegovina. During this oral presentation, possible lines of cooperation, opportunities and recent achievements will be exemplified and the audience will be invited to contribute their views on these initiatives.

  8. Tracer-based prediction of thermal reservoir lifetime: scope, limitations, and the role of thermosensitive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Licha, T.; Nottebohm, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal-lifetime prediction is a traditional endeavour of inter-well tracer tests conducted in geothermal reservoirs. Early tracer test signals (detectable within the first few years of operation) are expected to correlate with late-time production temperature evolutions ('thermal breakthrough', supposed to not occur before some decades of operation) of a geothermal reservoir. Whenever a geothermal reservoir can be described as a single-fracture system, its thermal lifetime will, ideally, be determined by two parameters (say, fracture aperture and porosity), whose inversion from conservative-tracer test signals is straightforward and non-ambiguous (provided that the tracer tests, and their interpretation, are performed in accordance to the rules of the art). However, as soon as only 'few more' fractures are considered, this clear-cut correlation is broken. A given geothermal reservoir can simultaneously feature a single-fracture behaviour, in terms of heat transport, and a multiple-fracture behaviour, in terms of solute tracer transport (or vice-versa), whose effective values of fracture apertures, spacings, and porosities are essentially uncorrelated between heat and solute tracers. Solute transport parameters derived from conservative-tracer tests will no longer characterize the heat transport processes (and thus temperature evolutions) taking place in the same reservoir. Parameters determining its thermal lifetime will remain 'invisible' to conservative tracers in inter-well tests. We demonstrate this issue at the example of a five-fracture system, representing a deep-geothermal reservoir, with well-doublet placement inducing fluid flow 'obliquely' to the fractures. Thermal breakthrough in this system is found to strongly depend on fracture apertures, whereas conservative-solute tracer signals from inter-well tests in the same system do not show a clear-cut correlation with fracture apertures. Only by using thermosensitive substances as tracers, a reliable correlation between (early) tracer signals and (later) thermal breakthrough can be re-established. Thus, thermosensitive tracers are indispensable for predicting thermal breakthrough, in such geothermal reservoirs whose 'hydrogeological personality' is given by a finite set of fractures, with flow occurring both across and along the fractures. In terms of the 'gebo benchmark-model' typology investigated by Hördt et al. (2011) [http://eposters.agu.org/abstracts/models-of-geothermal-reservoirs-as-a-basis-for-interdisciplinary-cooperation/] , such systems combine flow and transport patterns of the 'petrothermal' type and of the so-called 'deep-aquifer' type: across the fractures, heat is travelling faster than conservative-solute tracers; along the fractures, conservative-solute tracers experience much less retardation by transversal exchange (matrix diffusion), than heat; fluid (and tracer) flow is not limited to the fractures; matrix flow yields essential contribution to prolonging the fluid (and tracer) residence time. Thermal lifetime results from the opposite effects of fracture aperture as an: advection-related parameter: fluid travel time increases with increasing fracture aperture advection-unrelated parameter: fracture - matrix exchange rate increases with decreasing fracture aperture, which accelerates transport across the fracture, but retards transport along the fracture. In conservative-solute tracer signals, all these fracture aperture effects on tracer transport are masked by the very long residence time associated with the matrix flow component. Thermosensitive tracers are able to 'magnify' the visibility of fracture aperture effects against matrix flow effects. Acknowledgment: This study benefits from thermosensitive-tracer research conducted within the projects Smart Tracers and LOGRO, funded by the German Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU, 0327579 and 0325111B) and by Energie Baden-Württemberg (EnBW).

  9. Comparative dual tracer studies of. beta. -methyl-(1-C-14)heptadecanoic acid (BMHDA) and 15-p-(I-131)-iodophenyl-. beta. -methyl pentadecanoic acid (BMPDA) in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, K.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Yonekura, Y.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    C-11 labeled BMHDA, a branched chain fatty acid, has been reported to be a potential myocardial metabolic tracer for positron emission tomography (PET). The authors have studied the distribution of C-14 BMHDA and I-131 BMPDA in hypertensive rat hearts, using quantitative dual isotope autoradiographic (ARG) techniques. Dahl stain rats (blood pressure: 214+-8 mmHg) were injected with 10 ..mu..Ci of C-14 BMHDA and 170 ..mu..Ci of I-131 BMPDA. Just after sacrifice, hearts and lungs were removed and processed for ARG. The tissue sections (20 ..mu..m thick) were placed on x-ray film for 1 day to reveal the distribution of I-131. The 2nd exposure for C-14 was performed 3 months later to permit the decay of I-131. Selected pairs of ARG images were digitized and quantitated using a videodensitometric system. C-14 BMHDA showed very heterogeneous distribution in the hypertensive myocardium. Decreased uptake was seen in the endocardial region. I-131 BMPDA showed the same uneven distribution as C-14 BMHDA. The correlation coefficients of these two tracers distribution calculated from paired quantitative images were excellent (0.91-0.96). The data suggest that I-123 labeled BMPDA could be used as a biochemical market to measure fatty acid derangement for single photon emission tomography, and may have wider application than C-11 BMHDA which is limited due to availability of PET devices.

  10. CO, NOx and 13CO2 as tracers for fossil fuel CO2: results from a pilot study in Paris during winter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M.; Schmidt, M.; Delmotte, M.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Janssen, C.; Lehman, S. J.; Mondelain, D.; Perrussel, O.; Ramonet, M.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Bousquet, P.

    2013-08-01

    Measurements of the mole fraction of the CO2 and its isotopes were performed in Paris during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign (January-February 2010). Radiocarbon (14CO2) measurements were used to identify the relative contributions of 77% CO2 from fossil fuel consumption (CO2ff from liquid and gas combustion) and 23% from biospheric CO2 (CO2 from the use of biofuels and from human and plant respiration: CO2bio). These percentages correspond to average mole fractions of 26.4 ppm and 8.2 ppm for CO2ff and CO2bio, respectively. The 13CO2 analysis indicated that gas and liquid fuel contributed 70% and 30%, respectively, of the CO2 emission from fossil fuel use. Continuous measurements of CO and NOx and the ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff derived from radiocarbon measurements during four days make it possible to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution over the entire campaign. The ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff are functions of air mass origin and exhibited daily ranges of 7.9 to 14.5 ppb ppm-1 and 1.1 to 4.3 ppb ppm-1, respectively. These ratios are consistent with different emission inventories given the uncertainties of the different approaches. By using both tracers to derive the fossil fuel CO2, we observed similar diurnal cycles with two maxima during rush hour traffic.

  11. Isotopic Tracer Study of Hydraulic Transfer Between Native Woody Shrubs and Associated Annual Crops Under Dry Conditions in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogie, Nathaniel; Bayala, Roger; Diedhiou, Ibrahima; Fogel, Marilyn; Dick, Richard; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2015-04-01

    Erratic precipitation at the beginning and end of the rainy season combined with short drought periods during the cropping season pose a major challenge for rain-fed agriculture and food security in the Sahel. Research has shown that intercropping annual crops with native evergreen woody shrubs in Senegal can greatly increase crop productivity. Hydraulic redistribution (HR), or the diurnal rewetting of dry soil by the pathway of the root system that extends into wetter soil has been found in many plants and climates worldwide. The HR pathway could be a factor in Senegal where water provided by shrubs aids crop growth during dry periods but this has not been confirmed. Therefore, the objective was to determine the ability of shrubs to provide water to millet plants using the deuterium tracer. Penisetum glaucum (Pearl Millet) was grown in association with the native woody shrub Guiera senegalensis under drip irrigation until 68 days after sowing, followed by a with holding of water during late flowering and early grain-filling stage. Within 10 days the soils in the stressed plots became extremely dry with water potentials ranging from -0.5 Mpa to -3.0 Mpa at 20cm depth. Twenty days after the initiation of water stress, vials of isotopically enriched deuterium tracer was sealed around cut roots of three separate shrubs at a depth of 1.0 m followed by sampling of aboveground tissue from injection shrubs and closely growing crop plants over a period of five days. Using cryogenic vacuum distillation, plant water samples were extracted from plant tissue. With lab work completed on two replications, a highly enriched deuterium signal was observed in the tissue water of the shrub beginning twelve hours after the injection. In the same replication thirty-six hours after the beginning of injection, a highly enriched pulse of deuterium in the crop growing directly adjacent to the injection shrub was observed. In a concurrent injection to a nearby shrub under much drier conditions, slight pulses of enrichment were found in the shrub and crop, though with much lower magnitudes. Although this was a simulated drought experiment, we were able to recreate conditions similar to those experienced at this site under rain-fed conditions, where the presence of drought is a constant threat at the beginning and the end of the season. These findings support the hypothesis that there is transfer of hydraulically lifted water from native woody shrubs to annual food crops in the region.

  12. Novel and non-traditional use of stable isotope tracers to study metal bioavailability from natural particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Cain, Daniel J.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    We devised a novel tracing approach that involves enriching test organisms with a stable metal isotope of low natural abundance prior to characterizing metal bioavailability from natural inorganic particles. In addition to circumventing uncertainties associated with labeling natural particles and distinguishing background metals, the proposed "reverse labeling" technique overcomes many drawbacks inherent to using radioisotope tracers. Specifically, we chronically exposed freshwater snails (Lymnaea stagnalis) to synthetic water spiked with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu to increase the relative abundance of 65Cu in the snail’s tissues from 32% to >80%. The isotopically enriched snails were then exposed to benthic algae mixed with Cu-bearing Fe–Al particles collected from the Animas River (Colorado), an acid mine drainage impacted river. We used 63Cu to trace Cu uptake from the natural particles and inferred their bioavailability from calculation of Cu assimilation into tissues. Cu assimilation from these particles was 44%, indicating that 44% of the particulate Cu was absorbed by the invertebrate. This demonstrates that inorganic particulate Cu can be bioavailable. The reverse labeling approach shows great potential in various scientific areas such as environmental contamination and nutrition for addressing questions involving uptake of an element that naturally has multiple isotopes.

  13. Gas geochemistry studies at the gas hydrate occurrence in the permafrost environment of Mallik (NWT, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Erzinger, J.; Zimmer, M.; Schicks, J.; Dahms, E.; Mallik Working Group

    2003-04-01

    We present real-time mud gas monitoring data as well as results of noble gas and isotope investigations from the Mallik 2002 Production Research Well Program, an international research project on Gas Hydrates in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. Mud gas monitoring (extraction of gas dissolved in the drill mud followed by real-time analysis) revealed more or less complete gas depth profiles of Mallik 4L-38 and Mallik 5L-38 wells for N_2, O_2, Ar, He, CO_2, H_2, CH_4, C_2H_6, C_3H_8, C_4H10, and 222Rn; both wells are approx. 1150 m deep. Based on the molecular and and isotopic composition, hydrocarbons occurring at shallow depth (down to ˜400 m) are mostly of microbial origin. Below 400 m, the gas wetness parameter (CH_4/(C_2H_6 + C_3H_8)) and isotopes indicate mixing with thermogenic gas. Gas accumulation at the base of permafrost (˜650 m) as well as ?13C and helium isotopic data implies that the permafrost inhibits gas flux from below. Gas hydrate occurrence at Mallik is known in a depth between ˜890 m and 1100 m. The upper section of the hydrate bearing zone (890 m--920 m) consists predominantly of methane bearing gas hydrates. Between 920 m and 1050 m, concentration of C_2H_6, C_3H_8, and C_4H10 increases due to the occurrence of organic rich sediment layers. Below that interval, the gas composition is similar to the upper section of the hydrate zone. At the base of the hydrate bearing zone (˜1100 m), elevated helium and methane concentrations and their isotopic composition leads to the assumption that gas hydrates act as a barrier for gas migration from below. In mud gas samples from the hydrate zone, the concentrations of all noble gases are lower than in air. Using Ne as a tracer for air contamination, the air-normalized abundances of Ar, Ke and Xe in those samples increase with their mass. Non-atmospheric elemental ratios of the heavier noble gases are most possible the result of elemental fractionation during hydrate formation.

  14. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... blood-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of... either at rest or during exercise. No blood-gas study shall be performed if medically contraindicated....

  15. He II Line Emission as a Tracer of Nonradiative Preionized Shocks: Application to Winds and Circumstellar Disks in the

    E-print Network

    Hartigan, Patrick

    He II Line Emission as a Tracer of Nonradiative Preionized Shocks: Application to Winds with predictions of the brightness of He II â??4686 in nonradiative shocks give an upper limit to the mass outflow useful for studying nonradiative shocks in supernova remnants (Smith et al. 1993) where the gas is too

  16. Estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages of groundwater from selected sites: National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 2006-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Stephanie D.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Widman, Peggy K.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Wayland, Julian E.; Runkle, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    Piston-flow age dates were interpreted from measured concentrations of environmental tracers from 812 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program groundwater sites from 27 Study Units across the United States. The tracers of interest include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He). Tracer data compiled for this analysis were collected from 2006 to 2010 from groundwater wells in NAWQA studies, including: * Land-Use Studies (LUS, shallow wells, usually monitoring wells, located in recharge areas under dominant land-use settings), * Major-Aquifer Studies (MAS, wells, usually domestic supply wells, located in principal aquifers and representing the shallow drinking water supply), * Flow System Studies (FSS, networks of clustered wells located along a flowpath extending from a recharge zone to a discharge zone, preferably a shallow stream) associated with Land-Use Studies, and * Reference wells (wells representing groundwater minimally impacted by anthropogenic activities) also associated with Land-Use Studies. Tracer data were evaluated using documented methods and are presented as aqueous concentrations, equivalent atmospheric concentrations (for CFCs and SF6), and tracer-based piston-flow ages. Selected ancillary data, such as redox data, well-construction data, and major dissolved-gas (N2, O2, Ar, CH4, and CO2) data, also are presented. Recharge temperature was inferred using climate data (approximated by mean annual air temperature plus 1°C [MAAT +1°C]) as well as major dissolved-gas data (N2-Ar-based) where available. The N2-Ar-based temperatures showed significantly more variation than the climate-based data, as well as the effects of denitrification and degassing resulting from reducing conditions. The N2-Ar-based temperatures were colder than the climate-based temperatures in networks where recharge was limited to the winter months when evapotranspiration was reduced. The tracer-based piston-flow ages compiled in this report are provided as a consistent means of reporting the tracer data. The tracer-based piston-flow ages may provide an initial interpretation of age in cases in which mixing is minimal and may aid in developing a basic conceptualization of groundwater age in an aquifer. These interpretations are based on the assumption that tracer transport is by advection only and that no mixing occurs. In addition, it is assumed that other uncertainties are minimized, including tracer degradation, sorption, contamination, or fractionation, and that terrigenic (natural) sources of tracers, and spatially variable atmospheric tracer concentrations are constrained.

  17. Evaluating short-term changes in recreational water quality during a hydrograph event using a combination of microbial tracers, environmental microbiology, microbial source tracking and hydrological techniques: a case study in Southwest Wales, UK.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Mark D; Kay, David; Watkins, John; Davies, Cheryl; Kay, Chris; Thomas, Rod; Porter, Jonathan; Stapleton, Carl M; Moore, Heather

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative assessment of multiple sources to short-term variations in recreational water quality, as indexed by faecal indicator organism (FIO) concentrations, is becoming increasingly important with adoption of modern water quality standards and catchment-based water quality management requirements (e.g. the EU Water Framework Directive, Article 11 'Programmes of Measures' and the US Clean Water Act, 'Total Maximum Daily Loads'). This paper describes a study combining microbial tracers, intensive FIO measurement, open channel hydrology and molecular microbial source tracking (MST) to enhance understanding of recreational water quality at Amroth in southwest Wales, UK. Microbial tracers were released from four stream inputs during a moderate hydrograph event. Tracers from two local streams impacted simultaneously with a period of maximum FIO concentrations at the near-shore compliance monitoring site. Connection between these inputs and this site were rapid (9-33 min). Water quality impairment from a more remote stream input followed, 12.85 h after tracer release, sustaining FIO concentrations above desired compliance levels. MST analysis showed dominance of ruminant Bacteroidales genetic markers, associated with agricultural pollution. This integration of tracers and MST offers additional information on the movement and individual sources causing water quality impairment. PMID:20630556

  18. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeCain, Gary D.

    1998-01-01

    Air-injection and tracer testing were conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from August 1994 to July 1991. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Neurotoxicity after intracarotid 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea administration in the rat: Hemodynamic changes studied by double-tracer autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahiro, S.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Diksic, M.; Mitsuka, S.; Sugimoto, S.; Feindel, W. )

    1991-07-01

    Changes in blood-brain (BBB) permeability and local cerebral blood flow after intracarotid administration of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) were examined quantitatively in rats with double-tracer autoradiography using (14C)alpha-amino-isobutyric acid and (18F)fluoroantipyrine. Forty-eight female Wistar rats were divided into four groups. The control group (Group 1) received 1 ml of 5% dextrose. The other three groups received three different doses of BCNU dissolved in 5% dextrose: Group 2 rats received 1 mg, Group 3 3 mg, and Group 4 10 mg. The tracer study was performed on Day 1 or Days 4 to 12 after intracarotid administration of BCNU. In 11 rats in Group 2, there were no changes of BBB permeability. Transient BBB permeability changes were seen in the striatum or hippocampus in 3 of the 5 rats (60%) in Group 3 within 24 hours. In 8 of 9 rats (89%) in the same group, late BBB permeability changes were observed in the hypothalamus with or without histological changes. BBB permeability changes were seen in all rats of Group 4. Focal increase of local cerebral blood flow on the infused side compared with the non-infused side of the brain was observed, although not at a significant level, in 5 of 25 rats examined with (18F)fluoroantipyrine. The results of BBB permeability and histological examinations and study of heterogenous distribution by (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose indicated that the ipsilateral subcortical structures such as the hypothalamus, amygdala, internal capsule, and caudate putamen have the highest incidence of neurotoxicity, which are closely related to histopathological damage seen in human BCNU leucoencephalopathy.

  20. Experimental studies on a natural gas vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mitsunori; Ishizawa, Shizuo; Inada, Eiji; Idoguchi, Ryuichi; Sekiba, Toru

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents the results of several studies conducted on a natural gas vehicle. In one study of engine-out emissions performance, the exhaust emissions of the CNG engine were lower than those of the base gasoline engine. In another study of the conversion characteristics of three-way catalysts, it was found that the conversion efficiency of total hydrocarbons (THCs) was much lower in the lean-mixture region for the NGV. The reduced efficiency was traced to lower conversion and poor reactivity of low-end hydrocarbons and to a higher concentration of H2O. 12 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed whereby a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream-the principle being that the tracer gas would be desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. This manual describes the slug-injection and constant-rate-injection methods of measuring gas-tracer desorption. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, on methods of injection, sampling, and analysis, and on techniques for computing desorption and reaeration coefficients.

  2. Past leaded gasoline emissions as a nonpoint source tracer in riparian systems: A study of river inputs to San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunlap, C.E.; Bouse, R.; Flegal, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of lead in 1995-1998 river waters flowing into San Francisco Bay trace the washout of lead deposited in the drainage basin from leaded gasoline combustion. At the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers where they enter the Bay, the isotopic compositions of lead in the waters define a linear trend away from the measured historical compositions of leaded gas in California. The river waters are shifted away from leaded gasoline values and toward an isotopic composition similar to Sierra Nevadan inputs which became the predominant source of sedimentation in San Francisco Bay following the onset of hydraulic gold mining in 1853. Using lead isotopic compositions of hydraulic mine sediments and average leaded gasoline as mixing end members, we calculate that more than 50% of the lead in the present river water originated from leaded gasoline combustion. The strong adsorption of lead (log K(d) > 7.4) to particulates appears to limit the flushing of gasoline lead from the drainage basin, and the removal of that lead from the system may have reached an asymptotic limit. Consequently, gasoline lead isotopes should prove to be a useful nonpoint source tracer of the environmental distribution of particle- reactive anthropogenic metals in freshwater systems.

  3. Seasonal variation of secondary organic aerosol tracers in Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, R.-Q.; Ding, X.; He, Q.-F.; Cong, Z.-Y.; Yu, Q.-Q.; Wang, X.-M.

    2015-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) affects the earth's radiation balance and global climate. High-elevation areas are sensitive to global climate change. However, at present, SOA origins and seasonal variations are understudied in remote high-elevation areas. In this study, particulate samples were collected from July 2012 to July 2013 at the remote Nam Co (NC) site, Central Tibetan Plateau and analyzed for SOA tracers from biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes and ?-caryophyllene) and anthropogenic (aromatics) precursors. Among these compounds, isoprene SOA (SOAI) tracers represented the majority (26.6 ± 44.2 ng m-3), followed by monoterpene SOA (SOAM) tracers (0.97 ± 0.57 ng m-3), aromatic SOA (SOAA) tracer (2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid, DHOPA, 0.25 ± 0.18 ng m-3) and ?-caryophyllene SOA tracer (?-caryophyllenic acid, 0.09 ± 0.10 ng m-3). SOAI tracers exhibited high concentrations in the summer and low levels in the winter. The similar temperature dependence of SOAI tracers and isoprene emission suggested that the seasonal variation of SOAI tracers at the NC site was mainly influenced by the isoprene emission. The ratio of high-NOx to low-NOx products of SOAI (2-methylglyceric acid to 2-methyltetrols) was highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, due to the influence of temperature and relative humidity. The seasonal variation of SOAM tracers was impacted by monoterpenes emission and gas-particle partitioning. During the summer to the fall, temperature effect on partitioning was the dominant process influencing SOAM tracers' variation; while the temperature effect on emission was the dominant process influencing SOAM tracers' variation during the winter to the spring. SOAM tracer levels did not elevate with increased temperature in the summer, probably resulting from the counteraction of temperature effects on emission and partitioning. The concentrations of DHOPA were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than those reported in the urban regions of the world. Due to the transport of air pollutants from the adjacent Bangladesh and northeastern India, DHOPA presented relatively higher levels in the summer. In the winter when air masses mainly came from northwestern India, mass fractions of DHOPA in total tracers increased, although its concentrations declined. The SOA-tracer method was applied to estimate secondary organic carbon (SOC) from these four precursors. The annual average of SOC was 0.22 ± 0.29 ?gC m-3, with the biogenic SOC (sum of isoprene, monoterpenes and ?-caryophyllene) accounting for 75 %. In the summer, isoprene was the major precursor with its SOC contributions of 81 %. In the winter when the emission of biogenic precursors largely dropped, the contributions of aromatic SOC increased. Our study implies that anthropogenic pollutants emitted in the Indian subcontinent could be transported to the TP and have an impact on SOC over the remote NC.

  4. Use of environmental tracers to study the chemical evolution of shallow ground water in a karst area of northern Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G. ); Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E. )

    1993-03-01

    The pathways of shallow ground-water flow in poorly confined aquifer systems of northern FL are influenced by inflow to and outflow from numerous sinkhole lakes that are characteristic of the Sand Hills karst region. Ground-water samples were collected immediately upgradient and downgradient from Lake Barco at depths of 1.6--29 m below the water table from observation wells completed in the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate confining unit (icu), and the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples were also collected of rainfall, lake water, and ground water at a depth of 4.1 m beneath the lake bottom. The environmental tracers tritium and chlorofluorocarbons were used to estimate mean residence times of water and rates of chemical mass transfer along flow paths. Water samples collected from wells upgradient of the lake were oxic and had CFC-model recharge dates between 1971 and 1986. The content of delta H-2 and delta O-18 of water from the two aquifer systems and the icu was nearly identical to the isotopic composition of rainfall. Changes in the chemical composition of the ground water with depth were simulated by reacting rainfall with minerals and dissolved gases that exist in the hydrogeologic units. Ground-water samples collected from sites beneath and downgradient of the lake were anoxic, with measured concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and methane ranging from 0.02--0.58 mg/l and 0.30--6.1 mg/l, respectively. CFC-model recharge dates ranged from 1956 to 1983. The data indicated that ground water downgradient of the lake is being recharged by leakage of lake water. The chemical composition of ground water is influenced by the movement of lake water through reducing, organic-rich sediments accumulated at the bottom. Along the downgradient flow paths, the water chemistry evolves from the composition of lake water and is modified by subsequent reactions including reduction of sulfate and ferric iron, methanogenesis, and dissolution and precipitation of minerals.

  5. Dynamics of Enhanced Tracer Diffusion in Suspensions of Swimming Eukaryotic Microorganisms

    E-print Network

    Gollub, Jerry P.

    Dynamics of Enhanced Tracer Diffusion in Suspensions of Swimming Eukaryotic Microorganisms Kyriacos, we study passive tracers in suspensions of eukaryotic swimmers, the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [11], a biflagellated model eukaryote in the study of photosynthesis and flagella. Relative

  6. Particle and tracer diffusion in complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koynov, Kaloian; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    The diffusion of fluorescent tracers can be studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). This powerful method offers the possibility to monitor very small tracers at low concentrations, down to single molecules. Furthermore it possesses a sub-femtoliter detection volume that can be precisely positioned in a heterogeneous environment to probe the local dynamics. Despite its great potential and high versatility in addressing the diffusion and transport properties in complex systems, FCS has been predominantly applied in molecular and cell biology. Here we present some applications that are more relevant for material and soft matter science. First, we study the diffusion of single tracers with molecular sizes in undiluted polymer systems. Next, the diffusion of small molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) in silica inverse opals is studied and correlated to the size and morphology of the inverse opals. Finally, we show how FCS can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles at water-oil interfaces.

  7. Tracer for circulation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, H.; Santos, S.; Wysong, R. D.

    1985-03-19

    An improved tracer particle is described comprising an ion exchange core having a polymer coating thereon, the coated ion exchange core having a reaction site capable of reacting with a compound containing an oxirane group, said coated ion exchange core having been treated with a compound containing an oxirane group to react with said coated ion exchange core causing an increase in mass of the tracer particle. Preferably, the ion exchange core is labelled with a radionuclide. These particles have improved characteristics including improved stability against leaching and improved handling properties. Such particles are useful in circulatory determinations involving the injection of the particles as a suspension in a physiologically acceptable carrier or medium into the circulatory system of animals.

  8. Partitioning tracers and in-situ fluid-saturation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reviews applications of partitioning tracers in the petroleum industry. Partitioning between phases slows the partitioning tracers in a phenomenon known as chromatographic retardation, from which fluid saturations and surface properties can be deduced. Single-well tracer testing (SWTT) to determine residual oil saturation to waterflood, S{sub orw}, is the most common application of partitioning tracers. More than 200 tests have bene run since its invention in 1971. In addition to development of new simulators, a mass-balance method and in internally calibrated method were proposed for direct calculation of S{sub orw} from the tracer reaction rates. With the introduction of the chromatographic transformation technique, several successful interwell tests to determine residual oil saturations in watered-out and gas-saturated reservoirs have been reported. The technique involves direct comparison of the partitioning and nonpartitioning tracer profiles with no need for simulation. In a different approach, full-field simulation of a multiwell test has also been used to estimate oil saturation distribution. Other interesting applications include in-situ miscibility measurement, determining trapped gas saturation during a foam flood, relative permeability ratio measurement, and direct logging of gamma-emitting partitioning tracers through casing to determine residual oil saturation, S{sub or}, vertical distribution.

  9. Gas Gun Studies of Interface Wear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Tyler; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of interface wear were studied by performing gas gun experiments at velocities up to 1 km/s. The approach involved developing coefficients of constitutive strength models for Al 6061 and OFHC-Cu, then using those to design die geometry for interface wear gas gun experiments. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact experiments were performed to obtain coefficients of the Johnson-Cook constitutive strength model by correlating experimentally obtained deformed states of impacted samples with those predicted using ANSYS AUTODYN hydrocode. Simulations were used with validated strength models to design geometry involving acceleration of Al rods through a copper concentric cylindrical angular extrusion die. Experiments were conducted using 7.62 mm and 80 mm diameter gas guns. Differences in the microstructure of the interface layer and microhardness values illustrate that stress-strain conditions produced during acceleration of Al through the hollow concentric copper die, at velocities less than 800 m/s, result in formation of a layer via solid state alloying due to severe plastic deformation, while higher velocities produce an interface layer consisting of melted and re-solidified aluminum.

  10. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater in karst environments tends to have difficulties to distinguish multiple flows if several sources of water are present. Skaistkalne vicinity faces with such situation where old groundwater, fresh groundwater and inflow from river Iecava occurs. Attempts were made to distinguish groundwater residence time of multiple components of water applying CFC and tritium dating techniques supplied by tracer test and numerical model of study area. Study area covers territory between two rivers Iecava and Memele with water level difference of 7 meters and horizontal distance of 2.2 kilometres between both. Study area consists of karst affected Devonian gypsum and carbonaceous rocks covered by Quaternary low to high permeable deposits. Confined groundwater at depth of 10-25 meters where analysed by CFC's and tritium. At this depth groundwater exhibits anoxic reducing environment that has caused degradation of CFC's at similar degree in all samples. Taking it into account, mean residence time based on CFC piston flow model is 22 - 42 years and 28 - 34 years based on binary mixing model. Tritium results show signs of incensement of groundwater residence time towards discharge area. CFC combined with tritium proved increased vertical velocity in middle part between the rivers likely caused by hydrogeological window in Quaternary deposits created by karst processes. Numerical model (Delina et al. 2012) was applied and calculations yielded groundwater flow velocity rate at 0.3 - 1 m/day in area between the rivers. Investigation of CFC data resulted in possible groundwater flow rate of at a minimum of 0.2 m/day although it's not applicable to all sampled wells due to specific hydrogeological conditions. Tracer test was made between the rivers in order to distinguish main water flow paths and flow velocity. Results showed that very high permeable conduits connect rivers and karst lakes with velocity rates of 800 - 1300 m/day. Complex investigation leads to conclude that three different sources of groundwater occur characterized by different flow velocity, recharge age and chemical composition. Although CFC's has been degraded, it is possible to use the results to distinguish groundwater different components and even to estimate groundwater flow velocity because of near located recharge and discharge areas. Tritium results doesn't show considerable variations along flow path with 6 TU in average confirming conclusions based on CFC's. Tracer test approve very high groundwater velocity zones in study area that supposedly doesn't mix with groundwater in matrix. References Delina A., Babre A., Popovs K., Sennikovs J., Grinberga B. 2012. Effects of karst processes on surface water and groundwater hydrology at Skaistkalne vicinity, Latvia. - Hydrology Research, 43(4), IWA Publishing, pp. 445-459, doi:10.2166/nh.2012.123. This study is supported by ERAF project Nr. 1013/00542DP/2.1.1.1.0/13/APIA/VIAA/007

  11. Determination of ketone body kinetics using a D-(-)-3-hydroxy(4,4,4-/sub 2/H/sup 3/)butyrate tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Bougneres, P.F.; Balasse, E.O.; Ferre, P.; Bier, D.M.

    1986-02-01

    In studies where D-(-)-3-hydroxy(4,4,4-/sub 2/H/sup 3/)butyrate is employed as isotopic tracer in vivo, we have described a selected ion monitoring, gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry micromethod which measures (/sub 2/H/sup 3/) tracer enrichment in 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate from 300-microliters blood samples. For plasma samples in the physiologic range, intra- and interassay precisions for each ketone averaged better than +/- 1% and +/- 2%, respectively. The use of the method was validated by comparing kinetic data obtained with the above tracer with simultaneous flux data obtained with conventional D-(-)-3-hydroxy(3-/sup 14/C)butyrate tracer in five fasted rats.

  12. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  13. Contribution of time-related environmental tracing combined with tracer tests for characterization of a groundwater conceptual model: a case study at the Séchilienne landslide, western Alps (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, A.; Bertrand, C.; Mudry, J.; Bogaard, T.; Fabbri, O.; Baudement, C.; Régent, B.

    2015-08-01

    Groundwater-level rise plays an important role in the activation or reactivation of deep-seated landslides and so hydromechanical studies require a good knowledge of groundwater flows. Anisotropic and heterogeneous media combined with landslide deformation make classical hydrogeological investigations difficult. Hydrogeological investigations have recently focused on indirect hydrochemistry methods. This study aims at determining the groundwater conceptual model of the Séchilienne landslide and its hosting massif in the western Alps (France). The hydrogeological investigation is streamlined by combining three approaches: a one-time multi-tracer test survey during high-flow periods, a seasonal monitoring of the water stable-isotope content and electrical conductivity, and a hydrochemical survey during low-flow periods. The complexity of the hydrogeological setting of the Séchilienne massif leads to development of an original method to estimate the elevations of the spring recharge areas, based on topographical analyses and water stable-isotope contents of springs and precipitation. This study shows that the massif supporting the Séchilienne landslide is characterized by a dual-permeability behaviour typical of fractured-rock aquifers where conductive fractures play a major role in the drainage. There is a permeability contrast between the unstable zone and the intact rock mass supporting the landslide. This contrast leads to the definition of a shallow perched aquifer in the unstable zone and a deep aquifer in the intact massif hosting the landslide. The perched aquifer in the landslide is temporary, mainly discontinuous, and its extent and connectivity fluctuate according to the seasonal recharge.

  14. Gas-phase electron diffraction studies of unstable molecules 

    E-print Network

    Noble-Eddy, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) is the only viable technique for the accurate structural study of gas-phase molecules that contain more than ~10 atoms. Recent advances in Edinburgh have made it possible to study ...

  15. Noble gases as natural tracers of water circulation in the Paris Basin: 2. Calibration of a groundwater flow model using noble gas isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Goblet, Patrick; Ledoux, Emmanuel; Violette, Sophie; de Marsily, Ghislain

    1998-10-01

    Using the rare gas concentrations in the aquifers of the Paris Basin (see part 1 of this series), a numerical model of a two-dimensional cross section of the entire Paris Basin was built to simulate groundwater flow and the transport of 3He, 4He, and 40Ar isotopes. The model included seven aquifers separated by seven aquitards in a steady state flow regime. Transport of the gases is by advection, diffusion, and dispersion in steady or transient states. The 4He transport was simulated first and made it possible to calibrate both the crustal flux of this isotope and the average permeability of each aquifer, which were then favorably compared with measured values. These values present a high variability from aquifer to aquifer, between 8.5 × 10-7 and 3.5 × 10-4 m s-1. The water velocities and average residence times were also estimated. Average turnover times for the different aquifers are highly variable, ranging from 8700 years for the shallowest one (Ypresian) to 30 Myr for the deepest one (Trias). The calibrated model was also able to correctly represent the distribution of 3He and 40Ar in the basin. Diffusion proved to be an important mechanism for vertical transfer through the aquitards of the helium isotopes, as opposed to 40Ar, which is transported mainly by advection. On the basis of the (4He/40Ar) radiogenic ratio a constant value of 10-l1 m s-1 was attributed to the permeability of all the aquitards. A sensitivity study showed that the permeability of the aquitards situated in the lower part of the basin (Lias and aquitards in the Triassic and Dogger) could not be higher than 10-11 m s-1 given the observed distribution of the radiogenic 4He/40Ar ratio, but a lower limit could not be defined. The crustal fluxes of 3He, 4He, and 40Ar in the basin were estimated at 4.33 × 10-13 mol m-2 yr-1, 4. × 10-6 mol m-2 yr-1 and 2.52 × 10-7 mol m-2 yr-1, respectively. The simulation of the 3He and 4He transport showed that theR/Ra ratio (value of the measured R = 3He/4He ratio normalized to the atmospheric ratio Ra) entering at the base of the Trias from the bedrock remained constant while crossing the basin except in the zones close to the recharge areas where it is influenced by the atmospheric component. This constancy is due to the low radiogenic/nucleogenic production rate of these isotopes inside the basin, as compared to the crustal flux.

  16. DETECTION OF HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC TRACERS IN VEGETATION SMOKE SAMPLES BY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography
    (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of
    complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds
    which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC
    columns. The combination of this technique wit...

  17. Dense Gas Tracers and Star Formation Laws in Active Galaxies: APEX Survey of HCN J = 4 ? 3, HCO+ J = 4 ? 3, and CS J = 7 ? 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gao, Yu; Henkel, Christian; Zhao, Yinghe; Wang, Junzhi; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf

    2014-04-01

    We report HCN J = 4 ? 3, HCO+ J = 4 ? 3, and CS J = 7 ? 6 observations in 20 nearby star-forming galaxies with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment 12 m telescope. Combined with four HCN, three HCO+, and four CS detections from the literature, we probe the empirical link between the luminosity of molecular gas (L^{\\prime }_gas) and that of infrared emission (L IR), up to the highest gas densities (~106 cm-3) that have been probed so far. For nearby galaxies with large radii, we measure the IR luminosity within the submillimeter beam size (14''-18'') to match the molecular emission. We find linear slopes for L^{\\prime }_{CS\\, J=7{--}6}-L IR and L^{\\prime }_{HCN\\, J=4{--}3}-L IR, and a slightly super-linear slope for L^{\\prime }_{HCO^+\\, J=4{--}3}-L IR. The correlation of L^{\\prime }_{CS\\, J=7{--}6}-L IR even extends over eight orders of luminosity magnitude down to Galactic dense cores, with a fit of log(L IR) =1.00(± 0.01) ×log(L^{\\prime }_{CS\\, J=7{--}6}) + 4.03(± 0.04). Such linear correlations appear to hold for all densities >104 cm-3, and indicate that star formation rate is not related to the free-fall timescale for dense molecular gas.

  18. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields

    E-print Network

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

  19. Study of tropospheric CO and O3 enhancement episode over Indonesia during Autumn 2006 using the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers (MOZART-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Shuchita; Sheel, Varun

    2013-03-01

    An intense biomass burning event occurred over Indonesia in Autumn of 2006. We study the impact of this event on the free tropospheric abundances of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) using MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution In The Troposphere) observations, ozonesonde measurements and 3D chemistry transport model MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers). MOPITT observations showed an episode of enhanced CO in the free troposphere over the Indonesian region during October-November 2006. This feature is reproduced well by MOZART. The model mass diagnostics identifies the source of enhanced CO mixing ratio in the free troposphere (100-250 ppbv) as due to convective processes. The implication of the fire plume on the vertical distribution of O3 over Kuala Lumpur has been studied. The tropospheric O3 increased over this location by 10-25 ppbv during Autumn 2006 as compared to Autumn 2005 and 2007. The MOZART model simulation significantly underestimated this tropospheric O3 enhancement. The model is run both with and without Indonesian biomass burning emissions to estimate the contribution of fire emission in CO and O3 enhancement. Biomass burning emission is found to be responsible for an average increase in CO by 104 ± 56 ppbv and O3 by 5 ± 1 ppbv from surface to 100 hPa range. The model results also showed that biomass burning and El Niño related dynamical changes both contributed (˜4 ppbv-12 ppbv) to the observed increase in tropospheric O3 over the Indonesian region during Autumn 2006.

  20. Molecules as tracers of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Susanne

    2013-03-01

    Studying the molecular phase of the interstellar medium in galaxies is fundamental for the understanding of the onset and evolution of star formation and the growth of supermassive black holes. We can use molecules as observational tools exploiting them as tracers of chemical, physical and dynamical conditions. In this short review, key molecules (e.g. HCN, HCO+, HNC, HC3N, CN, H3 O +) in identifying the nature of buried activity and its evolution are discussed including some standard astrochemical scenarios. Furthermore, we can use IR excited molecular emission to probe the very inner regions of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) allowing us to get past the optically thick dust barrier of the compact obscured nuclei, e.g. in the dusty LIRG NGC4418. High resolution studies are often necessary to separate effects of excitation and radiative transport from those of chemistry - one example is absorption and effects of stimulated emission in the ULIRG Arp220. Finally, molecular gas in large scale galactic outflows is briefly discussed.

  1. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arterial blood-gas studies. 718.105 Section... DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Criteria for the Development of Medical Evidence § 718.105 Arterial blood-gas studies. (a) Blood-gas studies are performed to detect an impairment in the process of...

  2. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes using actinide elements. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1992-12-31

    The following are reported: high abundance sensitivity mass spectrometer for U-Th studies; {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th disequilibrium in recent lavas from Iceland; water-rock interaction from U-Th studies; resonance ionization mass spectrometry of Os and Ti isotopes; and self-diffusion of Mg.

  3. Impacts of Wood Additions on Dissolved and Particulate Nutrient Retention in an Agriculturally Impacted Stream: A Multi-Tracer Injection Study at Whatawhata, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J. D.; Wright-Stow, A.; Nagels, J.; Quinn, J.; Franklin, P.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Wood is a key component in forested streams, playing an important ecological and physical role in creating step-pool profiles, enhancing habitat heterogeneity, retaining organic matter, and changing water velocity. Wood additions can increase surface water-groundwater exchange, increasing in-stream residence times by slowing water velocities and providing high depositional areas for fine particles (i.e. particulate nutrients C, N, P). Thus, wood additions may create biogeochemical hotspots in streams that allow greater potential for local nutrient cycling and processing. The objectives of this research were to determine if added wood enhances in-stream heterogeneity, results in more complex flow paths, increases natural retention of further organic matter and changes geomorphic characteristics of the stream reach. We conducted a conservative solute and fluorescent fine particle tracer injection study in an agriculturally impacted stream with emplaced wood additions to estimate in-stream retention times in the Whatawhata catchment, North Island of New Zealand. Although similar solute peak concentrations were observed at the different in-stream sampling sites, increased retention was observed near to the wood. Both fine particle deposition and retention time was increased near the emplaced log. Fine particles were also analyzed in situ in sediment and biofilms on cobbles throughout the stream reach following the injection. A direct positive correlation was observed between cobble biofilm biomass and particle accumulation within this retention area. In general, the addition of wood to these agriculturally impacted streams enhanced hydraulic complexity and increased the retention of solute and fine particles.

  4. Fluid dynamic studies on scattering aerosol and its generation for application as tracer particles in supersonic flow measurements utilizing laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, M. K.; Hoyle, B. D.; Kirsch, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental study on the particle-fluid interactions of scattering aerosols was performed using monodisperse aerosols of different particle sizes for the application of laser Doppler velocimeters in subsonic turbulence measurements. Particle response was measured by subjecting the particles to an acoustically excited oscillatory fluid velocity field and by comparing the ratio of particle velocity amplitude to the fluid velocity amplitude as a function of particle size and the frequency of oscillation. Particle velocity was measured by using a differential laser Doppler velocimeter. The test aerosols were fairly monodisperse with a mean diameter that could be controlled over the size range from 0.1 to 1.0 micron. Experimental results on the generation of a fairly monodisperse aerosol of solid particles and liquid droplets and on the aerosol response in the frequency range 100 Hz to 100 kHz are presented. It is indicated that a unit density spherical scatterer of 0.3 micron-diameter would be an optimum choice as tracer particles for subsonic air turbulence measurements.

  5. Atmospheric trace gas studies in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, D.R.; Schilling, K.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper overviews trace gas studies that were carried out in Antarctica, with an emphasis on those by the Washingon State University Laboratory for Atmospheric Research. The results of trend analysis revealed that, although the atmospheric concentrations of F-11, F-12, CH3CCl3, and other halocarbons are still increasing, their rate of increase has slowed from the increasing rates observed in the 1970s. Vertical concentration profiles in Antarctica are shown to be dependent upon the seasonal variations in circulation patterns associated with the final warming and breakup of the polar vortex. It is shown that the stratospheric-tropospheric air exchange over Antarctica is influenced primarily by the following factors: (1) general circulation patterns with subsidence over the polar regions, (2) stratospheric air injection in the vicinity of jet streams and injection from tropopause folding upstream of troughs, and (3) mountain waves of sufficient magnitude to displace air parcels across the tropopause. 120 references.

  6. A consistent and efficient graphical analysis method to improve the quantification of reversible tracer binding in radioligand receptor dynamic PET studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Ye, Weiguo; Braši?, James R.; Crabb, Andrew H.; Hilton, John; Wong, Dean F.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used Logan plot in radioligand receptor dynamic PET studies produces marked noise-induced negative biases in the estimates of total distribution volume (DVT) and binding potential (BP). To avoid the inconsistencies in the estimates from the Logan plot, a new graphical analysis method was proposed and characterized in this study. The new plot with plasma input and with reference tissue input was first derived to estimate DVT and BP. A condition was provided to ensure that the estimate from the new plot equals DVT or BP. It was demonstrated theoretically that 1) the statistical expectations of the estimates from the new plot with given input are independent of the noise of the target tissue concentration measured by PET; and 2) the estimates from the time activity curves of regions of interest are identical to those from the parametric images for the new plot. The theoretical results of the new plot were also confirmed by computer simulations and fifty-five human [11C]raclopride dynamic PET studies. By contrast, the marked noise-induced underestimation in the DVT and BP images and noise- induced negative bias in the estimates from the Logan plot were demonstrated by the same data sets used for the new plot. The computational time for generating DVT or BP images in the human studies was reduced by 80% on average by the new plot in contrast to the Logan plot. In conclusion, the new plot is a consistent and computationally efficient graphical analysis method to improve the quantification of reversible tracer binding in radioligand receptor dynamic PET studies. PMID:18930830

  7. Study ranks oil, gas industry technology needs

    SciTech Connect

    Moritis, G.

    1995-10-30

    A survey of majors, other integrated oil and gas companies, independents, and service companies identified a wide variety of new and improved technologies that the oil and gas industry will need to continue to effectively and efficiently find, produce, and process oil and gas reserves. The survey is included in the National Petroleum Council`s July 19, 1995, draft report Research, Development, and Demonstration Needs of the Oil and Gas Industry. NPC identified 250 technologies in the following 11 areas: exploration, development, drilling and completion, production, deepwater offshore, Arctic region activities, oil processing refining, gas processing, gas gathering, gas storage, and environmental and regulatory. This article summarizes the results of the survey and describes the respondents. Four articles that follow describe the 250 technologies addressed in the survey in more detail.

  8. Water quality studies in Kranji Catchment, Singapore : use of organic tracer and PEDs for identifying potential sewage sources

    E-print Network

    Mendez Sagel, Adriana (Adriana Raquel)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify organic compounds that could serve as indicators of potential human fecal contamination sources to the Kranji Reservoir in Singapore that could be used as confirmation indicators ...

  9. Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

    2006-06-01

    A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

  10. 20 CFR 718.105 - Arterial blood-gas studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...contraindicated. If an exercise blood-gas test is administered, blood shall be drawn during exercise. (c) Any report of a blood-gas study submitted in connection... (2) Altitude and barometric pressure at which the test was...

  11. VAPOR-PHASE TRANSPORT OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN AN INTERMEDIATE-SCALE VADOSE-ZONE SYSTEM: RETENTION PROCESSES AND TRACER-BASED PREDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Carlson, Tyson D.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase miscible-displacement experiments were conducted using a large weighing lysimeter to evaluate retention processes for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water-unsaturated (vadoze-zone) systems, and to test the utility of gas-phase tracers for predicting VOC retardation. Trichloroethene (TCE) served as a model VOC, while trichlorofluoromethane (CFM) and heptane were used as partitioning tracers to independently characterize retention by water and the air-water interface, respectively. Retardation factors for TCE ranged between 1.9 and 3.5, depending on water content. The results indicate that dissolution into the bulk water was the primary retention mechanism for TCE under all conditions studied, contributing approximately two thirds of the total measured retention. Accumulation at the air-water interface comprised a significant fraction of the observed retention for all experiments, with an average contribution of approximately 24%. Sorption to the solid phase contributed approximately 10% to retention. Water contents and air-water interfacial areas estimated based on the CFM and heptane tracer data, respectively, were similar to independently measured values. Retardation factors for TCE predicted using the partitioning-tracer data were in reasonable agreement with the measured values. These results suggest that gas-phase tracer tests hold promise for characterizing the retention and transport of VOCs in the vadose-zone. PMID:23333418

  12. Geologic studies of deep natural gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T. S., (Edited By); Kuuskraa, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995, the USGS estimated a mean resource of 114 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable natural gas in plays deeper than 15,000 feet/4,572 meters in onshore regions of the United States. This volume summarizes major conclusions of ongoing work. Chapters A and B address the areal extent of drilling and distribution of deep basins in the U.S. Chapter C summarizes distribution of deep sedimentary basins and potential for deep gas in the former Soviet Union. Chapters D and E are geochemical papers addressing source-rock issues and deep gas generation. Chapter F develops a probabilistic method for subdividing gas resources into depth slices, and chapter G analyzes the relative uncertainty of estimates of deep gas in plays in the Gulf Coast Region. Chapter H evaluates the mechanism of hydrogenation of deep, high-rank spent kerogen by water, with subsequent generation of methane-rich HC gas.

  13. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modelling and the results of tracer studies in the mesoscale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Wenninger, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we developed a catchment hydrological model which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making for better management of the Migina Catchment (257.4 km2). The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Center - the Hydrologic Modelling System) (version 3.5) was used with its soil moisture accounting, unit hydrograph, liner reservoir (for baseflow) and Muskingum-Cunge (river routing) methods. We used rainfall data from 12 stations and streamflow data from 5 stations, which were collected as part of this study over a period of 2 years (May 2009 and June 2011). The catchment was divided into five sub-catchments. The model parameters were calibrated separately for each sub-catchment using the observed streamflow data. Calibration results obtained were found acceptable at four stations with a Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency index (NS) of 0.65 on daily runoff at the catchment outlet. Due to the lack of sufficient and reliable data for longer periods, a model validation was not undertaken. However, we used results from tracer-based hydrograph separation from a previous study to compare our model results in terms of the runoff components. The model performed reasonably well in simulating the total flow volume, peak flow and timing as well as the portion of direct runoff and baseflow. We observed considerable disparities in the parameters (e.g. groundwater storage) and runoff components across the five sub-catchments, which provided insights into the different hydrological processes on a sub-catchment scale. We conclude that such disparities justify the need to consider catchment subdivisions if such parameters and components of the water cycle are to form the base for decision making in water resources planning in the catchment.

  14. High performance simulation of environmental tracers in heterogeneous domains.

    PubMed

    Gardner, William P; Hammond, Glenn; Lichtner, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow, and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, and the mean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2D and 3D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer to the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3D domains differ significantly from 2D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3D systems. PMID:24372403

  15. Development of a mobile tracer correlation method for assessment of air emissions from landfills and other area sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Green, Roger B.; Hater, Gary R.; Swan, Nathan D.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2015-02-01

    A standardized version of a mobile tracer correlation measurement method was developed and used for assessment of methane emissions from 15 landfills in 56 field deployments from 2009 to 2013. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and acetylene tracer gas, this method has potential implementation and cost advantages over other mobile tracer correlation approaches. The field deployment, data acquisition and analysis procedures, and a range of use conditions are discussed. To test real-world method application, the field studies were conducted by engineering technician-level personnel under randomly-encountered daytime atmospheric conditions. A total of 1876 mobile tracer correlation measurement transects were attempted over 131 field sampling days. Of these, 1366 transect (73%) were successfully completed and passed basic data acceptance criteria as valid measurement attempts. Invalid data were caused primarily by equipment failures, transect execution errors, or poor plume transport conditions. Valid transects were further analyzed using signal-to-noise ratio, plume correlation, and emission rate difference method quality indicators described here. Encountered scenarios that can result in high emission measurement uncertainty or bias are discussed in term of these indicators. Reasonable values for the acceptance levels of the method quality indicators that help protect against method errors and reduce measurement noise are discussed. The application of a default indicator set to the valid data yield 456 transects (33%) that pass data acceptance criteria. Transects that fail were associated with insufficient advected plume transport, poor correlation between the tracer and source plumes, and potential emissions pooling conditions.

  16. Parametric study of gas entry into cemented wellbores

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.; Wiggins, M.L.

    1997-09-01

    A cement slurry is placed in a wellbore to harden into an impermeable mass that seals the annulus from fluid flow and protects the casing from corrosion for the life of the well. If fluid flow does occur in the form of gas migration, expensive remedial squeeze-cementing techniques are generally required. The objective of the work covered in this paper was to study the parameters that affect entry of gas into a cemented annulus. This research incorporated a detailed study of the factors that contribute to gas influx from the time of initial placement of the slurry, through the gelation or transition state of the slurry, to the set condition. On the basis of the understanding of the processes involved in gas entry, a simulator was developed that predicts the amount of gas that enters a cemented wellbore, and identifies the critical parameters that affect the gas entry. This study concerns itself with a portion of the gas flow problem: the entry of gas into a cemented annulus--and not with the flow of the gas up through the cement and the formation of a gas channel. This study will provide insight to the following questions. What cement properties are important to minimize gas entry? What role does fluid loss play in minimizing gas influx? What well parameters affect gas entry?

  17. Determination of the source of bioavailable Sr using ??Sr/??Sr tracers: a case study of hot pepper and rice.

    PubMed

    Song, Byeong-Yeol; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Hyung Seon; Lee, Kwang-Sik

    2014-09-24

    The geographical origin of agricultural products has been intensively studied, but links between agricultural products and the environments are poorly established. Soils, water (streamwater and groundwater), and plants (hot pepper, Capsicum annuum; and rice, Oryza sativa) were collected from all regions of South Korea and measured Sr isotope ratios ((87)Sr/(86)Sr). Sequential leaching of soil showed that Sr in the exchangeable and carbonate fractions (bioavailable) had a lower (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio than that in the silicate fraction, consistent with a low (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio in the plant. Although the bedrock-soil-water-plant system is closely linked, statistical analysis indicated that (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios of the plant showed the greatest agreement with those of water and the exchangeable fraction of soil. This study is the first report of (87)Sr/(86)Sr isoscapes in South Korea and first demonstrates that the agricultural product is strongly linked with the exchangeable fraction of soil and water. PMID:25186083

  18. Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager

    E-print Network

    Walker, D. Greg

    Thermo Tracer TS7302 Infrared Thermal Imager Fixed Installation Type The Thermo Tracer TS7302 is a fixed installation type infrared thermal imaging camera to monitor important facilities the infrared camera from the PC. · Infrared camera images can be monitored on the PC screen by the video

  19. Isotope tracer studies of diffusion in silicates and of geological transport processes in aqueous systems using actinide elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserburg, G.J.

    1999-02-01

    This research program has moved ahead with success in several areas. The isotopic composition of osmium in seawater and in some rivers was directly determined for the first time. The concentration of osmium was first estimated in both seawater and rivers. A major effort was directed toward the transport of the U,Th series nuclides in a watershed in Sweden. A serious effort was directed at developing a transport model for the U,Th series nuclides in aquifers. A detailed study of {sup 238}U-{sup 230}Th dating of a cave in Israel was carried out collaboratively. The Os-Re fractionation between silicate and sulfide melts were determined in MORB basalts and glasses and the isotopic composition of Os was measured in sulfide samples.

  20. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-05

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications, both in terms of incorporation of technology into current products, as well as to an NGGT product. In summary, potential program costs are shown for development of the candidate systems along with the importance of future DOE enabling participation. Three main conclusions have been established via this study: (1) Rapid recent changes within the power generation regulatory environment and the resulting ''bubble'' of gas turbine orders has altered the timing and relative significance associated with the conclusions of the ADL study upon which the original DOE NGGT solicitation was based. (2) Assuming that the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity circa 2010, the top candidate system that meets or exceeds the DOE PRDA requirements was determined to be a hybrid aero-derivative/heavy duty concept. (3) An investment by DOE of approximately $23MM/year to develop NGGT technologies near/mid term for validation and migration into a reasonable fraction of the installed base of GE F-class products could be leveraged into $1.2B Public Benefit, with greatest benefits resulting from RAM improvements. In addition to the monetary Public Benefit, there is also significant benefit in terms of reduced energy consumption, and reduced power plant land usage.

  1. Experimental study of sediment transport along the central Mediterranean coast of Israel, by means of fluorescent sand tracers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, M.; Zviely, D.; Kit, E.; Shteinman, B.

    2004-12-01

    The method of labeled natural sand particles was used to study sediment transport along the central Mediterranean coast of Israel. Six portions of 300 kg each were tagged with various fluorescent colors and distributed at six different locations in the vicinity of the Herzliya Marina. The tagged sand was scattered at the end of autumn, and sampled three times during the winter. Sampling was interrupted in mid-January due to unexpected dredging at the marina canal entrance. The wave climate during that time was analyzed using wave data from Ashdod (40 km south). Wave directions measured in Ashdod were corrected, to make them applicable to the Herzliya coast, in accordance with the directional shift values suggested by Perlin and Kit (1999). Four wave storms with significant wave heights (Hs) of over 2.5 m were observed. Two of them clearly indicate a dominant direction from the southwest and two others from the northwest. However, the time durations and the relative angles between the wave directions and the orthogonal to the coast of the storms propagating from the southwest are essentially larger than those arriving from the northwest. The following results were noted: a) the drift of tagged sand particles correlated to longshore sediment transport (LST) at all depths was in a northern direction throughout the field experiment. The longest distance of transport was 5 km over a period of 62 days. b)"On-shore" sediment transport was presented, sand from 15 m depth was found at 8 m depth. c) The cross-shore sediment transport carried sand to a depth of 8 m, but no colored sand from shallow water (2-4 m) was found deeper than 8 m. d) although sedimentation at the marina entrance during the experiment was high, only small amounts of tagged sand were found at the entrance. e) findings of tagged sand showed the main area of sedimentation to be along the Marina's main breakwater.

  2. /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose as a tracer in the positron emission tomographic study of senile dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, T.; Ferris, S.H.; Wolf, A.P.; De Leon, M.J.; Christman, D.R.; Reisberg, B.; Alavi, A.; Fowler, J.S.; George, A.E.; Reivich, M.

    1982-03-01

    Using /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose as a tracer, the authors obtained positron emission tomographic scans of 11 patients with senile dementia and 6 age-matched controls. The rate of glucose metabolism was significantly lower in the patients with senile dementia and significantly correlated with the degree of cognitive impairment.

  3. Simple light gas guns for hypervelocity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Milora, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two-stage light guns are used extensively in hypervelocity research. The applications of this technology include impact studies and special materials development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed two-stage guns that accelerate small projectiles (4-mm nominal diameter) to velocities of up to {approx}5 km/s. These guns are relatively small and simple (thus, easy to operate), allowing a significant number of test shots to be carried out and data accumulated in a short time. Materials that have been used for projectiles include plastics, frozen isotopes of hydrogen, and lithium hydride. One gun has been used to demonstrate repetitive operation at a rate of 0.7 Hz; and, with a few design improvements, it appears capable of performing at firing frequencies of 1--2 Hz. A schematic of ORNL two-stage device is shown below. Unlike most such devices, no rupture disks are used. Instead, a fast valve (high-flow type) initiates the acceleration process in the first stage. Projectiles can be loaded into the gun breech via the slide mechanism; this action has been automated which allows repetitive firing. Alternatively, the device is equipped with pipe gun'' apparatus in which gas can be frozen in situ in the gun barrel to form the projectile. This equipment operates with high reliability and is well suited for small-scale testing at high velocity. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Using predictive uncertainty analysis to optimise tracer test design and data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Ilka; Moore, Catherine; Post, Vincent; Wolf, Leif; Martens, Evelien; Prommer, Henning

    2014-07-01

    Tracer injection tests are regularly-used tools to identify and characterise flow and transport mechanisms in aquifers. Examples of practical applications are manifold and include, among others, managed aquifer recharge schemes, aquifer thermal energy storage systems and, increasingly important, the disposal of produced water from oil and shale gas wells. The hydrogeological and geochemical data collected during the injection tests are often employed to assess the potential impacts of injection on receptors such as drinking water wells and regularly serve as a basis for the development of conceptual and numerical models that underpin the prediction of potential impacts. As all field tracer injection tests impose substantial logistical and financial efforts, it is crucial to develop a solid a-priori understanding of the value of the various monitoring data to select monitoring strategies which provide the greatest return on investment. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of linear predictive uncertainty analysis (i.e. “data worth analysis”) to quantify the usefulness of different tracer types (bromide, temperature, methane and chloride as examples) and head measurements in the context of a field-scale aquifer injection trial of coal seam gas (CSG) co-produced water. Data worth was evaluated in terms of tracer type, in terms of tracer test design (e.g., injection rate, duration of test and the applied measurement frequency) and monitoring disposition to increase the reliability of injection impact assessments. This was followed by an uncertainty targeted Pareto analysis, which allowed the interdependencies of cost and predictive reliability for alternative monitoring campaigns to be compared directly. For the evaluated injection test, the data worth analysis assessed bromide as superior to head data and all other tracers during early sampling times. However, with time, chloride became a more suitable tracer to constrain simulations of physical transport processes, followed by methane. Temperature data was assessed as the least informative of the solute tracers. However, taking costs of data acquisition into account, it could be shown that temperature data when used in conjunction with other tracers was a valuable and cost-effective marker species due to temperatures low cost to worth ratio. In contrast, the high costs of acquisition of methane data compared to its muted worth, highlighted methanes unfavourable return on investment. Areas of optimal monitoring bore position as well as optimal numbers of bores for the investigated injection site were also established. The proposed tracer test optimisation is done through the application of common use groundwater flow and transport models in conjunction with publicly available tools for predictive uncertainty analysis to provide modelers and practitioners with a powerful yet efficient and cost effective tool which is generally applicable and easily transferrable from the present study to many applications beyond the case study of injection of treated CSG produced water.

  5. Single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rust, Thomas C.; Hoffman, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET aims to image two or more tracers in a single scan, simultaneously characterizing multiple aspects of physiology and function without the need for repeat imaging visits. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, constraints on the kinetic behavior of each tracer are applied to recover individual-tracer measures from the multi-tracer PET signal. The ability to rapidly and reliably image both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) would provide complementary measures of tumor metabolism and proliferative activity, with important applications in guiding oncologic treatment decisions and assessing response. However, this tracer combination presents one of the most challenging dual-tracer signal-separation problems—both tracers have the same radioactive half-life, and the injection delay is short relative to the half-life and tracer kinetics. This work investigates techniques for single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor imaging, characterizing the performance of recovering static and dynamic imaging measures for each tracer from dual-tracer datasets. Simulation studies were performed to characterize dual-tracer signal-separation performance for imaging protocols with both injection orders and injection delays of 10-60 min. Better performance was observed when FLT was administered first, and longer delays before administration of FDG provided more robust signal-separation and recovery of the single-tracer imaging measures. An injection delay of 30 min led to good recovery (R > 0.96) of static image values (e.g. SUV), Knet, and K1 as compared to values from separate, single-tracer time-activity curves. Recovery of higher order rate parameters (k2, k3) was less robust, indicating that information regarding these parameters was harder to recover in the presence of statistical noise and dual-tracer effects. Performance of the dual-tracer FLT(0 min)+FDG(32 min) technique was further evaluated using PET/CT imaging studies in five patients with primary brain tumors where the data from separate scans of each tracer were combined to synthesize dual-tracer scans with known single-tracer components; results demonstrated similar dual-tracer signal recovery performance. We conclude that rapid dual-tracer FLT+FDG tumor imaging is feasible and can provide quantitative tumor imaging measures comparable to those from conventional separate-scan imaging.

  6. Tracer Detection by Laser Spectroscopy for Applications in the Oil and Gas R. Nava, Texas A&M University, H. Schuessler, M. Fahes and H. Nasrabadi, Texas A&M University at Qatar, and

    E-print Network

    Schuessler, Hans

    . Nava, Texas A&M University, H. Schuessler, M. Fahes and H. Nasrabadi, Texas A&M University at Qatar done in Qatar for application in Qatar's North Field. Introduction Tracer technology has very important

  7. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  8. Hydroxy fatty acids in remote marine aerosols as microbial tracers: Long term study on ?-hydroxy fatty acids from the remote marine Island, Chichi-Jima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the long-range atmospheric transport of microbial aerosols from Southeast Asia to the western North Pacific, marine aerosols were collected at a remote Island, Chichi-Jima on a biweekly basis during 1990-1993. These samples were investigated for the atmospheric abundances of hydroxy fatty acids (OH FAs). ?-OH FAs are the major structural components of endotoxins in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) whereas w-OH FAs are present in cell walls of higher plants. Thus, we tested the applicability of the ?-OH FAs (C10-C18) and ?-OH FAs (C16-C26) to assess the Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and contribution of terrestrial higher plants, respectively. The average concentrations of ?- and ?-OH FAs show pronounced seasonal variability with spring maximum (~301 ng/m-3 and ~ 272 ng/m-3, respectively). The concentrations of total OH FAs increased in winter/spring and decreased in summer/autumn, except for 1992-93. This seasonal trend can be interpreted by the atmospheric transport of microbial soil dust and higher plant metabolites from the Asian continent during winter/spring, when westerly winds dominate over the western North Pacific. The even carbon predominance of ?- and ?-OH FAs (80 and 74 % of total) in marine aerosols could be explained by their significant contribution from GNB and terrestrial higher plants. These results have implications towards assessing the bacterial transport in the continental outflows. This study also confirms that ?-OH FAs can be used as bacterial tracers in ambient aerosol samples.Keywords: ?- and ?-hydroxy fatty acids, terrestrial biomarkers, marine aerosols, GC-MS

  9. Titan's post-equinox circulation revealed using chemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Calcutt, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s atmosphere harbors a vast array of minor chemical compounds produced by its active photochemical cycle - including many hydrocarbon and nitrile species. These species have a wide range of lifetimes and can be used as chemical tracers of atmospheric motion on a variety of time scales (Teanby et al 2008). Therefore, by measuring how the abundances of these species vary during Cassini’s mission so far, it is possible to probe changes in Titan’s general circulation. Here we use eight years of Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) data to study how the atmospheric circulation behaves during the equinox and post-equinox periods. As northern winter progressed to northern spring, significant changes in the distribution of trace gases were observed. These include an increase in trace gas abundance at the north pole and northward migration of the vortex boundary. The implications of the observed changed will be discussed - including a possible interpretation of the recent changes as a weakening of the north polar vortex accompanied by a reduction in cross-vortex mixing. References: Teanby, N. A., et al. (2008) "Titan's winter polar vortex structure revealed by chemical tracers". JGR-Planets, Vol. 113, E12003. Figure showing the observed variations in temperature and composition from the mission so far.

  10. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and tracer gas concentrations while another measured the nitrous oxide concentration. We present the performance of these instruments at different waste treatment facilities (waste water treatment plants, composting facilities, sludge mineralization beds, anaerobic digesters and landfills) in Denmark, and discuss the strengths and limitations of the method of the method for quantifying methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the different sources. Furthermore, we have measured the methane emissions from 10 landfills with emission rates ranging from 5 to 135 kg/h depending on the age, state, content and aftercare of the landfill. In addition, we have studied 3 waste water treatment plants, and found nitrous oxide emission of 200 to 700 g/h from the aeration tanks and a total methane emission ranging from 2 to 15 kg/h, with the primary emission coming from the sludge treatment. References Galle, B., Samuelsson, J., Svensson, B.H., and Börjesson, G. (2001). Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using a time correlation tracer method based on FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Environmental Science & Technology 35 (1), 21-25 Scheutz, C., Samuelsson, J., Fredenslund, A. M., and Kjeldsen, P. (2011). Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique. Waste Management, 31(5), 1009-17 Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, R.B. Alley, T. Berntsen, N.L. Bindoff, Z. Chen, A. Chidthaisong, J.M. Gregory, G.C. Hegerl, M. Heimann, B. Hewitson, B.J. Hoskins, F. Joos, J. Jouzel, V. Kattsov, U. Lohmann, T.Matsuno, M. Molina, N. Nicholls, J.Overpeck, G. Raga, V. Ramaswamy, J. Ren, M. Rusticucci, R. Somerville, T.F. Stocker, P. Whetton, R.A.Wood and D. Wratt, 2007: Technical Summary. In: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

  11. Tracer Brownian Motion in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zanten, John; Amin, Samiul; Kloxin, Christopher

    2003-03-01

    The utility of tracer tracer Brownian motion in probing the structure and dynamics of complex fluids is gaining increasing recognition. This is primarily due to the significant advantages that so-called tracer microrheology provides over traditional mechanical rheometry such as gently probing a material's linear response over a wide frequency range and small sample volumes. The underlying basis of the technique relies on having a correct understanding of the connection between the Brownian or thermal motion of the probe particles and the viscoelastic response of the suspending media. Although this connection has been well established for simple viscous fluids it is still not well understood for viscoelastic media. This to primarily due to:(i) the presence of local heterogeneities in these complex systems, (ii) the possible perturbation of the local rheological properties brought about by the probe particles and (iii) the influence of longitudinal dynamical modes. Previous experimental investigations have primarily focused on aqueous biopolymer solutions where the above mentioned factors do not seem to play a significant role. Recent investigations indicate that the above-mentioned factors may significantly influence tracer Brownian motion. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the connection between the probe Brownian motion and the viscoelastic response of the suspending media, comprehensive studies of several polymer and surfactant solutions-semi-dilute PEO solutions, CTAB/KBr & CTAB/NaSal wormlike micelle solutions, Pluronic F108 micellar dispersions & FCC soft crystals-were undertaken. Tracer microrheology results are reported for both ensemble diffusing wave spectroscopy-based ensemble and one & two particle tracking measurements.

  12. Assessment of surface water resources availability using catchment modeling and the results of tracer studies in the meso-scale Migina Catchment, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Mukubwa, A.; Maskey, S.; Wenninger, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the last couple of years, different hydrological research projects were undertaken in the Migina catchment (243.2 km2), a tributary of the Kagera river in Southern Rwanda. These projects were aimed to understand hydrological processes of the catchment using analytical and experimental approaches and to build a pilot case whose experience can be extended to other catchments in Rwanda. In the present study, we developed a hydrological model of the catchment, which can be used to inform water resources planning and decision making. The semi-distributed hydrological model HEC-HMS (version 3.5) was used with its soil moisture accounting, unit hydrograph, liner reservoir (for base flow) and Muskingum-Cunge (river routing) methods. We used rainfall data from 12 stations and streamflow data from 5 stations, which were collected as part of this study over a period of two years (May 2009 and June 2011). The catchment was divided into five sub-catchments each represented by one of the five observed streamflow gauges. The model parameters were calibrated separately for each sub-catchment using the observed streamflow data. Calibration results obtained were found acceptable at four stations with a Nash-Sutcliffe Model Efficiency of 0.65 on daily runoff at the catchment outlet. Due to the lack of sufficient and reliable data for longer periods, a model validation (split sample test) was not undertaken. However, we used results from tracer based hydrograph separation from a previous study to compare our model results in terms of the runoff components. It was shown that the model performed well in simulating the total flow volume, peak flow and timing as well as the portion of direct runoff and base flow. We observed considerable disparities in the parameters (e.g. groundwater storage) and runoff components across the five sub-catchments, that provided insights into the different hydrological processes at sub-catchment scale. We conclude that such disparities justify the need to consider catchment subdivisions, if such parameters and components of the water cycle are to form the base for decision making in water resources planning in the Migina catchment.

  13. Analysis of the Summer 2004 ozone budget over the United States using Intercontinental Transport Experiment Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS) observations and Model of Ozone and Related Tracers (MOZART-4) simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, G. G.; Emmons, L. K.; Hess, P. G.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Thompson, A. M.; Yorks, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    The origin of ozone over the summertime contiguous United States during summer 2004 was examined using the Intercontinental Transport Experiment (INTEX-A) Ozonesonde Network Study (IONS-04) over North America. We estimate the budget using the global chemistry transport Model of Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) with synthetic tracers that keep track of the ozone produced from selected NOx sources (stratosphere, lightning, anthropogenic, and biomass burning sources in Eurasia and the contiguous United States, and North American boreal fires). This "model budget" is analyzed in conjunction with results from a "laminar identification method" (LID), a more empirical approach to extracting information about contributions from ozone transported down from the stratosphere, advection, and convection. Both methods give comparable results for the contribution from stratospheric ozone, an average over all sites of 20 ± 7% for the LID budget and of 26 ± 6% for the model budget (the standard deviation gives the variability over the IONS sites). These results point toward the important contribution of downward transport of ozone from the stratosphere in assessing tropospheric ozone. The contributions for the other tracers are 25 ± 9% for U.S. sources, 13 ± 5% for Eurasian sources, 3 ± 2% for boreal fires and 10 ± 2% from lightning. In the boundary layer the dominant contribution generally comes from local (U.S.) sources. Eurasian sources can add up to 8% on average for some sites, lightning up to 4%, and North American boreal fires up to 10%. Variations in the tracer contributions across the different sites can be large, but the budget estimated by the model for the entire United States is similar to the budget averaged over the IONS-04 sites which lets us conclude that the sample of locations and launch days conveys a proper representation of the large-scale picture.

  14. Gas release and conductivity modification studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of gas clouds produced by releases from orbital velocity in either a point release or venting mode is described by the modification of snowplow equations valid in an intermediate altitude regime. Quantitative estimates are produced for the time dependence of the radius of the cloud, the average internal energy, the translational velocity, and the distance traveled. The dependence of these quantities on the assumed density profile, the internal energy of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats is examined. The new feature is the inclusion of the effect of the large orbital velocity. The resulting gas cloud models are used to calculate the characteristics of the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity enhancements that would be produced by the release of barium thermite at orbital velocity in either the point release or venting modes as a function of release altitude and chemical payload weight.

  15. The use of radon as tracer in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quindos Poncela, Luis; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael; Gutierrez Villanueva, Jose; Gonzalez Diez, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Radon can be used as a naturally occurring tracer for environmental processes. By means of grab-sampling or continuous monitoring of radon concentration, it is possible to assess several types of dynamic phenomena in air and water. We present a review of the use of radon and its progeny at the University of Cantabria. Radon can be an atmospheric dynamics indicator related with air mass interchange near land-sea discontinuities as well as for the study of vertical variations of air parameters (average values of different types of stability: 131-580 Bq m-3). Concerning indoor gas, we present some results obtained at Altamira Cave (Spain): from 222 to 6549 Bq m-3 (Hall) and from 999 to 6697 Bq m-3 (Paintings Room). Finally, variations of radon concentration in soil (0.3 to 9.1 kBq m-3) and underground water (values up to 500 Bq l-1) provide relevant information about different geophysical phenomena.

  16. Some design considerations for the proposed Dixie Valley tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1988-06-01

    A tracer test for the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal resource is planned for the summer of 1988, in order to study the fluid flow paths that will develop under typical operating conditions. During the test six production wells will provide the power plant with steam sufficient for generation of 60 MWe, requiring fluid production at a rate of approximately 600 kg/sec. Up to 75% by mass of the extracted fluid will be reinjected into the reservoir, using four injection wells. Tracer will be added to the injected fluid for a twenty-minute period, and subsequently the produced fluid will be monitored for the tracer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than pure (NH4)2SO4 particles. The chemical mechanism for these surface reactions remains to be elucidated. Observed growth rates extrapolated to ambient SO2 and H2O2 concentrations are 10 to 100 times smaller than those observed by McMurry and Wilson (1983) for ambient aerosols.

  18. Experimental Studies of Gas-Aerosol Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-02-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO_2 by H_2O_2 is believed to be the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective of this thesis is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO_2 by H_2O_2 in the atmosphere. In this thesis growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO_2 and H_2 O_2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charger capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 ?m was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH_4)_2SO _4 particles with SO_2 and H_2O_2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets >=0.3 mum, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets <=0.2 mum, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH_3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles exposed to SO_2, H_2O _2, NH_3 and H_2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe^{2+} , Fe^{3+}, Mn ^{2+}, Cu^{2+ }) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than pure (NH_4)_2SO _4 particles. The chemical mechanism for these surface reactions remains to be elucidated. Observed growth rates extrapolated to ambient SO_2 and H_2O _2 concentrations are 10 to 100 times smaller than those observed by McMurry and Wilson (1983) for ambient aerosols. Thus some other transformation process must be responsible for observed atmospheric rates.

  19. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  20. Redesigning TRACER trial after TRITON.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L

    2015-10-15

    Designing of smart clinical trials is critical for regulatory approval and future drug utilization. Importantly, trial design should be reconsidered if the interim analyses suggest unexpected harm, or conflicting results were yielded from the other trials within the same therapeutic area. With regard to antiplatelet agents, the perfect example is redesigning of the ongoing PRoFESS trial by eliminating aspirin from clopidogrel arm after the earlier MATCH trial results became available. The goal was to aseess the unchanged TRACER trial design in light of the evidence yielded from the earlier completed TRITON trial. TRACER was designed as a triple versus dual antiplatelet trial in NSTEMI patients with no previous long-term outcome data supporting such aggressive strategy. TRITON data represented dual versus dual antiplatelet therapy, and became available before TRACER enrollment starts revealing prasugrel front-loaded early vascular benefit predominantly in STEMI patients with the growing over time bleeding and cancer risks. Moreover, large prasugrel NSTEMI TRITON cohort exhibited trend towards excess mortality in experimental arm warning against aggressive TRACER design. The long-term TRITON results in general, and especially in the NSTEMI patients challenge unchanged TRACER trial design. Applying dual, rather than triple antiplatelet therapy protocol modification should be considered in TRACER to minimize bleeding, cancer, and non-cardiovascular death risks. PMID:26126053

  1. N-loss isotope effects in the Peru oxygen minimum zone studied using a mesoscale eddy as a natural tracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonnais, Annie; Altabet, Mark A.; Charoenpong, Chawalit N.; Larkum, Jennifer; Hu, Haibei; Bange, Hermann W.; Stramma, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Mesoscale eddies in Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) have been identified as important fixed nitrogen (N) loss hotspots that may significantly impact both the global rate of N-loss as well as the ocean's N isotope budget. They also represent "natural tracer experiments" with intensified biogeochemical signals that can be exploited to understand the large-scale processes that control N-loss and associated isotope effects (?; the ‰ deviation from 1 in the ratio of reaction rate constants for the light versus heavy isotopologues). We observed large ranges in the concentrations and N and O isotopic compositions of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and biogenic N2 associated with an anticyclonic mode-water eddy in the Peru OMZ during two cruises in November and December 2012. In the eddy's center where NO3- was nearly exhausted, we measured the highest ?15N values for both NO3- and NO2- (up to ~70‰ and 50‰) ever reported for an OMZ. Correspondingly, N deficit and biogenic N2-N concentrations were also the highest near the eddy's center (up to ~40 µmol L-1). ?15N-N2 also varied with biogenic N2 production, following kinetic isotopic fractionation during NO2- reduction to N2 and, for the first time, provided an independent assessment of N isotope fractionation during OMZ N-loss. We found apparent variable ? for NO3- reduction (up to ~30‰ in the presence of NO2-). However, the overall ? for N-loss was calculated to be only ~13-14‰ (as compared to canonical values of ~20-30‰) assuming a closed system and only slightly higher assuming an open system (16-19‰). Our results were similar whether calculated from the disappearance of DIN (NO3- + NO2-) or from the appearance of N2 and changes in isotopic composition. Further, we calculated the separate ? values for NO3- reduction to NO2- and NO2- reduction to N2 of ~16-21‰ and ~12‰, respectively, when the effect of NO2- oxidation could be removed. These results, together with the relationship between N and O of NO3- isotopes and the difference in ?15N between NO3- and NO2-, confirm a role for NO2- oxidation in increasing the apparent ? associated with NO3- reduction. The lower ? for N-loss calculated in this study could help reconcile the current imbalance in the global N budget if representative of global OMZ N-loss.

  2. Non-universal tracer diffusion in crowded media of non-inert obstacles

    E-print Network

    Surya K. Ghosh; Andrey G. Cherstvy; Ralf Metzler

    2014-12-23

    We study the diffusion of a tracer particle, which moves in continuum space between a lattice of excluded volume, immobile non-inert obstacles. In particular, we analyse how the strength of the tracer-obstacle interactions and the volume occupancy of the crowders alter the diffusive motion of the tracer. From the details of the partitioning of the tracer diffusion modes between trapping states when bound to obstacles and bulk diffusion, we examine the degree of localisation of the tracer in the lattice of crowders. We study the properties of the tracer diffusion in terms of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements, the trapping time distributions, the amplitude variation of the time averaged mean squared displacements, and the non-Gaussianity parameter of the diffusing tracer. We conclude that tracer-obstacle adsorption and binding triggers a transient anomalous diffusion. From a very narrow spread of recorded individual time averaged trajectories we exclude continuous type random walk processes as the underlying physical model of the tracer diffusion in our system. For moderate tracer-crowder attraction the motion is found to be fully ergodic, while at stronger attraction strength a transient disparity between ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements occurs. We also put our results into perspective with findings from experimental single-particle tracking and simulations of the diffusion of tagged tracers in dense crowded suspensions. Our results have implications for the diffusion, transport, and spreading of chemical components in highly crowded environments inside living cells and other structured liquids.

  3. Non-universal tracer diffusion in crowded media of non-inert obstacles.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surya K; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-21

    We study the diffusion of a tracer particle, which moves in continuum space between a lattice of excluded volume, immobile non-inert obstacles. In particular, we analyse how the strength of the tracer-obstacle interactions and the volume occupancy of the crowders alter the diffusive motion of the tracer. From the details of partitioning of the tracer diffusion modes between trapping states when bound to obstacles and bulk diffusion, we examine the degree of localisation of the tracer in the lattice of crowders. We study the properties of the tracer diffusion in terms of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements, the trapping time distributions, the amplitude variation of the time averaged mean squared displacements, and the non-Gaussianity parameter of the diffusing tracer. We conclude that tracer-obstacle adsorption and binding triggers a transient anomalous diffusion. From a very narrow spread of recorded individual time averaged trajectories we exclude continuous type random walk processes as the underlying physical model of the tracer diffusion in our system. For moderate tracer-crowder attraction the motion is found to be fully ergodic, while at stronger attraction strength a transient disparity between ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements occurs. We also put our results into perspective with findings from experimental single-particle tracking and simulations of the diffusion of tagged tracers in dense crowded suspensions. Our results have implications for the diffusion, transport, and spreading of chemical components in highly crowded environments inside living cells and other structured liquids. PMID:25474476

  4. Simple Spreadsheet Models For Interpretation Of Fractured Media Tracer Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted through fractured media is discussed within this paper. The analysis employed matching eight simple mathematical models to the experimental data to determine transport parameters. All of the models tested; two porous...

  5. Parametric Study of Gas Turbine Film-Cooling 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Kevin

    2012-10-19

    In this study, the film-cooling effectiveness in different regions of gas turbine blades was investigated with various film hole/slot configurations and mainstream flow conditions. The study consisted of three parts: 1) turbine blade span film...

  6. Trans-Caspian gas pipeline feasibility study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This study, conducted by Enron Engineering and Construction Company, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study provides detailed information concerning natural gas demand in Turkey and Southern Europe. The purpose of the study is to estimate the rate at which new gas can be absorbed in the Turkish market and be re-exported to the markets in Europe, as well as to forecast Turkish natural gas demand for the period up to 2020. The study also evaluates gas demand and pricing for the market in the 2002--2005 time frame. This is Volume 1 of a 3-volume report, and is divided into the following sections: (1) Task A: Gas Sales; (2) Task B: Initial Economic Screening; (3) Task D: Project Cost Analysis.

  7. The use of activable tracers in the evaluation of the performance of wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Craft, T F; Eichholz, G G

    1975-01-01

    The use of stable, activable tracers has been studied in applications to establish the performance of waste treatment plants and detect causes of irregular or improper functioning of individual plant processes. Various soluble tracers were evaluated, among them indium, scandium, and bromine. The inert tracers were compared with dye tracers and were found to be superior in turbid liquids and to give more quantitative information. On the other hand dye tracers are more convenient for rapid visible indication of their arrival whereas activable tracers require collection and removal to a neutron source, such as a reactor, for indication. Activable tracers are relatively simple to apply and the cost per test is reasonable. PMID:1193022

  8. Evaluating 10B-enriched Boric Acid, Bromide, and Heat as Tracers of Recycled Groundwater Flow near MAR Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T.; Clark, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled with the unpredictability of a changing climate, the projected growth in human population over the next century requires new and innovative ways to augment already-depleted water supplies. An increasingly popular and promising development is managed aquifer recharge (MAR), a cost-effective method of intentionally storing potable water in groundwater aquifers at engineered sites worldwide. Reclaimed (or recycled) water, defined as cleaned and treated wastewater, will account for a larger portion of MAR water in future years. A crucial component for managing groundwater recharged with reclaimed water is its subsurface travel time. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH), with the most recent draft of regulations issued on November 21, 2011, requires the application of groundwater tracers to demonstrate subsurface residence time. Residence time increases the quality of reclaimed water via soil-aquifer treatment (SAT), which includes mechanisms such as sorption, biological degradation, and microbial inactivation to remove potential contaminants or pathogens. This study addresses the need for an appropriate tracer to determine groundwater residence times near MAR facilities. Standard shallow groundwater dating techniques, such as T/3He and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) methods, cannot be used because their uncertainties are typically ± 2 years, longer than the target CDPH retention time of ~6 months. These methods also cannot map preferential flow paths. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), a nonreactive synthetic gas, is well-established as a deliberate tracer for determining subsurface travel time; however, SF6 is a very strong greenhouse gas and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is regulating its emission. Other tracers, such as noble gas isotopes, that have successfully determined subsurface retention times are impractical due to their high cost. A multi-tracer experiment at the San Gabriel Spreading Grounds test basin (Montebello Forebay, Los Angeles County, CA, USA) has been in progress since September 6, 2011, following injection of boric acid enriched in boron-10 (10B) and bromide (Br-) tracers. Tracer concentrations are collected at 9 monitoring wells that have pre-experiment estimated travel times between 0.5 to 180 days. Results indicate that 10B-enriched boric acid is an effective deliberate tracer at MAR sites; however, the ion's movement is slightly retarded relative to bromide by the substrate. 10B/Br- travel time ratios range from 1 to 1.4. In addition to the two deliberate geochemical tracers, heat is being evaluated as a possible intrinsic tracer at MAR sites. At the time of the experiment (late summer), reclaimed water was significantly warmer (~20°F) than the native groundwater as it entered the system. Time series are developed from loggers outfitted at each monitoring well, with measurements recorded hourly accurate to one thousandth of a degree. Results are similar to 10B & Br- travel times and validate the potential of heat as an intrinsic tracer.

  9. Quantifying Methane Fluxes Simply and Accurately: The Tracer Dilution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Christopher; Crosson, Eric; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary; Dayton, Dave; Lafleur, Rick; Merrill, Ray; Tan, Sze; Thoma, Eben

    2010-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric constituent with a wide variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic, including wetlands and other water bodies, permafrost, farms, landfills, and areas with significant petrochemical exploration, drilling, transport, or processing, or refining occurs. Despite its importance to the carbon cycle, its significant impact as a greenhouse gas, and its ubiquity in modern life as a source of energy, its sources and sinks in marine and terrestrial ecosystems are only poorly understood. This is largely because high quality, quantitative measurements of methane fluxes in these different environments have not been available, due both to the lack of robust field-deployable instrumentation as well as to the fact that most significant sources of methane extend over large areas (from 10's to 1,000,000's of square meters) and are heterogeneous emitters - i.e., the methane is not emitted evenly over the area in question. Quantifying the total methane emissions from such sources becomes a tremendous challenge, compounded by the fact that atmospheric transport from emission point to detection point can be highly variable. In this presentation we describe a robust, accurate, and easy-to-deploy technique called the tracer dilution method, in which a known gas (such as acetylene, nitrous oxide, or sulfur hexafluoride) is released in the same vicinity of the methane emissions. Measurements of methane and the tracer gas are then made downwind of the release point, in the so-called far-field, where the area of methane emissions cannot be distinguished from a point source (i.e., the two gas plumes are well-mixed). In this regime, the methane emissions are given by the ratio of the two measured concentrations, multiplied by the known tracer emission rate. The challenges associated with atmospheric variability and heterogeneous methane emissions are handled automatically by the transport and dispersion of the tracer. We present detailed methane flux results from four different landfills in the United States, using a commercially available Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) dual-species (methane - acetylene) analyzer. This instrument, because of its high precision, mobility, and ease-of-use, enables quantification of the methane flux from a variety of extended area sources. The instrument was operated off of batteries and was mounted in a four-wheel drive vehicle. A high-precision GPS and two-dimensional self-aligning anemometer were integrated directly with the instrument. Concentration data on methane and acetylene were collected every second, and, together with the wind and GPS data, were processed to provide quantitative measurements of total methane fluxes, on a time scale of just minutes. The landfills studied varied widely in their size, location, topography, and physical access. Data were collected using three variants of the method: the Mobile Transect Method, in which the dual-species analyzer is transported rapidly through the plumes in the far-field; the Stationary Plume Method, in which the analyzer is situated in a fixed location downwind of the release point; and a new method called the Mid-Field Stationary Method, in which the instrument is located at a fixed location at a closer distance than the true far-field, where the plume overlap is not ideal. The resulting methane fluxes varied over a wide range of values, from just a few kg methane / minute, to over 20 kg methane / minute. Finally, we describe how these methods can be used to quantify methane emissions from other natural and anthropogenic extended-area sources, such as wetlands.

  10. Tracer-encapsulated solid pellet injection system.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Shigeru; Tamura, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    The method of tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) is now flourishing in various fields. The original purpose to study impurity transport without giving substantial perturbation on the plasma is implemented successfully for years. In addition to this, TESPEL is being intensively applied to study thermal (especially non-local) transport, high energy particles with the use of TESPEL ablation cloud, and spectroscopy from the viewpoint of atomic data. It is now further growing up to the utilization of multiple tracer methods which was not planned at the initial phase of the project. The proof-of-principle experiment using triple tracers has been successfully implemented. This opens a way to compare the Z dependence or mass dependence of impurity transport. In this article, as TESPEL is used in a variety of fields, the TESPEL injection system is summarized together with the method of TESPEL production, TESPEL storage disk, TESPEL guide system, and the differential pumping system. Also, the observation system for TESPEL flight and TESPEL ablation is explained. PMID:22380087

  11. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Characterizing building ventilation with the pollutant concentration index: Results from field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Sullivan, D.P.; Thomas, J.M. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    A new method for characterizing ventilation in commercial buildings using the Pollutant Concentration Index (PCI) was evaluated via field studies in four buildings. The PCI parameter quantifies the effectiveness of ventilation in controlling air pollutant exposures for pollutants released continuously and spatially uniformly within the building. For the measurements, passive tracer gas sources spaced uniformly per unit floor area, simulated an indoor pollutant. The sources continuously released the tracer gas at a known rate. During the occupied periods of several days, air samples from seated breathing-level locations were collected in gas storage bags. The PCI values were based on the tracer gas concentrations in the sample storage bags and on the indoor tracer gas emission rate. The technique was successfully implemented in buildings ranging in floor area from 129 m{sup 2} to 4475 m{sup 2}. Results of these studies indicated that the spacing of tracer gas sources, between 8 and 73 m{sup 2}/source, had little effect upon measured values of the PCI. The agreement between PCI values measured simultaneously with two different tracers was usually within 15%. The precision of PCI measurements made with a single tracer gas was approximately 5%. Measured PCI values were referenced to predicted values for buildings that meet minimum ventilation standards. PCI values also indicated the spatial and temporal variability of the effectiveness of ventilation in controlling pollutant exposures.

  13. Chemical Tracers as an Indicator of Transport in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F. L.; Hurst, D. F.; Elkins, J. W.; Nance, J. D.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Previous airborne studies have proven the scientific value of chemical tracers in examining transport of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS). ESRL scientists operated two airborne gas chromatographs on the NCAR G-V during the NSF sponsored Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport START-08 campaign over the midlatitudes of central North America. The Unmanned aircraft systems Chromatograph for Atmospheric Trace Species (UCATS) is comprised of a two-channel electron capture detection-gas chromatograph (ECD-GC), an ozone absorption photometer, and a water vapor tunable diode laser spectrometer. It measures N2O and SF6 every 70 seconds on one EC-GC channel, and H2, CO, and CH4 every 140 seconds on the second channel. PAN and Trace Hydrohalocarbon ExpeRiment (PANTHER) is a six-channel gas chromatograph with four ECD-GC channels and two mass selective detector-gas chromatograph (MSD-GC) channels that double the sampling rate to 180 seconds by using two traps and columns. The ECD-GC channels measure N2O, SF6, CFC-11, CFC-12, halon-1211, and PAN once every 70 seconds, H2, CH4, and CO once every 140 seconds. The two MSD-GC channels measure methyl halides (CH3I, CH3Cl, CH3I), HCFCs (22, 141b, 142b), HFC-134a, sulfur gases (COS and CS2) once every 180 seconds. These data represent a diversity of atmospheric lifetimes and are useful in examining transport in UT/LS. One example is the tracer-tracer correlation plot of N2O versus SF6, which shows three distinction regions of transport, LS, tropospause transition, and UT. Tropospheric gradients for both gases are apparent in the UT region. Other correlations will be shown in this presentation. A comparison of common species measured between UCATS and PANTHER shows a better than one percent agreement between the two instruments.

  14. Test plan for determining breathing rates in single shell tanksusing tracer gases. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-06-20

    This test plan specifies the requirements and conditions for the injection of tracer gas (Helium (He)) into single shell tanks to determine breathing rates using periodic sampling. The eight tanks which have been selected at the time this Test Plan was developed are A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, U-103 (U-103 is counted twice, once during the winter months and once during the summer), and U-105. Other tanks to be sampled will be assigned by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at a later date in the study process as resources allow, the document shall be revised as required. The sampling of headspace for each of these tanks shall be performed using available risers or the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) cabinet as available. The tank farm vapor cognizant engineer shall assign the injection and sample testing point for each tank and document the point in the field work package. SUMMA TMI canisters, equipped in-line with dual particulate air filters and two silica gel sorbent traps will be used to collect the gas samples. The purpose of dual particulate air filters is to ensure no radioactive particulates are transferred to the SUMMA TMI canisters. The silica gel sorbent traps will effectively eliminate any tritiated water vapor that may be present in the sample gas stream. PNNL shall supply the tracer gases injection system and shall perform the analysis on the headspace samples. TWRS Characterization project shall inject the tracer gas and perform the sampling. Refer to Engineering Task Plan HNF-SD-TWR-ETP-002 for a detailed description of the responsibilities for this task.

  15. Off-gassing induced tracer release from molten basalt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Callow, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification (ISV) field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1990 to assess ISV suitability for long-term stabilization of buried waste that contains transuranic and other radionuclide contaminants. The ISV process uses electrical resistance heating to melt buried waste and soil in place, which upon cooldown and resolidification fixes the waste into a vitrified (glass-like) form. In these two ISV field tests, small quantities of rare-earth oxides (tracers DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) were placed in the test pits to simulate the presence of plutonium oxides and assess plutonium retention/release behavior. The analysis presented in this report indicates that dissolution of tracer oxides into basaltic melts can be expected with subsequent tracer molecular or microparticle carry-off by escaping gas bubbles, which is similar to adsorptive bubble separation and ion flotation processes employed in the chemical industry to separate dilute heavy species from liquids under gas sparging conditions. Gaseous bubble escape from the melt surface and associated aerosolization is believed to be responsible for small quantities of tracer ejection from the melt surface to the cover hood and off-gas collection system. Methods of controlling off-gassing during ISV would be expected to improve the overall retention of such heavy oxide contaminants during melting/vitrification of buried waste.

  16. Dyes as tracers for vadose zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, Markus; Wai, Nu Nu

    2003-03-01

    Dyes are important tracers to investigate subsurface water movement. For more than a century, dye tracers have provided clues about the hydrological cycle as well as flow and transport processes in the subsurface. Groundwater contamination often originates in the vadose zone. Agrochemicals applied to the soil surface, toxic compounds accidentally spilled by human activities, and contaminants released from waste repositories leach through the vadose zone and can ultimately pollute groundwater resources. Dyes are an important tool to assess flow pathways of such contaminants. This review compiles information on dyes used as hydrological tracers, with particular emphasis on vadose zone hydrology. We summarize briefly different human-applied tracers, including nondye tracers. We then provide a historical sketch of the use of dyes as tracers and describe newer developments in visualization and quantification of tracer experiments. Relevant chemical properties of dyes used as tracers are discussed and illustrated with dye intermediates and selected dye tracers. The types of dyes used as tracers in subsurface hydrology are summarized, and recommendations are made regarding the use of dye tracers. The review concludes with a toxicological assessment of dyes used as hydrological tracers. Many different dyes have been proposed as tracers for water movement in the subsurface. All of these compounds, however, are to some degree retarded by the subsurface medium. Nevertheless, dyes are useful tracers to visualize flow pathways.

  17. Integrating Source Apportionment Tracers into a Bottom-up Inventory of Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Hydraulic Fracturing Region.

    PubMed

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Marrero, Josette E; Lyon, David R; Simpson, Isobel J; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    A growing dependence on natural gas for energy may exacerbate emissions of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). Identifying fingerprints of these emissions is critical to our understanding of potential impacts. Here, we compare stable isotopic and alkane ratio tracers of natural gas, agricultural, and urban CH4 sources in the Barnett Shale hydraulic fracturing region near Fort Worth, Texas. Thermogenic and biogenic sources were compositionally distinct, and emissions from oil wells were enriched in alkanes and isotopically depleted relative to natural gas wells. Emissions from natural gas production varied in ?(13)C and alkane ratio composition, with ?D-CH4 representing the most consistent tracer of natural gas sources. We integrated our data into a bottom-up inventory of CH4 for the region, resulting in an inventory of ethane (C2H6) sources for comparison to top-down estimates of CH4 and C2H6 emissions. Methane emissions in the Barnett are a complex mixture of urban, agricultural, and fossil fuel sources, which makes source apportionment challenging. For example, spatial heterogeneity in gas composition and high C2H6/CH4 ratios in emissions from conventional oil production add uncertainty to top-down models of source apportionment. Future top-down studies may benefit from the addition of ?D-CH4 to distinguish thermogenic and biogenic sources. PMID:26148556

  18. The use of synthetic colloids in tracer transport experiments in saturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-08-01

    Studies of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in saturated, fractured geologic media are of great interest to researchers studying the potential long-term storage of hazardous wastes in or near such media. A popular technique for conducting such studies is to introduce tracers having different chemical and physical properties into a system and then observe the tracers at one or more downstream locations, inferring flow and transport mechanisms from the breakthrough characteristics of the different tracers. Many tracer studies have been conducted in saturated, fractured media to help develop and/or refine models capable of predicting contaminant transport over large scales in such media.

  19. Hydrogeological processes in a fluviokarstic area inferred from the analysis of natural hydrogeochemical tracers. The case study of eastern Serranía de Ronda (S Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberá, J. A.; Andreo, B.

    2015-04-01

    In riverine karst areas, surface water interacts with the groundwater flowing through carbonate aquifers. Understanding the interference of water fluxes in this type of environments is essential to effectively manage the groundwater resources, particularly in areas where karst aquifers comprise the main source of drinking water. In this research, the interaction between surface water and groundwater in the Turón river valley (eastern Serranía de Ronda, S Spain) and the functioning of Sierra Blanquilla karst aquifer have been characterised by means of hydrodynamic monitoring and the combined use of physical-chemical parameters and natural hydrogeochemical tracers. The results show connected/gaining streams in the river stretches close to the permanent springs, while in the surroundings of the overflow springs the river reaches behave as gaining (high flow) and as perched/losing (low flow). Soil natural tracers permit tracing runoff arising from the upper part of the hydrological watershed via river, which interacts with the groundwater drained in the main discharge area of the aquifer. Furthermore, the analysis of hydrogeochemical data and chemographs demonstrate that Sierra Blanquilla aquifer behaves as a typical conduit flow system in which the unsaturated zone predominantly participates during high flow periods, while the saturated zone is more active in low flow, when the groundwater inputs maintain the Turón river discharge. The more detailed understanding of how the hydrogeochemical characteristics of groundwater vary over time and space has direct consequences on karst spring protection and in the environmental preservation of groundwater-ecodependent systems.

  20. Development of Standardized Mobile Tracer Correlation Approach for Large Area Emission Measurements (DRAFT UNDER EPA REVIEW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-wittig, T. A.; Thoma, E.; Green, R.; Hater, G.; Swan, N.; Chanton, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heterogeneity, make direct (on-site) emission assessment difficult; methane emissions, from landfills for example, can be particularly complex [Thoma et al, 2009]. Recently, whole-facility (remote) measurement approaches based on tracer correlation have been utilized [Scheutz et al, 2011]. The approach uses a mobile platform to simultaneously measure a metered-release of a conservative gas (the tracer) along with the target compound (methane in the case of landfills). The known-rate tracer release provides a measure of atmospheric dispersion at the downwind observing location allowing the area source emission to be determined by a ratio calculation [Green et al, 2010]. Although powerful in concept, the approach has been somewhat limited to research applications due to the complexities and cost of the high-sensitivity measurement equipment required to quantify the part-per billion levels of tracer and target gas at kilometer-scale distances. The advent of compact, robust, and easy to use near-infrared optical measurement systems (such as cavity ring down spectroscopy) allow the tracer correlation approach to be investigated for wider use. Over the last several years, Waste Management Inc., the U.S. EPA, and collaborators have conducted method evaluation activities to determine the viability of a standardized approach through execution of a large number of field measurement trials at U.S. landfills. As opposed to previous studies [Scheutz et al, 2011] conducted at night (optimal plume transport conditions), the current work evaluated realistic use-scenarios; these scenarios include execution by non-scientist personnel, daylight operation, and full range of atmospheric condition (all plume transport conditions). The trials tested a novel tracer gas (acetylene), chosen for its performance and cost characteristics. This presentation will summarize method development activities for the field test trials (107 test days, with repeat measurements at 14 separate landfill sites). In addition to a brief description of the measurement technology, the method performance will be described, and primary data quality indicators and use conditions will be explored. Because measurements were taken under daylight and a variety of atmospheric conditions, the range of distance and wind conditions allows us to make conclusions about the strengths and limitations of the method. This enables us to show when and where it is possible to make a quality measurement using this technique and therefore develop a standardized method for large area emission measurements. Green, R. et al (2010). 'Methane Emission Measured at Two California Landfills by OTM-10 and an Acetylene Tracer Method.' Global Waste Management Symposium. San Antonio, Texas. Scheutz, C. et al. (2011). 'Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique." Waste Management 31(5): 1009-1017. Thoma, E., et al (2009). 'Development of EPA OTM 10 for landfill applications." Journal of Environmental Engineering 136(8): 769-776.

  1. An Experimental Study of a Granular Gas Fluidized by Vibrations

    E-print Network

    Falcon, Eric

    An Experimental Study of a Granular Gas Fluidized by Vibrations #19; Eric Falcon 1 , St#19;ephan with a vertically vibrated piston. We did observe clustering, but we could not rule #12; 2 #19; Eric Falcon et al

  2. Trans-Caspian gas pipeline feasibility study. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This study, conducted by Enron Engineering and Construction Company, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study provides detailed information concerning natural gas demand in Turkey and Southern Europe. The purpose of the study is to estimate the rate at which new gas can be absorbed in the Turkish market and be re-exported to the markets in Europe, as well as to forecast Turkish natural gas demand for the period up to 2020. The study also evaluates gas demand and pricing for the market in the 2002--2005 time frame. This is Volume 2 of a 3-volume report, and it is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Policy, Legal and Administrative Framework; (3) Assessment of Alternatives; (4) Baseline Conditions in the Project Area; (5) Potential (Unmitigated) Environment, Health and Safety Impacts; (6) Proposed Environmental Prevention and Mitigation; (7) Projected Net Environmental Impacts; (8) Bibliography.

  3. Trans-Caspian gas pipeline feasibility study. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This study, conducted by Enron Engineering and Construction Company, was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study provides detailed information concerning natural gas demand in Turkey and Southern Europe. The purpose of the study is to estimate the rate at which new gas can be absorbed in the Turkish market and be re-exported to the markets in Europe, as well as to forecast Turkish natural gas demand for the period up to 2020. The study also evaluates gas demand and pricing for the market in the 2002--2005 time frame. This is Volume 3 of a 3-volume report, and it is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Task C: Technical Feasibility and Preliminary Design; (3) Task F: Project Implementation Strategy.

  4. B-10 enriched boric acid, bromide, and heat as tracers of recycled groundwater flow near managed aquifer recharge operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.; Becker, T.; Johnson, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Recycling wastewater for potable and nonpotable use by artificially recharging aquifers is a decades-old but increasingly popular practice. Natural attenuation processes in the subsurface, known as soil aquifer treatment (SAT), purify recycled water during recharge and subsequent groundwater flow. Travel time criteria are often used to regulate managed aquifer recharge (MAR) operations. California state draft regulations currently gives preference to groundwater tracers to quantify underground residence time, with a target retention time of >6 months from infiltration to drinking water extraction for surface spreading projects using tertiary treated wastewater (less time may be possible if full advanced treated water is utilized). In the past sulfur hexafluoride, a very strong greenhouse gas, has been the principle deliberate tracer for this work. However, its emission has recently become regulated in California and new tracers are needed. Here, two prospective tracers are evaluated: boron-10 (B-10), the least abundant boron isotope, and heat (with recharging water naturally warmed at the sewage treatment plants and in surface-spreading basins). An additional deliberate tracer, bromide (Br), which is a well-studied conservative tracer, was released as a control. Tracer injection occurred at the San Gabriel Spreading Grounds research test basin in Los Angeles County, CA, USA. The basin was constructed and characterized by the US Geological Survey in the mid-1990s. Recycled wastewater was piped directly to this basin at a known rate (about 1.5 m3/day). Down gradient from the test basin are nine high quality monitoring wells in a line that extends from the center of the basin to 150 m down gradient. All of the wells were equipped with temperature loggers that recorded groundwater temperatures every hour with an accuracy of one thousandth of a degree. The pre-experiment expected arrival times ranged from less than one day to six months. Arrival of Br was always coincident or preceded the B-10 arrival, reflecting retardation of B-10 presumably due to exchange with clay surfaces. B-10/Br travel time ratios determined from the center of mass range from 1 to 1.4. Temperature time series were developed from data loggers. The 1.5° C diurnal temperature variation observed in the spreading pond was only apparent at one well that is screen about 3 m below the pond bottom. At the other wells, we observed temperature increases over a period of days to weeks. Basic analysis of temperature profiles yields a reliable estimate of the underground residence time; heat flow travel times are in good agreement with those derived from the geochemical tracers.

  5. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 12. Geochemical and reactive-transport modeling based on tracer injection-synoptic sampling studies for the Red River, New Mexico, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, James W.; Runkel, Robert L.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2005-01-01

    Reactive-transport processes in the Red River, downstream from the town of Red River in north-central New Mexico, were simulated using the OTEQ reactive-transport model. The simulations were calibrated using physical and chemical data from synoptic studies conducted during low-flow conditions in August 2001 and during March/April 2002. Discharge over the 20-km reach from the town of Red River to the USGS streamflow-gaging station near the town of Questa ranged from 395 to 1,180 L/s during the 2001 tracer and from 234 to 421 L/s during the 2002 tracer. The pH of the Red River ranged from 7.4 to 8.5 during the 2001 tracer and from 7.1 to 8.7 during the 2002 tracer, and seep and tributary samples had pH values of 2.8 to 9.0 during the 2001 tracer and 3.8 to 7.2 during the 2002 tracer. Mass-loading calculations allowed identification of several specific locations where elevated concentrations of potential contaminants entered the Red River . These locations, characterized by features on the north side of the Red River that are known to be sources of low-pH water containing elevated metal and sulfate concentrations, are: the initial 2.4 km of the study reach, including Bitter Creek, the stream section from 6.2 to 7.8 km, encompassing La Bobita well and the Hansen debris fan, Sulphur Gulch, at about 10.5 km, the area near Portal Springs, from 12.2 to 12.6 km, and the largest contributors of mass loading, the 13.7 to 13.9 km stream section near Cabin Springs and the 14.7 to 17.5 km stream section from Shaft Spring to Thunder Bridge, Goathill Gulch, and Capulin Canyon. Speciation and saturation index calculations indicated that although solubility limits the concentration of aluminum above pH 5.0, at pH values above 7 and aluminum concentrations below 0.3 mg/L inorganic speciation and mineral solubility controls no longer dominate and aluminum-organic complexing may occur. The August 2001 reactive-transport simulations included dissolved iron(II) oxidation, constrained using measured concentrations of dissolved iron(II) and dissolved iron(total). Both simulations included precipitation of amorphous Al(OH)3 and hydrous ferric oxide as Fe(OH)3, and sorption of copper and zinc to the precipitated hydrous ferric oxide. Simulations revealed that hydrogen, iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc were non-conservative and that mineral precipitation can account for iron and aluminum concentrations. Copper and zinc concentrations can be accounted for by simulating their sorption to hydrous ferric oxide forming in the water column of the Red River , although hydrous manganese oxides also may be important sorption substrates.

  6. Small Gas Turbine Combustor Primary Zone Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. E.; Young, E. R.; Miles, G. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A development process is described which consists of design, fabrication, and preliminary test evaluations of three approaches to internal aerodynamic primary zone flow patterns: (1) conventional double vortex swirl stabilization; (2) reverse flow swirl stabilization; and (3) large single vortex flow system. Each concept incorporates special design features aimed at extending the performance capability of the small engine combustor. Since inherent geometry of these combustors result in small combustion zone height and high surface area to volume ratio, design features focus on internal aerodynamics, fuel placement, and advanced cooling. The combustors are evaluated on a full scale annular combustor rig. A correlation of the primary zone performance with the overall performance is accomplished using three intrusion type gas sampling probes located at the exit of the primary zone section. Empirical and numerical methods are used for designing and predicting the performance of the three combustor concepts and their subsequent modifications. The calibration of analytical procedures with actual test results permits an updating of the analytical design techniques applicable to small reverse flow annular combustors.

  7. Study on alkali removal technology from coal gasification gas

    SciTech Connect

    Inai, Motoko; Kajibata, Yoshihiro; Takao, Shoichi; Suda, Masamitsu

    1999-07-01

    The authors have proposed a new coal based combined cycle power plant concept. However, there are certain technical problems that must be overcome to establish this system. Major technical problem of the system is hot corrosion of gas turbine blades caused by sulfur and alkali vapor, because of high temperature dust removal without sulfur removal from the coal gas. So the authors have conducted several fundamental studies on dry type alkali removal sorbents for the purposed of reducing the corrosion on gas turbine blades. Based on the fundamental studies the authors found preferable alkali removal sorbents, and made clear their alkali removal performance.

  8. Nicotelline: A Proposed Biomarker and Environmental Tracer for Particulate Matter Derived from Tobacco Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Peyton; Goniewicz, Maciej L.; Havel, Christopher; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2013-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) derived from tobacco smoke contains numerous toxic substances. Since the PM and gas phase of tobacco smoke may distribute differently in the environment, and substances in them may have different human bioavailability, multiple tracers and biomarkers for tobacco smoke constituents are desirable. Nicotelline is a relatively non-volatile alkaloid present in tobacco smoke, and therefore it has the potential to be a suitable tracer and biomarker for tobacco smoke-derived PM. We describe experiments demonstrating that nicotelline is present almost entirely in the PM, in both freshly generated cigarette smoke and aged cigarette smoke. An excellent correlation between the mass of nicotelline and the mass of the PM in aged cigarette smoke was found. We also describe experiments suggesting that the main source of nicotelline in tobacco smoke is dehydrogenation of another little-studied tobacco alkaloid, anatalline, during the burning process. We show that nicotelline metabolites can be measured in urine of smokers, and that nicotelline can be measured in house dust from homes of smokers and non-smokers. We conclude that nicotelline should be useful as a tracer and biomarker for PM derived from tobacco smoke. PMID:24125094

  9. Development and Validation of Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics for the Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. The formulation of the sources and sinks of tracer water is generally proportional to the prognostic water vapor variable. Because all water has been accounted for in tracers, the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The tracers have been implemented in a GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation consisting of several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. The recycling of water and interannual variability of the sources of water will be examined. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation will be discussed.

  10. Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts

    SciTech Connect

    Cronenberg, A.W. ); Callow, R.A. )

    1992-04-01

    Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

  11. Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts

    SciTech Connect

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Callow, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

  12. An aging study of a gas electron multiplier with micro-strip gas chamber readout

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, J.; Shipsey, I.P.I.

    1999-06-01

    The authors have performed an aging study of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) readout with a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC). The GEM is constructed from Kapton and copper, and the MSGC is constructed from semiconductive glass and gold. When the detector (GEM+MSGC) is operated in an argon-dimethyl ether (DME) gas mixture and irradiated with a 5.4 keV photon beam, about 220 mC/cm of charge can be accumulated without degradation of the detector performance. This corresponds to about 20 years of operation at the LHC.

  13. Tracer Migration in a Radially Divergent Flow Field: Longitudinal Dispersivity and Anionic Tracer Retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, J.C., P.M. Bertsch, M. Wilson, J. Singer, F. Majs and S.A. Aburime

    2007-01-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion, the combined effects of chemical diffusion and differences in solute path length and flow velocity, is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive three-dimensional datasets exist for critically evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion, and the conservative nature of several commonly used groundwater tracers is still in question. Therefore, we conducted a series of field-scale experiments using tritiated water ({sup 3}H{sup 1}HO), bromide (Br{sup -}), and two fluorobenzoates (2,4 Di-FBA, 2,6 Di-FBA) as tracers in the water-table aquifer on the USDOE's Savannah River Site (SRS), located on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 h (56.7 L min{sup -1}) to establish a steady-state forced radial gradient before the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, which lasted from 256 to 560 min, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using nonlabeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using six multilevel monitoring wells, radially spaced at approximate distances of 2.0, 3.0, and 4.5 m from the central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were pumped continuously ({approx}0.1 L min{sup -1}) throughout the course of the experiments. Longitudinal dispersivity ({alpha}{sub L}) and travel times for {sup 3}H{sup 1}HO breakthrough were estimated by fitting the field data to analytical approximations of the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) for uniform and radial flow conditions. Dispersivity varied greatly between wells located at similar transport distances and even between zones within a given well, which we attributed to variability in the hydraulic conductivity at the study site. The radial flow equation generally described tritium breakthrough better than the uniform flow solution, as indicated by the coefficient of determination, r{sup 2}, yielding lower {alpha}{sub L} while accounting for breakthrough tailing inherent to radial flow conditions. Complex multiple-peak breakthrough patterns were observed within certain sampling zones, indicative of multiple major flow paths and the superposition of resulting breakthrough curves. A strong correlation was found between {alpha}L and arrival times observed from one experiment to the next, indicative of the general reproducibility of the tracer results. Temporal moment analysis was used to evaluate tracer migration rate as an indicator of variations in hydraulic conductivity and flow velocity, as well as mass recovery and retardation for the ionic solutes compared with tritiated water. Retardation factors for Br{sup -} ranged from 0.99 to 1.67 with no clear trend with respect to transport distance; however, Br{sup -} mass recovery decreased with distance, suggesting that the retardation values are biased in terms of early arrival because of limited detection and an insufficient monitoring duration. Anion retardation was attributed to sorption by iron oxides. Similar results were observed for the FBA tracers. The assumption of conservative behavior for the anionic tracers would generally result in higher {alpha}L values and lower estimated flow velocities.

  14. North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, H.G.; Schuler, G.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-07-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater (DIC) is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, which is the time elapsed since a body of water has been in contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with ageing, i.e. the time component of circulation, and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". The latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere-ocean equilibration of 14C particularly in high latitudes where many water masses form. In the ocean's interior, preformed 14C-age behaves like a passive tracer. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. Here, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age. Between models, the variability of preformed 14C-age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combination of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics or gas exchange. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation, the choice of the gas-exchange constant from within the currently accepted range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age, it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a model's circulation on global and regional scales. Based on the results of this study, we propose that considering preformed 14C-age is critical for a correct assessment of circulation in ocean models.

  17. The use of tracers to assess leakage from the sequestration of CO2 in a depleted oil reservoir, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, A.W.; Diehl, J.R.; Bromhal, G.S.; Strazisar, B.R.; Wilson, T.H.; White, C.M.

    2007-05-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is a potentially useful strategy for greenhouse gas management and can be combined with enhanced oil recovery. Development of methods to estimate CO2 leakage rates is essential to assure that storage objectives are being met at sequestration facilities. Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were added as three 12 h slugs at about one week intervals during the injection of 2090 tons of CO2 into the West Pearl Queen (WPQ) depleted oil formation, sequestration pilot study site located in SE New Mexico. The CO2 was injected into the Permian Queen Formation. Leakage was monitored in soil–gas using a matrix of 40 capillary adsorbent tubes (CATs) left in the soil for periods ranging from days to months. The tracers, perfluoro-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane (PDCH), perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH) and perfluorodimethylcyclobutane (PDCB), were analyzed using thermal desorption, and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Monitoring was designed to look for immediate leakage, such as at the injection well bore and at nearby wells, and to develop the technology to estimate overall CO2 leak rates based on the use of PFTs. Tracers were detected in soil–gas at the monitoring sites 50 m from the injection well within days of injection. Tracers continued to escape over the following years. Leakage appears to have emanated from the vicinity of the injection well in a radial pattern to about 100 m and in directional patterns to 300 m. Leakage rates were estimated for the 3 tracers from each of the 4 sets of CATs in place following the start of CO2 injection. Leakage was fairly uniform during this period. As a first approximation, the CO2 leak rate was estimated at about 0.0085% of the total CO2 sequestered per annum.

  18. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  19. Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Elizabeth M.; Randel, William J.; Stanford, John L.

    1999-01-01

    The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with baroclinically unstable initial conditions similar to those used by Thorncroft et al. in their study of two life cycle paradigms. The two life cycles LCn and LCs have different initial horizontal wind shear structures that result in distinctive nonlinear development. In terms of potential vorticity-potential temperature (PV-theta) diagnostics, the LCn case is characterized by thinning troughs that are advected anti-cyclonically and equatorward, while the LCs case has broadening troughs that wrap up cyclonically and poleward. Four idealized passive tracers are included in the model to be advected by the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the CCM2, and their evolutions are investigated throughout the life cycles. Tracer budgets are analyzed in terms of the transformed Eulerian mean constituent transport formalism in pressure coordinates and also in isentropic coordinates. Results for both LCn and LCs show transport that is downgradient with respect to the background structure of the tracer field, but with a characteristic spatial structure that maximizes in the middle to high latitudes. For the idealized tropospheric tracers in this study, this represents a net upward and poleward transport that enhances concentrations at high latitudes. These results vary little with the initial distribution of the constituent field. The time tendency of the tracer is influenced most strongly by the eddy flux term. with the largest transport occurring during the nonlinear growth stage of the life cycle. The authors also study the transport of a lower-stratospheric tracer, to examine stratosphere-troposphere exchange for baroclinic waves.

  20. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. PMID:26703261

  1. Feasibility study of full-reactor gas core demonstration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Shaffer, C. J.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Separate studies of nuclear criticality, flow patterns, and thermodynamics for the gas core reactor concept have all given positive indications of its feasibility. However, before serious design for a full scale gas core application can be made, feasibility must be shown for operation with full interaction of the nuclear, thermal, and hydraulic effects. A minimum sized, and hence minimum expense, test arrangement is considered for a full gas core configuration. It is shown that the hydrogen coolant scattering effects dominate the nuclear considerations at elevated temperatures. A cavity diameter of somewhat larger than 4 ft (122 cm) will be needed if temperatures high enough to vaporize uranium are to be achieved.

  2. Study finds Devonian gas resources of western Canada attractive target

    SciTech Connect

    Reinson, G.E.; Lee, P.J. )

    1993-09-13

    This report summarizes results of a recently completed study on the conventional natural gas resources estimated to be contained in Devonian strata of the Western Canada sedimentary basin. This study is the first in a series dealing with conventional gas resources of the basin south of 62[degree] N. Lat. Estimates of regional resource potential have been prepared periodically by the Geological Survey of Canada, using systematic geological basin analysis and statistical resource evaluation methods. The major play groups in the western Canada gas project are Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Deformed Belt, Lower Cretaceous Mannville group, Middle Cretaceous Colorado group, and Upper Cretaceous-Tertiary. The Devonian assessment was undertaken first because of the existing comprehensive geological data base and because there is an upside potential for finding significant reserves in relatively large economic pools. The paper describes the assessment procedures andanalyzes mature plays and conceptual plays of gas.

  3. Use of inverse modeling for conditioning geostatistical models to vertical tracer profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Maroongroge, V.; Saad, N.; Pope, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new tracer test for estimating reservoir heterogeneity called vertical tracer profiling (VTP) is presented. This interwell tracer test is performed by injecting and/or collecting tracer samples at different locations along the wellbore. The problem in analyzing this and conventional interwell tracer data is finding the solution to an inverse problem, that is, the inference of the reservoir heterogeneity from the tracer production data. In this paper two inverse modeling techniques are presented and compared in terms of speed and quality of results. The first technique uses a tracer simulator as a forward model in a simulated annealing geostatistical algorithm for conditioning the generated model to tracer history. The second technique uses a least square history matching technique applied to the tracer history coupled with a geostatistical modeling method to solve the inverse problem. These techniques were used to investigate the effectiveness of vertical tracer profiling for determining reservoir zonation compared to traditional sampling of the tracer data. Both 2D and 3D models were used to test the efficiency of the inverse modeling algorithms, the use of tracer data for estimating horizontal correlation, and the advantages of the vertical tracer profiling. The 2D permeability field used in this study was measured on a sample of Antolini sandstone and the 3D permeability field was generated using a Gaussian simulation technique for a fining upwards geologic sequence. The geostatistically generated 2D models were tested by comparing model simulation results with experimental waterflood. The 3D models were also compared using waterflooding simulations.

  4. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) COMPLEX TERRAIN MODEL DEVELOPMENT: DESCRIPTION OF A COMPUTER DATA BASE FROM THE FULL SCALE PLUME STUDY, TRACY POWER PLANT, NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the EPA's Complex Terrain Model Development Program, the Full Scale Study was conducted at the Tracy Power Plant near Reno, Nevada. SO6 tracer gas and oil-fog particles were injected into the base of a 91.4 smokestack, and CF3Br tracer was released from one of three le...

  5. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  6. Gas-chromatographic study on the stereoselectivity of deprenyl metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tarjányi, Z; Kalász, H; Szebeni, G; Hollósi, I; Báthori, M; Fürst, S

    1998-08-01

    The metabolism and urinary elimination of both (-)-deprenyl and (+)-deprenyl have been studied. Gas-chromatographic analysis with mass specific detection indicated that the metabolism of (-)-deprenyl results in a large excess of methamphetamine compared to amphetamine, while the metabolism of (+)-deprenyl gave nearly equal amounts of amphetamine and methamphetamine. A novel deprenyl metabolite, phenylacetone, was also identified in our studies. PMID:9682156

  7. Evaluation of a tracer release and measurement system for the detection and quantification of air emissions using the tracer ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecobian, A.; Clements, A. L.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Williams, C. M.; Wells, B. L.; MacDonald, L. P.; Pierce, J. R.; Ham, J. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The number of oil and gas production operations is increasing as is their proximity to residential areas. These facilities have been known to emit methane and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere during the different phases of development and operation. To gain a better understanding of the types and magnitude of these emissions, accurate methods for identifying and measuring the plumes released from these sources are needed. One of the most common methods for characterization of emissions is the tracer ratio. In this method, a known amount of a tracer gas is released near the potential emission source, both the tracer and the compound(s) of interest are then measured at a location downwind of the potential emissions; and the emission rate is estimated based on the ratio of the compound of interest to the tracer at the location of the measurement. This work describes field tests conducted in an air field in Fort Collins, CO to evaluate a tracer release and detection system. Acetylene (tracer gas) and methane (emission from potential source) have been released from a custom made manifold system. A PICARRO G2203 analyzer (using cavity ring down spectroscopy) and a mobile kit A0941 have been deployed on a vehicle for the downwind measurements. The emissions are measured downwind of the source and the tracer ratio method is used to calculate the emissions of methane. The measured and calculated values have been compared. Additionally, silonite-coated canisters have been used for collection and analysis of acetylene to further validate the setup. This system has been evaluated for sensitivity, accuracy and response time through a series of controlled tracer and methane releases under various meteorological conditions. The results from these tests and error analysis for the system are presented and discussed.

  8. An Experimental Gas Study in a Model PDP Pixel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, J. R.; Shvydky, O.; Compaan, A. D.; Theodosiou, C. E.; Williamson, W., Jr.

    1998-10-01

    We have built a vacuum chamber for the study of gas mixtures in plasma display panels. The vacuum chamber is designed to deposit the MgO secondary electron layer in situ onto the electrode structure and then to backfill the chamber with a gas mixture. The electrode structure can then drive a gas discharge. We can then measure electrical and optical properties of the discharge as a function of pressure and gas composition. By depositing the MgO layer in situ we can insure that the MgO surface is clean, and near simulates real PDP conditions. We will present data on the break down voltage, window of bistability, and light emission all as a function of pressure and composition.

  9. Crystallographic studies of gas sorption in metal–organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Elliot J.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Brammer, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of porous crystalline materials of modular design. One of the primary applications of these materials is in the adsorption and separation of gases, with potential benefits to the energy, transport and medical sectors. In situ crystallography of MOFs under gas atmospheres has enabled the behaviour of the frameworks under gas loading to be investigated and has established the precise location of adsorbed gas molecules in a significant number of MOFs. This article reviews progress in such crystallographic studies, which has taken place over the past decade, but has its origins in earlier studies of zeolites, clathrates etc. The review considers studies by single-crystal or powder diffraction using either X-rays or neutrons. Features of MOFs that strongly affect gas sorption behaviour are discussed in the context of in situ crystallographic studies, specifically framework flexibility, and the presence of (organic) functional groups and unsaturated (open) metal sites within pores that can form specific interactions with gas molecules. PMID:24892587

  10. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with {sup 41}Ca tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; King, J.C.; Vieira, N.E.; Woodhouse, L.R.; Yergey, A.L.

    1996-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of {sup 41}Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, {sup 41}Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  11. Analysing the capabilities and limitations of tracer tests in stream-aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the limitations that apply when we couple conservative-tracer injection with reactive solute sampling to identify the transport and reaction processes active in a stream. Our methodology applies Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis to assess the ability of the tracer approach to identify the governing transport and reaction processes for a wide range of stream-solute transport and reaction scenarios likely to be encountered in high-gradient streams. Our analyses identified dimensionless factors that define the capabilities and limitations of the tracer approach. These factors provide a framework for comparing and contrasting alternative tracer test designs.

  12. A Study of the Cold Gas and Stellar Populations of the Antlia Cluster with KAT-7 and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley; Carignan, C.; Jarrett, T.; Goedhart, S.; Passmoor, S. S.; Wilcots, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of the Antlia Galaxy Cluster from the Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), a MeerKAT/SKA pathfinder array in South Africa, and describe some of the data reduction challenges overcome by the science commissioning team. Antlia is the third most nearby, massive galaxy cluster, yet it is poorly studied because it lies at low Galactic latitude (l=+19'?) in the Southern hemisphere. We combine the KAT-7 HI data with WISE infrared observations to study the gaseous and stellar components of the galaxy population of this dynamically young system. The velocity information from KAT-7 allows us to confirm gas rich cluster members that lack optical spectroscopic redshifts. Antlia is an ideal target for KAT-7 spectral line commissioning because the recessional velocity of cluster members is not confused with Galactic hydrogen, and the telescope resolution is such that we recover the full HI flux of galaxies, while not suffering from source confusion. The WISE observations cut through Galactic extinction to provide a more complete census of cluster member candidates. Blind HI observations have shown that the presence of gas rich objects around the dense environments of clusters and massive groups is an excellent tracer of substructure, highlighting filaments where galaxies are being accreted within the dark matter halo. With two distinct concentrations of galaxies centered on each of two large elliptical galaxies, the cluster is likely still in the process of merging, making it an interesting target for environmentally driven galaxy evolution studies.

  13. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    E-print Network

    Micha? Cie?la; Ewa Gudowska-Nowak; Francesc Sagués; Igor M. Sokolov

    2014-03-13

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens and radius of a diffusing probe.

  14. Regulation of exogenous and endogenous glucose metabolism by insulin and acetoacetate in the isolated working rat heart. A three tracer study of glycolysis, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R R; Cline, G W; Guthrie, P H; Goodwin, G W; Shulman, G I; Taegtmeyer, H

    1997-01-01

    Myocardial glucose use is regulated by competing substrates and hormonal influences. However, the interactions of these effectors on the metabolism of exogenous glucose and glucose derived from endogenous glycogen are not completely understood. In order to determine changes in exogenous glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and glycogen enrichment, hearts were perfused with glucose (5 mM) either alone, or glucose plus insulin (40 microU/ml), glucose plus acetoacetate (5 mM), or glucose plus insulin and acetoacetate, using a three tracer (3H, 14C, and 13C) technique. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and lactate production in the absence of acetoacetate, while acetoacetate inhibited the uptake of glucose and the oxidation of both exogenous glucose and endogenous carbohydrate. Depending on the metabolic conditions, the contribution of glycogen to carbohydrate metabolism varied from 20-60%. The addition of acetoacetate or insulin increased the incorporation of exogenous glucose into glycogen twofold, and the combination of the two had additive effects on the incorporation of glucose into glycogen. In contrast, the glycogen content was similar for the three groups. The increased incorporation of glucose in glycogen without a significant change in the glycogen content in hearts perfused with glucose, acetoacetate, and insulin suggests increased glycogen turnover. We conclude that insulin and acetoacetate regulate the incorporation of glucose into glycogen as well as the relative contributions of exogenous glucose and endogenous carbohydrate to myocardial energy metabolism by different mechanisms. PMID:9389756

  15. Application of AVHRR vegetation index to study atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO2: Results from a 3-D tracer transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Inez Y.; Tucker, C. J.; Prentice, Katharine C.

    1985-01-01

    The 'normalized difference vegetation indices' (NVI) derived from AVHRR radiances are combined with field data of soil respiration and a global map of net primary productivity to prescribe, for the globe, the seasonal exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. The monthly fluxes of CO2 thus obtained are used as inputs to a 3-D tracer transport model which uses winds generated by a 3-D atmospheric general circulation model to advect CO2 as an inert constituent. Analysis of the 3-D model results shows reasonable agreement between the simulated and observed annual cycles of atmospheric CO2 at the locations of the remote monitoring stations. The application is shown of atmospheric CO2 distributions to calibrate the NVI in terms of carbon fluxes. The approach suggests that the NVI may be used to provide quantitative information about long term and global scale variations of photosynthetic activity and of atmospheric CO2 concentrations provided that variations in the atmospheric circulation and in atmospheric composition are known.

  16. A study of the sources and sinks of methane and methyl chloroform using a global three-dimensional Lagrangian tropospheric tracer transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John A.; Brasseur, G. P.; Zimmerman, P. R.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Sources and sinks of methane and methyl chloroform are investigated using a global three-dimensional Lagrangian tropospheric tracer transport model with parameterized hydroxyl and temperature fields. Using the hydroxyl radical field calibrated to the methyl chloroform observations, the globally averaged release of methane and its spatial and temporal distribution were investigated. Two source function models of the spatial and temporal distribution of the flux of methane to the atmosphere were developed. The first model was based on the assumption that methane is emitted as a proportion of net primary productivity (NPP). The second model identified source regions for methane from rice paddies, wetlands, enteric fermentation, termites, and biomass burning based on high-resolution land use data. The most significant difference between the two models were predictions of methane fluxes over China and South East Asia, the location of most of the world's rice paddies, indicating that either the assumption that a uniform fraction of NPP is converted to methane is not valid for rice paddies, or that NPP is underestimated for rice paddies, or that present methane emission estimates from rice paddies are too high.

  17. Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

    2011-03-15

    The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

  18. Measurement of discharge using tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Cobb, Ernest D.

    1985-01-01

    The development of fluorescent dyes and fluorometers that can measure these dyes at very low concentrations has made dye-dilution methods practical for measuring discharge. These methods are particularly useful for determining discharge under certain flow conditions that are unfavorable for current meter measurements. These include small streams, canals, and pipes where 1. Turbulence is excessive for current-meter measurement but conducive to good mixing. 2. Moving rocks and debris may damage instruments placed in the flow. 3. Cross-sectional areas or velocities are indeterminate or changing. 4. The flow is unsteady, such as the flow that exists with storm-runoff events on small streams and urban storm-sewer systems. 5. The flow is physically inaccessible or unsafe. From a practical standpoint, such methods are limited primarily to small streams, because of the excessively long channel-mixing lengths required for larger streams. Very good accuracy can be obtained provided that 1. Adequate mixing length and time are allowed. 2. Careful field and laboratory techniques are used. 3. Dye losses are not significant. This manual describes the slug-injection and constant-rate injection methods of performing tracer-dilution measurements. Emphasis is on the use of fluorescent dyes as tracers and the equipment, field methods, and laboratory procedures for performing such measurements. The tracer-velocity method is also briefly discussed.

  19. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  20. Learning from the challenges of Ebola Virus Disease contact tracers in Sierra Leone, February, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ilesanmi, Olayinka Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sierra Leone was in the process of strengthening tracing of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) contact with training of contact tracers, continuous mentoring and monitoring, supervision and continuous support. This was through various national and international organizations. This study aimed at identifying the challenges of contact tracers with a view of improving contact tracing activities in Tonkolili District, Sierra Leone. Methods In-depth interview was conducted among contact tracers who were actively involved in contact tracing within the 4 weeks preceding the interview. In-depth interview guide was used to interview the contact tracers. Questions were asked about the state of EVD outbreak, challenges of contact tracing, ways to improving contact tracers activities and ways to ensure community participation and follow up action. Results A total of 12 Contact tracers were interviewed. Most of the contact tracers saw the lifting of ban by the Government on movement as a delay to stopping the outbreak. Some of them were being threatened by their communities and insulted. Some communities with EVD cases felt it was no longer in Sierra Leone and that the contact tracers were the ones infecting the people with Ebola. More than 80% of the participants indicated that retraining of contact tracers and re-orientation of community members would help in putting a stop to the outbreak. Conclusion All participants indicated interest in improving their activities and performance. They suggested that more social mobilization is needed to ensure the cooperation of their communities.

  1. Hydrodynamic tracer diffusion in suspensions of swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyap, T. V.; Koch, Donald L.; Wu, Mingming

    2014-08-01

    We present theoretical predictions, simulations, and experimental measurements of the diffusion of passive, Brownian tracer particles in the bulk of three-dimensional suspensions of swimming bacteria performing run-tumble random walks. In the theory, we derive an explicit expression for the "hydrodynamic" tracer diffusivity that results from the fluid disturbances created by a slender-body model of bacteria by ensemble averaging the mass conservation equation of the tracer over the space of tracer-bacterium interactions which are assumed to be binary. The theory assumes that the orientations of the bacterium before and after a tumble are uncorrelated and the fluid velocity disturbance created by the bacterium is small compared to its swimming speed. The dependence of the non-dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity widetilde{D_h} obtained by scaling the dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity by nL3UsL on the persistence in bacterial swimming and the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer are studied in detail through two nondimensional parameters—a Peclet number Pe = UsL/D which is the ratio of the time scale of bacterial swimming to the tracer diffusion time scale and a non-dimensional persistence time ?* = Us?/L obtained by scaling the dimensional bacterial persistence time by the time that a bacterium takes to swim over a distance equal to its length. Here, n, Us, ?, and L are the concentration, swimming speed, tumbling time, and the overall length of the bacteria, respectively, and D is the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer. widetilde{D_h} is found to be a monotonically increasing function of ?* and a non-monotonic function of Pe with a Pe1/2 scaling in the Pe ? 1 limit, an intermediate peak and a constant value in the Pe ? 1 limit for the typical case of wild-type bacteria with ?* = O(1). In the simulation study we compute the bacterial contribution to the tracer diffusivity from explicit numerical simulations of binary tracer-bacterium interactions to examine the validity of the weak disturbance assumption made in the theory, and to investigate the effects of correlations in the pre- and post-tumble bacterium orientations and the excluded volume (steric) interactions between the bacterium and the tracer. It is found that the weak disturbance assumption does not have a statistically significant effect on widetilde{D_h} and correlations among pre- and post-tumble bacterium orientations and bacterium-tracer excluded volume interactions are found to enhance the tracer diffusivity by modest but statistically significant factors. Finally, we measure the effective diffusion coefficient of 1.01 ?m diameter colloidal tracer particles in the bulk of a suspension of wild-type E. Coli cells and compare the experimental measurements with the predictions made by the theory and simulations.

  2. Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.T. |; Abas, M.R. bin |; Cass, G.R. |; Rogge, W.F. |; Mazurek, M.A.; Standley, L.J.; Hildemann, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

  3. Pharmaceuticals as Groundwater Tracers - Applications and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheytt, T. J.; Mersmann, P.; Heberer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Pharmaceutically active substances and metabolites are found at concentrations up to the microgram/L-level in groundwater samples from the Berlin (Germany) area and from several other places world wide. Among the compounds detected in groundwater are clofibric acid, propyphenazone, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and carbamazepine. Clofibric acid, the active metabolite of clofibrate and etofibrate (blood lipid regulators) is detected in groundwater at maximum concentrations of 7300 ng/L. Among the most important input paths of drugs are excretion and disposal into the sewage system. Groundwater contamination is likely to be due to leaky sewage systems, influent streams, bank filtration, and irrigation with effluent water from sewage treatment plants. There are no known natural sources of the above mentioned pharmaceuticals. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers may include: (a) Quantification of infiltration from underground septic tanks (b) Detection of leaky sewage systems / leaky sewage pipes (c) Estimation of the effectiveness of sewage treatment plants (d) Identification of transport pathways of other organic compounds (e) Quantification of surface water / groundwater interaction (f) Characterization of the biodegradation potential. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers is limited by variations in input. These variations depend on the amount of drugs prescribed and used in the study area, the social structure of the community, the amount of hospital discharge, and temporal concentration variations. Furthermore, the analysis of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals is sophisticated and expensive and may therefore limit the applicability of pharmaceuticals as tracers. Finally, the transport and degradation behavior of pharmaceuticals is not fully understood. Preliminary experiments in the laboratory were conducted using sediment material and groundwater from the Berlin area to evaluate the transport and sorption behavior of selected drugs. Results of the column experiments show that clofibric acid exhibits no degradation and almost no retardation (Rf = 1.1) whereas ibuprofen is biodegraded (> 90 %) under aerobic conditions. Carbamazepine shows no degradation in the soil column experiments but significant retardation under the prevailing conditions. We conclude that clofibric acid will show the transport behavior of a conservative tracer, whereas ibuprofen may be used to characterize the biodegradation potential in the aerobic zone.

  4. Eye-Tracking Study of Complexity in Gas Law Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui; Pienta, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    This study, part of a series investigating students' use of online tools to assess problem solving, uses eye-tracking hardware and software to explore the effect of problem difficulty and cognitive processes when students solve gas law word problems. Eye movements are indices of cognition; eye-tracking data typically include the location,…

  5. Tracer exchange between tropics and middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard; Douglass, Anne; Weaver, Clark

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the tropics and middle latitudes is studied using a tracer emitted at 50 hPa along a great circle route between Los Angeles, USA and Sydney, Australia. Though designed to examine the impact of stratospheric aircraft, the study more generally addresses the transport between tropics and middle latitudes for a three month period from January through March 1989. The results show that air is transported from the tropics to middle latitudes by planetary scale and tropospheric cyclonic scale waves. Except for intrusions by these wave events, the tropics are substantially isolated throughout the lower stratosphere. These waves draw material out of the tropics which ends up in the middle latitude westerly jets, with little material entering the winter polar latitudes prior to the springtime transition. The summer Southern Hemisphere is characterized by tracer being drawn out in streamers that extend from north and west to south and east. The material in the tropics is zonally asymmetric. The material that reaches the troposphere comes down in the synoptic scale eddies and is concentrated in the middle latitude jet stream. These characteristics are similar to those observed during the dispersion of volcanic clouds.

  6. Electrical studies for an industrial gas turbine cogeneration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, R.L.; Kalkstein, E.W. and Co., Newark, DE . Engineering Dept. Parsons Co., Pasadena, CA ); Willoughby, R.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Electrical studies are required to assure the proper integration of a gas-turbine cogeneration facility into an existing industrial-plant electrical system and the connected utility grid. Details of such a study effort are presented, including boundary-limit definition for the system model, individual component modeling, load-flow and short-circuit studies, stability studies, and simulation of on-line isolation from the electric utility during system undervoltage or underfrequency conditions. The impact of the studies on the design process and plant system reliability is discussed.

  7. Tracer kinetic studies of the low density lipoprotein metabolism in the fetal rat: An example for estimation of flux rates in the nonsteady state

    SciTech Connect

    Plonne, D.; Schlag, B.; Winkler, L.; Dargel, R. )

    1990-05-01

    To get insight into the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apoB flux in the rat fetus near term and in the early postnatal period, homologous apoE-free 125I-labeled LDL was injected into the umbilical vein of the rat fetus immediately after Caesarean section. Since the serum LDL-apoB spontaneously declined after birth, a time-dependent two-pool model was used to calculate the flux rates in the neonate from the specific activities of LDL-apoB up to 15 h post partum. An approximate value of LDL-apoB flux in the fetus at birth was obtained by extrapolation of the kinetic data to the time of injection of the tracer. The data revealed that the turnover of LDL-apoB in the fetus (18.6 micrograms LDL-apoB/h per g body weight) exceeded that in the adult rat (0.4 microgram/h per g body weight) by at least one order of magnitude. Even 15 h after delivery, the LDL-apoB influx amounted to 2.5 micrograms/h per g body weight. The fractional catabolic rate of LDL-apoB in the fetus at term (0.39, h-1) slightly exceeded that in the adult animal (0.15, h-1) and reached the adult level within the first 3 h after birth and remained constant thereafter. In the rat fetus, LDL-apoB flux greatly exceeds that of VLDL-apoB. The data support the view of a direct synthesis and secretion of LDL, most probably by the fetal membranes.

  8. Setup optimization toward accurate ageing studies of gas filled detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuhoza, A.; Schmidt, H. R.; Biswas, S.; Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C. J.

    2013-08-01

    An infrastructure has been set up at the GSI detector laboratory to study the influence of construction materials on the ageing properties of gas filled detectors, such as multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC), gas electron multiplier (GEM). Optimization of an ageing setup was performed by observing the variation of the normalized gain obtained using two identical MWPCs. An accuracy in the relative gain measurement below 1% has been achieved by monitoring environmental conditions and by systematic improvements of the measuring equipment. Ageing test of fiberglass G11 has been performed.

  9. A feasibility study of a hypersonic real-gas facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gully, J. H.; Driga, M. D.; Weldon, W. F.

    1987-01-01

    A four month feasibility study of a hypersonic real-gas free flight test facility for NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) was performed. The feasibility of using a high-energy electromagnetic launcher (EML) to accelerate complex models (lifting and nonlifting) in the hypersonic, real-gas facility was examined. Issues addressed include: design and performance of the accelerator; design and performance of the power supply; design and operation of the sabot and payload during acceleration and separation; effects of high current, magnetic fields, temperature, and stress on the sabot and payload; and survivability of payload instrumentation during acceleration, flight, and soft catch.

  10. Tracer transport in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.; Richardson, M. I.; Newman, C. E.; Lee, C.; Toigo, A. D.; Campin, J.

    2011-12-01

    Transport is crucial to understanding and reproducing the Martian dust and water cycles, and to interpreting putative methane and other trace gas (e.g. Argon) observations. However, as quantified by comparing model predictions with Argon measurements made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer [e.g. Sprague et al., 2004, 2007], current Mars general circulation models (GCM's) appear to do a poor job at tracer transport [e.g. Nelli et al., 2007]. This invalidates a core assumption of GCM modeling in the last decade - that transport is sufficiently well treated in models that we need focus only on improving physical parameterizations, and that differences between results from different GCM's stem purely from their treatment of physical processes. If instead it is the simulated dynamical processes that need better treatment we need to move towards higher-quality numerics, e.g. based on the finite volume formulation, and introduce a more sophisticated approach to advection following work done for terrestrial chemical transport modeling. Here we present the results of non-condensable tracer transport simulations using our newly developed Mars MITgcm, which has both of the aforementioned desirable attributes: a finite volume core and access to a range of sophisticated advection schemes. Our results are encouraging in that we are able to reproduce the observed peak polar Argon enhancement factor of six (about double that attainable with most other Mars GCMs). Our diagnostics show that the time-averaged zonal-mean advection produces net increases of Argon at the winter poles, while stationary and transient eddies transport Argon away from the poles. Using less diffusive nonlinear advection schemes with flux limiters tends to produce more advective fluxes of tracers into the southern winter pole than the more diffusive linear advection schemes, resulting in a greater net increase of polar Argon abundance. We further utilize a more realistic k-distribution radiative transfer model, an improvement over the wide-band models often used in Mars GCM's, and find that the improved radiative transfer in combination with an appropriate advection scheme can quantitatively reproduce the observed Argon distribution. Our results suggest that both advection schemes and physics parameterizations are equally important in good simulation of transport-sensitive climate components, and that newer finite-volume based models (such as our MITgcm and the GFDL / NASA Ames finite volume GCM) are likely necessary for further progress in these areas.

  11. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Tom

    2012-02-15

    Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  12. Difluoromethane as partitioning tracer to estimate vadose water saturations

    SciTech Connect

    Deeds, N.E.; McKinney, D.C.; Pope, G.A. ); Whitley, G.A. Jr. . Bureau of Reclamation)

    1999-07-01

    Water saturation in the vadose zone is an important parameter for many nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) remediation technologies, Conventional soil boring analyses may not provide accurate average water saturation data. Previous studies have shown that a partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) can provide an accurate estimate of average subsurface NAPL saturations. The PITT is proposed as a suitable technology for estimating average subsurface water saturations. In this research, difluoromethane was evaluated as a suitable tracer compound to partition among air, water, and NAPL phases. Method of moments analyses were used to develop equations necessary to determine water saturations from difluoromethane PITT results. One-dimensional column experiments provided air-water a/nd air-NAPL partition coefficient data for difluoromethane. Difluoromethane is shown to be a suitable tracer for use in field PITTs to predict water saturations in the vadose zone.

  13. Tracer-based estimation of secondary organic carbon in the Pearl River Delta, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xin-Ming; Gao, Bo; Fu, Xiao-Xin; He, Quan-Fu; Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Yu, Jian-Zhen; Zheng, Mei

    2012-03-01

    Fine particles (PM2.5) were collected using filter-based high-volume samplers during summer-winter 2008 at a rural site in the central Pearl River Delta (PRD), south China, to determine typical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers from significant biogenic (isoprene, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes) and anthropogenic (aromatics) precursors. Average isoprene SOA tracers were significantly higher during summer (126 ng m-3) than during fall-winter (25.1 ng m-3), owing largely to the higher isoprene emission and reaction rates in summer. Average monoterpene SOA tracers during summer (11.6 ng m-3) and fall-winter (16.4 ng m-3) showed much less difference compared to isoprene SOA tracers, probably resulting from the counteracting effects of temperature on the precursor emission/tracer formation and on gas/particle partitioning. The concentrations of the aromatics' SOA tracer (2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid) ranged from 1.70 to 52.0 ng m-3 with an average of 15.1 ng m-3, which was the highest reported in ambient air. The secondary organic carbon (SOC) estimated by the SOA-tracer method averaged 3.07 ?g C m-3 in summer and 2.00 ?g C m-3 in fall-winter, contributing 38.4% and 8.7% to OC, respectively. During summer, aromatics-SOC and isoprene-SOC reached 2.25 ± 1.5 ?g C m-3 and 0.64 ± 0.7 ?g C m-3 and accounted for 76% and 18% of the estimated SOC, respectively, while during fall-winter, aromatics-SOC (1.64 ± 1.4 ?g C m-3) was dominant with a share of 79% in total estimated SOC. These results indicated that anthropogenic aromatics were dominant SOC precursors in the highly industrialized and urbanized PRD region. During summer, SOC levels estimated by elemental carbon (EC) tracer method were not only consistent with but also correlated well with those by SOA-tracer method. During fall-winter, however, SOC by SOA-tracer method was only about one third of that by EC-tracer method. Their gaps were significantly correlated with the biomass burning tracer levoglucosan, indicating that input from biomass burning emission with very high ratios of OC/EC during fall-winter would result in an overestimate of SOC by EC-tracer method. Therefore cautions should be taken when estimating SOC by EC-tracer method, especially when biomass burning exhibits significant influences.

  14. Comparing Surface Residue Transfer Efficiencies to Hands Using Polar and Non-Polar Florescent Tracers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of this study indicate that dermal loadings of both tracers increase through the seventh brief contact. Dermal loading of Uvitex tends to increase at a higher rate than dermal loadings of riboflavin. Measurement of co-applied tracer and pesticide suggest results for thes...

  15. Evaluating Bacteriophage P22 as a Tracer in a Complex Surface Water

    E-print Network

    Evaluating Bacteriophage P22 as a Tracer in a Complex Surface Water System: The Grand River marine and fresh water environments. There is a strong interest in using bacteriophages as tracers the transport of bacteriophages in the subsurface environment, few studies examined phage transport in large

  16. Modeling of solute transport in snow using conservative tracers and artificial rain-on-snow experiments

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    Modeling of solute transport in snow using conservative tracers and artificial rain-on-snow; published 6 February 2008. [1] We report a study of solute transport in snow, using artificial rain-on-snow conservative tracers and artificial rain-on-snow experiments, Water Resour. Res., 44, W02411, doi:10

  17. Assessment of Sewer Source Contamination of Drinking Water Wells Using Tracers and Human Enteric Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the source, transport, and occurrence of human enteric viruses in municipal well water, focusing on sanitary sewer sources. A total of 33 wells from 14 communities were sampled once for wastewater tracers and viruses. Wastewater tracers were detected in 4 of these wells, and...

  18. Radiocarbon -a unique tracer of global carbon cycle dynamics Levin, Ingeborg and Hesshaimer, Vago

    E-print Network

    Gertz, Michael

    Radiocarbon - a unique tracer of global carbon cycle dynamics Levin, Ingeborg and Hesshaimer, Vago of the University of Arizona 69 RADIOCARBON ­ A UNIQUE TRACER OF GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE DYNAMICS Ingeborg Levin Vago and sinks. Studies of the "undisturbed" natural carbon cycle profit from the radioactive decay of 14C

  19. AFB/open cycle gas turbine conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, T. W.; Tashjian, R.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed gas turbine systems in industrial cogeneration are identified. Based on site-specific conceptual designs, the potential benefits of the AFB/gas turbine system were compared with an atmospheric fluidized design steam boiler/steam turbine system. The application of these cogeneration systems at four industrial plant sites is reviewed. A performance and benefit analysis was made along with a study of the representativeness of the sites both in regard to their own industry and compared to industry as a whole. A site was selected for the conceptual design, which included detailed site definition, AFB/gas turbine and AFB/steam turbine cogeneration system designs, detailed cost estimates, and comparative performance and benefit analysis. Market and benefit analyses identified the potential market penetration for the cogeneration technologies and quantified the potential benefits.

  20. A comparison of tracer methods for quantifying CO2 sources in an urban region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricin, Sonja; Pataki, Diane E.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2010-06-01

    The relative contribution of anthropogenic (natural gas and gasoline combustion) and biogenic (aboveground and belowground respiration) CO2 sources has previously been quantified with the 13C, 18O, and 14C isotopes of CO2. The unique combination of isotopic signatures of each source allows for top-down attribution of sources using atmospheric measurements. Other tracers of CO2 include carbon monoxide (CO), which is a direct tracer of fossil fuel combustion-derived CO2 as CO and CO2 are evolved at specific ratios (RCO/CO2) during combustion depending on fuel source and combustion efficiency. We used the 13C, 18O, and 14C tracers to partition between natural gas, gasoline, and aboveground and belowground respiration during four sampling events in the Los Angeles basin. Additionally, we compared the effectiveness of the independent CO tracer with the 14C tracer to distinguish between anthropogenic and biogenic CO2. The three isotope tracer results showed that during the sampling period, fossil fuel combustion was not a dominant source of CO2 and aboveground respiration contributed up to approximately 70% of CO2 sources during the spring. However, the percent fossil fuel CO2 calculated by the CO tracer was not entirely consistent with the fossil fuel CO2 calculated by 14C, which predicted up to ˜70% of winter CO2 from fossil fuel sources. The CO tracer was useful for showing diurnal patterns of CO2 sources. However, combustion RCO/CO2 values vary significantly, which poses a challenge for accurately identifying CO2 sources. Detailed local information about RCO/CO2 is required to effectively utilize the CO tracer for quantifying sources of CO2.

  1. Study of large-diameter gas puff implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, R. B.; Fedunin, A. V.; Labetsky, A. Yu; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Shishlov, A. V.

    2001-07-01

    Z-pinches with long time implosions is the subject of this paper. The experiments with neon, argon, krypton and xenon implosions have been conducted on a GIT-12 (Bugaev S P et al 1997 Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved., Fiz 40 38) generator at a current level of 2.2-2.5 MA. The goal was to study an unstable gas puff of large diameter. Attention was focused on the dynamics of the implosion of such a gas puff, namely on the effect of the gas puff mass and atomic constitution on the macroscopic parameters of the implosion. It has been established that during the implosion the wavelength of RT oscillations increases, reaching a value of 0.8-1 cm at the final stage. As this takes place, bubbles appear in the plasma shell bulk. The unstable implosion of a gas puff with a large atomic weight is accompanied by an increase in the resistance of the gas puff in the run-in phase, to a value exceeding the Spitzer resistance by two or three orders of magnitude.

  2. Primordial black holes as biased tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Yuichiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2015-06-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are theoretical black holes which can be formed during the radiation dominant era through the gravitational collapse of radiational overdensities. It has been well known that in the context of the structure formation in our Universe such collapsed objects, e.g., halos/galaxies, could be considered as bias tracers of underlying matter fluctuations and the halo/galaxy bias has been studied well. Applying such a biased tracer picture to PBHs, we investigate the large scale clustering of PBHs and obtain an almost mass-independent constraint to the scenario that the dark matter (DM) consists of PBHs. We focus on the case where the statistics of the primordial curvature perturbations is almost Gaussian, but with small local-type non-Gaussianity. If PBHs account for the DM abundance, such a large scale clustering of PBHs behaves as nothing but the matter isocurvature perturbation which is strictly constrained by the observations of cosmic microwave backgrounds (CMBs). From this constraint, we show that, in the case where a certain single field causes both CMB temperature perturbations and PBH formation, the PBH-DM scenario is excluded even with quite small local-type non-Gaussianity, |fNL|˜O (0.01 ).

  3. Numerical Study of Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song-Lin

    2002-01-01

    To further reduce pollutant emissions, such as CO, NO(x), UHCs, etc., in the next few decades, innovative concepts of gas turbine combustors must be developed. Several concepts, such as the LIPP (Lean- Premixed- Prevaporized), RQL (Rich-Burn Quick-Quench Lean-Burn), and LDI (Lean-Direct-Injection), have been under study for many years. To fully realize the potential of these concepts, several improvements, such as inlet geometry, air swirler, aerothermochemistry control, fuel preparation, fuel injection and injector design, etc., must be made, which can be studied through the experimental method and/or the numerical technique. The purpose of this proposal is to use the CFD technique to study, and hence, to guide the design process for low emission gas turbine combustors. A total of 13 technical papers have been (or will be) published.

  4. TRACING MOLECULAR GAS MASS IN EXTREME EXTRAGALACTIC ENVIRONMENTS: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Ming; Xilouris, Emmanuel M.; Kuno, Nario; Lisenfeld, Ute E-mail: padeli@astro.uni-bonn.d E-mail: kuno@nro.nao.ac.j

    2009-12-01

    We present a new observational study of the {sup 12}CO(1-0) line emission as an H{sub 2} gas mass tracer under extreme conditions in extragalactic environments. Our approach is to study the full neutral interstellar medium (H{sub 2}, H I, and dust) of two galaxies whose bulk interstellar medium (ISM) resides in environments that mark (and bracket) the excitation extremes of the ISM conditions found in infrared luminous galaxies, the starburst NGC 3310, and the quiescent spiral NGC 157. Our study maintains a robust statistical notion of the so-called X = N(H{sub 2})/I {sub CO} factor (i.e., a large ensemble of clouds is involved) while exploring its dependence on the very different average ISM conditions prevailing within these two systems. These are constrained by fully sampled {sup 12}CO(3-2) and {sup 12}CO(1-0) observations, at a matched beam resolution of half-power beam width approx15'', obtained with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea (Hawaii) and the 45 m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan, combined with sensitive 850 mum and 450 mum dust emission and H I interferometric images which allow a complete view of all the neutral ISM components. Complementary {sup 12}CO(2-1) observations were obtained with the JCMT toward the center of the two galaxies. We found an X factor varying by a factor of 5 within the spiral galaxy NGC 157 and about two times lower than the Galactic value in NGC 3310. In addition, the dust emission spectrum in NGC 3310 shows a pronounced submillimeter 'excess'. We tried to fit this excess by a cold dust component but very low temperatures were required (T {sub C} approx 5-11 K) with a correspondingly low gas-to-dust mass ratio of approx5-43. We furthermore show that it is not possible to maintain the large quantities of dust required at these low temperatures in this starburst galaxy. Instead, we conclude that the dust properties need to be different from Galactic dust in order to fit the submillimeter 'excess'. We show that the dust spectral energy distribution can be fitted by an enhanced abundance of very small grains and discuss different alternatives.

  5. Evaluation of saline tracer performance during electrical conductivity groundwater monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrocicco, Micòl; Prommer, Henning; Pasti, Luisa; Palpacelli, Stefano; Colombani, Nicolò

    2011-04-01

    Saline solutions are the most commonly used hydrological tracers, because they can be easily and economically monitored by in situ instrumentation such as electrical conductivity (EC) loggers in wells or by geoelectrical measurements. Unfortunately, these low-cost techniques only provide information on the total concentration of ions in solution, i.e., they cannot resolve the ionic composition of the aqueous solution. This limitation can introduce a bias in the estimation of aquifer parameters where sorption phenomena between saline tracers and sediments become relevant. In general, only selected anions such as Cl - and Br - are recognised to be transported unretarded and they are referred to as conservative tracers or mobile anions. However, cations within the saline tracer may interact with the soil matrix through a range of processes such as ion exchange, surface complexation and via physical mass-transfer phenomena. Heterogeneous reactions with minerals or mineral surfaces may not be negligible where aquifers are composed of fine alluvial sediments. The focus of the present study was to examine and to quantify the bias between the aquifer parameters estimated during model-based interpretation of experimental data of EC measurements of saline tracer relative to the aquifer parameters found by specific measurements (i.e. via ionic chromatography, IC) of truly conservative species. To accomplish this, column displacement experiments with alluvial aquifer materials collected from the Po lowlands (Italy) were performed under water saturated conditions. The behaviour of six selected, commonly used saline tracers (i.e., LiCl, KCl, and NaCl; LiBr, KBr, and NaBr) was studied and the data analysed by inverse modelling. The results demonstrate that the use of EC as a tracer can lead to an erroneous parameterisation of the investigated porous media, if the reactions between solute and matrix are neglected. In general, errors were significant except for KCl and KBr, which is due to the weak interaction between dissolved K + and the sediment material. The study shows that laboratory scale pre-investigations can help with tracer selection and to optimise the concentration range targeted for in situ multilevel monitoring by unspecific geoelectrical instrumentation.

  6. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Experimental gas-fired pulse-combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomquist, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on a gas-fired, water-cooled, Helmholtz-type pulse combustion burner are discussed. In addition to the experimental work, information is presented on the evolution of pulse combustion, the types of pulse combustion burners and their applications, and the types of fuels used. Also included is a survey of other pertinent studies of gas-fired pulse combustion. The burner used in the Argonne research effort was equipped with adjustable air and gas flapper valves and was operated stably over a heat-input range of 30,000 to 200,000 Btu/h. The burner's overall heat transfer in the pulsating mode was 22 to 31% higher than when the unit was operated in the steady mode. Important phenomena discussed include (1) effects on performance produced by inserting a corebustor to change tailpipe diameter, (2) effects observed following addition of an air-inlet decoupling chamber to the unit, and (3) occurrence of carbon monoxide in the exhaust gas.

  8. Experimental study on engine gas-path component fault monitoring using exhaust gas electrostatic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianzhong; Zuo, Hongfu; Liu, Pengpeng; Wen, Zhenhua

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the recent development in engine gas-path components health monitoring using electrostatic sensors in combination with signal-processing techniques. Two ground-based engine electrostatic monitoring experiments are reported and the exhaust gas electrostatic monitoring signal-based fault-detection method is proposed. It is found that the water washing, oil leakage and combustor linear cracking result in an increase in the activity level of the electrostatic monitoring signal, which can be detected by the electrostatic monitoring system. For on-line health monitoring of the gas-path components, a baseline model-based fault-detection method is proposed and the multivariate state estimation technique is used to establish the baseline model for the electrostatic monitoring signal. The method is applied to a data set from a turbo-shaft engine electrostatic monitoring experiment. The results of the case study show that the system with the developed method is capable of detecting the gas-path component fault in an on-line fashion.

  9. TRACER-TEST PLANNING USING THE EFFICIENT HYDROLOGIC TRACER-TEST DESIGN (EHTD) PROGRAM 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  10. TRACER-TEST PLANNING USING THE EFFICIENT HYDROLOGIC TRACER-TEST DESIGN (EHTD) PROGRAM 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  11. Heat and solute tracers: how do they compare in heterogeneous aquifers?

    PubMed

    Irvine, Dylan J; Simmons, Craig T; Werner, Adrian D; Graf, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A comparison of groundwater velocity in heterogeneous aquifers estimated from hydraulic methods, heat and solute tracers was made using numerical simulations. Aquifer heterogeneity was described by geostatistical properties of the Borden, Cape Cod, North Bay, and MADE aquifers. Both heat and solute tracers displayed little systematic under- or over-estimation in velocity relative to a hydraulic control. The worst cases were under-estimates of 6.63% for solute and 2.13% for the heat tracer. Both under- and over-estimation of velocity from the heat tracer relative to the solute tracer occurred. Differences between the estimates from the tracer methods increased as the mean velocity decreased, owing to differences in rates of molecular diffusion and thermal conduction. The variance in estimated velocity using all methods increased as the variance in log-hydraulic conductivity (K) and correlation length scales increased. The variance in velocity for each scenario was remarkably small when compared to ?2 ln(K) for all methods tested. The largest variability identified was for the solute tracer where 95% of velocity estimates ranged by a factor of 19 in simulations where 95% of the K values varied by almost four orders of magnitude. For the same K-fields, this range was a factor of 11 for the heat tracer. The variance in estimated velocity was always lowest when using heat as a tracer. The study results suggest that a solute tracer will provide more understanding about the variance in velocity caused by aquifer heterogeneity and a heat tracer provides a better approximation of the mean velocity. PMID:24359493

  12. Tracer tests and the structure of permeability in the Corallian limestone aquifer of northern England, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Aidan; Cachandt, Gerd; Franklin, Janine; Willmore, Fergus; Atkinson, Tim

    2012-05-01

    The Corallian limestone of northern England (UK) is widely exploited for water supplies and exhibits the karstic phenomena of sinking rivers, conduit development and groundwater velocities of several kilometres per day. To test a number of model-derived source protection zones and elucidate contaminant transport mechanisms in the aquifer, three tracer tests were conducted from a set of swallow-holes draining the River Derwent toward public water supply wells in the eastern part of the aquifer. Tracers used included: Enterobacter cloacae (bacteriophage), Photine C (optical brightener), sodium fluorescein (fluorescent dye) and sulphur hexafluoride (dissolved gas), the varying properties of which make them suitable analogues for different types of potential contaminant. Observed tracer transport times and arrival patterns indicate that tracer transport occurs through karstic channels embedded in a network of primary fissures which exert control over tracer concentrations once initial tracer plumes have passed. A dipole flow system is observed between the swallow-holes and the closest abstraction well, whilst previously modelled source protection zones do not accurately reflect either groundwater velocity or those areas of the aquifer supplying the wells. These findings imply that managing such aquifers for potential contamination should rely upon empirical tracer evidence for source-protection zone modelling.

  13. Aluminum-26 as a biological tracer using accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flarend, Richard Edward

    1997-06-01

    The development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has provided a practical method of detection for the only isotope of aluminum suitable as a tracer, 26Al. The use of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum has made possible the study of aluminum metabolism and the pharmacokinetics of aluminum-containing drugs at physiological levels. An overview of the various advantages of using 26Al as a tracer for aluminum and a general description of the AMS technique as applied to bio-medical applications is given. To illustrate the versatility of 26Al as a tracer for aluminum, 26Al studies of the past several years are discussed briefly. In addition, Two novel investigations dealing with 26Al-labeled drugs will be presented in more detail. In one of these studies, it was found that 26Al from aluminum hydroxide and aluminum phosphate vaccine adjuvants appeared in the blood just one hour after intramuscular injection. This is a surprising result since the currently held theory of how adjuvants work assumes that adjuvants remain insoluble and hold the antigen at the injection site for a long period of time. In another project, 26Al-labeled antiperspirants are being characterized by combining AMS with traditional analytical and chromatographic techniques. Future directions for this and other possible studies are discussed.

  14. Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants: measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C.; Mitchell, A. L.; Tkacik, D. S.; Subramanian, R.; Martinez, D. M.; Vaughn, T. L.; Williams, L.; Zimmerle, D.; Robinson, A. L.; Herndon, S. C.; Marchese, A. J.

    2015-05-01

    Increased natural gas production in recent years has spurred intense interest in methane (CH4) emissions associated with its production, gathering, processing, transmission, and distribution. Gathering and processing facilities (G&P facilities) are unique in that the wide range of gas sources (shale, coal-bed, tight gas, conventional, etc.) results in a wide range of gas compositions, which in turn requires an array of technologies to prepare the gas for pipeline transmission and distribution. We present an overview and detailed description of the measurement method and analysis approach used during a 20-week field campaign studying CH4 emissions from the natural gas G&P facilities between October 2013 and April 2014. Dual-tracer flux measurements and on-site observations were used to address the magnitude and origins of CH4 emissions from these facilities. The use of a second tracer as an internal standard revealed plume-specific uncertainties in the measured emission rates of 20-47%, depending upon plume classification. Combining downwind methane, ethane (C2H6), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and tracer gas measurements with on-site tracer gas release allows for quantification of facility emissions and in some cases a more detailed picture of source locations.

  15. Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants: measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, J. R.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Floerchinger, C.; Mitchell, A. L.; Tkacik, D. S.; Subramanian, R.; Martinez, D. M.; Vaughn, T. L.; Williams, L.; Zimmerle, D.; Robinson, A. L.; Herndon, S. C.; Marchese, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increased natural gas production in recent years has spurred intense interest in methane (CH4) emissions associated with its production, gathering, processing, transmission and distribution. Gathering and processing facilities (G&P facilities) are unique in that the wide range of gas sources (shale, coal-bed, tight gas, conventional, etc.) results in a wide range of gas compositions, which in turn requires an array of technologies to prepare the gas for pipeline transmission and distribution. We present an overview and detailed description of the measurement method and analysis approach used during a 20-week field campaign studying CH4 emissions from the natural gas G&P facilities between October 2013 and April 2014. Dual tracer flux measurements and onsite observations were used to address the magnitude and origins of CH4 emissions from these facilities. The use of a second tracer as an internal standard revealed plume-specific uncertainties in the measured emission rates of 20-47%, depending upon plume classification. Combining downwind methane, ethane (C2H6), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and tracer gas measurements with onsite tracer gas release allows for quantification of facility emissions, and in some cases a more detailed picture of source locations.

  16. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases. PMID:20232884

  17. Experimental Characterization and Molecular Study of Natural Gas Mixtures 

    E-print Network

    Cristancho Blanco, Diego Edison

    2011-08-08

    of Department, Michael Pishko May 2010 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering iii iii ABSTRACT Experimental Characterization and Molecular Study of Natural Gas Mixtures (May 2010) Diego Edison Cristancho Blanco, B.S.; B.S.; M... (in) b Calibration constant in the deviation equations of ITS-90 for a PRT B Second virial coefficient (cm3/mole) or Constant in the reference function of ITS-90 for a PRT calibration C Third virial coefficient (cm3/mole)2 p...

  18. Generalized mean-field study of a driven lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Szolnoki, Attila

    1996-03-01

    A generalized mean-field analysis has been performed to study the ordering process in a half-filled square lattice-gas model with repulsive nearest-neighbor interaction under the influence of a uniform electric field. We have determined the configuration probabilities on two-, four-, five-, and six-point clusters, excluding the possibility of sublattice ordering. The agreement between the results of six-point approximations and Monte Carlo simulations confirms the absence of phase transition for sufficiently strong fields.

  19. Selected Examples of Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion chemistry is an area in mass spectrometry that has received much research interest since the mid fifties of the last century. Although the focus of mass spectrometric research has shifted the last twenty years largely to life science studies, including proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, there are still several groups in the world active in gas-phase ion chemistry of both positive and negative ions, either unimolecularly and/or bimolecularly. In this tutorial lecture the formation and determination of tautomeric ion structures and intra-ionic catalyzed tautomerization in the gas phase will be discussed. In addition, an example of formation of different tautomeric structures in protic and aprotic solvents under electrospray ionization conditions will be given, as established by gas-phase infrared multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy. This will be followed by presenting an example of time-resolved MS/MS which enables to identify the structure of an ion, generated at a particular molecular ion lifetime. At the end of the lecture the power of ion mobility will be shown in elucidating the mechanism of epimerization of bis-Tröger bases having chiral nitrogen centers. PMID:24349921

  20. Suzaku study of gas properties along filaments of A2744

    E-print Network

    Ibaraki, Y; Akamatsu, H; Zhang, Y -Y; Finoguenov, A

    2013-01-01

    Context: We present the results of Suzaku observations of a massive galaxy cluster A2744, which is an active merger at $z=0.308$. Aims: By using long X-ray observations of A2744, we aim to understand the growth of the cluster and the gas heating process through mass accretion along the surrounding filaments. Methods: We analyzed data from two-pointed Suzaku observations of A2744 to derive the temperature distribution out to the virial radius in three different directions. We also performed a deprojection analysis to study radial profiles of gas temperature, density, and entropy and compared the X-ray results with multi-wavelength data to investigate correlations with the surface density of galaxies and with radio relics. Results: The gas temperature was measured out to the virial radius $r_{200}$ in the north-east region and to about $1.5r_{200}$ in the north-west and south regions. The radial profile of the gas temperature is rather flat and the temperature is very high (even near $r_{200}$); it is comparabl...

  1. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; Grouchy, P. W. L. de; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-15

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200?ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200?ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  2. Study of gas-puff Z-pinches on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, N.; Rosenberg, E. W.; Gourdain, P. A.; de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Potter, W. M.; Atoyan, L.; Cahill, A. D.; Evans, M.; Greenly, J. B.; Hoyt, C. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Schrafel, P. C.; Kroupp, E.; Fisher, A.; Maron, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were conducted on the 1 MA, 200 ns pulse duration Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) pulsed power generator in order to achieve an understanding of the dynamics and instability development in the imploding and stagnating plasma. The triple-nozzle gas-puff valve, pre-ionizer, and load hardware are described. Specific diagnostics for the gas-puff experiments, including a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence system for measuring the radial neutral density profiles along with a Laser Shearing Interferometer and Laser Wavefront Analyzer for electron density measurements, are also described. The results of a series of experiments using two annular argon (Ar) and/or neon (Ne) gas shells (puff-on-puff) with or without an on- (or near-) axis wire are presented. For all of these experiments, plenum pressures were adjusted to hold the radial mass density profile as similar as possible. Initial implosion stability studies were performed using various combinations of the heavier (Ar) and lighter (Ne) gasses. Implosions with Ne in the outer shell and Ar in the inner were more stable than the opposite arrangement. Current waveforms can be adjusted on COBRA and it was found that the particular shape of the 200 ns current pulse affected on the duration and diameter of the stagnated pinched column and the x-ray yield.

  3. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, M A; Kane, J; Loosmore, G; DeMuth, J; Latkowski, J

    2010-12-03

    ICF power plants, such as the LIFE scheme at LLNL, may employ a high-Z, target-chamber gas-fill to moderate the first-wall heat-pulse due to x-rays and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beam/target propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed plasma source producing 2-5 eV plasma comprised of high-Z gases. We use a 5-kJ, 100-ns theta discharge for high peak plasma-heating-power, an electrode-less discharge for minimizing impurities, and unobstructed axial access for diagnostics and beam (and/or target) propagation studies. We will report on the plasma source requirements, design process, and the system design.

  4. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the tracers from incidental reactions. We review the criteria for practical reactive tracers, which serves as the basis for experimental testing and characterization and can be used to identify other potential candidate tracers. We will also discuss the information obtainable from individual tracers, which has implications for using multiple tracers to obtain information about the thermal history of a reservoir. We will provide an update on our progress for conducting proof-of-principle tests for reactive tracers in the Raft River geothermal system.

  5. Continuous Temperature and Water-Level Data Collected for a Heat Tracer Study on a Selected Reach of Tri-State Canal, Western Nebraska, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hobza, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    The water supply in parts of the North Platte River Basin in the Nebraska Panhandle has been designated as fully appropriated or over appropriated by the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources. Recent legislation (LB 962) requires the North Platte Natural Resources District and the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources to develop an Integrated Management Plan to balance ground- and surface-water supply and demand within the North Platte Natural Resources District. For a ground-water-flow model to accurately simulate existing or future ground-water and surface-water conditions, accurate estimates of specific input variables such as streambed conductance or canal-seepage rates are required. As of 2008, the values input into ground-water models were estimated on the basis of interpreted lithology from test holes and geophysical surveys. Often, contrasts of several orders of magnitude exist for streambed conductance among the various sediment textures present locally, and thin, near-surface layers of fine sediment can clog the streambed, substantially reducing conductance. To accurately quantify the rates of leakage from irrigation canals and estimate ground-water recharge, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Platte Natural Resources District, collected continuous temperature and water-level data to use heat as a tracer for a selected reach of Tri-State Canal west of Scottsbluff, Nebraska. Continuous records of subsurface temperature, ground-water level, canal stage, and water temperature, and sediment core data are presented in this report. Subsurface temperature was monitored at four vertical sensor arrays of thermocouples installed at various depths beneath the canal bed from March through September 2007. Canal stage and water temperature were measured from June to September 2007. Ground-water level was recorded continuously in an observation well drilled near the subsurface temperature monitoring site. These data sets were collected for use as inputs for a computer model to estimate the vertical hydraulic conductivity. Before the initiation of flow, diurnal variations in subsurface temperature occurred because of daytime heating and nighttime cooling of bed sediment. Flow in Tri-State Canal was first detected on June 16 at the monitoring site as a disruption in the temperature signal in the shallowest thermocouple in all four vertical sensor arrays. This disruption in the temperature pattern occurred in deeper thermocouples at slightly later times during the rapid infiltration of canal water. The ground-water level began to rise approximately 23 hours after flow was first detected at the monitoring site. Canal stage rose for 7 days until the maximum flow capacity of the canal was approached on June 23, 2007. Measured water temperatures ranged from 18 to 25 degrees Celsius (C) while the canal was flowing near maximum capacity. Small diurnal variations of 1.0 to 1.5 degrees C in water temperature were recorded during this time. Measured ground-water levels rose constantly during the entire irrigation season until levels peaked on September 3, 2007, 3 days after diversions to Tri-State Canal ceased.

  6. Combining natural and man-made DNA tracers to advance understanding of hydrologic flow pathway evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Walter, M. T.; Lyon, S. W.; Rosqvist, G. N.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying and characterizing the sources, pathways and residence times of water and associated constituents is critical to developing improved understanding of watershed-stream connections and hydrological/ecological/biogeochemical models. To date the most robust information is obtained from integrated studies that combine natural tracers (e.g. isotopes, geochemical tracers) with controlled chemical tracer (e.g., bromide, dyes) or colloidal tracer (e.g., carboxilated microspheres, tagged clay particles, microorganisms) applications. In the presented study we explore how understanding of sources and flow pathways of water derived from natural tracer studies can be improved and expanded in space and time by simultaneously introducing man-made, synthetic DNA-based microtracers. The microtracer used were composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated. Tracer experiments using both natural tracers and the DNA-based microtracers were conducted in the sub-arctic, glacierized Tarfala (21.7 km2) catchment in northern Sweden. Isotopic hydrograph separations revealed that even though storm runoff was dominated by pre-event water the event water (i.e. rainfall) contributions to streamflow increased throughout the summer season as glacial snow cover decreased. This suggests that glaciers are a major source of the rainwater fraction in streamflow. Simultaneous injections of ten unique DNA-based microtracers confirmed this hypothesis and revealed that the transit time of water traveling from the glacier surface to the stream decreased fourfold over the summer season leading to instantaneous rainwater contributions during storm events. These results highlight that integrating simultaneous tracer injections (injecting tracers at multiple places at one time) with traditional tracer methods (sampling multiple times at one place) rather than using either approach in isolation can provide new insights into the source, timing and mixing of water moving through hydrologic systems.

  7. The fluorescent tracer experiment on Holiday Beach near Mugu Canyon, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinsman, Nicole; Xu, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    After revisiting sand tracer techniques originally developed in the 1960s, a range of fluorescent coating formulations were tested in the laboratory. Explicit steps are presented for the preparation of the formulation evaluated to have superior attributes, a thermoplastic pigment/dye in a colloidal mixture with a vinyl chloride/vinyl acetate copolymer. In September 2010, 0.59 cubic meters of fluorescent tracer material was injected into the littoral zone about 4 kilometers upcoast of Mugu submarine canyon in California. The movement of tracer was monitored in three dimensions over the course of 4 days using manual and automated techniques. Detailed observations of the tracer's behavior in the coastal zone indicate that this tracer successfully mimicked the native beach sand and similar methods could be used to validate models of tracer movement in this type of environment. Recommendations including how to time successful tracer studies and how to scale the field of view of automated camera systems are presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of the described tracer methodology.

  8. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M.; Ferguson, R. M.

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  9. Use of sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorocarbon tracers in plutonium storage containers for leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, J.K.

    1998-05-01

    This study involves an investigation of the feasibility of a tracer-based leak detection system for long-term interim plutonium storage. In particular, a protocol has been developed based on the use of inert tracers with varying concentrations in order to {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}tag{close_quotes} specific containers. A particular combination of tracers at specific ratios could be injected into the free volume of each container, allowing for the detection of leaks as well as determination of the location of leaking containers. Based on plutonium storage considerations, sulfur hexafluoride and four perfluorocarbon tracers were selected and should allow a wide range of viable fingerprinting combinations. A {open_quotes}high-low{close_quotes} protocol which uses two distinct chromatographic peak areas or concentration levels, is recommended. Combinations of air exchange rates, detection durations, and detectability limits are examined in order to predict minimum tracer concentrations required for injection in storage containers.

  10. The Postshock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, Edwin A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Neufeld, David A.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of preshock, shocked, and postshock gas; and (2) a Monte Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. For both models we separately examine the pure gas-phase chemistry as well as the chemistry including the interactions of molecules with grain surfaces. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km/s are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or "H2O legacy," in the postshock gas is approximately (4-7) x 10(exp 5) yr, independent of the gas density. A density dependence for the lifetime of H2O is found in gas-grain models as the water molecules deplete onto grains at the depletion timescale. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O, the weighted average of the amount of time gas spends in preshock, shock, and postshock stages, is a sensitive function of the frequency of shocks. Thus we predict that the abundance of H2O, and to a lesser extent O2, can be used to trace the history of shock activity in molecular gas. We use previous large-scale surveys of molecular outflows to constrain the frequency of 10 km/s shocks in regions with varying star formation properties and discuss the observations required to test these results. We discuss the postshock lifetimes for other possible outflow tracers (e.g., SiO and CH3OH) and show that the differences between the lifetimes for various tracers can produce potentially observable chemical variations between younger and older outflows. For gas-grain models we find that the abundance of water-ice on grain surfaces can be quite large and is comparable to that observed in molecular clouds. This offers a possible alternative method to create water mantles without resorting to grain surface chemistry: gas heating and chemical modification due to a C-type shock and subsequent depletion of the gas-phase species onto grain mantles.

  11. Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, V; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

  12. USING TRACERS TO DESCRIBE NAPL HETEROGENEITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracers are frequently used to estimate both the average travel time for water flow through the tracer swept volume and NAPL saturation. The same data can be used to develop a statistical distribution describing the hydraulic conductivity in the sept volume and a possible distri...

  13. Dual signature tracer: A new tool for soil management and research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poleykett, Jack; Quinton, John; Armstrong, Alona; Maher, Barbara; Black, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The significant detrimental effects that occur, both on and off site due to the transport of soil are well documented. Now more than ever, it is vital to understand the pathways, processes and fate of transported sediments, to underpin environmental strategy and develop robust forecast models. Researchers have employed a broad range of materials and techniques to trace the movement of soil through space and time. However, three primary challenges still remain: 1) to develop a tracer that has the same or similar hydraulic characteristics as soil: 2) to develop a tracer able to replicate the broad and variable particle size distribution of soils; and: 3) to develop a tracing methodology that increases the volume, and quality of data collected from the field. This study approaches these challenges using a unique 'dual signature' tracer comprising natural mineral material directly coated with a fluorescent dye pigment and loaded during coating with a naturally occurring magnetic mineral oxide creating a tracer with both fluorescent properties and para-magnetic character. An assessment of the effectiveness of the tracer as a tracer of soil was conducted at the soil box and plot scale under controlled rainfall conditions, to: 1) examine the behaviour of the tracer, and: 2) to assess the efficiency of the different tools available to monitor the tracer post- deployment. At the plot scale, a unique site specific tracer was developed to match the hydraulic characteristics (particle size distribution and specific gravity), of the native soil enabling the source-sink relationship, transport pathways and transport rate through the environment to be investigated. Spatial mapping of the tracer distribution within each plot was also conducted using photography and Ultra Violet (UV) illumination. The results of this study provide the basis for the development of a unique soil tracing methodology, which can be applied to investigate soil transport processes, at a range of scales in a variety of settings. Keywords: soil, processes, erosion, tracing, fluorescent, magnetic

  14. Soil processes drive seasonal variation in retention of 15N tracers in a deciduous forest catchment.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Christine L; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Weiss, Marissa S; McCalley, K; Sparks, Jed P; Thomas, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal patterns of stream nitrate concentration have long been interpreted as demonstrating the central role of plant uptake in regulating stream nitrogen loss from forested catchments. Soil processes are rarely considered as important drivers of these patterns. We examined seasonal variation in N retention in a deciduous forest using three whole-ecosystem 15N tracer additions: in late April (post-snowmelt, pre-leaf-out), late July (mid-growing- season), and late October (end of leaf-fall). We expected that plant 15N uptake would peak in late spring and midsummer, that immobilization in surface litter and soil would peak the following autumn leaf-fall, and that leaching losses would vary inversely with 15N retention. Similar to most other 15N tracer studies, we found that litter and soils dominated ecosystem retention of added 15N. However, 15N recovery in detrital pools varied tremendously by season, with > 90% retention in spring and autumn and sharply reduced 15N retention in late summer. During spring, over half of the 15N retained in soil occurred within one day in the heavy (mineral-associated) soil fraction. During summer, a large decrease in 15N retention one week after addition coincided with increased losses of 15NO3- to soil leachate and seasonal increases in soil and stream NO3- concentrations, although leaching accounted for only a small fraction of the lost 15N (< 0.2%). Uptake of 15N into roots did not vary by season and accounted for < 4% of each tracer addition. Denitrification or other processes that lead to N gas loss may have consumed the rest. These measurements of 15N movement provide strong evidence for the dominant role of soil processes in regulating seasonal N retention and losses in this catchment and perhaps others with similar soils. PMID:26649387

  15. Synthesis and characterization of environmentally friendly fluorescent particle tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Rapiti, Emiliano; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Tracers are widely used in experimental fluid mechanics and hydrology to investigate complex flows and water cycle processes. Commonly used tracers include dyes, artificial tracers, naturally occurring isotopes and chemicals, microorganisms, and DNA-based systems. Tracers should be characterized by low detection limits and high accuracy in following water paths and flow structures. For natural studies, tracers are also expected to be nontoxic and with low sorption affinity to natural substrates to minimize losses in the environment. In this context, while isotopes are completely natural, their use in field studies is limited by their ubiquity and, therefore, by the high uncertainty in data processing methodologies. Further, the use of dyes and artificial tracers can be hampered by extremely low detection limits due to dilution in natural streams and microorganisms, while DNA-based system may require physical sampling and time-consuming functionalization and detection procedures. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of fluorescent beads incorporating an eco-compatible fluorophore for environmental and laboratory applications. The particles are synthesized from natural beeswax through an inexpensive thermal procedure and can be engineered to present variable densities and diameters. A thorough characterization of their surface morphology at the nanoscale, crystal structure and size, chemical composition, and dye incorporation into the beeswax matrix is described by using a wide array of microscopy techniques. In addition, the particle fluorescence response is studied by performing excitation and emission scans on melted beeswax bead samples. The feasibility of using the synthesized particles in environmental settings is assessed through the design of ad-hoc weathering agent experiments where the beads are exposed to high energy radiation and hot water. Further, a proof of concept test is described to understand the particles' potential as a reliable hydrological tracer. In particular, an outdoor setup is developed where 250-420 µm environmentally friendly beads are deployed in high velocity flows. The transit of the beads is acquired with a miniature video acquisition system and images are analyzed to detect the particle transit.

  16. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  17. Dust-to-gas ratio, XCO factor and CO-dark gas in the Galactic anticentre: an observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.-Q.; Liu, X.-W.; Yuan, H.-B.; Huang, Y.; Xiang, M.-S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the correlation between extinction and H I and CO emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10°) within the footprint of the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey of the Galactic anticentre (XSTPS-GAC) on small and large scales. In Paper I, we present a three-dimensional (3D) dust extinction map within the footprint of XSTPS-GAC, covering a sky area of over 6000 deg2 at a spatial angular resolution of 6 arcmin. In the current work, the map is combined with data from gas tracers, including H I data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array H I survey and CO data from the Planck mission, to constrain the values of dust-to-gas ratio DGR = AV/N(H) and CO-to-H2 conversion factor XCO = N(H2)/WCO for the entire GAC footprint excluding the Galactic plane, as well as for selected star-forming regions (such as the Orion, Taurus and Perseus clouds) and a region of diffuse gas in the northern Galactic hemisphere. For the whole GAC footprint, we find DGR = (4.15 ± 0.01) × 10-22 mag cm2 and XCO = (1.72 ± 0.03) × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. We have also investigated the distribution of `CO-dark' gas (DG) within the footprint of GAC and found a linear correlation between the DG column density and the V-band extinction: N(DG) ˜eq 2.2 × 10^{21} (A_V - AcV) cm^{-2}. The mass fraction of DG is found to be fDG ˜ 0.55 towards the Galactic anticentre, which is respectively about 23 and 124 per cent of the atomic and CO-traced molecular gas in the same region. This result is consistent with the theoretical work of Papadopoulos et al. but much larger than that expected in the H2 cloud models by Wolfire et al.

  18. European gas market study sees limited role for LNG imports

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    An analysis of the Western European gas market published by the European Investment Bank concludes that although the share of imports will grow, existing suppliers Algeria, Russia, and Norway can meet projected demand until and perhaps even beyond 2010. {open_quotes}Alternative sources are not necessary, although Europe might call upon long-distance suppliers to diversify supply sources,{close_quotes} says study author Bertrand Rossert. The gas demand in Western Europe is estimated to grow from 335 bcm in 1995 to 390 bcm by 2000 and 410-450 bcm in 2010, led by the power and residential sectors. Demand in the electricity sector in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the U.K. should grow rapidly from 40 bcm in 1995 to 70 bcm in 2000 and at a slower rate thereafter. Beyond 2005, the expansion of gas-fired generation will depend on nuclear power policies. (In Eastern Europe, projections are more problematic because of political and economic uncertainties, but could grow from 70 bcm in 1995 to 100 bcm in 2005 and around 110 bcm in 2010).

  19. A novel tracer method for estimating sewer exfiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieckermann, J.; Borsuk, M.; Reichert, P.; Gujer, W.

    2005-05-01

    A novel method is presented to estimate exfiltration from sewer systems using artificial tracers. The method relies upon use of an upstream indicator signal and a downstream reference signal to eliminate the dependence of exfiltration estimates on the accuracy of discharge measurement. An experimental design, a data analysis procedure, and an uncertainty assessment process are described and illustrated by a case study. In a 2-km reach of unknown condition, exfiltration was estimated at 9.9 ± 2.7%. Uncertainty in this estimate was primarily due to the use of sodium chloride (NaCl) as the tracer substance. NaCl is measured using conductivity, which is present at nonnegligible levels in wastewater, thus confounding accurate identification of tracer peaks. As estimates of exfiltration should have as low a measurement error as possible, future development of the method will concentrate on improved experimental design and tracer selection. Although the method is not intended to replace traditional CCTV inspections, it can provide additional information to urban water managers for rational rehabilitation planning.

  20. A novel tracer method for estimating sewer exfiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieckermann, J.; Borsuk, M.; Reichert, P.; Gujer, W.

    2005-05-01

    A novel method is presented to estimate exfiltration from sewer systems using artificial tracers. The method relies upon use of an upstream indicator signal and a downstream reference signal to eliminate the dependence of exfiltration estimates on the accuracy of discharge measurement. An experimental design, a data analysis procedure, and an uncertainty assessment process are described and illustrated by a case study. In a 2-km reach of unknown condition, exfiltration was estimated at 9.9 +/- 2.7%. Uncertainty in this estimate was primarily due to the use of sodium chloride (NaCl) as the tracer substance. NaCl is measured using conductivity, which is present at nonnegligible levels in wastewater, thus confounding accurate identification of tracer peaks. As estimates of exfiltration should have as low a measurement error as possible, future development of the method will concentrate on improved experimental design and tracer selection. Although the method is not intended to replace traditional CCTV inspections, it can provide additional information to urban water managers for rational rehabilitation planning.

  1. Endogenous Gas Formation—An In Vitro Study with Relevance to Gas Microemboli during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, Lena; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Gas embolismis an identified problemduring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Our aim was to analyze the potential inf