Science.gov

Sample records for gas-forming brain abscess

  1. Brain abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... abscess deep in the brain An abscess and meningitis Several abscesses (rare) Shunts in the brain for ... Complications may include: Brain damage Meningitis that is severe and life threatening Return (recurrence) of infection Seizures

  2. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  3. Brain abscess: Current management

    PubMed Central

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  4. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad S; Ishaq, Muhammad K; Jones, Kellie R

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its ?-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  5. Gas-Forming Pyogenic Liver Abscess with Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Muhammad K.; Jones, Kellie R.

    2015-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare but rapidly fatal infection. The main virulence factor of this pathogen is its ?-toxin (lecithinase), which decomposes the phospholipid in cell membranes leading to cell lysis. Once the bacteria are in blood stream, massive intravascular hemolysis occurs. This can present as anemia on admission with evidence of hemolysis as indicated by low serum haptoglobin, high serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elevated indirect bilirubin, and spherocytosis. The clinical course of C. perfringens septicemia is marked by rapidly deteriorating course with a mortality rate ranging from 70 to 100%. The very rapid clinical course makes it difficult to diagnose on time, and most cases are diagnosed at autopsy. Therefore it is important to consider C. perfringens infection in any severely ill patient with fever and evidence of hemolysis. We present a case of seventy-seven-year-old male with septic shock secondary to pyogenic liver abscess with a brief review of existing literature on C. perfringens. PMID:26090240

  6. Aspergillus brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Nutan; Mohammad, Khalid; Kaur, Varinder

    2013-08-01

    Aspergillus brain abscess is a rare clinical entity, which remains a challenge to diagnose and treat. Most fungi are low virulence organisms, often living as commensals. They however, pose a considerable challenge in an immune-compromised host. Systemic steroids are commonly used in treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Despite their relatively safe profile, one peril of such treatment is immune suppression. It is prudent that physicians remain aware of the risk of various opportunistic infections in such patients. We present a case of fatal intra-cranial aspergillosis in an immuno-compromised patient on systemic steroids. PMID:24015447

  7. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  8. Gas-forming liver abscess associated with rapid hemolysis in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Kurasawa, Miwa; Nishikido, Takashi; Koike, Junko; Tominaga, Shin-ichi; Tamemoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We experienced a case of liver abscess due to Clostridium perfringens (CP) complicated with massive hemolysis and rapid death in an adequately controlled type 2 diabetic patient. The patient died 6 h after his first visit to the hospital. CP was later detected in a blood culture. We searched for case reports of CP septicemia and found 124 cases. Fifty patients survived, and 74 died. Of the 30 patients with liver abscess, only 3 cases survived following treatment with emergency surgical drainage. For the early detection of CP infection, detection of Gram-positive rods in the blood or drainage fluid is important. Spherocytes and ghost cells indicate intravascular hemolysis. The prognosis is very poor once massive hemolysis occurs. The major causative organisms of gas-forming liver abscess in diabetic patients are Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Although CP is relatively rare, the survival rate is very poor compared with those of K. pneumoniae and E. coli. Therefore, for every case that presents with a gas-forming liver abscess, the possibility of CP should be considered, and immediate aspiration of the abscess and Gram staining are important. PMID:24748935

  9. Posttraumatic Brain Abscess Caused by Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Khumalo, Amanda; Kiratu, Erastus; Mlisana, Koleka

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic brain abscesses are usually caused by Gram-negative bacilli, notably Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus. Although Aeromonas hydrophila is a recognized cause of trauma-related sepsis, it has not been previously isolated from posttraumatic brain abscesses. We describe the first case of Aeromonas hydrophila brain abscess. PMID:24622098

  10. Nocardia Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Lee, Dong Min; Jeong, Ji Hun; Moon, Song Mi; Seo, Yiel-Hae; Yoo, Chan Jong; Yang, Dongki; Cho, Yong Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia cerebral abscess is rare, constituting approximately 1-2% of all cerebral abscesses. Mortality for a cerebral abscess of Nocardia is three times higher than that of other bacterial cerebral abscesses, therefore, early diagnosis and therapy is important. Nocardia cerebral abscess is generally occur among immunocompromised patients, and critical infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report on a case of a brain abscess by Nocardia farcinica in an immunocompetent patient who received treatment with surgery and antibiotics. This is the second case of a brain abscess caused by N. farcinica in an immunocompetent patient in Korea. PMID:24693470

  11. Listeria monocytogenes: brain abscess or meningoencephalitis?

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, R; Sierra, M F; Pringle, G F; Shucart, W A; Butt, K M

    1979-01-01

    A brain abscess caused by Listeria monocytogenes developed in an immunosuppressed renal transplant patient. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis from this organism were encountered in three other renal transplant recipients at this medical center during the past 4 years. Focal neurologic deficits occurred in patients with either Listeria abscess or meningoencephalitis. Computerized tomography was a rapid aid to the diagnosis of abscess. Immunosuppression has increased the incidence of central nervous system Listeria infections, but ampicillin still provides effective treatment, even when immunosuppressive therapy is continued. Limited experience with Listeria brain abscess suggests that surgical intervention improves the prognosis. PMID:370686

  12. Chronic abscess of the brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J. A.; Shaw, M. D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of solitary brain stem abscess is less than 4% of all posterior fossa abscesses, and probably less than 1% of all intracranial abscesses. Two cases are reported, both presenting as chronic progressive clinical problems and initially diagnosed as gliomas. It is suggested that aspiration is a more suitable treatment than excision, and that in cases secondary to otogenic disease, radical mastoidectomy might have been an adequate method of prophylaxis. Images PMID:303282

  13. Snapshot in surgery: brain abscess as a complication of a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaowei; Wuppalapati, Siddhartha; Scott, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 35-year-old man was found to have a cerebral abscess secondary to a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess. Both cultures grew Streptococcus anginosus. Brain abscess is a rare but potential complication of sigmoid diverticulitis. Streptococcus anginosus, which is found in human gut flora, is a common cause of brain abscess. PMID:26185659

  14. Snapshot in surgery: brain abscess as a complication of a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhaowei; Wuppalapati, Siddhartha; Scott, Nigel

    2015-06-01

    A 35-year-old man was found to have a cerebral abscess secondary to a recurrent sigmoid diverticular abscess. Both cultures grew Streptococcus anginosus. Brain abscess is a rare but potential complication of sigmoid diverticulitis. Streptococcus anginosus, which is found in human gut flora, is a common cause of brain abscess. PMID:26185659

  15. Brain abscess: Heuristics, principles, pathobiology, practice.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Manu; Goel, Atul; Muzumdar, Dattatraya

    2015-01-01

    Brain abscess is an uncommon but a compelling reality in neurosurgical practice. Its focal, local, and systemic manifestations conceal its infective and obsessive nature. There are many a lesson that a brain abscess, as a bio-phenomenon, offers to the medical fraternity in general and the neurosurgeons, in particular. From Skt. puyati = to stink, comes the word "pus," meaning something foul, putrid, or rotten. From ab = away, and cedre = to go, comes the term "abscess" which is but nature's ingenious way of creating a fluid-filled cavity that will eventually rupture to an exterior to get rid of the non-self contents and proceed to healing. A brain abscess is special in the sense that it is, in general, more solid than fluid for reasons the human body and brain know best. PMID:26053804

  16. A Pneumococcal Brain Abscess: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Belodu, Rashmi; S., Nagarathna; R., Ravikumar; Kumar, Rakesh; B.A., Chandramouli

    2013-01-01

    A brain abscess which is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is a rare entity. Here, we have described a gentle man who presented with the signs and symptoms of a mass lesion which was localized to the temporal lobe. The clinical examination and computerized tomography revealed the diagnosis of a temporal abscess. The loculated mass was tapped and it was sent for histopathology, which confirmed the presence of an organizing abscess. A laboratory investigation of the pus revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. The treatment included total excision and the administration of prolonged antibiotics, which led to a good outcome in the patient. PMID:24086878

  17. [Solitary actinomycotic brain abscess: case report].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshihito; Nishimoto, Yo; Hayashi, Satoru; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kuzume, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Keiko; Enzan, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    Actinomycotic brain abscess is a rare condition with uncertain clinical features. Here we report the case of a 66-year-old immune-competent woman with an actinomycotic brain abscess who presented with sensory aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. She had no febrile episode or headache. Moreover, she did not have any periodontal or oto-rhino-laryngological disease, and the results of laboratory tests were normal. A computed tomography scan showed an irregular, low-density area in the left parietal lobe. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed low-signal intensity in a T1 weighted image, high-signal intensity in a T2 weighted image, and mixed intensity on a diffusion weighted image. Thallium-201 chloride scintigraphy showed definite accumulation of thallium in the lesion and the patient's condition gradually deteriorated. Ten days after gadolinium administration, a T1 weighted image showed a multi- lobulated irregular mass in the left parietal lobe. The patient subsequently underwent craniotomy and evacuation of the yellowish abscess. Gram staining of the tissue showed the presence of gram-positive filamentous rods, and abscess cultures were positive for Actinomyces and Prevotella disiens. The abscess resolved after treatment with a high dose of intravenous penicillin G (24 million units/day) for 8 weeks, followed by an oral dose of amoxicillin for 4 months. The patient was discharged with a rudimentary limitation of the visual field. PMID:22647477

  18. [Streptococcus intermedius: a rare cause of brain abscess in children].

    PubMed

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Hafid, I; Najib, J

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, also known as the Streptococcus milleri group. Although this is a commensal agent of the mouth and upper airways, it has been recognized as an important pathogen in the formation of abscesses. However, it has rarely been involved in the formation of brain abscess in children. We report 4 pediatric cases of brain abscess caused by S. intermedius. Three boys and 1 girl, all aged over 2 years, were admitted for a febrile meningeal syndrome and seizures, caused by a S. intermedius brain abscess. Diagnosis was obtained by brain imaging combined with culture of cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was favorable after antibiotic therapy and abscess puncture. S. intermedius should be considered a potential pathogen involved in the development of brain abscess in children. PMID:23375710

  19. Positive indium-111 leukocyte scan in Nocardia brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, J.M.; Osenbach, R.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Youngblood, L.; Crooks, L.; Landry, A.J.; Cawthon, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    We report a case of clinically unsuspected nocardia brain abscess detected by /sup 111/In-labeled autologous leukocytes. Clinical and computed tomographic findings supported the diagnosis of primary or metastatic tumor and the patient was treated with dexamethasone for 30 days prior to the leukocyte scan. Labeled leukocytes may provide a sensitive discriminator for brain abscess despite previous therapy with steroids.

  20. Molecular revolution in the diagnosis of microbial brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A K; Dufour, H; Roche, P-H; Lonjon, M; Raoult, D; Fournier, P-E

    2014-12-01

    A brain abscess is a life-threatening infection, frequently with serious sequelae. Culture-based methods present many limitations and do not enable an exhaustive documentation of the bacterial flora. 16S rRNA-based amplification, cloning, and high-throughput sequencing have dramatically increased the number of identified agents of brain abscesses, showing that the causative flora is polymicrobial in up to 40 % of cases, with the presence of at least one anaerobic bacterium. In contrast, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology is an appealing alternative to culture-based methods for diagnosing brain abscesses due to its speed, sensitivity, and specificity. Molecular typing is available for several bacterial and fungal genera, and this user-friendly tool is accessible for the clinical microbiology laboratory to diagnose microbes involved in a brain abscess. This article reviews the applications of the currently available tools for the etiological diagnosis of a brain abscess. PMID:24935615

  1. Successful Treatment of Multifoci Nocardial Brain Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingsheng; Zhan, Renya; Feng, Yiping; Chen, Jiajia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain nocardiosis is a serious opportunistic infection with high mortality. It exists more common in the immunocompromised hosts than the immunocompetent patients. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) has been mostly considered as the choice of the medical treatment. Linezolid is also newly found to be effective to avoid the invasive surgery. The authors reported a case of patient with multifoci nocardial brain abscesses who failed with the combination of linezolid and TMP-SMZ alone but recovered with the surgery intervention and sequential antibiotics for 2 years. The patient lived a high quality life without recurrence and complications during the 30 months follow-up. Through the literature review, we recommend earlier stereotactic aspiration for diagnosis, combination with surgery intervention and prolonged anti-infection therapy would improve the prognosis. PMID:25984673

  2. Toxic levels of ammonia in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Daniel; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Brain abscesses could lead to cerebral symptoms through tissue destruction, edema, changes in brain architecture, and increased intracranial pressure. However, the possibility that the pus itself could contribute to symptoms has received little attention. Brain abscesses are areas of tissue destruction, proteolysis, and formation of free amino acids, which are energy substrates for bacteria and possible sources of ammonia. Ammonia is neurotoxic, may cause brain edema, and could contribute to the symptoms of brain abscesses. METHODS The authors analyzed the extracellular phase of pus from 14 patients with brain abscesses with respect to ammonia and amino acids. For comparison, CSF from 10 patients undergoing external ventricular drainage was included. The ammonia-forming ability of Streptococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus aureus, two common microbial isolates in brain abscesses, was studied in vitro. RESULTS In brain abscesses ammonia was 15.5 mmol/L (median value; range 1.7-69.2 mmol/L). In CSF ammonia was 29 ?mol/L (range 17-55 ?mol/L; difference from value in pus: p < 0.001). The total concentration of amino acids in brain abscesses was 1.12-16 times higher than the ammonia concentration (p = 0.011). The median glucose value in pus was 0 mmol/L (range 0-2.1 mmol/L), lactate was 21 mmol/L (range 3.3-26.5 mmol/L), and pH was 6.8 (range 6.2-7.3). In vitro, S. intermedius and S. aureus formed ammonia at 6-7 mmol/L in 24 hours when incubated with 20 proteinogenic amino acids plus g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, and glutathione at 1 mmol/L. CONCLUSIONS Intracerebral abscesses contain toxic levels of ammonia. At the concentrations found in pus, ammonia could contribute to the brain edema and the symptoms of brain abscesses. PMID:26274996

  3. [Probable amebic brain abscess in a homosexual man with an Entamoeba histolytica liver abscess].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masayoshi; Taniguchi, Akira; Nagai, Moritaka; Sasaki, Ryogen; Naito, Yutaka; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2007-10-01

    A 51-year-old Japanese-Brazilian homosexual man was admitted to a hospital because of fever, headache and right epigastralgia. He had been homosexual for 20 years. An abdominal CT revealed a liver abscess and microscopic examination of the pus of the drainage revealed cystic forms of Entamoeba histolytica. Oral administration of metronidazole 2,250 mg/day was started for amebic liver abscess. He complained of severe throbbing headache, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed a brain mass of approximately 2 cm in diameter in the right parietooccipital lobe. An amebic brain abscess was suspected and he was transferred to our hospital. Continuous oral administration of metronidazole for 49 days instead of invasive procedures gradually improved headache, fever and right epigastralgia. On the follow-up MRIs, the brain mass was gradually encapsulated, reduced its size, and finally disappeared. A diagnosis of amebic brain abscess was made on the basis of coexistent amebic liver abscess, MRI findings and a dramatic effectiveness to metronidazole. One should pay attention to E. Histolytica infection in the differential diagnosis of the abscess of the liver and brain since it has been increasing in Japan in recent years. PMID:18095503

  4. Brain abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heng-Wei; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Citrobacter koseri is a gram-negative bacillus that causes mostly meningitis and brain abscesses in neonates and infants. However, brain abscess caused by Citrobacter koseri infection in an adult is extremely rare, and only 2 cases have been described. Here, we reported a 73-year-old male presenting with a 3-week headache. A history of diabetes mellitus was noted. The images revealed a brain abscess in the left frontal lobe and pus culture confirmed the growth of Citrobacter koseri. The clinical symptoms improved completely postoperatively. PMID:25864072

  5. Brain abscess after transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Berkel, A E M; Witte, M E; Koop, R; Hendrix, M G R; Klaase, J M

    2013-05-01

    A relatively new therapy in the treatment of hemorrhoids is transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization (THD). We report a case of brain abscess caused by Streptococcus milleri following THD. Although a brain abscess after drainage of a perianal abscess has been described in the literature, no report exists of a brain abscess following treatment of hemorrhoids. A healthy 51-year-old man with hemorrhoids underwent THD. Two weeks later he presented with a headache, bradyphrenia, flattened behavior and a left hemiplegia. No perianal complaint and/or perianal abscess was present. A contrast CT scan of the cerebrum showed a right temporoparieto-occipital abscess, with edema and compression of the surrounding tissue and lateral ventricles. MRI showed an abscess with leakage in the right lateral ventricle. Treatment with dexamethasone and intravenous antibiotics was started. Because of progression of symptoms, 3 weeks later ventriculoscopy was performed and the abscess was drained. Culture of the punctuate showed S. milleri. Because of developing hydrocephalus 3 days after ventriculoscopy, first an external ventricle drain and later a ventriculoperitoneal drain was placed. Hereafter the hemiplegia and cognitive disorders improved. This case report describes a severe complication following treatment of hemorrhoids with THD which until now, to our knowledge, has never been described in the literature. PMID:23741208

  6. [Unusual location of a brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes].

    PubMed

    Coste, J-F; Duval, V; Nguyen, Y; Guillard, T; Brasme, L; David, C; Strady, C; Lecuit, M; de Champs, C

    2012-10-01

    Here we report a case of sustentorial brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes. Blood culture and procalcitonine blood measurement were negative. L. monocytogenes was isolated from CSF after inoculation in Castañeda medium. PMID:21835558

  7. Diagnosis of brain abscesses with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rehncrona, S.; Brismar, J.; Holtas, S.

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen patients with intracerebral mass lesions where computed tomography (CT) was not fully conclusive with respect to the differential diagnosis between brain tumor and abscess were examined with leukocyte brain scintigraphy (LBS). Autologous leukocytes were labeled with indium-111 oxinate and were reinjected intravenously; registration with a gamma camera was performed after 24 and 48 hours. In 10 of 11 patients with the final diagnosis of a brain tumor, no accumulation of radiolabeled leukocytes could be detected in the brain. In 4 of 5 patients with the final diagnosis of brain abscess, scintigraphy showed a pronounced increase of focal activity corresponding to the lesion demonstrated with CT. The reasons for the one false-positive and the one false-negative result are discussed, and it is concluded that LBS (a) can be used to detect intracranial infection and (b) may be a useful diagnostic tool for distinguishing between brain abscess and brain tumor.

  8. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Onofrio, Anthony R.; Martinez, Lauren C.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Spak, Cedric W.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes. Brain abscesses related to this organism are rare. PMID:26130881

  9. Solitary supratentorial Listeria monocytogenes brain abscess in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    West, James A; Onofrio, Anthony R; Martinez, Lauren C; Opatowsky, Michael J; Spak, Cedric W; Layton, Kennith F

    2015-07-01

    We describe an 81-year-old man receiving azacitidine monotherapy for myelodysplastic syndrome who was improving from Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia after receiving antibiotic therapy during an earlier hospital admission. Shortly after discharge he developed new-onset seizure activity, with brain imaging on subsequent admissions demonstrating a posterior right frontal lobe mass. Specimen cultures after resection of the mass revealed this to be a cerebral abscess related to L. monocytogenes. Brain abscesses related to this organism are rare. PMID:26130881

  10. Nocardia abscessus brain abscess in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Al Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Mayman, Talal; Memish, Ziad A

    2013-06-01

    Nocardia brain abscesses typically occur in immunocompromised patients. Most cases of nocardiosis are caused by the Nocardia asteroides complex and Nocardia brasiliensis. Here, we present a patient with a Nocardia abscessus brain abscess. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA sequencing, and the organism was susceptible to linezolid, clarithromycin, ceftriaxone, imipenem, tobramycin, amikacin, minocycline and sulfamethoxazole. The patient was successfully treated medically in combination with surgical excision. PMID:23668458

  11. Scedosporium apiospermum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent man with silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Kennedy, Karina J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Scedosporium apiosporum brain abscesses in an immunocompetent 69-year-old man with a history of silicosis. Delayed diagnosis and institution of antifungal therapy was associated with neurological impairment, with subsequent complications resulting in death, highlighting the need for early diagnostic aspiration of brain abscesses non-responsive to antibiotics. We propose that, in the absence of identifiable immunosuppression, silicosis may have been a contributing factor to the development of central nervous system infection. PMID:24432222

  12. Brain abscess in hepatopulmonary syndrome associated with biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keiichi; Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Maeda, Kosaku

    2015-12-01

    The first-choice therapy for biliary atresia (BA) is Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy, which has been shown to greatly improve outcome. Various long-term complications, however, such as portal hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), can occur in patients with native liver. A rare case of brain abscess in an 11-year-old girl with HPS associated with BA is reported. The patient underwent hepatoportoenterostomy for BA at 53 days of age, with resolution of hyperbilirubinemia. At 10 years of age, she was diagnosed with severe HPS with right-to-left shunting, and preparations for liver transplantation proceeded. Three months after the diagnosis, she had a right parietal brain abscess. Given that the brain abscess enlarged in size, surgical drainage of the brain abscess was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, but a slight left hemiplegia remained at discharge. The presumed mechanism of abscess formation in HPS may be right-to-left bacterial transit through intrapulmonary vascular dilatations and/or arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:26711920

  13. The role of Streptococcus intermedius in brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A K; Fournier, P-E

    2013-04-01

    Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, despite recent advances made in detection and therapy. Streptococcus intermedius, a commensal organism, has the potential to cause significant morbidity. S. intermedius expresses one or more members of a family of structurally and antigenically related surface proteins termed antigen I/II, which plays a potential role in its pathogenesis. It is involved in binding to human fibronectin and laminin and in inducing IL-8 release from monocytes, which promotes neutrophil chemotaxis and activation. There are few published data on the role of this organism in brain abscess. This review focuses on the clinical evidence, pathogenic role, mechanism of predisposition, and currently employed strategies to fight against S. intermedius associated to brain abscess. PMID:23187823

  14. Scedosporium apiospermum causing brain abscess in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Singh, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is the asexual form of a rare fungus Pseudallescheria boydii that is usually present in the soil, sewage and dirty water. In immunocompromised patients, it is a rare infection involving multiple organs. We present a case of renal allograft recipient who developed fever two weeks post renal transplant. He was initially found to have dengue fever. After five days, he became drowsy and developed right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple irregular masses with associated edema consistent with fungal brain abscesses. Left parietal abscess was drained and he was started on voriconazole. His cyclosporine was stopped. Drained pus revealed fungal hyphae on potassium hydroxide stain and Scedosporium apiospermum on culture. Unfortunately, the patient died after five days. Scedosporium infections should be kept as a possibility in transplant recipients with disseminated infections, especially with a brain abscess. Despite antifungal therapy and surgical drainage, mortality rates are high. PMID:26586067

  15. Brain abscess mimicking brain metastasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khullar, Pooja; Datta, Niloy R; Wahi, Inderjeet Kaur; Kataria, Sabeena

    2016-03-01

    61year old female presented with chief complaints of headache for 30days, fever for 10days, altered behavior for 10days and convulsion for 2days. She was diagnosed and treated as a case of carcinoma of left breast 5years ago. MRI brain showed a lobulated lesion in the left frontal lobe. She came to our hospital for whole brain radiation as a diagnosed case of carcinoma of breast with brain metastasis. Review of MRI brain scan, revealed metastasis or query infective pathology. MR spectroscopy of the lesion revealed choline: creatinine and choline: NAA (N-Acetylaspartate) ratios of ∼1.6 and 1.5 respectively with the presence of lactate within the lesion suggestive of infective pathology. She underwent left fronto temporal craniotomy and evacuation of abscess and subdural empyema. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci. After 1month of evacuation and treatment she was fine. This case suggested a note of caution in every case of a rapidly evolving space-occupying lesion independent of the patient's previous history. PMID:26616913

  16. Kocuria varians infection associated with brain abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kocuria, established by Stackebrandt et al., previously was classified into Micrococcus. Only two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae are reported to be associated as pathogenic and found with catheter-related bacteremia and acute cholecystitis. Case presentation We herein report the first case of brain abscess caused by Kocuria varians, a gram-positive microorganism, in a 52-year-old man. Hematogenous spread is the probable pathogenesis. Conclusions This report presents a case of Kocuria varians brain abscess successfully treated with surgical excision combined with antimicrobial therapy. In addition, Vitek 2 system has been used to identify and differentiate between coagulase-negative staphylococcus. PMID:20423506

  17. Staging of human brain abscess by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Placone, R.

    1983-03-01

    Precontrast and postcontrast computed tomograp(hic (CT) scans of patients with brain abscesses were quantitatively studied to determine if the degree of encapsulation could be predicted. The findings in these cases correlated closely to the CT criteria for encapsulation previously established in an experimental model. Time-density curves of serial delayed postcontrast CT scans and the precontrast CT appearance yielded accurate criteria for determining the degree of encapsulation. The effect of corticosteroid treatment on contrast enhancement of brain abscess was also studied in one patient.

  18. Mycobacterium avium–intracellulare brain abscesses in an HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Christopher; Amaraneni, Akshay; Lutwick, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium–intracellulare complex (MAC) is an uncommon cause of brain abscesses even in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We present a case of a multiple MAC brain abscesses, confirmed by brain biopsy and culture, in a patient with AIDS. The patient's initial symptoms were weakness, confusion and headaches. The patient was initially treated for toxoplasmosis and pyogenic bacterial brain abscesses with no resolution. Following treatment for MAC the patient's abscesses resolved. PMID:26793442

  19. Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... almost any part of the body. The skin, under the skin, and the teeth are the most common sites. Abscesses may be caused by bacteria, parasites, and foreign substances. Abscesses in the skin are ...

  20. Brain abscess caused by Brucella abortus and Staphylococcus aureus in a child.

    PubMed

    Kalelioğlu, M; Ceylan, S; Köksal, I; Kuzeyli, K; Aktürk, F

    1990-01-01

    A case of a 12-year-old male with Fallot's tetralogy and brain abscess due to Brucella and Staphylococcus is presented. The abscess was aspirated and Brucella abortus and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. PMID:2127588

  1. Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  2. Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  3. Massive parallel sequencing provides new perspectives on bacterial brain abscesses.

    PubMed

    Kommedal, Øyvind; Wilhelmsen, Marianne Thulin; Skrede, Steinar; Meisal, Roger; Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Gaustad, Peter; Hermansen, Nils Olav; Vik-Mo, Einar; Solheim, Ole; Ambur, Ole Herman; Sæbø, Øystein; Høstmælingen, Christina Teisner; Helland, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Rapid development within the field of massive parallel sequencing (MPS) is about to bring this technology within reach for diagnostic microbiology laboratories. We wanted to explore its potential for improving diagnosis and understanding of polymicrobial infections, using bacterial brain abscesses as an example. We conducted a prospective nationwide study on bacterial brain abscesses. Fifty-two surgical samples were included over a 2-year period. The samples were categorized as either spontaneous intracerebral, spontaneous subdural, or postoperative. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from the specimens and sequenced using Ion Torrent technology, with an average of 500,000 reads per sample. The results were compared to those from culture- and Sanger sequencing-based diagnostics. Compared to culture, MPS allowed for triple the number of bacterial identifications. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus intermedius or combinations of them were found in all spontaneous polymicrobial abscesses. F. nucleatum was systematically detected in samples with anaerobic flora. The increased detection rate for Actinomyces spp. and facultative Gram-negative rods further revealed several species associations. We suggest that A. aphrophilus, F. nucleatum, and S. intermedius are key pathogens for the establishment of spontaneous polymicrobial brain abscesses. In addition, F. nucleatum seems to be important for the development of anaerobic flora. MPS can accurately describe polymicrobial specimens when a sufficient number of reads is used to compensate for unequal species concentrations and principles are defined to discard contaminant bacterial DNA in the subsequent data analysis. This will contribute to our understanding of how different types of polymicrobial infections develop. PMID:24671797

  4. Massive Parallel Sequencing Provides New Perspectives on Bacterial Brain Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Marianne Thulin; Skrede, Steinar; Meisal, Roger; Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Gaustad, Peter; Hermansen, Nils Olav; Vik-Mo, Einar; Solheim, Ole; Ambur, Ole Herman; Sæbø, Øystein; Høstmælingen, Christina Teisner; Helland, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development within the field of massive parallel sequencing (MPS) is about to bring this technology within reach for diagnostic microbiology laboratories. We wanted to explore its potential for improving diagnosis and understanding of polymicrobial infections, using bacterial brain abscesses as an example. We conducted a prospective nationwide study on bacterial brain abscesses. Fifty-two surgical samples were included over a 2-year period. The samples were categorized as either spontaneous intracerebral, spontaneous subdural, or postoperative. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from the specimens and sequenced using Ion Torrent technology, with an average of 500,000 reads per sample. The results were compared to those from culture- and Sanger sequencing-based diagnostics. Compared to culture, MPS allowed for triple the number of bacterial identifications. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus intermedius or combinations of them were found in all spontaneous polymicrobial abscesses. F. nucleatum was systematically detected in samples with anaerobic flora. The increased detection rate for Actinomyces spp. and facultative Gram-negative rods further revealed several species associations. We suggest that A. aphrophilus, F. nucleatum, and S. intermedius are key pathogens for the establishment of spontaneous polymicrobial brain abscesses. In addition, F. nucleatum seems to be important for the development of anaerobic flora. MPS can accurately describe polymicrobial specimens when a sufficient number of reads is used to compensate for unequal species concentrations and principles are defined to discard contaminant bacterial DNA in the subsequent data analysis. This will contribute to our understanding of how different types of polymicrobial infections develop. PMID:24671797

  5. Successful neuroendoscopic treatment of intraventricular brain abscess rupture.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Takafumi; Ikeda, Norio; Nakano, Shigeki; Sakakura, Takanori; Abiko, Masaru; Okamura, Tomomi

    2011-07-01

    Intraventricular rupture of a brain abscess is still associated with a high mortality rate. Here, we report such a case in a patient with normal immunity that was treated successfully using neuroendoscopic approach. A 69-year-old man who had presented with headache and fever developed confusion and restlessness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass with ring enhancement extending to the right ventricle. Emergency aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the spinal canal revealed severe purulent meningitis. Bacterial culture of the CSF and blood was negative. Because of prolonged consciousness disturbance, the patient underwent evacuation of the intraventrcular abscess using a neuroendoscope. The pus was centrifuged and collected for bacterial culture, and this revealed Streptococcus intermedius/milleri. After implantation of a ventricular catheter, gentamicin sulfate was administered twice a day for 9 days. Cefotaxime sodium was also administered intravenously for 14 days, followed by oral administration of cefcapene pivoxil hydrochloride for 10 days. The patient made a complete recovery, and was discharged 31 days after admission. After 20 months of follow-up, he is doing well and has returned to his work. In cases of intraventricular rupture of a brain abscess, a neuroendoscopic approach is useful for evacuation of intraventricular debris or septum, and identification of the causative bacterium for selection of antibiotics, possibly reducing the period of hospitalization. PMID:24765313

  6. Brain Abscess after Percutaneous Therapy for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Acqui, Michele; Familiari, Pietro; Pesce, Alessandro; Toccaceli, Giada; Raco, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of brain abscess following the percutaneous treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. This procedure envisages the access with a needle into the middle cranial fossa through the oral cavity. Thus, in this case, the bacterial infection can be more likely ascribed to the possible contamination of the needle inside the oral cavity rather than to other frequent and more controllable causes of infection like an imperfect sterilization of surgical instruments or an inadequate antiseptic preparation of both operator's hands and patient's skin. The subsequent brain abscess was treated with antibiotic therapy (Vancomycin 2?gr a day and Meropenem 8?g a day for 22 days before the surgical procedure and 30 days after, until complete normalization of laboratory parameters, clinical parameters, and neurological symptoms) and surgical drainage, although the culture of the abscess capsule and the purulent material resulted sterile. In conclusion, the percutaneous therapy for trigeminal neuralgia can be objectively related to risks, even if performed by expert hands. Therefore, it is important that the patient should be advised regarding risks/benefits and/or septic complications of such procedures, even if they occur very seldom. An association of surgery and antibiotic therapy results as effective treatment for this pathologic condition. PMID:25821610

  7. Vancomycin penetration of a brain abscess: case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.M.; Gutin, P.H.; Baskin, D.S.; Pons, V.G.

    1986-05-01

    A 56-year-old man developed an abscess within a right parietal cystic anaplastic astrocytoma 3 days after removal of iodine-125 sources placed 9 days earlier for interstitial radiation therapy. After treatment with cephalosporin antibiotics proved unsuccessful, the patient was treated with intravenous vancomycin and intermittent percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Vancomycin levels obtained from the brain abscess fluid, both before and during later operative removal of the abscess, were 15 and 18 micrograms/ml, respectively; the serum vancomycin level was 21 micrograms/ml. This is the first report of the excellent penetration of vancomycin into brain abscess fluid.

  8. Drastic Therapy for Listerial Brain Abscess Involving Combined Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Keiichi; Ideo, Katsumasa; Shindo, Seigo; Suga, Tomohiro; Ueda, Akihiko; Honda, Shoji; Hirahara, Tomoo; Watanabe, Masaki; Yamashita, Taro; Maeda, Yasushi; Yonemochi, Yasuhiro; Takita, Tomohiro; Ando, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is a rare causative pathogen of brain abscess that is often found in immunocompromised patients. Although patients with supratentorial listerial abscesses showed a longer survival with surgical drainage, the standard therapy for patients with subtentorial lesions has not been established. Case Report We report herein a patient with supra- and subtentorial brain abscesses caused by L. monocytogenes infection. These abscesses did not respond to antibiotics, and his symptoms gradually worsened. Drainage was not indicated for subtentorial lesions, and the patient was additionally treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which dramatically reduced the volume of abscesses and improved the symptoms. Conclusions This is the first report of drastic therapy for a patient with listerial brain abscesses involving combined antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The findings suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a good option for treating patients with deep-seated listerial abscesses and for who surgical drainage is not indicated. PMID:25324887

  9. A case of a brain stem abscess with a favorable outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bulthuis, Vincent J.; Gubler, Felix S.; Teernstra, Onno P. M.; Temel, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Background: A brain stem abscess is a rare and severe medical condition. Here, we present a rare case of a brain stem abscess in a young pregnant woman, requiring acute stereotactic intervention. Case Description: A 36-year-old woman presented with a headache, nausea, and vomiting, and computed tomography showed a space-occupying lesion in the brain stem. She became shortly after comatose, and we decided to perform an acute stereotactic aspiration of the abscess. Soon after surgery, her neurological condition improved dramatically. Conclusion: A brainstem abscess is a life-threatening condition with a potentially good outcome if treated adequately. PMID:26543670

  10. Isolation of Mycoplasma hominis from a brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Olson, D A; Tully, J G; Watson, H L; Cassell, G H; Gustafson, D R; Svien, K A; Smith, T F

    1997-04-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a commensal in the genital tract of women and has been associated with urogenital and extragenital infections. However, central nervous system infections with this organism in adults are very rare. Here we describe the recovery of M. hominis from a brain abscess associated with a postpartum infection. Seroconversion to the isolated strain was detected by both a metabolic inhibition test and an immunoblotting assay. This case demonstrates the pathogenic potential of M. hominis and the need for rapid recognition of the organism so that appropriate chemotherapeutic intervention can occur. PMID:9157171

  11. Multiple Brain Abscesses due to Streptococcus anginosus: Prediction of Mortality by an Imaging Severity Index Score

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient with altered mental status, brain abscesses, ventriculitis, and empyemas died of septic shock and brain abscesses secondary to Streptococcus anginosus despite aggressive treatment. An imaging severity index score with a better prognostic value than the Glasgow coma scale predicted mortality in this patient.

  12. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections Boils especially on the back or scalp Bone infections of the spine (vertebral osteomyelitis) People who inject ... Complications may include: Brain abscess Brain damage Bone ... Meningitis Nerve damage Return of infection Spinal cord abscess

  13. Brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dee, R R; Lorber, B

    1986-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an uncommon cause of brain abscess. Of a total of 14 cases of L. monocytogenes brain abscess (one described for the first time and 13 reported previously in the English-language literature), seven (50%) occurred in patients with leukemia and recipients of renal transplants; four (29%) of the cases occurred in previously healthy individuals. Common clinical findings were similar to those in brain abscess due to other causes and included fever (57%), headache (57%), and focal neurologic signs (64%). Distinctive, however, was the unusually high frequency of associated meningitis and bacteremia; blood cultures were positive in all eight cases in which they were performed. Eight (57%) of the 14 patients died. L. monocytogenes should be included in the differential diagnosis of brain abscess in patients with leukemia and in renal transplant recipients. Listerial brain abscess is highly unlikely when blood culture results are negative. PMID:3099364

  14. Potential nosocomial acquisition of epidemic Listeria monocytogenes presenting as multiple brain abscesses resembling nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Aleksandra; Reid, James; Nadon, A Celine; Grant, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Listerial brain abscesses are rare, and are found mostly in patients with underlying hematological malignancies or solid-organ transplants. A case of a patient with Crohn’s disease and multiple brain abscesses involving the left cerebellum and right sylvian fissure is described. The Gram stain and histopathology of the cerebellar abscess revealed Gram-positive, beaded rods suggestive of Nocardia. However, on culture, Listeria monocytogenes was identified. Listeria may appear Gram-variable and has been misidentified as streptococci, enterococci and diphtheroids. The present case is the first reported case of L monocytogenes resembling Nocardia on both microbiological and histopathological assessment. Reported cases of listerial brain abscesses are sporadic, while the current case was part of a nationwide listerial outbreak linked to consumption of contaminated deli meats. Broad antimicrobial therapy (including antilisterial coverage) in immunosuppressed patients presenting with brain abscess is crucial, until cultures confirm the identification of the organism. PMID:21358887

  15. A rare case of Trichosporon brain abscess, successfully treated with surgical excision and antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Keivan; Meidani, Mohsen; Rezaie, Farshid; Soheilnader, Shabnam; Fatehi, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Trichosporonosis is an acute, sometimes fatal infection with the potential capability of disseminating to multiple deep organs. More than 100 cases of trichosporonosis have been described, particularly in patients with neutropenia or haematological malignancies. In 1970, Watson et al. described the first case of brain trichosporonosis; the patient died 4 weeks after admission. Herein, we describe a 34-year-old man with a history of autoimmune hepatitis, hypothyroidism, and alopecia totalis, treated with corticosteroids, who was admitted with left lower limb weakness. Brain MRI revealed a diffuse brain lesion in the right frontoparietal area mimicking a brain abscess. After resection of the lesion, Trichosporon asahii was isolated from the abscess. Further treatment with antifungal agents resulted in improvement in clinical status. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of Trichosporon brain abscess since the first description in 1970 and the first case of successful treatment of Trichosporon brain abscess. PMID:22426768

  16. [Bifrontal cerebritis and brain abscess caused by Sreptococcus anginosus group: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Matamala, José Manuel; Núñez, Carolina; Ogrodnik, Rosa; Cartier, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of brain abscesses is mostly polymicrobial. Streptococci and anaerobic bacteria are the most commonly isolated pathogens. We report a previously healthy female without predisposing factors, presenting with a bifrontal cerebritis caused by a Streptococcus anginosus group infection. The patient developed a brain abscess and a subdural collection with severe intracranial hypertension of fatal evolution. The etiologic diagnosis was made culturing the material obtained from the subdural collection. It is presumed that, within the Streptococcus anginosus group, Streptococus intermedius could have been the causing bacteria, given its central nervous system tissue tropism and its predisposition to form brain abscesses. PMID:23732422

  17. Prevotella brain abscess in a healthy young patient with a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok; Choi, Chan Young; Kwak, Jae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    Brain abscesses are frequently caused by poly-microbial conditions. Comparatively, brain abscesses caused by Prevotella species are very rare. Right-to-left cardiac shunting due to a patent foramen ovale may predispose patients to infection. We report an isolated Prevotella brain abscess that occurred in a healthy, young, male patient with a patent foramen ovale. The patient did not have a clinically obvious odontogenic source of infection, and no other distant extracranial infectious sources were observed. The patient was successfully treated with stereotactic aspiration and antibiotics. PMID:26851526

  18. Microascus cinereus (Anamorph Scopulariopsis) Brain Abscess in a Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Moser, Stephen A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Pappas, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first documented case of brain abscess due to the dematiaceous fungus Microascus cinereus, an organism common in soil and stored grain. M. cinereus was isolated from brain abscess material from a bone marrow transplant recipient. The patient responded well to treatment by amphotericin B lipid complex, itraconazole, and a craniotomy but later died from secondary complications caused by graft-versus-host disease. PMID:10618123

  19. Secondary brain abscess following simple renal cyst infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common causative bacteria of neonatal meningitis, but hematogenous intracranial E. coli infection is rare in adults. Moreover, intracranial abscess formation owing to E. coli, including brain abscesses and subdural empyema formation, is extremely rare. We herein present a case involving a patient with a brain abscess owing to E. coli following a simple renal cyst infection. A review of the literature is also presented. Case presentation A 77-year-old Japanese woman with a history of polymyalgia rheumatica was admitted to our hospital because of persistent fever, right flank pain, and pyuria. Intravenous antibiotics were administered; however, her level of consciousness deteriorated 6 days after admission. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain abscess in the left occipital lobe and pyogenic ventriculitis. Enhanced abdominal computed tomography revealed a right renal cyst with heterogeneous content. Culture of urine, blood, and aspirated pus from the infected cyst revealed E. coli with identical antibiotic sensitivity in all sites, suggesting that the cyst infection and subsequent bacteremia might have caused the brain abscess. The patient recovered after a 6-week course of meropenem. Conclusion The prognosis of patients with E. coli-associated intracranial abscess is usually poor. Advanced age and immunosuppression may be potent risk factors for intracranial abscess formation owing to the hematogenous spread of E. coli. PMID:24934996

  20. Retrospective analysis of 49 cases of brain abscess and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, J; Stapleton, S; Holliman, R

    2007-01-01

    The case records of 49 patients discharged from St George's Hospital, London, between December 2000 and March 2004 with the diagnosis of brain abscess were reviewed in order to document the epidemiology, causes, treatment, and prognostic factors associated with brain abscess. Brain abscess occurred at all ages, more frequently in men than in women. Headache and altered mental status were common presenting symptoms. The frontal lobe was the most common site. Streptococcal infection was seen most commonly, but staphylococcal infection predominated in cases following neurosurgery. Computed tomography provided sufficient diagnostic information in most cases. All but five patients had early surgical drainage. Cefotaxime and metronidazole were used most often for empirical therapy. Thirty-nine patients recovered fully or had minimal incapacity. Five patients died. Patients with underlying cranial neoplasms or medical conditions had a worse outcome than those with a contiguous focus of infection or post-traumatic abscess. Changes in disease pattern were determined by comparison to a literature review. A PubMed search of the literature using the keywords "brain abscess" was undertaken, and identified papers and relevant citations were reviewed. Compared to earlier series, there was a marked decrease in the number of cases of brain abscess secondary to otitis media and congenital heart disease. There was an increase in the number of cases of brain abscess secondary to neurosurgery and trauma. Changes in the epidemiology of predisposing conditions for brain abscess are associated with changes in the patient population and causative organisms. Though still a potentially fatal infection, there have been recent improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. PMID:17180609

  1. Indium-111-granulocyte scintigraphy in brain abscess diagnosis: Limitations and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K.G.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Frederiksen, P.B.; Kock-Jensen, C.; Pedersen, N.T. )

    1990-07-01

    The scintigrams and records of 28 patients referred for indium-111-granulocyte scintigraphy (111In-GS) because of a suspected brain abscess were studied retrospectively. The final diagnosis was brain abscess in 8 patients, brain tumor in 18 patients, and infarct and hematoma in 1 patient each. Five patients not on corticosteroid treatment showed intense focal 111In accumulation in abscesses, whereas an abscess patient receiving a high steroid dose showed no uptake. Two patients studied twice showed intense uptake in abscesses when not on steroid therapy or on a low dose, whereas no uptake was seen when they received high or medium doses. Weak or moderate 111In uptake was observed in nine tumors. Microscopically assessed degree of tumor granulocyte infiltration, vessel proliferation, and hemorrhage did not correlate with the outcome of 111In GS. Our results suggest that intense focal cerebral 111In uptake favors the abscess diagnosis. Abscesses may go undetected, however, in patients on high- or medium-dose steroid therapy.

  2. Current concepts of bacterial infections of the central nervous system. Bacterial meningitis and bacterial brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Garvey, G

    1983-11-01

    Investigative work continues to provide guidance toward more rational management of bacterial meningitis and bacterial brain abscess. An increased understanding of the host's response in cases of bacterial meningitis has established that diffusibility of an antibiotic into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is necessary, but is not sufficient for microbial cure. The antibiotic must also have a bactericidal effect on the pathogen. Meningitis after neurosurgery may be caused by Gram-negative aerobic bacilli. In some of these cases the newer cephalosporin antibiotics may be a useful advance. Meningitis complicating ventricular CSF shunts presents a paradigm for the problem of eradicating foreign body-related infections. Studies of the interaction of the host, the organism, and the shunt material offer some explanation for the limited efficacy of antibiotics observed in this setting. There have been advances in microbial definition of bacterial brain abscess. The identification of Bacteroides fragilis as a pathogen in certain brain abscesses has established a role for a newly available antibiotic, metronidazole. The study of the pathological distinction between cerebritis and frank abscess is clarifying two clinical characteristics of brain abscess: the limited success of antibiotic treatment and the increase in intracranial pressure. Computerized tomography has offered a valuable clinical "look" at brain abscesses; however, there are still problems in correlating the scan images with the evolving pathological process. PMID:6352873

  3. Primary Intraventricular Brain Abscess Resulting in Isolated Dilation of the Inferior Horn and Unilateral Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Kawazoe, Yushi; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Primary intraventricular brain abscesses are rare, and there are no established treatment guidelines for this condition. We report a case in which isolated ventricular dilatation and unilateral hydrocephalus developed after seemingly successful conservative management and which required surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid. A 59-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with high-grade fever and headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed abscesses in the bilateral posterior horn. Although surgical evacuation of the abscesses was considered, conservative management with antibiotics was selected because of the paucity of severe neurological deficits and the concern that an attempt to evacuate the intraventricular abscess might lead to inadvertent rupture of the abscess capsule and acute ventriculitis. Despite reduction in the abscess volume, the patient developed an altered mental status 4 weeks after admission. Follow-up MRI revealed isolated dilation of the left inferior horn, compressing the brainstem. Emergency fenestration of the dilated inferior horn was performed, and endoscopic observation revealed an encapsulated abscess with adhesion to the ventricular wall which was thought responsible for the ventricular dilation and unilateral hydrocephalus. Two weeks after the initial surgery, the unilateral hydrocephalus was treated by placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Eradication of the intraventricular brain abscesses without surgical evacuation may justify the conservative management of this patient. However, the possibility that earlier surgical evacuation might have prevented development of the isolated ventricular dilation cannot be denied. Additional clinical experience is required to determine which treatment (surgical vs. conservative) is more appropriate in patients with primary intraventricular brain abscesses. PMID:26351446

  4. A brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin in a child with cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Moti; Birenboim, Ravit; Katz-Sagi, Hadas; Perles, Zeev; Averbuch, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present report was to present a rare case of a brain abscess in a child with heterotaxy syndrome, severe cardiac anomalies, and extensive dental caries. The pathogen was Streptococcus intermedius isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid. The source of the pathogen was probably an infection of a primary molar with a dentoalveolar abscess involving the bud of the permanent successor. After a long course of antibiotic regimens followed by a craniotomy with abscess drainage, a shunt, and comprehensive dental treatment, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any neurological sequel. At home, she completed an additional 3 months of oral antibiotics. This is the only known documented case of a toddler with a brain abscess of probable odontogenic origin without previous dental intervention. It emphasizes the importance of collaboration between cardiologists and pediatric dentists, especially in referring children with congenital heart defects for early dental checkups. PMID:23211917

  5. A Case of Brain Abscess Caused by Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Kenji; Nagai, Hiroki; Baba, Osamu; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Hasegawa, Shogo; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Reports of brain abscesses caused by medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) are very rare. We here present the case of a 76-year-old man with terminal-stage prostatic carcinoma and a brain abscess caused by MRONJ at the maxilla. The patient had been treated with zoledronic acid and denosumab for bone metastasis. For the brain abscess, an antibiotic regimen based on ceftriaxone and metronidazole and a sequestrectomy contributed to a successful outcome. In the case of maxillary MRONJ extending to the maxillary sinus, active resection of the infected bone should be considered to prevent the spread of the infection beyond the maxillary sinus, into the ethmoid sinus, and into the brain. PMID:26949551

  6. A Case of Brain Abscess Caused by Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kenji; Nagai, Hiroki; Baba, Osamu; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Hasegawa, Shogo; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Reports of brain abscesses caused by medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) are very rare. We here present the case of a 76-year-old man with terminal-stage prostatic carcinoma and a brain abscess caused by MRONJ at the maxilla. The patient had been treated with zoledronic acid and denosumab for bone metastasis. For the brain abscess, an antibiotic regimen based on ceftriaxone and metronidazole and a sequestrectomy contributed to a successful outcome. In the case of maxillary MRONJ extending to the maxillary sinus, active resection of the infected bone should be considered to prevent the spread of the infection beyond the maxillary sinus, into the ethmoid sinus, and into the brain. PMID:26949551

  7. Distinct cytokine pattern in response to different bacterial pathogens in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anamika; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Mishra, Priyanka; Singh, Aloukick Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Ojha, Bal Krishan

    2014-08-15

    Brain abscess is a focal suppurative process. Host inflammatory response in Gram type and specific bacteria has not been studied in brain abscess. A total of 57 brain abscess patients with monomicrobial infections were studied for Th1 (TNF-?, IFN-?, IL1-?), Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) and Th17 (IL-17, IL-23) cytokine response by reverse-transcriptase PCR and ELISA. Th1 and Th17 cytokines were significantly elevated in Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus intermedius) and Th2 cytokine (IL-10) in Gram negative (Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli) infections (p<0.05). Cytokine levels were significantly higher in abscess than blood (p<0.001). Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines (TNF-?, IFN-?, IL1-?, IL-17 and IL-23) were associated with the duration of symptoms; predisposing factors also influenced the levels of several cytokines. The expression of inflammatory cytokines in abscess was influenced by the bacterial pathogen, duration of symptoms and predisposing factors. Local milieu of brain plays significant role in secretion of various cytokines. PMID:24910026

  8. High-resolution ultrasound evaluation of experimental brain abscess evolution: comparison with computed tomography and neuropathology

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; Britt, R.H.; Lyons, B.; Carroll, B.; Wilson, D.A.; Buxton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) and high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging of experimental brain abscess were correlated with neuropathologic findings in nine mongrel dogs. The HRUS scan was more sensitive to different histologic features than the CT scan but both accurately delineated the evolution of the experimental brain abscess. All stages of abscess evolution were characterized by an appearance of an echogenic rim with a hypoechoic center. In the early stages the echogenicity of the abscess was related primarily to marked cellular infiltration while in the late stages extensive collagen deposition correlated closely with the echo pattern. The size of the abscess in the cerebritis stages appeared smaller on the HRUS scan than on the CT scan because the latter modality detected the extensive cerebritis around the developing necrotic center whereas the HRUS scan did not. This discrepancy disappeared in the capsule stages. The HRUS scan provided a more accurate depiction of the neuropathologic characteristics of the necrotic center than did the CT scan. Healing of the abscess, indicated by a decrease in size of the hypoechoic center, was accurately detected by the HRUS scan.

  9. Brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes: first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Treebupachatsakul, Pornpit; Srifeungfung, Somporn; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2006-09-01

    Brain abscess with bacteremia caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a young woman with immune thrombocytopenic purpura was reported. The clinical features included fever, headache, and left-side weakness. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large single abscess at the right frontoparietal area. L. monocytogenes was isolated from a blood culture. The patient promptly received a surgical drainage. Because she had a history of penicillin allergy, and the organism was resistant to ampicillin, she was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) alone for 12 months. During a one-year follow-up period, the patient improved and her neurological deficit gradually recovered. This is the first case of listerial brain abscess in Thailand that was successfully treated with TMP-SMX monotherapy and surgical drainage. PMID:17100394

  10. Brain Abscess in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a Cephalic Implant

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristy; McCort, Holly; Reuter, Jon D

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of brain abscess after craniotomy and the placement of a recording chamber for electrophysiologic records in an adult rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) enrolled in visual research. Approximately 2 wk after surgery, the macaque presented with nonspecific gastrointestinal signs and showed no evidence of fever, neurologic deficits, increased intracranial pressure, suggestive alterations in the CBC, or abnormal changes in the recording chamber. The macaque responded to symptomatic and antibiotic treatment and showed no behavioral or abnormal clinical signs for 3 wk before collapsing suddenly. The macaque was euthanized, and pathologic evaluation revealed a large brain abscess immediately under the original craniotomy. PMID:24209974

  11. Brain abscess caused by Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wang-Huei; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2009-05-01

    We describe a previously healthy patient with chronic otitis media complicated with cerebellar abscess caused by Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens. The organism was identified based on conventional biochemical identification methods, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the hsp65 gene, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated successfully with debridements and prolonged antibiotic therapy. PMID:19297591

  12. Brain Abscess and Keratoacanthoma Suggestive of Hyper IgE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Amin, Reza; Teymoori, Alireza; Houshmand, Hamidreza; Houshmand, Gholamreza; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Hyper immunoglobulin-E (IgE) syndrome is an autosomal immune deficiency disease. It is characterized by an increase in IgE and eosinophil count with both T-cell and B-cell malfunction. Here, we report an 8-year-old boy whose disease started with an unusual skin manifestation. When 6 months old he developed generalized red, nontender nodules and pathologic report of the skin lesion was unremarkable (inflammatory). Then he developed a painless, cold abscess. At the age of 4 years, he developed a seronegative polyarticular arthritis. Another skin biopsy was taken which was in favor of Keratoacanthoma. Laboratory workup for immune deficiency showed high eosinophil count and high level of immunoglobulin-E, due to some diagnostic criteria (NIH sores: 41 in 9-year-olds), he was suggestive of hyper IgE syndrome. At the age of 8, the patient developed an abscess in the left inguinal region. While in hospital, the patient developed generalized tonic colonic convulsion and fever. Brain computed tomography scan revealed an abscess in the right frontal lobe. Subsequently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain indicated expansion of the existing abscess to contralateral frontal lobe (left side). After evacuating the abscesses and administrating intravenous antibiotic, the patient's condition improved dramatically and fever stopped. PMID:26060590

  13. Brain Abscess and Keratoacanthoma Suggestive of Hyper IgE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Amin, Reza; Teymoori, Alireza; Houshmand, Hamidreza; Houshmand, Gholamreza; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Hyper immunoglobulin-E (IgE) syndrome is an autosomal immune deficiency disease. It is characterized by an increase in IgE and eosinophil count with both T-cell and B-cell malfunction. Here, we report an 8-year-old boy whose disease started with an unusual skin manifestation. When 6 months old he developed generalized red, nontender nodules and pathologic report of the skin lesion was unremarkable (inflammatory). Then he developed a painless, cold abscess. At the age of 4 years, he developed a seronegative polyarticular arthritis. Another skin biopsy was taken which was in favor of Keratoacanthoma. Laboratory workup for immune deficiency showed high eosinophil count and high level of immunoglobulin-E, due to some diagnostic criteria (NIH sores: 41 in 9-year-olds), he was suggestive of hyper IgE syndrome. At the age of 8, the patient developed an abscess in the left inguinal region. While in hospital, the patient developed generalized tonic colonic convulsion and fever. Brain computed tomography scan revealed an abscess in the right frontal lobe. Subsequently magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain indicated expansion of the existing abscess to contralateral frontal lobe (left side). After evacuating the abscesses and administrating intravenous antibiotic, the patient's condition improved dramatically and fever stopped. PMID:26060590

  14. Minocycline Modulates Neuroinflammation Independently of Its Antimicrobial Activity in Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kielian, Tammy; Esen, Nilufer; Liu, Shuliang; Phulwani, Nirmal K.; Syed, Mohsin M.; Phillips, Napoleon; Nishina, Koren; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Schwartzman, Joseph D.; Ruhe, Jorg J.

    2007-01-01

    Minocycline exerts beneficial immune modulatory effects in several noninfectious neurodegenerative disease models; however, its potential to influence the host immune response during central nervous system bacterial infections, such as brain abscess, has not yet been investigated. Using a minocycline-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus to dissect the antibiotic’s bacteriostatic versus immune modulatory effects in a mouse experimental brain abscess model, we found that minocycline significantly reduced mortality rates within the first 24 hours following bacterial exposure. This protection was associated with a transient decrease in the expression of several proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin-1β and CCL2 (MCP-1). Minocycline was also capable of protecting the brain parenchyma from necrotic damage as evident by significantly smaller abscesses in minocycline-treated mice. In addition, minocycline exerted anti-inflammatory effects when administered as late as 3 days following S. aureus infection, which correlated with a significant decrease in brain abscess size. Finally, minocycline was capable of partially attenuating S. aureus-dependent microglial and astrocyte activation. Therefore, minocycline may afford additional therapeutic benefits extending beyond its antimicrobial activity for the treatment of central nervous system infectious diseases typified by a pathogenic inflammatory component through its ability to balance beneficial versus detrimental inflammation. PMID:17717149

  15. A fatal case of Nocardia otitidiscaviarum pulmonary infection and brain abscess: taxonomic characterization by molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pelaez, Ana Isabel; del Mar Garcia-Suarez, Maria; Manteca, Angel; Melon, Ovidio; Aranaz, Carlos; Cimadevilla, Rafael; Mendez, Francisco Javier; Vazquez, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We report on a rare case of pulmonary Nocardiosis and brain abscess caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an elderly woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Taxonomic identification involved phenotypic testing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PMID:19366439

  16. Brain abscesses in children: results of 24 children from a reference center in Central Anatolia, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Mehmet; Ceylan, Ozgur; Per, Huseyin; Koc, Gonca; Tumturk, Abdulfettah; Kumandas, Sefer; Patiroglu, Turkan; Doganay, Selim; Gumus, Hakan; Unal, Ekrem; Kose, Mehmet; Gorkem, Sureyya Burcu; Kurtsoy, Ali; Ozturk, Mustafa Kursat

    2015-03-01

    Childhood brain abscesses are a rare and potentially life-threatening condition requiring urgent diagnosis and treatment. This retrospective study analyzed the clinical and radiologic findings of 24 (7 girl, 17 boys) cases with brain abscess. Mean age was 92.98 ± 68.04 months. The most common presenting symptoms were nausea-vomiting (45.8%) and headache (41.7%). Brain abscess was most commonly located in the frontal region. Diffusion restriction was determined in 78.4% of lesions. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient value in these lesions was 0.511 ± 0.23 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. Cultures were sterile in 40% of cases. Antimicrobial therapy was given to only 16.7% of cases. Predisposing factors were identified in 91.6% of cases (congenital heart disease in 20.8% and immunosuppression in 20.8%). Mortality level was 12.5%. In conclusion, immunocompromised states, and congenital heart disease have become an important predisposing factor for brain abscesses. Effective and prompt management should ensure better outcome in childhood. PMID:25223695

  17. Clinical Pathway in the Treatment of Nocardial Brain Abscesses following Systemic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun-Cong; Hsu, Jee-Ching; Hsu, Yung-Hsing; Hsu, Wen-Hsing; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2014-01-01

    Nocardial infections are commonly encountered in patients with immunocompromised states. Cerebral nocardiosis is an uncommon clinical entity, representing only 2% of all cerebral abscesses. It has a higher mortality rate, especially for multiple cerebral lesions in immunocompromised hosts following systemic infections. However, an optimal treatment policy to deal with these immunocompromised patients in Asia is still lacking. We retrospectively reviewed the subjects with nocardial brain abscesses from 2001 to 2011 at our medical center. All of them had multiple brain abscesses, underlying with immunocompromised state following systemic infections. All cases were under steroid control due to their comorbidities for more than six months. The comorbidities and misdiagnosis often lead to poor prognosis. The change in the environments of the microorganisms caused by immunosuppressive agents and multiple antibiotic uses may play an important role in this critical disorder. Aggressive craniotomy should be performed in time to avoid grievous neurological outcomes. Our conclusion is that early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic uses should be implemented promptly, and aggressive craniotomy should be performed for nocardial brain abscesses in subjects with systemic infections under an immunocompromised status. PMID:25254126

  18. Multiple abscesses of the left brain hemisphere due to Listeria monocytogenes in an immunocompromised patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matera, Giovanni; Puccio, Rossana; Giancotti, Aida; Quirino, Angela; Guadagnino, Vincenzo; Pardatscher, Kurt; Caroleo, Santo; De Rose, Marisa; Amorosi, Andrea; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses in a cirrhotic and diabetic 57-year-old woman showing fever, aphasia, right hemiparesis and seizures. Neuroradiological investigation revealed unilateral cerebritis evolving in multiple abscesses. From blood and surgical drainage samples Listeria monocytogenes grew in pure culture. Despite decompressive craniotomy, the patient died two months after hospital admission. PMID:23299068

  19. Brain metastasis from a lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma mimicking a brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Taiichi; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Kadoyama, Shigeru; Higa, Takashi; Shiono, Saori; Teramoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is a rare tumor of the lung that accounts for 0.1–0.2% of all pulmonary tumors. To the best of our knowledge, brain metastasis from lung MEC is rare and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of this lesion have not been documented. Case Description: We herein report the case of a 72-year-old male. MRI revealed a left parietal tumor showing ring enhancement with medium gadolinium contrast and an evident high intensity area in the nonenhanced central portion on diffusion-weighted images (DWI) mimicking a brain abscess. Histologically, MEC is composed of a mixture of different cell types including mucin-secreting glandular cells and squamous cells. Accordingly, we suggest that the high DWI signal can be explained by the development of intracellular and intraluminal mucin, which have a high viscosity. Conclusion: Further accumulation of cases with brain metastasis from MEC is needed to establish the characteristic image findings, which would lead to prompt and adequate treatment. PMID:26167374

  20. Brain Abscess following Rituximab Infusion in a Patient with Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Talal M.; Muammer, Shahad A.; Ellis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 52 Final Diagnosis: Brain abscess Symptoms: Fever • headache • weakness, left sided Medication: Prednisolone • Azathioprine • Rituximab Clinical Procedure: Stereotactic brain biopsy and LP Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for developing meningitis or, rarely, brain abscess with opportunistic organisms like Listeria monocytogenes. Case Report: A 52 year-old Saudi Arabian woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris and diabetes and had been on prednisolone and azathioprine for about 4 years. She presented with headache, low-grade fever, and left-sided weakness 2 weeks after receiving the second dose of rituximab infusion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhanced space-occupying lesion with multiple small cyst-like structures and vasogenic edema in the right temporoparietal area. Her blood culture was positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and a brain biopsy showed necrotic tissues with pus and inflammatory cells. She recovered after a 6-week course of antibiotics with ampicillin and gentamycin. Conclusions: Brain abscess due to Listeria monocytogenes is a risk that should be considered when adding rituximab to the regimen of a patient who is already Immunocompromised. PMID:25659437

  1. The evolution of a brain abscess the complementary roles of radionuclide (RN) and computed tomography (CT) scans

    SciTech Connect

    Masucci, E.F.; Sauerbrunn, B.J.

    1982-04-01

    Serial /sup 99m/Tc glucoheptonate brain scans demonstrated a brain abscess in a patient from the earliest phase of acute focal encephalitis (cerebritis) through the capsule formation and the recovery phase. The role of the RN and CT scans in the diagnosis of the early stage of cerebritis and the complementary nature of RN and CT scans in intracranial infections, particularly abscesses, are discussed. Guidelines for the use of RN and CT scans are suggested.

  2. Candida tropicalis brain abscess in a neonate: An emerging nosocomial menace

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Gulati, Sheffali; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Atin; Singh, Manmohan; Xess, Immaculata

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are a relatively uncommon cause of brain abscess in neonates and early infancy. They are usually associated with predisposing factors like prematurity, low birth weight, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Candida tropicalis (C. tropicalis) is rapidly emerging as a nosocomial threat in the neonatal intensive care settings. This case report describes a neonate with C. tropicalis brain abscess who was diagnosed early and managed aggressively with a favorable outcome. Inadvertent use of intravenous antibiotics can have serious complications such as invasive fungal infection. Correct microbiological diagnosis is the key to successful treatment of deep-seated pyogenic infection. Fungal etiology should always be studied in relevant clinical settings. PMID:25506171

  3. [Brain abscesses after extracranial infections of the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Marchiori, C; Tonon, E; Boscolo Rizzo, P; Vaglia, A; Meyding-Lamadé, U; Levorato, M; Da Mosto, M C; Dietz, A

    2003-10-01

    The authors report on 20 immunocompetent patients with brain abscess after 12 cases of middle ear, seven tooth and a single frontal sinus infection. The clinical aspects, hematochemical and microbiological data, the role of imaging diagnostics (CT, MR) and the type of treatment are analysed. Neurosurgery was performed on 17 patients (85%), eight of whom subsequently underwent evacuation of the primary source of infection (four mastoidectomies, two timpanoplasties, two tooth extractions). Mastoidectomy was eventually carried out on one of the three patients who did not undergo neurosurgery. Microbiological diagnosis was possible in nine patients through culture examination: Proteus mirabilis in three cases, Peptostreptococcus sp. in two, Micrococcus varians, Proteus vulgaris, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus viridans not typed in single cases. The pus was sterile in eight patients (47.1% of those operated). An association of two antimicrobial agents was used in 18 patients, while in two cases monotherapy was preferred, based on the isolated bacteria. Treatment lasted on average 38 days. The most frequently used therapy regimen (75%) was the association of a beta-lactam drug with chloramphenicol or metronidazole. Therapy was successful in 19/20 patients; one patient died. There was no significant difference in prognostic terms with regard to sex, age, duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis, clinical picture at onset, number and size of abscesses or type of treatment. Recognising the first clinical signs and symptoms (headache, fever, alterations in consciousness, focal neurological deficit, epileptic seizures) is extremely important for prompt diagnosis of brain abscess. PMID:14523535

  4. [Disseminated Nocardiosis Complicated by Multiple Brain Abscesses: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Koh, Masaki; Tomita, Takahiro; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Ashizawa, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    We report a relatively rare case of a disseminated type of nocardiosis without lung involvement. A 75-year-old man developed moderate fever and disturbed consciousness and was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory examinations revealed signs of inflammation. Chest X-rays indicated no abnormalities, but brain MRI showed ring-like enhancement lesions in the right temporal and left frontal lobes. Similar lesions were identified in the left kidney and right leg. The brain lesions were purulent and were surgically irrigated. Gram- and Kinyoun-positive bacteria were identified, and the patient was diagnosed as suffering from a disseminated type of nocardiosis without lung involvement. He was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for over 10 months. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged without any neurological sequelae two months after surgery. Kinyoun staining was important in early diagnosis and hence providing appropriate therapy for life-threatening nocardiosis. PMID:26646175

  5. Intracranial brain abscess preceded by orbital cellulitis and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wen-Chao; Lin, Maggie S F; Huang, Hua-Tzu; Chao, Shih-Chun; Lo, Yi-Chen

    2010-05-01

    A 17-year-old boy with pyrexia, headache, and frequent drop attacks reported an acute onset of periorbital pain and swelling 1 month previously. Coronal computed tomography (CT) identified an ethmoid sinusitis, which was treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous gentamicin, prostaphylline, and metronidazone. Because of persistent symptoms, the patient returned 1 month later. The CT identified accumulation of debris in both frontal sinuses and a multilobulated lesion over the right frontal lobe. Bicoronal craniotomy was performed, and a mass located in the right frontal lobe was excised; the mass comprised chronic inflammatory tissues without evidence of malignancy. A postoperative brain CT confirmed the absence of a residual mass, and no recurrence or neurologic deficits were noted during the 3-month follow-up period. Intracranial complications cannot be prevented entirely even with the judicious use of antibiotics. Early application of the appropriate imaging modality and institution of aggressive therapy in any patient, not just pediatric patients, to prevent potential long-term disabilities and death are essential. PMID:20485088

  6. Brain abscess due to Cladophialophora bantiana: a review of 124 cases.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Kaur, Harsimran; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Appannanavar, Suma B; Patel, Atul; Mukherjee, Kanchan K; Ghosh, Anup; Ray, Ujjwayini

    2016-02-01

    Brain abscess caused by Cladophialophora bantiana is a rare disease associated with high mortality due to delay in diagnosis and absence of standardized therapy. We reviewed 124 culture proven C. bantiana brain abscess cases; 103 cases published in English literature during 1952 through 2014 and 21 unpublished cases from our reference center. The majority (57.3%) of the patients was from Asian countries especially from India (62/124, 50%). The diagnosis of the cases was delayed with mean duration 115 days after developing symptoms. The disease was nearly equally distributed in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts but associated with significantly higher mortality (77.1%) in later group. Complete excision of brain lesion in immunocompetent host led to significantly better survival (43.7%). Though all commercially available antifungal drugs have been used in these patients, amphotericin B deoxycholate or lipid preparations were most commonly (62.83%) prescribed agent. None of the drugs used was found to be independently associated with improved outcome. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of 13 isolates of our center, demonstrated good activity to voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole, but these triazoles were prescribed in only 29.2% patients. Increased awareness with early suspicion of the disease, and aggressive medical and surgical approach in treating these patients may improve the outcome. PMID:26483430

  7. A case report of Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pailhoriès, H; Rabier, V; Eveillard, M; Mahaza, C; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Chennebault, J-M; Kempf, M; Lemarié, C

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with a Mycoplasma hominis brain abscess occurring after a cranial trauma, which was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The presence of colonies on classic blood agar plates and the use of MALDI-TOF MS, a valuable diagnostic tool that identified M. hominis due to its presence in the VITEK MS database, allowed the rapid diagnosis of this infection. PMID:25449252

  8. Association of ICAM-1 (K469E) and MCP-1 -2518 A>G gene polymorphism with brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Priyanka; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Singh, Kamini; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Ojha, Bal Krishna

    2016-03-15

    Brain abscess develops in response to a parenchymal infection. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) play vital role in central nervous system (CNS) diseases. We studied ICAM-1 (K469E) and MCP-1 (-2518 A>G) polymorphisms among brain abscess patients. The genotypic distributions of ICAM-1 (K469E) and MCP-1 (-2518 A>G) were significantly different between patients and controls. Further, patient with predisposing factors, and also with culture result, we found significant association. The study revealed that the polymorphisms of these molecules lead to increased production, which appears to be a risk for the development of brain abscess. PMID:26943967

  9. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient. A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization. Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array. PMID:26945363

  10. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus Fumigatus in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Liu, Wei-Lun; Chang, Tsung Chain; Li, Ming-Chi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Invasive cerebral aspergillosis always developed in immunocompromised host. Early diagnosis may save life in this critical condition; however, it is difficult to reach. Herein, we presented an unusual case of invasive cerebral aspergillosis in a cirrhotic patient.A 47-year-old man presented with progressive deterioration of consciousness for three days. The patient had a history of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class C. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain showed multi-focal parenchymal lesions, which was consistent with multiple brain abscesses. The diagnosis of invasive cerebral aspergillosis was made by molecular based laboratory methods including Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay and oligonucleotide array. Despite treatment with the antifungal agent, Amphotericin B, the patient died at the ninth day of hospitalization.Our findings suggest that liver cirrhosis can be one of risk factors of invasive cerebral aspergillosis, and support the diagnosing usefulness of MRI, Aspergillus galactomannan antigen assay, and oligonucleotide array. PMID:26945363

  11. Sinus venosus atrial septal defect presenting with brain abscesses in a 77-year-old immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Alhamshari, Yaser S M; Punjabi, Chitra; Pressman, Gregg S; Govil, Anita

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 77-year-old immunocompetent patient who initially presented with vertigo, nausea and vomiting, with symptoms later progressing to headaches and increased lethargy. Brain MRI revealed ring-enhancing lesions typical of abscesses in the right cerebellum. Transoesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) was performed to look for the source of his abscesses, and uncovered a sinus venosus type atrial septal defect. Cardiac CT was carried out; the patient was found to have a sinus venosus atrial septal defect with partial anomalous pulmonary venous return. Moreover, dental examination showed multiple dental caries with poor oral hygiene. The patient was started on intravenous empiric antibiotics and steroids. Subsequent brain imaging showed almost complete resolution of the abscesses. The patient's symptoms started to improve, and he was eventually sent to an intensive rehabilitation centre with future plans to surgically correct his congenital heart disease to prevent further complications. PMID:26475881

  12. Multiple Brain Abscesses Due to Phialemonium in a Renal Transplant Recipient: First Case Report in the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ayd?n, Mehtap; Özçelik, Ümit; Çevik, Halime; Ç?nar, Özlem; Evren, Ebru; Demira?, Alp

    2015-11-01

    Fungal brain abscesses are a rare but serious complication in transplant recipients. Phialemonium organisms are rare causes of invasive mold infections. Here, we present the first case of a renal transplant recipient with multiple brain abscesses caused by Phialemonium infection A. A 51-year-old female kidney transplant recipient was admitted with pneumonia of an unknown cause and treated with empiric intravenous antibiotics. Her treatment was uneventful, and she was discharged 1010 days later. After 5 days, she was readmitted with fever, cerebral palsy, and speech disorder. The patient had undergone living-donor renal transplant 7 months earlier. A cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed for a possible cerebrovascular pathology. The magnetic resonance imaging scan showed multiple brain abscesses located at the left parietal, frontal and occipital lobes; right parietal and occipital lobes; right basal ganglia; and left cerebellum. The patient received meropenem, linezolid, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, and AmBisome for probable pathogenic infection, and immunosuppressive agents dosage was reduced increasingly immunosuppressed. We identified Phialemonium in cerebrospinal fluid culture. The patient received voriconazole 200 mg twice daily. Lesions could not be drained due to lack of capsula formation. The patient died on the 30th day of antifungal therapy. Phialemonium organisms, although a rare cause of fungal infections, are associated with a high mortality rate in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing multiple brain abscesses due to Phialemonium in a transplant recipient. Clinicians recipient should be alert about these rare opportunistic fungi in the differential diagnosis of brain abscess, and bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage are recommended for transplant patients when they are admitted with pneumonia exclude fungal infections. PMID:26640919

  13. Brain abscess of unknown etiology in a 2-year-old child: a case report.

    PubMed

    St?nescu, Georgeta Ligia; Nedelcu??, Ramona Mihaela; Dop, Dalia; Diaconu, Radu; C?lin, Gigi; Niculescu, Elena Carmen; Gheonea, Cristian; St?nescu, Radu; Anghelina, Liliana; St?nescu, Mihail Relu

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of brain abscess necroptically discovered in a 2-year-old child hospitalized in the Pediatrics Clinic of the "Filantropia" Municipal Hospital, Craiova, Romania. The family, with a poor financial situation, reports previous episodes that may be interpreted as comitial crises. Clinically speaking, he presents a height-weight hypertrophia, vitamin D loss rickets, and psychomotor retardation. At the objective examination, we found a weight of 10 500 g (!), second and third degree mesocardiac systolic beat and cardiomegaly in the thorax-cardiac-pulmonary X-ray examination. Despite the intensive treatment, death occurs few hours after hospitalization. During the autopsy, there is observed a partial dehiscence of the cranial arch sutures, with a 6÷5 cm ovalary cavity in the parietal lobe, containing approximately 200 mL of yellow-green serous liquid, with uneven walls, but with no hemorrhagic or puss infiltrates. The heart is enlarged (in comparison to the general somatic development) of 9÷7÷4 cm, without any cardiac malformations. The microscopic examination showed degenerative neuronal and ischemic lesions on the left-brain hemisphere. Comparing to the data from specialty literature, we consider it as a yellow brain softening (according to Rokitansky's classification), most probably of an embolic cause. PMID:26662160

  14. A retrospective study on the aetiology, management, and outcome of brain abscess in an 11-year, single-centre study from China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain abscesses continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in developed and developing countries. Their aetiology and management remain complex and unclear, making improvement of treatments and outcome difficult. Methods To determine the demographics, management, and the variables that affect the outcome in subjects with brain abscesses treated at a single centre over an 11-year period, we retrospectively analysed data in 60 patients with brain abscesses surgically treated with stereotactically guided aspiration or open craniotomy excision in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital between January 2001 and December 2011. Such variables as age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission, clinical presentation, location, number of lesions, predisposing factors, mechanism of infection, aetiological agent, and therapy were analysed independently. Results Our analysis demonstrated that patient age and gender were factors that influence the occurrence of brain abscess; female patients and patients greater than 40 years of age were most likely to suffer a brain abscess. We also found that a patient’s GCS score upon admission did not influence outcome. While frequency of successful culturing of the infectious agent was low, positive cultures were obtained in only 8 of the cases (13.33%), in which the most common isolate was Streptococcus milleri. Outcome was favourable in 78.33% of the subjects, while the mortality rate was 20%. The outcome of one patient was poor due to the abscess in the basal ganglia region. Conclusions Stereotactically guided aspiration is an effective treatment for brain abscess with an overall favourable outcome. Mortality due to brain abscess was not directly related to surgery nor surgical technique. Additional studies will continue to reveal patients trends that may improve treatment for brain abscess. PMID:24903315

  15. Acrophialophora fusispora Brain Abscess in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Review of Cases and Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohsen, I. Z.; Sutton, D. A.; Sigler, L.; Almodovar, E.; Mahgoub, N.; Frayha, H.; Al-Hajjar, S.; Rinaldi, M. G.; Walsh, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was referred to King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center. The diagnosis without central nervous system (CNS) involvement was confirmed on admission, and chemotherapy was initiated according to the Children Cancer Group (CCG) 1882 protocol for high-risk-group leukemia. During neutropenia amphotericin B (AMB) (1 mg/kg of body weight/day) was initiated for presumed fungal infection when a computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed multiple nodular densities. After 3 weeks of AMB therapy, a follow-up chest CT revealed progression of the pulmonary nodules. The patient subsequently suffered a seizure, and a CT scan of the brain was consistent with infarction or hemorrhage. Because of progression of pulmonary lesions while receiving AMB, antifungal therapy was changed to liposomal AMB (LAMB) (6 mg/kg/day). Despite 26 days of LAMB, the patient continued to have intermittent fever, and CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated findings consistent with a brain abscess. Aspiration of brain abscess was performed and the Gomori methenamine silver stain was positive for hyphal elements. Culture of this material grew Acrophialophora fusispora. Lung biopsy showed necrotizing fungal pneumonia with negative culture. The dosage of LAMB was increased, and itraconazole (ITRA) was added; subsequently LAMB was discontinued and therapy was continued with ITRA alone. The patient demonstrated clinical and radiological improvement. In vitro, the isolate was susceptible to low concentrations of AMB and ITRA. A. fusispora is a thermotolerant, fast-growing fungus with neurotropic potential. We report the first case of human infection involving the CNS. Acrophialophora resembles Paecilomyces but differs in having colonies that become dark and in the development of phialides along the sides or at the tips of echinulate brown conidiophores. Conidia are borne in long chains and are smooth or ornamented with fine-to-coarse echinulations, sometimes in spiral bands. The taxonomy of the genus Acrophialophora is reviewed, and Acrophialophora nainiana and Acrophialophora levis are considered as synonyms of A. fusispora. PMID:11101597

  16. MRI-DWI improves the early diagnosis of brain abscess induced by Candida albicans in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Jing; Du, Ya-Nan; Wang, Ying-Jie; Li, Xin; Wang, Rui; Chen, Li-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in brain abscess induced by invasive fungal infection (IFI) of the central nervous system. Methods The clinical data of eight preterm infants with IFI of the central nervous system were retrospectively analyzed. All these eight children received three sequential brain MRI modes T1WI, T2WI and DWI during hospitalization and after discharge. Results All these eight preterm infants were infected with Candida albicans, seven of which were manifested by brain abscess and four were accompanied by meningitis. MRI of seven infants with brain abscess indicated extensive invasion including involvement of subcortical white matter, deep periventricular white matter and semiovale center white matter. MRI examination was conducted within 11 d following infection on four cases and showed diffuse or multiple miliary nodules, hyper-intense signal on DWI, while insignificant signal changes on T1WI and T2WI. DWI signal nearly disappeared three weeks later. T1WI/T2WI signal changed most significantly 2-4 weeks following infection, with nodules ring-shaped, hyper-intense signal around T1WI and hypo-intense signal in the center. Signal on T2WI was just on the opposite. Severe cases presented fusion of different degrees. Significant enhanced effect was observed on T1WI. Four weeks later, the lesion gradually became fewer and smaller on T1WI, transferred into dot or line-like hyper-intense signal and presented obviously hypo-intense signal on T2WI. Dynamic MRI of two cases showed delayed myelination and corpus callosum thinning. Conclusion MRI-DWI and dynamic MRI changes can improve the early diagnosis of brain abscess induced by Candida albicans in preterm infants.

  17. Brain Abscesses Caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a Multiple Myeloma Patient Treated with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone: a Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Jacopo; Luzzati, Roberto; Maurel, Cristina; Rosin, Chiara; Valentinotti, Romina; Farina, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of multiple brain abscesses caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a patient suffering from multiple myeloma on treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. N. paucivorans is a recently described species of the genus Nocardia, which is supposed to have a heightened neurotropism in cases of disseminated infection. Although nocardiosis itself is an uncommon infectious complication in multiple myeloma so far, nocardial brain abscess should be added to the spectrum of adverse effects due to this novel chemotherapy regimen. PMID:25574370

  18. Brain Abscesses Caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a Multiple Myeloma Patient Treated with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone: a Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Jacopo; Luzzati, Roberto; Maurel, Cristina; Rosin, Chiara; Valentinotti, Romina; Farina, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of multiple brain abscesses caused by Nocardia paucivorans in a patient suffering from multiple myeloma on treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. N. paucivorans is a recently described species of the genus Nocardia, which is supposed to have a heightened neurotropism in cases of disseminated infection. Although nocardiosis itself is an uncommon infectious complication in multiple myeloma so far, nocardial brain abscess should be added to the spectrum of adverse effects due to this novel chemotherapy regimen. PMID:25574370

  19. Rapid brain death caused by a cerebellar abscess with Fusobacterium nucleatum in a young man with drug abuse: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobic microorganism that causes disease entities such as periodontal and soft tissue abscesses, pulmonary and intraabdominal infections and very rarely intracerebral infections. Case presentation Here, we report the rare case of a previously healthy 25-year-old German man with a cerebellar abscess caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum that resulted in rapid brain death. Toxicological screening showed positivity for amphetamines and cannabis. The diagnosis was obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification of bacterial deoxyribonucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusions In drug users clinicians should think about rare causes of brain abscesses/meningitis. Early diagnosis is necessary and justifies the use of molecular techniques. PMID:24915846

  20. Aetiological diagnosis of brain abscesses and spinal infections: application of broad range bacterial polymerase chain reaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kupila, L; Rantakokko-Jalava, K; Jalava, J; Nikkari, S; Peltonen, R; Meurman, O; Marttila, R; Kotilainen, E; Kotilainen, P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of the broad range bacterial rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method combined with DNA sequencing in the aetiological diagnosis of intracranial or spinal infections in neurosurgical patients. Methods: In addition to conventional methods, the broad range bacterial PCR approach was applied to examine pus or tissue specimens from cerebral or spinal lesions in patients treated in a neurosurgical unit for a clinical or neuroradiological suspicion of bacterial brain abscess or spondylitis. Results: Among the 44 patients with intracranial or spinal lesions, the final diagnosis suggested bacterial disease in 25 patients, among whom the aetiological agent was identified in 17. A causative bacterial species was identified only by the rDNA PCR method in six cases, by both the PCR methodology and bacterial culture in six cases, and by bacterial culture alone in five. All samples in which a bacterial aetiology was identified only by the PCR approach were taken during antimicrobial treatment, and in three patients the method yielded the diagnosis even after ? 12 days of parenteral treatment. One case also identified by the PCR approach alone involved a brain abscess caused by Mycoplasma hominis, which is not readily cultured by routine methods. Conclusions: In patients with brain abscesses and spinal infections, the broad range bacterial rDNA PCR approach may be the only method to provide an aetiological diagnosis when the patient is receiving antimicrobial treatment, or when the causative agent is fastidious. PMID:12754340

  1. Treatment of a brain abscess caused by Scedosporium apiospermum and Phaeoacremonium parasiticum in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Chongtrakool, Piriyaporn; Wirojtananugoon, Chewarat; Watcharananan, Siriorn P; Sumethkul, Vasant; Boongird, Atthaporn; Jirasiritham, Sopon

    2013-05-01

    Cerebral mycosis is a significant cause of morbidity among immunocompromised populations. We present here a case of cerebral infection with Scedosporium apiospermum and Phaeoacremonium parasiticum in a 49-year-old renal transplant recipient. Fourteen years after renal transplantation, the patient presented with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis treated with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B. The patient had clinical and radiographic improvement. However, 6 weeks later, the patient presented with cerebral infection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple rim enhancing brain abscesses. Brain and cerebrospinal fluid cultures ultimately grew Scedosporium apiospermum and Phaeoacremonium parasiticum. The patient was treated with voriconazole for 6 months and had clinical and radiologic improvement. We believe this is the first reported case of co-infection of the brain with scedosporiosis and phaeohyphomycosis in a renal transplant recipient, who had received intravenous liposomal amphotericin B. Voriconazole may represent a new therapeutic option for these simultaneous infections in the brain. PMID:24050081

  2. Peritonsillar abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... type of bacteria called group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus . Peritonsillar abscess most often occurs in older children, ... abscess can travel into the lungs and cause pneumonia. Symptoms of peritonsillar abscess include: Fever and chills ...

  3. On the report of the first successful surgical treatment of brain abscess in the Ottoman Empire by Dr. Cemil Topuzlu in 1891.

    PubMed

    Mut, Melike; Dinç, Gülten; Naderi, Sait

    2007-10-01

    IN 1891, Dr. Cemil Topuzlu operated on a brain abscess that originated as a complication of a depression fracture of the cranial inner table. The patient presented with Jacksonian seizures on his left side after a sharp trauma resulting in a 15 cm-long scalp laceration and underlying linear cranial fracture in the right parietal bone. Dr. Topuzlu attributed Jacksonian epilepsy to the fracture irritating the motor area in the right hemisphere and attempted a craniotomy based on his measurements to localize the Rolandic fissure. The operation was complicated by a brain abscess, and Dr. Topuzlu reoperated to drain the abscess. He successfully treated the brain abscess and Jacksonian seizures and then presented this case in the Royal Society of Medicine of the Ottoman Empire and in the International Surgery Congress in Lyon in 1894. The case report was published in his surgery book in 1905. The case was not only the first case of brain abscess to be treated successfully with surgical intervention in the Ottoman Empire, it was also one of the first cases of neurological surgery performed using contemporary anesthesiological and surgical techniques, which reveals the importance of neurological examination and cerebral localization techniques in the era before x-rays. Dr. Topuzlu was the founder of modern surgery in the Ottoman Empire and deserves to be credited for his novel applications in the 19th century. PMID:17986950

  4. Open evacuation of pus: a satisfactory surgical approach to the problem of brain abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Maurice-Williams, R S

    1983-01-01

    The operative management of intracerebral abscesses remains controversial, with both primary radical excision and repeated aspiration having their advocates. This paper describes a surgical technique which combines the advantages while avoiding the disadvantages of the two surgical approaches. At open operation the abscess is widely incised, all pus removed from within the capsule and any daughter loculi under direct vision and the empty capsule irrigated with antibiotic solution before closure of the wound without drainage. Fifteen cases were treated by this method. There were no deaths, 13 patients made full neurological recoveries and two were left partially disabled. In only one case was a second operation necessary to remove pus which had re-formed after an adequate primary clearance. There were no cases of wound sepsis or of late recurrence of the abscess. Images PMID:6886714

  5. Brain Abscesses Due to Aspergillus nidulans Infection During Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Manish; Harvey, Melissa; McDonald, Allison; Speert, David P; Dix, David

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who was diagnosed with cerebral abscesses due to Aspergillus nidulans infection on day 28 of induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He responded well to treatment with voriconazole and caspofungin, making a full recovery. There are very few cases of invasive aspergillosis reported in children during induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia and A. nidulans is rare in the absence of chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:25985238

  6. Two Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Species Isolated from a Brain Abscess: First Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium immunogenum and Mycobacterium llatzerense

    PubMed Central

    Greninger, Alexander L.; Langelier, Charles; Cunningham, Gail; Keh, Chris; Melgar, Michael; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria are rarely found in central nervous system infections. We describe a case of polymicrobial infection in a brain abscess including two rapidly growing Mycobacterium species, M. immunogenum and M. llatzerense. The Mycobacterium isolates were distinguishable by molecular methods, and whole-genome sequencing showed <60% pairwise nucleotide identity. PMID:25926490

  7. Perirenal abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The biggest risk factor for perirenal abscess is kidney stones , by blockage of urine flow. This provides a ... perirenal abscess should lead to a good outcome. Kidney stones must be treated to avoid further infections. In ...

  8. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors increase your risk of an anorectal abscess: Anal sex Chemotherapy drugs used to treat cancer Diabetes Inflammatory ... abscess from forming. Use condoms during intercourse, including anal sex, to prevent such infections. In infants and toddlers, ...

  9. Intracranial blastomycotic abscess mimicking malignant brain neoplasm: Successful treatment with voriconazole and surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kanika; Dawkins, Ross L.; Bauer, David F.; Palmer, Cheryl A.; Hackney, James R.; Markert, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral blastomycosis is a rarely reported disease, and in the absence of associated, underlying systemic infection, poses a great diagnostic difficulty. Magnetic resonance imaging can sometimes provide equivocal information when trying to pinpoint a diagnosis. Classically, cerebral blastomycosis has been treated with amphotericin B. Voriconazole is a newer triazole antifungal with potential as a follow-up treatment of blastomycosis of the central nervous system after initial therapy with amphotericin B. Case Description: We describe one such case of a cerebral blastomycotic abscess, presenting in the absence of any systemic disease, which was initially thought to be a neoplasm. It was successfully treated by surgical resection followed by sequential amphotericin B and voriconazole. The patient did well with voriconazole therapy and was followed for voriconazole tolerance with liver function tests, which continued to be stable at 8 months past the initiation of therapy. At 12 months postoperatively, the patient was doing well and showed gradual improvement in a visual field cut, with no sign of recurrent infection. Conclusions: Isolated cerebral blastomycosis can present a diagnostic challenge. In the absence of systemic infection, surgical resection followed by antifungal therapy is a logical treatment plan. PMID:26673672

  10. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  11. Peritonsillar Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the jaw, neck, and chest, or even the lungs, which can lead to pneumonia . continue What Should You Do? Call your doctor if you have a sore throat with a fever or any of the other problems that can be caused by a peritonsillar abscess. It's rare that a peritonsillar abscess will get ...

  12. Delayed Development of Brain Abscesses Following Stent-Graft Placement in a Head and Neck Cancer Patient Presenting with Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Oweis, Yaseen; Gemmete, Joseph J. Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya; Ansari, Sameer

    2011-02-15

    We describe the delayed development of intracranial abscesses following emergent treatment with a covered stent-graft for carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) in a patient with head and neck cancer. The patient presented with hemoptysis and frank arterial bleeding through the tracheostomy site. A self-expandable stent-graft was deployed across a small pseudoaneurysm arising from the right common carotid artery (RCCA) and resulted in immediate hemostasis. Three months later, the patient suffered a recurrent hemorrhage. CT of the neck demonstrated periluminal fluid around the caudal aspect of the stent-graft with intraluminal thrombus and a small pseudoaneurysm. Subsequently, the patient underwent a balloon test occlusion study and endovascular sacrifice of the RCCA and right internal carotid artery. MRI of the brain demonstrated at least four ring-enhancing lesions within the right cerebral hemisphere consistent with intracranial abscesses that resolved with broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage.

  13. Pediatric intracranial abscesses.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Sharma, Julia; Dobson, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial infections in children are a relatively rare, but potentially severe condition. Because of the potential for rapid deterioration, timely diagnosis and treatment are necessary. These infections are categorized based on their intracranial location: epidural abscess, subdural empyema, and brain abscess. They largely arise from direct extension of adjacent infection, hematogenous seeding, or trauma. Clinical presentations of intracranial infections also vary. However, common signs and symptoms include headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, focal neurologic deficits, and seizures. In general, MRI demonstrates a peripherally enhancing lesion with high signal on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Bacterial isolates vary, but most commonly are a single pathogen. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary team approach including such modalities as antibiotic therapy and surgical drainage. When possible, open surgical evacuation of the abscess is preferred, however, in cases of deep-seated lesions, or in unstable patients, aspiration has also been performed with good results. PMID:25917804

  14. Skin abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... abscesses may occur after: A bacterial infection (often staphylococcus) A minor wound or injury Boils Folliculitis (infection ... Daum RS. Staphylococcus aureus . In: Long SS, ed. Principles and Practice ... Diseases. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012: ...

  15. Cerebral Abscess Potentially of Odontogenic Origin

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hadj Hassine, Marouene; Oualha, Lamia; Derbel, Amine; Douki, Nabiha

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome. PMID:25705523

  16. Potential consequences of essential drug shortages in Canada: Brain abscess due to Nocardia farcinica associated with dapsone prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wuerz, Terry C; Bow, Eric J; Seftel, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Canadian pharmacies experienced a shortage of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole tablets. Drug shortages may result in unintended clinical consequences such as infection with pathogens against which the alternative medication is ineffective. This is highlighted in the present article, which describes a case of brain abscess due to Nocardia species that developed while receiving dapsone as an alternative for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in a highly immune-suppressed patient. Clinicians should be cognizant of these issues when prescribing alternative agents. PMID:24421828

  17. Brain Abscess Associated with Isolated Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium in the Absence of Coronary Sinus and Atrial Septal Defect

    SciTech Connect

    Erol, Ilknur Cetin, I. Ilker; Alehan, Fuesun; Varan, Birguel; Ozkan, Sueleyman; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Tokel, Kursad

    2006-06-15

    A previously healthy 12-year-old girl presented with severe headache for 2 weeks. On physical examination, there was finger clubbing without apparent cyanosis. Neurological examination revealed only papiledema without focal neurologic signs. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed the characteristic features of brain abscess in the left frontal lobe. Cardiologic workup to exclude a right-to-left shunt showed an abnormality of the systemic venous drainage: presence of isolated left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium in the absence of coronary sinus and atrial septal defect. This anomaly is rare, because only a few other cases have been reported.

  18. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gland. The areolar gland is located in the breast under or below the areola (colored area around the nipple). ... an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  19. A rare but fatal case of granulomatous amebic encephalitis with brain abscess: the first case reported from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Feyzi Birol; Tufan, Kadir; Cekinmez, Melih; Erdo?an, Bülent; Altinörs, Mehmet Nur

    2009-07-01

    The incidence of protozoal and helminthic infestations of the central nervous system (CNS) is less than 1%, but these infestations tend to follow a fatal course. They are more common among children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. CNS infections due to Entamoeba histolytica have been known for a long time. In recent years, especially in developing countries, there has been an increase in CNS infections due to free-living amebas (FLAs). Acute CNS infection due to Naegleria fowleri, which ends in death within 2-7 days, is termed primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM); subacute or chronic CNS infections due to Acanthamoeba spp, Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia diploidea, which occasionally cause cerebral abscess, are termed granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE). This paper presents a case of GAE with abscess formation in a 75-year-old male patient. PMID:19621290

  20. [Pituitary abscess].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Aramendi, A; Garibi, J; Zorrilla, J; Aurrechoechea, J; Claro, T

    1993-01-01

    A pituitary abscess case clinically evolving as an adenoma is presented. The diagnosis was established at the time the surgical procedure was performed. Previous studies and postoperative investigation proved the absence of features accounting for side infection. Moreover, anatomopathological studies also dismissed the existence of any type of tumoral traces. However, due to a lack of experience, the pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging was interpreted as pertaining to pituitary adenoma on the basis of its greater frequency. PMID:8247215

  1. [Brain Abscess due to Infection with Dematiaceous Fungi Cladophialophora bantiana Associated with Hypogammaglobulinemia Following Gastrectomy:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Sayama, Tetsuro; Haga, Sei; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Makihara, Kosuke; Morioka, Takato

    2016-01-01

    Dematiaceous fungi have melanin-like pigment in the cell wall and usually cause a variety of dermal infections in humans. Infections of the central nervous system(cerebral phaeohyphomycosis)are rare but serious, since they commonly occur in immunocompromized patients. A 76-year-old man was admitted with mild motor aphasia and underwent total excision of a mass in the left frontal lobe. With the postoperative diagnosis of brain abscess due to infection with dematiaceous fungi(C. bantiana)associated with hypogammaglobulinemia following gastrectomy, intravenous antifungal drugs including amphotericin B and fluconazole were administered. Regrowth of the abscess with intraventricular rupture was noted at about the 88th day after the initial surgery, and the patient underwent neuroendoscopic aspiration of the pus and placement of a ventricular drain. Following intraventricular administration of miconazole through ventricular drainage or an Ommaya reservoir, neuroradiological findings improved, but general and neurological conditions worsened. Further treatment was discontinued and the patient died 9 months after onset. The poor outcome in this patient is attributed to 1)intractability of dematiaceous fungi, 2)development of ventriculitis and the need for intraventricular administration of antifungal drugs, and 3)untreatable hypogammaglobulinemia following gastrectomy. PMID:26771098

  2. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection that is also called ...

  3. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  4. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology of intracranial abscesses.

    PubMed

    Brook, I

    1992-01-01

    The bacteriologic and clinical findings of 39 pediatric patients with intracranial abscess are presented. Twenty-three children presented with brain abscess and 16 with subdural empyema. Predisposing conditions were present in all instances. Sinusitis was present in 25 children and 4 patients each had chronic otitis media, dental abscess, and congenital heart disease. The abscess was located in the frontal area in 14 patients, parietal in 13, and temporal in 12. Anaerobic organisms alone were recovered in 22 patients (56%), aerobic bacteria alone in 7 (18%), and mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 10 (26%) patients. There were 79 anaerobic isolates (2 per specimen). The predominant anaerobes were anaerobic Gram-positive cocci (29 isolates); Bacteroides sp. (12, including 5 Bacteroides fragilis group), Fusobacterium sp. (14 isolates); and Prevotella sp. and Actinomyces sp. (6 isolates each). A total of 17 aerobic or facultative isolates (0.4 per specimen), including 11 Gram-positive cocci and 6 Haemophilus sp., were recovered. Antimicrobial therapy was administered to all patients. Nine patients (i.e., 6 with sinusitis and subdural empyema, 3 with sinusitis and brain abscess) did not respond to antimicrobial therapy and aspiration of the abscess, and required surgical drainage of inflamed sinuses. These findings indicate the major role of anaerobic organisms in the polymicrobial etiology of intracranial abscess in children. PMID:1622518

  5. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  6. Bartholin cyst or abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is very rare. Any vaginal discharge or fluid drainage will be sent to a lab for testing. ... and closes quickly. Therefore, the abscess often returns. DRAINAGE OF THE ABSCESS A small surgical cut can ...

  7. Tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Eva; Baruah, Paramita

    2014-01-01

    Retropharyngeal tubercular abscess is an uncommon cause of neck pain and dysphagia in the developed world. In this report, we describe an insidiously presenting retropharyngeal abscess treated successfully with intraoral aspiration and antitubercular chemotherapy. A 33-year-old female patient presented with neck pain and dysphagia. MRI revealed a large retropharyngeal abscess that was aspirated intraorally under local anaesthetic. Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) was confirmed by positive culture. The patient improved significantly following the initiation of antitubercular therapy. Retropharyngeal abscess is a recognised presentation of TB. The treatment is mainly medical with combination of specific antitubercular antibiotics, and aspiration may be sufficient for abscess drainage. PMID:24632900

  8. A Case of Brain Abscess Caused by Propionibacterium acnes 13 Months after Neurosurgery and Confirmed by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Soie; Kim, Jun Sik; Seo, Sang Won; Ra, Eun Kyung; Joo, Sei-Ick; Kim, So Yeon; Park, Sung Sup

    2011-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus and a normal inhabitant of the skin. Although it is often considered a contaminant of blood cultures, it can occasionally cause serious infections, including postoperative central nervous system infections. Here, we report the case of a 70-yr-old man who developed a large cerebral abscess caused by P. acnes 13 months after neurosurgery. Immediate gram staining of the pus from his brain revealed the presence of gram-positive coccobacilli. However, colony growth was observed only after 5 days of culture. Therefore, we performed 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the pus specimen. The isolate was identified as P. acnes. The colonies developed 9 days after the initial culture. The API Rapid ID 32A test (bioMérieux, France) was performed using a colony, but an unacceptable profile was obtained. Then, the pus was transferred into the enrichment broths of the BACTEC FX (Becton Dickinson, USA) and BacT/Alert 3D (bioMérieux, Organon Teknika, USA) systems, but only the BACTEC FX system could detect growth after 5 days. We performed 16S rRNA gene sequencing and API Rapid 32A profiling with a colony recovered from Brucella agar, which was inoculated with the microbial growth in the enrichment broth from the BACTEC FX system. The organism was identified as P. acnes by both methods. This case suggests that 16S rRNA gene sequencing may be a useful alternative for identifying slowly growing P. acnes from specimens that do not show growth after 5 days of culture. PMID:21474989

  9. Spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscess.

    PubMed

    Metsemakers, W J; Quanten, I; Vanhoenacker, F; Spiessens, T

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscesses or fistulae are rare complications of neglected biliary calculous disease which have become extremely rare during the last decades. We report a case of spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscess in a 69-year-old male who presented with a mass in the right subcostal region.The diagnosis was made by CT scan with multiplanar reformating. Treatment consisted of incision and drainage of the abdominal wall abscess followed by cholecystectomy in a one-stage protocol. PMID:20957892

  10. Are Pyogenic Liver Abscesses Still a Surgical Concern? A Western Experience

    PubMed Central

    Alkofer, Barbara; Dufay, Corentin; Parienti, Jean Jacques; Lepennec, Vincent; Dargere, Sylvie; Chiche, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds. Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare disease whose management has shifted toward greater use of percutaneous drainage. Surgery still plays a role in treatment, but its indications are not clear. Method. We conducted a retrospective study of pyogenic abscess cases admitted to our university hospital between 1999 and 2010 and assessed the factors potentially associated with surgical treatment versus medical treatment alone. Results. In total, 103 liver abscess patients were treated at our center. The mortality was 9%. The main symptoms were fever and abdominal pain. All of the patients had CRP > 6?g/dL. Sixty-nine patients had a unique abscess. Seventeen patients were treated with antibiotics alone and 57 with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Twenty-seven patients who were treated with percutaneous techniques required surgery, and 29 patients initially received it. Eventually, 43 patients underwent abscess surgery. The factors associated with failed medical treatment were gas-forming abscess (P = 0.006) and septic shock at the initial presentation (P = 0.008). Conclusion. Medical and percutaneous treatment constitute the standard management of liver abscess cases. Surgery remains necessary after failure of the initial treatment but should also be considered as an early intervention for cases presenting with gas-forming abscesses and septic shock and when treatment of the underlying cause is immediately required. PMID:22536008

  11. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... clean out the abscess. You will be put under general anesthesia so that you are asleep for the surgery . Surgery may be needed if: Your abscess cannot be reached safely using a needle through the skin Your appendix, intestines, or another organ has burst ...

  12. Multiple listerial liver abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, D; Richards, J E; Rees, Y; Wicks, A C

    1987-01-01

    Hepatic involvement in listeriosis is uncommon in adults. Cases previously reported include three presenting as acute hepatitis and three of listerial liver abscesses found at necropsy. We report a case of multiple listerial liver abscesses. We believe this to be the first time this diagnosis has been made in a living patient. PMID:3428693

  13. [Management of Lung Abscess].

    PubMed

    Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Ukena, D

    2015-10-01

    A lung abscess is an infectious pulmonary disease characterised by the presence of a pus-filled cavity within the lung parenchyma. The content of an abscess often drains into the airways spontaneously, leading to an air-fluid level visible on chest X-rays and CT scans. Primary lung abscesses occur in patients who are prone to aspiration or in otherwise healthy individuals; secondary lung abscesses typically develop in association with a stenosing lung neoplasm or a systemic disease that compromises immune defences, such as AIDS, or after organ transplantation. The organisms found in abscesses caused by aspiration pneumonia reflect the resident flora of the oropharynx. The most commonly isolated organisms are anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Peptostreptococcus) or streptococci; in alcoholics with poor oral hygiene, the spectrum of pathogens includes Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Actinomyces. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) are mandatory procedures in the diagnostic algorithm. Standard treatment for a lung abscess consists of systemic antibiotic therapy, which is based on the anticipated or proven bacterial spectrum of the abscess. In most cases, primary abscesses are successfully treated by calculated empiric antibiotic therapy, with an estimated lethality rate of less than 10 %. Secondary abscesses, despite targeted antimicrobial therapy, are associated with a poor prognosis, which depends on the patient's general condition and underlying disease; lethality is as high as 75 %. Negative prognostic factors are old age, severe comorbidities, immunosuppression, bronchial obstruction, and neoplasms. Surgical intervention due to failure of conservative treatment is required in only 10 % of patients, with a success rate of up to 90 % and postoperative mortality rates ranging between 0 and 33 %. Treatment success after endoscopic or percutaneous drainage is achieved in 73 to 100 % of cases, with an acceptable mortality rate (0-9 %). PMID:26351764

  14. Nonsurgical drainage of splenic abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, W.A.; Harris, S.A. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.

    1983-08-01

    The mortality associated with intraabdominal abscess remains high despite modern surgical methods and antibiotics. Draingae of abscesses of the abdomen, retroperitoneum, pelvis, pancreatic pseudocyst, mediastinum, and lung may be treated effectively by percutaneous catheter placement. In several reports of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, only three cases of splenic abscess drainage have been reported. The authors have recently drained two splenic abscesses with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and emphasize several advantages of the percutaneous guided approach.

  15. [A case of culture-negative brain abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius infection diagnosed by broad-range PCR of 16S ribosomal RNA].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobuyuki; Asai, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Wakayama, Akatsuki

    2013-10-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with altered mental status during hospitalization for pneumonia. MRI showed multifocal ring-enhanced lesions, which consisted of multiple cerebral abscesses. We started empirical antibiotic therapy, but the following morning, his condition rapidly deteriorated and a CT scan revealed acute hydrocephalus, which required ventricular drainage. Gram staining of cerebro-spinal fluid from the ventricular drainage showed gram-positive cocci in chains, but culture results were negative. 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing with broad-range PCR of the cerebro-spinal fluid identified Streptococcus intermedius. On the basis of this identification, the antibiotic regimen was changed to ampicillin monotherapy. After 1 year of antibiotic therapy, all the abscesses had disappeared and the patient was discharged without any sequelae. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis with broad-range PCR is a very useful method for facilitating the etiological diagnosis and selection of appropriate treatment for culture-negative infections. PMID:24101431

  16. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess to form. This ... pressure. It involves removing part of the spine bone and ... treat the infection. They are usually given through a vein (IV).

  17. [Paraglottic laryngeal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fernández Pérez, A; Fernández-Nogueras Jiménez, F; Moreno León, J A

    2002-01-01

    We present 2 cases of laryngeal abscesses in the paraglottic space. We revise the existing literature in relation with this nowadays rare entity that requires a quick diagnosis and treatment as it is a fast life threatening disease. PMID:12402494

  18. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News) Swiss Report Highlights Danger of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Additional Content Medical News Abscess in the Lungs ... mouth or throat, such as fungi or Mycobacterium tuberculosis (the organism that causes tuberculosis). Other bacteria that ...

  19. Neonatal iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Atsushi; Kameoka, Kazuhiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Watanabe, Yuji; Kawakami, Sanae; Tauchi, Hisamichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2012-10-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in children, particularly in neonates. A male neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with a weight of 2915 g. On day 22 after birth, his family noticed that his right thigh was swollen. Abdominal computed tomography showed a mass extending to the right iliopsoas from the right thigh with thick septa. Puncture to the right groin yielded purulent fluid, and so a diagnosis of abscess was made. The puncture was followed by surgical drainage through a small inguinal incision, and the abscess cavity was irrigated thoroughly using normal saline. Culture of abscess fluid was positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae, so intravenous ABPC infusion was continued. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicate that the IPA was derived from arthritis of the hip, and the patients received Riemenbügel for the incomplete hip dislocation. He is doing well at 2 years of age. PMID:23005905

  20. [Voluminous Pott's abscess].

    PubMed

    Dahou Makhloufi, C

    2014-11-01

    Osteoarticular tuberculosis was frequent throughout the world a decade ago but antituberculous chemotherapy and prophylactic measures have clearly contributed to the reduction of its frequency. However, Pott's disease is frequently complicated by an abscess and some locations are exceptional on account of their gravity. We report a case of dorsal spondylodiscitis with a voluminous Pott's abscess compressing the mediastinal structures with a risk of perforating into the trachea. PMID:25433591

  1. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  2. Favorable outcome in cerebral abscesses caused by Citrobacter koseri in a newborn infant

    PubMed Central

    Algubaisi, Sarah; Bührer, Christoph; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Spors, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of brain abscesses in newborn infants is controversial. We report on a 6-week-old infant with multiple brain abscesses caused by Citrobacter koseri that resolved after treatment with combined surgical drainage and intravenous therapy with meropenem and fosfomycin. PMID:26793443

  3. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  4. [Complicated abscesses of the lungs].

    PubMed

    Gukasian, E A; MuromskiÄ­, Iu A

    1985-07-01

    The work is based upon the treatment of 445 patients with complicated abscesses of the lungs for the period from 1963 to 1984. 158 operations were performed in 149 patients. General lethality in patients with complicated abscesses of the lungs was 11%. The operative treatment is thought to be absolutely indicated in patients with abscesses of the lungs complicated by hemorrhage and in patients with gangrenous abscesses of the lungs. PMID:4060481

  5. Neonatal orbital abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gogri, Pratik Y.; Misra, Somen L.; Misra, Neeta S.; Gidwani, Hitesh V.; Bhandari, Akshay J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital abscess generally occurs in older children but it can rarely affect infants and neonates too. We report a case of community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) neonatal orbital abscess in a 12-day-old term female neonate with no significant past medical history or risk factor for developing the infection. The case highlights the importance of consideration of CA-MRSA as a causative agent of neonatal orbital cellulitis even in a neonate without any obvious predisposing condition. Prompt initiation of appropriate medical therapy against MRSA and surgical drainage of the abscess prevents life threatening complications of orbital cellulitis which more often tend to be fatal in neonates. PMID:26622145

  6. Abscess formation within a cerebellar metastasis: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yukihiro; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Mineura, Katsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The managements of brain abscesses and brain tumors including brain metastases differ greatly, especially in terms of surgical procedures. Therefore, differentiating between the two is essential for assuring optimal treatment. However, on rare occasion, these two lesions coexist. Only five cases with both a brain tumor and an abscess have thus, far been reported. We experienced a patient with a brain abscess within a cerebellar metastasis. Case presentation A middle-aged man receiving treatment for bile duct cancer presented with headache and nausea. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed two lesions, one in each cerebellar hemisphere. Although these lesions appeared to be brain metastases, the right lesion showed high intensity on diffusion-weighted images (DWI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings suggested an abscess. Surgical puncture of the lesion identified it as a brain abscess histologically, and we thus, administered antibiotics. However, since the lesion grew, we performed a second surgery for removal, which histopathologically the lesion to be a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The final diagnosis was an abscess within a cerebellar metastasis. Discussion/conclusion Modern diagnostic tools such as DWI and MRS are reportedly reliable for differentiating brain tumors from brain abscesses, though they are not specific in cases with both lesions. The present case highlights the importance of considering coexisting diseases prior to surgery when we encounter a lesion which has the imaging characteristics of both a tumor and an abscess. The patient may have a better outcome if, preoperatively, surgeons take into consideration the possibility of the coexistence of a brain tumor and a brain abscess. PMID:25799962

  7. Easy drainage of presacral abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, H. S.

    2006-01-01

    Presacral region is one of the difficult regions for drainage of abscess as the approaches described for this carry a lot of morbidities. Transpedicular approach is described for the drainage of presacral abscess. Further, tuberculous abscess as a cause of cauda equina syndrome is reported. Patient had complete neurological recovery within weeks of drainage of abscess. Transpedicular drainage of presacral abscess is a safer option for recently developed neurological deficit. Late presentation may need anterior approach, which is associated with increased morbidity. PMID:17149636

  8. Hepatic abscesses after adhesiolysis

    PubMed Central

    Antonsen, J.; Balachandran, R.; Helgstrand, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hematogenous spread of bacteria from the bowel due to bacterial translocation has been postulated in animal and trauma studies. This case presents a patient with possible hematogenous bacterial spreading after acute laparotomy. Case presentation A 57-year old woman was admitted with abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed mechanical small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy was performed showing no contamination, and no bowel resection was performed. The patient was not given any antibiotics during this time. The patient was re-admitted 24 h after discharge with fever, elevated white count and abdominal pain. A computed tomography showed newly developed intrahepatic abscesses. These were treated with antibiotics, and the patient was discharged with follow-up ultrasound showing diminished abscesses. Discussion This case discusses the possible pathophysiology behind the development of intrahepatic abscesses after small bowel obstruction. Conclusion Febrilia and pain in upper right quadrant of the abdomen days after a simple operation for bowel obstruction could be caused by translocation of intestinal bacteria and subsequent formation of hepatic abscesses. PMID:26410805

  9. Paediatric retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Selvadurai, D; Banerjee, A R

    2004-12-01

    Retropharyngeal abscess (RPA) is an uncommon condition with the potential for significant morbidity and mortality if not detected early. The authors present a case report of a 19-month-old child who presented with the common clinical features of a retropharyngeal abscess and in whom the diagnosis was not established by examination and ultrasonography. This led to a delay in appropriate management until a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed under general anaesthesia. The scan demonstrated the diagnosis and surgical drainage was performed under the same anaesthetic. The child subsequently made a complete recovery. The investigation and treatment of RPAs is a matter of some debate and the authors review the recent literature to determine the best management strategy. PMID:15667676

  10. Tubercular thyroid abscess.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Pahwa, Harvinder Singh; Srivastava, Rohit; Khan, Khursheed Alam

    2013-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented with neck swelling, difficulty in swallowing, voice change along with systemic features such as evening rise of temperature, chronic cough and weight loss. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed two cystic swellings. An ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of tubercular abscess. The patient responded well to antigravity aspiration of the swellings and antitubercular treatment. PMID:23814203

  11. Therapy of Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Lübbert, Christoph; Wiegand, Johannes; Karlas, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Liver abscess (LA) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Methods This review comprehensively describes epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of LA, with a strong focus on antimicrobial treatment choices and the impact of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Results In industrialized areas, pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) accounts for over 80% of the cases, whereas Entamoeba histolyticais responsible for up to 10% of the cases, with a higher incidence in tropical areas. Highly virulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniaehave emerged as a predominant cause of PLA in Asian countries and tend to spread to the USA, Australia, and European countries, therefore requiring special alertness. Most common symptoms of LA are fever, chills, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain, although a broad spectrum of non-specific symptoms may also occur. Conclusion Imaging studies (ultrasound, computed tomography scan) and microbiological findings play a crucial role in the diagnosis of LA. The treatment of choice for PLA is a multimodal approach combining broad-spectrum antibiotics and aspiration or drainage of larger abscess cavities. Amebic LA can be cured by metronidazole therapy without drainage. PMID:26287275

  12. Lung abscess and empyema.

    PubMed

    Neild, J E; Eykyn, S J; Phillips, I

    1985-12-01

    Forty-eight patients presenting with lung abscess or empyema were studied between 1976 and 1984. The clinical features, diagnostic techniques and management are discussed. Aerobes were cultured from specimens obtained in 37.5 per cent of cases, both aerobes and anaerobes in 54.2 per cent and anaerobes alone in only 8.3 per cent. Bacteroides fragilis was not isolated. Forty-two per cent of patients had previously received antibiotics, but fully sensitive organisms were grown from 17 of 20 specimens from this group. Forty-five per cent of aerobes and 17.8 per cent of anaerobes were resistant to penicillin. There were no specific clinical features which distinguished the patients with a lung abscess from those with an empyema, nor between those with an underlying abnormality and those in whom the infection arose in a previously normal lung. Lung abscesses should be treated medically with intensive physiotherapy and appropriate antibiotics; penicillin can no longer be considered the antibiotic of choice. If the cavity fails to drain satisfactorily, further investigations should be undertaken to exclude a tumour or other underlying abnormality. PMID:4095257

  13. Pyogenic abscess of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, K.

    1961-01-01

    The author records the case histories of 27 patients suffering from liver abscess admitted during the period 1946-60 to the Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford. Seventeen were examples of multiple and 10 of single abscess. In most cases the primary source was determinable. Despite there being only one survivor of the 10 patients with a solitary abscess, the author considers the condition easily curable if recognized early. PMID:13696562

  14. A middle-aged lady with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Law, Siu-Tong; Lee, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare, but rapidly fatal infection. It is usually associated with malignancy and immunosuppression. We report the case of 50-year-old lady with the secondary liver metastases from rectal cancer presented with fever and epigastric pain. The identification of Gram-positive bacilli septicaemia, the presence of gas-forming liver abscess and massive intravascular hemolysis should lead to the suspicion of C. perfringens infection. Here we review twenty cases published since 1990 and their clinical features are discussed. The importance of ”an aggressive treatment policy” with multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:22993668

  15. Multi-Organ Failure Secondary to a Clostridium Perfringens Gaseous Liver Abscess following a Self-Limited Episode of Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Merchant, Chandni; Atluri, Paavani; Dwivedi, Sukrut

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Liver absces Symptoms: Diarrhea • jaundice • vomiting • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT scan guided drainage Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens is an unusual pathogen responsible for the development of a gas-forming pyogenic liver abscess. Progression to septicemia with this infection has amplified case fatality rates. Case Report: We report a case of an 81-year-old lady with pyogenic liver abscess with gas formation that was preceded by an acute gastroenteritis. The most common precipitating factors are invasive procedures and immunosuppression. Clostridium perfringens was unexpectedly isolated in the drained abscess, as well as blood. It is a normal inhabitant of the human bowel and a common cause of food poisoning, notoriously leading to tissue necrosis and gas gangrene. Conclusions: We report a case of gas-forming pyogenic liver abscess and bacteremia progressing to fatal septic shock, caused by an uncommon Clostridium perfringens isolate. PMID:25807198

  16. Ascaris-induced liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Javid, G; Wani, N A; Gulzar, G M; Khan, B A; Shah, A H; Shah, O J; Khan, M

    1999-11-01

    The prevalence, symptomatology, and outcome of Ascaris-induced liver abscess was studied prospectively in Kashmir, India, which is an endemic area of ascariasis, from December 1987 to December 1997. Of 510 patients with liver abscess admitted during this period, 74 had biliary ascariasis as the cause (14.51%). Of these 74 patients, 11 had intact ascaridae (live or dead) within the abscess. Six patients had a single abscess, and five had multiple abscesses. Seven patients had associated worms in the bile ducts. Ultrasonography was the main diagnostic procedure used. Ten patients were diagnosed based on clinical and ultrasound findings, and one was diagnosed during laparotomy. Most of the patients were young (age range 3-40 years) with a mean age of 17.20 years. Seven were females, and four were males. Ten patients underwent surgery; nine recovered completely, and one died postoperatively due to septicemia. Another patient died as well: a young child who presented late, was in refractory septic shock following suppurative cholangitis and liver abscess, and could not be taken for surgery. The mortality thus was 9.9%. Liver abscess following invasion of intrahepatic biliary radicles by ascaridae through the ampulla is an unusual complication of an otherwise common disease in Kashmir Valley, affecting children and young adults. The outcome depends on early diagnosis and surgical drainage of the abscess with extraction of worms from the ducts. PMID:10501884

  17. Intracranial abscess in Ectopia Cordis.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph; Tipper, Geoffrey Adrian; Hussain, Zakier; Balakrishnan, Venkataraman; Gan, Peter

    2014-08-25

    We present a case of intracranial abscess in a young female with Ectopia Cordis, an exceptionally rare cardiac condition. The neurosurgical implication is the predisposition to intracranial abscess formation. A heightened awareness of this association will aid diagnosis in similar clinical scenarios. PMID:25153988

  18. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  19. [Lung abscess: changes in treatment?].

    PubMed

    Clottu, E; Nicod, L P

    2015-11-18

    Lung abscess occurs in very pleomorphic according to germs initially involved. The mechanism commonly found is an aspiration of the oropharyngeal flora in patients with disorders of consciousness or swallowing. The infection is polymicrobial, with presence of anaerobic germs in 2/3 of the cases. The support consists of a prolonged antibiotic treatment, as well as anaerobic until resolution or stability of the radiological image. In case of prolonged toxic state, drainage of the abscess is to be discussed especially if there is no airways drainage. Surgical sanctions is rarely needed regardless of the size of the abscess, unless underlying carcinoma is present. PMID:26742239

  20. [A case of subclinical frontal lobe abscess as a complication of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Kozakiewicz, Jacek; Gierlotka, Agata; Pieniazek, Jerzy; Chrobak, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays suppurative complications of sinusitis are uncommon in orderto widespread treatment with antibiotics. Intracranial complications include bacterial meningitis, encephalitis, brain abscess, epidural or subdural abscess and sinus thrombophlebitis.The 13-40% of all brain abscesses are sinogenic complications. The inflammation process spreads from sinuses by valveless diploic veins of the skull as thrombophlebitis or by direct extension of osteomyelitis. Jatrogenic, posttraumatic or natural fissures in bony walls can also take part in spreading the infection. Diagnostic process includes laryngological and neurological evaluation with the computer tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with intracranial complications require broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical treatment in orderto remove the origin of infection in the sinuses. For physicians they are always challenging conditions according to their significantly high mortality. The case of the 24 year old patient with sinogenic brain abscess was shown in this paper. He neglected ambulatory treatment of chronic sinusitis because of lack of the medical insurance. After episode of losing the consciousness he was admitted to the ENT Department with headache, nausea, fever and dehydration. The diagnose was established based on laryngological and neurological examination and visualization of brain abscess on CT scans. He was treated by surgical intervention conducted by team of head and neck surgeons and neurosurgeons. Intensive antibiotic therapy with the Uffenorde operation of frontal sinuses and neurosurgical removal of the brain abscess was performed.The epidemiology, clinical course, diagnostic problems and therapy were described. PMID:25775820

  1. [Nasal septal abscess].

    PubMed

    Barril, María F; Ferolla, Fausto M; José, Pablo; Echave, Cecilia; Tomezzoli, Silvana; Fiorini, Sandra; López, Eduardo Luis

    2008-12-01

    A nasal septal abscess (NA) is defined as a collection of pus between the cartilage or bony septum and its normally applied mucoperichondrium or mucoperiostium. It is an uncommon disease which should be suspected in a patient with acute onset of nasal obstruction and recent history of nasal trauma, periodontal infection or an inflammatory process of the rhinosinusal region. We report a case of an 8-year-old boy with bilateral NA caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MR-CO) in order to emphasize the importance of prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment to prevent the potentially dangerous spread of infection and the development of severe functional and cosmetic sequelae. PMID:19107309

  2. [Fungal mycotic aneurysms and multiple cerebral abscesses caused by Scedosporium apiospermum. Apropos of a case with review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Baudrillard, J C; Rousseaux, P; Lerais, J M; Toubas, O; Scherpereel, B; Gari, M; Comte, P

    1985-04-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial fungal aneurysm and brain abscesses. The compromised host was a young drowned woman. Scedosporium Apiospermum was isolated in fungal culture from abscess. Radiological and clinical pictures are typical of the hyphal form. PMID:3839532

  3. Novel Peritonsillar Abscess Task Simulator.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven R; Chang, C W David

    2014-04-01

    The management of peritonsillar abscesses is a skill developed early in residency training. Although drainage is not technically complicated, the procedure is intimidating to the neophyte. Task simulators have become increasingly common to provide training opportunities in a controlled environment. The authors designed a peritonsillar abscess simulator using a latex moulage of the oral cavity and other common materials. Twelve medical professionals of various levels of experience were instructed to expose, anesthetize, aspirate, and drain the simulated abscess. After completion, a questionnaire was completed by each volunteer. Initial impressions were positive that the model adequately replicated the tasks requisite for abscess drainage and was suitable as an instructional device. The initial construct cost was approximately 10 dollars, with disposables costing roughly 25 cents. Further research is under way to formally assess the simulator for face, content, and construct validity. PMID:24705219

  4. Spreading of multiple Listeria monocytogenes abscesses via central nervous system fiber tracts: case report.

    PubMed

    Bojanowski, Michel W; Seizeur, Romuald; Effendi, Khaled; Bourgouin, Patrick; Magro, Elsa; Letourneau-Guillon, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Animal studies have shown that Listeria monocytogenes can probably access the brain through a peripheral intraneural route, and it has been suggested that a similar process may occur in humans. However, thus far, its spreading through the central nervous system (CNS) has not been completely elucidated. The authors present a case of multiple L. monocytogenes cerebral abscesses characterized by a pattern of distribution that suggested spread along white matter fiber tracts and reviewed the literature to identify other cases for analysis. They elected to include only those cases with 3 or more cerebral abscesses to make sure that the distribution was not random, but rather followed a pattern. In addition, they included those cases with abscesses in both the brainstem and the cerebral hemispheres, but excluded cases in which abscesses were located solely in the brainstem. Of 77 cases of L. monocytogenes CNS abscesses found in the literature, 17 involved multiple abscesses. Of those, 6 were excluded for lack of imaging and 3 because they involved only the brainstem. Of the 8 remaining cases from the literature, one was a case of bilateral abscesses that did not follow a fiber tract; another was also bilateral, but with lesions appearing to follow fiber tracts on one side; and in the remaining 6, to which the authors added their own case for a total of 7, all the abscesses were located exclusively in the same hemisphere and distributed along white matter fiber tracts. The findings suggest that after entering the CNS, L. monocytogenes travels within the axons, resulting in a characteristic pattern of distribution of multiple abscesses along the white matter fiber tracts in the brain. This report is the first description suggesting intraaxonal CNS spread of L. monocytogenes infection in humans following its entry into the brain. This distinct pattern is clearly seen on imaging and its recognition may be valuable in the diagnosis of listeriosis. This finding may allow for earlier diagnosis, which may improve outcome. PMID:26090836

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in diabetic patients: association of glycemic control with the clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) has been reported with increasing frequency in East Asian countries in the past 3 decades, especially in Taiwan and Korea. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for KPLA and highly associated with septic metastatic complications from KPLA. We investigated the association of glycemic control in diabetic patients with the clinical characteristics of KPLA in Taiwan. Methods Adult diabetic patients with KPLA were identified retrospectively in a medical center from January 2007 to January 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared among patients with different levels of current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Risk factors for metastatic infection from KPLA were analyzed. Results Patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c???7%) were significantly younger than those with controlled glycemia (HbA1c < 7%). Patients with uncontrolled glycemia had the trend to have a higher rate of gas-forming liver abscess, cryptogenic liver abscess, and metastatic infection than those with controlled glycemia. Cryptogenic liver abscess and metastatic infection were more common in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c value >; 10%) after adjustment with age. HbA1c level and abscess < 5 cm were independent risk factors for metastatic complications from KPLA. Conclusions Glycemic control in diabetic patients played an essential role in the clinical characteristics of KPLA, especially in metastatic complications from KPLA. PMID:23363608

  6. Percutaneous drainage of lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Shim, C; Santos, G H; Zelefsky, M

    1990-01-01

    Most lung abscesses are successfully treated with antibiotics. However, occasional patients with lung abscesses that drain poorly, causing persistent fever and toxic symptoms, may require surgical intervention. Lobectomy is the most frequent surgical procedure. Some patients are debilitated and have underlying medical conditions such as heart disease, chronic pulmonary disease, or liver disease that may render surgical intervention risky. Recently there have been reports of percutaneous drainage of lung abscess with good results. We have successfully carried out percutaneous drainage of lung abscess in 4 patients and an infected bulla in 1. All patients had failed to respond to therapy with antibiotics and postural drainage. There was prompt disappearance of the fluid level in the cavity, decline in temperature, and abatement of toxic symptoms with drainage. The cavities closed gradually over the next 6-12 weeks. The patients tolerated the chest tube well and there were no side effects from the tube drainage. Percutaneous tube drainage is the surgical treatment of choice in the medically complicated patient with a poorly draining lung abscess. PMID:2122136

  7. Propionibacterium acnes causing an aortic root abscess

    PubMed Central

    Horner, S M; Sturridge, M F; Swanton, R H

    1992-01-01

    A case of endocarditis caused by Propionibacterium acnes associated with an aortic root abscess is presented. This supports the current opinion that aortic root abscesses are not necessarily associated with microorganisms of high virulence. PMID:1389743

  8. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Sen Dokumac?, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16?weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient’s symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined. PMID:24072838

  9. Percutaneous management of multiple liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.H.; Collins, T.L.; Yrizarry, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage is now an accepted technique in the management of hepatic and other intraabdominal abscesses. Most abscesses accepted by the radiologist for drainage are unilocular with a safe percutaneous approach. This report demonstrates that even multiple hepatic abscesses may be successfully managed by percutaneous drainage. The use of computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis and sonography for safe puncture guidance is discussed.

  10. Confusing presentation of chaetomium brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Waheed, Shahan; Mangrio, Salman Ahmed; Rashid, Sana; Qadeer, Mohsin; Bari, Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    We put forth the case of a young immunocompetent female who presented with fever and left basal ganglia bleed secondary to vasculitis. After 2 weeks of prednisolone therapy, she continued to deteriorate. MRI scan revealed enhancement of previous hematoma, pus was aspirated surgically and fungal culture grew Chaetomium. PMID:24977715

  11. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Lachara V; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  12. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  13. Dynamic changes during evacuation of a left temporal abscess in open MRI: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Bernays, R L; Kollias, S S; Yonekawa, Y

    2002-05-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness of "near real-time" neuro-navigation by open MRI systems for guidance of stereotactic evacuation of intracranial abscesses. A 70-year-old patient was referred to our institution with an intracranial left temporal abscess. He presented with headache, senso-motor aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. The abscess (35 x 25 mm) was stereotactically evacuated under MRI guidance, and a recurrence of a daughter abscess was again evacuated on the 9th postoperative day. "Near real-time" imaging showed an indentation of the abscess wall of 11 mm along the trajectory. A thermosensitive MRI protocol demonstrated a higher temperature around the abscess capsule than in the brain tissue more distant to the capsule, demonstrating the inflammatory process. The patient had 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy for gram-negative bacteria and was discharged with improved clinical symptoms 5 weeks after admission. Follow-up CT 2 months postoperatively showed a complete resolution of the abscess. Open MRI-guided interventions with "near real-time" imaging demonstrate the anatomical changes during an ongoing procedure and can be accommodated for enhancing the overall precision of stereotactic procedures. Thermosensitive MRI protocols are capable of revealing temperature gradients around inflammatory processes. PMID:12012131

  14. Anorectal Infection: Abscess–Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Abcarian, Herand

    2011-01-01

    Anorectal abscess and fistula are among the most common diseases encountered in adults. Abscess and fistula should be considered the acute and chronic phase of the same anorectal infection. Abscesses are thought to begin as an infection in the anal glands spreading into adjacent spaces and resulting in fistulas in ~40% of cases. The treatment of an anorectal abscess is early, adequate, dependent drainage. The treatment of a fistula, although surgical in all cases, is more complex due to the possibility of fecal incontinence as a result of sphincterotomy. Primary fistulotomy and cutting setons have the same incidence of fecal incontinence depending on the complexity of the fistula. So even though the aim of a surgical procedure is to cure a fistula, conservative management short of major sphincterotomy is warranted to preserve fecal incontinence. However, trading radical surgery for conservative (nonsphincter cutting) procedures such as a draining seton, fibrin sealant, anal fistula plug, endorectal advancement flap, dermal island flap, anoplasty, and LIFT (ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract) procedure all result in more recurrence/persistence requiring repeated operations in many cases. A surgeon dealing with fistulas on a regular basis must tailor various operations to the needs of the patient depending on the complexity of the fistula encountered. PMID:22379401

  15. Pyogenic psoas abscess: analysis of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, M F; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shi, Z Y; Lin, Y H

    1999-12-01

    From 1993 to 1998, 29 pyogenic psoas abscesses occurring in 27 patients were seen in Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Their age range was 25 to 85 years. Diabetes mellitus was the leading underlying disease. Fever and pain in the flank area, back and hip were the usual manifestations. The duration of symptoms prior to the diagnosis ranged from 3 days to 6 months. Most abscesses were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) images and proven by abscess cultures, which were divided into primary and secondary types. Eighteen of 29 abscesses were regarded as primary. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen in the primary abscesses, followed by Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, viridans streptococci, S. epidermidis, and Salmonella spp.. In the secondary abscess category, E. coli was the leading organism in this series, followed by S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, viridans streptococci and Candida albicans. The associated conditions included epidural abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, perirenal abscess, pulmonary tuberculosis, empyema, hydronephrosis and trauma history. The initial empiric therapy comprised mostly of cefazolin or oxacillin with or without an aminoglycoside. Thirteen patients underwent percutaneous drainage, while six received surgical debridement, including two with a recurrent abscess. One patient had both drainage and debridement. Others received medical treatment only. Two of the patients with primary abscess died in spite of percutaneous drainage. Therefore, open drainage, besides appropriate antibiotic treatment, is still required to control complex abscesses with sepsis. PMID:10650491

  16. Effective treatment of cerebral mucormycosis associated with brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Chamdine, Omar; Gaur, Aditya H; Broniscer, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Isolated cerebral mucormycosis is rare. We describe a patient with a brain tumor and a surgically-related Rhizopus oryzae brain abscess. Her abscess was effectively treated with posaconazole, micafungin and colony-stimulating factor followed by posaconazole alone. To our knowledge, cerebral mucormycosis secondary to brain surgery had not been previously reported. PMID:25420158

  17. Brain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  18. Idiopathic bilateral male breast abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Sinha, Mithilesh Kumar; Gaurav, Kumar; Kumar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with bilateral breast swelling, along with pain and redness for 7 days. Bilateral axillary nodes were also palpable; which were multiple and discrete. A provisional diagnosis of bilateral breast abscess was made with suspicion of underlying malignancy. Incision and drainage through subareolar incision was performed and the adjoining tissue was excised and sent for histopathological examination. PMID:24614823

  19. Candida parotitis with abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Even-Tov, Ella; Niv, A; Kraus, M; Nash, Michael

    2006-03-01

    This report describes the case of an elderly, diabetic man who developed acute suppurative parotitis with abscess formation. The causative agent of parotid abscess was Candida albicans, which is an unusual cause of salivary gland pathology. The parotid gland is the salivary gland most commonly affected by inflammation. Acute parotitis occurs most often in elderly patients who are debilitated by systemic disease or are in a state of dehydration following major surgical procedures. Despite the high prevalence of oral candida carriage, there have been few previous reports of candida sialoadenitis in the literature. This is due to the toxicity of saliva to fungi under normal conditions. The diagnosis of candidiasis in our patient was made by culturing the purulent discharge from Stensen's duct and by culture of the pus obtained at surgical drainage of the abscess. After incision and drainage, the patient was treated with intravenous and then oral fluconazole for a total of 4 weeks with complete resolution of his condition. This case is interesting in light of recent and ongoing investigations of salivary proteins as potential new antifungal agents. PMID:16618667

  20. [Psoas abscess after anterior spinal fusion].

    PubMed

    Mückley, T; Schütz, T; Hierholzer, C; Potulski, M; Beisse, R; Bühren, V

    2003-03-01

    We present 3 cases of secondary psoas abscess after anterior spinal fusion. Psoas abscess is still a rare clinical entity. It is often associated with unspecific symptomatology and may present as late infection. A high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography is the imaging technology of choice. Treatment includes open abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy. In secondary psoas abscess causative treatment of the primary infection focus is essential. For psoas abscess after anterior spondylodesis this includes treatment of a deep wound infection. Predisposing factors for postoperative infection are large implants, bone grafting, long operating times, previous spinal surgery, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders. Usually several operations are necessary to eradicate infection. As long as stability is guaranteed, implant materials should be removed. Continuing antibiotic therapy for 2-3 weeks after normalization of infectious parameters is suggested. Delayed therapy results in an increase of the morbidity and mortality of psoas abscess. PMID:12658345

  1. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Masquerading as Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vinit; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Bansal, Rinkesh K.; Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy masquerading as liver abscess, and presenting with fever, is mainly described in patients with colorectal cancers with liver metastasis. Primary liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as non-resolving liver abscess is extremely uncommon and carries a dismal prognosis. We present a rare case of non-resolving liver abscess as a presenting manifestation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25941437

  2. [Liver abscess and appendicular foreign body].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Paul G; Buysschaert M; De Cannière L; Trigaux JP; Donckier J; Coche E

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of liver abscess secondary to appendicitis which was due to a wire within the appendix. Appendicitis was asymptomatic, probably because of its retrocaecal position and/or previous antibiotic treatment. The abscess was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and percutaneous drainage, followed by a second stage appendicectomy. This case illustrates the value of gastrointestinal radiological investigations before considering the abscess as cryptogenetic.

  3. Cerebellar abscess. A review of 47 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A

    1975-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of cerebellar abscess have been reviewed, 93% of which were secondary to otogenic disease. There has been little change in the annual incidence during the period of time under review. The overall mortality was 41%, but with successive decades the mortality has increased. Three factors appear to be of importance in determining survival: the patient's ability to control his infection; reduction of the effect of the posterior fossa mass, preferably by complete excision of the abscess under antibiotic cover; and, in the case of otogenic abscess, an adequate radical mastoidectomy with bone removal to the site of attachment of the abscess to the dura mater. PMID:1151412

  4. Acute tongue abscess. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Kostas; Hadjipetrou, Loukia; Antoniades, Vasilis; Antoniades, Dimitris

    2004-05-01

    Abscess of the tongue seems to be a rare clinical entity and is a potentially life-threatening infection. It may result in airway compromise and disseminated infection to other regions. Thus, a tongue abscess should be considered in all cases of acute tongue swelling, especially when host defences are severely impaired. In acute cases the diagnosis of tongue abscess can be reached clinically. Needle aspiration of pus collection is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool, which provides considerable amelioration of symptoms. Three cases of tongue abscess are reported, along with discussion of the presentation, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and management of this disease. PMID:15153867

  5. [Pulmonary abscess treated with postural drainage].

    PubMed

    Prnjavorac, B; Ajanović, E; Binakaj, D; Rozajac, S; Djogić, H; Hasukić, S; Denjalić, A; Skiljo, H

    1996-01-01

    Case record of patients with lung abscess treated by postural drainage is presented in this paper. In young man with multiple explosive injuries lung abscess was formed two months after injury. A postural drainage with parenteral application of antibiotics has been performed. The expectoration was painful. At the seventh day there was no temperature, ESR was described at the tenth day. The general status was becoming better. At the seventeenth day patient was discharged from Hospital. Rig imaging was shown nearly completely resolution of lung abscess. Postural drainage was effective because of favorable localisation of abscess near the large bronchus and basely part of the lung. PMID:9333679

  6. Congenital Prepubic Sinus Accompanied by Prevesical Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Nomura, Teruhisa; Haneda, Yaburu; Sawada, Norifumi; Araki, Isao; Takeda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Congenital prepubic sinus is an extremely rare anomaly. The etiology is uncertain and the anatomical features often differ from each other. We report a 22-year-old woman with a congenital prepubic sinus accompanied by a prevesical abscess. She was admitted to our hospital with high-grade fever and low abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a prevesical abscess. After treatment of the prevesical abscess, we completely excised the congenital prepubic sinus. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case that accompanied by prevesical abscess on a congenital prepubic sinus. Moreover, this case represents the oldest reported age of a patient with a congenital prepubic sinus. PMID:25918630

  7. Myocardial abscess complicating healed myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, S.; Young, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An isolated myocardial abscess due to Bacteroides fragilis developed in the scar of a myocardial infarction. Fever, chills and signs of pericarditis were the main clinical features. Mild enteritis 1 week prior to the onset of symptoms related to the abscess was the most likely cause of the bacteremia. The diagnosis was established at thoracotomy, performed because of cardiac tamponade. Thirteen other cases of isolated bacterial myocardial abscess accompanying myocardial infarction have been reported, but all the infarctions were recent. Surgical resection for a suspected myocardial abscess should be considered in view of the high mortality, largely from cardiac rupture. Images FIG. 1 PMID:861868

  8. Pilonidal Abscess Associated With Primary Actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Malik, Mohamad Hashir; Keh, Chris Hang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Pilonidal disease in the sacrococcygeal region usually presents as abscesses, recurrent inflammation, cellulitis or fistula tracks. However, few reports on actinomycosis affecting pilonidal sinuses have been published. We report a case of a 25-year-old woman who presented with a pilonidal abscess who underwent surgical drainage and debridement. Pus from the pilonidal abscess was sent for microbiology, which grew actinomyces turicensis associated with prevotella bivia and peptostreptococci. She was treated with oral amoxicillin-clavulanate after surgical drainage for one week and recovered well. Actinomycosis associated with pilonidal abscesses, though uncommon, should be recognized and can be satisfactorily treated with a combination of surgical drainage and antibiotics. PMID:26817020

  9. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  10. [Optimal length of antibiotic therapy in aspirated cerebral abscess].

    PubMed

    Lepresle, E; Djindjian, M; Nguyen, J P; Goujon, C

    1990-03-10

    Between 1983 and 1988, 22 patients with brain abscess were admitted to our neurosurgery department; 2 patients deeply comatose on admission and who died on the first day were excluded from this study. Treatment consisted of needle aspiration of the abscess and antibacterial therapy initially using a broad-spectrum antibiotic later replaced, in all cases, by an antibiotic found to be active in vitro against the organism(s) isolated. The portal of entry was eradicated as early as possible. The duration of antibiotic therapy was determined according to the changes observed on computerized tomography images classified as cavitary, nodular, hypodense or normal. Nodular images were taken as reflecting an inflammatory state in the healing process, and hypodense images as sequelae, so that antibiotics were withdrawn in patients with such images. Altogether, 62 per cent of the patients received antibiotics for 60 days and 95 per cent for 90 days. There was no recurrence. In some patients with deep or, chiefly, multiple abscesses, treatment was pursued. In any case, antibiotics should not be given for more than 90 days if the initial treatment has proved effective, since cure is achieved in 45 to 60 days on average. PMID:2138760

  11. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment. PMID:26298050

  12. Minimally invasive image-guided keyhole aspiration of cerebral abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiang-Hui; Feng, Shi-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Li, Chong; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhou, Tao; Jiang, Jinli; Wang, Fuyu; Ma, Xiaodong; Bu, Bo; Yu, Xin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low incidence of brain abscesses in Western nations (1-2%), the incidence in developing countries is as high as 8%. We evaluate a minimally invasive image-guided keyhole aspiration of cerebral abscesses and compare it with a series of cases treated with surgical excision. 23 patients (20 male and 3 female, aged 7-67 years) underwent image-guided burr hole aspiration of single or multiple cerebral abscesses. Patient characteristics, perioperative, and postoperative data were analyzed and compared with a second group of 22 patients (14 male and 8 female, aged 12-72) treated for cerebral abscesses with open surgical excision. In all cases, the surgical procedure was performed successfully without complication. 8 of the 23 aspiration cases were performed with the aid of iMRI. A comparison of patient demographics, duration of hospital stay, duration of antibiotic therapy, postoperative neurological recovery time, intraoperative blood loss, operative duration, length of incision, postoperative fever, repeat surgery, and mortality was performed between the aspiration and excision groups. Intraoperative blood loss, operative duration, length of incision, and postoperative fever were all significantly reduced in the aspiration group. Though, duration of hospital stay and antibiotic therapy and postoperative neurological recovery time were all increased in the aspiration group, and statistical significance was observed in all except the duration of hospital stay. This technique is a feasible and comparable minimally invasive alternative to open surgical excision and may provide reduced intraoperative blood loss, shortened operative duration, improved cosmetic outcomes, and a lessened incidence of postoperative fever. PMID:25784984

  13. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received. PMID:22116986

  14. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  15. Cardiac aneurysm complicated by E. coli abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, F.E.; Yuille, D.L.; Jackson, L.J.; Zeft, H.J.; Mullen, D.C.

    1983-12-01

    An E. coli myocardial abscess developed in the region of an old aneurysmal myocardial scar. In spite of vigorous antibiotic therapy fever and positive blood cultures persisted. A combination of In-111 WBC scanning and Tc-99m RBC gated heart imaging located the infection in the aneurysmal scar. The abscess was resected and the patient survived.

  16. New approaches in treating abdominal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    Ultrasonography, computed tomography and radionuclide scintigraphy are changing the management of patients with intra-abdominal abscesses. Traditional surgical incision and drainage may not be necessary in all cases. Percutaneous catheter drainage using radiologic techniques has a high success rate. Although there are factors that preclude the use of percutaneous catheter drainage of an abscess, it nonetheless may be an alternative in certain situations.

  17. Facklamia hominis scapula abscess, Marseille, France

    PubMed Central

    Abat, C.; Garcia, V.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Facklamia hominis is a Gram-positive bacterium that was first isolated from various human samples, excluding abscesses of the scapula. We here report the first scapular abscess infection due to F. hominis, found in Marseille, France. We also reviewed all cases published in the literature.

  18. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  19. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  20. Medical treatment of multiple streptococcal liver abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlow, A.; Vellend, H.

    1983-04-01

    We describe four cases of multiple, cryptogenic, and streptococcal liver abscesses which were cured with antibiotic therapy. Two of the patients were referred for medical management as a last resort after open surgical drainage failed to eradicate the suppurative process. The other two patients were treated from the time of diagnosis with antimicrobial agents alone. Blood cultures or needle aspirates of the abscesses yielded a pure growth of streptococci in all instances. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin G. Cryptogenic streptococcal abscesses may represent a subset of multiple hepatic abscesses particularly amenable to successful medical therapy consisting of a minimum of 6 weeks parenteral antibiotic therapy followed by a period of oral antibiotics until clinical, biochemical, and radiological resolution of the abscesses has occurred.

  1. Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  2. Abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of "staph" bacteria resistant to antibiotics in the penicillin family, which have been the cornerstone of antibiotic ... population. While CA-MRSA bacteria are resistant to penicillin and penicillin-related antibiotics, most staph infections with ...

  3. Bilateral Psoas Muscle Abscess Associated with Emphysematous Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Ki; Kwon, Jae-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Psoas muscle abscess associated with emphysematous urinary tract infection is very rare. There were very few reports about urinary tract infections such as renal abscess, perinephric abscess, and emphysematous pyelonephritis complicated with psoas muscle abscess; however, psoas muscle abscess associated with emphysematous cystitis has not yet been reported. Here, we report a case of bilateral posas muscle abscess following emphysematous cystitis in an 81-year-old nondiabetic man, who was treated successfully with prolonged antibiotic therapy and supportive care. Early recognition of psoas muscle abscess can prevent aggressive interventional procedure and warrant good prognosis. PMID:25755669

  4. Lemierre’s disease: a case with bilateral iliopsoas abscesses and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre’s disease is characterized by sepsis, often with an oropharyngeal source, secondary septic emboli and internal jugular vein thrombosis (Lancet 1:701–3, 1936. Clin Microbiol Rev 20(4):622–59, 2007). Septic emboli affecting many bodily sites have been reported, including the lungs, joints, bones, and brain. The case report describes an unusual case of Lemierre’s disease in a 64 year old gentleman causing profound sepsis, acute kidney injury, bilateral iliopsoas abscesses and a right hand abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Lemierre’s disease in the context of bilateral psoas abscesses, and highlights the ambiguity surrounding the definition of Lemierre’s disease. The clinical literature review highlights the difficulty in definitively diagnosing the condition and offers some suggestions for recognising and refining the diagnostic criterion of Lemierre’s. PMID:24904685

  5. Variable CT appearance of hepatic abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, R.A.; Korobkin, M.; Foster, W.L.; Silverman, P.M.; Thompson, W.M.

    1984-05-01

    Fifty computed tomographic (CT) scans in 33 patients with 37 separate episodes of hepatic abscess were reviewed retrospectively. Abnormalitites were detected in all but one case (97% sensitivity). The CT appearance of the lesions varied from well defined, rounded cavities with contents near water density, resembling poorly defined hepatic cysts, to higher-density foci indistinguishable from hepatic neoplasms. In only 19% was gas present within the abscess. Rim enhancement was seen in only 6%. This study suggests that CT is a sensitive test for detecting hepatic abscess but is often nonspecific.

  6. Lung abscess in children in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Tumwine, J K

    1992-10-01

    Despite the rarity of lung abscess in children, 24 patients were treated at Harare Central Hospital during the 10 year period (1979 to 1988). The bacteriology and clinical findings of the 24 patients are presented. Bacteria were isolated from 18 patients. The most frequent isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, group A beta haemolytic streptococci, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most of the abscesses followed measles, empyema or an episode of aspiration. The patients were managed with bronchoscopy, physiotherapy, and appropriate antibiotics, and had a mortality of 25%. Efforts at controlling measles as well as early and appropriate management of empyema are likely to reduce the number of lung abscesses in children. PMID:1473506

  7. The management abscess of the lung.

    PubMed

    BYRON, F X

    1952-05-01

    A review of the literature raises considerable doubt as to the advisability of surgical drainage of lung abscess as a definitive procedure. The mortality rate with use of this procedure and other hazards associated with it, must now be viewed in the light of improved methods of conservative therapy - involving the use of penicillin, bronchoscopic treatment and postural drainage-by which cure can be obtained in more than 80 per cent of cases of acute abscess and in a smaller proportion of cases of chronic abscess. Another factor to be considered is the better chance for diagnosis and effective resection of associated carcinoma when conservative treatment is employed. PMID:14935878

  8. Intramedullary pyogenic abscess in the conus medullaris.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M F; Mohamed, M B; Kalsi, P; Sinar, E J; Bradey, N

    2012-02-01

    Primary pyogenic abscess in the conus medullaris in a healthy adult has never been reported. An urgent MRI scan with contrast and prompt surgical evacuation may lead to good neurological recovery. PMID:22264156

  9. Abscess formation within a Rathke's cleft cyst

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Ian C.; Mahmood, Sajedha; Scoones, David; Bradey, Nicholas; Kane, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    We report and discuss the rare case of a pituitary abscess forming within a Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC). A 66-year-old gentleman presented with visual deterioration and symptoms suggestive of hypopituitarism. The patient underwent transsphenoidal debulking of the lesion whereupon purulent material was discovered. Histological examination was suggestive of RCC together with numerous neutrophils characteristic of abscess. Microbiological culture of the material grew Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was treated for a RCC abscess and received antibiotics and endocrine replacement therapy. The patient has been followed up for 2 years without recurrence. Although uncommon, we recommend the consideration of RCC abscess as a differential diagnosis of a pituitary mass lesion as clinical presentation and radiological assessment are not specific in identifying these lesions preoperatively. PMID:25378415

  10. Klebsiella pneumoniae Liver Abscess and Metastatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jason T.; Lewis, Catherine R.; Danner, Omar K.; Wilson, Kenneth L.; Matthews, L. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well-known cause of liver abscess. Higher rates of liver abscess associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae are seen in Taiwan. Metastatic endophthalmitis is a common complication associated with a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Case Report. We report a case of a 67-year-old Korean female with Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess. The patient developed metastatic endophthalmitis and ultimately succumbed to her disease despite aggressive medical and surgical treatment. Conclusion. Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Liver abscesses preferably should be treated with percutaneous drainage, but surgical treatment is needed in some cases. Metastatic spread to the eye is a common complication that must be treated aggressively with intravenous antibiotics and surgical intervention if necessary. PMID:26788530

  11. Epidural abscess secondary to acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Marguerite; Meshkat, Babek; El-Masry, Sherif

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a 1-week history of back pain, on a background of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and rectal carcinoma for which he had undergone abdominoperineal resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He exhibited signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the tip of the appendix, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space extending to T9. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and appendicectomy and prolonged course intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 months after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a very common pathology (appendicitis) and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:25527687

  12. Lung abscess caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Omae, Takashi; Matsubayashi, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with West syndrome was referred to hospital because of high fever and cough. Chest X-ray and computed tomography showed consolidation with an abscess in the right upper lobe. Laboratory data indicated cytokine storm. Various antibacterial agents and additional corticosteroid were unable to control the hypercytokinemia, which was suppressed after cyclosporine A was started. The lung abscess remained, however, and right upper lobectomy was performed. Culture from the abscess showed no growth, while polymerase chain reaction assay indicated Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Serum passive agglutinin titer for M. pneumoniae was significantly elevated in the convalescent phase. These findings are strong evidence that the lung abscess was caused by M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26177124

  13. [Young girl with abscesses in the face].

    PubMed

    Waagsbø, Bjørn; Tofteland, Ståle; Kittang, Ole Bjørn

    2011-11-15

    Skin and soft tissue infections are most often caused by Staphylococcus aureus or various species of streptococcus. This case report summarizes the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and clinical outcome of a facial infection presenting as multiple abscesses in a young and otherwise healthy girl. Nocardia brasiliensis was recovered from abscess aspiration, and treatment failure was eventually recognized for the recommended empirical antibiotic treatment, broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgery. PMID:22085952

  14. Dynamic CT features of hepatic abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, D.; Vasile, N.; Fagniez, P.L.; Segui, S.; Grably, D.; Larde, D.

    1985-03-01

    Forty hepatic abscesses were examined with dynamic computed tomography (CT). A double target sign, consisting of a hypodense central area surrounded by first a hyperdense ring and then a hypodense zone, seems to be highly suggestive of abscess formation. In 12 cases, the hepatic parenchyma surrounding the lesion demonstrated transient hyperdensity after contrast injection, possibly due to localized hepatic venous obstruction secondary to acute hepatic inflammation. This is similar to the appearance of an arterioportal fistula.

  15. [Pathogenesis and treatment of chronic lung abscesses].

    PubMed

    OstrovskiÄ­, V K; ShnaÄ­der, A A

    1990-01-01

    The main causes of the development of chronic abscesses of the lungs in 41 patient were the presence of the pulmonary tissue sequesters, interlobar location of a process, large (5 cm and more) diameter of the cavities. The infiltrative form of an abscess was distinguished. The process should be considered as chronic in ineffectiveness of all the types of treatment. With the use of the conservative methods, 14 patients were cured. PMID:2280521

  16. Renal Hemorrhagic Actinomycotic Abscess in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Bhardwaj, Neha R.; Di Giovanni, Laura M.; Eggener, Scott; Torre, Micaela Della

    2014-01-01

    Actinomyces israelii is a gram-positive, filamentous anaerobic bacteria colonizing the oral and gastrointestinal tracts. Retroperitoneal actinomycotic abscess is uncommon and its rare presentation as a hemorrhagic mass may be confused with malignancy. We present a case of this unusual infection complicating pregnancy. Increased awareness of actinomycotic abscess in the differential diagnosis of renal mass concerning for malignancy is critical to early recognition and treatment of this rare infection and most importantly, avoidance of unnecessary surgical intervention. PMID:24757509

  17. Acute Abdomen Caused by Brucellar Hepatic Abscess.

    PubMed

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Barut, Ibrahim; Koca, Tugba; Kaya, Onur; Aktas, Recep Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis that is common worldwide, is endemic in many countries, primarily those of the Mediterranean region (including Turkey). Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella spp. infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella melitensis, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen. PMID:26526924

  18. Propionibacterium acnes Pyogenic Liver Abscess and Pylephlebitis

    PubMed Central

    Poursina, Arash; Weissman, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Reported is an unusual case of pyogenic liver abscess and septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein in a 44-year-old male caused by Propionibacterium acnes successfully managed with a combination of percutaneous drainage and antimicrobial therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this bacterium isolated in pure culture as the sole etiologic organism of pyogenic liver abscess and pylephlebitis in an adult patient. PMID:25954544

  19. Pyogenic liver abscess: Changing patterns in approach

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz A; Bari, Shams UL; Rouf, Khawaja Abdul; Wani, Khurshid Alam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To define optimum management of the pyogenic liver abscess and assess new trends in treatment. METHODS: One hundred and sixty nine patients with pyogenic liver abscess managed at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar, Kashmir (India) from July 2001 to August 2006 were studied to evaluate and define the optimum treatment. RESULTS: Mortality in the surgically treated group of patients was 9.4% (12/119), while those treated non-surgically had a fatality rate of 16.66% (7/42). Multiple liver abscesses treated surgically had a surprisingly low mortality of 30%. The biliary tract (64.97%) was the most common cause of liver abscess. Multiple abscesses, mixed organisms and abscess complications are all associated with a significantly increased mortality. However, the lethality of the primary disease process was the most important factor in determining survival. CONCLUSION: Transperitoneal surgical drainage and antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment. Percutaneous drainage is recommended for high risk patients only. PMID:21206721

  20. Hepatic abscess: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lardière-Deguelte, S; Ragot, E; Amroun, K; Piardi, T; Dokmak, S; Bruno, O; Appere, F; Sibert, A; Hoeffel, C; Sommacale, D; Kianmanesh, R

    2015-09-01

    Microbial contamination of the liver parenchyma leading to hepatic abscess (HA) can occur via the bile ducts or vessels (arterial or portal) or directly, by contiguity. Infection is usually bacterial, sometimes parasitic, or very rarely fungal. In the Western world, bacterial (pyogenic) HA is most prevalent; the mortality is high approaching 15%, due mostly to patient debilitation and persistence of the underlying cause. In South-East Asia and Africa, amebic infection is the most frequent cause. The etiologies of HA are multiple including lithiasic biliary disease (cholecystitis, cholangitis), intra-abdominal collections (appendicitis, sigmoid diverticulitis, Crohn's disease), and bile duct ischemia secondary to pancreatoduodenectomy, liver transplantation, interventional techniques (radio-frequency ablation, intra-arterial chemo-embolization), and/or liver trauma. More rarely, HA occurs in the wake of septicemia either on healthy or preexisting liver diseases (biliary cysts, hydatid cyst, cystic or necrotic metastases). The incidence of HA secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae is increasing and can give rise to other distant septic metastases. The diagnosis of HA depends mainly on imaging (sonography and/or CT scan), with confirmation by needle aspiration for bacteriology studies. The therapeutic strategy consists of bactericidal antibiotics, adapted to the germs, sometimes in combination with percutaneous or surgical drainage, and control of the primary source. The presence of bile in the aspirate or drainage fluid attests to communication with the biliary tree and calls for biliary MRI looking for obstruction. When faced with HA, the attending physician should seek advice from a multi-specialty team including an interventional radiologist, a hepatobiliary surgeon and an infectious disease specialist. This should help to determine the origin and mechanisms responsible for the abscess, and to then propose the best appropriate treatment. The presence of chronic enteric biliary contamination (i.e., sphincterotomy, bilio-enterostomy) should be determined before performing radio-frequency ablation and/or chemo-embolization; substantial stenosis of the celiac trunk should be detected before performing pancreatoduodenectomy to help avoid iatrogenic HA. PMID:25770745

  1. Imported Amoebic Liver Abscess in France

    PubMed Central

    Cordel, Hugues; Prendki, Virginie; Madec, Yoann; Houze, Sandrine; Paris, Luc; Bourée, Patrice; Caumes, Eric; Matheron, Sophie; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) can be found in individuals in non-endemic areas, especially in foreign-born travelers. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of ALA in patients admitted to French hospitals between 2002 and 2006. We compared imported ALA cases in European and foreign-born patients and assessed the factors associated with abscess size using a logistic regression model. Results We investigated 90 ALA cases. Patient median age was 41. The male:female ratio was 3.5?1. We were able to determine the origin for 75 patients: 38 were European-born and 37 foreign-born. With respect to clinical characteristics, no significant difference was observed between European and foreign-born patients except a longer lag time between the return to France after traveling abroad and the onset of symptoms for foreign-born. Factors associated with an abscess size of more than 69 mm were being male (OR?=?11.25, p<0.01), aged more than 41 years old (OR?=?3.63, p?=?0.02) and being an immigrant (OR?=?11.56, p?=?0.03). Percutaneous aspiration was not based on initial abscess size but was carried out significantly more often on patients who were admitted to surgical units (OR?=?10, p<0.01). The median time to abscess disappearance for 24 ALA was 7.5 months. Conclusions/Significance In this study on imported ALA was one of the largest worldwide in terms of the number of cases included males, older patients and foreign-born patients presented with larger abscesses, suggesting that hormonal and immunological factors may be involved in ALA physiopathology. The long lag time before developing ALA after returning to a non-endemic area must be highlighted to clinicians so that they will consider Entamoeba histolytica as a possible pathogen of liver abscesses more often. PMID:23951372

  2. [Thalamo-mesencephalic aspergillus abscess in a heart transplant subject: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Mazzaferri, Fulvia; Adami, Irene; Tocco, Pierluigi; Cazzadori, Angelo; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Storato, Silvia; Ferrari, Sergio; Concia, Ercole

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare and highly fatal infection that mainly affects immunocompromised patients. We report on a case of a heart transplanted Caucasian man, who arrived at our hospital because of the onset of diplopy. We performed a broad diagnostic work-up: the brain MRI showed a single ring-enhancing thalamo-mesencephalic area suggestive of abscess lesion; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis disclosed galactomannan and beta-D-glucan antigens. Thus the antifungal therapy was immediately started. We decided to discontinue the therapy 16 months later because of severe hepatic toxicity, given that the patient was persistently asymptomatic, brain imaging showed a progressive resolution of the abscess area and CSF antigen analysis was persistently negative. The follow-up at three months was unchanged. PMID:25819052

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, S.D.; Fisher, M.R.; Amparo, E.G.; Hricak, H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1985-06-01

    Ten patients with percutaneous biopsy or surgically proven abscesses were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to describe the appearance of abscesses, define the capability of MRI to localize abscesses, and compare the capabilities of MRI and CT for the diagnosis and determination of the extend of an abscess. Comparative CT scans were available in six cases. MRI demonstrated a more clear delineation of the extent of inflammatory changes than did CT, and MRI demonstrated the abscess as a collection distinct from surrounding structures on at least one repetition rate. Surgical clips in the postoperative patient with an abscess did not degrade the MR images as often occurred with CT. This study describes the MRI appearance of abscess and indicates a potential value of the use of MRI to evaluate abscess outside the central nervous system and spine.

  4. Prostatic abscess: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Porfyris, Orestis; Kalomoiris, Paraskevas

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of prostatic abscess in a 52 year old male with a history of diabetes mellitus. The abscess was treated successfully with surgical drainage by transurethral unroofing of the cavity of the abscess. The use of transrectal ultrasound is valuable in the diagnosis, treatment and follow up of the abscess, while drainage is usually necessary for the treatment, which can be done by transrectal, transperineal and transurethral route. PMID:24085239

  5. Subhepatic Sterile Abscess 10 Years After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Anne K.; Zamora, Jose Gonzales

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a large, sterile, subhepatic abdominal wall abscess secondary to foreign body reaction to dropped gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 10 years ago. Dropped gallstones are common complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but they rarely result in abscess formation. When abscesses do occur, they may present a few months to a few years after surgery. It is important to recognize dropped gallstones as an etiology for subhepatic abscess in patients with history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26157931

  6. Muscle Abscess due to Salmonella Enterica.

    PubMed

    Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Ceylan, Bahadir; Iraz, Meryem; Elmadag, Nuh Mehmet; Aslan, Turan

    2013-07-01

    Non typhoidal Salmonellae spp. causes clinical symptoms especially in neonates, infants, aged and immunocompromised patients. Hematogenous dissemination may occur in complicated cases whereas the formation of abscess is rare. A 61-year old woman presented to our hospital with pain and a mass in her left arm, without fever and leukocytosis. She was using methotrexate, corticosteroids and quinine for rheumatoid arthritis. She had a history of cervix cancer and was given radiotherapy and chemotherapy 3 years ago. Upon physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging, the mass was considered as an abscess and was surgically drained. Salmonella enterica spp. enterica was yielded in the culture of the drainage material. Ceftriaxon 2g/day was started intramuscularly and continued for 4 weeks. Salmonellosis is usually a self-limited disease, generally restricted to gastrointestinal tract and acquired following food poisoning. Management of Salmonella abscess requires a combination of antibiotherapy, surgical drainage and eradication of primary foci. PMID:24396582

  7. Pelvic Endometriosis Presenting as a Supralevator Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Bernard B.; Tuckson, Wayne B.

    1988-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with sepsis nine days after a transrectal incision and drainage of a recurrent supralevator abscess. The findings included a large mass arising from the pelvis containing multiple, leaking, and infected endometrial cysts. After a supracervical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, sigmoid loop colostomy, appendectomy, and extensive irrigation and debridement, her condition improved with no recurrence at two-year follow-up. This case illustrates the varied presentations of endometriosis, the importance of identifying the source of a perirectal or perianal abscess, and that when a supralevator abscess develops from an intraabdominal process, the process must be addressed to prevent recurrence, fistulization, or other complications. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:3246707

  8. Renal Abscess Caused by Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amarjeet; Sarma, Smita; Kumar, Navin; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a true pathogen, which is capable of causing both intestinal and extraintestinal infections. Unusual presentations of Salmonella should always be kept in mind as this organism can cause disease in almost any organ of the body. S. typhi has been reported to cause the life-threatening infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, myocarditis, empyema, and hepatic abscess. Renal involvement by S. typhi is a relatively rare presentation. We report a case of renal abscess caused by S. typhi in an afebrile, 10-year-old child who did not have any clinical history of enteric fever. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolation of S. typhi from the renal abscess, and interestingly this isolate was found to be resistant to quinolones. PMID:26417164

  9. Infratemporal fossa abscess: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, M Panduranga; Bhojwani, Kiran M; Mahale, Ajit; Meyyappan, Hari; Abhijit, Kumar

    2009-05-01

    An abscess in the infratemporal fossa is a rare complication of dental extraction. Although it is a recognized entity, only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of abscess in the infratemporal fossa of a 55-year-old woman with noninsulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes who presented with left-sided facial pain and marked trismus. The abscess was managed successfully with external drainage. We have made an attempt to comprehensively review the literature on this rare condition, with special emphasis on its anatomic complexity and varied clinical presentation, and we provide a detailed discussion of the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:19444778

  10. Thigh abscess due to Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed Central

    Malani, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Chakshu; Weigand, Robert T.; Gupta, Vicram; Rangineni, Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is an uncommon cause of nocardiosis and usually infects immunocompromised individuals. We describe a patient with Hodgkin's disease and a thigh abscess due to N. farcinica. To the best of our knowledge, this has never been reported before in the English literature. It is important to recognize this complication, because a delay in diagnosis may result in widespread dissemination. Unless initially suspected, culture and identification will be delayed, as selective media for isolating Nocardia are not routinely used in most clinical laboratories. It is also important to differentiate N. farcinica from other Nocardia species due to its resistance to many antibiotics that are routinely used to treat abscesses, including cephalosporins. A case report along with literature review is presented in an effort to stress the importance of including this pathogen in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients with abscesses. PMID:16775924

  11. Disseminated trichosporonosis in a burn patient: meningitis and cerebral abscess due to Trichosporon asahii.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Orville D; Nyi Nyi, May-Phyo; Abbott, Sean P; Rainford, Lois E; Castle, Daphney M; Coard, Kathleen C M

    2011-12-01

    A 44-year-old diabetic female presented to a hospital in Jamaica with thermal burns. Trichosporon asahii was isolated from facial wounds, sputum, and a meningeal swab. Dissemination of the fungus was demonstrated in stained histological sections of the meninges and a brain abscess at autopsy. Pure growth of the fungus from patient samples submitted and an environmental isolate obtained from a wash basin in the hospital supported the diagnosis. PMID:22012010

  12. Disseminated Trichosporonosis in a Burn Patient: Meningitis and Cerebral Abscess Due to Trichosporon asahii?

    PubMed Central

    Heslop, Orville D.; Nyi Nyi, May-Phyo; Abbott, Sean P.; Rainford, Lois E.; Castle, Daphney M.; Coard, Kathleen C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A 44-year-old diabetic female presented to a hospital in Jamaica with thermal burns. Trichosporon asahii was isolated from facial wounds, sputum, and a meningeal swab. Dissemination of the fungus was demonstrated in stained histological sections of the meninges and a brain abscess at autopsy. Pure growth of the fungus from patient samples submitted and an environmental isolate obtained from a wash basin in the hospital supported the diagnosis. PMID:22012010

  13. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  14. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  15. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  16. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  17. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  18. Nephrobronchial fistula and lung abscess secondary to Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Uppe, Abhay; Nikalji, Ravindra; Dubey, Manish; Kadu, Nilesh

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple causes of lung abscess, but the differential rarely includes pyelonephritis as a primary cause leading to lung abscess resulting from the development of a nephrobronchial fistula. The patient had no urinary symptoms or abdominal pain and the etiology of lung abscess was only incidentally discovered after chest CT revealed extension of pleural fluid below the diaphragm. PMID:26180394

  19. Corticosteroid Therapy for Liver Abscess in Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Anderson, Victoria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Malech, Harry L.; DeRavin, SukSee; Wilks, David; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Zerbe, Christa S.; Heller, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Liver abscesses in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) are typically difficult to treat and often require surgery. We describe 9 X-linked CGD patients with staphylococcal liver abscesses refractory to conventional therapy successfully treated with corticosteroids and antibiotics. Corticosteroids may have a role in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus liver abscesses in CGD. PMID:22157170

  20. Omental and extraperitoneal abscesses complicating cholecystocolic fistula

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, K

    2003-01-01

    Background Acute cholecystitis resolves with conservative treatment in most patients, but empyema or perforation of an ischaemic area may develop, resulting in a pericholecystic abscess, bile peritonitis or a cholecysto-enteric fistula. Case outline A 63-year-old man presented with extraperitoneal and omental abscess formation complicating a cholecystocolic fistula secondary to gallbladder disease. Histological examination of the gallbladder and omentum showed xanthogranulomatous inflammation. Conclusion A detailed literature review failed to demonstrate a previous report of this combination of rare complications of gallbladder disease. PMID:18332986

  1. Anorectal Abscess and Fistula-in-Ano

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Adam M.; DeNobile, John W.

    1988-01-01

    The etiology of anorectal abscess and fistula-in-ano is discussed. The anatomy, which is vital to the understanding and treatment of the above, is reviewed, with two of the more common classifications of fistula-in-ano presented. The different methods of treating each are discussed, and some of the common complications of the procedure are listed. A true understanding of the disease process and anatomy is needed before treatment of fistulous abscesses is begun, but, with it, successful outcomes will occur in most cases. PMID:3074175

  2. Diagnostic strategy in evaluation of renal abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, C.J.; Tsai, S.H.; Smith, S.J.; Cass, A.S.

    1981-12-01

    The diagnosis of renal abscess is still a challenging problem. Early manifestations are usually nonspecific and nonlocalizing. Clinical picture, laboratory data, and intravenous pyelogram do not always differentiate between inflammatory lesions and neoplastic processes. Two cases with bilateral, metachronous renal abscesses are presented. The use of 111Indium scan is probably the major recent advance used for unmasking this inflammatory lesion. Sonography, computerized tomography scan, and even arteriography are sometimes necessary to establish reliable preoperative diagnosis. The diagnostic strategy for a systematic approach to the lesion is outlined.

  3. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  4. Falciform ligament abscess after omphalitis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Lee, Hae Won; Park, Kwi-Won; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2010-07-01

    A falciform ligament abscess is a rare type of intra-abdominal abscess. A 2-yr-old male, who had omphalitis two months previously, presented with a fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The ultrasound and CT scan showed an abdominal wall abscess located anterior to the liver, which was refractory to conservative management with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. On the third recurrence, surgical exploration was performed and revealed an abscess arising from the falciform ligament; the falciform ligament was excised. A follow up ultrasound confirmed complete resolution of the abscess with no further recurrence. PMID:20592906

  5. Management of superior subperiosteal orbital abscess.

    PubMed

    Gavriel, Haim; Jabrin, Basel; Eviatar, Ephraim

    2016-01-01

    A superior subperiosteal orbital abscess (SSPOA) is a collection of purulent material between the periorbit and the superior bony orbital wall, and is typically a complication of frontal sinusitis. SSPOA is characteristically managed by classic external surgical drainage. The aim of our study was to assess the role of surgical intervention in SSPOA. A retrospective medical chart review of patients diagnosed with SSPOA secondary to rhinosinusitis between the year 2005 and 2013 was conducted. Collected data included age, gender, co-morbidity, clinical presentation, prior antibiotic management, CT scans, surgical approach, outcome and complications. Six patients were included in our study, three males and three females with a mean age of 22.8 (range 9-58). Two patients were treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid for 3 days prior to admission. Only the youngest patient with the smallest abscess responded successfully to conservative treatment, while the rest were managed surgically: three patients were treated successfully by the endonasal endoscopic approach and two patients were treated by utilizing the combined endonasal endoscopic and external approach. In patients who underwent the combined approach, the abscess was located in a more antero-lateral position than those treated endonasal endoscopically only. The location of a SSPOA dictates the surgical approach. The most antero-lateral SSPOAs should be drained by the combined approach, while more posterior abscesses should be approached endoscopically. Furthermore, a small SSPOA is first to be reported to resolve with conservative treatment. Level 4 (case series). PMID:25700832

  6. [Case of the abscess type cutaneous nocardiosis].

    PubMed

    Iketani, Yuki; Hata, Yasuki; Yamamoto, Nao; Oguri, Toyoko

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, who had write infull (ITP) and angina, developed a rash similar to an insect bite on the left Achilles tendon one week before visiting our hospital. The rash evolved into pustule. Three or 4 days later she had redness and swelling on her left leg, which was pain full.She went to a clinic, where she was given cefdinir (CFDN) and referred to our hospital.When she came to our hospital, she had an abscess on her left heel, and linear redness and heat along lymph ducts in her left leg and lymph node swelling in her left groin.We diagnosed bacterial lymphangitis, and gave her cefcapene (CFPN-PI) and gentamicin (GM) ointment. Six days later, she recovered.Later abscess culture yielded an organism which was suspected to be Nocardia sp. We identified the organism as Nocardia brasiliensis and diagnosed abscess-type cutaneous nocardiosis. We administered sulfametthoxazole / trimethoprim for one week and checked her whole body on CT, which revealed no lesions.This case was considered to be cutaneous nocardiosis, for which beta-lactam antimicrobial drug or external application of GM ointment would be effective, and abscess-type cutaneous nocardiosis, which recovered with medical treatment for a general bacterial infection was suggested. PMID:24682099

  7. Breast abscess associated with Helcococcus kunzii.

    PubMed

    Chagla, A H; Borczyk, A A; Facklam, R R; Lovgren, M

    1998-08-01

    Helcococcus kunzii, a nonvirulent member of the human skin flora, has recently been implicated in causing infections in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of breast abscess associated with H. kunzii in an immunocompetant patient and discuss the criteria used in its identification and our observations of susceptibility testing for this species. PMID:9666030

  8. Liver abscess caused by tuberculosis and melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Azali, Hafiz Yafee Amar; Norly, Salleh; Wong, Leh Meng; Tan, Kia Sin; Safian, Naim Muhammad

    2007-04-01

    We report an unusual co-existence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and acid fast bacilli in a young Malay gentleman with liver abscess. He was treated with antibiotics and surgical drainage. This phenomenon has not been reported in previous literature and the dilemma of its management is discussed. PMID:17475585

  9. Melioidosis presenting as spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, D; Puthucheary, S D; Waran, V

    2003-12-01

    Central nervous system melioidosis is an unusual infection in humans. This article reports a case of melioidosis presenting as an acute spinal epidural abscess. A discussion of this case and its management together with a brief review of melioidosis of the central nervous system is presented. PMID:14756491

  10. Pyogenic splenic abscess in intravenous drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Nallathambi, M N; Ivatury, R R; Lankin, D H; Wapnir, I L; Stahl, W M

    1987-06-01

    Among the surgical complications of intravenous drug addiction, pyogenic splenic abscess is considered to be a rare entity. A review of the literature reveals only 24 cases of splenic abscess secondary to this particular etiology. The authors report five patients with intravenous drug addiction who underwent splenectomy for pyogenic splenic abscess within 1 year. Fever and abdominal pain were the only constant physical signs. Three patients had associated infective endocarditis, and the other two patients sustained blunt trauma to the left side of the trunk weeks earlier. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound were diagnostic in all five patients preoperatively, and they were complementary when combined. Four of the five patients had Staphylococcus aureus septicemia at the time of splenectomy. Three patients recovered from their operations, and the other two, both with endocarditis, died postoperatively from causes unrelated to splenic abscess and splenectomy. A high index of suspicion is warranted in this susceptible group of patients with vague abdominal signs and persistent sepsis to rule out splenic suppuration. The noninvasive imaging methods, CT scan and ultrasound, facilitate early diagnosis in these patients. PMID:3579050

  11. Amebic liver abscess: emergency department diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Doezema, D; Hauswald, M

    1988-11-01

    Twelve patients with amebic liver abscess were admitted to a university hospital. Ten of these patients were admitted through the emergency department. Patients, especially men from third world countries, with fever, right upper quadrant pain, and leukocytosis are at high risk for this disease and should have the diagnosis confirmed with amebic serology and ultrasonography or computed tomography. PMID:3178960

  12. Trichomonas species in a subhepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, E B; Friis-Møller, A; Friis, J

    1987-06-01

    A rare case of Trichomonas tenax/Trichomonas hominis and mixed oral bacterial flora in pus from a subhepatic abscess in a patient with a perforated penetrating ventricular ulcer is reported and the possible pathogenicity of the flagellate is discussed. PMID:3622496

  13. A rare cause of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, David; Hornibrook, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    We describe a patient with mid-facial pain and nasal obstruction due to a nasal septal abscess (NSA) complicating an occult fungal ball of the sphenoid sinus. We highlight the importance of suspecting unusual pathology in patients with NSA and no trauma history. PMID:23793181

  14. Periappendicular Abscess Presenting within an Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Loberant, Norman; Bickel, Amitai

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the appendix within an inguinal hernia is a rare finding. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed appendicitis within an inguinal hernia, complicated by a supervening periappendicular abscess. She was successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics and percutaneous drainage. PMID:26605128

  15. [Amebic liver abscess of unusual presentation].

    PubMed

    Berthoud, S; Rime, F; Buffle, P

    1976-06-12

    A 35-year-old male who had travelled extensively in the tropics presented with severe anorexia and vomiting associated with fever of 39-40 degrees C during a 4-day period. The clinical findings were entirely negative. In 1973, he had been given metronidazole for amebic dysentery, since when recurrent attacks of diarrhea and abdominal pain had been treated with iodoquinoleines. Stool examination was negative for amebae. Liver scan revealed a suspect "expansive process" in the right lobe. The presumptive diagnosis of amebic abscess was made and metronidazole therapy was started. In less than 24 h the patient became afebrile. The abscess was confirmed by a further liver scan. The definitive diagnosis of amebiasis was established 16 days later when the immunofluorescence level, which had been previously negative, became positive 1/480. This case demonstrates the dangers of the indiscriminate use of iodoquinoleines in patients who have travelled in tropical countries. The amebic liver abscess may be silent locally while causing systemic manifestations such as fever. Early treatment of hepatic amebiasis is recommended even with a presumptive diagnosis. Serological tests during the development of an amebic abscess may be negative and should be repeated after several days of therapy. PMID:996499

  16. [Cervical abscess due to Turicella otitidis].

    PubMed

    Fernández Pérez, A; Palop Borrás, B; Moreno León, J A; Fernández-Nogueras Jiménez, F

    1999-05-01

    We report an extraotic infection by a relatively new pathogen, Turicella otitidis, which to ur knowledge has not been described elsewhere. It was isolated from a cervical abscess in a 7-year-old boy. The clinical and microbiological features of this infection are reviewed. PMID:10431086

  17. Abdominal abscesses with enteric communications: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Chintapalli, K.; Thorsen, M.K.; Foley, W.D.; Unger, G.F.

    1983-07-01

    CT examinations of four proven abdominal abscesses with enteric communications are reported. All the patients received oral contrast (3% Gastrografin solution). Three patients recieved rectal contrast. The patient who did not receive rectal contrast had a prior abdominoperineal resection. Contrast material was administered intravenously unless there was a contraindication or a suspected enteric vesical fistula. A representative case is described.

  18. Multiple intracranial abscesses: Heralding asymptomatic venosus ASD.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen K; Marzook, Rehab Ali; Sulaibeekh, Leena

    2013-10-01

    A case of multiple intracranial abscesses in an immune-competent young girl is reported. She had chicken pox. Two weeks later, she presented with multiple intracranial abscesses. No significant cardiac abnormality was detected on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The condition was treated medically. However, one of the abscesses adjacent to the CSF pathways enlarged on treatment and caused obstructive hydrocephalus that required stereotactic aspiration. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci in chain. Pus was sterile on culture. She was treated with broad spectrum IV antibiotics based on Gram staining report for 6 weeks followed by another 8 weeks of oral antibiotics. She made good recovery and had been leading a normal life. The abscess capsules took 30 months to resolve completely on MRI. A repeat TTE done in the follow up showed enlarged right heart chambers with a suggestion of a venosus ASD. A trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE) confirmed the presence of sinus venosus ASD from the SVC side with mainly left to right shunt. There was also partial anomalous drainage of the pulmonary veins. The patient underwent correction of the defect and has been doing well. PMID:24551007

  19. Infected Aortic Aneurysm after Intraabdominal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Ancel J.; Rowlands, Brian J.; Flynn, Timothy C.

    1987-01-01

    Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm is rarely associated with an antecedent history of a localized suppurative process. This report describes a case in which an infected aortic aneurysm occurred after surgical treatment of an appendiceal abscess. Diagnosis and management of infected aneurysms are discussed, together with a review of the literature. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:208-214) Images PMID:15229743

  20. Gas Forming a V-Shape Aluminum Sheet into a Trough of Saddle-Contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shyong; Lan, Hsien-Chin; Lee, Jye; Wang, Jian-Yih; Huang, J. C.; Chu, Chun Lin

    2012-11-01

    A sheet metal trough of aluminum alloys is manufactured by gas-forming process at 500 °C. The product with slope walls is of ~1.2 m long and ~260 mm opening width, comprising two conical sinks at two ends. The depth of one sink apex is ~350 mm, which results in the depth/width ratio reaching 1.4. To form such a complex shape with high aspect ratio, a pre-form of V-shape groove is prepared prior to the gas-forming work. When this double concave trough is turned upside down, the convex contour resembles the back of a twin hump camel. The formability of this configuration depends on the gas pressurization rate profile, the working temperature, material's micro-structure, as well as pre-form design. The latter point is demonstrated by comparing two aluminum alloys, AA5182 and SP5083, with nearly same compositions but very different grain sizes.

  1. Prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín; Morán-Mendoza, Onofre; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Mandeville, Peter B; Tapia-Pérez, J Humberto; Sánchez-Reyna, Martín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José Juan; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables that predict the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses. Methods We prospectively carried out a case–control study on a cohort of patients who had been diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses using clinical, ultrasonic, and serologic methods. Patients with pyogenic abscesses, negative ELISA tests for amoebiasis, immunosuppression status, or previous abdominal surgery were excluded. All patients received metronidazole, and those who demonstrated 4 days of unfavorable clinical responses received percutaneous or surgical draining of the abscess. Demographic, laboratory, and ultrasonographic characteristics were assessed as prognostic indications of failure. Results Of 40 patients with amoebic liver abscess, 24 (mean age: 36.7±11.2 years) responded to medical treatment and 16 (41.8±11.6 years) required drainage, including 14 patients who underwent percutaneous drainage and two patients who required surgery. The albumin level, abscess volume, abscess diameter, and alkaline phosphatase level were all statistically significant (P<0.05) on the bivariate analysis. The highest (>99%) sensitivity and negative predictive value were observed for an abscess volume >500 ml and diameter >10 cm, while the best specificity and positive predictive value were achieved with the combination of low serum albumin level, high alkaline phosphatase level, and large abscess volume or diameter. Conclusions The prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses include low albumin, high alkaline phosphatase, and large abscess volume or diameter. The combination of these variables is a useful and easy tool for determining appropriate therapy. PMID:23265424

  2. Appendicitis with psoas abscess successfully treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Otowa, Yasunori; Sumi, Yasuo; Kanaji, Shingo; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Although acute appendicitis is a common disease, retroperitoneal abscesses are rarely observed. Here, we report a case consisting of a psoas abscess and cutaneous fistula caused by appendicitis. The patient was a 56-year-old male who was introduced to our institution due to an intractable right psoas abscess. Imaging tests had been performed over the previous 3 years; however, clinicians could not find the origin of the abscess and failed to resolve the problem. A successful operation was performed via a laparoscopic approach, and 17 mo have passed without recurrence. The advantage of laparoscopic surgery is well understood in cases of appendicitis with abscesses. However, the indication for laparoscopic approach is not clear for retroperitoneal abscesses. From our experience, we can conclude that appendicitis with retroperitoneal abscesses can be managed and treated using a laparoscopic approach. PMID:25009411

  3. Current trends in the diagnosis and treatment of tuboovarian abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, D.V.; Sweet, R.L.

    1985-04-15

    Tuboovarian abscess is a well-recognized complication of acute salpingitis and has been reported in as many as one third of hospital admissions for acute salpingitis. The incidence of tuboovarian abscess is expected to increase as a result of the current epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and their sequelae. Patients with tuboovarian abscess most commonly present with lower abdominal pain and an adnexal mass(es). Fever and leukocytosis may be absent. Ultrasound, computed tomographic scans, laparoscopy, or laparotomy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Tuboovarian abscess may be unilateral or bilateral regardless of intrauterine contraceptive device usage. Tuboovarian abscess is polymicrobial with a preponderance of anaerobic organisms. An initial conservative antimicrobial approach to the management of the unruptured tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if the antimicrobial agents used can penetrate abscesses, remain active within the abscess environment, and are active against the major pathogens in tuboovarian abscess, including the resistant gram-negative anaerobes such as Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides bivius. However, if the patient does not begin to show a response within a reasonable amount of time, about 48 to 72 hours, surgical intervention should be undertaken. Suspicion of rupture should remain an indication for immediate operation. Once operation is undertaken, a conservative approach with unilateral adnexectomy for one-side tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if future fertility or hormone production is desired.

  4. Etiological agents and predisposing factors of intracranial abscesses in a Greek university hospital.

    PubMed

    Sofianou, D; Selviarides, P; Sofianos, E; Tsakris, A; Foroglou, G

    1996-01-01

    The bacteriology for 21 patients with brain abscesses is presented and correlated with their predisposing conditions. Chronic otomastoiditis was the most common predisposing factor, and the overall most frequent infected sites were the frontal and temporal regions. Gram-negative non-sporeforming anaerobes of the genus Bacteroides and Fusobacterlum followed by aerobic streptococci were the predominant pathogens. Enterobacteria were only identified in postcraniotomy abscesses, while a substantial number of fastidious species was detected in suppurations related to congenital heart disease. Altogether, anaerobes alone were recovered in seven patients, aerobes alone in six, and mixed aerobes and anaerobes in four patients. These findings confirm the predominant role of anaerobes in the etiology of intracranial suppurations. PMID:8740108

  5. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  6. Neonatal Iliopsoas Abscess: The First Korean Case.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lim, Ryoung-Kyoung; Park, Kyung-Hee; Byun, Shin-Yun; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Hae-Young

    2015-08-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is rare in neonates. We present a case of neonatal IPA that was initially believed to bean inguinal hernia. A 20-day-old male infant was referred to our hospital for herniorrhaphy after a 2-day history of swelling and bluish discoloration of the left inguinal area and leg without limitation of motion. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography suggested a femoral hernia, but the anatomy was unclear. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a multi-septated cystic mass extending into the psoas muscle from the lower pole of the left kidney to the femur neck. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated, and prompt surgical exploration was planned. After opening the retroperitoneal cavity via an inguinal incision, an IPA was diagnosed and surgically drained. Culture of the abscess fluid detected Staphylococcus aureus, sensitive to methicillin. The patient was discharged without complication on the 17th postoperative day. PMID:26240501

  7. [Pulmonary abscess caused by fish bone].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eisuke; Okabe, Kazunori; Takahagi, Akihiro; Hayashi, Tatsurou; Tanaka, Toshiki; Sano, Fumiho; Tao, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    We describe an extremely rare case of pulmonary abscess caused by fish bone which stabbed the lung from transesophageal route. A 60-year-old woman referred to our hospital complaining of fever. Three days before, she had swallowing pain while eating the bony parts of a fish. An examination on admission showed that C-reactive protein (CRP) is 9.70 mg/dl. Chest computed tomography (CT)revealed, 4 cm mass shadow in the right upper lobe and fish bone material in the mass shadow. Esophagography showed no abnormal findings. Right upper lobectomy was performed under the diagnosis of pulmonary abscess by fish bone. Post operative course was uneventful. The cause was suspected of migration of a fish bone into the right upper lobe via mediasinum and thoracic cavity from esophagus. PMID:23445648

  8. Lung abscess due to Pseudomonas cepacia.

    PubMed

    Poe, R H; Marcus, H R; Emerson, G L

    1977-05-01

    A diabetic patient with pneumonia of unspecified origin developed a lung abscess after therapy with ultrasonic nebulization. The etiologic organism was identified as Pseudomonas cepacia. Investigation determined the source of the organism to be the reservoir of the ultrasonic nebulizer, to which the patient was directly exposed through removal of the bottom of the disposable medication cup. When this organism is isolated a nosocomial source of infection should be suspected. PMID:855960

  9. [Multiple hepatic abscesses: a pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Zanolini, C; Gallio, F; Del Piano, A; Galatà, F

    1995-01-01

    The Authors describe the case of an immunologically healthy 14 year old boy presenting a hepatic infection with multiple abscesses. This case is of particular interest because of its rarity in Pediatrics. Probable etiologies, pathogenic mechanisms and treatments are discussed. The Authors underline the usefulness of ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool and as a non-invasive means of following the course of the disease. PMID:7739934

  10. [Treatment of giant lung abscesses in children].

    PubMed

    Avilova, O M; SamaÄ­, A G; OleÄ­nik, V S

    1984-08-01

    The method of occlusion of the draining bronchus in combination with a one-step percutaneous drainage of the purulent cavity by the Monaldi principle was used in 12 children for the treatment of giant pulmonary abscesses. It was shown that the proposed method unlike traditional procedures allows effective sanitation to be performed. It relieves symptoms of intrathoracic strain and thereby allows avoiding operations at the height of purulent intoxication. No complications and lethality followed the treatment. PMID:6093318

  11. Liver abscess due to sewing needle perforation.

    PubMed

    Jutte, Ewoud; Cense, Huib

    2010-01-01

    A 45-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with a 1-week history of right upper abdominal pain and nausea. Ultrasonography showed a thickened duodenum with infiltration. Subsequent gastroscopy did not reveal any abnormalities. CT scan showed a foreign body perforation at the duodenum and a liver abscess (Fig. 1A,B). A diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. During the operation, the abscess was drained (Fig. 2A,B) and a sewing needle was removed (Fig. 3A,B). The patient claimed to have no recollection of swallowing the needle and made a quick recovery. Although rare, gastrointestinal perforations due to ingested foreign bodies most frequently occur at ileocecal, rectosigmoid, and duodenal regions[1]. Sewing needle perforations into the liver have been reported in children, adults, and psychiatric cases. Symptoms can vary from mild gastric pain to signs of peritonitis[2]. "Wait and see" is recommended for asymptomatic patients with no complications. Symptomatic patients (e.g., liver abscess) need surgical intervention[1,2,3]. PMID:20694449

  12. A cerebral abscess at first internist glance.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rita; Patrício, Catarina; Moura Valejo Coelho, Margarida; Brotas, Vítor

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred to the neurosurgery ward, with a presumptive diagnosis of cerebral abscess. The case was also discussed with the internists as internal medicine consultants. The neurosurgeons pointed out a right temporal lobe abscedated lesion on CT, but we noticed that the hypodense attenuation that usually surrounds the abscess wall (vasogenic oedema) extended to a broader, well-delimitated area, suggesting medium cerebral artery territory. The patient had left-sided hemiplegia with a confusional state and low-grade fever. Considering possible haematogenous dissemination, an echocardiography was performed, confirming mitral endocarditis. Blood cultures and aspirated pus isolated Escherichia coli. Investigating the patient's medical history, we learned he had been submitted to bladder catheterisation 7?weeks before for acute urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, and empirically medicated for urinary tract infection. E. coli had also been isolated in a urine specimen at the time. The clinical history of the patient cancelled the pathogenesis of cerebral abscess. PMID:26621864

  13. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: Computed tomography features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xi-Zhen; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess (IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). All IPTAs (11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis. PMID:26435779

  14. Perianal Abscess and Proctitis by Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Shin; Choi, Sung Youn; Jeong, Eun Haeng; Bang, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Sik; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Dong Il

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can at times cause invasive infections, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus and a history of alcohol abuse. A 61-year-old man with diabetes mellitus and a history of alcohol abuse presented with abdominal and anal pain for two weeks. After admission, he underwent sigmoidoscopy, which revealed multiple ulcerations with yellowish exudate in the rectum and sigmoid colon. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. After one week, follow up sigmoidoscopy was performed owing to sustained fever and diarrhea. The lesions were aggravated and seemed webbed in appearance because of damage to the rectal mucosa. Abdominal computed tomography and rectal magnetic resonance imaging were performed, and showed a perianal and perirectal abscess. The patient underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colostomy and perirectal abscess incision and drainage. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was identified in pus culture. The antibiotics were switched to ertapenem. He improved after surgery and was discharged. K. pneumoniae can cause rapid invasive infection in patients with diabetes and a history of alcohol abuse. We report the first rare case of proctitis and perianal abscess caused by invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:25691848

  15. Hepatogastric fistula: a rare complication of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Gandham, Venkata Srinivas; Pottakkat, Biju; Panicker, Lakshmi C; Hari, Ranjit Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Hepatogastric fistula is very rare. We report a case of hepatogastric fistula as a complication of pyogenic liver abscess. A 40-year-old man presented with upper abdominal pain and high-grade fever of 2?weeks. Evaluation revealed multiple liver abscesses. On an empirical diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscess, he was treated with antibiotics. During hospital stay he developed intermittent large quantity bilious vomiting. Gastroduodenoscopy and contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen showed rupture of left lobe liver abscess into the stomach. As expectant management failed to resolve the abscess, endoscopic retrograde papillotomy and stenting of common bile duct was performed. After endoscopic stenting, symptoms subsided. Imaging repeated after 2 weeks of endoscopic stenting showed resolving abscess. He was discharged and is doing well on regular follow-ups. We conclude that hepatogastric fistula can be managed by endoscopic stenting as bile flow through the stent hastens resolution and healing of the fistula. PMID:25035445

  16. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (57). Melioidotic prostatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Yip, S K; Ang, B S; Tan, J

    2001-01-01

    A 46-year-old previously healthy man presented with urosepsis and lower urinary tract obstruction. Both urine and blood cultures grew Burkholderia pseudomallei. Intravenous Ceftazidime failed to control the infection. Prostatic abscess formation was first detected by transrectal ultrasonography, and the extent was subsequently delineated by computed tomography. The abscess was drained by transurethral resection, which served to eradicate a possible persistent focus of infection. The diagnosis and management of prostatic abscess, and Melioidosis infection, are discussed. PMID:11361238

  17. Bloater Formation by Gas-forming Lactic Acid Bacteria in Cucumber Fermentations1

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. L.; Borg, A. F.; Bell, T. A.

    1968-01-01

    The formation of “bloaters” (hollow stock) in cucumbers brined for salt-stock purposes at 5 to 10% salt has been associated with gaseous fermentation caused chiefly by yeasts. Recently, serious early bloater damage, not attributable to yeasts, has been observed in commercial-scale experiments on control of bloaters in overnight dill pickles brined in 50-gal barrels at 3.0 to 4.5% salt. Growth of fermentative species of yeasts was effectively controlled by the addition of 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1% sorbic acid or its sodium salt. In contrast to this, the fermenting brines showed extremely high populations of acid-forming bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and Pediococcus cerevisiae. The gas-forming species (i.e., L. brevis) constituted a high proportion of the total populations. Representative isolates from 36 barrels of overnight dill pickles were tested for their ability to produce bloaters in 1-quart jars of pasteurized cucumbers equilibrated at 4 to 5% salt, 0.25% lactic acid, and pH 4.0. Bloaters, identical with those made by yeast cultures, were produced in all jars inoculated with L. brevis. No bloaters were produced by L. plantarum and P. cerevisiae. These results suggest that the control of bloater damage in cucumber fermentations, particularly at low salt concentrations, may necessitate inhibition of gas-forming lactic acid bacteria. PMID:16349808

  18. Recurrent Bacterial Meningitis Accompanied by A Spinal Intramedullary Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Seong; Ju, Chang Il; Lee, Hyun Young

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is rarely complicated by an intradural spinal abscess, and recurrent meningitis is an uncommon presentation of a spinal intramedullary abscess. Here, we report a 63-year-old patient with recurrent meningitis as the first manifestation of an underlying spinal intramedullary abscess. To the best of our knowledge, no previous report has been issued on recurrent meningitis accompanied by a spinal intramedullary abscess in an adult. In this article, the pathophysiological mechanism of this uncommon entity is discussed and the relevant literature reviewed. PMID:22949971

  19. [Total penectomy for corpus cavernosum abscess: a case report].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Juntaro; Namiki, Shunichi; Kamiyama, Yoshihiro; Adachi, Hisanobu; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Saito, Hideo; Arai, Yoichi

    2015-03-01

    Abscess of corpus cavernosum penis is a rare infection condition. A 69-year-old-man was referred toour hospital with gradual development of penis swelling. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed abscess formation in the corpus cavernosum. There was no apparent cause of his penile abscess from either history or clinical examination. Open drainage improved his clinical symptoms transiently. However, severe penile pain relapsed, and abscess progressively extended in the corpus cavernosum and spongiosum, necessitating total penectomy. The surgical specimen revealed intensive inflammation and his condition improved immediately after penectomy. PMID:25918269

  20. Analysis of the Bacterial Diversity in Liver Abscess: Differences Between Pyogenic and Amebic Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Reyna-Fabián, Miriam E; Zermeño, Valeria; Ximénez, Cecilia; Flores, Janin; Romero, Miguel F; Diaz, Daniel; Argueta, Jesús; Moran, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Cerritos, René

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that virulence in Entamoeba histolytica is triggered in the presence of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria species using in vitro and in vivo experimental animal models. In this study, we examined samples aspirated from abscess material obtained from patients who were clinically diagnosed with amebic liver abscess (ALA) or pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). To determine the diversity of bacterial species in the abscesses, we performed partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, the E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar species were genotyped using tRNA-linked short tandem repeats as specific molecular markers. The association between clinical data and bacterial and parasite genotypes were examined through a correspondence analysis. The results showed the presence of numerous bacterial groups. These taxonomic groups constitute common members of the gut microbiota, although all of the detected bacterial species have a close phylogenetic relationship with bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, some patients clinically diagnosed with PLA and ALA were coinfected with E. dispar or E. histolytica, which suggests that the virulence of these parasites increased in the presence of bacteria. However, no specific bacterial groups were associated with this effect. Together, our results suggest a nonspecific mechanism of virulence modulation by bacteria in Entamoeba. PMID:26572872

  1. Nocardia brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip; Ammar, Hussam

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia species exist in the environment as a saprophyte; it is found worldwide in soil and decaying plant matter. They often infect patients with underlying immune compromise, pulmonary disease or history of trauma or surgery. The diagnosis of nocardiosis can be easily missed as it mimics many other granulomatous and neoplastic disease. We report a 69-year-old man who presented with chronic back pain and paraparesis. He was found to have Nocardial brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Laminectomy and epidural wash out was performed but with no neurological recovery. This is the second reported case of N brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis in the literature. PMID:23585503

  2. [Pleomorphic adenoma causing a peritonsillar abscess].

    PubMed

    Glazer, Daniel Victor; Rømeling, Frans

    2014-12-22

    Pleomorphic adenoma located in the soft palate is extremely rare. We report a 42-year-old woman, who presented to the ear nose & throat department with a mucosal swelling of the right soft palate mimicking a peritonsillar abscess. Drainage was attempted several times without significant results. Emergency tonsillectomy was carried out, which showed a tumour intraorally beside the right tonsil. The tumour and the tonsil were radically excised. Histological analysis of the tumour revealed a pleomorphic adenoma. At three-month follow-up the patient was doing well and MRI scan revealed a residual tumour of 6 mm. PMID:25534344

  3. Tubo-Ovarian Abscess: Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Newton G.

    1986-01-01

    That a female patient with abdominal pain is often considered to have pelvic inflammatory disease until proven otherwise is ubiquitous in the medical literature. This view is dangerous and should be challenged because it has resulted in episodes of ruptured appendix, death from ruptured ectopic pregnancies, and serious morbidity from delayed diagnoses of such entities as diverticulitis and endometriosis. Proper diagnostic steps should be taken for all patients with abdominal pain of unclear etiology. This article reviews the pathogenesis of tubo-ovarian abscesses so as to separate and clearly identify fact from fiction. Diagnostic steps and management guidelines are discussed. PMID:3537321

  4. Corpus cavernosum abscess after Winter procedure performance

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, Joao Roberto; Nascimento, Fabio Jose; Gromatsky, Celso; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male patient with sickle-cell disease reported his third episode of priapism complicated by the presence of a corpus cavernosum abscess after the performance of a Winter procedure 20?days prior to his presentation. While in hospital for 11?days, two penile needle aspirations and three surgical drainages were performed with associated antibiotic therapy. He evolved with erectile dysfunction refractory to drug therapy and his infectious condition improved. An early penile prosthesis implantation followed after the use of a vacuum pump in an attempt to decrease the fibrotic process of the corpora cavernosa. Final results were positive. PMID:24515231

  5. Nocardia brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip; Ammar, Hussam

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia species exist in the environment as a saprophyte; it is found worldwide in soil and decaying plant matter. They often infect patients with underlying immune compromise, pulmonary disease or history of trauma or surgery. The diagnosis of nocardiosis can be easily missed as it mimics many other granulomatous and neoplastic disease. We report a 69-year-old man who presented with chronic back pain and paraparesis. He was found to have Nocardial brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Laminectomy and epidural wash out was performed but with no neurological recovery. This is the second reported case of N brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis in the literature. PMID:23585503

  6. Iliopsoas abscess in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Maines, Evelina; Franceschi, Roberto; Cauvin, Vittoria; d’Annunzio, Giuseppe; Pini Prato, Alessio; Castagnola, Elio; Di Palma, Annunziata

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Iliopsoas abscesses have been reported in adult diabetic patients, but only one case has been so far reported in the pediatric diabetic literature. We report three cases of iliopsoas abscesses in three adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, suggesting that an increased awareness of this condition is required for its early recognition and prompt treatment. PMID:26273460

  7. Penile Abscess: A Case Report and Review of Literature*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Cindy; Winter, Matthew; Chalasani, Venu; Dean, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A case of penile abscess after amphetamine injection into the penis is reported. A 45-year-old male patient was successfully treated with surgical drainage and antibiotics. There were no 3-month consequences of treatment at follow-up, and the patient maintained potency, without any penile deformity. The aetiology, diagnosis, and management of penile abscesses are discussed. PMID:26955536

  8. Bacterial killing in vitro by abscess-derived neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Finlay-Jones, J J; Hart, P H; Spencer, L K; Nulsen, M F; Kenny, P A; McDonald, P J

    1991-02-01

    In the absence of antimicrobial therapy, bacteria such as Bacteriodes fragilis, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis may persist within an intra-abdominal abscess in the presence of large numbers of neutrophils which, under optimal conditions in vitro, can readily phagocytose and kill the same bacterial strains. Neutrophils taken from abscesses induced by gram-negative bacteria such as those above contain viable organisms. On incubation in vitro in the presence of serum, these neutrophils kill the bacteria phagocytosed in the abscess poorly, if at all, yet can readily kill organisms added in vitro. To determine possible mechanisms that might explain this, we examined the bactericidal activity in vitro of neutrophils from a range of abscesses induced by one or two species of bacteria plus an abscess-potentiating agent, bran. The organisms studied were B. fragilis, E. coli, P. mirabilis and Staphylococcus aureus. The killing in vitro of E. coli and P. mirabilis, engulfed within an abscess, was significantly less than that of the same organisms when they were added to the in-vitro assay. In contrast, the killing of S. aureus was similar, whether engulfed in vivo or in vitro. However, S. aureus was less susceptible to phagocytosis and killing in vitro than P. mirabilis or E. coli, and the killing of S. aureus during in-vitro incubation of neutrophils that had engulfed the organism with in the abscess was similar to that of the gram-negative bacteria engulfed within the abscess.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1990143

  9. Genomewide association study of liver abscess in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen percent of U.S. cattle slaughtered in 2011 had liver abscesses. As a result, these cattle have reduced carcass weight and poor carcass quality resulting in reduced value. Liver abscess can result from a common bacterial cause Fusobacterium necrophorum, which inhabits rumen lesions caused ...

  10. Retroperitoneal abscesses in two western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Hahn, Alicia; D'Agostino, Jennifer; Cole, Gretchen A; Raines, Jan

    2014-03-01

    This report describes two cases of retroperitoneal abscesses in female western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Clinical symptoms included perivulvar discharge, lameness, hindlimb paresis, and general malaise. Retroperitoneal abscesses should be considered as part of a complete differential list in female gorillas with similar clinical signs. PMID:24712182

  11. Enterohepatic Migration of Fish Bone Resulting in Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ede, Chikwendu; Sobnach, Sanju; Kahn, Delawir; Bhyat, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Liver abscess formation due to enterohepatic migration of a foreign body is extremely rare. Foreign body ingestion is generally an unconscious and painless event, thus complicating preoperative diagnosis in most patients. We report the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with secondary peritonitis from a ruptured hepatic abscess after an ingested fish bone migrated into the liver. PMID:26634168

  12. Enterohepatic Migration of Fish Bone Resulting in Liver Abscess.

    PubMed

    Ede, Chikwendu; Sobnach, Sanju; Kahn, Delawir; Bhyat, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Liver abscess formation due to enterohepatic migration of a foreign body is extremely rare. Foreign body ingestion is generally an unconscious and painless event, thus complicating preoperative diagnosis in most patients. We report the case of a 61-year-old man who presented with secondary peritonitis from a ruptured hepatic abscess after an ingested fish bone migrated into the liver. PMID:26634168

  13. A case of spontaneous abscess of the corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Brennan, John; O'kelly, Fardod; Quinlan, David M

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous abscess of the corpus cavernosum is an extremely rare presentation. This is the first documented case of corpus cavernosal abscess caused exclusively by organisms from the Streptococcus milleri group, which have previously been described as being associated with abscess formation. This report outlines the case of a 56-year-old alcoholic male with no risk factors who presented with an 8-day history of penile pain, swelling and sepsis. A diagnosis of abscess of the right corpus cavernosum was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Management required intravenous antibiotics, penile exploration, incision and drainage. Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius were isolated. The aetiology, diagnosis, management and microbiology of this unusual presentation are discussed, and the few previously documented cases of abscess of the corpus cavernosum are reviewed. PMID:23506057

  14. Silent colon carcinoma presenting as a hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Andrea; Caporale, Alessandro; Demoro, Martino; Scimò, Michele; Galati, Francesca; Galati, Gaspare

    2007-01-01

    Penetration and abscess formation in an adjacent parenchymal organ as presentation of a colon cancer is very uncommon. We report a rare case of pyogenic liver abscess as the first manifestation of an infiltrative and penetrating hepatic flexure colon carcinoma without liver metastases. A 50-year-old woman was admitted with right abdominal pain, fever and chills. The initial diagnosis was a pyogenic liver abscess. Subsequent CT scan and colonoscopy evidenced a hepatic flexure colon cancer abscessed within segment 6 of the liver. Eight months after a right colectomy and liver resection there was no evidence of disease. The occurrence of a pyogenic liver abscess should raise the suspicion of a silent colon cancer. PMID:18338500

  15. Zolpidem Use Associated With Increased Risk of Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This was a population-based case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program since 2000 to 2011. We identified 1325 patients aged 20 to 84 years with the first-attack of pyogenic liver abscess as the cases, and 5082 patients without pyogenic liver abscess matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of hospitalization for pyogenic liver abscess as the controls. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted ?7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as current use of zolpidem. Patients whose last remaining 1 tablet for zolpidem was noted >7 days before the date of admission for pyogenic liver abscess were defined as late use of zolpidem. Patients who never received 1 prescription for zolpidem were defined as never use of zolpidem. A multivariable unconditional logistic regression model was used to measure the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) to explore the association between zolpidem use and pyogenic liver abscess. After adjustment for possible confounding variables, the adjusted OR of pyogenic liver abscess was 3.89 for patients with current use of zolpidem (95% CI 2.89, 5.23), when compared with those with never use of zolpidem. The adjusted OR decreased to 0.85 for those with late use of zolpidem (95% CI 0.70, 1.03), but without statistical significance. Current use of zolpidem is associated with the increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess. Physicians should take the risk of pyogenic liver abscess into account when prescribing zolpidem. PMID:26266369

  16. Biofilm formation and Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess is an emerging infectious disease. This syndrome was unknown before the late 1980s when it was first recognized in Taiwan. Over the next two decades it increased in prevalence in Taiwan and was reported from other nations of East Asia. It was then that the rest of the world became aware of this interesting new syndrome. The disease is no longer confined to East Asia, and is now an emerging infection in North America and Europe. How did this come about? We now understand some of the genetic changes that turn commensal E. coli into extra-intestinal pathogens. K pneumoniae is another member of the Enterobacteriaceae that is usually normal flora in the gut, but we know relatively little about how it evolved into an invasive pathogen capable of causing abscesses in normal livers. The phenotype of the liver-invasive strains is hyperviscosity of the polysaccharide capsules, but while the gene that determines that property is required it is not sufficient to create the pathogen, and more research is needed to discover the other virulence genes, and thus to potentially target them therapeutically. PMID:22561156

  17. Evaluation and management of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; DePasse, J Mason; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Palumbo, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon and potentially catastrophic condition. SEA often presents a diagnostic challenge, as the "classic triad" of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is evident in only a minority of patients. When diagnosis is delayed, irreversible neurological damage may ensue. To minimize morbidity, an appropriate level of suspicion and an understanding of the diagnostic evaluation are essential. Infection should be suspected in patients presenting with axial pain, fever, or elevated inflammatory markers. Although patients with no known risk factors can develop SEA, clinical concern should be heightened in the presence of diabetes, intravenous drug use, chronic renal failure, immunosuppressant therapy, or a recent invasive spine procedure. When the clinical profile is consistent with the diagnosis of SEA, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal column should be obtained on an emergent basis to delineate the location and neural compressive effect of the abscess. Rapid diagnosis allows for efficient treatment, which optimizes the potential for a positive outcome. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:130-135. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26540492

  18. Diagnosis of postoperative intra-abdominal abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenwirth-Ozar, E.; Pollak, E.W.

    1981-08-01

    Clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and radionuclide findings of 40 patients with operatively proven intra-abdominal abscesses were evaluated to determine their degree of diagnostic accuracy. Correct preoperative diagnosis was established by clinical, laboratory, and simple radiologic technics in 24 (60%) patients, whereas more sophisticated imaging procedures were used in 16. Gallium citrate Ga 67 scan was done in nine and was positive in six, ultrasonic scan was positive in seven of 16, and computerized tomography in six of eight patients. In 12, two consecutive imaging procedures were used. Concordant results were obtained in eight, of which five were accurate and three inaccurate. Of the four remaining patients with discordant results, the second imaging procedure was incorrect in three and correct in one instance. Accordingly, sophisticated imaging procedures were done in only 40% of patients and were accurate in 75% of less of cases. Furthermore, addition of a second imaging procedure did not increase diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, these technics, while improving the previously existing diagnostic means, should be still considered less than perfect and their negative result should not exclude the need for diagnostic celiotomy when clinical findings are highly suggestive of intra-abdominal abscess.

  19. [Abscess excision and primary fistulectomy as initial therapy of peri-proctal abscess. A prospective analysis of 122 patients].

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, S; Fischbach, N; Heumüller, L; Marla, B

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of 122 patients with anorectal abscesses was carried out to elucidate the value of abscess drainage with primary fistulectomy, when fistulas were identified. Patients were followed from 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 years with a mean follow-up of three years. In 52 patients (Group A) a primary fistula was present (42.6%), in 47 patients simultaneous excision of abscess and drainage of the intersphincteric space combined with partial sphincterotomy was performed. Recidives occurred in 17.3%. In 5 patients with a high transsphincteric or suprasphincteric fistula, a two-stage fistulectomy was done. In all 70 patients of group B no fistula was found at drainage operation. The incidence of recurrent anorectal abscess was 21.4%. In this group it is shown that the rate of recurrence was not related to a simultaneous excision of abscess and drainage of the intersphincteric space. PMID:2311453

  20. Thigh abscess as an extension of psoas abscess: the first manifestation of perforated appendiceal adenocarcinoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Igor; Pecin, Ivan; Prutki, Maja; Augustin, Goran; Nedic, Ana; Gojevic, Ante; Potocki, Kristina; Reiner, Zeljko

    2015-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a painful, swollen, red right thigh and the mild pain in the right abdomen without nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea that lasted for 1 week. Laboratory findings revealed elevated inflammatory markers. Computed tomography of the right thigh, abdomen and pelvis showed an abscess formation in the adductor muscles draining from the abscess that completely occupied the right retroperitoneum up to the diaphragm, dissecting downward through the inguinal canal. Appendix was enlarged with an appendicolith. Emergent exploratory laparotomy revealed a perforated appendix with psoas abscess. Pathohistological diagnosis revealed adenocarcinoma of the appendix. Thigh abscess is an uncommon condition with insidious clinical presentation. Therefore, early recognition and setting of the correct diagnosis enables adequate treatment avoiding additional complications and in some cases potential life-threatening conditions. When upper leg abscess is suspected or proven abdominal examination is mandatory. PMID:25412593

  1. Transurethral Drainage of Prostatic Abscess: Points of Technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Shazly, Mohamed; El- Enzy, Nawaf; El-Enzy, Khaled; Yordanov, Encho; Hathout, Badawy; Allam, Adel

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of prostatic abscess (PA) has markedly declined with the widespread use of antibiotics and the decreasing incidence of urethral gonococcal infections. Objectives To evaluate different treatment methods for prostatic abscess and to describe technical points that will improve the outcome of transurethral (TUR) drainage of prostatic abscess. Patients and Methods We performed a retrospective study of a series of 11 patients diagnosed with prostatic abscess, who were admitted and treated in Farwaniya Hospital, Kuwait, between February 2008 and November 2010. Drainage was indicated when antibiotic therapy did not cause clinical improvement and after prostatic abscess was confirmed by TRUS (Transrectal ultrasonography) and/or CT computed Tomographyscan. TUR drainage was indicated in 7 cases, ultrasound-guided transrectal drainage was performed in 2 cases, and ultrasound-guided perineal drainage was performed in 2 cases. Results All patients that underwent TUR-drainage had successful outcomes, without the need of secondary treatment or further surgery. Conclusions TUR drainage of a prostatic abscess increases the likelihood of a successful outcome and lowers the incidence of treatment failure or repeated surgery. Less invasive treatment, with perineal or transrectal aspiration, may be preferred as a primary treatment in relatively young patients with localized abscess cavities. PMID:23573466

  2. Splenic abscess: clinical features, microbiologic finding, treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Sangchan, Apichat; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Mairiang, Pisaln

    2003-05-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare clinical entity but may be underreported. A retrospective study at Srinagarind Hospital revealed 60 cases of splenic abscess between 1992 and 2001. The causative organisms were identified in 41 cases (68.3%). Gram negative bacilli were commonly isolated and Burkholderia pseudomallei was the most predominant. Diabetes mellitus and leukemia were common underlying diseases found in 46.3 per cent and 9.7 per cent of culture confirmed cases, respectively. The patients usually presented with fever, left upper quadrant pain, tenderness and splenomegaly. Multiple abscesses were more commonly found in the melioidosis than in the non-melioidosis group (p = 0.032), but a single abscess was more commonly found in the non-melioidosis than in the melioidosis group (p = 0.032). Concurrent liver abscesses, often multiple, were not different in both groups. Antimicrobials alone were given in 66.7 per cent of cases with melioidosis and 64.7 per cent of non-melioidosis group. Splenectomy and percutaneous aspiration were performed only in 29.3 per cent and 4.9 per cent of cases with splenic abscess. The overall mortality rate of splenic abscess was only 4.9 per cent in the present series. In conclusion, splenic abscess is not uncommon. Burkholderia pseudomalleli is the most common causative agent found in the present series. Therefore, it should be targeted in the initial empirical antibiotic therapy before the culture results are available especially when multiple lesions in the spleen and concurrent multiple liver abscesses are seen. Prolonged treatment with appropriate antimicrobials alone is usually effective. Splenectomy and/or aspiration may be useful in selected patients. PMID:12859100

  3. Neutrophil localization in acute and chronic experimental abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, D.M.; Bettin, K.M.; Gerding, D.N.

    1987-04-01

    Abdominal abscesses are associated with a high mortality, and usually require surgical drainage for cure. A potential mechanism explaining the inability of the host to clear this infection may be in part a result of the inability of the neutrophil to localize at the site of an established infection. To study this question, either acute (4 hours old) or chronic (2 weeks old) abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus were created in perforated capsules implanted in the peritoneal cavity of rabbits. Homologous neutrophils were obtained from donor rabbits 4 hours after peritoneal glycogen stimulation and labeled with indium 111 oxine. Only 0.71% of injected /sup 111/In-labeled neutrophils localized in the chronic abscesses, compared with 1.77% in acute abscesses (P less than or equal to 0.01). Animals with chronic infections had a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils (P less than 0.002). Failure of neutrophil localization was not associated with less chemotactic activity within the abscess, as measured by a chemotaxis-under-agarose assay, or caused by a barrier surrounding the abscess as detected by radionuclide imaging. Only 0.07% of injected neutrophils localized into acute abdominal abscesses in animals with a concomitant chronic subcutaneous abscess. These chronically infected animals also demonstrated a low peak intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils when compared with animals with only an acute infection (P less than 0.002). These data reveal that neutrophils localize to abscesses poorly in animals with chronic infections. The mechanism is possibly related to a systemic factor(s) associated with a lower intravascular recovery of injected neutrophils in chronically infected animals.

  4. Retropharyngeal abscess as a rare presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ekka, Meera; Sinha, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    A tubercular retropharyngeal abscess is rare in immunocompetent adults. In the case of a tubercular retropharyngeal abscess, it is usually due to cervical spine tuberculosis and is seen mostly in children. A 19-year-old female patient presented to our Medicine Outpatient Department (OPD) at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) with odynophagia and neck pain for two months, without any other constitutional symptoms. On evaluation, she was diagnosed with tubercular retropharyngeal abscess along with pulmonary tuberculosis, without involvement of the cervical spine. This patient was successfully treated by antituberculosis drug therapy alone, without any need for surgical drainage. PMID:25983413

  5. [Renal carbuncle and perirenal abscess in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Steiß, J-O; Hamscho, N; Durschnabel, M; Burchert, D; Hahn, A; Weidner, W; Altinkilic, B

    2014-10-01

    Renal abscesses are rare in childhood. The diagnosis is often complicated by non-specific symptoms and the typical signs of urinary tract infections are frequently absent. The currently available imaging methods are necessary and helpful for a differentiated therapeutic approach; nevertheless, cases are continuously being found in which a renal abscess is only diagnosed intraoperatively. In most patients a combined intravenous therapy including an antibiotic which is effective against staphylococci is sufficient. The therapy is supported if necessary by percutaneous abscess drainage. Open revision or even nephrectomy is rarely required. PMID:25190305

  6. Ascariasis as a cause of hepatic abscess: A report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, V; Thakur, S; Rana, B

    2015-01-01

    We receive around 60 cases of hepatic abscess in a year. The commonest diagnosis reached at the time of discharge is amoebic liver abscess. The diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess is mostly presumptive and thus the patients are usually given a mixed treatment with injection ceftriaxone and tablet metronidazole. Here we report three cases of hepatic abscess diagnosed recently, where ascariasis was the probable etiology. Ascariasis may be a much commoner cause of hepatic abscesses in this region than we think. PMID:26068350

  7. Bilateral Orbital Abscesses After Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Lee, Winston; Garg, Aakriti; Garibaldi, Daniel C; Leibert, Michelle; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Infectious orbital complications after strabismus surgery are rare. Their incidence is estimated to be 1 case per 1,100 surgeries and include preseptal cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, subconjunctival and sub-Tenon's abscesses, myositis, and endophthalmitis. This report describes the case of an otherwise healthy 3-year-old boy who underwent bilateral medial rectus recession and disinsertion of the inferior obliques. A few days after surgery, the patient presented with bilateral periorbital edema and inferotemporal chemosis. A series of CT scans with contrast revealed inferotemporal orbital collections OU. The patient immediately underwent transconjunctival drainage of fibrinous and seropurulent collections in the sub-Tenon's space and experienced rapid improvement a few days later. The patient is reported to be in stable condition in a follow-up examination performed more than a year after the reported events. PMID:24896771

  8. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess.

    PubMed

    Brzost, Jacek; Cyran, Anna M; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88?mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  9. Splenic Abscesses in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Richard F.; Wong, Frances L.; Perez, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia, an aerobic gram-negative rod, is the causative organism behind melioidosis and is a common soil and water organism found predominantly in South-East Asia. We report the case of a 68 year-old man returning from an extended trip to the Philippines, with splenic hypodense lesions on abdominal computer tomography scan, later confirmed to be culture-positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei. The patient was treated with a course of intravenous ceftazidime followed by eradication therapy with oral doxycycline and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. He recovered with complete resolution of symptoms at follow up. In a returning traveler from an endemic area, melioidosis should be considered as part of the differential for any febrile illness with abscesses. PMID:25874071

  10. [Psoas abscess as a chicken pox complication].

    PubMed

    Larcamon, Jorge E; Juanco, Gabriela; Alvarez, Lionel A; Pebe, Florián V

    2010-06-01

    Chicken pox is the most frequent exantematic illness; usually its course is self-limited and benign. Several bacterial complications are described due to the disruption of the skin as a defensive barrier because of the characteristics of the injuries and the associated inmunodepression. Psoas abscess is a rare illness and it's difficult to diagnose, with a general unspecified clinical presentation. We present the case of a 5-year-old girl, on her fifth day of chicken pox, who consults about a febrile convulsion, from which she recovers without any neurological symptoms, referring to functional impotence of her inferior left limb and pain in the lumbar and gluteal zone, which irradiates to the homolateral hip, making deambulation impossible. The definitive diagnosis was made with a CAT at hospital admission. The germ isolated was community-acquired methricillin-resistant Staphilococcus aureus. Treatment consisted in surgical drainage and endovenous antibiotics. PMID:20544129

  11. [Tibial abscess caused by histoplasma capsulatum].

    PubMed

    de Fernández, M I; Negroni, R; Arechavala, A

    2001-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is the most serious form of the disease produced by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Histoplasmosis was first described by Darling in 1906, and it is endemic in certain areas of Central and Southeastern regions of USA, and most Latin America countries, including the Pampa húmeda and Mesopotamia regions in Argentina, but in other continents it has a limited regional distribution. Lung involvement predominates in 90% of cases, but H. capsulatum may involve bone and soft tissues. Bone lesions without other signs of infection are very rare, and are often misdiagnosed as cancer. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a man with a myelodysplasia who presented a left tibial abscess, without any clinical evidence of pulmonary involvement. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole. PMID:11374144

  12. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits.

  13. Intra-Abscess Administration of Antibiotics Through Ultrasound–Guided Percutaneous Catheter for the Treatment of Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Uria, Gerardo; Pakam, Raghavakalyan; Midde, Manoranjan; Naik, Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a potentially life-threatening disease. The treatment of a pyogenic liver abscess usually involves ultrasound guided percutaneous drainage because of the poor penetration of the systemic administration of antibiotics inside the abscess. However, a sizable proportion of patients will necessitate surgical interventions, which involves high peri- and post-operative risks. Theoretically, the local instillation of antibiotics inside the pyogenic liver abscess fluid could achieve a high concentration of the antibiotic for a long period of time. This could be especially beneficial for time-dependent bactericidal antibiotics such as beta-lactams, because their bactericidal effectiveness depends on the amount of time that bacteria are exposed to the antibiotic. We are reporting two patients with complicated pyogenic liver abscesses, who were successfully treated with systemic antibiotics and local instillation of meropenem inside the cavities of the abscesses. These cases suggest that the local instillation of the beta-lactam antibiotics could be an effective and a safe strategy for the treatment of pyogenic liver abscesses that cannot be completely drained through an ultrasound guided percutaneous catheter. PMID:24086880

  14. Occult Candida thyroid abscess diagnosed by gallium-67 scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, M.C.; Blattner, S. )

    1990-06-01

    A clinically silent fungal thyroid abscess was identified by Ga-67 citrate scanning and successfully drained surgically in a young leukemic patient. Whole-body radionuclide scanning remains a valuable method to help diagnose persistent fever in the immunocompromised host.

  15. Psoas Abscess Caused by Spontaneous Rupture of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, June-Kyu; Cha, Soo-Min; Joo, Yong-Bum

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of colon cancer, combined with psoas abscess formation, is rare. A 44-year-old male visited for back pain and left buttock mass. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance image revealed a large abscess in the left psoas muscle and in the left lower quadrant area. Ten days after incision and drainage, a skin defect around the left anterior superior iliac spine remained. A local flap was performed using a superficial skin graft. Ten days after the stitches had been removed, fecal discharge was observed around the anterior superior iliac spine at the flap site. An operation was performed by a general surgeon who had diagnosed this as a case of enterocutaneous fistula. Operative findings included a ruptured tumor mass in the descending colon, which was connected to a retroperitoneal abscess. Pathologic report findings determined adenocarcinoma of the resected colon. Herein, we report a case of psoas abscess resulting from perforating colon cancer. PMID:22162799

  16. Sterile abscess mimicking recurrent tumour in the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, V; Anandacoomaraswamy, K S; Atlas, M D

    2002-05-01

    Vestibular schwannomas are the most common tumours encountered in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) region, accounting for 90 per cent of all lesions. Early pyogenic abscess following surgery and delayed abscesses due to retained foreign bodies have been reported. We describe a case of sterile abscess of unknown aetiology in the CPA region, occurring 13 years after surgical excision of a vestibular schwannoma. The clinical and radiological features were suggestive of recurrent vestibular schwannoma or malignant transformation. We believe this is the first reported case of delayed occurrence of sterile abscess in the CPA region. Further the diagnostic difficulties of such rare lesions occurring in the CPA after vestibular schwannoma surgery are discussed. PMID:12080999

  17. Abscess of residual lobe after pulmonary resection for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligabue, Tommaso; Voltolini, Luca; Ghiribelli, Claudia; Luzzi, Luca; Rapicetta, Cristian; Gotti, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    Abscess of the residual lobe after lobectomy is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Between January 1975 and December 2006, 1,460 patients underwent elective pulmonary lobectomy for non-small-cell lung cancer at our institution. Abscess of the residual lung parenchyma occurred in 5 (0.3%) cases (4 bilobectomies and 1 lobectomy). Postoperative chest radiography showed incomplete expansion and consolidation of residual lung parenchyma. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed persistent bronchial occlusion from purulent secretions and/or bronchial collapse. Computed tomography in 3 patients demonstrated lung abscess foci. Surgical treatment included completion right pneumonectomy in 3 patients and a middle lobectomy in one. Complications after repeat thoracotomy comprised contralateral pneumonia and sepsis in 1 patient. Residual lobar abscess after lobectomy should be suspected in patients presenting with fever, leukocytosis, bronchial obstruction and lung consolidation despite antibiotic therapy, physiotherapy and bronchoscopy. Computed tomography is mandatory for early diagnosis. Surgical resection of the affected lobe is recommended. PMID:18381867

  18. Pulmonary Abscess as a Complication of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Kern, Ryan M; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Maldonado, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man who developed pulmonary abscess as a complication of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy. He had been receiving prednisone therapy, but otherwise had no specific risk factors for lung abscess. Cryobiopsy is a novel technique for obtaining peripheral lung parenchymal tissue for the evaluation of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Cryobiopsy is being increasingly proposed as an alternative to surgical lung biopsy or conventional bronchoscopic transbronchial forceps biopsy, but the safety profile of the procedure has not been fully appreciated. Pulmonary abscess has been rarely reported as a complication of other bronchoscopic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle biopsy, however, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of pulmonary abscess complicating peripheral lung cryobiopsy. PMID:26705015

  19. Iliopsoas tuberculous abscess associated with cervical and axillary tuberculous lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Latsios, Dimitrios; Chloros, Diamantis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Dagdilelis, Loukas; Sichletidis, Lazaros

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of iliopsoas tuberculous abscess without obvious spinal column involvement. Cervical and axillary tuberculous lymphadenopathy were also presented. Despite appropriate antituberculous treatment, patient required percutaneous drainage with CT-guided catheter insertion. PMID:22693294

  20. An Easily Overlooked Presentation of Malignant Psoas Abscess: Hip Pain

    PubMed Central

    Askin, Ayhan; Bayram, Korhan Baris; Demirdal, Umit Secil; Korkmaz, Merve Bergin; Gurgan, Alev Demirbilek; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Psoas abscess is a rare infectious disease with nonspecific clinical presentation that frequently causes a diagnostic difficulty. Its insidious onset and occult characteristics can cause diagnostic delays. It is classified as primary or secondary. Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly causative pathogen in primary psoas abscess. Secondary psoas abscess usually occurs as a result of underlying diseases. A high index of clinical suspicion, the past and recent history of the patient, and imaging studies can be helpful in diagnosing the disease. The delay of the treatment is related with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this paper, 54-year-old patient with severe hip pain having an abscess in the psoas muscle due to metastatic cervical carcinoma is presented. PMID:25685574

  1. A Tuboovarian Abscess Associated with a Ruptured Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Sheele, Johnathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of a tuboovarian abscess complicated by a ruptured spleen. Our patient was a 27-year-old female with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of urinary symptoms and diarrhea. After being diagnosed with a tuboovarian abscess (TOA), she received antibiotics and was admitted to the gynecology service. Shortly thereafter she developed hemorrhagic shock, necessitating a splenectomy and salpingooophorectomy from a ruptured spleen. PMID:26904315

  2. Intra-abdominal abscess in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, K.; Plzak, L.; Deveney, C.W.

    1987-06-01

    Prompt recognition, early localization, and adequate drainage have contributed to the decreased morbidity and mortality rates associated with intra-abdominal abscess in the last decade. The physical examination, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and radionuclide scans provide information that leads to early detection and localization of abscess in almost all patients. Percutaneous drainage should be the initial procedure unless specific indications for surgery exist. 36 references.

  3. Isolated aspergillosis myocardial abscesses in a liver-transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Dang-Tran, Kim-Diêp; Chabbert, Valérie; Esposito, Laure; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Dédouit, Fabrice; Rostaing, Lionel; Rousseau, Hervé; Otal, Phillippe; Kamar, Nassim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac abscess is an uncommon and fatal complication after transplantation. We report a case of an initially isolated aspergillosis myocardial abscess diagnosed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). At that time, there was no other biological evidence or other extracardiac manifestations. A three-month course of dual antifungal therapy followed by a single antifungal therapy was empirically given. Six month after admission, Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated for the first time and the patient deceased from a disseminated aspergillosis. PMID:24707433

  4. [Hepatic abscess as first manifestation of pneumococcal invasive disease].

    PubMed

    Gilardi, Leonardo; Eugenia Dellepiane, María

    2011-08-01

    Pneumococcal invasive disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in different population groups. Most cases originate from an airway infection. We describe a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented a liver abscess as first manifestation of pneumococcal invasive disease, without respiratory symptoms. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage and systemic antibiotics with good results. Streptococcus pneumoniae should be considered among the possible etiologies of hepatic abscess, even in absence of respiratory symptoms. PMID:22052406

  5. Suprarenal abscess in the neonate. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Sty, J.R.; Hodgson, N.B.

    1986-01-01

    Although suprarenal abscess in a newborn is rare, a prompt diagnosis is essential for proper patient management. The findings obtained with Tc-99m glucoheptonate renal imaging in a newborn with a right adrenal abscess are reported. A radionuclide renal imaging sequence over a 15-hour period demonstrated a rim sign which can be used to suggest the diagnosis. Radionuclide and ultrasound imaging of neonatal adrenal masses is discussed.

  6. Hypocholesterolemia in Patients with an Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Flores, María S.; Obregón-Cárdenas, Adriana; Tamez, Eva; Rodríguez, Elba; Arévalo, Katiushka; Quintero, Isela; Tijerina, Rolando; Bosques, Francisco; Galán, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Many parasites induce changes in the lipid profiles of the host. Cholesterol increases the virulence of Entamoeba histolytica in animal models and in vitro culture. This study aimed to determine, in patients with an amebic liver abscess, the correlation between cholesterol and other features, such as the size and number of abscesses, standard hematological and serum chemistry profiles, liver tests, and duration of hospital stay. Methods A total of 108 patients with an amebic liver abscess and 140 clinically healthy volunteers were investigated. Cholesterol and triglycerides were measured in the sera. The data from medical observations and laboratory tests were obtained from the clinical records. Results A total of 93% of patients with an amebic liver abscess showed hypocholesterolemia not related to any of the studied parameters. Liver function tests correlated with the size of the abscess. The most severe cases of amebic liver disease or death were found in patients whose cholesterol levels continued to decrease despite receiving antiamebic treatment and hospital care. Conclusions Our results show that the hypocholesterolemia observed in patients with an amebic liver abscess is not related to any of the clinical and laboratory features analyzed. This is the first study relating hypocholesterolemia to severity of hepatic amebiasis. PMID:25071907

  7. Preparation of alginate beads for floating drug delivery system: effects of CO(2) gas-forming agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, B Y; Park, H J; Hwang, S J; Park, J B

    2002-06-01

    Floating beads were prepared from a sodium alginate solution containing CaCO(3) or NaHCO(3) as gas-forming agents. The solution was dropped to 1% CaCl(2) solution containing 10% acetic acid for CO(2) gas and gel formation. The effects of gas-forming agents on bead size and floating properties were investigated. As gas-forming agents increased, the size and floating properties increased. Bead porosity and volume average pore size, as well as the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the beads were examined with Mercury porosimetry and Scanning Electron Microscopy. NaHCO(3) significantly increased porosity and pore diameter than CaCO(3). Incorporation of CaCO(3) into alginate solution resulted in smoother beads than those produced with NaHCO(3). Gel strength analysis indicated that bead strength decreased with increasing gas-forming agent from 9 to 4 N. Beads incorporating CaCO(3) exhibited significantly increased gel strength over control and NaHCO(3)-containing samples. Release characteristics of riboflavin as a model drug were studied in vitro. Release rate of riboflavin increased proportionally with addition of NaHCO(3). However, increasing weight ratios of CaCO(3) did not appreciably accelerate drug release. The results of these studies indicate that CaCO(3) is superior to NaHCO(3) as a gas forming agent in alginate bead preparations. The enhanced buoyancy and sustained release properties of CaCO(3)-containing beads make them an excellent candidate for floating drug dosage systems (FDDS). PMID:12052693

  8. Uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes by brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, S.; Husain, M.M.; Adametz, J.R.; Pallin, J.S.; Angtuaco, T.L.; Boyd, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Uptake of indium-labeled leukocytes was seen in two cases of histologically proven brain metastasis. In one, this led to misdiagnosis of the lesion as an abscess. On histological evaluation, a large number of white blood cells or macrophages was seen at the neoplastic sites. Reasons for leukocyte accumulation around metastatic brain neoplasms are discussed. In contrast to the current reports that indium-labeled leukocyte scans can differentiate intracranial infection from tumor, these cases demonstrate their lack of specificity in the detection of brain abscess.

  9. Different actions of deferoxamine and iron on Ga-67 abscess detection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhensli, R.D.; Mueller, R.M.; Fridrich, R.

    1984-06-01

    The contrast-enhancing properties of iron (Fe) and deferoxamine (DFO) in abscess imaging with Ga-67 citrate were compared in rats bearing turpentine-induced abscesses. Iron administration shifted Ga-67 from plasma into tissues such as muscle and fat. As a result, the abscess-to-plasma ratio increased whereas the abscess-to-muscle ratio decreased. DFO enhanced the abscess-to-muscle and abscess-to-plasma ratios by increasing urinary Ga-67 excretion. The authors conclude that abscess imaging with Ga-67 citrate may be improved by administration of (a) Fe for detection of abscesses masked by blood activity, or (b) DFO for detection of abscesses surrounded by muscle tissue.

  10. Deep neck abscess in neonatal period: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Mehmet; Dereci, Selim; Aslan, Yakup

    2014-04-01

    Deep neck abscess is very rare in neonatal period. We reported a deep neck abscess caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection (MSSA) in a neonate. A 10-day male infant was admitted to our neonatal unit with the complaints of fever, irritability, and refused to food intake. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed as an abscess in the neck. Needle aspiration from abscess revealed pus. Antibiotics and drainage were applied. We also reviewed the neonatal deep neck abscess reported in English literature and clinical presentation, risk factors, causing microorganisms, treatment, complication and outcome of deep neck abscesses were discussed. PMID:24512784

  11. Amoebic liver abscess production by Entamoeba dispar.

    PubMed

    Dolabella, Silvio S; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Navarro-García, Fernando; Cerritos, René; Ximénez, Cecilia; Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; Silva, Edward F; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2012-01-01

    Although Entamoeba dispar displays a similar morphology to Entamoeba histolytica, cellular and molecular studies have revealed significant differences between these two amoebae, including the former being characterized as non-pathogenic and the later as pathogenic. However, recent in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown that E. dispar strains of different origin are capable of causing liver damage and destroying cell culture lines in the presence of common intestinal bacteria. These results suggested that E. dispar may present pathogenic behavior according to the specific E. dispar strain, culture and environmental conditions. To investigate this possibility, we carried out in vivo and in vitro studies using a xenic strain E. dispar (ICB-ADO) isolated from a symptomatic non-dysenteric Brazilian patient. This strain was able to induce liver necrosis in a hamster model that was more severe than that produced by E. histolytica. The ICB-ADO isolate also caused significantly more destruction of cultured MDCK cells and increased loss of transepithelial resistance than did the E. histolytica. Xenic E. dispar exhibited high proteolytic activity, which was partially inhibited by the addition of cysteine-protease inhibitors. Based on our biochemical and molecular characterization of E. dispar (ICB-ADO) xenic culture and its ability to produce liver abscesses, we conclude that this specific strain can indeed produce tissue damage, distinct from the frequently used non- pathogenic E. dispar SAW 760 strain. PMID:22166569

  12. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  13. Intracranial Fusarium Fungal Abscess in an Immunocompetent Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Asa; Pham, Martin H.; Lee, Brian; Commins, Deborah; Cadden, Joseph; Giannotta, Steven L.; Zada, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fusarium spp is an omnipresent fungal species that may lead to fatal infections in immunocompromised populations. Spontaneous intracranial infection by Fusarium spp in immunocompetent individuals is exceedingly rare. Case Report An immunocompetent 33-year-old Hispanic woman presented with persistent headaches and was found to have a contrast-enhancing mass in the left petrous apex and prepontine cistern. She underwent a subsequent craniotomy for biopsy and partial resection that revealed a Fusarium abscess. She had a left transient partial oculomotor palsy following the operation that resolved over the next few weeks. She was treated with long-term intravenous antifungal therapy and remained at her neurologic baseline 18 months following the intervention. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Fusarium spp brain abscess in an immunocompetent patient. Treatment options include surgical intervention and various antifungal medications. Conclusion This case demonstrates the rare potential of intracranial Fusarium infection in the immunocompetent host, as well as its successful treatment with surgical aspiration and antifungal therapy. PMID:25485222

  14. NOTES for the management of an intra-abdominal abscess: transcolonic peritonoscopy and abscess drainage in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Moustarah, Fady; Talarico, Joseph; Zinc, Jill; Gatmaitan, Patrick; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied natural orifice transcolonic drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses in a canine survival model to evaluate the difficulty of peritonoscopy and abscess drainage and the reliability of endoluminal colotomy closure. Methods We placed a 7 cm nonsterile saline-filled latex balloon intra-abdominally to mimic or induce an abscess or inflammatory mass. Seven days later, we advanced a single-channel endoscope transanally into the sigmoid colon of the animal, made a colotomy and then advanced the endoscope intraperitoneally. We evacuated the identified abscess and placed a drain transabdominally. We closed the colotomy endoluminally with a tissue approximation system using 2 polypropylene sutures attached to metal T-bars. Two weeks later, we evaluated the colotomy closure at laparotomy. Results We studied 12 dogs: 8 had subphrenic balloon implants and 4 had inter-bowel loop implants. Eleven survived and underwent transcolonic peritonoscopy; we identified the “abscess” in 9. The colotomy was successfully closed in 10 of 11 dogs. Although abscesses were easily identified, the overall difficulty of the peritonoscopy was moderate to severe. One dog required colotomy closure via laparotomy, while 9 had successful endoluminal closure. After colotomy closure, 8 animals survived for 2 weeks (study end point) without surgical complications, sepsis or localized abdominal infections. On postmortem examination, all closures were intact without any adjacent organ damage or procedure-related complications. Conclusion Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery provides a novel alternative to treating intra-abdominal pathology. It is technically feasible to perform endoscopic transcolonic peritonoscopy and drainage of an intra-abdominal abscess with reliable closure of the colotomy in a canine experimental model. PMID:23706846

  15. Percutaneous drainage of a diverticular abscess should be limited to two attempts for a resilient diverticular abscess.

    PubMed

    Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Rana, Gurteshwar; Bhullar, Jasneet; Essad, Kate; Mohey, Leela; Mittal, Vijay K

    2014-07-01

    Management of a resilient diverticular abscess poses a big challenge. Currently there are no guidelines for the number of percutaneous drainages to be performed in resilient diverticular abscesses before attempting surgery. All patients (n = 117) who presented with a computed tomography scan-proven diverticular abscess from July 2008 to June 2011 were studied. They were divided into four groups based on the number of percutaneous drainages they underwent for their diverticular abscess: six patients underwent three or more drainages, nine patients underwent two drainages, 27 patients had one drainage, and 75 patients had no drainage. Readjustment, flushing, and upgrading size of the drain were not considered as separate drainage procedures. The size of abscess cavity was significantly higher for the patients who had three or more drainages (mean 8 cm, P < 0.001). A Hartmann's procedure was performed in the majority of patients in the three or more drainage group (83%) but in decreasing frequency as the number of drainages performed dropped: two drainage group (44%), one drainage group (15%), and no drainage group (19%). There was a significantly higher preoperative hospital stay for drainage and antibiotics in the patients from the three or more drainage group (P < 0.001). Patients with a resilient diverticular abscess are very likely to undergo a Hartmann's procedure after two attempted drainages. By performing additional percutaneous drainages in an attempt to avoid ostomy, patients are at an increased risk of sepsis and peritonitis with prolonged antibiotics and increased healthcare costs. We recommend limiting percutaneous drainage procedures to two attempts to cool down a resilient diverticular abscess before definitive surgery. PMID:24987892

  16. Primary breast lymphoma presenting as non-healing axillary abscess.

    PubMed

    Anele, Chukwuemeka; Phan, Yih Chyn; Wong, Suanne; Poddar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus with a history consistent with a right axillary abscess, presented to her general practitioner (GP). A diagnosis of folliculitis was made and the GP started a course of flucloxacillin. Despite antibiotics, the patient's symptoms worsened and the abscess increased in size. This prompted her GP to perform an incision and drainage procedure of the abscess. The practice nurse subsequently oversaw the follow-up care of the wound. Two months after the incision and drainage, and after regular wound dressing, the patient was referred to the acute surgical team with a complicated, non-healing right axillary abscess cavity and associated generalised right breast cellulitis. There was no history of breast symptoms prior to the onset of the axillary abscess. The patient underwent wound debridement, washout and application of negative pressure vacuum therapy. Biopsies revealed primary breast lymphoma (B-cell). She underwent radical chemotherapy and is currently in remission. PMID:26446318

  17. Laparoscopic drainage of liver abscess: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, G.; AGRUSA, A.; FRAZZETTA, G.; DE VITA, G.; CHIANETTA, D.; DI BUONO, G.; AMATO, G.; GULOTTA, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Aim. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the minimally invasive surgical approach (laparoscopic drainage) of liver abscesses in selected cases. Case report. Male, 58 years old, from a rural area, presented with epigastric abdominal pain, fever, weight loss, loss of appetite, a palpable mass in the epigastrium and neutrophilic leukocytosis. CT revealed a complex multiloculated liver abscess in segments 2–3. Systemic antibiotic therapy alone was ineffective; percutaneous drainage was excluded due to the characteristics of the lesion. Result Given the complexity of the lesion, a laparoscopic approach was chosen involving complete drainage of the abscess, debridement and irrigation; the cavity was unroofed using electrocautery and samples were obtained for bacterial culture and drug testing. Two drains were left in the cavity for seven days. No complications were observed. Discussion. In accordance with the scientific literature, after thorough imaging we performed laparoscopic drainage of a large, complex liver abscess as a safe, effective alternative to open surgery when antibiotic therapy alone failed and percutaneous drainage was uncertain. Conclusion Not all liver abscesses can be treated with antibiotic therapy or percutaneous drainage. Laparoscopic drainage in association with systemic antibiotic therapy is a safe and effective minimally invasive approach that should be considered in selected patients. PMID:23837960

  18. Iliopsoas Abscess (together with Bullet) Resulting from a Firearms Injury

    PubMed Central

    Güzel, Yunus; Çiftçi, Sadettin; Özdemir, Ali; Acar, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Psoas abscess, which is a rarely encountered infection, is defined as the accumulation of suppurative fluid within the fascia surrounding the psoas and iliac muscles. It is categorised as being primary or secondary. Although there are reports in the literature of secondary psoas abscess from foreign bodies, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of psoas abscess developing due to a bullet, following a firearms injury. The patient was first seen in the Emergency Department following a firearms injury in the posterolateral lumbar region and as the neurovascular examination was normal, the patient was discharged after 24 hours of observation. One month later, the patient presented again to the polyclinic with a high temperature and back pain. As a result of physical examination and tests, a diagnosis was made of psoas abscess and percutaneous drainage was applied under ultrasonography guidance. The complaints improved but, 10 days later with an increase in pain and indications of infection, open abscess drainage was applied and the bullet was removed. At the 6-month follow-up examination, the patient had no complaints. PMID:26075128

  19. Hepatic Abscess Complicating Transarterial Chemoembolization in a Patient with Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Guy E.; Ingraham, Christopher R.; Nair, Ajit V.; Padia, Siddharth A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic abscess following transarterial chemoembolization is an uncommon complication. The authors describe a case of liver abscess after transarterial chemoembolization for neuroendocrine liver metastases, including risk factors, prophylaxis, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:22654261

  20. Midline extraperitoneal approach for bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscess originating from anorectal infection

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Koji; Oshima, Yuka; Saito, Kentaro; Uesaka, Takahiro; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Kasai, Hironori; Minagawa, Nozomi; Oshima, Takahiro; Okawa, Yumi; Misawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Anorectal abscess is one of the most common anorectal conditions encountered in practice. However, such abscesses may rarely extend upward and cause life-threatening medical conditions. Presentation of case A 53-year-old woman presented with symptoms of anorectal abscess and evidence of severe inflammatory response and acute kidney injury. Computed tomography revealed a widespread abscess extending to the bilateral retroperitoneal spaces. Surgical drainage was performed via a totally extraperitoneal approach through a lower midline abdominal incision, and the patient had a rapid and uncomplicated recovery. Discussion Although retroperitoneal abscesses originating from the anorectal region are rare, they are life-threating events that require immediate treatment. Percutaneous abscess drainage has been recently evolved; however, surgical drainage is required sometimes that may be challenging, particularly in the case of widespread abscesses, as in our case. Conclusion The midline extraperitoneal approach reported here might be an effective surgical option for patients with bilateral widespread retroperitoneal abscesses. PMID:26701843

  1. High ( sup 18 F)-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in abdominal abscesses: A PET study

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, T.; Ichiya, Y.; Kuwabara, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Miyake, Y.; Gunasekera, R.; Masuda, K. )

    1989-09-01

    We report two cases of abdominal abscess displaying high uptake of (18F)fluorodeoxyglycose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET). Abdominal abscesses should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal masses showing high FDG uptake in PET studies.

  2. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  3. Psoas Abscess Secondary to Renal Tuberculosis in a Middle-aged Woman

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A psoas muscle abscess is a relatively uncommon condition that can present with vague clinical features. With the decreasing prevalence of tuberculosis, psoas abscesses of tuberculous origin are currently rare in developed countries, but are typically caused by tuberculosis of the spine. Here, an unusual case of a psoas abscess secondary to renal tuberculosis in a middle-aged woman is presented. The abscess was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage followed by nephrectomy and additional antituberculous medications. PMID:24255765

  4. Insidious manifestation of pyogenic liver abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius and Micrococcus luteus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Antreas; Xenophontos, Eleni; Karatsi, Alexandra; Petrides, Christos; Kleridou, Maro; Zintilis, Chrysostomos

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are caused by various microorganisms and usually present with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis and liver enzyme abnormalities. This case presents the insidious manifestation of a pyogenic liver abscess in a 34-year-old immunocompetent male, where classical manifestations of a liver abscess were absent. The microorganisms cultured from the abscess belonged to oral cavity's and gastrointestinal tract's normal flora. PMID:26770811

  5. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer with abdominal wall abscess].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Shimizu, Shinichiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Hajime; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Akinari; Satoh, Yayoi; Satsuka, Tetsutaro; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Kanada, Yoko; Otsuka, Ryota; Yanagihara, Akitoshi; Yokoyama, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takushi

    2014-11-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted for an abdominal mass. Computed tomography revealed an abscess (21 × 20 cm) in the abdominal wall and a tumor in the sigmoid colon. Thus, cancer of the sigmoid colon complicated by an abscess of the abdominal wall was diagnosed. The abscess was drained and transverse colostomy was performed with curative intent. After the intervention, chemotherapy (XELOX×3) was administered. Three months later, sigmoidectomy was performed and the stoma was closed. Macroscopic and microscopic examination of the resected specimen detected no remnants of cancer. In patients with advanced colon cancer and abdominal wall involvement, a two-stage operation and preoperative chemotherapy may be considered essential when curative resection is performed. PMID:25731327

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jang-Mi; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Deok Soo; Shim, Jung Yeon; Park, Moon Soo

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a leading pathogen that causes pyogenic liver abscesses (PLAs) in Korea. K. pneumoniae liver abscess (KLA) is potentially life threatening, and the diagnosis is difficult. In developed countries, PLA is rarely observed in children and is frequently associated with disorders of granulocyte function and previous abdominal infection. We observed a case of KLA in a healthy 12-year-old boy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of KLA in an immunocompetent child without an underlying disease in Korea. The patient was treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and antibiotics. The catheter was placed in the intrahepatic abscess for 3 weeks and parenteral antibiotics (ceftriaxone and amikacin) were administered for 4 weeks, followed by oral antibiotics (cefixime) for 2 weeks. We reported this case to raise awareness of KLA in immunocompetent children among physicians, and to review the diagnosis, risk factors, potential complications, and appropriate treatment of KLA. PMID:24223603

  7. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  8. Neurological melioidosis in Norway presenting with a cerebral abscess

    PubMed Central

    Hesstvedt, Liv; Reikvam, Dag Henrik; Dunlop, Oona

    2014-01-01

    Neurological melioidosis is a rare condition, as less than 30 cases have been reported in the last 50 years. We present a case of neurological melioidosis, presenting with a cerebral abscess in a returning traveler from an endemic area. While traveling in Cambodia on holiday, the patient was admitted to local hospital for pneumonia. Her condition improved after antimicrobial treatment, and she returned to Norway when discharged. The patient had several contacts with the health care system after returning to Norway, due to recurrent fever and deterioration. Short-term antimicrobial treatment was given with temporary improvement in her condition. Eventually she developed stroke-like symptoms, and a cerebral abscess was found. Cultures from the abscess were positive for Burkholderia pseudomallei and the treatment was adjusted accordingly.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pelvic collections and abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Urien, Ignacio; Vila, Juan J; Jimenez, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic abscesses are usually the end stage in the progression of an infection. They may occur from surgical complications, generalized abdominal infections such as appendicitis or diverticulitis, or from localized infections such as pelvic inflammatory disease or inflammatory bowel disease. Although surgery has been considered as the treatment of choice by some authors, pelvic abscesses can be managed by non-invasive methods such as ultrasound and computed tomography-guided drainage. The development of therapeutic linear echoendoscopes has allowed the endoscopist to perform therapeutic procedures. Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided drainage of pelvic collections has been demonstrated to be feasible, efficient and safe. It allows the endoscopist to insert stents and drainage catheters into the abscess cavity which drains through the large bowel. This article reviews technique, current results and future prospects of EUS-guided drainage of pelvic lesions. PMID:21160937

  10. Splenic Abscess: A Rare Complication of the UVC in Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Ameer; Ahmed Shatla, Emad Sadek; Imanullah, Sameera; Bedair, Elsaid M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Splenic abscess is one of the rarest complications of the UVC in a newborn and it is hypothesized that it could be due to an infection or trauma caused by a catheter. The case that is being reported presented with abdominal distension and recurrent desaturation with suspicion of neonatal sepsis versus necrotizing enterocolitis. However, the final diagnosis was splenic abscess as a complication of an inappropriate UVC insertion which was discovered by abdominal ultrasound. The patient was given broad spectrum antibiotics empirically and the symptoms were resolved without any surgical intervention. Such cases and controlled studies need to be reported in order to identify further causes and risk factors associated with splenic abscess in a patient with UVC which can eventually help us adopt preventive strategies to avoid such complications. PMID:24511404

  11. Management of Pleural Effusion, Empyema, and Lung Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Pleural effusion is an accumulation of fluid in the pleural space that is classified as transudate or exudate according to its composition and underlying pathophysiology. Empyema is defined by purulent fluid collection in the pleural space, which is most commonly caused by pneumonia. A lung abscess, on the other hand, is a parenchymal necrosis with confined cavitation that results from a pulmonary infection. Pleural effusion, empyema, and lung abscess are commonly encountered clinical problems that increase mortality. These conditions have traditionally been managed by antibiotics or surgical placement of a large drainage tube. However, as the efficacy of minimally invasive interventional procedures has been well established, image-guided small percutaneous drainage tubes have been considered as the mainstay of treatment for patients with pleural fluid collections or a lung abscess. In this article, the technical aspects of image-guided interventions, indications, expected benefits, and complications are discussed and the published literature is reviewed. PMID:22379278

  12. [Pancarditis as cause of death after abscess tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Dressler, J; Berberich, A; Hüttenbrink, K-B; Müller, E

    2004-09-01

    Paratonsillar abscesses are preferably treated by abscess tonsillectomy as operative therapy. The casuistry of a patient aged 17 who was tonsillectomized for a paratonsillar abscess and died after 12 days prompted a discussion on the scope of preoperative diagnostics. The clinical examination and anamnesis of the young man prior to the operation did not give evidence of any concomitant diseases. It was only through extensive microscopic investigations of the myocardium after autopsy that inflammatory infiltrates of the epicardium, endocardium and myocardium in the vicinity of portions of the conduction system were detected. The relevance of autopsy to the quality assurance in clinical activities is emphasized. Legal questions of possible negligent homicide as a result of the failure to take diagnostic and therapeutic measures are raised. PMID:15372341

  13. Diagnostic imaging of abdominal fluid collections and abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.E.; Blinder, R.A.; Rice, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    With today's advanced technology, the clinician and radiologist have a number of techniques with which to evaluate the abdomen for fluid collections and/or abscesses. Three points are clear from the plethora of literature concerning this subject: the need to individualize the clinical and imaging approach to each patient suspected of an abnormal fluid collection or abscess, the need to individualize the imaging procedure based upon what is done best at the institution, and the need for percutaneous aspiration of all fluid collections for diagnosis. No single imaging test is totally sensitive or specific for the detection of an infected fluid collection. Overall, CT probably does provide the most accurate means to detect an intra-abdominal abscess. Because of this, and because it is less operator dependent than ultrasound, CT is used most often as the procedure of choice at our institution.155 references.

  14. Diagnosis and successful treatment of a caudal lingual abscess in a geriatric dog.

    PubMed

    Kelmer, Efrat; Kelmer, Gal; Kerl, Marie E

    2007-08-01

    A 13-year-old, intact male, golden retriever was presented for glossomegaly. A diagnosis of a caudal lingual abscess was made by fine needle aspiration under general anesthesia. The dog showed marked clinical improvement following abscess drainage. Lingual abscesses should be included as a differential diagnosis in any dog with an unexplained acute glossomegaly. PMID:17824331

  15. Microbiology and Management of Pediatric Liver Abscesses: Two Cases Caused by Streptococcus anginosus Group

    PubMed Central

    Cellucci, Michael; Simon, Erin; Eppes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses in the pediatric population are rare occurrences in the developed world. We present two cases of previously healthy males presenting with fever and abdominal pain found to have liver abscesses due to organisms in the Streptococcus anginosus group. The microbiology of S. anginosus along with the management and recommended treatment in children with liver abscesses is discussed. PMID:23119195

  16. Abdominal foreign body: late presentation as a rectus sheath abscess.

    PubMed

    Noushif, M; Sivaprasad, S; Prashanth, A

    2011-05-01

    Intra-abdominal ingested foreign bodies are usually an incidental finding, typically encountered in mentally challenged patients. We present the case of a 65-year-old mentally sound woman who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and a lump in the hypogastrium. Evaluation revealed a rectus sheath abscess extending to the peritoneum, with a foreign body in situ. On enquiry, the patient revealed that she had accidentally ingested a tailoring needle 17 years ago. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an ingested foreign body as a rectus sheath abscess after a long duration. PMID:21633760

  17. Scrotal Abscess as Initial Presentation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Kathy H.; Nourparvar, Paymon; DeCaro, John J.; Walsh, Mark D.; Issa, Muta M.; Ritenour, Chad W. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of scrotal squamous cell carcinoma in a 67-year-old man that presented as a recurrent nonhealing scrotal abscess. Radical scrotectomy and bilateral simple orchiectomy were performed. A pudendal thigh flap was used for wound closure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of its use after radical surgery for scrotal cancer. The clinical features, staging, and treatment of scrotal squamous cell carcinoma are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of including scrotal cancer in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a scrotal abscess. PMID:24102031

  18. CT differentiation of subphrenic abscess and pleural effusion

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.S.; Proto, A.V.; Clark, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic scans of 38 patients with proven subphrenic abscesses and 28 patients with proven pleural effusions were reviewed without knowledge of the final diagnosis. In 26% of cases the hemidiaphragm could be identified directly as a stripe, while in 71% of cases only the hemidiaphragmatic contour could be seen. In 3% of cases the hemidiaphragm position was indeterminate because insufficient scans of the chest or abdomen were obtained. In the cases where the hemidiaphragm position could be established, the computed tomographic diagnosis was correct in 100% of subphrenic abscesses and in 96% of pleural effusions. Methods of identifying the hemidiaphragm on computed tomography and the possible pitfalls are discussed.

  19. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  20. Psoas Abscess Secondary to Urinary Tract Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aldamanhori, Reem; Barakat, Alaa; Al-Madi, Maha; Kamal, Baher

    2015-01-01

    Psoas abscess is a rare condition where infection spreads from a nearby or distant septic focus to the psoas sheath. The causative bacterial organisms at distal sites reach the psoas via lymphatic or hematogenous spread, whereas infection from nearby sites that include the urinary system reaches the psoas directly. There are few reports that account for bacterial infection after endourological procedures as the cause of direct spread of infection to the psoas muscle.2 We report a case of psoas abscess caused by fungal infection that spread from an injured left ureter to the psoas sheath.

  1. Temporal lobe abscess in a patient with isolated sphenoiditis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas A; Carter, Cody S; Seiberling, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old immunocompetent man admitted for severe retro-orbital headache was diagnosed with isolated sphenoiditis. At the time of scheduled surgery, the patient was mildly obtunded, and a head CT revealed a temporal lobe abscess. The patient underwent a left temporal craniectomy and a bilateral endoscopic sphenoid sinusotomy, which revealed gross fungal debris. The patient made a full recovery with resolution of abscess and sinus findings. Suspicion for intracranial infection should be raised in any sinus patient with neurological changes. Early diagnosis with imaging studies is extremely important for surgical drainage before permanent neurological sequelae. PMID:22852114

  2. Seminal vesicle abscess following prostate biopsy requiring transgluteal percutaneous drainage.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Christopher E; Davis, William A; Rothstein, Christopher P; Engel, Jason D

    2013-06-01

    Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy (TRUSB) of the prostate directly contaminates the prostate with rectal flora. Patients commonly receive fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics to prevent infection. Infectious complications following TRUSB are increasing. The most common offending organism is Escherichia coli (E. coli), with isolates of this bacteria showing growing resistance to FQs. We present to our knowledge the first reported case of seminal vesicle abscess formation after TRUSB. The abscess was initially not seen on computed tomography and eventually treated with percutaneous drainage by a transgluteal approach. We review literature on infectious complications following TRUSB with implications for future antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:23783054

  3. Treatment of Acute Puerperal Mastitis and Breast Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cantlie, Helene Bertrand

    1988-01-01

    Mastitis is a benign infection of the breast if it is treated early. If two days elapse before treatment is started, it can lead to serious complications such as chronic or recurrent mastitis or breast abscess. Treatment consists in frequent nursing and massaging or stripping the breast to keep it empty of milk or pus, and appropriate antibiotics. Incision and drainage of a breast abscess can be done in the office under local anesthesia, and the drainage continued at home by the mother. PMID:21253250

  4. Perihepatic abscess caused by dropped appendicoliths following laparoscopic appendectomy: sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Black, Michelle T; Ha, Bo Yoon; Kang, Young S; Garland, Adella M

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old girl presenting with acute appendicitis complicated by perforated appendix, followed by perihepatic abscess associated with ectopic appendicoliths. CT findings were initially suspicious for an intrahepatic abscess with internal calcifications. However, on sonography the abscess appeared to be in a perihepatic location. Perihepatic abscess associated with a dropped or retained appendicolith has been rarely reported. Awareness of the possibility of a perihepatic abscess as a complication of laparoscopic appendectomy and use of sonography should result in optimal management of this rare complication. PMID:22573213

  5. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Machicado, Jorge D.; Davogustto, Giovanni E.; Pan, Jen-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic abscesses are usually related to gram-negative bacilli. However, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a substantial cause of prostatic abscesses in recent years. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of orthotopic liver transplantation 10 years ago who presented with acute onset dysuria and abdominal pain and was diagnosed with a MRSA prostatic abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing a prostatic abscess in a liver transplant recipient and the first reporting MRSA as the causative organism of a prostatic abscess in a solid organ transplant recipient. PMID:25389507

  6. Pyogenic liver abscess following acupuncture and moxibustion treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Jung; Lee, Sangyeoup; Jeong, Dong Wook; Cho, Young Hye; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Jeong Gyu; Kim, Yun Jin; Yi, Yu Hyun; Lim, Ji Yong

    2013-09-01

    Acupuncture treatment is generally regarded as a relatively safe procedure. However, most procedures have some complications and acupuncture treatment is no exception. Reported complications of acupuncture treatment were mostly mild or temporary symptoms, but certain severe adverse effects were also observed. We report here for the first time a case of liver abscess following acupuncture and moxibustion treatment. PMID:24106589

  7. Clinical Characteristics Associated with Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Tuboovarian Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Huma; Lau, Trevin C.; Karmon, Anatte E.; Styer, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Although parenteral antibiotic treatment is a standard approach for tuboovarian abscesses, a significant proportion of patients fail therapy and require interventional radiology (IR) guided drainage. The objective of this study is to assess if specific clinical factors are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. Study Design. Retrospective medical record review of patients hospitalized for tuboovarian abscesses from 2001 through 2012 was performed. Clinical characteristics were compared for patients who underwent successful parenteral antibiotic treatment, failed antibiotic treatment necessitating subsequent IR drainage, initial drainage with concurrent antibiotics, and surgery. Results. One hundred thirteen patients admitted for inpatient treatment were identified. Sixty-one (54%) patients were treated with antibiotics alone. Within this group, 24.6% failed antibiotic treatment and required drainage. Mean white blood cell count (K/μL) (18.7 ± 5.94 versus 13.9 ± 5.12) (p = 0.003), mean maximum diameter of tuboovarian abscess (cm) (6.8 ± 2.9 versus 5.2 ± 2.0) (p = 0.03), and length of stay (days) (9.47 ± 7.43 versus 4.59 ± 2.4) (p = 0.002) were significantly greater for patients who failed antibiotic treatment. Conclusions. Admission white blood cell count greater than 16 K/μL and abscess size greater than 5.18 cm are associated with antibiotic treatment failure. These factors may provide guidance for initial selection of IR guided drainage. PMID:26989337

  8. Percutaneous needle aspiration of small interloop abscesses in children.

    PubMed

    Saluja, S; Fields, J M; Schwartz, D S; DeCou, J M; Gosche, J R; Touloukian, R J; Seashore, J H; Keller, M S

    1998-09-01

    Treatment of small postoperative interloop abscesses (ILA) can be challenging. In children, these collections have usually been drained surgically at a second operation. This article describes three children with small postoperative ILAs who were treated by percutaneous needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotics, with good outcomes. The advantages of this technique and its utilization in the management of children with ILAs are discussed. PMID:9716688

  9. Pyogenic psoas abscess: a rare complication after orthotopic heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Madden, Brendan P; Datta, Subir; Planche, Timothy

    2002-08-01

    We describe a 57-year-old man who developed a primary psoas abscess after treatment for acute allograft rejection, 5 years after orthotopic heart transplantation. The infective organism was methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and the patient underwent successful treatment with computed tomography-guided percutaneous drainage combined with teicoplanin and fusidic acid. PMID:12163097

  10. Sonography of thigh abscess: detection, diagnosis, and drainage.

    PubMed

    vanSonnenberg, E; Wittich, G R; Casola, G; Cabrera, O A; Gosink, B B; Resnick, D L

    1987-10-01

    Sonographic characteristics and percutaneous catheter drainage of thigh abscesses in 18 patients are described. Most of these patients had underlying diseases including osteomyelitis, trauma, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, leukemia, lymphoma, sepsis, bleeding dyscrasia, and autoimmune disease. Previous procedures on these thigh collections included seven operations and 12 nondiagnostic ward aspirations. All collections were shown by sonography to be either anterior or anterolateral. Two cases referred for drainage were posteromedial; sonography showed these to be mycotic pseudoaneurysms. The abscesses were either anechoic or hypoechoic, and occasionally had debris and septations. Abscesses associated with underlying osteomyelitis abutted the femur; those related to other causes generally were more superficial within muscle or fascial layers. Sonographically guided catheter drainage successfully cured all patients, even those in whom ward aspiration or formal surgery had been unsuccessful. Sonography is a simple and inexpensive method of imaging and guiding the drainage of thigh abscesses. Percutaneous catheter drainage is the treatment of choice in cases in which simple emergency room or ward incision and drainage are inadequate. PMID:3307356

  11. Lumbar septic arthritis and psoas abscess due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Fanny; Rossi, Pascal; Lagier, Jean Christophe; Craighero, Fabien; Frances, Yves; Granel, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Invasive infections due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus mainly include negative blood culture endocarditis and osteoarticular infections. The authors present herein a rare case of posterior septic arthritis related to A aphrophilus involving lumbar spine with contiguous abscesses of psoas and paravertebral muscles. The infection likely originated from oral cavity. A good outcome was observed after a prolonged and targeted antibiotherapy. PMID:22696632

  12. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  13. Ischiorectal fossa abscess after pelvic floor injection of botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Brueseke, Taylor J; Lane, Felicia L

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum toxin is used to treat pelvic floor tension myalgia; however, its safety profile is poorly understood. We report an ischiorectal fossa abscess after pelvic floor injections of botulinum toxin. Physicians need to be aware of this possible complication, consider alternate injection techniques and antiseptic preparation before injection. PMID:22381609

  14. Splenic abscess due to blastomycosis: scintigraphic, sonographic, and CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubuisson, R.L.; Jones, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the radiologic evaluation of a case of splenic abscess secondary to North American blastomycosis in a known intravenous drug abuser, a disease not believed to be previously reported in the radiologic literature. Dynamic computed tomography proved especially useful in narrowing the diagnostic possibilities and excluding vascular lesions.

  15. Hepatic abscess in liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.K.; Memsic, L.D.; Pusey, E.J.; Dietrich, R.B.; Busuttil, R.W.; Hawkins, R.A.; Kangarloo, H.

    1986-04-01

    Serial HIDA scanning was performed on a patient following liver transplantation. During the patient's course he developed biliary obstruction that manifested as a photopenic region in the liver, on the HIDA scan which filled in on the delayed views. The patient subsequently developed a region in the superior portion of the right lobe of the liver that did not fill in with activity on delayed views. The patient was experiencing low-grade fevers and was clinically believed to have either an abscess or an episode of rejection. A gallium scan was performed revealing a photopenic defect in the same region as the HIDA. Because of the clinical suspicion of abscess, a percutaneous transhepatic drainage study was performed, revealing a large abscess cavity in the suspect area within the liver. Following the drainage the patient did well. This case illustrates the usefulness of serial HIDA scanning in patients who have received liver transplants. It also is important to note that the gallium scan was negative in this hepatic abscess. In the authors' opinions, the finding of an intrahepatic fluid collection in a septic patient that does not fill with activity on the HIDA study, should be considered the source of the infection, until proven otherwise, and should be drained regardless of the findings of other studies.

  16. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  17. [Pleural empyema and lung abscess: current treatment options].

    PubMed

    Hecker, E; Hamouri, S; Müller, E; Ewig, S

    2012-06-01

    Parapneumonic pleural empyema has been classified into different stages and classes. While the American Thoracic Society (ATS) classification is based on the natural course of the disease, Light has classified pleural empyema according to the radiological, physical and biochemical characteristics, and the American College of Chest Physician (ACCP) has categorised the patients with pleural empyema according to the risk of a poor outcome. According to this classification the management of the pleural empyema is based on the stage of the disease. Therapeutic strategies include chest tube, chest tube with fibrinolysis, thoracoscopic debridement and decortication in open or minimally invasive techniques. Primary lung abscesses develop in previously healthy lung parenchyma and are caused by aspiration. In addition, abscess formation can occur without aspiration, and important differences relate to community-acquired, nosocomial abscesses and those in the immunosuppressed host. 90 % of all lung abscesses can be cured with antibiotic treatment alone, 10 % have to be treated with an interventional catheter or chest tubes and only 1 % require thoracic surgery because of complications independent of the former conservative or interventional treatment strategies. PMID:22711325

  18. A Rare Case of Intratonsillar Abscess in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Arora, Rubeena; Garg, Sunil; Ranjan, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    A rare case of intratonsillar abscess is presented in a 25-year old healthy adult male, where the clinical presentation was found to be unique hitherto unreported in the medical literature. The clinical record also highlights the importance of incision and drainage in the management of such cases. With this case, we illustrate a rare entity that present in an extremely rare manner.

  19. Postoperative testicular abscess with bacteremia due to Actinomyces neuii

    PubMed Central

    Crescencio, Juan Carlos Rico; Koshy, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Bacteremia due to Actinomyces neuii has been reported in the literature 14 times. A. neuii is an endogenous organism that has been cultured in clinical specimens of the genitourinary tract; we are reporting a unique case of A. neuii postoperative testicular abscess with bacteremia which was successfully treated with surgery and a short course of parenteral antimicrobials.

  20. Lung abscess-etiology, diagnostic and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Ivan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kioumis, Ioannis; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Baloukas, Dimitris; Kuhajda, Danijela

    2015-08-01

    Lung abscess is a type of liquefactive necrosis of the lung tissue and formation of cavities (more than 2 cm) containing necrotic debris or fluid caused by microbial infection. It can be caused by aspiration, which may occur during altered consciousness and it usually causes a pus-filled cavity. Moreover, alcoholism is the most common condition predisposing to lung abscesses. Lung abscess is considered primary (60%) when it results from existing lung parenchymal process and is termed secondary when it complicates another process, e.g., vascular emboli or follows rupture of extrapulmonary abscess into lung. There are several imaging techniques which can identify the material inside the thorax such as computerized tomography (CT) scan of the thorax and ultrasound of the thorax. Broad spectrum antibiotic to cover mixed flora is the mainstay of treatment. Pulmonary physiotherapy and postural drainage are also important. Surgical procedures are required in selective patients for drainage or pulmonary resection. In the current review we will present all current information from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:26366400

  1. [Diagnosis and treatment of acute abscesses of the lungs].

    PubMed

    Lamm, Ia E; Abisheva, A B; Kozachenko, N V; Tsaplina, I E

    1988-06-01

    Under study were results of clinical, immunological and bacteriological examinations of 130 patients with acute abscesses of the lungs. The complex treatment included antibacterial therapy taking into account the antibiotic sensitivity of the microflora, correction of disturbances of the protein and water-salt metabolism, desintoxication measures, immunotherapy and sanitation of purulent cavities and the tracheobronchial tree. PMID:3222852

  2. Epidural abscess with associated spondylodiscitis following prostatic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dobson, G; Cowie, C J A; Holliman, D

    2015-07-01

    Spondylodiscitis is often iatrogenic in nature. We report the case of a 69-year-old man presenting with spondylodiscitis and associated epidural abscess following transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy despite ciprofloxacin cover. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spondylodiscitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Escherichia coli. PMID:26264110

  3. Eggerthella lenta bacteremia complicated by spondylodiscitis, psoas abscess, and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, B J; Korman, T M; Junckerstorff, R K

    2014-04-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  4. Liver abscess in the tropics: experience in the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, K. L.; Wong, N. W.; Paramsothy, M.; Nojeg, M.; Somasundaram, K.

    1987-01-01

    We reviewed 204 cases of liver abscess seen between 1970 and 1985. Ninety were found to be amoebic, 24 pyogenic and one tuberculous. The cause of the abscesses in the remaining 89 patients was not established. The patients were predominantly male, Indians, and in the 30-60 age group. The majority of patients presented with fever and right hypochondrial pain. The most common laboratory findings were leucocytosis, hypoalbuminaemia and an elevated serum alkaline phosphatase. Amoebic abscesses were mainly solitary while pyogenic abscesses were mainly multiple. Complications were few in our patients and included rupture into the pleural and peritoneal cavities and septicaemic shock. An overall mortality of 2.9% was recorded. The difficulty in diagnosing the abscess type is highlighted. The single most important test in helping us diagnose amoebic abscess, presumably the most common type of abscess in the tropics, is the Entamoeba histolytica antibody assay. This test should be used more frequently in the tropics. PMID:3658864

  5. Comparison of indium 111-labeled platelets v leukocytes in a pyogenic abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.P.; Sugerman, H.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Hirsch, J.I.; Sharp, D.E.; Qureshi, G.D.

    1985-02-01

    This study sought to determine which blood component, WBCs or platelets, is the more specific indicator of an abscess and where each localizes. An abscess was created using stool in the hind limb of dogs. After 24 hours, one group was given autologous indium 111-labeled platelets and another group was given autologous indium 111-labeled WBCs. Blood, abscess fluid, infected operative control muscle tissue, and nonoperative control muscle tissue were counted for radioactivity 24 hours after administration of the labeled cells. There was significantly less WBC radioactivity in blood and more within abscess fluid compared with platelets. The highest platelet activity occurred in muscle tissue adjacent to the abscess compared with platelet activity in abscess fluid or control muscle tissue. The unwanted high platelet blood background activity and the desirable high concentration of WBC radioactivity within the abscess fluid makes the latter the preferential radionuclide imaging agent.

  6. High intermuscular anal abscess and fistula: analysis of 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Bernard, D; Tassé, D; Morgan, S

    1983-03-01

    Although the majority of anal abscesses and fistulas are of the simple or low variety (intersphincteric or transsphincteric in Parks' classification), some of the simple, but high intermuscular, type are not recognized clinically and are not properly treated because they do not present the usual visible signs. Characteristically, there is no external swelling, induration or opening and there is high extension with a palpable mass or induration above the levator ani. Out of 350 patients with anal abscesses and fistulas treated by the first author, 25 (7%) patients had a high intermuscular abscess. Of these 25, 14 (56%) had a history of anal problems. Eight of these 14 had undergone anorectal surgery previously, and in 3 laparotomy was added, 2 being left with a diverting colostomy. On the other hand, 11 (44%) patients had no previous anal manifestation and 9 of them presented with an acute abscess. All patients had a palpable mass or induration above the levator ani and in all but one a primary opening was found on the dentate line. Fistulotomy was done in 22 of the 25 cases and incision and drainage into the anorectum in the other 3. The authors conclude that for prompt diagnosis and proper treatment the surgeon should be highly suspicious of the condition, have a perfect knowledge of the surgical anatomy of anal abscesses and fistulas and follow three steps: (a) look for a primary opening at the dentate line, (b) pass a cannula from this opening into the cavity or induration and (c) divide the circular muscle and internal sphincter until the upper end of the tract is reached. PMID:6825001

  7. Ampicillin-sulbactam therapy for multiple pyogenic hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Zenon, G J; Cadle, R M; Hamill, R J

    1990-12-01

    A patient with multiple, pyogenic hepatic abscesses is described, and the pathophysiology, etiologies, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and management of the disease are reviewed. A 55-year-old man with a history of ethanol abuse and pancreatitis developed fever, chills, general malaise, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain two weeks before hospitalization. Baseline laboratory and hematology results included serum albumin concentration, 3.2 g/dL; serum alkaline phosphatase concentration, 239 mIU/mL; total serum bilirubin concentration, 1.3 mg/dL; white blood cell count, 18,400/cu mm; red blood cell count, 4.7 million/cu mm; hemoglobin, 12.5 g/dL; and hematocrit, 38.8%. Abdominal ultrasound showed echo-free cavities throughout the hepatic parenchyma; abdominal computed-tomography (CT) scan showed hepatomegaly and multiple radiolucent spaces. CT-guided needle aspiration of a hepatic mass yielded purulent material that grew Fusobacterium necrophorum under anaerobic conditions. On day 7, the patient was started on i.v. ampicillin sodium-sulbactam sodium. A CT scan two weeks later showed a reduction in the number and sizes of abscesses. The patient continued i.v. therapy for one month, then was discharged on a regimen of p.o. amoxicillin trihydrate-clavulanate potassium. Hepatic abscesses are either amebic or pyogenic; the latter usually has a higher mortality. The etiologies of pyogenic hepatic abscesses include ascending cholangitis, portal vein bacteremia, systemic bacteremia, extension from a contiguous focus of infection, and trauma. Diagnosis is difficult and relies highly on clinical suspicion. Clinical symptoms include hepatomegaly, fever, chills, and malaise. Abnormal laboratory values include leukocytosis, anemia, and hypoalbuminemia. The abscesses are frequently polymicrobial; Escherichia coli is the most commonly isolated species. CT is the best radiological technique for diagnosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2292177

  8. Single and multiple pyogenic liver abscesses. Natural history, diagnosis and treatment, with emphasis on percutaneous drainage.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M I; Corey, G R; Gallis, H A; Durack, D T

    1984-09-01

    The presenting features, modes of treatment and clinical course were reviewed for 55 patients with pyogenic liver abscess, seen at Duke University Medical Center over a 15-year period. Thirty-three patients had a solitary abscess and 22 had multiple abscesses. Most patients were between the ages of 40 and 60 years. Males predominated, 2.4:1. Major underlying conditions included biliary tract disease, malignancy and colonic disease. Eight patients, each with a solitary abscess, had no identifiable underlying condition. Symptoms and signs were nonspecific: fever, chills, focal abdominal tenderness and hepatomegaly were common. A raised serum alkaline phosphatase level was the most consistent abnormal laboratory finding. CT with contrast enhancement, radioisotope scanning and ultrasonography all accurately defined solitary hepatic abscesses. However, CT scan was more successful than other imaging techniques in detecting multiple abscesses. In seven patients the diagnosis was made only at laparotomy. Overall, a diagnosis of liver abscess was made in 50 living patients (91%). Microorganisms were recovered from pus and/or blood cultures of 44 patients (80%). Most common were enteric gram-negative facultative rods, anaerobic gram-negative rods, and microaerophilic streptococci. Single abscesses were more likely than multiple abscesses to contain more than one organism. All patients received antibiotics; the choice of antibiotic does not appear to be critical provided the regimen has a broad spectrum including activity against anaerobes. Surgical or percutaneous drainage was successful when attempted in all patients with a single abscess, but the outcome was less favorable in those with multiple abscesses. Percutaneous drainage is currently replacing open operative drainage as the method of choice. Overall mortality in patients with single abscesses was 15% (5/33) and in those with multiple abscesses 41% (9/22). PMID:6472091

  9. A Case of an Aortic Abscess around the Elephant Trunk.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeshiro; Kawasaki, Muneyasu; Katayanagi, Tomoyuki; Okuma, Shinnosuke; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Shiono, Noritsugu; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2015-12-20

    A 52-year-old male patient with a history of total arch replacement using the elephant trunk technique for acute aortic dissection 4 years before visited our hospital with the chief complaint of persistent fever. Chest computed tomography (CT) suggested prosthetic vascular graft infection, which was treated surgically after chemotherapy. The first surgery consisted of debridement of an abscess around the vascular graft and in the aorta around the elephant trunk, and thoracic descending aorta replacement and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in view of the risk of bleeding from the peripheral region of the elephant trunk. One week later, omental filling was performed as the second step. This is a very rare case of aortic abscess around the elephant trunk that could successfully be managed by graft-conserving treatment. PMID:26226888

  10. Treatment of acute abscesses in the casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M H; Curran, F; Johnson, R A; Oates, J; Givel, J C; Chabloz, R; ALexander-Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    In the treatment of acute pyogenic soft-tissue abscess incision, curettage, and primary suture was compared with incision and drainage alone in a randomised prospective trial. Operations were performed under antibiotic cover by casualty officers, and patients were reviewed by an independent observer in a septic dressing clinic. Altogether 114 patients were studied, of whom 54 were treated by curettage and primary suture and 60 by simple drainage. The mean healing time was 8.9 days in those treated by primary suture and 7.8 days in those treated by simple drainage (p less than 0.05). Primary healing failed to occur in 19 (35%) of the sutured wounds, but there were no other complications in either group. It is concluded that incision and drainage alone is adequate treatment for acute soft-tissue abscess. PMID:6805714

  11. Periodontal bacteria in rabbit mandibular and maxillary abscesses.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Jenkins, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2002-03-01

    Despite the high incidence of odontogenic abscesses in pet rabbits, published data on the bacteriology of these infections are lacking, and clinical cultures are often ambiguous, making antibiotic choices difficult. In order to define the bacteriology of these infections, 12 rabbit mandibular and maxillary abscesses were cultured aerobically and anaerobically. All specimens yielded pathogenic bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella heparinolytica, Prevotella spp., Peptostreptococcus micros, Streptococcus milleri group, Actinomyces israelii, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum. These organisms are consistent with the characterized bacteriology of periodontal disease in human and other mammalian studies. The isolates were tested against 10 antimicrobial agents commonly used to treat rabbits; 100% of the strains tested were susceptible to clindamycin, 96% were susceptible to penicillin and ceftriaxone, 54% were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, and only 7% were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:11880435

  12. Mycotic Abdominal Pseudoaneurysm due to Psoas Abscess after Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2015-12-01

    A 36-year-old man, who had undergone thoracoscopic anterior spinal fusion using the plate system and posterior screw fusion three months previously, presented to our hospital with left flank pain and fever. Computed tomography indicated the presence of a psoas muscle abscess. However, after two days of percutaneous catheter drainage, a mycotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm was detected via computed tomography. We performed in situ revascularization using a prosthetic graft with omental wrapping. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified on blood and pus culture, and systemic vancomycin was administered for one month. Although the abscess recurred, it was successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and systemic vancomycin administration for three months, without the need for instrumentation removal. The patient remained asymptomatic throughout two years of follow-up. PMID:26665118

  13. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhys D.R.; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. PMID:21808663

  14. Mycotic Abdominal Pseudoaneurysm due to Psoas Abscess after Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2015-01-01

    A 36-year-old man, who had undergone thoracoscopic anterior spinal fusion using the plate system and posterior screw fusion three months previously, presented to our hospital with left flank pain and fever. Computed tomography indicated the presence of a psoas muscle abscess. However, after two days of percutaneous catheter drainage, a mycotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm was detected via computed tomography. We performed in situ revascularization using a prosthetic graft with omental wrapping. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified on blood and pus culture, and systemic vancomycin was administered for one month. Although the abscess recurred, it was successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage and systemic vancomycin administration for three months, without the need for instrumentation removal. The patient remained asymptomatic throughout two years of follow-up. PMID:26665118

  15. Branch portal vein pyaemia secondary to amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Conor; Sohan, Oliver; Murray, Lois; Fox, Thomas Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a young returning traveller who contracted amoebic dysentery while visiting India. She presented to a major London Hospital several months later with features suggestive of amoebic liver abscesses, a known sequelae of amoebiasis. MRI with intravenous contrast demonstrated an area of likely occlusion of the portal vein. The patient was treated with intravenous metronidazole for 10?days followed by diloxanide furoate, an intraluminal agent. The largest abscess was drained acutely under ultrasound guidance. The portal vein occlusion was treated medically without the use of anticoagulation. A repeat ultrasound at 6?weeks post-treatment confirmed patency of the portal vein indicating spontaneous recanalisation with antimicrobial therapy alone. PMID:26055593

  16. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  17. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  18. Differentiating lung abscess and empyema: radiography and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.; Podrasky, A.E.; Webb, W.R.

    1983-07-01

    Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of 70 inflammatory thoracic lesions in 63 patients were reviewed and scored for diagnostic features. Pathologic confirmation of the final diagnosis was available in 42% (5/12) of lung abscesses and 31% (18/58) of empyemas. CT alone was sufficient to correctly diagnose 100% (70/70) of cases. Diagnostic information not available from conventional chest radiographs was obtained in 47% (33/70) of cases; in an additional 34% of patients, CT more accurately defined the extent of disease. The most reliable CT features for the differential diagnosis of lung abscess and empyema were wall characteristics, pleural separation, and lung compression. Conventional radiographic features such as size, shape, and the angle of the lesion with the chest wall were less helpful, though also best assessed by CT.

  19. Nonsurgical resolution of caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess in a cat

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Joohyun; CHOI, Mincheol

    2014-01-01

    A one-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was admitted with a history of anorexia, regurgitation and pyrexia for two days. Fever and leukocytosis were identified. There were a large soft tissue density oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on thoracic radiographs, a fluid-filled oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on ultrasonography, and left-sided and ventrally displaced and compressed esophagus on esophagram. On esophageal endoscopy, there were no esophageal abnormalities. CT findings with a fluid filled mass with rim enhancement indicated a caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess. The patient was treated with oral antibiotics, because the owner declined percutaneous drainage and surgery. The patient was admitted on emergency with severe respiratory distress; and ruptured abscess and deteriorated pleuropneumonia were suspected. With intensive hospitalization care and additional antibiotic therapy, the patient had full recovery. PMID:25648207

  20. Nonsurgical resolution of caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess in a cat.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joohyun; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, castrated male domestic short hair cat was admitted with a history of anorexia, regurgitation and pyrexia for two days. Fever and leukocytosis were identified. There were a large soft tissue density oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on thoracic radiographs, a fluid-filled oval mass in the caudal mediastinum on ultrasonography, and left-sided and ventrally displaced and compressed esophagus on esophagram. On esophageal endoscopy, there were no esophageal abnormalities. CT findings with a fluid filled mass with rim enhancement indicated a caudal mediastinal paraesophageal abscess. The patient was treated with oral antibiotics, because the owner declined percutaneous drainage and surgery. The patient was admitted on emergency with severe respiratory distress; and ruptured abscess and deteriorated pleuropneumonia were suspected. With intensive hospitalization care and additional antibiotic therapy, the patient had full recovery. PMID:25648207

  1. Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Presenting as a Parotid Gland Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Blenda; Soares, Daniela; Sampaio, Patrick; Santiago, Mittermayer

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a small-vessel vasculitis consisting of necrotizing granulomatous lesions in airways and focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis. However, it may affect other sites such as the skin, central nervous system, eyes, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and liver. We describe a rare case of GPA in which the initial manifestation was the involvement of the parotid gland mimicking a pyogenic abscess. PMID:25815014

  2. Multidrug-resistant Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis presenting as multiple muscle abscesses.

    PubMed

    Veerappan Kandasamy, Vimalkumar; Nagabandi, Arun; Horowitz, Edward A; Vivekanandan, Renuga

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old Caucasian man presented with multiple leg abscesses due to Nocardia pseudobrasiliensis. He was on chronic steroid therapy for myasthenia gravis. We present the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of this rare organism. N. pseudobrasiliensis is a new emerging species that was previously thought to belong to the N. brasiliensis species. The distinction between the two species is extremely important given the different antibiotic susceptibility pattern and association of N. pseudobrasiliensis with more invasive and disseminated disease. PMID:25948839

  3. Descending mediastinitis with mediastinal abscess after supracricoid partial laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Benito, José; Espinoza, Sophie; Gutiérrez-Fonseca, Raimundo; Bagan, Patrick; Laccourreye, Ollivier

    2013-06-01

    We document a rare and not-yet-reported condition after supracricoid partial laryngectomy: the development of descending mediastinitis with mediastinal abscess. We present a case in which early diagnosis and team management allowed for a successful outcome. The pathophysiology of this severe complication, as well as its diagnosis, management, and prevention, is discussed, together with a review of the medical scientific literature. PMID:23837388

  4. Unsuspected hepatic abscess associated with biliary tract disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.G.; Beaton, H.L.

    1983-11-01

    Experience at Beth Israel Medical Center with 10 patients who had unsuspected intrahepatic abscesses due to biliary tract disease led to a reevaluation of this entity. Ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and radionuclide imaging techniques have radically altered the approach to the evaluation and management of this disease in the last several years, and rapid diagnosis and treatment have led to a markedly improved prognosis, especially in those patients with calculous disease of the biliary tract.

  5. Umbilical cord remnant abscess in a yearling colt.

    PubMed

    Collatos, C; Reef, V B; Richardson, D W

    1989-11-01

    An abscess of the external umbilical remnant and umbilical vein remnant was diagnosed in a 16-month-old colt, using ultrasonography. Because of the colt's size, primary closure of the surgical incision after umbilical cord resection was not complete. Vertical mattress stainless steel sutures and stents were used, and healing was by second intention. Intervening gas-filled viscera made it impossible to visualize ultrasonographically the bladder of umbilical artery remnants in a colt of this age. PMID:2684942

  6. Pigtail Catheter in the Management of Liver Abscess.

    PubMed

    Eastiak, M F; Saifullah, M; Islam, M S; Hossain, M J; Mannan, M; Mousumi, M S; Alam, F; Sultana, I; Debnath, B C

    2015-10-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is a common condition in Bangladesh. Though conservative treatment plays a major role, refractory patients can be successfully treated with minimally invasive approach. This prospective study was carried out to evaluate the prospect of sono-guided percutaneous catheter drainage for liver abscess patients not responding to conservative treatment. This study was done at Dhaka Medical College Hospital from January 2005 to June 2006 among patients with liver abscess that were treated conservatively outside and got admitted in different surgery and medicine units. Included 35 patients were evaluated clinically and through relevant investigations. Sono-guided percutaneous pigtail catheter was introduced for drainage and patients were followed up for two weeks on average at hospital indoor by amount of drainage, clinical improvement and serial follow up USG. After discharge from the hospital, all patients were followed up monthly and assessed clinically and ultrasonographically up to two months on outdoor basis. Thirty five patients underwent pigtail catheter drainage that was refractory to conservative treatment or needle aspiration. Following insertion of catheter patients who were pyrexic, fever subsided in two to three days and never back during the postoperative period and follow up. Antimicrobials were changed according to the report of the culture and sensitivity of the aspirate that was done routinely. Maximum total (4300ml) amount of pus was drained in a patient. Average duration of catheter drainage in this study was 8 days. With a very low morbidity and zero mortality rates, minimum treatment costs and early return to regular life style proved this minimally invasive procedure to be a rational treatment option for amoebic liver abscess in selective cases. PMID:26620018

  7. Coccidioides parenchymal cerebral abscess in the setting of lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Motley, Benjamin D; Grabowski, Matthew; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides immitis is a dimorphic fungus endemic to southwestern United States of America. When symptomatic, infection usually results in a subacute respiratory infection. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis occurs in less than 1% of all cases. We report a patient with follicular lymphoma and recent travel to Arizona, who underwent resection of a cerebral Coccidioides abscess. Serology testing was negative. This case highlights the importance of clinical suspicion in patients with neurologic symptoms and travel to an endemic location. PMID:25124645

  8. BCG vaccination as a cause of osteomyelitis and subcutaneous abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, H; Salmi, I; Vahvanen, V; Ahlqvist, J

    1984-01-01

    Ten patients with osteomyelitis and three with a subcutaneous abscess, all caused by BCG vaccination, are described. All patients were less than 3 years old and had as newborns been vaccinated intracutaneously in the left gluteal or hip area. Pain, limping, or a slightly tender subcutaneous induration were the primary symptoms. The sites of predilection of osteomyelitis were the metaphysis or epiphysis of the femur, these being affected in five out of 10 cases. All three subcutaneous abscesses were in the thoracic region. Prolonged (up to 30 months) combined tuberculostatic medication, in addition to appropriate surgical procedures, resulted in healing, but two cases of arthritis and two of secondary abscesses developed. In addition, sequestrectomy and two late operations, for coxa valga and hip subluxation, were deemed to be necessary. Radiographs showed femoral overgrowth of up to 1 cm in two symptomless patients three to seven years after the first discharge. We conclude that the benefits of BCG vaccination should be weighed against the risk of complications, especially in countries with a low incidence of tuberculosis. PMID:6703766

  9. Disseminated necrotic mediastinitis spread from odontogenic abscess: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Filiaci, Fabio; Riccardi, Emiliano; Mitro, Valeria; Piombino, Pasquale; Rinna, Claudio; Agrillo, Alessandro; Ungari, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aims Deep neck infections are rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. Mediastinitis is a severe inflammatory process involving the connective tissues that fills the intracellular spaces and surrounds the organs in the middle of the chest. This pathology has both an acute and a chronic form and, in most cases, it has an infectious etiology. This study want to expose the experience acquired in the Oral and Maxillo-facial Sciences Department, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, regarding two clinical cases of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis starting from an odontogenic abscess. Methods We report two clinical cases of disseminated necrotic mediastinitis with two different medical and surgical approaches. The radiographic and photographic documentation of the patients was collected in the pre-and post-operatively. All patients underwent a CT scan and MRI. Results Mediastinitis can result from a serious odontogenic abscess, and the extent of its inflammation process must be never underestimated. Dental surgeons play a key role as a correct diagnosis can prevent further increasing of the inflammation process. Conclusions A late diagnosis and an inadequate draining represent the major causes of the elevated mortality rate of disseminated necrotizing mediastinitis. PMID:26330907

  10. [Endocavitary drainage (Monaldi's technic) in the treatment of pulmonary abscess].

    PubMed

    Vergeret, J; Dabadie, P; Dupon, M; Maurette, P; Taytard, A; Chevais, R

    1983-01-01

    The technique of intracavitary aspiration introduced by Monaldi in 1938 in the treatment of tuberculous cavities and then applied by him in the treatment of lung abscesses was forgotten for nearly 30 years. The advent of antibiotics and their success explain its abandonment. It may take an important place again in the treatment of difficult cases, as a last resort, after failure of properly conducted classical medical treatment. A study of 20 hospitalised patients in an intensive care unit presenting with severe pulmonary abscesses demonstrates this point. After recalling the causes, the therapeutic difficulties and the complications of these abscesses, the authors describe the medications, the method of endocavitary drainage and the technical problems posed by its use in patients often artificially ventilated. The absence of any major dangers inherent in using this technique is also discussed. Finally the short (one month) and long term (20 months) results were analysed. Three deaths occurred during the initial period, although largely explained by associated lesions in these patients. The other 17 patients, of whom 11 were followed up for more than six months, had a satisfactory outcome from the respiratory stand-point. The disappearance of all signs of infection was constantly obtained and in only four patients the bullous cavities persisted. The authors conclude by attesting the efficacy of the technique and its low risk often in the most critically ill patients. PMID:6878847

  11. Renal abscesses in childhood: report of two uncommon cases

    PubMed Central

    Cancelinha, Candida; Santos, Lea; Ferreira, Carmen; Gomes, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Renal abscesses are rare conditions in children, but they must be remembered in differential diagnosis of fever and abdominal pain. The authors report two paediatric cases with unusual presentation. Case 1: a 15-year-old girl was admitted following a period of fever, vomiting and left hypochondrium pain which became more localised to the left lower ribs. Blood tests suggested bacterial infection, but urinalysis and culture were negative. Renal CT scan presented features of bilateral pyelonephritis and left renal abscesses, while ultrasound remained normal until the ninth day of disease. Case 2: a 2-year-old girl, with diagnosis of β-thalassemia minor, had intermittent diffuse abdominal pain with 2 weeks of evolution. Renal ultrasonography and CT scan showed a heterogeneous mass compatible with Willms tumour. Intraoperative diagnosis was compatible with renal abscess with isolation of Proteus mirabilis in the fluid. Both responded well to long-term antibiotics and to surgical drainage (in the second case). PMID:24671317

  12. Spinal surgery: an unusual case of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Kevin A

    2009-01-01

    Southeast Missouri Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, admitted a patient from an outside hospital with back pain and progressive quadriparesis. Imaging revealed an extensive spinal epidural abscess that extended from the craniocervical junction to the sacral spine. Because of the patient's critical condition and the need to minimize the duration of surgery and anesthesia, two surgical teams simultaneously operated on the patient on the day of admission. One team performed a decompressive laminectomy of C1 through C7 and T1 through T6, while the other team performed, through a separate skin incision, a decompressive laminectomy on T11, L2, L3, and L4 as well as partial evacuation of a psoas abscess. The extensive laminectomies were required due to the adherent granulomatous nature of the abscess. Simple irrigation and intraoperative aspiration with suction was ineffective. The patient remained in the hospital for approximately three weeks and was discharged to a long-term acute care facility. Over the next five months her motor function gradually improved and she was discharged to home. Currently, she remains at home, free of significant pain and able to ambulate independently. PMID:19753924

  13. Multiple Amoebic Liver Abscess As Initial Manifestation in Hiv Sero-Positive Male

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is the most frequent extra-intestinal manifestation of Entamoeba histolytica infection. Immunosuppression is known to predispose to amoebic liver abscess. Although amoebic liver abscess is seen more commonly in patients of Human-Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), first presentation of HIV sero-positive patient as multiple liver abscess is quite uncommon.The author reports an unusual case of multiple liver abscesses in an HIV seropositive patient. This middle aged male with history of multiple unprotected sexual encounters presented with spasmodic abdominal pain, fever, diarrhoea and weight loss along with generalised ill-health and painful liver enlargement. HIV-1 serology was found to be reactive. Imaging revealed an enlarged liver with multiple, irregular, hypoechoic foci characteristic of abscesses. Amoebic aetiology was later confirmed by percutaneous aspiration and microscopy. Administration of appropriate chemotherapeutics along with institution of antiretroviral therapy led to both clinical resolution as well as disappearance of lesions. PMID:26266151

  14. Use of indium-111-labeled autologous leukocytes in differentiating pancreatic abscess from pseudocyst

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, T.A.; Kohatsu, S.; Goodwin, D.A.

    1981-09-01

    Pancreatic abscess is very difficult to diagnose and the differentiate from pancreatic pseudocyst based on clinical findings, laboratory studies and roentgenographic examinations. Eight patients diagnosed as having a pancreatic mass by ultrasonography or computed tomography also underwent indium-111-labeled autologous leukocyte scanning (10 scans) for suspected intraabdominal sepsis. This scan detects migration of labeled leukocytes into abscesses or areas of inflammation. Four patients had abscess and positive scans, and four patients had pseudocyst and negative scans. There was one false-positive scan in a patient with a recurrent pancreatic mass after drainage of an abscess. Since pancreatic abscess requires prompt drainage, and since it may be preferable to delay drainage of a pseudocyst, the differentiation of these two conditions is important. This test appears very effective in diagnosing pancreatic abscess and differentiating it from a pseudocyst.

  15. Nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles are therapeutic for Staphylococcus aureus abscesses in a murine model of infection.

    PubMed

    Han, George; Martinez, Luis R; Mihu, Mircea Radu; Friedman, Adam J; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a leading cause of a diverse spectrum of bacterial diseases, including abscesses. Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical component of the natural host defense against pathogens such as SA, but its therapeutic applications have been limited by a lack of effective delivery options. We tested the efficacy of a NO-releasing nanoparticle system (NO-np) in methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA) abscesses in mice. The results show that the NO-np exert antimicrobial activity against MRSA in vitro and in abscesses. Topical or intradermal NO-np treatment of abscesses reduces the involved area and bacterial load while improving skin architecture. Notably, we evaluated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that are involved in immunomodulation and wound healing, revealing that NO-np lead to a reduction in angiogenesis preventing bacterial dissemination from abscesses. These data suggest that NO-np may be useful therapeutics for microbial abscesses. PMID:19915659

  16. Comparative imaging in the evaluation of hepatic abscesses in immunocompromised children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three children, two with aplastic anemia and one with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood, were evaluated for hepatic abscess with hepatic scintigraphy (HS), gray-scale sonography (GSS), 67Ga imaging (GA), and computed tomography (CT). Each of the children was found to harbor two abscesses. All were detected with GSS and CT. In the two children imaged with GA, all four abscesses were seen. In two patients imaged twice with HS, 50% of the lesions were missed.

  17. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning. False-negative study in a renal abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Bedi, D.G.; Fawcett, H.D.; Winsett, M.Z.; Fagan, C.J.

    1986-04-01

    A 33-year-old man had clinical features of a right renal abscess. Results of excretory urography and ultrasonography showed a focal complex mass lesion in the right kidney. An In-111 leukocyte scan failed to detect the right renal abscess, which later was aspirated under CT guidance and explored surgically. The role of In-111 leukocyte imaging in the detection of intra-abdominal abscesses, with limitations of the procedure, is discussed.

  18. Two unusual nerve abscesses--lepromatous leprosy and pure neural leprosy: case reports.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G R; Ramana, P V; Vasundhara, N; Reddy, M K

    1996-09-01

    We report two cases of nerve abscesses, one suffering from lepromatous leprosy (LL) and the other from tuberculoid neural leprosy. Neither had any signs of reactions. Both were untreated cases. Surgical nerve decompression and systemic prednisolone had resolved the nerve abscess in the first case, whereas the second one responded only to surgical nerve decompression. The unusual nature of clinical presentation of nerve abscess has been outlined. PMID:8885616

  19. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of myocardial abscess formation in patients with endocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, M.D.; Jacobson, A.F.

    1989-05-01

    Myocardial abscess formation in patients with bacterial endocarditis in most clinical settings, especially in patients with prosthetic valves, is a primary indicator for surgical valve replacement. We report the detection of myocardial abscesses using /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy in three patients with prosthetic or native valve endocarditis and nondiagnostic echocardiograms. Leukocyte scintigraphy may allow identification of myocardial abscess formation earlier than other imaging modalities.

  20. Sporotrichoid pattern of nerve abscesses in borderline tuberculoid leprosy: A Case Report (sporotrichoid like abscesses in leprosy).

    PubMed

    Garg, G; Thami, G P; Mohan, H

    2014-01-01

    Linear distribution of multiple subcutaneous nodules or ulcers along the course of lymphatics, classically seen in lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis, has been observed in a number of other infections like localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, cutaneous tuberculous and non tuberculous mycobacterial infections, Pasteurella tularensis, Scopulariopsis blochi, Nocardia brasiliensis, yaws and syphilis. A case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with multiple cutaneous nodules corresponding to resolving nerve abscesses in a sporotrichoid pattern is being reported. PMID:26411249

  1. Liver hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by ingested fish bones: surgical management of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Matrella, Fulvio; Piardi, Tullio; Dokmak, Safi; Bruno, Onorina; Maestraggi, Quentin; Kianmanesh, Reza; Sommacale, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Several hepatobiliary complications secondary to gastrointestinal perforation after ingestion of a fish bone have been described in the literature, the most common being liver abscess, which can be potentially fatal. Treatment involves removal of the foreign body if possible (endoscopically or surgically), drainage of the abscess (radiologically or surgically), and appropriate antibiotic therapy. To our knowledge, no cases of hepatic hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by a fish bone have been described in the literature. We report surgical management of two cases of abscess localized in the hepatic hilum secondary to the ingestion of fish bones. PMID:25019078

  2. Multiple Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis with Bilateral Psoas Abscesses Accompanying Osteomyelitis of Lateral Malleolus - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Jin; Park, Woo-Sung; Jin, Jong-Mun; Song, Ha Hun

    2008-01-01

    A psoas abscess is a potentially life-threatening infection. Multiple pyogenic spondylodiscitis with bilateral psoas abscesses accompanying an osteomyelitis of the lateral malleolus is an extremely rare event. We present our experience with needle aspiration for the treatment of osteomyelitis of the lateral malleolus and CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage for a psoas abscess in an elderly patient. Both infections were completely resolved without recurrence. A psoas abscess should be included in the differential diagnosis of a patient with low back pain during musculoskeletal infection. Percutaneous needle aspiration or CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage is an effective method for treating certain musculoskeletal infections. PMID:20404964

  3. Ultrasonography and indium 111 white blood cell scanning for the detection of intraabdominal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, B.; Silverman, P.M.; Goodwin, D.A.; McDougall, I.R.

    1981-07-01

    Ultrasound and indium 111 white blood cell scanning were performed on 163 patients with suspected intraabdominal abscesses. In all but one case, intraabdominal abscesses were correctly identified by one or both tests; conversely, no patient was falsely diagnosed by both tests to have an abscess. Sonography was useful in those patients with focal symptoms, and frequently identified nonabscess causes for fever. White cell scanning was valuable when focal signs were absent, and frequently identified extraabdominal sources of sepsis. The two imaging modalities are complementary and provide a highly accurate and sensitive means of intraabdominal abscess detection.

  4. Indium-111 labeled leukocytes in the evaluation of suspected abdominal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.E.; Black, R.E.; Welch, D.M.; Maxwell, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-eight indium-111-labeled leukocyte imaging studies were performed in 53 patients with suspected abdominal abscesses. Twenty-nine studies gave abnormal results. Nine wound infections were demonstrated, and 14 abscesses were correctly identified. Four studied demonstrated colonic accumulation, one of which remains unexplained, and two accessory spleens were identified. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging is a sensitive and specific study in evaluating patients with suspected abdominal abscess. Differentiation of abscess from other causes of inflammation has not been a problem. The exact role of leukocyte imaging compared with gallium-67 citrate imaging, ultrasound and computerized tomography remains to be determined.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of intra-abdominal abscess in critically ill patients

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.K.; Hahn, H.H.

    1982-04-01

    Intra-abdominal abscess remains a challenging clinical problem. Patients are frequently critically ill with major organ system failure. An aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic approach is mandated. Application of newer imaging techniques should allow a better than 90 per cent accuracy of abscess localization. Clearer definition of the abscess cavity by ultrasound or computerized tomography facilitates planning of surgical drainage route preoperatively. Ultrasound and computerized tomography have also allowed directed percutaneous aspiration of intra-abdominal fluid collections for diagnosis. In selected patients, percutaneous drainage has the proven capability to completely resolve a large percentage of intra-abdominal abscesses. Final application of this technique awaits further study.

  6. Liver hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by ingested fish bones: surgical management of two cases.

    PubMed

    Matrella, Fulvio; Lhuaire, Martin; Piardi, Tullio; Dokmak, Safi; Bruno, Onorina; Maestraggi, Quentin; Kianmanesh, Reza; Sommacale, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several hepatobiliary complications secondary to gastrointestinal perforation after ingestion of a fish bone have been described in the literature, the most common being liver abscess, which can be potentially fatal. Treatment involves removal of the foreign body if possible (endoscopically or surgically), drainage of the abscess (radiologically or surgically), and appropriate antibiotic therapy. To our knowledge, no cases of hepatic hilar abscesses secondary to gastrointestinal perforation by a fish bone have been described in the literature. We report surgical management of two cases of abscess localized in the hepatic hilum secondary to the ingestion of fish bones. PMID:25019078

  7. Cervical Epidural Abscess: Rare Complication of Bacterial Endocarditis with Streptococcus Viridans: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Although many patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complain of joint, muscle, and back pain, infections at these sights are rare. The incidence of spinal abscess in cervical spine complicating endocarditis is very rare. Although the surgical management is the mainstay of treatment, conservative treatment can get success in selected patients. We report a patient with cervical epidural abscess due to Streptococcus viridans endocarditis. Both epidural abscess and IE were managed conservatively with intravenous antibiotics for 8 weeks, with recovery. It is important to remind spinal epidural abscess can occur in those patients with bacterial endocarditis. PMID:25883665

  8. Retroperitoneal abscess resulting from perforated retrocecal appendicitis:a case report.

    PubMed

    Ofrim, O I; Legrand, M J

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal abscess secondary to acute appendicitis is a relatively rare, but serious surgical infection. Adequate drainage and coverage with the appropriate antibiotics has led to improved outcome of retroperitoneal abscesses in recent years. We report the case of a 52 years old patient operated in emergency for perforated retrocecal appendicitis. A retroperitoneal abscess was diagnosed 5 days later, by computed tomography. The drainage of the abscess and the antibiotic therapy have ensured the total recovery of the patient. The alternatives of therapy are discussed. PMID:23741936

  9. Two rare manifestations of Q fever: splenic and hepatic abscesses and cerebral venous thrombosis, with literature review ma non troppo

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Manuel Mendes; Chaves, Andreia; Gouveia, Ana; Santos, Lèlita

    2014-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. It often manifests as a flu-like syndrome; other common manifestations are pneumonia, hepatitis and endocarditis. Its course may be acute or chronic. The authors present two clinical cases of Q fever with rare manifestations. Case 1: A 55-year-old man admitted due to abdominal pain, diarrhoea and fever. Blood tests showed elevated transaminases, low platelets and elevated C reactive protein, with normal white cell counts; abdominal ultrasound showed splenic and hepatic abscesses. Serologies to C burnetii were positive (1:640), leading to the diagnosis of Q fever with splenic and hepatic abscesses. Case 2: A 47-year-old man admitted due to headache after sneezing, with unstable gait and vertigo. A brain tomography showed cerebral venous thrombosis. After an exhaustive investigation, antibodies to C burnetii were found and were undoubtedly positive (1:5120), leading to the diagnosis of Q fever. Both patients were treated with oral doxycycline. PMID:24501338

  10. Epidemiology, Clinical Features and Outcome of Liver Abscess: A single Reference Center Experience in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Mushtak Talib; Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Muhsin, Saif A.; Al-Dehwe, Baidaa; Abukamar, Mohamed; Elzouki, Abdel-Naser

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the etiology, clinical presentation, management and outcome of liver abscess in adult patients admitted at Hamad general hospital, Qatar. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted to involve all adult patients who sequentially encountered episodes of liver abscess during the period from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010. Blood cultures were drawn from all patients in the first 24 hours after admission. In addition, all patients had stool examinations and indirect Hemagglutination test for Entameba histolytica. Aspiration of abscess was done under CT guidance and aspirated pus was sent for gram stain and culture. Results In total, 67 patients were admitted with liver abscess; 56 patients with pyogenic liver abscess and 11 with amebic liver abscess. There were 61 (91%) males and six (9%) females and their mean age was 47.4 ± 18.5 years. Fever, abdominal pain and vomiting were the commonest presenting features. Of the 56 pyogenic liver abscess patients, four discharged against medical advice and seven refused all invasive procedures and were treated with antibiotics for six weeks. The remaining 44 (79%) patients were treated with antibiotics and one or more invasive procedures, while one patient was treated surgically. The commonest organism isolated was Klebseilla pneumonia found in 21 patients (38%). The mean duration of hospitalization was 13.6 ± 8.1 days; the mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 34.7 ± 40.6 days, and one patient died. In contrast, all amebic liver abscess patients underwent ultrasound guided aspiration and showed good response to metronidazole treatment. Their mean duration of hospitalization was 7.7 ± 4.1 days, mean duration of therapy was 11.8 ± 2.1 days, and all patients were cured. Conclusion Pyogenic liver abscess was more common than amebic liver abscess with Klebseilla pneumonia being the commonest organism. With good medical measures and early drainage of liver abscess, surgical intervention was unnecessary in almost all the cases. PMID:25170406

  11. Unusual Presentation of Recurrent Pyogenic Bilateral Psoas Abscess Causing Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism by Iliac Vein Compression

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Sakam, Sailaja; Ashraf, Umair; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 47 Final Diagnosis: Bilateral psoas abscess • acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis • bilateral pulmonary embolism Symptoms: Progressive left leg swelling • productive cough with whitish sputum • right flank pain Medication: Antibiotics and anticoagulation Clinical Procedure: CT-guided percutaneous drain placement Specialty: Internal Medicine/Critical Care Objective: Unusual presentation Background: Psoas abscesses are a known cause of back pain, but they have not been reported as a cause of acute lower extremity thromboses and bilateral pulmonary emboli. We report a patient with bilateral psoas abscesses causing extensive pulmonary emboli through compression of the iliac vein. Case Report: A 47-year-old man presented with bilateral leg swelling over 4 weeks. Physical examination revealed a thin male with bilateral leg swelling, extending to the thigh on his left side. He had hemoglobin of 10.5 g/dl, leukocytosis of 16 000/ml, and an elevated D-dimer. A computed tomography (CT) angiogram of his chest showed extensive bilateral pulmonary emboli and infarcts. He remained febrile with vague flank pain, prompting a CT of his abdomen and pelvis that showed large, multiloculated, septated, bilateral psoas abscesses with compression of the left femoral vein by the left psoas abscess and a thrombus distal to the occlusion. Two liters of pus was drained from the left psoas abscess by CT-guidance, and although the Gram staining showed Gram-positive cocci in clusters, cultures from the abscess and blood were negative. A repeat CT showed resolution of the abscesses, and the drain was removed. He was discharged to a nursing home to complete a course of intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulation. Conclusions: Although the infectious complications of psoas abscesses have been described in the literature, the mechanical complications of bilateral psoas abscesses are lacking. It is important to assess for complete resolution of psoas abscesses through follow-up imaging to prevent venous thromboembolic events. PMID:26356406

  12. Tuberculous Liver Abscess in an Immunocompetent Patient: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Toolabi, Karamollah; Tehrani, Shabnam; Hemmatian, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous or tubercular liver abscess (TLA) is a rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass or cystic lesions of the liver especially in a high TB prevalence country like Iran. Case Presentation We report an immunocompetent 48 year-old woman with TLA and peritoneal infection. Although hepatic TLA is very rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass or cystic lesions of the liver especially in a high TB prevalence country. PMID:25713592

  13. Cutaneous abscess caused by Corynebacterium lactis in a companion dog.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Simpson-Louredo, Liliane; Santos, Cíntia Silva; Hirata, Raphael; Ferioli, Raquel Beneton; Romera, Adriana Resmond Cruz; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-07-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. Corynebacterium lactis, a recently described species of the genus Corynebacterium, was first isolated from milk of asymptomatic cows. In the present study a cutaneous abscess caused by C. lactis in a dog was recognized by cytologic and histologic examination in addition to 16S rRNA gene analysis of the microorganism. Therefore, C. lactis should be included among other bacterial species recognized as emerging pathogens for companion animals. PMID:25937144

  14. Staphylococcus lugdunensis abscesses complicating molluscum contagiosum in two children.

    PubMed

    Lacour, Marc; Posfay-Barbe, Klara Maria; La Scala, Giorgio Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We report the occurrence of Staphylococcus lugdunensis abscesses in two girls with molluscum contagiosum who both required surgical intervention under general anaesthesia. S. lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus recently recognized as an emerging human pathogen. Because of its ubiquitous nature and the high prevalence of molluscum contagiosum in children, it is likely that this as yet unreported association may be underestimated, thus raising the question as to whether bacterial culture of superinfected mollusca should be obtained more often. PMID:25557353

  15. Pancreatic and Colonic Abscess Formation Secondary to HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, James M; Pursell, Nicole; Fumia, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia and the variant HELLP syndrome are systemic conditions associated with vascular changes resulting in vasoconstriction. Most commonly, patients present with elevated blood pressure and proteinuria, with a background of complaints such as headache, scotoma, and right upper quadrant pain. The systemic vascular changes experienced can target any organ system, oftentimes with more than one organ system being involved. We present the case of a patient admitted with HELLP syndrome who subsequently developed multisystem organ dysfunction, including placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, acute renal failure, colitis, abdominal ascites, pancreatitis, and the development of pancreatic and colonic abscesses. PMID:26064725

  16. Pancreatic and Colonic Abscess Formation Secondary to HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fumia, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia and the variant HELLP syndrome are systemic conditions associated with vascular changes resulting in vasoconstriction. Most commonly, patients present with elevated blood pressure and proteinuria, with a background of complaints such as headache, scotoma, and right upper quadrant pain. The systemic vascular changes experienced can target any organ system, oftentimes with more than one organ system being involved. We present the case of a patient admitted with HELLP syndrome who subsequently developed multisystem organ dysfunction, including placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, acute renal failure, colitis, abdominal ascites, pancreatitis, and the development of pancreatic and colonic abscesses. PMID:26064725

  17. A Case of Liver Abscess with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Koyano, Saho; Tatsuno, Keita; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio spp. are gram-negative, sulfate-reducing, and anaerobic bacteria found in the digestive tract of humans. Because Desulfovibrio spp. are infrequent causative agents of infectious diseases and are difficult to isolate and to identify from clinical specimens, the appropriate antibiotic therapy to infection with Desulfovibrio spp. has not been determined. We report the first case of liver abscess with bacteremia due to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to show the clinical presentation and treatment. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam and oral amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. PMID:25632357

  18. The warm sacroiliac joint. A finding in pelvic abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, J.D. Jr.; Epstein, N.; Negrin, J.A.; Spencer, R.P. )

    1990-09-01

    Two patients with pain referable to the low back and sacroiliac regions had bone scans with similar findings. In each, one sacroiliac joint was warm (uptake on that side was slightly greater than that in the contralateral area). Ga-67 imaging also demonstrated increased uptake in the same locale. Subsequent CT scanning revealed pelvic abscesses adjacent to the affected joints. Asymmetric uptake of bone imaging agent may have been related to hyperemia and heating of the sacroiliac joint. Rapid defervescence with antibiotics and drainage (and no CT evidence of bone involvement) suggested that osteomyelitis was not involved in these cases.

  19. Tattooing: A potential novel risk factor for iliopsoas abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sweny; Jain, Ankur; Sattari, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Iliopsoas abscess (IPA) is an uncommon infection. The clinical presentation is usually insidious. Most patients present with nonspecific symptoms, leading to difficulty in prompt and accurate diagnosis. Delay in diagnosis can lead to complications, such as sepsis and death. Tattooing has become more popular over the recent years and has been associated with tattooing-related and blood-borne infections. We present two related cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus IPA after tattooing and review the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and management of IPA. PMID:25232550

  20. [A subcutaneous thoracic abscess due to the aspiration of an ear of grain].

    PubMed

    Murgoci, G

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with a child aged 9 years, with spastic then productive cough and moderate haemoptysis. X-ray picture shows a condensation process at the bottom of the right hemothorax. A subcutaneous abscess is registered 10 days after hospitalization. At the abscess incision, a wheatear inhaled previously by the child is found out. PMID:1342810

  1. Genome Sequence of the Human Abscess Isolate Streptococcus intermedius BA1.

    PubMed

    Planet, Paul J; Rampersaud, Ryan; Hymes, Saul R; Whittier, Susan; Della-Latta, Phyllis A; Narechania, Apurva; Daugherty, Sean C; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Desalle, Robert; Ravel, Jacques; Ratner, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a human pathogen with a propensity for abscess formation. We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of S. intermedius strain BA1, an isolate from a human epidural abscess. This sequence provides insight into the biology of S. intermedius and will aid investigations of pathogenicity. PMID:23405291

  2. Clinicopathological study and management of liver abscess in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amitesh Kumar; Das, Anjan; Chowdhury, Firoz; Biswas, Madhuri Ranjana; Prasad, Sanjay Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Liver abscess is a burning problem in tropical nations, with often lethal consequences and diagnostic/therapeutic challenges. We have determined etiopathology, clinical, radiological, and bacteriological characteristics of this condition and review its management strategies. Materials and Methods: During the period of the month from May 2007 to September 2009, a prospective study was performed involving 125 patients admitted to the in-patient ward of the Department of General Surgery of N.R.S Medical College their diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical features (such as right upper abdomen pain, and fever), laboratory investigations and radiological evidence of liver abscess. Results: Amoebic liver abscess was the most common (88%) type of liver abscess among the study groups. There was a strong correlation with the occurrence of liver abscesses and addiction to alcohol, history of diabetes mellitus and low socioeconomic status. The most common etiology of pyogenic liver abscess was Escherichia coli. Ultrasonography (USG) of the abdomen was accurate and cost-effective in diagnosis of liver abscesses. Percutaneous catheter drainage was the most effective method of treatment (with a 100% success rate). Conclusion: Most patients in our study had liver abscess of amoebic origin and had temporal relationship with diabetes, alcoholism, and staggering socioeconomic status. We suggest early recognition of clinical features and prompt abdominal USG as cost-effective means for treatment initiation and reducing complications. PMID:25810638

  3. Klebsiella pneumonia-induced prostate abscess: How to work it up?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hoen; Yang, Won Jae; Kim, Tae Hyong

    2014-01-01

    Introducton: Klebsiella pneumonia (KP) is related to a metastatic phenomenon from the originally affected primary organ. About 28% of patients with pyogenic liver abscess arising from KP suffer from metastatic complications. This study was done to define the clinical features of KP-induced prostate abscess. Methods: A total of 14 patients were diagnosed with prostate abscess based on clinical, laboratory examination and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan from 2007 to 2013. Results: Among these 14 patients, KP was the dominant causative microorganism in 6 patients (42.9%), followed by Esherchia coli in 2, Pseudomonas aeroginosa in 1, methicillin-resistant Staphyolcoccus aureus in 1, and no growth in either the urine or blood culture in 4. Four (66.7%) of the 6 KP induced-prostate abscess had other concurrent abscess sites besides the prostate: liver in 3, kidney in 1, and perianal area with endogenous endophthalmitis that ended in loss of vision in 1 patient. Conclusions: We report on the clinical features of KP-induced prostate abscess based on a small number of patients, which is the main limitation of our study. We believe that if the causative organism of a prostate abscess was KP, more workup would be needed to rule out the presence of an abscess in other organs, especially in the liver. Abdominopelvic CT scan would be a proper imaging modality. PMID:25485013

  4. Tuberculous abscess of the thyroid gland: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mandeep; Ojili, Vijayanadh; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Bhansali, Anil

    2006-06-01

    Tuberculosis of the thyroid gland is very rare, with an acute abscess formation being the least common form of presentation. We report the sono-graphic features of two cases of tuberculous thyroid abscess that were confirmed via ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:16673371

  5. Incidental Diagnosis of Appendiceal Abscess by Colonoscopy; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ramin; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Although complicated acute appendicitis is occasionally observed in general practice, the diagnosis of appendiceal abscess by colonoscopy is unusual. We report a case of appendiceal abscess with spontaneous drainage into the lumen of colon diagnosed during colonoscopy and resolved by the time of surgery. PMID:26106469

  6. Abdominal computed tomography for postoperative abscess: is it useful during the first week?

    PubMed

    Antevil, Jared L; Egan, John C; Woodbury, Robert O; Rivera, Louis; Oreilly, Eamon B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2006-06-01

    While classic teaching dictates computed tomography (CT) for postoperative abdominal or pelvic abscess in the first week is of low yield, little evidence supports intentional delays in imaging for suspected abscess. This retrospective review examined all CT scans obtained for clinical suspicion of abscess between 3 and 30 days after abdominal or pelvic operation over a 3-year period. Scans were grouped into those obtained between 3 and 7 days after surgery (EARLY) and those obtained after day 7 (LATE). Diagnostic yield was compared between EARLY and LATE groups. Of 262 CT examinations (EARLY, n = 106; LATE, n = 156), 71 studies (27%) demonstrated abscess. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic yield of CT for abscess between EARLY and LATE groups (23% [24 of 106] versus 30% [47 of 156], P = 0.18). Of patients with an abscess, 63% (45 of 71) underwent percutaneous or operative drainage (EARLY 75% [18 of 24], LATE 57% [27 of 47], P = 0.15). Abdominal CT for postoperative abscess can be expected to be diagnostic in a substantial proportion of cases in the first week, the majority of which lead to percutaneous or operative drainage. Postoperative CT for intra-abdominal abscess should be obtained as clinically indicated, regardless of interval from surgery. PMID:16769549

  7. Gliosarcoma developing in close relationship to an abscess cavity injected with thorotrast

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, P.M.; Barber, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    A case of an unusual tumor developing at the site of an abscess is reported. The tumor presented 21 years after burr hole drainage of the abscess and instillation of the contrast medium thorotrast. The bizarre nature of the tumor and its immediate proximity to the thorotrast lead the authors to believe that the tumor was caused by the contrast medium.

  8. Diagnosis of a liver abscess with Ga-67 and radiocolloid tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sangar, V.K.; Gini, A.; Fuentes, R.T.; Holmes, R.A.

    1989-06-01

    A 46 year-old white male with fever of unknown origin demonstrated a multiloculated hepatic cyst on abdominal CT. Persistent fever and leukocytosis prompted Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver-spleen and gallium-67 citrate imaging to identify a possible liver abscess. SPECT imaging provided pertinent clinical information that allowed the diagnosis of abscess to be made.

  9. Liver Abscess Caused by magA+ Klebsiella pneumoniae in North America

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.; Sandler, Netanya; Libby, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Taiwan has witnessed an emerging syndrome of liver abscess caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying the magA gene required for exopolysaccharide web biosynthesis. We report a patient transferred from Alaska to Washington State with a magA+ K. pneumoniae liver abscess and describe a simple approach for recognition of these hypervirulent strains. PMID:15695726

  10. Streptobacillus moniliformis as the causative agent in spondylodiscitis and psoas abscess after rooster scratches.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Damien; Robin, Frédéric; Bouvier, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Bonnet, Richard; Lesens, Olivier; Hennequin, Claire

    2008-08-01

    We report a case of Streptobacillus moniliformis spondylodiscitis accompanied by a psoas abscess in an 80-year-old man scratched by a rooster. S. moniliformis was identified from abscess fluid by use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. After 18 weeks of antimicrobial therapy, the clinical condition of the patient improved. PMID:18562588

  11. Indium-111 labeled leukocyte images demonstrating a lung abscess with prominent fluid level

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, J.D.; Winer-Muram, H.

    1986-08-01

    In-111 labeled leukocyte images show an abscess cavity with a fluid level on 24-hour upright images. Fluid levels, frequently seen on radiographs, are uncommon on nuclear images. This finding demonstrates rapid migration of labeled leukocytes into purulent abscess fluid.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepatic and perihepatic abscess drainage: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Lane, Devin; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Interventional radiology-guided percutaneous drainage of liver abscesses with concomitant use of antibiotics has been the conventional approach for the treatment of liver abscesses. Hepatic abscesses refractory or not amenable to percutaneous drainage have been treated with surgical drainage, either via laparoscopic or open laparotomy techniques. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage of liver abscesses. A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing the technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided liver abscess drainage. The indications, techniques, endoprostheses, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of seven cases have been described so far in the literature which included patients with failed conventional treatment modalities. The EUS-guided drainage technique involves puncturing the abscess using endosonography to gain access, passing a guidewire followed by tract dilation and placement of an endoprosthesis for drainage. Studies have reported 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No complications were reported. EUS-guided drainage of liver abscesses can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of liver abscesses in selected patients. PMID:24587822

  13. Streptobacillus moniliformis as the Causative Agent in Spondylodiscitis and Psoas Abscess after Rooster Scratches?

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Damien; Robin, Frédéric; Bouvier, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Bonnet, Richard; Lesens, Olivier; Hennequin, Claire

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of Streptobacillus moniliformis spondylodiscitis accompanied by a psoas abscess in an 80-year-old man scratched by a rooster. S. moniliformis was identified from abscess fluid by use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. After 18 weeks of antimicrobial therapy, the clinical condition of the patient improved. PMID:18562588

  14. Laparoscopic Management of Tubo-Ovarian Stitch Abscess after Tubal Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Ghongdemath, Jyoti S; Shindholimath, Vishwanath V; Krishna, L

    2011-01-01

    Tubo-ovarian abscess usually results from ascending infection of the lower genital tract. In few cases, it can occur as a result of direct contamination at the time of tubal sterilization. We describe two rare cases of “tubo-ovarian stitch abscess” after post-partum tubal sterilization and managed successfully by laparoscopy at a tertiary care teaching hospital. PMID:26085757

  15. Pyogenic liver abscess and the emergence of Klebsiella as an etiology: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmad H; Smalligan, Roger D; Ahmed, Mashrafi; Khasawneh, Faisal A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) is a significant, though uncommon, cause of morbidity in the United States. Recently, Klebsiella has emerged as an important cause of PLA. We analyzed the clinical course, microbiology, and treatment outcomes of patients discharged with PLA. In addition, we sought to examine the incidence of and risk factors for Klebsiella liver abscess (KLA). Methods We reviewed the charts of patients who discharged with PLA from two teaching hospitals in West Texas between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011. Results We identified 49 cases of PLA. Abscess cultures were positive in 23 (48%) patients. The mean age of the cohort was 56 years (range: 20–83 years). Sixty percent were male. The most frequent conditions associated with PLA were intra-abdominal infections (ten cases; 20%), diabetes mellitus (nine cases; 18%) and malignancy (nine cases; 18%). Klebsiella was the most commonly isolated species from the abscess cultures (seven cases; 30% of all positive abscess cultures). We used univariate and logistic regression analyses to identify the risk factors for KLA. Controlling for age, only malignancy was identified in our cohort as a risk factor for a Klebsiella liver abscess. The overall mortality was 2%. Conclusion Klebsiella is emerging as an important cause of liver abscesses. Malignancy may be an important risk factor for Klebsiella liver abscess. PMID:24379693

  16. Percutaneous needle aspiration in uncomplicated amebic liver abscess: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Bammigatti, Chanaveerappa; Ramasubramanian, N S; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess develops in less than 1% of patients with amoebaisis and metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of amebic liver abscess. Abscesses of less than 5 cm can be treated with metronidazole alone. However, abscesses of more than 10 cm must undergo ultrasound guided percutaneous needle aspiration along with metronidazole. The role of percutaneous needle aspiration in abscesses of 5 to 10 cm is not clear. Fifty-seven patients with a solitary, right lobe, uncomplicated amoebic liver abscess of 5-10 cm were randomized to receive either metronidazole alone (control group; n = 29) or ultrasound guided percutaneous needle aspiration along with metronidazole (intervention group; n = 28). Although the resolution of pain and fever occurred earlier in the intervention group (27 h and 17 h, respectively) than the control group (48 h and 30 h, respectively), the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.16 and 0.48, respectively). There were no deaths during the study period and treatment failure, complications (rupture of abscess), days to normalization of leukocytosis and duration of hospitalization were similar in both groups. Ultrasound guided percutaneous needle aspiration along with metronidazole was no better than metronidazole alone in the management of uncomplicated, solitary, right lobe amoebic liver abscess of 5 to 10 cm. PMID:23550199

  17. An autopsy case of otogenic intracranial abscess and meningitis with Bezold's abscess: evaluation of inflammatory bone destruction by postmortem cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Kanawaku, Yoshimasa; Yanase, Takeshi; Hayashi, Kino; Harada, Kazuki; Kanetake, Jun; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2013-11-01

    The deceased was an unidentified young male found unconscious on a walkway. On autopsy, outer and inner fistulae of the left temporal bone, subcutaneous abscess in the left side of the neck and head, and an intracranial abscess were noted. A portion of the left temporal bone was removed and scanned by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (normally used for dentistry applications) to evaluate the lesion. The cone-beam CT image revealed roughening of the bone wall and hypolucency of the mastoid air cells, consistent with an inflammatory bone lesion. According to autopsy and imaging findings, the cause of death was diagnosed as intracranial abscess with Bezold's abscess secondary to left mastoiditis as a complication of otitis media. Although determining the histopathology of bone specimens is time-consuming and costly work, we believe that use of cone-beam CT for hard tissue specimens can be useful in forensic practice. PMID:24112990

  18. Intra-abdominal abscess demonstrating an unusually large intra-abdominal pattern on an indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.R.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; ter Penning, B.; Yellin, J.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 WBC imaging of a patient with occult septicemia revealed a large focal pattern of radiopharmaceutical distribution within the abdominal cavity at 24 hours post radiopharmaceutical administration. This finding was felt to represent a large intra-abdominal abscess. A five liter peritoneal abscess was found at surgery. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an intra-abdominal abscess.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the diagnosis and treatment of a gastric wall abscess.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Amamiya, Kana; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2016-01-01

    A gastric wall abscess is rare and it can reportedly appear similar to a submucosal tumor on endoscopy. Few reports have described endoscopic ultrasonographic findings for a gastric wall abscess. An 84-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for tarry stools. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an elevated lesion similar to a submucosal tumor at the posterior wall of the stomach. Erosion and a white coat were observed on top of the lesion. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed an anechoic lesion connected to the proper muscular layer with a hyperechoic area in the center of the lesion. The lesion was diagnosed as a gastric wall abscess using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and was treated with endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage. The final diagnosis was a gastric wall abscess presenting as gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The patient was discharged with internal drainage stents. Computed tomography performed 3 months after discharge did not show recurrence of the abscess. PMID:26703177

  20. Gastric subepithelial lesion complicated with abscess: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bum; Oh, Myung Jin; Lee, Si Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric abscess is a localized pyogenic inflammation of the gastric wall, which is a rare form of suppurative gastritis. The rarity of gastric abscess may be associated with the difficulty of early diagnosis and high mortality as a result. In general, subepithelial lesions (SELs) of the stomach are incidentally detected during the course of upper endoscopy without specific clinical symptoms and signs. However, some gastric SELs present rarely as a form of hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation, and abscess. Here we report a 45-year-old man with gastric SEL presenting as a gastric abscess, which was diagnosed as an ectopic pancreas of the stomach, along with a review of the literature. Although gastric SEL presenting as an abscess is known as a serious and life-threatening lesion, the patient made a complete recovery through surgical resection as well as medical treatment. PMID:26034377

  1. Multiple Liver Abscesses Associated with Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Ki

    2013-01-01

    Liver abscess following ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting occurs very rarely. We report an unusual case of multiple liver abscesses caused by Staphylococcus capitis in a 50-year-old compromised woman due to a complicating VP shunt infection. We reviewed the nine cases of VP shunt complications reported in the English literature, and speculated that the most likely pathogenetic mechanism in our case is an infected peritoneal tip that migrated to and penetrated the liver, which subsequently caused the formation of multiple liver abscesses. The patient was successfully treated with percutaneous aspiration, drainage of the abscesses, intravenous antibiotics, and shunt revision. Awareness and vigilance of the possibility of liver abscess formation caused by VP shunt infection will help establish an early accurate diagnosis and therapeutic strategy. PMID:24379956

  2. Hepatic abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum after a trip to the dentist.

    PubMed

    Bytyci, Faton; Khromenko, Elena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man with no significant medical history was admitted to the hospital, with high-grade fever and right upper quadrant pain. He was found, on abdominal ultrasound, to have a right lobe hepatic cystic lesion. MRI of the abdomen confirmed a hepatic abscess. Cultures obtained under CT guidance showed the abscess to be caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is a rare bacterium that can cause potentially fatal liver abscesses. Following drainage and intravenous antibiotic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged on a 4-week antibiotic course. An abdominal CT, performed 6 weeks after discharge, showed total resolution of the abscess. The patient had, 2 weeks prior to the development of the liver abscess, undergone routine dental cleaning. Neither upper respiratory symptoms nor sore throat had been identified prior to the presentation. PMID:26933183

  3. Iliopsoas Abscess Possibly due to Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection after Chemoradiotherapy for Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hyo, Yukiyoshi; Fujisaki, Tomoya; Hyo, Rui; Tanaka, Hiroki; Harada, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Iliopsoas abscess was once an uncommon condition but now occurs somewhat more frequently due to the increasing number of immunocompromised patients, such as those with diabetes. We encountered a case of iliopsoas abscess following chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted for a sore throat and left neck swelling. Hypopharyngeal cancer was diagnosed, but the patient refused surgery. After two rounds of chemotherapy, febrile neutropenia developed and chest computed tomography (CT) revealed an iliopsoas abscess. The platelet count was low but recovered after administration of antibiotics and could not be explained by puncture of the abscess. CT-guided drainage eventually improved his symptoms. Even for disorders of the head and neck region, iliopsoas abscess should be suspected in immunocompromised patients who develop a fever. CT and magnetic resonance imaging should be performed at an early stage as it is important to determine whether surgical drainage is indicated. PMID:26989543

  4. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  5. Pyogenic Hepatic Abscess--Less is More. A Review for General Internists.

    PubMed

    Biskup, Ewelina; Yang, Xiao-Yu

    2015-09-30

    Pyogenic hepatic abscesses are rare, and fatal if untreated. Recent progresses in diagnostic and interventional radiology facilitated their management. However, abscesses located in the caudate lobe are still a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, especially to general internists, who tend to overtreatment. Literature of this specific form of hepatic abscess is scarce. The aim of this article was to review the existing literature on caudate lobe abscesses, as well as to provide a brief overview over pyogenic liver abscesses in order to draw attention of general internists to this important differential diagnosis and facilitate the decision-making on therapy. We underline that current evidence suggests a less is more position, so as to warrant a quality approach. PMID:26422074

  6. The effect of corticosteroids on subcutaneous abscess formation in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, K. A.; Gelfand, J. A.; Bartlett, J. G.; Gorbach, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    We have used a recently developed model for s.c. abscess formation to study the effect of corticosteroids on abscess formation in mice. Mice were given daily i.p. injections of either hydrocortisone, 20 mg/kg/day or dexamethasone, 0.8 mg/kg/day, starting 3 days before inoculation with Staph, aureus and continuing for the duration of the experiment. Another group of mice was given a single injection of dexamethasone, 8 mg/kg, 1 h after inoculation with Staph. aureus. Encapsulated abscesses developed in all animals by Day 4, and there was no mortality. Abscess volume +/- s.l. mean at 4 days was reduced (p less than 0.0005) from 39.9 +/- 3.0 mm3 in controls to 16.7 +/- 3.6 mm3 in the daily dexamethasone group. Abscess volume at 4 days after a single dose of dexamethasone was 39.9 +/- 8.0 mm3. Bacterial concentrations per ml of pus were equivalent in all groups (10(10,6)-10(10.9). The effect of steroids on formation of sterile abscesses was also studied. Abscess volumes were smaller in animals given daily hydrocortisone or dexamethasone when compared to controls, but the difference was significant only for mice receiving daily hydrocortisone. These results suggest that prolonged high-dose steroid administration decreased the magnitude of the acute inflammatory reaction responsible for abscess formation in the soft tissue but did not interfere significantly with the process of containment and encapsulation of s.c. abscesses. A single massive dose of steroid did not influence abscess formation. PMID:7248166

  7. Amoebic liver abscess: a report from central India.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Satyarth; Noor, Mohd Talha; Jain, Sunil; Kumar, Ravindra; Thakur, Bhagwan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is a serious but curable hepatic illness predominantly seen in tropical countries. We describe our experience of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters, radiological findings and treatment strategies. This is a retrospective analysis of 114 patients who were admitted from January 2012 to September 2014 at our centre. The mean age of presentation was 41.7?±?13.9 years, the majority of patients were male (86.8%) with chronic alcoholism (63.2%). Most of the patients had a solitary right lobe liver abscess. Abdominal pain, fever, tachycardia and hepatomegaly were the most common clinical findings while hypoalbuminaemia, anaemia, leucocytosis and electrolyte imbalance were the most common laboratory abnormalities. A significant number of patients could be managed with antibiotics only (45.6%), percutaneous radiological drainage techniques being an important adjunct in selected cases (percutaneous needle aspiration, 20.2%; percutaneous pigtail catheter drainage, 30.7%). Surgical intervention was required in only a few cases (3.5%). Mortality was 3.5%. PMID:26156972

  8. [Pulmonary abscess: a 111-case series in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Rakotoson, J L; Rebasy, L; Andrianasolo, R; Rakotoharivelo, H; Rakotomizao, J R; Andrianarisoa, A C F

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a series of 111 cases of pulmonary abscess observed over a 4-year period in Madagascar. There were 75 men (67.6%) and 36 women (32.4%) with a mean age of 38 years. Alcohol and tobacco use was found in 32.2% of cases. Thirteen patients (11.7%) used chewing tobacco and all patients were exposed to passive smoking. Eighty-eight patients (79.2%) had a history of bronchopulmonary disorders. Onset was progressive in 63% of cases. The main symptoms were fever (81.9%), pulmonary condensation (74.7%) and pleurisy (9.9%). Coughing was productive in 91.8% cases including 54% of patients having muco-purulent expectorations. In 49 patients (44.1%), chest radiography showed an opacity with a hydroaeric level. The abscess was solitary in 40 cases, multiple in 9, and bilateral in 5. In-hospital antibiotherapy was performed on a presumptive basis: tritherapy in 92 patients (82.9%), bitherapy in 18 (16.2%) and monotherapy in one (0.9%). Other treatment modalities inculuded respiratory kinesitherapy in 57 cases (51.3%), surgical drainage in four (3.6%) and pneumonectomy in one (0.9%). Outcome was favorable in 93 cases (8,7%) but there were 18 deaths (16.2%). This study emphasizes the value of achieving early diagnosis, identifying supporting factors and starting appropriate treatment promptly. PMID:22235615

  9. Retropharyngeal Abscess Initially Diagnosed by the Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Ja-ho

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report a case where a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) revealed the cause of a recently developed idiopathic dysphagia in a 66-year-old patient and enabled emergent treatment. The patient reported a 10-day history of fever, cough, sputum production, and progressive jaundice. He was then admitted to the hospital with suspicion of aspiration pneumonia. Despite treatment with antibiotics, fever and leukocytosis were persistent. As he also reported dysphagia, we performed the VFSS, which showed subglottic aspiration on all types of food and revealed a retropharyngeal mass causing mechanical compression. A contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) of his neck was performed following the VFSS, which helped diagnose the mass as an extensive retropharyngeal abscess with mediastinitis. Following this diagnosis, emergent surgical incision and drainage was performed on the patient. Although the VFSS is primarily designed to evaluate swallowing function rather than to diagnose a disease, it can be used to reveal the primary medical cause of dysphagia while it studies the mechanical and structural abnormalities in the oropharyngeal and esophageal regions. This study also proposes that retropharyngeal abscess should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases showing progressive dysphagia with fever. As confirmed through this work, the VFSS can function as a useful tool for detecting crucial diseases accompanying deglutition disorder. PMID:22977785

  10. Subacute splenic abscess. Appearance on indium-111 leukocyte, gallium-67, and technetium-99m sulfur colloid imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ammann, W.; Chiu, B.K.; Wright, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    A case of a 23-year-old man with an encapsulated, anaerobic splenic abscess is reported. Both the In-111 leukocyte and Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans demonstrated an intrasplenic defect. The Ga-67 citrate scan revealed uptake in the rim of the abscess only where the abscess cavity was relatively photon-deficient. The combined Tc-99m sulfur colloid/In-111 leukocyte/Ga-67 scan appearance of a subacute splenic abscess has not been described previously. In cases suspected to be splenic abscesses the combined In-111 leukocyte/Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging is the most useful.

  11. A Case Report of Listeria monocytogenes Abscesses Presenting as Cortically Predominant Ring-Enhancing Lesions

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus-Alvelo, Indira; Merenda, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Listeria monocytogenes, a common cause of bacterial meningitis, rarely involves the central nervous system (CNS) in the form of multiple cerebral ring-enhancing lesions. Methods An 81-year-old woman with rapidly progressive decline in her mental status in the setting of multiple cortically predominant ring-enhancing lesions was transferred to our institution. A mild upper respiratory tract infection and diarrhea symptoms preceded the mental status deterioration. Her past medical history is significant for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In light of the patient's age, the presence of hyponatremia and the history of diabetes mellitus, the empiric antimicrobial treatment was modified to include ampicillin, meropenem, vancomycin, voriconazole and pyrimethamine/sulfadiazine to prevent opportunistic infections. Intravenous dexamethasone was added due to significant perilesional vasogenic edema. Results The patient presented with stupor, but neither fever nor leukocytosis. CSF results were significant only for a mildly elevated protein level. The report of a repeat brain MRI was as follows: large areas of high FLAIR signals and tubular/lobulated/ring enhacement in bifrontal regions with a smaller focus in the left anterior midbrain, indicating for underlying multicentric glioma or multicentric primary CNS lymphoma. A brain biopsy, however, revealed an early abscess formation caused by a L. monocytogenes infection. Conclusion A high index of suspicion in patients with risk factors for this infection is key to ensure the timely initiation of appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy in the setting of cerebral ring-enhancing lesions. Intravenous ampicillin is the treatment of choice, but meropenem represents a valid alternative. PMID:26034484

  12. Potentially Life-Threatening Neck Abscesses: Therapeutic Management Under CT-Guided Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, L. Mylona, S.; Kalioras, V.; Pomoni, M.; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness of CT-guided drainage of potentially life-threatening neck abscesses. Methods. Between September 2001 and December 2003, 15 patients presented to the emergency room with potentially life-threatening neck abscesses. Their clinical condition was critical due to the abscess size (larger than 3 cm in diameter; mean diameter 5.2 cm, SD 0.91 cm) and/or abscess location. A CT scan was carried out immediately to assess the lesion. At the same time, under CT guidance, an 8 Fr trocar-type pigtail catheter was inserted, in order to drain the abscess. The decision to drain percutaneously was based on a consensus between the surgical, infectious disease and radiology teams. The catheter was kept in place until drainage stopped, and a follow-up scan was performed. Results. In 14 (93%) patients, the abscess was completely drained, and in 1 (7%) case the collection was still present because of multiple internal septation. That patient was treated by surgical management. The catheter was in place for a mean of 3 days (SD 0.96 day). Conclusion. Despite the fact that the number of our patients is small, CT-guided percutaneous drainage seems to be a fast, safe and highly effective low-cost method for the treatment of potentially life-threatening neck abscesses.

  13. Delayed administration of tissue plasminogen activator reduces intra-abdominal abscess formation.

    PubMed

    McRitchie, D I; Cummings, D; Rotstein, O D

    1989-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that intraperitoneal fibrinolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) prevented intraabdominal abscess formation in a rat fibrin clot infection model when administered simultaneously with the infecting inoculum. To more closely mimic the clinical setting, the efficacy of delayed administration of t-PA on intra-abdominal abscess formation was examined. A delay of 2, 6, and 18 hours had no effect on the rate of abscess formation but did reduce abscess size, indicating partial fibrinolysis. Since fibrin clots dehydrate in vivo, we hypothesized that a higher concentration of t-PA might be necessary to effect complete abscess resolution. High-dose t-PA (0.1 mg/mL) prevented abscess formation following a 6-hour delay and reduced mean weight following an 18-hour delay. Since heparin sodium may prevent new fibrin deposition and enhance t-PA activity, it was combined with t-PA to investigate potential synergistic effects. Despite adequate anticoagulation with heparin, no synergy with t-PA could be documented. In addition, the combination of antibiotics with t-PA did not affect its efficacy in vivo. We demonstrate that delayed administration of t-PA is effective in preventing abscess formation and may have implications for the clinical setting where initial surgical intervention is usually delayed. PMID:2511820

  14. The frequency of dental abscesses increases in periods of low barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Svabik, Otto; Orlik, Alexander; Figl, Michael; Fischer, Michael B; Schicho, Kurt; Wutzl, Arno; Forster, Johannes; Jesch, Philip; Perisanidis, Christos; Undt, Gerhard; Millesi, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Bioclimatic conditions are thought to have an impact on the frequency of dental abscesses but previous studies have suffered from small patient cohorts, methodological obstacles, and restriction to a single site resulting in limited geographic and meteorological variability. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of environmental temperature and barometric pressure on the frequency of dental abscesses. Three maxillofacial and two dental clinics in Vienna retrospectively provided a total of 19,218 patients with dentoalveolar abscesses who were treated by intraoral incision between 1998 and 2011. Daily records from six local meteorological stations were consulted to assess daily meteorological parameters. Univariate and multivariate hurdle count regression models were fitted to estimate the effect of daily average barometric pressure and temperature on registered abscess frequencies. Temporal confounders causing variance of the observed abscess frequencies - such as weekday, business day, and month - were taken into consideration. On days of low barometric pressure a significant rise in dental abscess frequency was observed, even when adjusting for confounders. Environmental temperature, in contrast, did not show any effect. In conclusion, bioclimatic conditions affect health as low barometric pressure increases the number of patients with dental abscesses. PMID:26346764

  15. Omentalisation in the treatment of sublumbar abscessation: long-term outcome in 10 dogs.

    PubMed

    Woodbridge, N; Martinoli, S; Cherubini, G B; Caine, A; Nelissen, P; White, R

    The objectives of this study were to report the technique of omentalisation for the management of sublumbar abscessation associated with suspected migrating plant material, the intraoperative and postoperative complications that occurred and the long-term outcome of the cases. A retrospective case series of dogs (n=10) with sublumbar abscessation managed by exploration and drainage combined with omentalisation of the abscess cavity is reported in this study. The sublumbar area was approached through a ventral midline coeliotomy, the abscess was explored, drained, debrided and subsequently packed with omentum. One dog sustained an aortic rupture during exploration of the abscess, the aorta was repaired; there were no postoperative complications. There was long-term (>12?months) resolution of clinical signs in all dogs. Drainage and omentalisation of sublumbar abscesses resulted in complete resolution of signs in all dogs and was associated with a low incidence of complications. Omentalisation is an effective treatment for dogs presenting with sublumbar abscesses associated with suspected migrating plant material. PMID:25319594

  16. Drainage of pediatric lung abscess by cough, catheter, or complete resection.

    PubMed

    Kosloske, A M; Ball, W S; Butler, C; Musemeche, C A

    1986-07-01

    We treated eight children, aged 7 weeks to 17 years, for lung abscess. Each abscess followed an episode of aspiration or a bacterial pneumonia. Associated conditions were leukemia, congenital immune deficiency, endocarditis, cerebral palsy, and prematurity. Seven of the 8 children had polymicrobial infections, usually containing both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The success of medical treatment by antibiotics and chest physiotherapy was age related; 3 of the 8 children, aged 10 to 17 years, recovered on this regimen, whereas five children, aged 7 weeks to 7 years, required catheter drainage or resection for cure. Drainage by catheter pneumonostomy was performed for solitary peripheral bacterial abscesses. A large intercostal catheter was inserted into the cavity, either operatively or percutaneously. Wedge resection was performed for multiple, central, or fungal abscesses. Pneumonostomy was curative in 3 of 4 children. One chronic abscess recurred after pneumonostomy and required resection. Wedge resection was curative in the two children who came to thoracotomy; lobectomy was not necessary. Although all eight children recovered from their lung abscesses, three of them died within a year of sepsis. Lung abscess today occurs in immunocompromised children who are vulnerable to fatal infections. Chest physiotherapy is unlikely to achieve good drainage in children under 7 years of age. Medical failures can be identified within the first week of treatment. Early and aggressive surgical treatment is indicated in such children, and may be lifesaving. PMID:3735040

  17. Modern management of pyogenic hepatic abscess: a case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pyogenic hepatic abscesses are relatively rare, though untreated are uniformly fatal. A recent paradigm shift in the management of liver abscesses, facilitated by advances in diagnostic and interventional radiology, has decreased mortality rates. The aim of this study was to review our experience in managing pyogenic liver abscess, review the literature in this field, and propose guidelines to aid in the current management of this complex disease. Methods Demographic and clinical details of all patients admitted to a single institution with liver abscess over a 5 year period were reviewed. Clinical presentation, aetiology, diagnostic work-up, treatment, morbidity and mortality data were collated. Results Over a 5 year period 11 patients presented to a single institution with pyogenic hepatic abscess (55% males, mean age 60.3 years). Common clinical features at presentation were non-specific constitutional symptoms and signs. Aetiology was predominantly gallstones (45%) or diverticular disease (27%). In addition to empiric antimicrobial therapy, all patients underwent radiologically guided percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess at diagnosis and only 2 patients required surgical intervention, including one 16-year old female who underwent hemi-hepatectomy for a complex and rare Actinomycotic abscess. There were no mortalities after minimum follow-up of one year. Conclusions Pyogenic liver abscesses are uncommon, and mortality has decreased over the last two decades. Antimicrobial therapy and radiological intervention form the mainstay of modern treatment. Surgical intervention should be considered for patients with large, complex, septated or multiple abscesses, underlying disease or in whom percutaneous drainage has failed. PMID:21435221

  18. EPIZOOTIOLOGY OF CRANIAL ABSCESS DISEASE IN WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) OF GEORGIA, USA.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bradley S; Belser, Emily H; Killmaster, Charlie H; Bowers, John W; Irwin, Brian J; Yabsley, Michael J; Miller, Karl V

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial abscess disease is a cause of natural mortality for mature male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of abscesses are associated with bacterial infection by Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes, but a complete understanding of the epidemiology of this disease is lacking. We quantified the effects of individual characteristics, site-specific herd demographics, land cover, and soil variables in estimating the probability of this disease. We examined 7,545 white-tailed deer from 60 sites throughout Georgia US for signs of cranial abscesses, the predecessor of intracranial abscesses, and recorded the presence or absence of cranial abscesses for each individual examined. We detected no cranial abscesses in 2,562 female deer but 91 abscesses in 4,983 male deer examined (1.8%). A generalized linear mixed model, treating site as a random effect, was used to examine several potential explanatory risk factors including site-level landscape and soil characteristics (soil and forest type), demographic factors (deer density and male to female ratio), and individual host factors (deer sex and age). Model results indicated that the probability of a male having a cranial abscess increased with age and that adult sex ratio (male:female) was positively associated with this disease. Site-specific variables for land cover and soil types were not strongly associated with observations of the disease at the scale measured and a large amount of among-site variability remained. Given the demonstrated effect of age, gender, and local sex ratios but the remaining unexplained spatial variability, additional investigation into spatiotemporal variation of the presumed bacterial causative agent of cranial abscesses appears warranted. PMID:25984774

  19. High prevalence of abscesses and self-treatment among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Gallardo, Manuel; Hasan, Samreen; Minuto, Joshua; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Soft tissue infections are common among injection drug users (IDUs), but information on correlates and treatment in this highly marginalized population is lacking. Methods Six hundred twenty-three community-recruited IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico, completed a detailed interview on abscess history and treatment. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to identify factors independently associated with having an abscess in the prior 6 months. Results Overall, 46% had ever had an abscess and 20% had had an abscess in the past 6 months. Only 12% had sought medical care for their most recent abscess; 60% treated the abscess themselves. The most common self-treatment method was to apply heated (24%) or unheated (23%) Aloe vera leaf. Other methods included draining the wound with a syringe (19%) or knife (11%). Factors independently associated with recent abscess were having income from sex work (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.08–10.00), smoking methamphetamine (aOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.05–2.62), seeking someone to help with injection (aOR 2.06, 95% CI 1.18–3.61), and reporting that police affected where they used drugs (aOR 2.14, 95% CI 1.15–3.96). Conclusions Abscesses are common among IDUs in this setting, but appropriate treatment is rare. Interventions to reduce barriers to medical care in this population are needed. Research on the effectiveness of Aloe vera application in this setting is also needed, as are interventions to provide IDU sex workers, methamphetamine smokers, and those who assist with injection with the information and equipment necessary to reduce abscess risk. PMID:20381396

  20. Limitations of using imaging diagnosis for psoas abscess in its early stage.

    PubMed

    Takada, Toshihiko; Terada, Kazuhiko; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ohira, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients diagnosed with psoas abscess have a high mortality rate. The major cause of its poor prognosis is delayed treatment. Therefore, making a correct diagnosis rapidly is important. Both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered to be the gold standards as imaging modalities that have a high sensitivity for detecting psoas abscess. There have been few reports regarding the limitations of these methods, but psoas abscess in its early stage may go undetected by CT and MRI. Methods Detection of psoas abscess by CT and MRI was investigated in the present study through a retrospective review of 15 patients in whom psoas abscess was diagnosed during a course of ten years at our hospital. Results In all patients, psoas abscess was diagnosed by at least a plain CT, enhanced CT, and/or plain MRI. The interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 20.9±17.9 days (mean ± standard deviation). In three patients, repeat imaging identified a psoas abscess, whereas initial imaging failed to detect it. The overall sensitivity of plain CT, enhanced CT, and plain MRI for psoas abscess was 78%, 86%, and 88%, respectively. From six days after the onset of symptoms, the sensitivity of each modality was 100%, while the sensitivity from day one to five days was only 33%, 50%, and 50%, respectively. Conclusion Although CT and MRI are considered to be gold standard modalities for diagnosing psoas abscess, both methods can fail to notice this condition in its early stage. PMID:26466693

  1. Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma misdiagnosed as multiple organ abscesses: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenmin; Zuo, Yunlong; Yang, Yiyu; Tao, Jianping; Hong, Jie; Wu, Zhiyuan; Chen, Feiyan; Dang, Run; Liang, Yufeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Dabo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old male with fever, left maxillofacial swelling, cervical and mediastinal masses, and lymphadenopathy who developed respiratory failure and shock caused by tracheal compression and superior vena cava reflux disorder. The initial diagnosis was maxillary sinus, cervical, and mediastinal abscesses. Initial treatments included maxillary sinus abscess resection, neck abscess incision drainage, and antibiotics. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) was diagnosed ultimately according to pathological and immunohistochemical examination of cervical lesion biopsy tissue. We analyze the reasons for misdiagnosis by comparing clinical and pathological features of ALCL to other systemic illnesses that cause lymphadenopathy. PMID:26770602

  2. First report of a thyroid abscess in the pediatric age group caused by Arcanobacterium haemolyticum.

    PubMed

    Sayyahfar, Shirin; Nasiri, Seyed Javad

    2012-08-01

    Thyroid abscess is a rare event especially in the pediatric age group. We report a 2-year-old girl with thyroid abscess who presented with fever and an anterior painful neck mass. Culture of the aspirated fluid yielded Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, which is one of the etiologies of pharyngitis and rash in children and, especially, young adults. As far as we are aware this is the first report of thyroid abscess in the pediatric or adult age group caused by Arcanobacterium haemolyticum. PMID:22286406

  3. Bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip: diagnosis using arthrography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, L.S.; Schneider, R.; Goldman, A.B.; Kazam, E.; Ranawat, C.S.; Ghelman, B.

    1985-08-01

    Bursae or abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint were demonstrated by hip arthrography or by computed tomography (CT) in 40 cases. The bursae or abscess cavities were associated with underlying abnormalities in the hip, including painful hip prostheses, infection, and inflammatory or degenerative arthritis. Symptoms may be produced directly as a result of infection or indirectly as a result of inflammation or pressure on adjacent structures. Hip arthrography can confirm a diagnosis of bursae and abscess cavities communicating with the hip joint in patients with hip pain or soft-tissue masses around the groin. Differentiation of enlarged bursae from other abnormalities is important to avoid unnecessary or incorrect surgery.

  4. Abscess Formation after Septic Arthritis in the Sternoclavicular Joint of Two Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Jeppe; Tang, Mariann; Hjortdal, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Abscess formation after septic arthritis in the sternoclavicular joint is a rare phenomenon in healthy people without immune suppression, intravenous drug abuse, or diabetes. Here we report two cases with formation of abscess in two middle-aged men, with no relevant comorbidities and no obvious sites of infection. The abscesses were both treated surgically with debridement followed by negative pressure wound therapy and antibiotics. The cases differ in diagnostic procedures and delay of diagnosis and broach the issues of handling a rare disease. PMID:26844002

  5. Spontaneous Corpus Cavernosum Abscess in a Healthy Man Using Long-Term Androgenic Anabolic Steroids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abscess formation of the corpus cavernosum is very rare. Here, we report a case of long-term anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse that is suspected to have facilitated the development of a corpus cavernosum abscess in a healthy bodybuilder. Cultures obtained from the abscess contained Staphylococcus epidermidis, a microorganism that almost exclusively affects immunocompromised patients. Therefore, prompt drainage of pus from cavernosal bodies should be the primary aim of the treatment. This case illustrates the potential danger of AAS suppressing the immune system and causing a serious infection. PMID:25927061

  6. [Treatment of patients with lung abscess by local administration of papain].

    PubMed

    Udod, V M; Kolos, A I; Gritsuliak, Z N

    1989-03-01

    Under study were results of treatment of 109 patients with lung abscess aged from 17 to 76 years. All the patients were treated by active antiinflammatory therapy, bronchosanitation measures. In addition, local treatment by transthoracal punctures and drainage of the abscess cavity was used. Patients of the main group (52 patients) were given transthoracal injections of 0.5% solution of papain. The inclusion of papain in the complex therapy of patients with a lung abscess allowed to improve results of the treatment of this severe disease. The method may be recommended for wide use in pulmonology. PMID:2665304

  7. Emergent Airway Management of an Uncooperative Child with a Large Retropharyngeal and Posterior Mediastinal Abscess.

    PubMed

    Diep, Jack; Kam, David; Kuenzler, Keith A; Arthur, Jill F

    2016-02-01

    Retropharyngeal abscesses are deep neck space infections that can lead to life-threatening airway emergencies and other catastrophic complications. Retropharyngeal abscesses demand prompt diagnosis and early establishment of a definitive airway when there is airway compromise. This can be difficult in an uncooperative patient. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl with mediastinitis and tracheal compression and anterior displacement from a large retropharyngeal and posterior mediastinal abscess secondary to traumatic esophageal perforation, who received successful awake nasal fiberoptic intubation. Anesthesiologists must be prepared for airway emergencies in uncooperative patients, especially children, but there is controversy concerning the use of sedation. PMID:26599735

  8. Recurrent Breast Abscesses due to Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii, a Human Pathogen Uncommon in Caucasian Women

    PubMed Central

    Le Flèche-Matéos, Anne; Berthet, Nicolas; Lomprez, Fabienne; Arnoux, Yolande; Le Guern, Anne-Sophie; Leclercq, India; Burguière, Ana Maria; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background. Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii (Ck) was first described in 1998 from human sputum. Contrary to what is observed in ethnic groups such as Maori, Ck is rarely isolated from breast abscesses and granulomatous mastitis in Caucasian women. Case Presentation. We herein report a case of recurrent breast abscesses in a 46-year-old Caucasian woman. Conclusion. In the case of recurrent breast abscesses, even in Caucasian women, the possible involvement of Ck should be investigated. The current lack of such investigations, probably due to the difficulty to detect Ck, may cause the underestimation of such an aetiology. PMID:23008788

  9. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  10. Spinal Subdural Abscess: A Rare Complication of Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Usoltseva, Natalia; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Rehman, Ateeq; Samji, Swetha; D’Costa, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural abscess (SSA) is an uncommon entity. The exact incidence is unknown, with very few cases reported in the literature. This condition may result in spinal cord compression, thus constituting a medical and neurosurgical emergency. The pathogenesis of SSA is not well-described, and the available knowledge is based on case observations only. There is only one case report that describes direct seeding from decubitus ulcers as a possible mechanism for development of SSA. We report a case of subacute onset of quadriplegia in a male patient, age 55 years, due to spinal cord compression from SSA and superimposed spinal subdural hematoma. The direct seeding from decubitus ulcers is thought to be the cause of infection in our patient. We present this case of SSA to elucidate and review the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, and treatment regarding management of this rare disorder. PMID:24667217

  11. Transorbital Craniocerebral Occult Penetrating Injury with Cerebral Abscess Complication

    PubMed Central

    Abdulbaki, Arif; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Almalki, Amal; Alohaly, Nasser; Baeesa, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Transorbital intracranial penetrating injury is an uncommon mechanism of head injury. These injuries can be occult during the initial clinical presentation. Certain patients develop an intracranial cerebral infection. Herein, we report a 5-year-old child with an occult transorbital intracranial penetrating injury caused by a pen. A retained pen tip was found at the superior orbital roof and was not noticed at initial presentation. This was complicated by a right frontal lobe cerebral abscess. This paper emphasizes the importance of orbitocranial imaging in any penetrating orbital injury. A review of the literature on intracranial infection locations in relation to the route and mechanism of injury is included to complement this report. PMID:23097729

  12. Disseminated tuberculosis following liver transplant presenting with an axillary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ladds, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Four years after an orthoptic liver transplant for hepatocellular carcinoma secondary to alcoholic liver disease, the patient presented in a crescendo manner with skin infections and finally a septic right arm wound. The abscess was drained and cultures grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient reported a previous episode of ‘pneumonia’ and subsequent hospitalisations for recurrent chest infections, and following further investigation, he was diagnosed with disseminated tuberculosis. The infection responded to triple therapy, but primary closure of the arm wound was unsuccessful and it was treated conservatively with negative pressure wound therapy. The patient remains an inpatient 3?months after his presentation, responding well to therapy and anticipating imminent discharge. The patient's case serves as a reminder that infections are common in solid organ transplant recipients and clinicians should be aware of unusual or recurrent presentations in these patients, to allow for early diagnosis and timely management. PMID:24510698

  13. Primary Aspergillus sellar abscess simulating pituitary tumor in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Taohui; Zhang, Na; Wang, Long; Jiao, Jiantong; Zhao, Yiqing; Li, Zheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with headache, dizziness, and decreased visual acuity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sellar mass with sphenoid sinus extension. The result of hormone showed an obviously high prolactin (815 ng/mL). The mass was resected and diagnosed with aspergillosis pathologically. Postoperatively, the level of prolactin dramatically decreased, and the patient received medical treatment with voriconazole and caspofungin. During a 6-month follow-up, the patient's headache and dizziness disappeared, and visual acuity improved. Therefore, aspergillus sellar abscess could result in hyperprolactinemia and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a sellar mass, even in immunocompetent patients. A combination of surgery and antifungal therapy could reduce the hyperprolactinemia and improve symptoms. PMID:25675014

  14. Psoas abscess and severe fasciitis due to a caecal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ng, Nigel Yong Boon; Twoon, Mark; Thomson, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    A man in his mid-50s presented with a painful and swollen right thigh and buttock. This was accompanied by a month long history of flank pain, back pain, vague abdominal pain, limp, fever and weight loss. On examination, there was extensive erythaema, heat, tenderness, oedema and crepitus over his right buttock and thigh. The patient was referred to plastic surgery to exclude necrotising fasciitis of the gluteal and thigh region. After CT imaging, a psoas abscess (PA) and caecal mass were identified. Subsequent right hemicolectomy, PA drainage and debridement of his right thigh were performed. This case reminds clinicians of the many non-specific ways a PA can present and that a high level of suspicion assists in making a timely diagnosis. PMID:25631760

  15. Cervical epidural abscess following an Escherichia coli urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Shane C; Baker, Joseph F; Ellanti, Prasad; Synnott, Keith

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 64-year-old man developed an Escherichia coli spinal epidural abscess (SEA) isolated to the cervical vertebrae posturinary tract infection 9?days previously. He subsequently underwent emergent surgical decompression followed by a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. He is symptom free at 1-year follow-up. SEA is an uncommon condition. Even with modern surgical techniques and antimicrobial agents, the mortality remains significant. Intravenous drug use, spinal procedures and medical conditions such as diabetes, Crohn's disease and chronic renal failure are all known risk factors for SEA and the majority of cases are associated with at least one of these risk factors. The case report highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for this condition even in patients without established risk factors who present with red flag symptoms: back pain, fever and neurological deficit, as the consequences of a delayed diagnosis can be severe. PMID:24473426

  16. Unusual presentation of filariasis as an abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Mukta; Pruthi, Sonam Kumar; Gupta, Renu; Khare, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Bancroftian filariasis, a tropical and subtropical disease caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, is transmitted by the culex mosquito. The disease is conventionally diagnosed by the demonstration of microfilaria in peripheral blood smear. Microfilaria and adult filarial worms have been incidentally detected in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in various locations. The disease may be missed if one is not aware of the possibility, particularly in cases where eosinophilia is absent. Therefore, clinicians and pathologists need to be more vigilant in the endemic zones for early diagnosis and the treatment of filariasis. We report here an unusual case of filariasis in a 17-year-old female with a swelling in the lower part of the left arm on the flexor surface. This highlights the chances of finding microfilaria in cytology of an unsuspected case at an unusual site. This case, in addition, stresses the fact that microfilaria may be associated with an abscess even in the absence of eosinophilia.

  17. Lipoprotein lipase deficiency presenting with neonatal perianal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Lauren S; Burnett, John R; Mehta, Divyesh K; Martin, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a member of the triglyceride lipase gene family, is synthesised by parenchymal cells of the heart, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues before being transported to luminal surfaces of vascular endothelial cells to exert its main physiological function to hydrolyse plasma lipoproteins. LPL deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, resulting in severe hypertriglyceridaemia from birth. The effect of marked hypertriglyceridaemia on the immune function in children has not been described. We present a case of a neonate with LPL deficiency and grossly elevated plasma triglyceride levels, presenting with recurrent and recalcitrant perianal abscesses suggestive of underlying immunodeficiency. With reduced levels of plasma triglycerides, the recurrent perianal infections resolved. This case report reviews evidence for potential deleterious effects of hypertriglyceridaemia on immune function, however, underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Whether hypertriglyceridaemia contributes to immune dysfunction in this context is unknown. If there is a pathophysiological link, this may have implications for hypertriglyceridaemia management. PMID:26825936

  18. Spinal subdural abscess: a rare complication of decubitus ulcer.

    PubMed

    Usoltseva, Natalia; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Rehman, Ateeq; Samji, Swetha; D'Costa, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Spinal subdural abscess (SSA) is an uncommon entity. The exact incidence is unknown, with very few cases reported in the literature. This condition may result in spinal cord compression, thus constituting a medical and neurosurgical emergency. The pathogenesis of SSA is not well-described, and the available knowledge is based on case observations only. There is only one case report that describes direct seeding from decubitus ulcers as a possible mechanism for development of SSA. We report a case of subacute onset of quadriplegia in a male patient, age 55 years, due to spinal cord compression from SSA and superimposed spinal subdural hematoma. The direct seeding from decubitus ulcers is thought to be the cause of infection in our patient. We present this case of SSA to elucidate and review the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, and treatment regarding management of this rare disorder. PMID:24667217

  19. Percutaneous Management of Abscess and Fistula Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    AAssar, O. Sami; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Gordon, Roy L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Way, Lawrence W.; Kerlan, Robert K.

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous drainage of fluid collections following pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure). Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 19 patients referred to our service with fluid collections following pancreaticoduodenectomy. The presence of associated enteric or biliary fistulas, the route(s) of access for image-guided drainage, the incidence of positive bacterial cultures, and the duration and success of percutaneous management were recorded. Results: Fistulous communication to the jejunum in the region of the pancreatico-jejunal anastomosis was demonstrable in all 19 patients by gentle contrast injection into drainage tubes. Three patients had concurrent biliary fistulas. In 18 of 19 patients, fluid samples yielded positive bacterial cultures. Successful percutaneous evacuation of fluid was achieved in 17 of 19 patients (89%). The mean duration of drainage was 31 days. Conclusion: Percutaneous drainage of abscess following pancreaticoduodenectomy is effective in virtually all patients despite the coexistence of enteric and biliary fistulas.

  20. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting. PMID:19561990