Science.gov

Sample records for gas-particle two-phase flows

  1. Application of Lumley's drag reduction model to two-phase gas-particle flow in a pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.S.; Chung, M.K.; Sung, H.J. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper discusses two-fluid model incorporated with Lumley's drag reduction model to analyze the mechanism of momentum transfer in the turbulent dilute gas-particle flow in a vertical pipe. The change of the effective viscous sublayer thickness by the presence of particles is modeled by Lumley's theoretical model. The numerical computations of the friction factor and the pressure drop in a fully developed pipe flow are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data for an average particle size of 15 {mu}m. it is proved that Lumley's model is successful in predicting the correct reduction behavior of the drag in the gas-particle flows It has been confirmed that the effective viscous sublayer thickness for two-phase gas-particle flow is dependent on the particle relaxation time, Kolmogoroff time scale and the solids-gas loading ratio.

  2. Two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program to characterize the spray from candidate nozzles for icing-cloud simulation is discussed. One canidate nozzle, which is currently used for icing research, has been characterized for flow and drop size. The median-volume diameter (MVD) from this air-assist nozzle is compared with correlations in the literature. The new experimental spray facility is discussed, and the drop-size instruments are discussed in detail. Since there is no absolute standard for drop-size measurements and there are other limitations, such as drop -size range and velocity range, several instruments are used and results are compared. A two-phase model was developed at Pennsylvania State University. The model uses the k-epsilon model of turbulence in the continous phase. Three methods for treating the discrete phase are used: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model, (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) model, and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) model. In the LHF model both phases have the same velocity and temperature at each point. The DSF model provides interphase transport but ignores the effects of turbulent fluctuations. In the SSF model the drops interact with turbulent eddies whose properties are determined by the k-epsilon turbulence model. The two-phase flow model has been extended to include the effects of evaporation and combustion.

  3. One- and two-phase nozzle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, I.S.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent technique, in conjunction with the boundary-fitted coordinates system, is applied to solve a gas-only one-phase flow and a fully-coupled, gas-particle two-phase flow inside nozzles with small throat radii of curvature, steep wall gradients, and submerged configurations. The emphasis of the study has been placed on one- and two-phase flow in the transonic region. Various particle sizes and particle mass fractions have been investigated in the two-phase flow. The salient features associated with the two-phase nozzle flow compared with those of the one-phase flow are illustrated through the calculations of the JPL nozzle, the Titan III solid rocket motor, and the submerged nozzle configuration found in the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) solid rocket motor.

  4. Two phase potential flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.B.

    1991-06-01

    New results for the flow of a dispersion of particles in an inviscid irrotational flow are reported. Equations of motion for an isotropic assembly have been derived and applied to several example problems. Theorems have been derived relating the macroscopic (averaged) properties of flows composed of unit cells. The effective conductivity of a suspension has been obtained in new ways, using the method of images, and related to forces exerted by a fluid on particles when there is relative motion. 11 refs.

  5. Studies of two phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    The development of instrumentation for the support of research in two-phase flow in simulated microgravity conditions was performed. The funds were expended in the development of a technique for characterizing the motion and size distribution of small liquid droplets dispersed in a flowing gas. Phenomena like this occur in both microgravity and normal earth gravity situations inside of conduits that are carrying liquid-vapor mixtures at high flow rates. Some effort to develop a conductance probe for the measurement of liquid film thickness was also expended.

  6. Two-phase potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Graham B.

    1989-01-01

    Some features of two recent approaches of two-phase potential flow are presented. The first approach is based on a set of progressive examples that can be analyzed using common techniques, such as conservation laws, and taken together appear to lead in the direction of a general theory. The second approach is based on variational methods, a classical approach to conservative mechanical systems that has a respectable history of application to single phase flows. This latter approach, exemplified by several recent papers by Geurst, appears generally to be consistent with the former approach, at least in those cases for which it is possible to obtain comparable results. Each approach has a justifiable theoretical base and is self-consistent. Moreover, both approaches appear to give the right prediction for several well-defined situations.

  7. DSMC simulation of two-phase plume flow with UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume in which the phase of particles is liquid or solid flows from a solid propellant rocket of hypersonic vehicle flying at high altitudes, the aluminum oxide particulates not only impact the rarefied gas flow properties, but also make a great difference to plume radiation signature, so the radiation prediction of the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow is very important for space target detection of hypersonic vehicles. Accordingly, this project aims to study the rarefied gas-particle two-phase flow and ultraviolet radiation (UV) characteristics. Considering a two-way interphase coupling of momentum and energy, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is developed for particle phase change and the particle flow, including particulate collision, coalescence as well as separation, and a Monte Carlo ray trace model is implemented for the particulate UV radiation. A program for the numerical simulation of the gas-particle two-phase flow and radiation in which the gas flow nonequilibrium is strong is implemented as well. Ultraviolet radiation characteristics of the particle phase is studied based on the calculation of the flow field coupled with the radiation calculation, the radiation model for different size particles is analyzed, focusing on the effects of particle emission, absorption, scattering as well as the searchlight emission of the nozzle. A new approach may be proposed to describe the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow and radiation transfer characteristics in this project.

  8. DSMC simulation of two-phase plume flow with UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Ling

    2014-12-09

    Rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume in which the phase of particles is liquid or solid flows from a solid propellant rocket of hypersonic vehicle flying at high altitudes, the aluminum oxide particulates not only impact the rarefied gas flow properties, but also make a great difference to plume radiation signature, so the radiation prediction of the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow is very important for space target detection of hypersonic vehicles. Accordingly, this project aims to study the rarefied gas-particle two-phase flow and ultraviolet radiation (UV) characteristics. Considering a two-way interphase coupling of momentum and energy, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is developed for particle phase change and the particle flow, including particulate collision, coalescence as well as separation, and a Monte Carlo ray trace model is implemented for the particulate UV radiation. A program for the numerical simulation of the gas-particle two-phase flow and radiation in which the gas flow nonequilibrium is strong is implemented as well. Ultraviolet radiation characteristics of the particle phase is studied based on the calculation of the flow field coupled with the radiation calculation, the radiation model for different size particles is analyzed, focusing on the effects of particle emission, absorption, scattering as well as the searchlight emission of the nozzle. A new approach may be proposed to describe the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow and radiation transfer characteristics in this project.

  9. Two-Phase Flow Separator Investigation

    NASA Video Gallery

    The goal of the Two-Phase Flow Separator investigation is to help increase understanding of how to separate gases and liquids in microgravity. Many systems on the space station contain both liquids...

  10. Two-phase flow studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.; Maeder, P.F.

    1980-08-01

    Progress on the following is reported: literature survey, design of two-phase flow testing facility, design of nozzle loop, thermophysical properties, design manual, and advanced energy conversion systems. (MHR)

  11. Two-Phase Potential Flow. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.B.

    1999-06-11

    The objective of this work was to devise essentially exact solutions to a set of well-defined basic problems of inviscid fluid flow with particulate inclusions. This would help to establish a sound basis for fundamental theoretical developments in the field of two-phase flow. The results of this effort have ranged from basic theorems and the formulation of conservation laws for two-phase mixtures, to detailed predictions for specific geometrical patterns and experimental confirmation of these results.

  12. Strongly coupled turbulent gas-particle flows in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) simulations of strongly coupled (high mass loading) gas-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of exploring the fundamental physics of fully developed, wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. An adaptive spatial filter is developed that accurately decomposes the total granular energy of the particles into correlated and uncorrelated components at each location in the wall-normal direction of the flow. In this manner, Reynolds- and phase-averaged (PA) two-phase turbulence statistics up to second order are reported for both phases and for three values of the PA mean fluid velocity. As expected due to the high mass loading, in all cases the turbulence production due to mean drag dominates production due to mean shear. A multiphase LRR-IP Reynolds-stress turbulence model is developed to predict the turbulent flow statistics as a function of the wall-normal distance. Using a correlation for the vertical drift velocity developed from the EL data, the turbulence model predictions agree satisfactorily with all of one-point EL statistics for the vertical channel flows, as well as for the homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence (CIT) statistics reported previously. Funded by U.S. National Science Foundation (CBET-1437865).

  13. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, John D.; Tong, Long S.

    1977-03-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  14. Two-phase flow in fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.; Long, J.; Zuidema, P.

    1993-11-01

    This report gives the results of a three-day workshop on two-phase flow in fractured rock. The workshop focused on two-phase flow processes that are important in geologic disposal of nuclear waste as experienced in a variety of repository settings. The goals and objectives of the workshop were threefold: exchange information; describe the current state of understanding; and identify research needs. The participants were divided into four subgroups. Each group was asked to address a series of two-phase flow processes. The following groups were defined to address these processes: basic flow processes; fracture/matrix interactions; complex flow processes; and coupled processes. For each process, the groups were asked to address these four issues: (1) describe the two-phase flow processes that are important with respect to repository performance; (2) describe how this process relates to the specific driving programmatic issues given above for nuclear waste storage; (3) evaluate the state of understanding for these processes; and (4) suggest additional research to address poorly understood processes relevant to repository performance. The reports from each of the four working groups are given here.

  15. Two-phase flow centrifugal pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisely, Eugene Andras

    The performance of centrifugal pumps subjected to a liquid-gas-mixture flow is a significant concern to manufacturers and to some users such as Chemical, Nuclear Power Plants, and Gas-Oil Industries. Particularly in the nuclear power industry, the prediction of performance degradation under the two-phase flow conditions occurring in a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is a significant part of the overall analysis of that accident. In this experimental work, the pressure distribution was measured in a rotating, partially shrouded, open, radial impeller and volute under a wide range of air-water two-phase flow conditions. To obtain these pressure measurements, small-diameter pressure-tap holes were drilled through the casing of the radial pump. High speed photography was used to determine the flow regime of the air-water mixture through the vane and in the volute. An analytical model was developed to predict the radial pump single- and two-phase flow pressure distribution. This distribution was compared with the test data for different suction void fractions. The physical mechanism responsible for pump performance degradation was also investigated.

  16. Stability of oscillatory two phase Couette flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the stability of two phase Couette flow of different liquids bounded between plane parallel plates. One of the plates has a time dependent velocity in its own plane, which is composed of a constant steady part and a time harmonic component. In the absence of time harmonic modulations, the flow can be unstable to an interfacial instability if the viscosities are different and the more viscous fluid occupies the thinner of the two layers. Using Floquet theory, we show analytically in the limit of long waves, that time periodic modulations in the basic flow can have a significant influence on flow stability. In particular, flows which are otherwise unstable for extensive ranges of viscosity ratios, can be stabilized completely by the inclusion of background modulations, a finding that can have useful consequences in many practical applications.

  17. Two-Phase Quality/Flow Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A quality and/or flow meter employs a capacitance probe assembly for measuring the dielectric constant of flow stream, particularly a two-phase flow stream including liquid and gas components.ne dielectric constant of the flow stream varies depending upon the volume ratios of its liquid and gas components, and capacitance measurements can therefore be employed to calculate the quality of the flow, which is defined as the volume ratio of liquid in the flow to the total volume ratio of gas and liquid in the flow. By using two spaced capacitance sensors, and cross-correlating the time varying capacitance values of each, the velocity of the flow stream can also be determined. A microcontroller-based processing circuit is employed to measure the capacitance of the probe sensors.The circuit employs high speed timer and counter circuits to provide a high resolution measurement of the time interval required to charge each capacitor in the probe assembly. In this manner, a high resolution, noise resistant, digital representation of each of capacitance value is obtained without the need for a high resolution A/D converter, or a high frequency oscillator circuit. One embodiment of the probe assembly employs a capacitor with two ground plates which provide symmetry to insure that accurate measurements are made thereby.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    2001-01-01

    Two phase flows can be found in broad situations in nature, biology, and industry devices and can involve diverse and complex mechanisms. While the physical models may be specific for certain situations, the mathematical formulation and numerical treatment for solving the governing equations can be general. Hence, we will require information concerning each individual phase as needed in a single phase. but also the interactions between them. These interaction terms, however, pose additional numerical challenges because they are beyond the basis that we use to construct modern numerical schemes, namely the hyperbolicity of equations. Moreover, due to disparate differences in time scales, fluid compressibility and nonlinearity become acute, further complicating the numerical procedures. In this paper, we will show the ideas and procedure how the AUSM-family schemes are extended for solving two phase flows problems. Specifically, both phases are assumed in thermodynamic equilibrium, namely, the time scales involved in phase interactions are extremely short in comparison with those in fluid speeds and pressure fluctuations. Details of the numerical formulation and issues involved are discussed and the effectiveness of the method are demonstrated for several industrial examples.

  19. Tracer Partitioning in Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, K.; Hesse, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The concentration distributions of geochemical tracers in a subsurface reservoir can be used as an indication of the reservoir flow paths and constituent fluid origin. In this case, we are motivated by the origin of marked geochemical gradients in the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir in northeastern New Mexico. This reservoir contains 99% CO2 with various trace noble gas components and overlies the formation brine in a sloping aquifer. It is thought that magmatic CO2 entered the reservoir, and displaced the brine. This displacement created gradients in the concentrations of the noble gases. Two models to explain noble gas partitioning in two-phase flow are presented here. The first model assumes that the noble gases act as tracers and uses a first order non-linear partial differential equation to compute the volume fraction of each phase along the displament path. A one-way coupled partial differential equation determines the tracer concentration, which has no effect on the overall flow or phase saturations. The second model treats each noble gas as a regular component resulting in a three-component, two-phase system. As the noble gas injection concentration goes to zero, we see the three-component system behave like the one-way coupled system of the first model. Both the analytical and numerical solutions are presented for these models. For the process of a gas displacing a liquid, we see that a noble gas tracer with greater preference for the gas phase, such as Helium, will move more quickly along the flowpath than a heavier tracer that will more easily enter the liquid phase, such as Argon. When we include partial miscibility of both the major and trace components, these differences in speed are shown in a bank of the tracer at the saturation front. In the three component model, the noble gas bank has finite width and concentration. In the limit where the noble gas is treated as a tracer, the width of the bank is zero and the concentration increases linearly

  20. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  1. Flow Pattern Phenomena in Two-Phase Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Simon, William E.

    2004-02-01

    Space transportation systems require high-performance thermal protection and fluid management techniques for systems ranging from cryogenic fluid management devices to primary structures and propulsion systems exposed to extremely high temperatures, as well as for other space systems such as cooling or environment control for advanced space suits and integrated circuits. Although considerable developmental effort is being expended to bring potentially applicable technologies to a readiness level for practical use, new and innovative methods are still needed. One such method is the concept of Advanced Micro Cooling Modules (AMCMs), which are essentially compact two-phase heat exchangers constructed of microchannels and designed to remove large amounts of heat rapidly from critical systems by incorporating phase transition. The development of AMCMs requires fundamental technological advancement in many areas, including: (1) development of measurement methods/systems for flow-pattern measurement/identification for two-phase mixtures in microchannels; (2) development of a phenomenological model for two-phase flow which includes the quantitative measure of flow patterns; and (3) database development for multiphase heat transfer/fluid dynamics flows in microchannels. This paper focuses on the results of experimental research in the phenomena of two-phase flow in microchannels. The work encompasses both an experimental and an analytical approach to incorporating flow patterns for air-water mixtures flowing in a microchannel, which are necessary tools for the optimal design of AMCMs. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: (1) design and construction of a sensitive test system for two-phase flow in microchannels, one which measures ac and dc components of in-situ physical mixture parameters including spatial concentration using concomitant methods; (2) data acquisition and analysis in the amplitude, time, and frequency domains; and (3) analysis of results

  2. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase is taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.

  4. Nonisothermal Two-Phase Porous Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-21

    NORIA is a finite element program that simultaneously solves four nonlinear parabolic, partial differential equations that describe the transport of water, water vapor, air, and energy through partially saturated porous media. NORIA is designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, non-isothermal, unsaturated porous flow problems. Nearly all material properties, such as permeability, can either be set to constant values or defined as functions of the dependent and independent variables by user-supplied subroutines. The gas phase ismore » taken to be ideal. NORIA is intended to solve nonisothermal problems in which large gradients are expected in the gas pressure.« less

  5. Two-phase flows within systems with ambient pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    In systems where the design inlet and outlet pressures are maintained above the thermodynamic critical pressure, it is often assumed that two phase flows within the system cannot occur. Designers rely on this simple rule of thumb to circumvent problems associated with a highly compressible two phase flow occurring within the supercritical pressure system along with the uncertainties in rotordynamics, load capacity, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermophysical property variations. The simple rule of thumb is adequate in many low power designs but is inadequate for high performance turbomachines and linear systems, where two phase regions can exist even though outlet pressure is greater than critical pressure. Rotordynamic-fluid-mechanic restoring forces depend on momentum differences, and those for a two phase zone can differ significantly from those for a single-phase zone. Using the Reynolds equation the angular velocity, eccentricity, geometry, and ambient conditions are varied to determine the point of two phase flow incipience.

  6. Void fraction correlations in two-phase horizontal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiou, G.; Maeder, P.F.; DiPippo, R.; Dickinson, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This study examines some physical mechanisms which impose limits on the possible existence of two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe. With the aid of this analysis and the use of the Martinelli variable, X, a method is developed which determines the range of possible void fractions for a given two-phase flow. This method affords a means of direct comparison among void fraction correlations, as well as between correlation predictions and experimental results. In this respect, four well-known void fraction correlations are compared against each other and with experimental results obtained in the Brown University Two-Phase Flow Research Facility.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic generators using two-phase liquid-metal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, M.

    1969-01-01

    Two-phase flow generator cycle of a magnetohydrodynamic /MHD/ generator uses a working fluid which is compressible and treated as an expanding gas. The two-phase mixture passes from the heat source through the MHD generator, where the expansion process takes place and the electrical energy is extracted.

  8. Momentum flux in two phase two component low quality flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Graham, R. W.; Henry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    In two phase flow systems line losses comprise frictional and momentum pressure drops. For design purposes, it would be desirable to estimate the line losses employing a one-dimensional calculation. Two methods for computing one-dimensional momentum flux at a test section discharge station are compared to the experimental value for a range of two-phase flow conditions. The one-dimensional homogeneous model appears to be more accurate generally in predicting the momentum than the variable slip model.

  9. Two-Phase flow instrumentation for nuclear accidents simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monni, G.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the research work performed at the Energy Department of the Politecnico di Torino, concerning the development of two-phase flow instrumentation and of models, based on the analysis of experimental data, that are able to interpret the measurement signals. The study has been performed with particular reference to the design of power plants, such as nuclear water reactors, where the two-phase flow thermal fluid dynamics must be accurately modeled and predicted. In two-phase flow typically a set of different measurement instruments (Spool Piece - SP) must be installed in order to evaluate the mass flow rate of the phases in a large range of flow conditions (flow patterns, pressures and temperatures); moreover, an interpretative model of the SP need to be developed and experimentally verified. The investigated meters are: Turbine, Venturi, Impedance Probes, Concave sensors, Wire mesh sensor, Electrical Capacitance Probe. Different instrument combinations have been tested, and the performance of each one has been analyzed.

  10. Definition of two-phase flow behaviors for spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Miller, Katherine M.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Data for complete models of two-phase flow in microgravity are taken from in-flight experiments and applied to an adiabatic flow-regime analysis to study the feasibility of two-phase systems for spacecraft. The data are taken from five in-flight experiments by Hill et al. (1990) in which a two-phase pump circulates a freon mixture and vapor and liquid flow streams are measured. Adiabatic flow regimes are analyzed based on the experimental superficial velocities of liquid and vapor, and comparisons are made with the results of two-phase flow regimes at 1 g. A motion analyzer records the flow characteristics at a rate of 1000 frames/sec, and stratified flow regimes are reported at 1 g. The flow regimes observed under microgravitational conditions are primarily annular and include slug and bubbly-slug regimes. The present data are of interest to the design and analysis of two-phase thermal-management systems for use in space missions.

  11. Study of two-phase flows in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tirthankar

    Study of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is extremely important. One of the major applications of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions is in the design of active thermal control systems for future space applications. Previous space crafts were characterized by low heat generation within the spacecraft which needed to be redistributed within the craft or rejected to space. This task could easily have been accomplished by pumped single-phase loops or passive systems such as heat pipes and so on. However with increase in heat generation within the space craft as predicted for future missions, pumped boiling two-phase flows are being considered. This is because of higher heat transfer co-efficients associated with boiling heat transfer among other advantages. Two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions also find important applications in space propulsion as in space nuclear power reactors as well as in many other life support systems of space crafts. Two-fluid model along with Interfacial Area Transport Equation (IATE) is a useful tool available to predict the behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. It should be noted that considerable differences exist between two-phase flows under reduced and normal gravity conditions especially for low inertia flows. This is because due to suppression of the gravity field the gas-liquid two-phase flows take a considerable time to develop under reduced gravity conditions as compared to normal gravity conditions. Hence other common methods of analysis applicable for fully developed gas-liquid two-phase flows under normal gravity conditions, like flow regimes and flow regime transition criteria, will not be applicable to gas-liquid two-phase flows under reduced gravity conditions. However the two-fluid model and the IATE need to be evaluated first against detailed experimental data obtained under reduced gravity conditions. Although lot of studies

  12. Two-phase flow in helical and spiral coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Bush, Mia L.; Omrani, Adel; Yan, An

    1995-01-01

    Coiled tube heat exchangers involving two-phase flows are used in a variety of application areas, extending from the aerospace industry to petrochemical, refrigeration land power generation industries. The optimal design in each situation requires a fundamental understanding of the heat, mass and momentum transfer characteristic of the flowing two-phase mixture. However, two-phase flows in lengths of horizontal or vertical straight channels with heat transfer are often quite difficult in themselves to understand sufficiently well to permit accurate system designs. The present study has the following general objectives: (1) Observe two-phase flow patterns of air-water and R-113 working fluids over a range of flow conditions, for helical and spiral coil geometries, of circular and rectangular cross-section; (2) Compare observed flow patterns with predictions of existing flow maps; (3) Study criteria for flow regime transitions for possible modifications of existing flow pattern maps; and (4) Measure associated pressure drops across the coiled test sections over the rage of flow conditions specified.

  13. Effective property models for homogeneous two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, M.M.; Muzychka, Y.S.

    2008-10-15

    Using an analogy between thermal conductivity of porous media and viscosity in two-phase flow, new definitions for two-phase viscosity are proposed. These new definitions satisfy the following two conditions: namely (i) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the liquid viscosity at the mass quality = 0% and (ii) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the gas viscosity at the mass quality = 100%. These new definitions can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach. These new models are assessed using published experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels in the form of Fanning friction factor (f{sub m}) versus Reynolds number (Re{sub m}). The published data include different working fluids such as R-12, R-22, argon (R740), R717, R134a, R410A and propane (R290) at different diameters and different saturation temperatures. Models are assessed on the basis minimizing the root mean square error (e{sub RMS}). It is shown that these new definitions of two-phase viscosity can be used to analyze the experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels using simple friction models. (author)

  14. Method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1975-12-19

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  15. Nonequilibrium hydrogen combustion in one- and two-phase supersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Hourng, L.W.; Chien, L.C.

    1997-05-01

    A time-splitting method for the numerical simulation of stiff nonequilibrium combustion problem was developed. The algorithm has been applied to simulate the shock-induced combustion and to investigate a supersonic one-and two-phase flowfield. The results are physically reasonable and demonstrate that the presence of particles has a dramatic effect on the nozzle flowfield and the thrust. Supersonic combustion usually happens in high speed flying aerodynamic problems, such as supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engine for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Particularly for the scramjet engine, due to short residence time in the combustion chamber, it still contains incomplete combustion fuel as it enters the nozzle. For solid propellant rocket motors, the exhaust stream contains particles of aluminum oxide. In these two-phase nozzle flows, transfer of momentum and heat between gas particles often result in a decrease of nozzle efficiency.

  16. A review of two-phase flow-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    1987-08-01

    Two-phase flow exists in many shell-and-tube heat exchangers and power generation components. The flowing fluid is a source of energy that can induce small-amplitude subcritical oscillations and large-amplitude dynamic instabilities. In fact, many practical system components have experienced excessive flow-induced vibrations. To prevent unacceptable flow-induced vibration, we must understand excitation mechanisms, develop analytical and experimental techniques, and provide reliable design guidelines. Thus, we are conducting a comprehensive program to study structural vibration in components subjected to two-phase flow. This report reviews the current understanding of vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, crossflow, and axial flow, with emphasis on excitation mechanisms, mathematical models, and available experimental data. A unified theory is presented for cylinders oscillating under different flow conditions. Based on the theory, future research needs are outlined.

  17. Supersonic Flow of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Mixtures. Volume 2: RAMP - A Computer Code for Analysis of Chemically Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program written in conjunction with the numerical solution of the flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures was documented. The solution to the set of governing equations was obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form were shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The characteristic directions for the gas-particle system are found to be the conventional gas Mach lines, the gas streamlines and the particle streamlines. The basic mesh construction for the flow solution is along streamlines and normals to the streamlines for axisymmetric or two-dimensional flow. The analysis gives detailed information of the supersonic flow and provides for a continuous solution of the nozzle and exhaust plume flow fields. Boundary conditions for the flow solution are either the nozzle wall or the exhaust plume boundary.

  18. Momentum flux in two phase two component low quality flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Graham, R. W.; Henry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Values of a one-dimensional momentum flux at a test section discharge station of a two-phase two-component low quality flow computed by two methods, one based on a one-dimensional homogeneous model and the other on a variable slip model, are compared to experimental values for a range of two-phase flow conditions. The comparison seems to indicate the superior accuracy in momentum flux predictions to be on the side of the one-dimensional homogeneous model.

  19. Two Phase Flow and Space-Based Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    1999-01-01

    A reduced gravity environment offers the ability to remove the effect of buoyancy on two phase flows whereby density differences that normally would promote relative velocities between the phases and also alter the shape of the interface are removed. However, besides being a potent research tool, there are also many space-based technologies that will either utilize or encounter two-phase flow behavior, and as a consequence, several questions must be addressed. This paper presents some of these technologies missions. Finally, this paper gives a description of web-sites for some funding.

  20. Two-phase flow measurement based on oblique laser scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendruscolo, Tiago P.; Fischer, Robert; Martelli, Cícero; Rodrigues, Rômulo L. P.; Morales, Rigoberto E. M.; da Silva, Marco J.

    2015-07-01

    Multiphase flow measurements play a crucial role in monitoring productions processes in many industries. To guarantee the safety of processes involving multiphase flows, it is important to detect changes in the flow conditions before they can cause damage, often in fractions of seconds. Here we demonstrate how the scattering pattern of a laser beam passing a two-phase flow under an oblique angle to the flow direction can be used to detect derivations from the desired flow conditions in microseconds. Applying machine-learning techniques to signals obtained from three photo-detectors we achieve a compact, versatile, low-cost sensor design for safety applications.

  1. Coarse-Grid Simulation of Reacting and Non-Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Loezos, Peter N.; Srivastava, Anuj; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2001-11-06

    for the dynamics associated with the gas bubbles. This is possible only if frictional stresses are modeled properly. One of the objectives of our research is to develop a robust scheme for capturing the frictional stresses and a methodology to determine experimentally the parameters in such a model. We have now developed and implemented in MFIX a constitutive model for the rheology of granular materials in the dense, friction-dominated regime, and have shown that the key parameters in the frictional model can be estimated from fluidization-defluidization experiments. Such experiments have been performed with many different particle systems to demonstrate the viability of the procedure and the model itself. The second objective of our research is to develop methodologies for practical simulation of gas particle flows in fast-fluidized beds and risers, where the particle concentration is typically in the range of 1-30 vol %. In our past research, we have shown that meso-scale structures that take the form of clusters and streamers, which have been observed in risers, can be captured qualitatively through transient integration of continuum equations for the gas and particle phases. These structures arise as a result of two instability mechanisms, both of which are accounted for in a rheological model deduced in the literature by adapting the kinetic theory of gases to gas-particle mixtures. These meso-scale structures are too small in size to be resolved in simulations of flow in large process vessels, and are invariably invisible in the coarse-grid simulations. Yet, they affect the flow characteristics profoundly; in particular, they alter the effective interaction force that couples the gas and particle phases, and dramatically increase the effective viscosities of the two phases. We had proposed to develop a more practical approach, where we simulate the dynamics of only the large clusters using coarse grids and account for the effects of smaller, unresolved clusters

  2. Modulating patterns of two-phase flow with electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Anand, Robbyn K.; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of electro-hydrodynamic actuation to control the transition between three major flow patterns of an aqueous-oil Newtonian flow in a microchannel: droplets, beads-on-a-string (BOAS), and multi-stream laminar flow. We observed interesting transitional flow patterns between droplets and BOAS as the electric field was modulated. The ability to control flow patterns of a two-phase fluid in a microchannel adds to the microfluidic tool box and improves our understanding of this interesting fluid behavior. PMID:25379091

  3. Low gravity two-phase flow with heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1991-01-01

    A realistic model for the transfer line chilldown operation under low-gravity conditions is developed to provide a comprehensive predictive capability on the behavior of liquid vapor, two-phase diabatic flows in pipes. The tasks described involve the development of numerical code and the establishment of the necessary experimental data base for low-gravity simulation.

  4. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  5. Spacecraft heat transfer by two-phase flow method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigerator/freezer has been designed with an oil-free compressor to provide an economical two-phase flow system for heat transfer. A computer simulation has been done for the condenser and evaporator to determine the design parameters, such as length, diameter, and flow regimes, for different refrigerants and load requirements. A large Reynolds number was considered to ensure annular flow (in order to maximize heat transfer coefficients) and large Froude number. The simulation was correlated with the test data of a vapor compression refrigerator/freezer flown on STS-4 (which provided information on vapor compression in a zero-gravity environment). The two-phase system will be used for the Spacelab mission SLS-1 and can be used in future spacecraft and high-speed aircraft, where weight, volume, and power requirements are critical.

  6. Neutron Imaging of a Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction remains a crucial parameter in understanding and characterizing two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in both heat transfer and pressure drop correlations of two-phase flows, from the macro to micro- channel scale. Void fraction estimation dictates the sizing of both evaporating and condensing phase change heat exchangers, for example. In order to measure void fraction some invasive approach is necessary. Typically, visualization is achieved either downstream of the test section or on top by machining to expose the channel. Both approaches can lead to inaccuracies. The former assumes the flow will not be affected moving from the heat exchanger surface to the transparent section. The latter distorts the heat flow path. Neutron Imaging can provide a non-invasive measurement because metals such as Aluminum are essentially transparent to neutrons. Hence, if a refrigerant is selected that provides suitable neutron attenuation; steady-state void fraction measurements in two-phase flow are attainable in-situ without disturbing the fluid flow or heat flow path. Neutron Imaging has been used in the past to qualitatively describe the flow in heat exchangers in terms of maldistributions without providing void fraction data. This work is distinguished from previous efforts because the heat exchanger has been designed and the refrigerant selected to avail of neutron imaging. This work describes the experimental flow loop that enables a boiling two-phase flow; the heat exchanger test section and downstream transparent section are described. The flow loop controls the degree of subcooling and the refrigerant flowrate. Heating cartridges embedded in the test section are employed to control the heat input. Neutron-imaged steady-state void fraction measurements are captured and compared to representative high-speed videography captured at the visualization section. This allows a qualitative comparison between neutron imaged and traditional techniques. The

  7. Modeling of density loaded two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, A.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical model for densely loaded particle-laden flows is proposed to account for particle collisions and particle-turbulence interaction. The coupled conservation equations are based on a Eulerian scheme for the gas and a stochastic Lagrangian technique for the particles. The model was validated against the experimental data of densely loaded particle-laden jet flows. The comparison between the computational results and measurements suggested that both turbulence modulation and particle collisions are important and should be considered in an accurate analysis of dense two-phase flows.

  8. Two-fluid model for two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, M.

    1987-06-01

    The two-fluid model formulation is discussed in detail. The emphasis of the paper is on the three-dimensional formulation and the closure issues. The origin of the interfacial and turbulent transfer terms in the averaged formulation is explained and their original mathematical forms are examined. The interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy is proportional to the interfacial area and driving force. This is not a postulate but a result of the careful examination of the mathematical form of the exact interfacial terms. These two effects are considered separately. Since all the interfacial transfer terms involve the interfacial area concentration, the accurate modeling of the local interfacial area concentration is the first step to be taken for a development of a reliable two-fluid model closure relations. The interfacial momentum interaction has been studied in terms of the standard-drag, lift, virtual mass, and Basset forces. Available analytical and semi-empirical correlations and closure relations are reviewed and existing shortcomings are pointed out. The other major area of importance is the modeling of turbulent transfer in two-phase flow. The two-phase flow turbulence problem is coupled with the phase separation problem even in a steady-state fully developed flow. Thus the two-phase turbulence cannot be understood without understanding the interfacial drag and lift forces accurately. There are some indications that the mixing length type model may not be sufficient to describe the three-dimensional turbulent and flow structures. Although it is a very difficult challenge, the two-phase flow turbulence should be investigated both experimentally and analytically with long time-scale research.

  9. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  10. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.

    1992-09-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter`s closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  11. A study of two phase flow in fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.; Pruess, K.; Vomvoris, S.; Segan, S.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate characterization of the two-phase flow behavior of the fractured rock mass is vital to the safety of a potential high level nuclear waste repository in the unsaturated, fractured welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, NV. A tool for studying the two-phase flow properties of a fracture networks was developed. It is based on a simple mechanistic model in which the capillary pressure of a fracture is a unique function of the aperture. Whether a particular fracture element is occupied by wetting fluid or non-wetting fluid is determined by allowability and accessibility criteria. Relative permeability characteristics of a simulated fracture network were investigated using the model. Different assumptions are examined regarding the interactions between phases. In all cases, strong phase interference was observed. Hysteresis effects and irreducible saturation were also explained based on the model.

  12. By-pass pigs for two-phase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.L.; Spronsen, G. van; Klaus, E.H.; Stewart, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Pigging two-phase pipelines normally leads to the generation of large liquid slug volumes in front of the pig requiring excessively large separators or slug catchers. The concept of using a high by-pass pig to disperse the liquid and reduce the maximum liquid production rate prior to pig arrival is under investigation by Shell Exploration and Production companies. A simulation model of the dynamics of the pig and related two-phase flow behavior in the pipeline was used to predict the performance of by-pass pigs. Field trials in a dry gas pipeline were carried out to provide friction data and to validate the model. It was then used to explore operating possibilities in a two-phase lie which led to the follow-up trial in a 15.6 km, 20 inch OD two-phase offshore interfield pipeline with risers. Whereas the volume of liquid swept in front of the pig would be 179 m{sup 3} if the by-pass fraction were zero, a reduction of 70% to 53m{sup 3} was achieved in the field with a by-pass fraction of 10%. The predicted mobility of the high by-pass pig in the pipeline and risers was verified and the beneficial effects due to the by-pass concept exceeded the prediction of the simplified model. The significant gains of using a by-pass pig in modifying gas and liquid production rates during pigging operation have been demonstrated. The method can widen the possibility of applying two-phase flow pipeline transportation to cases where separator or slug catcher capacity are limited for reasons of practicality or cost.

  13. Two-Phase Annular Flow in Helical Coil Flow Channels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Lin, Chin S.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of both single- and two-phase flow studies in curved and coiled flow geometries is first presented. Some of the complexities of two-phase liquid-vapor flow in curved and coiled geometries are discussed, and serve as an introduction to the advantages of observing such flows under a low-gravity environment. The studies proposed -- annular two-phase air-water flow in helical coil flow channels are described. Objectives of the studies are summarized.

  14. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  15. Two-Phase Mass Flow Measurement Using Noise Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Robert Pugmire; Keller, Joseph George; Stephens, A. G.; Blotter, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a low cost, non-intrusive, mass flow measurement sensor for two-phase flow conditions in geothermal applications. The emphasis of the work to date has been on a device that will monitor two-phase flow in the above-ground piping systems. The flashing brines have the potential for excessive scaling and corrosion of exposed surfaces, which can reduce the effectiveness of any measurement device. A major objective in the work has been the development of an instrument that is less susceptible to the scaling and corrosion effects. The focus of the project efforts has been on transducer noise analysis, a technology initiated at the INEEL. A transducer sensing a process condition will have, in addition to its usual signal, various noise components superimposed upon the primary signal that can be related to flow. Investigators have proposed that this technique be applied to steam and liquid water flow mixtures where the signal from an accelerometer mounted on an external pipe surface is evaluated to determine flow rate.

  16. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  17. Investigation of two phase (oil, tensid) flow in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, G.

    1980-07-01

    Capillary flow phenomena were studied. The feasibility of a crude extraction method which can increase the eventual output of existing oil wells is discussed. A gas/water solution together with other additives is pumped into the well. This solution acts on the crude trapped in permeable stone formations. The state of the trapped oil is similar to oil in a capillary tube. Using laboratory apparatus, the characteristic two phase flow resulting when the tensid solution forces the oil out of the capillary was demonstrated.

  18. Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

    1984-03-01

    Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

  19. Two-phase, gas-liquid flows in static mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.F.; Kale, D.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that static mixers are used for many gas-liquid two-phase operations. some of the typical applications are processing of natural gas to remove hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide, waste water treatment, dissolution of gases, hydrogenation, chlorination, and so on. They have experimentally studied the pressure drop for oxygen-water system in a bubble column packed with Sulzer-Koch-type mixing elements. They observed that the ratio of pressure drop through the packed bubble column to that through the unpacked one was slightly greater than one. The suitability of static mixers to mix fluids of very widely different viscosities has been demonstrated. Two-phase operations in polymer industry involve very viscous fluids. Due to the high viscosity of these fluids, the flow will be predominantly in laminar region for both fluids. There are no data on gas-liquid two-phase systems incorporating viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids where flows are predominantly in laminar region.

  20. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-11-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  1. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  2. On drag reduction in a two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatapova, E. Ya.; Ajaev, V. S.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-02-01

    Bubbles collected on a local hydrophobic surface with nanocoating in a two-phase flow in a minichannel have been detected experimentally. It has been proposed to use the effect of concentration of gas bubbles on hydrophobic segments of the surface of the channel with contrast wettability for ensuring drag reduction. A two-dimensional flow model with the Navier slip condition in the region of the bubble layer gives criteria of drag reduction, depending on the slip length, dimension of bubbles, and dimension of the segment with nanocoating. The presence of the bubble layer on half of the surface of the channel can increase the flow rate of a liquid flowing through the channel by 40% at a fixed pressure gradient.

  3. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  4. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-09-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini [1] is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  5. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  6. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, G. A.; Trapp, J. A.

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles, thus, avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  7. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A. ); Trapp, J.A. Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  8. Particle-fluid two-phase flow modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Trapp, J.A. |

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes a numerical scheme and computer program, DISCON, for the calculation of two-phase flows that does not require the use of flow regime maps. This model is intermediate between-thermal instantaneous and the averaged two-fluid model. It solves the Eulerian continuity, momentum, and energy equations for each liquid control volume, and the Lagrangian mass, momentum, energy, and position equations for each bubble. The bubbles are modeled individually using a large representative number of bubbles thus avoiding the numerical diffusion associated with Eulerian models. DISCON has been used to calculate the bubbling of air through a column of water and the subcooled boiling of water in a flow channel. The results of these calculations are presented.

  9. Experimental study of phase separation in dividing two phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yong; Yang Zhilin; Xu Jijun

    1996-12-31

    Experimental study of phase separation of air-water two phase bubbly, slug flow in the horizontal T-junction is carried out. The influences of the inlet mass quality X1, mass extraction rate G3/G1, and fraction of extracted liquid QL3/QL1 on phase separation characteristics are analyzed. For the first time, the authors have found and defined pulsating run effect by the visual experiments, which show that under certain conditions, the down stream flow of the T-junction has strangely affected the phase redistribution of the junction, and firstly point out that the downstream geometric condition is very important to the study of phase separation phenomenon of two-phase flow in a T-junction. This kind of phenomenon has many applications in the field of energy, power, petroleum and chemical industries, such as the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a small break in a horizontal coolant pipe in nuclear reactor, and the flip-flop effect in the natural gas transportation pipeline system, etc.

  10. Two Phase Flow Mapping and Transition Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, Masood; Chao, David F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, recent microgravity two-phase flow data for air-water, air-water-glycerin, and air- water-Zonyl FSP mixtures are analyzed for transition from bubbly to slug and from slug to annular flow. It is found that Weber number-based maps are inadequate to predict flow-pattern transition, especially over a wide range of liquid flow rates. It is further shown that slug to annular flow transition is dependent on liquid phase Reynolds number at high liquid flow rate. This effect may be attributed to growing importance of liquid phase inertia in the dynamics of the phase flow and distribution. As a result a new form of scaling is introduced to present data using liquid Weber number based on vapor and liquid superficial velocities and Reynolds number based on liquid superficial velocity. This new combination of the dimensionless parameters seem to be more appropriate for the presentation of the microgravity data and provides a better flow pattern prediction and should be considered for evaluation with data obtained in the future. Similarly, the analysis of bubble to slug flow transition indicates a strong dependence on both liquid inertia and turbulence fluctuations which seem to play a significant role on this transition at high values of liquid velocity. A revised mapping of data using a new group of dimensionless parameters show a better and more consistent description of flow transition over a wide range of liquid flow rates. Further evaluation of the proposed flow transition mapping will have to be made after a wider range of microgravity data become available.

  11. Droplets formation and merging in two-phase flow microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  12. Droplets Formation and Merging in Two-Phase Flow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H. G.; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed. PMID:21731459

  13. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  14. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  15. Flooding in counter-current two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, W.A.; Ganic, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Flooding is a phenomenon which is best described as the transition from counter-current to co-current flow. Early notice was taken of this phenomenon in the chemical engineering industry. Flooding also plays an important role in the field of two-phase heat transfer since it is a limit for many systems involving counter-current flow. Practical applications of flooding limited processes include wickless thermosyphons and the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of pressurized water nuclear reactors. The phenomenon of flooding also is involved in the behavior of nuclear reactor core materials during severe accident conditions where flooding is one of the mechanisms governing the motion of the molten fuel pin cladding.

  16. Conceptual design for spacelab two-phase flow experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; King, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    KC-135 aircraft tests confirmed the gravity sensitivity of two phase flow correlations. The prime component of the apparatus is a 1.5 cm dia by 90 cm fused quartz tube test section selected for visual observation. The water-cabin air system with water recycle was a clear choice for a flow regime-pressure drop test since it was used satisfactorily on KC-135 tests. Freon-11 with either overboard dump or with liquid-recycle will be used for the heat transfer test. The two experiments use common hardware. The experimental plan covers 120 data points in six hours with mass velocities from 10 to 640 kg/sec-sq m and qualities 0.01 to 0.64. The apparatus with pump, separator, storage tank and controls is mounted in a double spacelab rack. Supporting hardware, procedures, measured variables and program costs are defined.

  17. Two-phase flow cell for chemiluminescence and bioluminescence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, J.L.; Seitz, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach to two-phase CL (chemiluminescence) measurements is reported. A magnetically stirred reagent phase is separated from the analyte phase by a dialysis membrane so that only smaller molecules can go from one phase to the other. The system is designed so that the analyte phase flows through a spiral groove on an aluminum block that is flush against the dialysis membrane. As solution flows through the spiral grove, analyte diffuses into the reagent phase where it reacts to produce light. A simple model is developed to predict how this system will behave. Experimentally, the system is evaluated by using the luminol reaction catalyzed by peroxidase, the firefly reaction, and the bacterial bioluminescence reaction. 10 references, 4 tables, 6 figures.

  18. Tsunami Generated by a Two-Phase Submarine Debris Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini (2011) is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model includes several essential physical aspects, including Mohr-Coulomb plasticity for the solid stress, while the fluid stress is modelled as a solid volume fraction gradient enhanced non-Newtonian viscous stress. The generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes the viscous drag, buoyancy, and the virtual mass. The generalized drag covers both the solid-like and fluid-like contributions, and can be applied to linear to quadratic drags. Strong couplings exist between the solid and the fluid momentum transfer. The advantage of the real two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase or quasi-two-phase models is that by considering the solid (and/or the fluid) volume fraction appropriately, the initial mass can be divided into several (even mutually disjoint) parts; a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This offers a unique and innovative opportunity within a single framework to simultaneously simulate (a) the sliding debris (or landslide), (b) the water lake or ocean, (c) the debris impact at the lake or ocean, (d) tsunami generation and propagation, (e) mixing and separation between the solid and the fluid phases, and (f) sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. The new model is applied to two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows. Benchmark numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of the debris impact induced tsunamis are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanche and landslides. Special attention is paid to study the basic features of the debris impact to the mountain lakes or oceans. This includes the generation, amplification and propagation of the multiple

  19. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  20. Calculation of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolpadi, A.K.

    1995-10-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion a model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model, and a combustion model comprising an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. This two-phase model was applied to a real piece of combustion hardware in the form of a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor. For the purposes of comparison, calculations were also performed by treating the fuel as a single gaseous phase. The effect on the solution of two extreme situations of the fuel as a gas and initially as a liquid was examined. The distribution of the velocity field and the conserved scalar within the combustor, as well as the distribution of the temperature field in the reaction zone and in the exhaust, were all predicted with the combustor operating both at high-power and low-power (ground idle) conditions. The calculated exit gas temperature was compared with test rig measurements. Under both low and high-power conditions, the temperature appeared to show an improved agreement with the measured data when the calculations were performed with the spray model as compared to a single-phase calculation.

  1. Closures for Course-Grid Simulation of Fluidized Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2010-02-14

    Gas-particle flows in fluidized beds and riser reactors are inherently unstable, and they manifest fluctuations over a wide range of length and time scales. Two-fluid models for such flows reveal unstable modes whose length scale is as small as ten particle diameters. Yet, because of limited computational resources, gas-particle flows in large fluidized beds are invariably simulated by solving discretized versions of the two-fluid model equations over a coarse spatial grid. Such coarse-grid simulations do not resolve the small-scale spatial structures which are known to affect the macroscale flow structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus there is a need to develop filtered two-fluid models which are suitable for coarse-grid simulations and capturing the effect of the small-scale structures through closures in terms of the filtered variables. The overall objective of the project is to develop validated closures for filtered two-fluid models for gas-particle flows, with the transport gasifier as a primary, motivating example. In this project, highly resolved three-dimensional simulations of a kinetic theory based two-fluid model for gas-particle flows have been performed and the statistical information on structures in the 100-1000 particle diameters length scale has been extracted. Based on these results, closures for filtered two-fluid models have been constructed. The filtered model equations and closures have been validated against experimental data and the results obtained in highly resolved simulations of gas-particle flows. The proposed project enables more accurate simulations of not only the transport gasifier, but also many other non-reacting and reacting gas-particle flows in a variety of chemical reactors. The results of this study are in the form of closures which can readily be incorporated into existing multi-phase flow codes such as MFIX (www.mfix.org). Therefore, the benefits of this study can be realized quickly. The training provided

  2. Turbulent gas-particle flow in vertical risers

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Jackson, R.; Sundaresan, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The riser reactors used for the catalytic cracking of gas oil use a transported solid catalyst, and their performance can be predicted with confidence only if the physical mechanism that determines the cross-sectional distribution of the catalyst can be identified and modeled. Understanding this mechanism is, therefore, of central importance in predicting the behavior of any system in which solid particles are transported through a duct by fluid, and this is the problem addressed here. Many experimental studies on the cross-sectional distribution of particles in vertical risers have revealed marked segregation of particles. These flows are inherently unsteady with large fluctuations in suspension density. In this article, the authors have analyzed the time-smoothed equations for the motion of dense suspensions to demonstrate the role of these fluctuations on the occurrence of segregation. It is shown that the particles will congregate in regions where the kinetic energy of fluctuations associated with the particles is small. In the context of transport of small particles such as FCC, a simplified model based on the mixture velocity can be constructed. A speculative K-[epsilon] model based on this velocity is analyzed to illustrate the extent of segregation of particles afforded by unsteady fluctuations.

  3. Two-phase flow effect on hybrid rocket combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jih Lung

    2009-10-01

    This study numerically explores the aerodynamic and combustion processes in a hybrid rocket combustor, under a two-phase turbulent flow environment, considering the evaporation, combustion and drag of droplet and droplet ignition criterion. The predictions of temperature, reaction mode, reactant mass fraction, velocity, oxidizer consumption, fuel regression and droplet number distribution enhance understanding of the two-phase combustion aerodynamics inside the combustor. A parametric study of the inlet spray pattern, including spray cone angle, spray injection velocity and droplet size, is performed to improve the operation of reactant mixing and higher fuel regression rate. Analytical results indicate that both the oxidizer consumption and the fuel regression increase with increasing spray cone angle and spray injection velocity in the practical range of operation. However, for stoichiometric operation, the superior spray cone angle is within 20-60°, and spray injection velocity within 20-40 m/s, under a volume-mean droplet radius of 50 μm. The power dependence of solid-fuel regression on total mass flux is found to decrease with rising of droplet mean size.

  4. Particle Rotation Effects in Rarefied Two-Phase Plume Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jonathan M.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2005-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of solid particle rotation in high-altitude solid rocket exhaust plume flows, through the development and application of methods for the simulation of two phase flows involving small rotating particles and a nonequilibrium gas. Green's functions are derived for the force, moment, and heat transfer rate to a rotating solid sphere within a locally free-molecular gas, and integration over a Maxwellian gas velocity distribution is used to determine the influence of particle rotation on the heat transfer rate at the equilibrium limit. The use of these Green's functions for the determination of particle phase properties through the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method is discussed, and a procedure is outlined for the stochastic modeling of interphase collisions. As a test case, we consider the nearfield plume flow for a Star-27 solid rocket motor exhausting into a vacuum, and vary particle angular velocities at the nozzle exit plane in order to evaluate the influence of particle rotation on various flow properties. Simulation results show that rotation may lead to slightly higher particle temperatures near the central axis, but for the case considered the effects of particle rotation are generally found to be negligible.

  5. Vapor core turbulence in annular two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reports a new technique to measure vapor turbulence in two-phase flows using hot-film anemometry. Continuous vapor turbulence measurements along with local void fraction, droplet frequency, droplet velocity and droplet diameter were measured in a thin, vertical duct. By first eliminating the portion of the output voltage signal resulting from the interaction of dispersed liquid droplets with the HFA sensor, the discrete voltage samples associated with the vapor phase were separately analyzed. The data revealed that, over the range of liquid droplet sizes and concentrations encountered, the presence of the droplet field acts to enhance vapor turbulence. In addition, there is evidence that vapor turbulence is significantly influenced by the wall-bounded liquid film. The present results are qualitatively consistent with the limited data available in the open literature.

  6. Measurement of two-phase flow momentum with force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two strain-gage-based drag transducers were developed to measure two-phase flow in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) test facilities. One transducer, a drag body (DB), was designed to measure the bidirectional average momentum flux passing through an end box. The second drag sensor, a break through detector (BTD), was designed to sense liquid downflow from the upper plenum to the core region. After prototype sensors passed numerous acceptance tests, transducers were fabricated and installed in two experimental test facilities, one in Japan and one in West Germany. High-quality data were extracted from both the DBs and BTDs for a variety of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. The information collected from these sensors has added to the understanding of the thermohydraulic phenomena that occur during the refill/reflood stage of a LOCA in a PWR. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  7. A digital physics method for two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, David M.

    1997-10-01

    Digital Physics refers to a fully discrete, microdynamieal system whose mean behavior recovers real continuum physics. The purpose of this project is to develop a Digital Physics method by which to model the flow of single-component fluids with a non-ideal-gas equation of state, such as liquids and two-phase mixtures. The new system, called the multiphase system, is built upon the framework of a previously developed Digital Physics system. This original Digital Physics system, the standard system, is used to simulate low Mach number flow of an ideal gas. Previously, substantial performance improvements (compared to CFD numerical solvers) have been achieved with the standard system for hydrodynamic simulations of ideal gas flows. Hence the underlying motivation of this work is the development of a more efficient simulation tool for detailed two phase flow investigation as compared to current numerical methods. Specifically, the multiphase system simulates the local instantaneous flow field including explicit representation of the interfaces. The multiphase system contains significant extensions of the standard system, particularly a non-local operation allowing microscopic interactions at a distance, loosely mimicking a real liquid, while preserving exact (global) conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. It retains the advantages of Digital Physics compared to other lattice gas methods for flow modeling, such as Galilean invariance, elimination of the dynamic pressure anomaly, and a meaningful energy transport equation. In the multiphase system the energy degree of freedom has been extended to allow a consistent empirical thermodynamics suitable for a system with liquid-vapor coexistence. Thus in addition to correct hydrodynamic transport, the multiphase system achieves appropriate equations of state for the liquid and vapor phases; the current implementation employs a van der Waals thermodynamical system. The multiphase system does not model heat transfer

  8. Particle migration in two-phase, viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaensson, Nick; Hulsen, Martien; Anderson, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Particles suspended in creeping, viscoelastic flows can migrate across stream lines due to gradients in normal stresses. This phenomenon has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. However, particle migration in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces is hardly studied. We present results of simulations in 2D and 3D of rigid spherical particles in two-phase flows, where either one or both of the fluids are viscoelastic. The fluid-fluid interface is assumed to be diffuse and is described using Cahn-Hilliard theory. The particle boundary is assumed to be sharp and is described by a boundary-fitted, moving mesh. The governing equations are solved using the finite element method. We show that differences in normal stresses between the two fluids can induce a migration of the particle towards the interface in a shear flow. Depending on the magnitude of the surface tension and the properties of the fluids, particle migration can be halted due to the induced Laplace pressure, the particle can be adsorbed at the interface, or the particle can cross the interface into the other fluid. Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  9. Unsteady flow analysis of a two-phase hydraulic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, N.; Kwak, M.; Lee, W. J.; Moshfeghi, M.; Chang, C.-S.; Kang, N.-W.

    2016-06-01

    Hydraulic couplings are being widely used for torque transmitting between separate shafts. A mechanism for controlling the transmitted torque of a hydraulic system is to change the amount of working fluid inside the system. This paper numerically investigates three-dimensional turbulent flow in a real hydraulic coupling with different ratios of charged working fluid. Working fluid is assumed to be water and the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model together with the VOF method are used to investigate two-phase flow inside the wheels. Unsteady simulations are conducted using the sliding mesh technique. The primary wheel is rotating at a fixed speed of 1780 rpm and the secondary wheel rotates at different speeds for simulating different speed ratios. Results are investigated for different blade angles, speed ratios and also different water volume fractions, and are presented in the form of flow patterns, fluid average velocity and also torques values. According to the results, blade angle severely affects the velocity vector and the transmitted torque. Also in the partially-filled cases, air is accumulated in the center of the wheel forming a toroidal shape wrapped by water and the transmitted torque sensitively depends on the water volume fraction. In addition, in the fully-filled case the transmitted torque decreases as the speed ration increases and the average velocity associated with lower speed ratios are higher.

  10. Two-phase flow research. Phase I. Two-phase nozzle research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    An investigation of energy transfer in two-phase nozzles was conducted. Experimental performance of converging-diverging nozzles operating on air-water mixtures is presented for a wide range of parameters. Thrust measurements characterized the performance and photographic documentation was used to visually observe the off-design regimes. Thirty-six nozzle configurations were tested to determine the effects of convergence angle, area ratio, and nozzle length. In addition, the pressure ratio and mass flowrate ratio were varied to experimentally map off-design performance. The test results indicate the effects of wall friction and infer temperature and velocity differences between phases and the effect on nozzle performance. The major conclusions reached were: the slip ratio between the phases, gas velocity to liquid velocity, is shown to be below about 4 or 5, and, in most of the test cases run, was estimated to between about 1-1/2 to 2-1/2; in all cases except the free-jet the mass )

  11. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  12. Analysis of gas/particles flow in the riser of a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Arastoopour, H.; Benyahia, S.

    1999-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) packages (CFX and Fluent) governing equations were modified using kinetic theory for cohesive and non-cohesive particles of different sizes, and used to simulate 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional transient gas/particle flow behavior using FCC particles in the riser section of a circulating fluidized bed. The calculated solid flux velocity and pressure drop agreed reasonably well with the experimental data obtained using laser doppler anemometer and large-scale experiments.

  13. Tracking Interfaces in Vertical Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Aktas, Birol

    2002-07-01

    The presence of stratified liquid-gas interfaces in vertical flows poses difficulties to most classes of solution methods for two-phase flows of practical interest in the field of reactor safety and thermal-hydraulics. These difficulties can plague the reactor simulations unless handled with proper care. To illustrate these difficulties, the US NRC Consolidated Thermal-hydraulics Code (TRAC-M) was exercised with selected numerical bench-mark problems. These numerical benchmarks demonstrate that the use of an average void fraction for computational volumes simulating vertical flows is inadequate when these volumes consist of stratified liquid-gas interfaces. In these computational volumes, there are really two regions separated by the liquid-gas interface and each region has a distinct flow topology. An accurate description of these divided computational volumes require that separate void fractions be assigned to each region. This strategy requires that the liquid-gas interfaces be tracked in order to determine their location, the volumes of regions separated by the interface, and the void fractions in these regions. The idea of tracking stratified liquid-gas interfaces is not new. There are examples of tracking methods that were developed for reactor safety codes and applied to reactor simulations in the past with some limited success. The users of these safety codes were warned against potential flow oscillations, conflicting water levels, and pressure disturbances which could be caused by the tracking methods themselves. An example of these methods is the level tracking method of TRAC-M. A review of this method is given here to explore the reasons behind its failures. The review shows that modifications to the field equations are mostly responsible for these failures. Following the review, a systematic approach to incorporate interface tracking methods is outlined. This approach is applicable to most classes of solution methods. For demonstration, the approach to

  14. Cytoplasm dynamics and cell motion: two-phase flow models.

    PubMed

    Alt, W; Dembo, M

    1999-03-01

    The motion of amoeboid cells is characterized by cytoplasmic streaming and by membrane protrusions and retractions which occur even in the absence of interactions with a substratum. Cell translocation requires, in addition, a transmission mechanism wherein the power produced by the cytoplasmic engine is applied to the substratum in a highly controlled fashion through specific adhesion proteins. Here we present a simple mechano-chemical model that tries to capture the physical essence of these complex biomolecular processes. Our model is based on the continuum equations for a viscous and reactive two-phase fluid model with moving boundaries, and on force balance equations that average the stochastic interactions between actin polymers and membrane proteins. In this paper we present a new derivation and analysis of these equations based on minimization of a power functional. This derivation also leads to a clear formulation and classification of the kinds of boundary conditions that should be specified at free surfaces and at the sites of interaction of the cell and the substratum. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional lamella reveal that even this extremely simplified model is capable of producing several typical features of cell motility. These include periodic 'ruffle' formation, protrusion-retraction cycles, centripetal flow and cell-substratum traction forces. PMID:10204394

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Two-Phase Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Christopher James

    This thesis, comprised of two parts, deals with the flow of suspensions. Part I concerns specifically with the stability of a single drop translating through a quiescent, unbounded suspending fluid at low Reynolds number. The evolution of the shape of an initially nonspherical drop as it translates is studied numerically and experimentally. For finite capillary numbers, it is shown that the drop reverts to a sphere provided that the initial deformation is small enough. However, beyond certain critical initial deformation, the drop deforms continuously. For initially prolate shapes, the drop elongates with the formation of a tail; for initially oblate shapes, the drop flattens with the formation of a cavity at its rear. Experiments extend the numerical results. It is found that initially unstable prolate drops break up into multiple droplets, while initially unstable oblate drops deform in double-emulsion drops. Part II of this thesis considers the flow of high concentration solid suspensions through a rectangular channel. By adapting the well-known Laser Doppler Anemometry, an experimental technique is developed to measure the velocity as well as particle volume fraction of the suspension. A crucial element in these experiments is the reduction of the optical turbidity of the suspension. To accomplish this goal, a systematic method based on refractive-index-matching of the two phases is employed. Experimental results show that the velocity profile is blunted while the concentration profile has a maximum near the center. The qualitative features of the experimental data compare reasonably well with theoretical predictions based on the shear-induced particle migration theory.

  16. Sub-grid drag models for horizontal cylinder arrays immersed in gas-particle multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-08

    Immersed cylindrical tube arrays often are used as heat exchangers in gas-particle fluidized beds. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of large fluidized beds, explicit resolution of small cylinders is computationally infeasible. Instead, the cylinder array may be viewed as an effective porous medium in coarse-grid simulations. The cylinders' influence on the suspension as a whole, manifested as an effective drag force, and on the relative motion between gas and particles, manifested as a correction to the gas-particle drag, must be modeled via suitable sub-grid constitutive relationships. In this work, highly resolved unit-cell simulations of flow around an array of horizontal cylinders, arranged in a staggered configuration, are filtered to construct sub-grid, or `filtered', drag models, which can be implemented in coarse-grid simulations. The force on the suspension exerted by the cylinders is comprised of, as expected, a buoyancy contribution, and a kinetic component analogous to fluid drag on a single cylinder. Furthermore, the introduction of tubes also is found to enhance segregation at the scale of the cylinder size, which, in turn, leads to a reduction in the filtered gas-particle drag.

  17. Zero-G two phase flow regime modeling in adiabatic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Wheeler, Montgomery; Miller, Katheryn M.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow regime analysis. The data come from a recent sets of experiments. The experiments were funded by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and conducted by NASA JSC with Texas A&M University. The experiment was on loan to NASA JSC from Foster-Miller, Inc., who constructed it with funding from the Air Force Phillips Laboratory. The experiment used R12 as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate the two phase mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown 19 times for 577 parabolas aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates zero-G conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes in 0-G. The superficial velocities of liquid and vapor have been obtained from the measured flow rates and are presented along with the observed flow regimes and several flow regime transition predictions. None of the predictions completely describe the transitions as indicated by the data.

  18. Developing flow of a gas-particle mixture in a vertical riser

    SciTech Connect

    Pita, J.A. ); Sundaresan, S. )

    1993-04-01

    The riser reactors used for the catalytic cracking of gas oil use a transported solid catalyst, and their performance can be predicted with confidence only if the physical mechanism that determines the cross-sectional distribution of the catalyst can be identified and modeled. A computational study of steady, developing flow of gas-particle suspensions in a vertical riser has been carried out, using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials, to understand the role of inlet configuration on the pattern of flow development. Three inlet configurations - uniform inlet, core-annulus flow at the inlet and circumferential injection of secondary gas - were examined. It is found that the inlet configuration can have a profound impact on the rate of segregation of particles to the wall and the internal recirculation. Circumferential injection of gas has a favorable effect on the flow in the sense that it can decrease the extent of internal recirculation.

  19. Two parametric flow measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Chen, C.; Xu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    The importance and current development of two parametric measurement during two-phase flow are briefly reviewed in this paper. Gas-liquid two-phase two parametric metering experiments were conducted by using an oval gear meter and a sharp edged orifice mounted in series in a horizontal pipe. Compressed air and water were used as gas and liquid phases respectively. The correlations, which can be used to predict the total flow rate and volumetric quality of two-phase flow or volumetric flow rate of each phase, have also been proposed in this paper. Comparison of the calculated values of flow rate of each phase from the correlations with the test data showed that the root mean square fractional deviation for gas flow rate is 2.9 percent and for liquid flow rate 4.4 percent. The method proposed in this paper can be used to measure the gas and liquid flow rate in two-phase flow region without having to separate the phases.

  20. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Wang; Xiaodong Sun; Benjamin Doup; Haihua Zhao

    2012-12-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As twophase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminator s are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Flow pattern and heat transfer behavior of boiling two-phase flow in inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dezhang; Ning, Ouyang

    1992-09-01

    Movable Electrical Conducting Probe (MECP), a kind of simple and reliable measuring transducer, used for predicting full-flow-path flow pattern in a boiling vapor/liquid two-phase flow is introduced in this paper. When the test pipe is set at different inclination angles, several kinds of flow patterns, such as bubble, slug, churn, intermittent, and annular flows, may be observed in accordance with the locations of MECP. By means of flow pattern analysis, flow field numerical calculations have been carried out, and heat transfer coefficient correlations along full-flow-path derived. The results show that heat transfer performance of boiling two-phase flow could be significantly augmented as expected in some flow pattern zones. The results of the investigation, measuring techniques and conclusions contained in this paper would be a useful reference in foundational research for prediction of flow pattern and heat transfer behavior in boiling two-phase flow, as well as for turbine vane liquid-cooling design.

  2. Flow field simulation of gas-water two phase flow in annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Pengcheng; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The gas-water two-phase flow is very common in the industrial processes. the deep understanding of the two-phase flow state is to achieve the production equipment design and safe operation. In the measurement of gas-water two-phase flow, the differential pressure sensor is widely used, and some measurement model of multiphase flow have been concluded. The differential pressure is generated when fluid flowing through the throttling components to calculate flow rate. This paper mainly focuses on two points: 1. The change rule of the parameters include velocity, pressure, phase fraction as the change of time, when the phase inlet velocity is given. 2. Analysis the distribution of the parameters above-mentioned at a certain moment under the condition of different water inlet velocity. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was used to simulate gas-water two-phase flow fluid in the annular channel, which is composed of horizontal pipe and long- waist cone sensor. The simulation results were obtained from FLUENT software.

  3. COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2004-03-01

    The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

  4. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  5. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  6. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  7. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  8. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  9. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.

    2009-02-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NOx formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  10. Two-phase flow research using the learjet apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquillen, John B.; Neumann, Eric S.

    1995-01-01

    Low-gravity, gas-liquid flow research can be conducted aboard the NASA Lewis Learjet, the Lewis DC-9, or the Johnson Space Center KC-135. Air and water solutions serve as the test liquids in cylindrical test sections with an inner diameter of 1.27 cm and lengths up to 1.5 m. Superficial velocities range from 0.1 to 1.1 m/sec for liquids and from 0.1 to 25 m/sec for air. Flow rate, differential pressure, void fraction, film thickness, wall-shear stress, and acceleration data are measured and recorded throughout the 20 sec duration of the experiment. Flow is visualized by photographing at 400 frames with a high-speed, 16-mm camera.

  11. Experimental Studies on the Measurement of Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longbo; Zhang, Hongjian; Hua, Yuefang; Zhou, Hongliang

    2007-06-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow measurement was investigated with a Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter in this work. Based on the Venturi differential pressure and the quality of two-phase flow, a model for measuring oil-water mass flow rate was developed, in which fluid asymmetry of oil-water two-phase flow was considered. However, measuring the quality of two-phase flow on-line is rather difficult at present. Though double-U Coriolis meter can provide accurate measurement of two-phase flow, it can not provide desired respective mass flow rate. Therefore, a double-parameter measurement method with Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter is proposed. According to the flow rate requirement of Venturi, a new flow regime identification method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been developed for the separated flow and the dispersed flow. With the Venturi model developed in this paper and mass flow rate of oil-water mixture measured with double-U Coriolis meter, mixture mass flow rate, oil mass flow rate and water mass flow rate could be obtained by the correlation. Experiments of flow rate measurement of oil-water two-phase flow were carried out in the horizontal tube with 25mm inner diameter. The water fraction range is from 5% to 95%. Experimental results showed that the flow regime could be identified well with SVM, and the relative error of the total mass flow rate and respective mass flow rate of oil-water two-phase flow was less than ±1.5% and ±10%, respectively.

  12. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-01

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  13. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  14. Irreversible entropy production in two-phase flows with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Okong'o, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    A derivation of the irreversible entropy production, that is the dissipation, in two-phase flows is presented for the purpose of examining the effect of evaporative-drop modulation of flows having turbulent features.

  15. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  16. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors. PMID:21694270

  17. A continuum theory for two-phase flows of particulate solids: application to Poiseuille flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsorno, Davide; Varsakelis, Christos; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2015-11-01

    In the first part of this talk, we present a novel two-phase continuum model for incompressible fluid-saturated granular flows. The model accounts for both compaction and shear-induced dilatancy and accommodates correlations for the granular rheology in a thermodynamically consistent way. In the second part of this talk, we exercise this two-phase model in the numerical simulation of a fully-developed Poiseuille flow of a dense suspension. The numerical predictions are shown to compare favorably against experimental measurements and confirm that the model can capture the important characteristics of the flow field, such as segregation and formation of plug zones. Finally, results from parametric studies with respect to the initial concentration, the magnitude of the external forcing and the width of the channel are presented and the role of these physical parameters is quantified. Financial Support has been provided by SEDITRANS, an Initial Training Network of the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme

  18. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Boiling Two-Phase Flow of Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Oike, Mamoru; Kamijo, Kenjiro

    Two-dimensional characteristics of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen in a duct flow are numerically investigated to contribute to the further development of new high-performance cryogenic engineering applications. First, the governing equations of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen based on the unsteady drift-flux model are presented and several flow characteristics are numerically calculated taking account the effect of cryogenic flow states. Based on the numerical results, a two-dimensional structure of the boiling two-phase flow of liquid nitrogen is shown in detail, and it is found that the phase change of liquid nitrogen occurs in quite a short time interval compared with that of two-phase pressurized water at high temperature. Next, it is clarified that the distributions of pressure and the void fraction in a two-phase flow show a tendency different from those of fluids at room temperature because of the decrease in sound velocity due to large compressibility and the rapid phase change velocity in a cryogenic two-phase mixture flow. According to these numerical results, the fundamental characteristics of the cryogenic two-phase flow are predicted. The numerical results obtained will contribute to advanced cryogenic industrial applications.

  19. Three dimensional, two phases flow simulation around a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrocq, Thomas; Ludovic, Cassan

    2015-04-01

    Fishways are facilities build on the obstacles in river, as dams, to allow the free circulation of migratory fishes. This study focuses on "natural fishpasses" which are high slopes channels composed of blocks rows arranged in staggered. The characterization of the flow structure in this kind of fishways is the aim of the study even if the present first approach is achieved on a single block to validate the model. On one hand, three dimensional simulations are carried with several turbulence closure (k-ɛ, k-ω, RNG-k-ɛ). The VOF model is used to track the free surface. The computation run by the software OpenFOAM which enables to do massively parallel computing. On the other hand, experiments are conducted on a flume in the lab in order to compare the results. The tested configurations are, an emerged cylinder, no slope (i.e 0%) and flows of 10 and 20L/s. The objectif is the comparison of the free surface flow between experiments and simulation results at high Froude number. The results show a good agreement between the experiments and the simulations. The perspective is the simulation of a full fishpasse.

  20. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  1. Two Phase Flow Measurements by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, Stephen A; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2006-08-14

    In concentrated suspensions, there is a tendency for the solid phase to migrate from regions of high shear rate to regions of low shear (Leighton & Acrivos, 1987). In the early years that our effort was funded by the DOE Division of Basic Energy Science, quantitative measurement of this process in neutrally buoyant suspensions was a major focus (Abbott, et al., 1991; Altobelli, et al., 1991). Much of this work was used to improve multi-phase numerical models at Sandia National Laboratories. Later, our collaborators at Sandia and the University of New Mexico incorporated body forces into their numerical models of suspension flow (Rao, Mondy, Sun, et al., 2002). We developed experiments that allow us to study flows driven by buoyancy, to characterize these flows in well-known and useful engineering terms (Altobelli and Mondy, 2002) and to begin to explore the less well-understood area of flows with multiple solid phases (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003). We also studied flows that combine the effects of shear and buoyancy, and flows of suspensions made from non-Newtonian liquids (Rao, Mondy, Baer, et al, 2002). We were able to demonstrate the usefulness of proton NMR imaging of liquid phase concentration and velocity and produced quantitative data not obtainable by other methods. Fluids flowing through porous solids are important in geophysics and in chemical processing. NMR techniques have been widely used to study liquid flow in porous media. We pioneered the extension of these studies to gas flows (Koptyug, et al, 2000, 2000, 2001, 2002). This extension allows us to investigate a wider range of Peclet numbers, and to gather data on problems of interest in catalysis. We devised two kinds of NMR experiments for three-phase systems. Both experiments employ two NMR visible phases and one phase that gives no NMR signal. The earlier method depends on the two visible phases differing in a NMR relaxation property. The second method (Beyea, Altobelli, et al., 2003) uses two

  2. Enhanced two phase flow in heat transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Tegrotenhuis, Ward E; Humble, Paul H; Lavender, Curt A; Caldwell, Dustin D

    2013-12-03

    A family of structures and designs for use in devices such as heat exchangers so as to allow for enhanced performance in heat exchangers smaller and lighter weight than other existing devices. These structures provide flow paths for liquid and vapor and are generally open. In some embodiments of the invention, these structures can also provide secondary heat transfer as well. In an evaporate heat exchanger, the inclusion of these structures and devices enhance the heat transfer coefficient of the evaporation phase change process with comparable or lower pressure drop.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  4. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  5. Analytical solution for two-phase flow in a wellbore using the drift-flux model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Webb, S.W.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents analytical solutions for steady-state, compressible two-phase flow through a wellbore under isothermal conditions using the drift flux conceptual model. Although only applicable to highly idealized systems, the analytical solutions are useful for verifying numerical simulation capabilities that can handle much more complicated systems, and can be used in their own right for gaining insight about two-phase flow processes in wells. The analytical solutions are obtained by solving the mixture momentum equation of steady-state, two-phase flow with an assumption that the two phases are immiscible. These analytical solutions describe the steady-state behavior of two-phase flow in the wellbore, including profiles of phase saturation, phase velocities, and pressure gradients, as affected by the total mass flow rate, phase mass fraction, and drift velocity (i.e., the slip between two phases). Close matching between the analytical solutions and numerical solutions for a hypothetical CO{sub 2} leakage problem as well as to field data from a CO{sub 2} production well indicates that the analytical solution is capable of capturing the major features of steady-state two-phase flow through an open wellbore, and that the related assumptions and simplifications are justified for many actual systems. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution to evaluate how the bottomhole pressure in a well in which CO{sub 2} is leaking upward responds to the mass flow rate of CO{sub 2}-water mixture.

  6. Two-phase fluid flow in geometric packing.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Aureliano Sancho S; Oliveira, Rafael S; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2015-12-13

    We investigate how a plug of obstacles inside a two-dimensional channel affects the drainage of high viscous fluid (oil) when the channel is invaded by a less viscous fluid (water). The plug consists of an Apollonian packing with, at most, 17 circles of different sizes, which is intended to model an inhomogeneous porous region. The work aims to quantify the amount of retained oil in the region where the flow is influenced by the packing. The investigation, carried out with the help of the computational fluid dynamics package ANSYS-FLUENT, is based on the integration of the complete set of equations of motion. The study considers the effect of both the injection speed and the number and size of obstacles, which directly affects the porosity of the system. The results indicate a complex dependence in the fraction of retained oil on the velocity and geometric parameters. The regions where the oil remains trapped is very sensitive to the number of circles and their size, which influence in different ways the porosity of the system. Nevertheless, at low values of Reynolds and capillary numbers Re<4 and n(c)≃10(-5), the overall expected result that the volume fraction of oil retained decreases with increasing porosity is recovered. A direct relationship between the injection speed and the fraction of oil is also obtained. PMID:26527816

  7. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  8. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-12-31

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime.

  9. Analysis of Fractional Flow for Transient Two-Phase Flow in Fractal Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Duan, Yonggang; Fang, Quantang; Dai, Xiaolu; Wu, Jinsui

    2016-03-01

    Prediction of fractional flow in fractal porous medium is important for reservoir engineering and chemical engineering as well as hydrology. A physical conceptual fractional flow model of transient two-phase flow is developed in fractal porous medium based on the fractal characteristics of pore-size distribution and on the approximation that porous medium consist of a bundle of tortuous capillaries. The analytical expression for fractional flow for wetting phase is presented, and the proposed expression is the function of structural parameters (such as tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, maximum and minimum diameters of capillaries) and fluid properties (such as contact angle, viscosity and interfacial tension) in fractal porous medium. The sensitive parameters that influence fractional flow and its derivative are formulated, and their impacts on fractional flow are discussed.

  10. A two phase Mach number description of the equilibrium flow of nitrogen in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.; Adcock, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Some additional thermodynamic properties of the usual two-phase form which is linear in the moisture fraction are derived which are useful in the analysis of many kinds of duct flow. The method used is based on knowledge of the vapor pressure and Gibbs function as functions of temperature. With these, additional two-phase functions linear in moisture fraction are generated, which ultimately reveal that the squared ratio of mixture specific volume to mixture sound speed depends on liquid mass fraction and temperature in the same manner as do many weighted mean two-phase properties. This leads to a simple method of calculating two-phase Mach numbers for various duct flows. The matching of one- and two-phase flows at a saturated vapor point with discontinuous Mach number is also discussed.

  11. Single and two-phase flow fluid dynamics in parallel helical coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Salve, M.; Orio, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The design of helical coiled steam generators requires the knowledge of the single and two-phase fluid dynamics. The present work reports the results of an experimental campaign on single-phase and two phase pressure drops and void fraction in three parallel helicoidal pipes, in which the total water flow rate is splitted by means of a branch. With this test configuration the distribution of the water flow rate in the helicoidal pipes and the phenomena of the instability of the two-phase flow have been experimentally investigated.

  12. Application of neutron radiography to visualization of cryogenic fluid boiling two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Asano, Hitoshi; Fujii, Terushige; Ushiro, Toshihiko; Iwatani, Junji; Murata, Yutaka; Mochiki, Koh-ichi; Taguchi, Akira; Matsubayashi, Masahito; Tsuruno, Akira

    1996-02-01

    Liquid nitrogen boiling two-phase flows in a metallic container and in a heat exchanger were visualized by real-time thermal neutron radiography at JRR-3M at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and image processed by the Musashi dynamic image processing system. Boiling phenomena in a pool and boiling two-phase flow in an aluminum plate fin type heat exchanger were visualized. It was shown that neutron radiography was applicable to visualization of cryogenic boiling two-phase flow and the designs of cryogenic heat exchangers.

  13. Numerical simulation of multi-dimensional two-phase flow based on flux vector splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Staedtke, H.; Franchello, G.; Worth, B.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the numerical simulation of transient, multidimensional two-phase flow. The development is based on a fully hyperbolic two-fluid model of two-phase flow using separated conservation equations for the two phases. Features of the new model include the existence of real eigenvalues, and a complete set of independent eigenvectors which can be expressed algebraically in terms of the major dependent flow parameters. This facilitates the application of numerical techniques specifically developed for high speed single-phase gas flows which combine signal propagation along characteristic lines with the conservation property with respect to mass, momentum and energy. Advantages of the new model for the numerical simulation of one- and two- dimensional two-phase flow are discussed.

  14. Two-phase flow characteristics of liquid oxygen flow in low pressure liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Namkyung; Kim, Seunghan; Kim, Youngmog; Jeong, Sangkwon; Jung, Jeheon

    2004-06-01

    In most cryogenic liquid rocket engines, liquid oxygen manifold and injector are not thermally insulated from room temperature environment for the purpose of reducing system complexity and weight. This feature of cryogenic liquid supply system results in the situation that liquid oxygen flow is vaporized especially in the vicinity of the manifold and the injector wall. The transient two-phase flow tendency is severe for low combustion pressure rocket engine without using turbo-pump. This paper focuses on the two-phase flow phenomena of liquid oxygen in low combustion pressure rocket engine. The KSR-III (Korea Sounding Rocket) engine test data is thoroughly analyzed to estimate the vapor fraction of liquid oxygen flow near the engine manifold and the injector. During the cold flow and the combustion tests of the KSR-III Engine, the static and dynamic pressures are measured at the engine inlet, the liquid oxygen manifold and the combustion chamber. The manifold outer wall and the inner wall temperatures are also measured. In this paper, we present the experimental investigation on the vapor generation, the vapor mass fraction, and the boiling characteristics of the liquid oxygen flow in the engine manifold and injector.

  15. Modeling of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Cale; Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of a microgravity two-phase flow throughout a manifold system consisting of two parallel flow headers joined by branching conduits was modeled. Adiabatic conditions were assumed. The two-phase flow was modeled using the homogeneous equilibrium model for pressure changes, along with a previously developed phase separation equation, which describes the phase redistribution at a dividing T-junction. An iterative numerical method for calculating the mass flow rate, flow quality, and pressure associated with the flow throughout a manifold was developed.

  16. Numerical analysis of critical two-phase flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Romstedt, P.; Werner, W.

    1986-01-01

    The numerical calculation of critical two-phase flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle is complicated by a singularity of the fluid flow equations at the unknown critical point. A method of calculating critical state and its location without any additional assumptions is described. The critical state is identified by its mathematical properties: characteristics and solvability of linear systems with a singular matrix. Because the numerically estimable mathematical properties are the only necessary conditions for the existence of critical flow, some physical ''compatibility criteria'' (flow velocity equals model-consistent two-phase sonic velocity; critical flow is independent of downstream flow state variations) are used as substitutes for mathematically sufficient conditions. Numerical results are shown for the critical flow through LOBI nozzles and for the Super Moby Dick experiment. The two-phase flow is described by a model with equal phase velocities and thermodynamic nonequilibrium.

  17. Scalewise investigation of two-phase flow turbulence in upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Hyunseok; Park, Hyungmin

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the two-phase flow turbulence in upward turbulent bubbly pipe flows (at the Reynolds number of 5300) is invesgitated, especially focusing on the changes in flow structures with bubbles depending on the length scales. For the scalewise investigation, we perform the wavelet multi-resolution analysis on the velocity fields at three streamwise locations, measured with high-speed two-phase particle image velocimetry technology. While we intentaionlly introduce asymmetrically distributed bubbles at the pipe inlet, the mean volume void fraction is varied from from 0.3% to 1.86% and the considered mean bubble diameter is roughly maintained at 3.8 mm. With the present condition, turbulence enhancement is achieived for most cases but the turbulent suppression is also captured near the wall for the smallest void fraction case. Comparing the scalewise energy contribution, it is understood that the flow structures with length scales between bubble radius and bubble wake size are enhanced due to bubbles, resulting in the turbulence enhancement. On the other hand, flow structure with smaller length scales (mostly existing near the wall) may decrease depending on the bubble condition, which may be one of the explanations in turbulence suppression with bubbles. Supported by the NRF grant funded by the Korea government (NRF-2012M2A8A4055647) via SNU-IAMD.

  18. Future directions in two-phase flow and heat transfer in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankoff, S. George

    1994-01-01

    Some areas of opportunity for future research in microgravity two-phase flow and heat transfer are pointed out. These satisfy the dual requirements of relevance to current and future needs, and scientific/engineering interest.

  19. A theoretical evaluation of aluminum gel propellant two-phase flow losses on vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Donn C.; Turns, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of a hydrocarbon/Al/O2(gaseous) fueled rocket combustion chamber was developed to study secondary atomization effects on propellant combustion. This chamber model was coupled with a two dimensional, two-phase flow nozzle code to estimate the two-phase flow losses associated with solid combustion products. Results indicate that moderate secondary atomization significantly reduces propellant burnout distance and Al2O3 particle size; however, secondary atomization provides only moderate decreases in two-phase flow induced I(sub sp) losses. Despite these two-phase flow losses, a simple mission study indicates that aluminum gel propellants may permit a greater maximum payload than the hydrocarbon/O2 bi-propellant combination for a vehicle of fixed propellant volume. Secondary atomization was also found to reduce radiation losses from the solid combustion products to the chamber walls, primarily through reductions in propellant burnout distance.

  20. Depth averaging two phase flow equations: combining hydraulic and granular flow extremes for hazard mapping.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoba, G.; Sheridan, M.; Pitman, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ground-hugging particle-laden flows constitute some of the most dangerous natural phenomena on Earth. Such currents, in the form of snow avalanches, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, lahars, and landslides, are among the most destructive processes in nature. Humans tend to settle in areas near rich soils, volcanoes, or watercourses, all of which could be strongly affected by these dangerous flows. In order to improve risk preparedness and site management in the affected zones, an appropriate knowledge of these natural hazardous phenomena is required. Their evolution in time, flow dynamics and run out distance are key aspects that help in the planning for hazardous events, development of hazardous regions and design of management policy to prepare in advance of potential natural disasters. This paper describes a depth-averaged model for two phase flows that is currently in develop at the University at Buffalo. It will be fully implemented within the TITAN2D framework that presently simulates dry geophysical mass flows over natural-scale terrains. The initial TITAN2D code was developed to simulate granular flow. But because the introduction of an interstitial fluid strongly modifies the dynamics of the flow, a new, more general, two-phase model was developed to account for a broad range in volume fraction of solids. The proposed mathematical model depth-integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for each phase, solid and fluid. The solid phase is modeled assuming a Coulomb constitutive behavior (at the theoretical limit of pure solids), whereas the fluid phase conforms to a typical hydraulic approach (at the limit of pure fluid). The linkage for compositions between the pure end-member phases is accommodated by the inclusion of a phenomenological-based drag coefficient. The model is capable of simulating particle volumetric fractions as dilute as 0.001 and as concentrated as 0.55.

  1. Combining hydraulic and granular flow extremes for density currents by depth averaging two phase flow equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoba, G. A.; Sheridan, M.; Pitman, B.

    2009-05-01

    Ground-hugging particle-laden flows constitute some of the most dangerous natural phenomena on Earth. Such currents, in the form of snow avalanches, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, lahars, and landslides, are among the most destructive processes in nature. Humans tend to settle in areas near rich soils, volcanoes, or watercourses, all of which could be strongly affected by these dangerous flows. In order to improve risk preparedness and site management in the affected zones, an appropriate knowledge of these natural hazardous phenomena is required. Their evolution in time, flow dynamics and run out distance are key aspects that help in the planning for hazardous events, development of hazardous regions and design of management policy to prepare in advance of potential natural disasters. This paper describes a depth-averaged model for two phase flows that is currently in develop at the University at Buffalo. It is presently implemented within the TITAN2D framework to improve the version that currently simulates dry geophysical mass flows over natural-scale terrains. The initial TITAN2D code was developed to simulate granular flow. But because the introduction of an interstitial fluid strongly modifies the dynamics of the flow, a new, more general, two-phase model was developed to account for a broad range in volume fraction of solids. The proposed mathematical model depth-integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for each phase, solid and fluid. The solid phase is modeled assuming a Coulomb constitutive behavior (at the theoretical limit of pure solids), whereas the fluid phase conforms to a typical hydraulic approach (at the limit of pure fluid). The linkage for compositions between the pure end-member phases is accommodated by the inclusion of a phenomenological-based drag coefficient. The model is capable of simulating particle volumetric fractions as dilute as 0.001 and as concentrated as 0.55.

  2. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  3. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Fan, H. G.; Zhuge, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling.

  4. In-step Two-phase Flow (TPF) Thermal Control Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Two-Phase Flow Thermal Control Experiment is part of the NASA/OAST In-Space Technology Experiments (In-STEP) Program. The experiment is configured for the Hitchhiker Shuttle payload system and consists of a capillary pumped loop, heatpipe radiator, and two-phase flow heat exchanger. The flight experiment design approach, test plan, payload design, and test components are described in outline and graphic form.

  5. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R.

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  6. A study of two-phase flow in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D.; Downing, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A test loop was designed and fabricated for observing and measuring pressure drops of two-phase flow in reduced gravity. The portable flow test loop was then tested aboard the NASA-JSC KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. The test loop employed the Sundstrand Two-Phase Thermal Management System (TPTMS) concept which was specially fitted with a clear two-phase return line and condenser cover for flow observation. A two-phase (liquid/vapor) mixture was produced by pumping nearly saturated liquid through an evaporator and adding heat via electric heaters. The quality of the two-phase flow was varied by changing the evaporator heat load. The test loop was operated on the ground before and after the KC135 flight tests to create a one-gravity data base. The ground testing included all the test points run during the reduced gravity testing. Two days of reduced gravity tests aboard the KC135 were performed. During the flight tests, reduced-gravity, one-gravity, and nearly two-gravity accelerations were experienced. Data was taken during the entire flight which provided flow regime and pressure drop data for the three operating conditions. The test results show that two-phase pressure drops and flow regimes can be accurately predicted in zero-gravity.

  7. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  8. Gas-liquid two-phase flow across a bank of micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Santosh; Peles, Yoav

    2007-04-01

    Adiabatic nitrogen-water two-phase flow across a bank of staggered circular micropillars, 100μm long with a diameter of 100μm and a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5, was investigated experimentally for Reynolds number ranging from 5 to 50. Flow patterns, void fraction, and pressure drop were obtained, discussed, and compared to large scale as well as microchannel results. Two-phase flow patterns were determined by flow visualization, and a flow map was constructed as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities. Significant deviations from conventional scale systems, with respect to flow patterns and trend lines, were observed. A unique flow pattern, driven by surface tension, was observed and termed bridge flow. The applicability of conventional scale models to predict the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop was also assessed. Comparison with a conventional scale void fraction model revealed good agreement, but was found to be in a physically wrong form. Thus, a modified physically based model for void fraction was developed. A two-phase frictional multiplier was found to be a strong function of mass flux, unlike in previous microchannel studies. It was observed that models from conventional scale systems did not adequately predict the two-phase frictional multiplier at the microscale, thus, a modified model accounting for mass flux was developed.

  9. Scaling of Two-Phase Flows to Partial-Earth Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn M.; Witte, Larry C.

    2003-01-01

    A report presents a method of scaling, to partial-Earth gravity, of parameters that describe pressure drops and other characteristics of two-phase (liquid/ vapor) flows. The development of the method was prompted by the need for a means of designing two-phase flow systems to operate on the Moon and on Mars, using fluid-properties and flow data from terrestrial two-phase-flow experiments, thus eliminating the need for partial-gravity testing. The report presents an explicit procedure for designing an Earth-based test bed that can provide hydrodynamic similarity with two-phase fluids flowing in partial-gravity systems. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the flow regime (i.e., the spatial orientation of the phases). The method also provides for determination of pressure drops in two-phase partial-gravity flows by use of a generalization of the classical Moody chart (previously applicable to single-phase flow only). The report presents experimental data from Mars- and Moon-activity experiments that appear to demonstrate the validity of this method.

  10. Forced convection flow boiling and two-phase flow phenomena in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yun Whan

    2008-07-01

    The present study was performed to numerically analyze the evaporation phenomena through the liquid-vapor interface and to investigate bubble dynamics and heat transfer behavior during forced convective flow boiling in a microchannel. Flow instabilities of two-phase flow boiling in a microchannel were studied as well. The main objective of this research is to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of two-phase flow boiling in a microchannel and provide predictive tools to design thermal management systems, for example, microchannel heat sinks. The numerical results obtained from this study were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with experimental results in the open literature. Physical and mathematical models, accounting for evaporating phenomena through the liquid-vapor interface in a microchannel at constant heat flux and constant wall temperature, have been developed, respectively. The heat transfer mechanism is affected by the dominant heat conduction through the thin liquid film and vaporization at the liquid-vapor interface. The thickness of the liquid film and the pressure of the liquid and vapor phases were simultaneously solved by the governing differential equations. The developed semi-analytical evaporation model that takes into account of the interfacial phenomena and surface tension effects was used to obtain solutions numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of heat flux 19 and wall temperature on the liquid film were evaluated. The obtained pressure drops in a microchannel were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results of Qu and Mudawar (2004). Forced convective flow boiling in a single microchannel with different channel heights was studied through a numerical simulation to investigate bubble dynamics, flow patterns, and heat transfer. The momentum and energy equations were solved using the finite volume method while the liquid-vapor interface of a bubble is captured using the VOF (Volume of Fluid

  11. Characterization of annular two-phase gas-liquid flows in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. Scott; Mcquillen, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A series of two-phase gas-liquid flow experiments were developed to study annular flows in microgravity using the NASA Lewis Learjet. A test section was built to measure the liquid film thickness around the perimeter of the tube permitting the three dimensional nature of the gas-liquid interface to be observed. A second test section was used to measure the film thickness, pressure drop and wall shear stress in annular microgravity two-phase flows. Three liquids were studied to determine the effects of liquid viscosity and surface tension. The result of this study provide insight into the wave characteristics, pressure drop and droplet entrainment in microgravity annular flows.

  12. Two phase flow in geothermal systems. Final report, April 1, 1984-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, P.F.; Kestin, J.

    1985-04-01

    Studies were performed to better understand the physical mechanisms involved in two-phase, single substance flow and their thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic implications. Flow properties were measured over a wide range of flow conditions from low-flash Mach number to high-flash Mach numbers to simulate actual two-phase flow over the full length of a geothermal well from the flash horizon to the choked wellhead. Void fraction, friction factors and entropy production were calculated. 2 refs., 12 figs. (ACR)

  13. Experimental study on exciting force by two-phase cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Fujita, K.; Shiraki, K.; Kanazawa, H.; Sakata, K.

    1982-01-01

    Buffeting forces acting on tube arrays and induced by air-water two-phase cross flow, in the range of bubble flow and slug flow (or froth flow), are experimentally examined. Experimental results are treated by statistical modal analysis for use in design calculation. Based on these results, a hypothesis, especially applicable in the region of slug flow, is proposed to explain the experimental results. 9 refs.

  14. Supersonic flow of chemically reacting gas-particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penny, M. M.; Smith, S. D.; Anderson, P. G.; Sulyma, P. R.; Pearson, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical solution for chemically reacting supersonic gas-particle flows in rocket nozzles and exhaust plumes was described. The gas-particle flow solution is fully coupled in that the effects of particle drag and heat transfer between the gas and particle phases are treated. Gas and particles exchange momentum via the drag exerted on the gas by the particles. Energy is exchanged between the phases via heat transfer (convection and/or radiation). Thermochemistry calculations (chemical equilibrium, frozen or chemical kinetics) were shown to be uncoupled from the flow solution and, as such, can be solved separately. The solution to the set of governing equations is obtained by utilizing the method of characteristics. The equations cast in characteristic form are shown to be formally the same for ideal, frozen, chemical equilibrium and chemical non-equilibrium reacting gas mixtures. The particle distribution is represented in the numerical solution by a finite distribution of particle sizes.

  15. Film boiling from spheres in single- and two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data on film boiling heat transfer from single, inductively heated, spheres in single- and two-phase flow (saturated water and steam, respectively) are presented. In the single-phase-flow experiments water velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 m/s; in the two-phase-flow experiments superficial water and steam velocities covered 0.1 to 0.6 m/s and 4 to 10 m/s, respectively. All experiments were run at atmospheric pressure and with sphere temperatures from 900C down to quenching. Limited interpretations of the single-phase- flow data are possible, but the two-phase-flow data are new and unique.

  16. Film boiling from spheres in single- and two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W.

    1992-10-01

    Experimental data on film boiling heat transfer from single, inductively heated, spheres in single- and two-phase flow (saturated water and steam, respectively) are presented. In the single-phase-flow experiments water velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 m/s; in the two-phase-flow experiments superficial water and steam velocities covered 0.1 to 0.6 m/s and 4 to 10 m/s, respectively. All experiments were run at atmospheric pressure and with sphere temperatures from 900C down to quenching. Limited interpretations of the single-phase- flow data are possible, but the two-phase-flow data are new and unique.

  17. Measurement of local two-phase flow parameters of nanofluids using conductivity double-sensor probe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A two-phase flow experiment using air and water-based γ-Al2O3 nanofluid was conducted to observe the basic hydraulic phenomenon of nanofluids. The local two-phase flow parameters were measured with a conductivity double-sensor two-phase void meter. The void fraction, interfacial velocity, interfacial area concentration, and mean bubble diameter were evaluated, and all of those results using the nanofluid were compared with the corresponding results for pure water. The void fraction distribution was flattened in the nanofluid case more than it was in the pure water case. The higher interfacial area concentration resulted in a smaller mean bubble diameter in the case of the nanofluid. This was the first attempt to measure the local two-phase flow parameters of nanofluids using a conductivity double-sensor two-phase void meter. Throughout this experimental study, the differences in the internal two-phase flow structure of the nanofluid were identified. In addition, the heat transfer enhancement of the nanofluid can be resulted from the increase of the interfacial area concentration which means the available area of the heat and mass transfer. PMID:21711823

  18. Measurement of local two-phase flow parameters of nanofluids using conductivity double-sensor probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yu Sun; Chang, Soon Heung

    2011-12-01

    A two-phase flow experiment using air and water-based γ-Al2O3 nanofluid was conducted to observe the basic hydraulic phenomenon of nanofluids. The local two-phase flow parameters were measured with a conductivity double-sensor two-phase void meter. The void fraction, interfacial velocity, interfacial area concentration, and mean bubble diameter were evaluated, and all of those results using the nanofluid were compared with the corresponding results for pure water. The void fraction distribution was flattened in the nanofluid case more than it was in the pure water case. The higher interfacial area concentration resulted in a smaller mean bubble diameter in the case of the nanofluid. This was the first attempt to measure the local two-phase flow parameters of nanofluids using a conductivity double-sensor two-phase void meter. Throughout this experimental study, the differences in the internal two-phase flow structure of the nanofluid were identified. In addition, the heat transfer enhancement of the nanofluid can be resulted from the increase of the interfacial area concentration which means the available area of the heat and mass transfer.

  19. A new two-phase erosion-deposition model for mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transports. The model enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by introducing a two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology. The adaptive basal morphology allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. With rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions and losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent description of erosion-entrainment-deposition processes. Simulation indicates a sharp erosion-front and steady-state-rear erosion depth. The model appropriately captures the emergence and propagation of complex frontal surge dynamics associated with the frontal ambient-drag which is a new hypothesis associated with erosion. The novel enhanced real two-phase model also allows for simulating fluid-run-off during the deposition process. The model resembles laboratory experiments for particle-fluid mixture flows and reveals some major aspects of the mechanics associated with erosion, entrainment and deposition. Reference: Shiva P. Pudasaini (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  20. Multi-needle capacitance probe for non-conductive two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrós-Andreu, G.; Martinez-Cuenca, R.; Torró, S.; Escrig, J.; Hewakandamby, B.; Chiva, S.

    2016-07-01

    Despite its variable degree of application, intrusive instrumentation is the most accurate way to obtain local information in a two-phase flow system, especially local interfacial velocity and local interfacial area parameters. In this way, multi-needle probes, based on conductivity or optical principles, have been extensively used in the past few decades by many researchers in two-phase flow investigations. Moreover, the signal processing methods used to obtain the time-averaged two-phase flow parameters in this type of sensor have been thoroughly discussed and validated by many experiments. The objective of the present study is to develop a miniaturized multi-needle probe, based on capacitance measurements applicable to a wide range of non-conductive two-phase flows and, thus, to extend the applicability of multi-needle sensor whilst also maintaining a signal processing methodology provided in the literature for conductivity probes. Results from the experiments performed assess the applicability of the proposed sensor measurement principle and signal processing method for the bubbly flow regime. These results also provide an insight into the sensor application for more complex two-phase flow regimes.

  1. Study of two-phase flow and heat transfer in reduced gravities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdollahian, Davood; Barez, Fred

    1994-01-01

    Design of the two-phase systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters in reduced gravities. A program has been initiated by NASA to design a two-phase test loop and perform a series of experiments to generate the data for the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability under reduced gravities. In addition to low gravity airplane trajectory testing, the experimental program consists of a set of laboratory tests with vertical upflow and downflow configurations. Modularity is considered in the design of this experiment and the test loop in instrumented to provide data for two-phase pressure drop and flow regime behavior. Since the program is in the final stages of the design and construction task, this article is intended to discuss the phenomena, design approach, and the description of the test loop.

  2. Bubble Generation in a Flowing Liquid Medium and Resulting Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pais, S. C.; Kamotani, Y.; Bhunia, A.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The present investigation reports a study of bubble generation under reduced gravity conditions, using both a co-flow and a cross-flow configuration. This study may be used in the conceptual design of a space-based thermal management system. Ensuing two-phase flow void fraction can be accurately monitored using a single nozzle gas injection system within a continuous liquid flow conduit, as utilized in the present investigation. Accurate monitoring of void fraction leads to precise control of heat and mass transfer coefficients related to a thermal management system; hence providing an efficient and highly effective means of removing heat aboard spacecraft or space stations. Our experiments are performed in parabolic flight aboard the modified DC-9 Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft at NASA Lewis Research Center, using an air-water system. For the purpose of bubble dispersion in a flowing liquid, we use both a co-flow and a cross-flow configuration. In the co-flow geometry, air is introduced through a nozzle in the same direction with the liquid flow. On the other hand, in the cross-flow configuration, air is injected perpendicular to the direction of water flow, via a nozzle protruding inside the two-phase flow conduit. Three different flow conduit (pipe) diameters are used, namely, 1.27 cm, 1.9 cm and 2.54 cm. Two different ratios of nozzle to pipe diameter (D(sub N))sup * are considered, namely (D(sub N))sup * = 0.1 and 0.2, while superficial liquid velocities are varied from 8 to 70 cm/s depending on flow conduit diameter. It is experimentally observed that by holding all other flow conditions and geometry constant, generated bubbles decrease in size with increase in superficial liquid velocity. Detached bubble diameter is shown to increase with air injection nozzle diameter. Likewise, generated bubbles grow in size with increasing pipe diameter. Along the same lines, it is shown that bubble frequency of formation increases and hence the time to detachment of a

  3. Development of Numerical Simulation Method for Compressible Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical simulation method of compressible gas-liquid two-phase flow is developed for analyses of a cavitation bubble. Thermodynamic state of both phases is described with stiffened gas equation of state. Interface of two phases is captured by Level-Set method. As internal energy jump between two phases is critical for the stability of computation, total energy equation is modified so that inviscid flux of energy is smoothly connected across the interface. Detail of governing equations as well as their discretization is described followed by the result of one-dimensional simple example computation.

  4. Interfacial area transport across vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Mohan Singh

    The accurate prediction of two-phase flow using the two-fluid model requires closure relations for the interfacial area concentration ( ai), which can be provided by the interfacial area transport equation (IATE). Models have been developed for the IATE in straight pipe geometries. However, to analyze practical systems, it is important that the IATE accounts for flows in pipes with varying orientation that are interconnected via different flow restrictions. In view of this, the current study performs experiments to investigate the geometric effects of 90- degree vertical elbows in air-water two-phase flows and develops a one-group IATE applicable to vertical-upward-to-horizontal two-phase flows. The experimental facility consists of both vertical and horizontal sections constructed from 50.8 mm inner diameter acrylic pipes that are interconnected via 90-degree glass elbows. The elbows have a radius of curvature of Rc/D = 3 and are installed at L/D = 63 and 244.7 from the inlet. Experiments are performed to characterize the elbow-effect on both global and local two-phase flow parameters. A four-sensor conductivity probe is used to acquire detailed measurements of local two-phase flow parameters at thirteen axial locations along the test section in eight flow conditions that are within the bubbly flow regime at inlet. The measurements show that in bubbly flow conditions, the vertical-upward elbow causes a characteristic bimodal-type bubble distribution and the change in this distribution farther downstream of the elbow corresponds to the dissipation of the elbow-effects. In view of developing the IATE for vertical-upward to horizontal two-phase flows, predictive models for the dissipation length of the elbow-effect and closure relations for advection of gas-phase, pressure loss, and covariance of bubble interactions are developed. The new models are evaluated against the current experimental database. Overall, the model predictions agree with the data within +/-7

  5. Two-Phase Flow within Geological Flow Analogies--A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.; Ferer, M.V.; Richards, M.; Bromhal, G.S.

    2006-10-01

    Displacement of a viscous fluid in heterogeneous geological media by a less viscous one does not evacuate 100% of the defending fluid due to capillary and viscous fingering. This is of importance in geological flows that are encountered in secondary oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration in saturated brine fields. Hele-Shaw and pore/throat cells are commonly used to study this in the labratory. Numerical simulations of this flow phenomenon with pore-throat models have been prevalent for over two decades. This current work solves the full Navier-Stokes equations of conservation within random pore-throat geometries with varying properties to study the resulting flow properties. Verification of the solution method is performed by comparison of the model predictions with the available experimental data in the literature. Experimental flows in a pore-throat cell with a known geometrical structure are shown to be in good agreement with the model. Dynamic comparisons to a computational pore-throat model have been shown to be in good agreement as well. There are also additional two-phase immiscible flow patterns that can be identified from the current solutions for which the corresponding laboratory counter part or the pore-throat model predictions are not available. The identification of these flow patterns may allow more accurate modeling of fluid displacement on the reservoir scale.

  6. Influence of two-phase flow characteristic on critical heat flux in low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, Sangryoul

    1996-08-01

    Estimation of the critical heat flux (CHF) in a boiling two-phase flow is one of the important subjects for the safety of water-cooled reactors and other energy systems. In the case of a boiling two-phase flow at low pressure, flow pattern and void fraction are easy to change by the power input and the flow becomes more complex due to low density of gas phase. The CHF is affected by the flow pattern. In this study, the CHFs were measured over wide quality range from the subcooled boiling to the annular-mist flow. By using Pyrex glass tube as a test channel, the two-phase flow situation was observed. Graphite rod or stainless steel tube was used as a heater rod and installed at the center of the glass tube. Two-phase flow was formed by steam injection to circulating water at an upstream region of the test section. The flow pattern was kept nearly constant over the length of test section due to the low input power density into the fluid. Then, the characteristics of CHF could be investigated at each flow patterns of bubbly, slug, annular and annular-mist flow. In the subcooled boiling region of bubbly flow, the CHF decreased with increase of quality and was less sensitive to flow rate. In the slug flow region, the CHF showed a minimum value. With more increase of quality in the annular flow, the CHF increased and reached a peak value at a certain quality depending on a flow rate. The peak of CHF occurred almost at a constant vapor mass velocity. In the annular-mist flow region, the CHF decreased with increase of quality. In the region, the effect of heated length on the CHF was systematically measured and validity of an analytical model considering dryout of liquid film based on formation of a dry patch was investigated.

  7. Reduced-gravity two-phase flow experiments in the NASA KC-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Michener, Thomas E.; Best, Frederick R.; Kachnik, Leo J.

    1988-01-01

    An adequate understanding is sought of flow and heat transfer behavior in reduced and zero gravity conditions. Microgravity thermal-hydraulic analysis capabilities were developed for application to space nuclear power systems. A series of reduced gravity two phase flow experiments using the NASA KC-135 were performed. The objective was to supply basic thermal hydraulic information that could be used in development of analytical tools for design of space power systems. The experiments are described. Two main conclusions were drawn. First, the tests demonstrate that the KC-135 is a suitable test environment for obtaining two phase flow and heat transfer data in reduced gravity conditions. Second, the behavior of two phase flow in low gravity is sufficiently different from that obtained in 1 g to warrant intensive investigation of the phenomenon if adequate analytical tools are to be developed for microgravity conditions.

  8. Two-phase flow characterization for fluid components and variable gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenitis, John M.; Miller, Kathryn M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a program initiated by the NASA Johnson Space Center to investigate vapor-liquid flow regimes and pressure drops in pipe components and variable gravity conditions. This program supports the Space Station Freedom External Active Thermal Control System design and future space missions, including the Space Exploration Initiative activities. The objectives for this program include studying two-phase flow behavior in fluid components (smooth pipes, bellows lines, quick-disconnect fittings), expanding the two-phase database for zero-g conditions, developing a database for low-g conditions (for example, Moon-g, Mars-g), and validating models for two-phase flow analyses. Zero-g and low-g data will be gathered using a Freon-12 flow loop during four test series on the KC-135 aircraft beginning in August 1991.

  9. Hierarchy of two-phase flow models for autonomous control of cryogenic loading operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinskiy, Dmitry G.; Ponizovskaya-Devine, Ekaterina; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kashani, Ali; Khasin, Michael; Timucin, Dogan; Sass, Jared; Perotti, Jose; Brown, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    We report on the development of a hierarchy of models of cryogenic two-phase flow motivated by NASA plans to develop and maturate technology of cryogenic propellant loading on the ground and in space. The solution of this problem requires models that are fast and accurate enough to identify flow conditions, detect faults, and to propose optimal recovery strategy. The hierarchy of models described in this presentation is ranging from homogeneous moving- front approximation to separated non-equilibrium two-phase cryogenic flow. We compare model predictions with experimental data and discuss possible application of these models to on-line integrated health management and control of cryogenic loading operation.

  10. Self-sustained hydrodynamic oscillations in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, K. C.

    1969-01-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical study of factors affecting self-sustaining hydrodynamic oscillations in boiling-water loops are reported. Data on flow variables, and the effects of geometry, subcooling and pressure on the development of oscillatory behavior in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop are included.

  11. Toward the use of similarity theory in two-phase choked flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendericks, R. C.; Sengers, J. V.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of two phase choked flows in normalized coordinates were made between pure components and available data using a reference fluid to compute the thermophysical properties. The results are favorable. Solution of the governing equations for two LNG mixtures show some possible similarities between the normalized choked flows of the two mixtures, but the departures from the pure component loci are significant.

  12. Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

  13. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  14. Two-phase flow and transport in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,Z.H.; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-03-20

    Two-phase flow and transport of reactants and products in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is studied analytically and numerically. Four regimes of water distribution and transport are classified by defining three threshold current densities and a maximum current density. They correspond to first appearance of liquid water at the membrane/cathode interface, extension of the gas-liquid two-phase zone to the cathode/channel interface, saturated moist air exiting the gas channel, and complete consumption of oxygen by the electrochemical reaction. When the cell operates above the first threshold current density, liquid water appears and a two-phase zone forms within the porous cathode. A two-phase, multi-component mixture model in conjunction with a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is applied to simulate the cathode operation in this regime. The model is able to handle the situation where a single-phase region co-exists with a two-phase zone in the air cathode. For the first time, the polarization curve as well as water and oxygen concentration distributions encompassing both single- and two-phase regimes of the air cathode are presented. Capillary action is found to be the dominant mechanism for water transport inside the two-phase zone. The liquid water saturation within the cathode is predicted to reach 6.3% at 1.4 A/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Particle Image Velocimetry Analysis in Micromodels to Investigate Two-Phase Flow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, S.; Soulaine, C.; Kovscek, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The inherent instabilities in two-phase displacements play a key role in the process of carbon dioxide sequestration. Thus, a fundamental understanding of two-phase unstable flows in porous media across a range of length and time scales is essential. However, the dynamics at the pore scale remains relatively unknown and influences macroscale behaviors. In that context, experiments in simplified porous media were performed in order to investigate pore scale mechanisms. The dynamics of fluid displacement in porous media were captured with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).The experimental apparatus includes 2D etched micromodels connected to a syringe pump and placed under a microscope for flow visualization. The micromodels contain an etched flow pattern composed of circular grains homogeneously distributed or composed of a sandstone replica pattern. The fluids under study are seeded with polymer microparticles and image sequences of the flow are recorded. The motion of the seeding particles is used to calculate the velocity field of the flow with PIV algortithms.The PIV measurements were first validated for single phase flow. For that purpose, experiments were performed where water and microparticles flowed through the micromodels. The PIV measurements were compared to 2D direct numerical simulations of the flow through the different geometries under consideration. Experiments and numerical simulations show a good agreement. PIV measurements are quantitatively validated to investigate flow mechanisms at the pore scale. Then, the feasibility of PIV measurements for two-phase flow in micromodels has been demonstrated and we can now use this technique with confidence to investigate multiphase flow dynamics. Experiments in micromodels will henceforth allow the validation of two-phase flow simulation, in fact no reliable numerical works have been published at this scale for multiphase flows.

  16. Two-Phase Flow in Geothermal Wells: Development and Uses of a Good Computer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Ramirez, Jaime

    1983-06-01

    A computer code is developed for vertical two-phase flow in geothermal wellbores. The two-phase correlations used were developed by Orkiszewski (1967) and others and are widely applicable in the oil and gas industry. The computer code is compared to the flowing survey measurements from wells in the East Mesa, Cerro Prieto, and Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal fields with success. Well data from the Svartsengi field in Iceland are also used. Several applications of the computer code are considered. They range from reservoir analysis to wellbore deposition studies. It is considered that accurate and workable wellbore simulators have an important role to play in geothermal reservoir engineering.

  17. Two-phase flow stability structure in a natural circulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhiwei

    1995-09-01

    The present study reports a numerical analysis of two-phase flow stability structures in a natural circulation system with two parallel, heated channels. The numerical model is derived, based on the Galerkin moving nodal method. This analysis is related to some design options applicable to integral heating reactors with a slightly-boiling operation mode, and is also of general interest to similar facilities. The options include: (1) Symmetric heating and throttling; (2) Asymmetric heating and symmetric throttling; (3) Asymmetric heating and throttling. The oscillation modes for these variants are discussed. Comparisons with the data from the INET two-phase flow stability experiment have qualitatively validated the present analysis.

  18. Analysis of the Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer Aspects of Microgravity Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezkallah, Kamiel S.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results for void fractions, flow regimes, and heat transfer rates in two-phase, liquid-gas flows are summarized in this paper. The data was collected on-board NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft in a 9.525 mm circular tube (i.d.), uniformly heated at the outer surface. Water and air flows were examined as well as three glycerol/water solutions and air. Results are reported for the water-air data.

  19. Implementation of the interfacial area transport equation in trace for boiling two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Matthew S.

    Correctly predicting the interfacial area concentration (a i) is vital to the overall accuracy of the two-fluid model because ai describes the amount of surface area that exists between the two-phases, and is therefore directly related to interfacial mass, momentum and energy transfer. The conventional method for specifying ai in the two-fluid model is through flow regime-based empirical correlations coupled with regime transition criteria. However, a more physically consistent approach to predicting ai is through the interfacial area transport equation (IATE), which can address the deficiencies of the flow regime-based approach. Some previous studies have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of IATE in developmental versions of the nuclear reactor systems analysis code, TRACE. However, a full TRACE version capable of predicting boiling two-phase flows with the IATE has not been established. Therefore, the current work develops a version of TRACE that is capable of predicting boiling two-phase flows using the IATE. The development is carried out in stages. First, a version of TRACE which employs the two-group IATE for adiabatic, vertical upward, air-water conditions is developed. An in-depth assessment on the existing experimental database is performed to select reliable experimental data for code assessment. Then, the implementation is assessed against the qualified air-water two-phase flow experimental data. Good agreement is observed between the experimental data for ai and the TRACE code with an average error of +/-9% for all conditions. Following the initial development, one-group IATE models for vertical downward and horizontal two-phase flows are implemented and assessed against qualified data. Finally, IATE models capable of predicting subcooled boiling two-phase flows are implemented. An assessment of the models shows that TRACE is capable of generating ai in subcooled boiling two-phase flows with the IATE and that heat transfer effects dominate

  20. A Simplified Approach to Modeling Two-phase Flow of Seawater Near a Dike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Lowell, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Magmatic dikes represent the fundamental unit of mass accretion and heat input into the oceanic crust. Dikes also drive hydrothermal circulation that may result in event plumes, but in any case the circulation will carry a pulse of mineral-laden hydrothermal fluids and heat to the seafloor. Two-phase flow and phase segregation are important aspects of hydrothermal circulation following dike emplacement. These processes are confined to narrow regions near the dike margins, and the duration of two-phase flow is brief. Nevertheless, sampling of hydrothermal fluids following dike emplacement has shown the early appearance of low chlorinity vapor phase fluids followed, in some cases (e.g., "F" vent at EPR 9° N), by the appearance of brines. We provide a simplified treatment of two-phase flow of seawater near a dike in an effort to quantify the thickness and duration of the two-phase zone, the amount of brine formed, and its distribution in the subsurface. We first estimate these parameters by considering simple conductive cooling of the dike. This approach shows that for a two-meter wide dike, the width of the two-phase zone is approximately 15 cm and that a zone of halite is deposited near the dike wall. After 10 days, the two-phase zone has disappeared at the base of the dike, and disappears everywhere else after about 15 days. We then use a simplified buoyancy driven convection model to quantify the degree of phase segregation and the distribution of brine. The results of this simplified model are compared with data from "F" vent. This approach provides semi-quantitative and conceptual constraints on numerical models for two-phase convection in NaCl-H2O fluids.

  1. Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2000-08-29

    Film boiling on spheres in single- and two-phase flows was studied experimentally and theoretically with an emphasis on establishing the film boiling heat transfer closure law, which is useful in the analysis of nuclear reactor core melt accidents. Systematic experimentation of film boiling on spheres in single-phase water flows was carried out to investigate the effects of liquid subcooling (from 0 to 40 C), liquid velocity (from 0 to 2 m/s), sphere superheat (from 200 to 900 C), sphere diameter (from 6 to 19 mm), and sphere material (stainless steel and brass) on film boiling heat transfer. Based on the experimental data a general film boiling heat transfer correlation is developed. Utilizing a two-phase laminar boundary-layer model for the unseparated front film region and a turbulent eddy model for the separated rear region, a theoretical model was developed to predict the film boiling heat transfer in all single-phase regimes. The film boiling from a sphere in two-phase flows was investigated both in upward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.2 to 0.65, water velocity from 0.6 to 3.2 m/s, and steam velocity from 3.0 to 9.0 m/s) and in downward two-phase flows (with void fraction from 0.7 to 0.95, water velocity from 1.9 to 6.5 m/s, and steam velocity from 1.1 to 9.0 m/s). The saturated single-phase heat transfer correlation was found to be applicable to the two-phase film boiling data by making use of the actual water velocity (water phase velocity), and an adjustment factor of (1 - {alpha}){sup 1/4} (with a being the void fraction) for downward flow case only. Slight adjustments of the Reynolds number exponents in the correlation provided an even better interpretation of the two-phase data. Preliminary experiments were also conducted to address the influences of multi-sphere structure on the film boiling heat transfer in single- and two-phase flows.

  2. Evaluation of the Sensitivity of Two-Phase Flow Model for the Steam Separator Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michio Murase; Masao Chaki

    2006-07-01

    Reducing of the pressure losses of steam separator systems of boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is useful to reduce the required pump head and enhance core stability design margin. The need to reduce the pressure losses of steam separator systems is especially important in BWR plants that have high power density cores and natural circulation systems. The core flow rate of a BWR plant with a natural circulation system is affected by the pressure losses of steam separator systems. In BWR plants with high power density cores, the core stability design margin is affected by these pressure losses. Generally, reducing the pressure losses of the steam separator systems leads to increased carry-under and carryover. Reducing the pressure losses while keeping the characteristics of both carry-under and carryover is desired, so many studies have been done. The steam separator of a BWR plant consists of a standpipe section, a swirl vane section and three-barrel sections. Two-phase flow of steam and water enters the steam separator through the standpipe section and reaches the swirl vane section. In the swirl vane section, the two-phase flow is given centrifugal force and is basically separated into steam and water. Therefore investigating the two-phase flow characteristics of the swirl vane section is very important. After the swirl vane section, the two-phase flow enters the barrel sections. Each barrel has a pick-off ring. The water in the barrel section is mainly removed by these pick-off rings because the water mainly flows upward as a liquid film in the barrel section due to the centrifugal force given in the swirl vane section. We researched the effect of using the drag force model of the swirling two-phase flow in analyzing a steam separator and we found that the drag force model greatly affects the results of the analysis. (authors)

  3. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Schubert, Gerald; Eichelberger, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient.

  4. Thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. .; Schubert, G.; Eichelberger, J.C. California Univ., Los Angeles Alaska Univ., Fairbanks )

    1992-11-01

    The coupling between thermal and dynamical regimes of single- and two-phase magmatic flow in dikes, due to temperature-dependent viscosity and dissipation, was investigated using finite element calculations of magma flow in dikelike channels with length-to-width ratios of 1000:1 or more. Solutions of the steady state equations governing magma flow are obtained for a variety of conditions ranging from idealized plane-parallel models to cases involving nonparallel geometry and two-phase flows. The implications of the numerical simulations for the dynamics of flow in a dike-reservoir system and the consequences of dike entrance conditions on magmatic storage are discussed. Consideration is also given to an unmixing/self-lubrication mechanism which may be important for the lubrication of silicic magmas rising to the earth's surface in mixed magma ascent scenarios, which naturally segregates magma mixtures of two components with differing viscosities to minimize the driving pressure gradient. 56 refs.

  5. Two-phase flow in the cooling circuit of a cryogenic rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclik, D.

    1992-07-01

    Transient two-phase flow was investigated for the hydrogen cooling circuit of the HM7 rocket engine. The nuclear reactor code ATHLET/THESEUS was adapted to cryogenics and applied to both principal and prototype experiments for validation and simulation purposes. The cooling circuit two-phase flow simulation focused on the hydrogen prechilling and pump transient phase prior to ignition. Both a single- and a multichannel model were designed and employed for a valve leakage flow, a nominal prechilling flow, and a prechilling with a subsequent pump-transient flow. The latter case was performed in order to evaluate the difference between a nominal and a delayed turbo-pump start-up. It was found that an extension of the nominal prechilling sequence in the order of 1 second is sufficient to finally provide for liquid injection conditions of hydrogen which, as commonly known, is undesirable for smooth ignition and engine starting transients.

  6. Dynamics of face and annular seals with two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William F.; Basu, Prithwish; Beatty, Paul A.; Beeler, Richard M.; Lau, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study was made of face and annular seals under conditions where boiling, i.e., phase change of the leaking fluid, occurs within the seal. Many seals operate in this mode because of flashing due to pressure drop and/or heat input from frictional heating. Some of the distinctive behavior characteristics of two phase seals are discussed, particularly their axial stability. The main conclusions are that seals with two phase flow may be unstable if improperly balanced. Detailed theoretical analyses of low (laminar) and high (turbulent) leakage seals are presented along with computer codes, parametric studies, and in particular a simplified PC based code that allows for rapid performance prediction: calculations of stiffness coefficients, temperature and pressure distributions, and leakage rates for parallel and coned face seals. A simplified combined computer code for the performance prediction over the laminar and turbulent ranges of a two phase flow is described and documented. The analyses, results, and computer codes are summarized.

  7. Entropy analysis on non-equilibrium two-phase flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Karwat, H.; Ruan, Y.Q.

    1995-09-01

    A method of entropy analysis according to the second law of thermodynamics is proposed for the assessment of a class of practical non-equilibrium two-phase flow models. Entropy conditions are derived directly from a local instantaneous formulation for an arbitrary control volume of a structural two-phase fluid, which are finally expressed in terms of the averaged thermodynamic independent variables and their time derivatives as well as the boundary conditions for the volume. On the basis of a widely used thermal-hydraulic system code it is demonstrated with practical examples that entropy production rates in control volumes can be numerically quantified by using the data from the output data files. Entropy analysis using the proposed method is useful in identifying some potential problems in two-phase flow models and predictions as well as in studying the effects of some free parameters in closure relationships.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of two-phase flow: Effective rheology and flow patterns of particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deubelbeiss, Y.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Connolly, J. A. D.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the mechanical behavior of a two-phase system consisting of rigid grains and an interconnected pore fluid. For this purpose we use 2D direct numerical simulations on the spatial scale of individual grains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid rheology. By using the stress-strain rate relation we derive scaling laws for effective viscosity of two-phase particle suspensions. We demonstrate that the effective rheology of the assemblage is non-Newtonian only if the fluid has a non-Newtonian rheology. At small fluid fraction, inter-granular strain rates are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the applied background strain rate. We suggest that this effect explains the experimentally observed change at higher strain rates in rheology, from Newtonian to non-Newtonian aggregate rheology. To establish the conditions at which the fluid-solid aggregate deforms coherently as a consequence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities we studied flow patterns of particle suspensions and characterized them as a function of fluid fraction, viscosity, density, shape and size of the grains. From initial conditions with homogeneously distributed grains and interstitial fluid above a layer of pure fluid, our results show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates for moderate to large fluid fractions. At large fluid fractions, we observed a transition to a Stokes suspension mode, in which grains do not interact but sink independently. An analytical expression is derived that predicts the transition from Rayleigh-Taylor instability to Stokes suspension mode. The transition is a function of fluid fraction, radius of the grains, height of the interface and initial amplitude. Systematic numerical simulations are in good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  9. Experimental and Analytical Study of Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Abdollahian, Davood; Quintal, J.; Zahm, J.

    1996-01-01

    Design of the two-phase flow systems which are anticipated to be utilized in future spacecraft thermal management systems requires a knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters in reduced gravities. A program has been initiated by NASA to design a two-phase test loop and to perform a series of experiments to study the effect of gravity on the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and onset of instability. The test loop is also instrumented to generate data for two-phase pressure drop. In addition to low gravity airplane trajectory testing, the experimental program consisted of a set of laboratory tests which were intended to generate data under the bounding conditions (+1 g and -1 g) in order to plan the test matrix. One set of airplane trajectory tests has been performed and several modifications to the test set-up have been identified. Preliminary test results have been used to demonstrate the applicability of the earth gravity models for prediction of the two-phase friction pressure drop.

  10. Conservative model and numerical simulations of compressible two-phase pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, A.; Romenski, E.; Lebedeva, N.

    2016-06-01

    The two-phase two-pressure model for transient one-dimensional compressible pipe flow is considered. Governing equations of the model form a hyperbolic system of conservation laws. The Runge-Kutta-WENO method providing accuracy of the 3rd order in time and 5th order in space is implemented. Numerical results for several test problems are presented.

  11. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  12. MONA: An accurate two-phase well flow model based on phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Asheim, H.

    1984-10-01

    In two phase flow, holdup and pressure loss are related to interfacial slippage. A model based on the slippage concept has been developed and tested using production well data from Forties, the Ekofisk area, and flowline data from Prudhoe Bay. The model developed turned out considerably more accurate than the standard models used for comparison.

  13. COMPARING SIMULATED AND EXPERIMENTAL HYSTERETIC TWO- PHASE TRANSIENT FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hysteretic model for two-phase permeability (k)-saturation (S)-pressure (P) relations is outlined that accounts for effects of nonwetting fluid entrapment. The model can be employed in unsaturated fluid flow computer codes to predict temporal and spatial fluid distributions. Co...

  14. An analytical model for prediction of two-phase (noncondensable) flow pump performance

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, O.

    1985-03-01

    During operational transients or a hypothetical LOCA (loss of coolant accident) condition, the recirculating coolant of PWR (pressurized water reactor) may flash into steam due to a loss of line pressure. Under such two-phase flow conditions, it is well known that the recirculation pump becomes unable to generate the same head as that of the single-phase flow case. Similar situations also exist in oil well submersible pumps where a fair amount of gas is contained in oil. Based on the one dimensional control volume method, an analytical method has been developed to determine the performance of pumps operating under two-phase flow conditions. The analytical method has incorporated pump geometry, void fraction, flow slippage and flow regime into the basic formula, but neglected the compressibility and condensation effects. During the course of model development, it has been found that the head degradation is mainly caused by higher acceleration on liquid phase and deceleration on gas phase than in the case of single-phase flows. The numerical results for head degradations and torques obtained with the model favorably compared with the air/water two-phase flow test data of Babcock and Wilcox (1/3 scale) and Creare (1/20 scale) pumps.

  15. Blob population dynamics during immiscible two-phase flows in reconstructed porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiotis, A. G.; Talon, L.; Salin, D.

    2013-03-01

    We study the dynamics of nonwetting liquid blobs during immiscible two-phase flows in stochastically reconstructed porous domains predominantly saturated by a wetting fluid. The flow problem is solved explicitly using a Lattice-Boltzmann model that captures both the bulk phase and interfacial dynamics of the process. We show that the nonwetting blobs undergo a continuous life cycle of dynamic breaking up and coalescence producing two populations of blobs, a mobile and a stranded one, that exchange continuously mass between them. The process reaches a “steady state” when the rates of coalescence and breaking up become equal, and the macroscopic flow variables remain practically constant with time. At steady state, mass partitioning between mobile and immobile populations depends strongly on the applied Bond number Bo and the initial nonwetting phase distributions. Three flow regimes are identified: a single-phase flow Darcy-type regime at low Bo numbers, a non-Darcy two-phase flow regime at intermediate values of Bo, where the capillary number scales as Ca∝Bo2, and a Darcy-type two-phase flow regime at higher values of Bo. Our numerical results are found to be in good agreement with recent experimental and theoretical works.

  16. Design and operation of a two-phase flow research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, P.F.; Kestin, J.; Dickinson, D.A.; DiPippo, R.; Olia, H.

    1982-05-01

    In this report we describe the new two-phase flow facility that has been constructed at Brown University. Included is the design philosophy that led us to select a blow-down, Freon tunnel as the means of studying the flow of a pure substance undergoing liquid-vapor phase changes. Each component is discussed from the initial design considerations, through sizing calculations, to actual system specifications. Special emphasis is placed on the instrumentation and automatic data acquisition and processing system. Finally a sampling of results obtained so far is presented. Section 1 gives the reasons for the construction of the facility and lists some of the uses and objectives of its operation. The reader can gain a good overview of the facility from Section 2 without a great deal of detail. In Section 3 we present the rationale for the particular design choices that were made and give details about the selection and sizing of all major components except the instrumentation. The latter subject is treated in Section 4 where we discuss the temperature and pressure probes, mass flow rate measurement, and other instrumentation. Section 5 is devoted to the test section proper where all the two-phase flow measurements and observations take place. The electronic data acquisition and facility control system is the subject of Section 6. Results on two-phase friction factors and flow pattern observations in a horizontal pipe are given in Section 7 along with the ranges of flow that have been covered so far. In capsule summary, the two-phase flow test facility is operational and has demonstrated a wide range of flow conditions from purely liquid to purely vapor through a variety of two-phase situations. Only horizontal flows have been studied so far, but the test section has been designed to operate in inclined positions up to fully vertical. The instrumentation performs very well as does the fully automatic control system. We believe the test facility is capable of yielding

  17. European Xfel-Linac Two-Phase he II Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, V.; Petersen, B.; Sellmann, D.; Xiang, Y.

    2008-03-01

    The superconducting 1.3-GHz niobium cavities of the XFEL linear accelerator will be cooled in a bath of saturated liquid He II at a temperature of 2 K. The liquid He II supply of the 1.7-km long linac is subdivided in sections of about 150 m length. In these sections a two-phase flow of He II liquid and corresponding vapor occurs. A stable stratified smooth helium flow has to be maintained for the RF operation of the cavities, to avoid any vibrations or microphonic effects. A computer code has been developed to simulate the two-phase flow patterns in the XFEL-linac, based on an existing model. The flow characteristics at different cryogenic loads and helium temperatures have been calculated. The results are shown and the consequences for the design of the XFEL-linac cryogenic system are discussed.

  18. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Data were obtained for two phase and gaseous choked flow nitrogen in a long constant area duct of 16200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall friction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data resonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  19. Two phase choke flow in tubes with very large L/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Two phase and gaseous choked flow data for fluid nitrogen were obtained for a test section which was a long constant area duct of 16 200 L/D with a diverging diffuser attached to the exit. Flow rate data were taken along five isotherms (reduced temperature of 0.81, 0.96, 1.06, 1.12, and 2.34) for reduced pressures to 3. The flow rate data were mapped in the usual manner using stagnation conditions at the inlet mixing chamber upstream of the entrance length. The results are predictable by a two-phase homogeneous equilibrium choking flow model which includes wall fraction. A simplified theory which in essence decouples the long tube region from the high acceleration choking region also appears to predict the data reasonably well, but about 15 percent low.

  20. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate damping and fluidelastic instability in tube arrays subjected to two-phase cross-flow. The purpose of this research was to improve our understanding of these phenomena and how they are affected by void fraction and flow regime. The model tube bundle had 10 cantilevered tubes in a parallel-triangular configuration, with a pitch ratio of 1.49. The two-phase flow loop used in this research utilized Refrigerant 11 as the working fluid, which better models steam-water than air-water mixtures in terms of vapour-liquid mass ratio as well as permitting phase changes due to pressure fluctuations. The void fraction was measured using a gamma densitometer, introducing an improvement over the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in terms of void fraction, density and velocity predictions. Three different damping measurement methodologies were implemented and compared in order to obtain a more reliable damping estimate. The methods were the traditionally used half-power bandwidth, the logarithmic decrement and an exponential fitting to the tube decay response. The decay trace was obtained by "plucking" the monitored tube from outside the test section using a novel technique, in which a pair of electromagnets changed their polarity at the natural frequency of the tube to produce resonance. The experiments showed that the half-power bandwidth produces higher damping values than the other two methods. The primary difference between the methods is caused by tube frequency shifting, triggered by fluctuations in the added mass and coupling between the tubes, which depend on void fraction and flow regime. The exponential fitting proved to be the more consistent and reliable approach to estimating damping. In order to examine the relationship between the damping ratio and mass flux, the former was plotted as a function of void fraction and pitch mass flux in an iso-contour plot. The results showed that damping is not independent of mass

  1. Measurement of thickness of thin water film in two-phase flow by capacitance method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R.K.; Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.; Turko, B.

    1981-09-01

    A technique has been developed for measuring water film thickness in a two-phase annular flow system by the capacitance method. An experimental model of the flow system with two types of electrodes mounted on the inner wall of a cylindrical tube has been constructed and evaluated. The apparatus and its ability to observe fluctuations and wave motions of the water film passing over the electrodes is described in some detail.

  2. Application of the principle of corresponding states to two phase choked flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that several fluids including methane, oxygen, and nitrogen appear to form an average parametric plot which indicates that the isenthalpic Joule-Thomson coefficient must nearly obey the principle of corresponding states. With this as a basis, it was assumed that there could be several thermodynamic flow processes which nearly obey the principle. An examination was made to determine whether two-phase choked flow could be one of them. The analysis is described and the results are given.

  3. KC-135 zero-gravity two phase flow pressure drop: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Anne; Reinarts, Thomas R.; Best, Frederick R.; Hill, Wayne S.

    1991-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow pressure drop experiments. The data are those of a recent experiment (Hill and Best 1990) funded by the U.S. Air Force and conducted by Foster-Miller in conjunction with Texas A&M University. A boiling and condensing experiment was built in which R-12 was used as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate a freon mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown five times aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates 0-``g'' conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included stratified and annual flow regimes in 1-``g'' which became bubbly, slug or annular flow regimes in 0-``g''. A portion of the current work outlines a methodology to analyze data for two-phase, 0-g experimental studies. A technique for correcting the raw pressure drop data collected from the test package is given. The Corrected pressure drop measurements are compared with predictive model. The corrected pressure drop measurements show no statistically significant difference between the 1-``g'' and 0-``g'' tests for mass flow rates between 0.00653 and 0.0544 kg/s in an 8 mm ID tube. An annular flow model gave the best overall predictions of pressure drop. The homogeneous, and Beattle and Whalley (1982) models showed good agreement with the pressure drops measured for the slug and bubbly/slug flow conditions. The two-phase multiplier deduced from the data appeared to follow the Martinelli-Nelson trend but at lower values than for

  4. Stochastic Discrete Equation Method (sDEM) for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, R.; Congedo, P.M.; Geraci, G.; Rodio, M.G.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme for the numerical approximation of a five-equation model taking into account Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) is presented. In particular, the Discrete Equation Method (DEM) for the discretization of the five-equation model is modified for including a formulation based on the adaptive Semi-Intrusive (aSI) scheme, thus yielding a new intrusive scheme (sDEM) for simulating stochastic two-phase flows. Some reference test-cases are performed in order to demonstrate the convergence properties and the efficiency of the overall scheme. The propagation of initial conditions uncertainties is evaluated in terms of mean and variance of several thermodynamic properties of the two phases.

  5. Pore-scale investigation of two-phase flow using micro particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmati, M.; Piri, M.; Stegmeir, M.

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing a two phase, two fields of view (FOV) Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (uPIV) system, simultaneous flow of oil and water in PDMS and glass porous systems are studied. We use glass and PDMS micromodels that are water- and oil-wet, respectively. They allow the study the effect of wettability on the flow. The velocity field of each phase is resolved in real-time and space using two high speed 4 MP cameras and a high repetition dual-head laser for small FOV and two 29 MP cameras and a low repetition dual-head powerful laser for the large FOV. Small FOV part of the system is used to investigate details of the flow at the pore scale and the interactions between the fluids and the medium. The large FOV is used to resolve the velocity over the entire micromodel. High-resolution micro-CT images of Bentheimer sandstone are used to construct two-dimensional. Single- and two-phase flow experiments are performed in these models. In the two-phase flow tests, imbibition and drainage experiments are carried out to obtain capillary pressure-saturation curves for different flow combinations. The velocity fields are resolved during each imbibition and drainage test and the effect of saturation of each phase on the velocity field is shown.

  6. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Flow in Severely Damaged Core Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Meekunnasombat, Phongsan; Fichot, Florian; Quintard, Michel

    2006-07-01

    In the event of a severe accident in a nuclear reactor, the oxidation, dissolution and collapse of fuel rods is likely to change dramatically the geometry of the core. A large part of the core would be damaged and would look like porous medium made of randomly distributed pellet fragments, broken claddings and relocated melts. Such a complex medium must be cooled in order to stop the accident progression. IRSN investigates the effectiveness of the water re-flooding mechanism in cooling this medium where complex two-phase flows are likely to exist. A macroscopic model for the prediction of the cooling sequence was developed for the ICARE/CATHARE code (IRSN mechanistic code for severe accidents). It still needs to be improved and assessed. It appears that a better understanding of the flow at the pore scale is necessary. As a result, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code was developed to investigate the local features of a two-phase flow in complex geometries. In this paper, the Cahn-Hilliard model is used to simulate flows of two immiscible fluids in geometries representing a damaged core. These geometries are synthesized from experimental tomography images (PHEBUS-FP project) in order to study the effects of each degradation feature, such as displacement and fragmentation of the fuel rods and claddings, on the two-phase flow. For example, the presence of fragmented fuel claddings is likely to enhance the trapping of the residual phase (either steam or water) within the medium which leads to less flow fluctuations in the other phase. Such features are clearly shown by DNS calculations. From a series of calculations where the geometry of the porous medium is changed, conclusions are drawn for the impact of rods damage level on the characteristics of two-phase flow in the core. (authors)

  8. A numerical study of two-phase flow in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpadi, A. K.

    1992-07-01

    A method is presented for computing steady two-phase turbulent combusting flow in a gas turbine combustor. The gas phase equations are solved in an Eulerian frame of reference. The two-phase calculations are performed by using a liquid droplet spray combustion model and treating the motion of the evaporating fuel droplets in a Lagrangian frame of reference. The numerical algorithm employs nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinates, a multigrid iterative solution procedure, the standard k-epsilon turbulence model, and a combustion model made up of an assumed shape probability density function and the conserved scalar formulation. The trajectory computation of the fuel provides the source terms for all the gas phase equations. Results of the application of the two-phase model to a modern GE/SNECMA single annular CFM56 turbofan engine combustor are reported.

  9. The Two-Phase Hell-Shaw Flow: Construction of an Exact Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaikah, K. R.

    2013-03-01

    We consider a two-phase Hele-Shaw cell whether or not the gap thickness is time-dependent. We construct an exact solution in terms of the Schwarz function of the interface for the two-phase Hele-Shaw flow. The derivation is based upon the single-valued complex velocity potential instead of the multiple-valued complex potential. As a result, the construction is applicable to the case of the time-dependent gap. In addition, there is no need to introduce branch cuts in the computational domain. Furthermore, the interface evolution in a two-phase problem is closely linked to its counterpart in a one-phase problem

  10. Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Baroncini, Virgínia H V; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Marco José; Morales, Rigoberto E M

    2015-01-01

    Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented. The sensor unit consists of the optical fiber Bragg grating positioned transversely to the flow and fixed in the pipe walls. The hydrodynamic pressure applied by the liquid or air/liquid flow to the optical fiber induces deformation that can be detected by the FBG. Given that the applied pressure is directly related to the mass flow, it is possible to establish a relationship using the grating resonance wavelength shift to determine the mass flow when the flow velocity is well known. For two phase flows of air and liquid, there is a significant change in the force applied to the fiber that accounts for the very distinct densities of these substances. As a consequence, the optical fiber deformation and the correspondent grating wavelength shift as a function of the flow will be very different for an air bubble or a liquid slug, allowing their detection as they flow through the pipe. A quasi-distributed sensing tool with 18 sensors evenly spread along the pipe is developed and characterized, making possible the characterization of the flow, as well as the tracking of the bubbles over a large section of the test bed. Results show good agreement with standard measurement methods and open up plenty of opportunities to both laboratory measurement tools and field applications. PMID:25789494

  11. Single- and Two-Phase Flow Characterization Using Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Baroncini, Virgínia H.V.; Martelli, Cicero; da Silva, Marco José; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Single- and two-phase flow characterization using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented. The sensor unit consists of the optical fiber Bragg grating positioned transversely to the flow and fixed in the pipe walls. The hydrodynamic pressure applied by the liquid or air/liquid flow to the optical fiber induces deformation that can be detected by the FBG. Given that the applied pressure is directly related to the mass flow, it is possible to establish a relationship using the grating resonance wavelength shift to determine the mass flow when the flow velocity is well known. For two phase flows of air and liquid, there is a significant change in the force applied to the fiber that accounts for the very distinct densities of these substances. As a consequence, the optical fiber deformation and the correspondent grating wavelength shift as a function of the flow will be very different for an air bubble or a liquid slug, allowing their detection as they flow through the pipe. A quasi-distributed sensing tool with 18 sensors evenly spread along the pipe is developed and characterized, making possible the characterization of the flow, as well as the tracking of the bubbles over a large section of the test bed. Results show good agreement with standard measurement methods and open up plenty of opportunities to both laboratory measurement tools and field applications. PMID:25789494

  12. A study of nonlinear dynamics of single- and two-phase flow oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawasha, Phetolo Ruby

    The dynamics of single- and two-phase flows in channels can be contingent on nonlinearities which are not clearly understood. These nonlinearities could be interfacial forces between the flowing fluid and its walls, variations in fluid properties, growth of voids, etc. The understanding of nonlinear dynamics of fluid flow is critical in physical systems which can undergo undesirable system operating scenarios such an oscillatory behavior which may lead to component failure. A nonlinear lumped mathematical model of a surge tank with a constant inlet flow into the tank and an outlet flow through a channel is derived from first principles. The model is used to demonstrate that surge tanks with inlet and outlet flows contribute to oscillatory behavior in laminar, turbulent, single-phase, and two-phase flow systems. Some oscillations are underdamped while others are self-sustaining. The mechanisms that are active in single-phase oscillations with no heating are presented using specific cases of simplified models. Also, it is demonstrated how an external mechanism such as boiling contributes to the oscillations observed in two-phase flow and gives rise to sustained oscillations (or pressure drop oscillations). A description of the pressure drop oscillation mechanism is presented using the steady state pressure drop versus mass flow rate characteristic curve of the heated channel, available steady state pressure drop versus mass flow rate from the surge tank, and the transient pressure drop versus mass flow rate limit cycle. Parametric studies are used to verify the theoretical pressure drop oscillations model using experimental data by Yuncu's (1990). The following contributions are unique: (1) comparisons of nonlinear pressure drop oscillation models with and without the effect of the wall thermal heat capacity and (2) comparisons of linearized pressure drop oscillation models with and without the effect of the wall thermal heat capacity to identify stability boundaries.

  13. A conservative approximation to compressible two-phase flow models in the stiff mechanical relaxation limit

    SciTech Connect

    Deledicque, Vincent; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2008-11-10

    In this article, we present and analyze a conservative approximation to reduced one-pressure one-velocity models for compressible two-phase flows that contain non-conservative products. This approximation is valid when certain material properties of the two phases are considerably different from each other. Although it cannot be applied to arbitrary mixtures, it is applicable to many heterogeneous mixtures of technological interest. Herein, we derive the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and Riemann invariants for the homogeneous part of the proposed model and develop an exact Riemann solver for it. Further, we investigate the structure of the steady two-phase detonation waves, with inert or reactive solid particles, admitted by the proposed model. Comparisons with the corresponding gaseous detonations are also made. Moreover, we derive a lower limit for the propagation speed of steady two-phase detonations in the case of reactive particles. At the limiting case of very dilute mixtures, this minimum speed tends to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity of gaseous detonations. Finally, we report on numerical simulations of the transmission of a purely gaseous detonation to heterogeneous mixtures containing inert or reactive solid particles. The effect of the solid particles on the structure of the resulting two-phase detonation is discussed in detail.

  14. Use of two-phase flow heat transfer method in spacecraft thermal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    In space applications, weight, volume and power are critical parameters. Presently liquid freon is used in the radiator planels of the Space Shuttle to dissipate heat. This requires a large amount of freon, large power for pumps, large volume and weight. Use of two-phase flow method to transfer heat can reduce them significantly. A modified commercial vapor compression refrigerator/freezer was sucessfully flown in STS-4 to study the effect of zero-gravity on the system. The duty cycle was about 5 percent higher in flight as compared to that on earth due to low flow velocity in condenser. The vapor Reynolds number at exit was about 4000 as compared to about 12,000. Efforts are underway to design a refrigerator/freezer using an oil-free compressor for Spacelab Mission 4 scheduled to fly in January 1986. A thermal system can be designed for spacecraft using the two-phase flow to transfer heat economically.

  15. Two-phase flow in porous media: power-law scaling of effective permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøva, Morten; Hansen, Alex

    2011-09-01

    A recent experiment has reported power-law scaling of effective permeability of two-phase flow with respect to capillary number for a two-dimensional model porous medium. In this paper, we consider the simultaneous flow of two phases through a porous medium under steady-state conditions, fixed total flow-rate and saturation, using a two-dimensional network simulator. We obtain power-law exponents for the scaling of effective permeability with respect to capillary number. The simulations are performed both for viscosity matched fluids and for a high viscosity ratio resembling that of air and water. Good power-law behaviour is found for both cases. Different exponents are found, depending on saturation.

  16. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  17. Two-phase power-law modeling of pipe flows displaying shear-thinning phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jianmin; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes work in modeling concentrated liquid-solids flows in pipes. COMMIX-M, a three-dimensional transient and steady-state computer program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, was used to compute velocities and concentrations. Based on the authors` previous analyses, some concentrated liquid-solids suspension flows display shear-thinning rather than Newtonian phenomena. Therefore, they developed a two-phase non-Newtonian power-law model that includes the effect of solids concentration on solids viscosity. With this new two-phase power-law solids-viscosity model, and with constitutive relationships for interfacial drag, virtual mass effect, shear lift force, and solids partial-slip boundary condition at the pipe walls, COMMIX-M is capable of analyzing concentrated three-dimensional liquid-solids flows.

  18. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  19. Impact of Gas-liquid Two-phase Flow on Fluid Borne Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniwaki, Mitsuhiro; Shimomura, Nobuo

    In pipe lines such as those found in refrigeration cycle, a gas-liquid two-phase flow may occur because of a pressure change in the pipe. This flow causes noise. A vapor phase ratio in a fluid and the behavior of bubbles are related to the outbreak of noise. This experimental study investigated the fluid borne noise caused by gas-liquid two-phase flow passing through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. In the experiment, sound pressure was measured for two purposes: to see the influence of the air-water ratio on sound pressure and to see the change in sound pressure when a single bubble passed through a contracted section in horizontal pipe. The experiment showed that the fluid borne noise of gas-liquid two-phase flow grew louder than that of a liquid single-phase flow. As for the frequency distribution of the fluid borne noise, the sound pressure level was higher in the high frequency band. Furthermore, the fluid borne noise grew louder with increasing bubble diameter.

  20. Investigation of Two-Phase Flows in Piping Bends and Elbows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Allen B.; Sciascia, Vincent M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the hydrodynamic characteristics of two-phase R-113 flow has been carried out. Straight tube pressure drop data, as a function of mass flow rate (mass flux) and flow quality has been obtained using the Two-Phase Flow Test Facility located in the Advanced Thermal Laboratories of the Crew and Thermal Systems Division at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. Additionally, after successfully obtaining the straight tube pressure drop data, the test facility was modified in order to obtain pressure drop data for the flow of two-phase R-113 through 180 deg piping bends. Inherent instabilities of the test facility prevented the successful acquisition of pressure drop data through the piping bends. The experimental straight tube data will be presented and compared with existing predictive correlations in an attempt to gain insight into the utility of such correlations as the basis for developing design criteria. A discussion of the instabilities which rendered successful acquisition of the piping bend data will be presented and suggestions will be made for eliminating these system tendencies. Finally, recommendations for future investigations, based on successful reconfiguration of the test facility, will be made.

  1. Analysis of nanoscale two-phase flow of argon using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-12-09

    Two phase flows through micro and nanochannels have attracted a lot of attention because of their immense applicability to many advanced fields such as MEMS/NEMS, electronic cooling, bioengineering etc. In this work, a molecular dynamics simulation method is employed to study the condensation process of superheated argon vapor force driven flow through a nanochannel combining fluid flow and heat transfer. A simple and effective particle insertion method is proposed to model phase change of argon based on non-periodic boundary conditions in the simulation domain. Starting from a crystalline solid wall of channel, the condensation process evolves from a transient unsteady state where we study the influence of different wall temperatures and fluid wall interactions on interfacial and heat transport properties of two phase flows. Subsequently, we analyzed transient temperature, density and velocity fields across the channel and their dependency on varying wall temperature and fluid wall interaction, after a dynamic equilibrium is achieved in phase transition. Quasi-steady nonequilibrium temperature profile, heat flux and interfacial thermal resistance were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the molecular dynamics method, with the proposed particle insertion method, effectively solves unsteady nonequilibrium two phase flows at nanoscale resolutions whose interphase between liquid and vapor phase is typically of the order of a few molecular diameters.

  2. Two-phase distribution in the vertical flow line of a domestic wet central heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fsadni, A.-M.; Ge, Y. T.

    2013-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of bubble distribution in bubbly two-phase flow are reviewed in the context of the micro bubbles present in a domestic gas fired wet central heating system. The latter systems are mostly operated through the circulation of heated standard tap water through a closed loop circuit which often results in water supersaturated with dissolved air. This leads to micro bubble nucleation at the primary heat exchanger wall, followed by detachment along the flow. Consequently, a bubbly two-phase flow characterises the flow line of such systems. The two-phase distribution across the vertical and horizontal pipes was measured through a consideration of the volumetric void fraction, quantified through photographic techniques. The bubble distribution in the vertical pipe in down flow conditions was measured to be quasi homogenous across the pipe section with a negligible reduction in the void fraction at close proximity to the pipe wall. Such a reduction was more evident at lower bulk fluid velocities.

  3. Time-resolved Fast Neutron Radiography of Air-water Two-phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Bromberger, Benjamin; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    Neutron imaging, in general, is a useful technique for visualizing low-Z materials (such as water or plastics) obscured by high-Z materials. However, when significant amounts of both materials are present and full-bodied samples have to be examined, cold and thermal neutrons rapidly reach their applicability limit as the samples become opaque. In such cases one can benefit from the high penetrating power of fast neutrons. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of time-resolved, fast neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick flow channel with Aluminum walls and rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. Exposure times down to 3.33 ms have been achieved at reasonable image quality and acceptable motion artifacts. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two-phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and bubble velocities have been measured.

  4. Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  5. A GPU-accelerated flow solver for incompressible two-phase fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codyer, Stephen; Raessi, Mehdi; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-11-01

    We present a numerical solver for incompressible, immiscible, two-phase fluid flows that is accelerated by using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the projection method, which involves solving a pressure Poisson problem at each time step. A second-order discretization of the Poisson problem leads to a sparse matrix with five and seven diagonals for two- and three-dimensional simulations, respectively. Running a serial linear algebra solver on a single CPU can take 50-99.9% of the total simulation time to solve the above system for pressure. To remove this bottleneck, we utilized the large parallelization capabilities of GPUs; we developed a linear algebra solver based on the conjugate gradient iterative method (CGIM) by using CUDA 4.0 libraries and compared its performance with CUSP, an open-source, GPU library for linear algebra. Compared to running the CGIM solver on a single CPU core, for a 2D case, our GPU solver yields speedups of up to 88x in solver time and 81x overall time on a single GPU card. In 3D cases, the speedups are up to 81x (solver) and 15x (overall). Speedup is faster at higher grid resolutions and our GPU solver outperforms CUSP. Current work examines the acceleration versus a parallel CGIM CPU solver.

  6. Design and construction of an experiment for two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.G.; Aziz, K.

    1993-08-01

    In numerical reservoir simulation naturally fractured reservoirs are commonly divided into matrix and fracture systems. The high permeability fractures are usually entirely responsible for flow between blocks and flow to the wells. The flow in these fractures is modeled using Darcy`s law and its extension to multiphase flow by means of relative permeabilities. The influence and measurement of fracture relative permeability for two-phase flow in fractured porous media have not been studied extensively, and the few works presented in the literature are contradictory. Experimental and numerical work on two-phase flow in fractured porous media has been initiated. An apparatus for monitoring this type of flow was designed and constructed. It consists of an artificially fractured core inside an epoxy core holder, detailed pressure and effluent monitoring, saturation measurements by means of a CT-scanner and a computerized data acquisition system. The complete apparatus was assembled and tested at conditions similar to the conditions expected for the two-phase flow experiments. Fine grid simulations of the experimental setup-were performed in order to establish experimental conditions and to study the effects of several key variables. These variables include fracture relative permeability and fracture capillary pressure. The numerical computations show that the flow is dominated by capillary imbibition, and that fracture relative permeabilities have only a minor influence. High oil recoveries without water production are achieved due to effective water imbibition from the fracture to the matrix. When imbibition is absent, fracture relative permeabilities affect the flow behavior at early production times.

  7. Conceptual plan: Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program was established to address concerns regarding two-phase flow properties and to provide WIPP-specific, geologically consistent experimental data to develop more appropriate correlations for Salado rock to replace those currently used in Performance Assessment models. Researchers in Sandia`s Fluid Flow and Transport Department originally identified and emphasized the need for laboratory measurements of Salado threshold pressure and relative permeability. The program expanded to include the measurement of capillary pressure, rock compressibility, porosity, and intrinsic permeability and the assessment of core damage. Sensitivity analyses identified the anhydrite interbed layers as the most likely path for the dissipation of waste-generated gas from waste-storage rooms because of their relatively high permeability. Due to this the program will initially focus on the anhydrite interbed material. The program may expand to include similar rock and flow measurements on other WIPP materials including impure halite, pure halite, and backfill and seal materials. This conceptual plan presents the scope, objectives, and historical documentation of the development of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Program through January 1993. Potential laboratory techniques for assessing core damage and measuring porosity, rock compressibility, capillary and threshold pressure, permeability as a function of stress, and relative permeability are discussed. Details of actual test designs, test procedures, and data analysis are not included in this report, but will be included in the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program Test Plan pending the results of experimental and other scoping activities in FY93.

  8. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  9. Conservative numerical schemes for unsteady one-dimensional two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cascales, Jose Ramon

    The thesis is devoted to the modelization of non steady two phase mixtures of liquid and vapour. It has been motivated by the great amount of industrial applications in which we find these phenomena. Transient two phase flow is a very important issue in nuclear, chemical and industrial applications. In the case of the nuclear industry due to the importance of preventing loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and guaranteeing a good performance of the coolant system in power plants. We justify the present development by means of the introduction of the most important codes developed during the last two decades and their associated mesh techniques. It is basically focused on the extension of some conservative and explicit schemes to obtain approximate solutions of the system of equations in one dimensional one pressure two phase flow. They have been centred and upwind schemes to solve multiphase flow problems, most of them based on the exact or approximate solution of Riemann problems using Godunov's like methods such as Approximate Riemann solvers or Flux Splitting methods. We have studied mainly TVD schemes, Adapted TVD schemes (ATVD) and the AUSM family of schemes. Firstly we introduce the 1D two phase flow system of equations with which we will work. We consider the systems of equations more used depending on the model. Thus we introduce the homogeneous model, the isentropic model and the separated model will be treated in some detail. The evaluation of the eigenstructure of the homogeneous and the separated two phase flow is studied. Different methods to determine the eigenvalues are presented. A general method to determine the eigenvectors is studied as well. We extend different conservative schemes to two phase flow whose good behaviour in single phase has been well proved. They are basically TVD schemes, the Adapted TVD schemes developed by Gascon and Corberan and the AUSM family of schemes, firstly introduced by Steffen and Liou. Most of the extensions developed

  10. Hydrodynamics of two phase flow through homogeneous and stratified porous layers

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W; Lee, H; Dhir, V K; Catton, I

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-phase flow through porous layers formed of nonheated glass particles has been made. The effect of particle size, particle size distribution, bed porosity and bed stratification on void fraction and pressure drop through particulate beds formed in a cylindrical and rectangular test section has been investigated. A model based on drift flux approach has been developed for the void fraction in homogeneous beds. Using the two phase friction pressure drop data, the relative permeabilities of the two phases have been concluded with void fraction. The void fraction and two-phase friction pressure gradient in beds composed of mixtures of spherical particles as well as sharps of different nominal sizes have also been examined. It is found that the models for single size particles are also applicable to mixtures of particles if a mean particle diameter for the mixture is defined. The observations in stratified beds indicate depletion or build up of voids at the interface between high and low permeability regions. Blocking of the flow into one of the layers of laterally stratified beds caused the pressures at different horizontal locations at the same bed height to be different from each other.

  11. Flow of polydisperse gas-particle mixture in a duct followed by coagulation in a nonlinear wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukmakov, A. L.; Bayanov, R. I.; Tukmakov, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulation of the flow of an aerosol of polydisperse composition in a plane duct, where the resonance acoustic oscillations are generated, which are directed across the flow, has been carried out. The peculiarities of the flow, which is followed by coagulation and alteration of the distribution of particles over their sizes, have been described. The carrying medium has been modeled with the aid of the system of Navier-Stokes equations for compressible heat-conducting gas. The polydisperse phase dynamics is described by the systems of equations involving the equations of continuity, conservation of the momentum and internal energy. Equations of the motion of carrying medium and disperse fractions are written with allowance for interphase exchange by the momentum and energy. A Lagrangian model has been used to describe the coagulation process. The dispersion alteration in the gas-particle flow under the action of acoustic oscillations, which are resonant for the duct cross section, is analyzed.

  12. Internal structure and interfacial area in two-phase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.

    1991-12-31

    The interfacial transfer terms and the importance of the interfacial area concentration are reviewed first with respect to the two-fluid model formulation of two-phase flow systems. Then the available measurement techniques for interfacial area are reviewed. At present, it appears that various methods such as the chemical, light attenuation, photographic, ultrasound attenuation and probe techniques have a number of limitations. Among these measurement techniques, however, the local probe method using one or more double sensors seems to have the greatest potential in terns of accuracy and wider applicability in various two-phase flow patterns. From the brief review of existing interfacial area modeling methods, it is concluded that the conventional approaches might not be sufficient, and new directions are indicated. Recent experimental results on local interfacial structural characteristics of horizontal bubbly two-phase flow and internal flow structure development are presented. More specifically, experimental results on local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size, bubble interface velocity and bubble frequency are documented in detail. Finally, a theoretical model predicting the mean bubble size and interfacial area concentration is proposed. The theoretically predicted bubble size and interfacial area concentration are found to agree reasonably well with those measured by using a double-sensor resistivity technique.

  13. Internal structure and interfacial area in two-phase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial transfer terms and the importance of the interfacial area concentration are reviewed first with respect to the two-fluid model formulation of two-phase flow systems. Then the available measurement techniques for interfacial area are reviewed. At present, it appears that various methods such as the chemical, light attenuation, photographic, ultrasound attenuation and probe techniques have a number of limitations. Among these measurement techniques, however, the local probe method using one or more double sensors seems to have the greatest potential in terns of accuracy and wider applicability in various two-phase flow patterns. From the brief review of existing interfacial area modeling methods, it is concluded that the conventional approaches might not be sufficient, and new directions are indicated. Recent experimental results on local interfacial structural characteristics of horizontal bubbly two-phase flow and internal flow structure development are presented. More specifically, experimental results on local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size, bubble interface velocity and bubble frequency are documented in detail. Finally, a theoretical model predicting the mean bubble size and interfacial area concentration is proposed. The theoretically predicted bubble size and interfacial area concentration are found to agree reasonably well with those measured by using a double-sensor resistivity technique.

  14. Two-Phase Flow Visualization of Refrigerant Fluid at Expansion Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeo; Saito, Takayuki; Kiwata, Takahiro; Matsumura, Kazuhiko

    Recently, the noise caused by the refrigerant fluid is spotlighted due to the demand of low noise home and office air conditioners. Especially, reduction of refrigerant fluid noise and vibration noise generated from throttle in the expansion valve is becoming important. Therefore in this study it is intended to resolve fluctuating phenomena of fluid, which may be the cause of noise, by flow visualization and measurement of fluid pressure and temperature at throttle valves, focusing on two-phase flow of refrigerant fluid. A test equipment suitable for flow visualization of R410a refrigerant was developed by epoch making design and manufacturing method. Visualization was realized by laser beam irradiated on the visualization equipment and by high-speed video camera. Test conditions are set of combinations of 4 different conditions of compressor revolution and 4 different conditions of valve opening of expansion valve. As results of the following conclusions are drawn. (1)A visualization technique of throttle of expansion valve has been developed by manufacturing visualization equipment, which is most suitable to the test. (2)It has been confirmed that refrigerants is liquid and two-phase condition in the upstream of throttle, where a needle is inserted and that refrigerant fluid flow in two-phase in the downstream of throttle.

  15. A Novel Hyperbolization Procedure for The Two-Phase Six-Equation Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Robert Nourgaliev; Nam Dinh

    2011-10-01

    We introduce a novel approach for the hyperbolization of the well-known two-phase six equation flow model. The six-equation model has been frequently used in many two-phase flow applications such as bubbly fluid flows in nuclear reactors. One major drawback of this model is that it can be arbitrarily non-hyperbolic resulting in difficulties such as numerical instability issues. Non-hyperbolic behavior can be associated with complex eigenvalues that correspond to characteristic matrix of the system. Complex eigenvalues are often due to certain flow parameter choices such as the definition of inter-facial pressure terms. In our method, we prevent the characteristic matrix receiving complex eigenvalues by fine tuning the inter-facial pressure terms with an iterative procedure. In this way, the characteristic matrix possesses all real eigenvalues meaning that the characteristic wave speeds are all real therefore the overall two-phase flowmodel becomes hyperbolic. The main advantage of this is that one can apply less diffusive highly accurate high resolution numerical schemes that often rely on explicit calculations of real eigenvalues. We note that existing non-hyperbolic models are discretized mainly based on low order highly dissipative numerical techniques in order to avoid stability issues.

  16. A Simple and Efficient Diffuse Interface Method for Compressible Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ray A. Berry; Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas

    2009-05-01

    In nuclear reactor safety and optimization there are key issues that rely on in-depth understanding of basic two-phase flow phenomena with heat and mass transfer. For many reasons, to be discussed, there is growing interest in the application of two-phase flow models to provide diffuse, but nevertheless resolved, simulation of interfaces between two immiscible compressible fluids – diffuse interface method (DIM). Because of its ability to dynamically create interfaces and to solve interfaces separating pure media and mixtures for DNS-like (Direct Numerical Simulation) simulations of interfacial flows, we examine the construction of a simple, robust, fast, and accurate numerical formulation for the 5-equation Kapila et al. [1] reduced two-phase model. Though apparently simple, the Kapila et al. model contains a volume fraction differential transport equation containing a nonlinear, non-conservative term which poses serious computational challenges. To circumvent the difficulties encountered with the single velocity and single pressure Kapila et al. [1] multiphase flow model, a 6-equation relaxation hyperbolic model is built to solve interface problems with compressible fluids. In this approach, pressure non-equilibrium is first restored, followed by a relaxation to an asymptotic solution which is convergent to the solutions of the Kapila et al. reduced model. The apparent complexity introduced with this extended hyperbolic model actually leads to considerable simplifications regarding numerical resolution, and the various ingredients used by this method are general enough to consider future extensions to problems involving complex physics.

  17. A Local Condensation Analysis Representing Two-phase Annular Flow in Condenser/radiator Capillary Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Amir

    1991-01-01

    NASA's effort for the thermal environmental control of the Space Station Freedom is directed towards the design, analysis, and development of an Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). A two phase, flow through condenser/radiator concept was baselined, as a part of the ATCS, for the radiation of space station thermal load into space. The proposed condenser rejects heat through direct condensation of ATCS working fluid (ammonia) in the small diameter radiator tubes. Analysis of the condensation process and design of condenser tubes are based on the available two phase flow models for the prediction of flow regimes, heat transfer, and pressure drops. The prediction formulas use the existing empirical relationships of friction factor at gas-liquid interface. An attempt is made to study the stability of interfacial waves in two phase annular flow. The formulation is presented of a stability problem in cylindrical coordinates. The contribution of fluid viscosity, surface tension, and transverse radius of curvature to the interfacial surface is included. A solution is obtained for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability problem which can be used to determine the critical and most dangerous wavelengths for interfacial waves.

  18. Two-phase flow in smooth and rough fractures: Measurement and correlation by porous-medium and pipe flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Fourar, M.; Bories, S. ); Lenormand, R. ); Persoff, P. )

    1993-11-01

    Two-phase (air-water) flow experiments were conducted in horizontal artificial fractures. The fractures were between glass plates that were either smooth or artificially roughened by gluing a layer of glass beads to them. One smooth fracture with an aperture of 1 mm and three rough fractures, one with the two surfaces in contact and two without contact, were studied. For both types of fractures, the flow structures are similar to those observed in two-phase flow in a pipe, with structures (bubbles, fingering bubbles, films, and drops) depending on the gas and liquid flow rates. The pressure gradients measured for different liquid and gas velocities were interpreted by three models. First, using Darcy's law leads to relative permeability curves similar to conventional ones for porous media. However, these curves depend not only on saturation but also on flow rats. This effect is caused by inertial forces which are not included in this approach. Second, the standard approach for two-phase flow in pipes (Lockhart and Martinelli's equation) agrees with experimental results, at least for small pressure gradients. Finally, the best fit was obtained by treating the two phases as one homogeneous phase. All the properties are averaged, and the pressure drop is deduced from an empirical correlation between the two-phase Reynolds number and the friction factor. 22 refs., 11 figs.

  19. Experimental study of seismic vibration effect on two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Wen

    This study is to investigate the seismic vibration effects on two-phase flow. Based on the seismic characteristics found in literature, the properties for designing a test facility to simulate vibration and the test conditions for adiabatic and diabatic (subcooled boiling) two-phase flows have been chosen. In order to perform this experiment, an annulus test section has been built and attached to a vibration module. For experimental investigation and visualization of two-phase flow, Pyrex-glass tubes have been utilized as a transparent test section and stainless steel instrumentation ports are designed to acquire experimental data. In the design process, calculations considering the resonance, natural frequency, structural deflection, material properties and vibration conditions for the vibration structure have been performed to choose a suitable vibration beam. The motion equations of the eccentric cam are also analyzed with respect to displacement (vibration amplitude), velocity and acceleration. Each design process is set for the goal of an economical, reliable and controllable vibration condition for the two-phase flow test section. In addition, the scaling laws for geometric similarity, hydrodynamic similarity and thermal similarity are taken into account for the annulus test section to simulate a fuel assembly sub-channel of a prototypic boiling water reactor (BWR). Potential hydrodynamic and thermal effects for two-phase flow under seismic vibration are broken down and analyzed in detail. Based on the 1-D drift-flux model, the hydrodynamics effects are discussed with respect to the possible variations of distribution parameters, C0, and drift velocity, <<νgj>>, caused by the changes of the void distribution, bubble diameter and flow regimes. Sensitivity studies are carried out for analyzing these potential hydrodynamic effects. In addition, the void generation relations in a diabatic (subcooled boiling) two-phase flow system are taken into account for

  20. Characterizing dynamic hysteresis and fractal statistics of chaotic two-phase flow and application to fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Michael B.; Litster, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we analyze the stability of two-phase flow regimes and their transitions using chaotic and fractal statistics, and we report new measurements of dynamic two-phase pressure drop hysteresis that is related to flow regime stability and channel water content. Two-phase flow dynamics are relevant to a variety of real-world systems, and quantifying transient two-phase flow phenomena is important for efficient design. We recorded two-phase (air and water) pressure drops and flow images in a microchannel under both steady and transient conditions. Using Lyapunov exponents and Hurst exponents to characterize the steady-state pressure fluctuations, we develop a new, measurable regime identification criteria based on the dynamic stability of the two-phase pressure signal. We also applied a new experimental technique by continuously cycling the air flow rate to study dynamic hysteresis in two-phase pressure drops, which is separate from steady-state hysteresis and can be used to understand two-phase flow development time scales. Using recorded images of the two-phase flow, we show that the capacitive dynamic hysteresis is related to channel water content and flow regime stability. The mixed-wettability microchannel and in-channel water introduction used in this study simulate a polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode air flow channel.

  1. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  2. Targeted delivery by smart capsules for controlling two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Weitz, David; Harvard Weitzgroup Team

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is significantly influenced by the physical properties of the fluids and the geometry of the medium. We develop a variety of smart microcapsules that can deliver and release specific substances to the target location in the porous medium, and therefore change the fluid property or medium geometry at certain locations. In this talk, I will present two types of smart capsules for targeted surfactant delivery to the vicinity of oil-water interface and targeted microgel delivery for improving the homogeneity of the porous medium, respectively. We further prove the concept by monitoring the capsule location and the fluid structure in the porous media by micro-CT and confocal microscopy. This technique not only is of particular importance to the relevant industry applications especially in the oil industry but also opens a new window to study the mechanism of two-phase flow in porous media. Advanced Energy Consortium BEG08-027.

  3. A gas kinetic scheme for the Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liang; Zhao, Guiping; Tian, Baolin; Wang, Shuanghu

    2012-09-15

    Numerical methods for the Baer-Nunziato (BN) two-phase flow model have attracted much attention in recent years. In this paper, we present a new gas kinetic scheme for the BN two-phase flow model containing non-conservative terms in the framework of finite volume method. In the view of microscopic aspect, a generalized Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) model which matches with the BN model is constructed. Based on the integral solution of the generalized BGK model, we construct the distribution functions at the cell interface. Then numerical fluxes can be obtained by taking moments of the distribution functions, and non-conservative terms are explicitly introduced into the construction of numerical fluxes. In this method, not only the complex iterative process of exact solutions is avoided, but also the non-conservative terms included in the equation can be handled well.

  4. Two-phase flow dynamics during boiling of R134a refrigerant in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovalyg, D. M.; Baranenko, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    This study is devoted to complex experimental investigation of two-phase flow boiling of R134a refrigerant in a minichannel having a hydraulic diameter of 540 μm at heat fluxes up to 70 kW/m2 and mass fluxes up to 700 kg/(m2 s). Flow regimes, pressure drop, heat transfer coefficient, and behavior of instabilities are analyzed as functions of vapor quality. On the basis of experimental data, the methods for calculating two-phase pressure drop in a minichannel with a diameter of about 500 μm are determined, and new correlation is proposed for estimating the heat-transfer coefficient; the region of stable boiling of the refrigerant is also determined.

  5. Some issues in the simulation of two-phase flows: The relative velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräbel, J.; Hensel, S.; Ueberholz, P.; Zeidan, D.; Farber, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare numerical approximations for solving the Riemann problem for a hyperbolic two-phase flow model in two-dimensional space. The model is based on mixture parameters of state where the relative velocity between the two-phase systems is taken into account. This relative velocity appears as a main discontinuous flow variable through the complete wave structure and cannot be recovered correctly by some numerical techniques when simulating the associated Riemann problem. Simulations are validated by comparing the results of the numerical calculation qualitatively with OpenFOAM software. Simulations also indicate that OpenFOAM is unable to resolve the relative velocity associated with the Riemann problem.

  6. Decay of the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-06-01

    We establish the optimal {Lp-L2(1 ≤ p < 6/5)} time decay rates of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the 3D inviscid liquid-gas two-phase flow model and analyze the influences of the damping on the qualitative behaviors of solution. Compared with the viscous liquid-gas two-phase flow model (Zhang and Zhu in J Differ Equ 258:2315-2338, 2015), our results imply that the friction effect of the damping is stronger than the dissipation effect of the viscosities and enhances the decay rate of the velocity. Our proof is based on Hodge decomposition technique, the {Lp-L2} estimates for the linearized equations and an elaborate energy method.

  7. Fluid structure interaction solver coupled with volume of fluid method for two-phase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, D.; Fancellu, L.; Manservisi, S.; Menghini, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose to study the behavior of a solid elastic object that interacts with a multiphase flow. Fluid structure interaction and multiphase problems are of great interest in engineering and science because of many potential applications. The study of this interaction by coupling a fluid structure interaction (FSI) solver with a multiphase problem could open a large range of possibilities in the investigation of realistic problems. We use a FSI solver based on a monolithic approach, while the two-phase interface advection and reconstruction is computed in the framework of a Volume of Fluid method which is one of the more popular algorithms for two-phase flow problems. The coupling between the FSI and VOF algorithm is efficiently handled with the use of MEDMEM libraries implemented in the computational platform Salome. The numerical results of a dam break problem over a deformable solid are reported in order to show the robustness and stability of this numerical approach.

  8. Cavitation and two-phase flow characteristics of SRPR (Savannah River Plant Reactor) pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The possible head degradation of the SRPR pumps may be attributable to two independent phenomena, one due to the inception of cavitation and the other due to the two-phase flow phenomena. The head degradation due to the appearance of cavitation on the pump blade is hardly likely in the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) since the coolant circulating line is highly pressurized so that the cavitation is difficult to occur even at LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. On the other hand, the suction pressure of SRPR pump is order-of-magnitude smaller than that of PWR so that the cavitation phenomena, may prevail, should LOCA occur, depending on the extent of LOCA condition. In this study, therefore, both cavitation phenomena and two-phase flow phenomena were investigated for the SRPR pump by using various analytical tools and the numerical results are presented herein.

  9. Finite difference solution for a generalized Reynolds equation with homogeneous two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Wheeler, R. L., III; Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt is made to relate elements of two-phase flow and kinetic theory to the modified generalized Reynolds equation and to the energy equation, in order to arrive at a unified model simulating the pressure and flows in journal bearings, hydrostatic journal bearings, or squeeze film dampers when a two-phase situation occurs due to sudden fluid depressurization and heat generation. The numerical examples presented furnish a test of the algorithm for constant properties, and give insight into the effect of the shaft fluid heat transfer coefficient on the temperature profiles. The different level of pressures achievable for a given angular velocity depends on whether the bearing is thermal or nonisothermal; upwind differencing is noted to be essential for the derivation of a realistic profile.

  10. Performance of WPA Conductivity Sensor during Two-Phase Fluid Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Layne; O'Connor, Edward W.; Snowdon, Doug

    2003-01-01

    The Conductivity Sensor designed for use in the Node 3 Water Processor Assembly (WPA) was based on the existing Space Shuttle application for the fuel cell water system. However, engineering analysis has determined that this sensor design is potentially sensitive to two-phase fluid flow (gadliquid) in microgravity. The source for this sensitivity is the fact that gas bubbles will become lodged between the sensor probe and the wall of the housing without the aid of buoyancy in l-g. Once gas becomes lodged in the housing, the measured conductivity will be offset based on the volume of occluded gas. A development conductivity sensor was flown on the NASA Microgravity Plan to measure the offset, which was determined to range between 0 and 50%. Based on these findings, a development program was initiated at the sensor s manufacturer to develop a sensor design fully compatible with two-phase fluid flow in microgravity.

  11. A numerical method for a model of two-phase flow in a coupled free flow and porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we study two-phase fluid flow in coupled free flow and porous media regions. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the porous medium region. We propose a Robin-Robin domain decomposition method for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  12. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients: Effect of viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Da Hlaing, Nan; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2007-05-15

    The effect of liquid viscosity on the flow regimes and the corresponding pressure gradients along the vertical two-phase flow was investigated. Experiment was carried out in a vertical transparent tube of 0.019 m in diameter and 3 m in length and the pressure gradients were measured by a U-tube manometer. Water and a 50 vol.% glycerol solution were used as the working fluids whose kinematic viscosities were 0.85 x 10{sup -6} and 4.0 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In our air-liquid annular two-phase flow, the liquid film of various thicknesses flowed adjacent to the wall and the gas phase flowed at the center of the tube. The superficial air velocity, j{sub air}, was varied between 0.0021 and 58.7 m/s and the superficial liquid velocity, j{sub liquid}, was varied between 0 and 0.1053 m/s. In the bubble, the slug and the slug-churn flow regimes, the pressure gradients decreased with increasing Reynolds number. But in the annular and the mist flow regimes, pressure gradients increased with increasing Reynolds number. Finally, the experimentally measured pressure gradient values were compared and are in good agreement with the theoretical values. (author)

  13. Vertical two-phase flow regimes and pressure gradients under the influence of SDS surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Duangprasert, Tanabordee; Sirivat, Anuvat; Siemanond, Kitipat; Wilkes, James O.

    2008-01-15

    Two-phase gas/liquid flows in vertical pipes have been systematically investigated. Water and SDS surfactant solutions at various concentrations were used as the working fluids. In particular, we focus our work on the influence of surfactant addition on the flow regimes, the corresponding pressure gradients, and the bubble sizes and velocity. Adding the surfactant lowers the air critical Reynolds numbers for the bubble-slug flow and the slug flow transitions. The pressure gradients of SDS solutions are lower than those of pure water especially in the slug flow and the slug-churn flow regimes, implying turbulent drag reduction. At low Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the surfactant solution are lower than those of pure water due to the increase in viscosity. With increasing and at high Re{sub air}, the bubble sizes of the SDS solution become greater than those of pure water which is attributed to the effect of surface tension. (author)

  14. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  15. Two-phase flow and heat transfer in porous beds under variable body forces, part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, H. R.

    1970-01-01

    The design of an experiment to determine the behavior of two-phase vapor-liquid and gas-liquid flow through porous beds in low gravity environments is discussed. The selection of porous materials, liquids, and gases is described. The parameters necessary for the design and development of a flight experimental system are examined. The general specifications for system elements requiring additional development are identified.

  16. Dynamics of face and annular seals with two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William F.; Basu, Prithwish; Beatty, Paul A.; Beeler, Richard M.; Lau, Stephen

    1989-01-01

    A detailed study was made of face and annular seals under conditions where boiling, i.e., phase change of the leaking fluid, occurs within the seal. Many seals operate in this mode because of flashing due to pressure drop and/or heat input from frictional heating. High pressure, water pumps, industrial chemical pumps, and cryogenic pumps are mentioned as a few of many applications. The initial motivation was the LOX-GOX seals for the space shuttle main engine, but the study was expanded to include any face or annular seal where boiling occurs. Some of the distinctive behavior characteristics of two-phase seals were discussed, particularly their axial stability. While two-phase seals probably exhibit instability to disturbances of other degrees of freedom such as wobble, etc., under certain conditions, such analyses are too complex to be treated at present. Since an all liquid seal (with parallel faces) has a neutral axial stiffness curve, and is stabilized axially by convergent coning, other degrees of freedom stability analyses are necessary. However, the axial stability behavior of the two-phase seal is always a consideration no matter how well the seal is aligned and regardless of the speed. Hence, axial stability is thought of as the primary design consideration for two-phase seals and indeed the stability behavior under sub-cooling variations probably overshadows other concerns. The main thrust was the dynamic analysis of axial motion of two-phase face seals, principally the determination of axial stiffness, and the steady behavior of two-phase annular seals. The main conclusions are that seals with two-phase flow may be unstable if improperly balanced. Detailed theoretical analyses of low (laminar) and high (turbulent) leakage seals are presented along with computer codes, parametric studies, and in particular a simplified PC based code that allows for rapid performance prediction. A simplified combined computer code for the performance prediction over the

  17. Two-phase Flow Ejector as Water Refrigerant by Using Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, H.; Nakagawa, M.

    2013-04-01

    Energy saving and the use of clean energy sources have recently become significant issues. It is expected that clean energy sources such as solar panels and fuel cells will be installed in many private dwellings. However, when electrical power is generated, exhaust heat is simultaneously produced. Especially for the summer season, the development of refrigeration systems that can use this waste heat is highly desirable. One approach is an ejector that can reduce the mechanical compression work required in a normal refrigeration cycle. We focus on the use of water as a refrigerant, since this can be safely implemented in private dwellings. Although the energy conversion efficiency is low, it is promising because it can use heat that would otherwise be discarded. However, a steam ejector refrigeration cycle requires a large amount of energy to change saturated water into vapour. Thus, we propose a more efficient two-phase flow ejector cycle. Experiments were carried out in which the quality of the two-phase flow from a tank was varied, and the efficiency of the ejector and nozzle was determined. The results show that a vacuum state can be achieved and suction exerted with a two-phase flow state at the ejector nozzle inlet.

  18. Two-phase flow in geothermal energy sources. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A geothermal well consisting of single and two-phase flow sections was modeled in order to explore the variables important to the process. For this purpose a computer program was developed in a versatile form in order to be able to incorporate a variety of two phase flow void fraction and friction correlations. A parametric study indicated that the most significant variables controlling the production rate are: hydrostatic pressure drop or void fraction in the two-phase mixture; and, heat transfer from the wellbore to the surrounding earth. Downhole instrumentation was developed and applied in two flowing wells to provide experimental data for the computer program. The wells (East Mesa 8-1, and a private well) behaved differently. Well 8-1 did not flash and numerous shakedown problems in the probe were encountered. The private well did flash and the instrumentation detected the onset of flashing. A Users Manual was developed and presented in a workshop held in conjunction with the Geothermal Resources Council.

  19. Chromatographic sample collection from two-phase (gas+liquid) flows.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Thomas J; Windom, Bret C

    2011-12-01

    A particularly challenging sample presentation in analytical chemistry is a flowing stream that consists of both a gas and liquid phase, combined with the common situation in which a reliable analysis is needed for both phases, separately. In these cases, the vapor and liquid must be physically separated (without change to either), before the individual phases can be collected and analyzed. It is not possible to analyze two-phase flows otherwise. Although the two phases are at equilibrium, it is imperative that no liquid contaminate the vapor, and no vapor be entrained in the liquid at a given temperature and pressure. In this paper, we describe a simple on-line device that can individually separate and collect the vapor and liquid phases of a two-phase flow. The apparatus, which we call P(2)SC, uses an adaptation of the branch point separator, with vapor collection done downstream in a metal bellows. The liquid collection is done in a length of Teflon tube. The separated vapor and liquid phases are then easily transferred into any desired analytical instrument with a syringe, although any sample introduction method, such as a valve, could be used as well. We discuss the application of this device with a stream of thermally stressed rocket kerosene. PMID:22036084

  20. Parallel numerical modeling of two-phase flow during CO2 storage in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqing; Zehner, Björn; Böttcher, Norbert; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf

    2013-04-01

    Numerical modeling of CO2 storage processes in saline aquifers is computationally expensive due to the complexity and nonlinearity of the observed physical processes (e.g., two-phase flow) , and the large size of real reservoir site that also exhibits a heterogeneous distribution of material properties. The modeling of the physical process in the storage sites with a high degree of accuracy requires a fine discretization of the considered domain. Naturally, this leads to the requirement of extremely high computational resources. This work focuses on the parallel simulation of the two-phase flow in CO2 storage sites. The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the governing equations. Based on the overlapped domain decomposition approach, the PETSc package is employed to parallelize the global equation assembly and the linear solver, respectively. A numerical model based on the real test site Ketzin in Germany is adopted for parallel modeling. The model domain is discretized with more than four million tetrahedral elements. The parallel simulations are carried out on super computers with different number of cores. The obtained speedup shows a good scalability of the current parallel finite element approach of the two-phase flow modeling in geological CO2 storage applications.

  1. Network simulation of steady-state two-phase flow in consolidated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinides, G.N.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1996-02-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is a complex process encountered in many fields of practical engineering interest, such as oil recovery from reservoir rocks, aquifer pollution by liquid wastes and soil reconstitution, and agricultural irrigation. A computer-aided simulator of steady-state two-phase flow in consolidated porous media is developed. The porous medium is modeled as a 3-D pore network of suitably shaped and randomly sized unit cells of the constricted-tube type. The problem of two-phase flow is solved using the network approach. The wetting phase saturation, the viscosity ratio, the capillary number, and the probability of coalescence between two colliding ganglia are changed systematically, where as the geometrical and topological characteristics of the porous medium and wettability (dynamic contact angles) are kept constant. In the range of the parameter values investigated, the flow behavior observed is ganglion population dynamics (intrinsically unsteady, but giving a time-averaged steady state). The mean ganglion size and fraction of the nonwetting phase in the form of stranded ganglia are studied as functions of the main dimensionless parameters. Fractional flows and relative permeabilities are determined and correlated with flow phenomena at pore level. Effects of the wetting phase saturation, the viscosity ratio, the capillary number, and the coalescence factor on relative permeabilities are examined.

  2. Simulation of two-phase flow through porous media using the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    A finite-element model of two-phase flow of air and water movement through porous media was developed. The formulation for radial flow used axisymmetric linear triangular elements. Due to the radial nature of the problem, a two-dimensional formulation was used to represent three-dimensional space. Governing equations were based on Darcy's equation and continuity. Air was treated as a compressible fluid by using the Ideal Gas Law. A gravity-driven saturated-flow problem was modeled and the predicted flow rate exactly matched the analytical solution. Comparisons of analytical and experimental results of one-phase radial and vertical flow were made in which capillary pressure distributions were almost exactly matched by the two-phase model (TPM). The effect of air compression on infiltration was simulated. It was concluded that the TPM modeled air compression and its inhibiting effect on infiltration even though air counter flow through the surface boundary was not permitted. The difficulty in describing the boundary conditions for air at a boundary where infiltration occurred was examined. The effect of erroneous input data for the soil moisture characteristic curve and the relative permeability curve was examined.

  3. Stability analysis of two phase stratified flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavatula, Dinesh; S, Pushpavanam

    2015-11-01

    Two phase stratified flows arise in extraction operations in microfluidic systems. It is well established that stratified flows in between two infinite plates is always unstable. However such flows are experimentally observed in micro channels. To understand this paradox we perform a linear stability analysis of stratified two phase Poiseuille flow in a rectangular duct. A two-dimensional fully developed flow through the rectangular channel is considered. The linearized equations along with the boundary conditions in primitive variable formulation are numerically solved using Chebyshev collocation method. All the primitive variables, which are the velocity and pressure fields, are retained in the linearised governing equations. Since boundary conditions for disturbance pressure do not exist, the corresponding compatibility conditions derived from the Navier-Stokes equations are collocated both at the walls and the interface. The resulting eigen-value problem is solved using a shift and invert Arnoldi algorithm. The role of different parameters such as Aspect ratio, density ratio, viscosity ratio on the stability characteristics is analyzed. The stability results are validated in the limit of large Aspect Ratios. The flow fields are sought as a combination of Chebyshev polynomials in both y and z directions. Ministry of Human Resource and Development (MHDR).

  4. Effects of Gravity on Cocurrent Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of research on the influence of gravity on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid two-phase flow through packed columns. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under reduced gravity conditions compared to normal gravity cocurrent down-flow. This is illustrated by comparing the flow regime transitions found in reduced gravity with the transitions predicted by Talmor. Next, the effect of gravity on the total pressure drop in a packed column is shown to depend on the flow regime. The difference is roughly equivalent to the liquid static head for bubbly flow but begins to decrease at the onset of pulse flow. As the spray flow regime is approached by increasing the gas to liquid ratio, the effect of gravity on pressure drop becomes negligible. Finally, gravity tends to suppress the amplitude of each pressure pulse. An example of this phenomenon is presented.

  5. Hyperbolic models for two-phase (or two-material) flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D.L.

    1981-08-01

    For some time it has been known that many of the two-phase flow models lead to ill-posed problems unless viscous stresses are included. The inclusion of viscous stresses changes the character of the equations from hyperbolic to parabolic. A continuing problem has been to find a well-posed hyperbolic system of equations which provide a reasonable model for two-phase flow, or to show that no such model exists. Another outstanding problem has been to understand why the derivation procedures for microstructural models produce models with the peculiar defect of being unstable. A careful investigation of the derivation procedures for the simple case of stratified flow suggests that the equal-pressures assumption is most likely the assumption leading to instability. Consideration of the alternative assumption suggests a model, namely the Unequal-Pressures Model, which is expressed by a first order system of partial differential equations with real characteristics. Thus the problem of complex characteristics (or sound speeds) which lead to the instability in the equal-pressures models is obviated. The form that the analysis takes suggests a technique for categorizing models according to the evolution equations for their internal state variables in order to aid model builders in quickly determining which models will lead to complex characteristics. Also a model with real characteristics for the two-phase flow of a bubbly liquid arises from an extension of the Unequal-Pressures model for single-layered flow to multi-layered flow. This Unequal-Pressures model has real characteristics fo all physically acceptable states and has a complete set of eigenvectors except for a set of measure zero in state space and therefore is hyperbolic in state space. Also this Unequal-Pressures model is stable in the sense of von Neumann a.e. in state space.

  6. Flux-dependent percolation transition in immiscible two-phase flows in porous media.

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Thomas; Hansen, Alex; Oren, Pål-Eric

    2009-03-01

    Using numerical simulations, we study immiscible two-phase flow in a pore network reconstructed from Berea sandstone under flow conditions that are statistically invariant under translation. Under such conditions, the flow is a state function which is not dependent on initial conditions. We find a second-order phase transition resembling the phase inversion transition found in emulsions. The flow regimes under consideration are those of low surface tension-hence high capillary numbers Ca-where viscous forces dominate. Nevertheless, capillary forces are imminent, we observe a critical stage in saturation where the transition takes place. We determine polydispersity critical exponent tau=2.27+/-0.08 and find that the critical saturation depends on how fast the fluids flow. PMID:19392052

  7. Two phase flow and heat transfer in porous beds under variable body forces, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, J. L.; Henry, H. R.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations of a pilot model of a channel for the study of two-phase flow under low or zero gravity are presented. The formulation of dimensionless parameters to indicate the relative magnitude of the effects of capillarity, gravity, pressure gradient, viscosity, and inertia is described. The investigation is based on the principal equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Techniques were investigated by using a laser velocimeter for measuring point velocities of the fluid within the porous material without disturbing the flow.

  8. WENO wavelet method for a hyperbolic model of two-phase flow in conservative form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Dia; Kozakevicius, Alice J.; Schmidt, Alex A.; Jakobsson, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The current work presents a WENO wavelet adaptive method for solving multiphase flow problems. The grid adaptivity in each time step is obtained by the application of a thresholded interpolating wavelet transform, which allows the construction of a small yet effective sparse point representation of the solution. The spatial operator is solved by the Lax-Friedrich flux splitting approach in which the flux derivatives are approximated by the WENO scheme. Hyperbolic models of two-phase flow in conservative form are efficiently solved since shocks and rarefaction waves are precisely captured by the chosen methodology. Substantial computational gains are obtained through the grid reduction feature while maintaining the quality of the solutions.

  9. Interfacial area measurement and transport modeling in air-water two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu

    In two-fluid model, the interfacial area concentration (IAC) is an important parameter that characterizes the interaction of two-phases at the interface. The accuracy of IAC modeling and local measurements largely affects the efficiency of designing and assessing two-phase flow systems. The prediction of the dynamical evolution of IAC is one of the most challenging tasks in research and application. This thesis is focused on developing advanced local measurement techniques to obtain reliable two-phase parameters and implementing efficient theoretical models for IAC source and sink terms in a two-group interfacial area transport equation based on experiments. In this study, an advanced local measurement technique using a four-sensor conductivity probe has been presented for obtaining IAC in air-water flows. It extends the existing conductivity probe method to slug and churn-turbulent flows with a unified probe design and comprehensive signal processing system. Sophisticated algorithm and software have been implemented that is robust in handling most practical conditions with high reliability. Systematic analyses on the issues of probe applications and benchmarks have been performed. The improved four-sensor method has also been applied to flow conditions with significant local recirculation, which was considered the most challenging situation for local measurement in two-phase flow. Using the well-established instrumentation, solid databases for a two-inch air-water loop have been built with sufficient information on the axial development and the radial distribution of the local parameters. Mechanistic models of major fluid particle interaction phenomena involving two bubble groups have been proposed, including the shearing-off of small bubbles from slug/cap bubbles, the wake entrainment of group-1 bubble into group-2 bubble, the wake acceleration and coalescence between group-2 bubbles, and the breakup of group-2 bubbles due to surface instability. Prediction of

  10. An inviscid regularization technique for two-phase flows with shocks and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Kamran; Li, Teng

    2015-11-01

    An inviscid regularization technique for the simulation of multiphase flows with sharp interfaces is introduced. This methodology is based on a similar approach successfully used by our group in the past for regularizing single-phase problems with shocks and/or turbulence. The observable divergence theorem is employed to obtain the governing equations, namely the observable Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, from the conservation laws. Results of several inviscid simulations of incompressible and compressible two-phase flows with sharp interfaces are reported and compared with other available techniques. Specifically, simulation results of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and rising bubble problems in viscous or inviscid fluids are reported.

  11. Prediction of gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho; Platt, Jonathan A.

    1993-01-01

    An attempt is made to predict gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe in a microgravity environment through scaling analysis based on dominant physical mechanisms. Simple inlet geometry is adopted in the analysis to see the effect of inlet configuration on flow regime transitions. Comparison of the prediction with the existing experimental data shows good agreement, though more work is required to better define some physical parameters. The analysis clarifies much of the physics involved in this problem and can be applied to other configurations.

  12. Two-phase flow behavior in a spiral tube under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsusaburo; Muragishi, Osamu

    1990-10-01

    An experimental visualization of the two-phase flow of ethyl alcohol and R113 in a spiral tube under microgravity is reported, and a flow pattern map which takes the effects of centrifugal force into account is presented. The experimental technique, which uses a 10-m class drop tower to maintain a gravity level of 0.001 G for about 0.9 sec, is described. The results support the prediction that the effect of liquid surface tension becomes especially important under microgravity conditions. Models explaining the findings are developed.

  13. Electrical impedance imaging in two-phase, gas-liquid flows: 1. Initial investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. T.; Ovacik, L.; Jones, O. C.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of interfacial area density in two-phase, gas-liquid flows is one of the major elements impeding significant development of predictive tools based on the two-fluid model. Currently, these models require coupling of liquid and vapor at interfaces using constitutive equations which do not exist in any but the most rudimentary form. Work described herein represents the first step towards the development of Electrical Impedance Computed Tomography (EICT) for nonintrusive determination of interfacial structure and evolution in such flows.

  14. Experimental and Analytical Study of Lead-Bismuth-Water Direct Contact Boiling Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitrian; Dostal, Vaclav; Takahashi, Minoru

    The characteristics of lead-bismuth(Pb-Bi)-water boiling two-phase flow were investigated experimentally and analytically using a Pb-Bi-water direct contact boiling two-phase flow loop. Pb-Bi flow rates and void fraction were measured in a vertical circular tube at conditions of system pressure 7MPa, liquid metal temperature 460°C and injected water temperature 220°C. The drift-flux model with the assumption that bubble sizes were dependent on the fluid surface tension and the density ratio of Pb-Bi to steam-water mixture was chosen and modified by the best fit to the measured void fraction. Pb-Bi flow rates were analytically estimated using balance condition between buoyancy force and pressure losses, where the buoyancy force was calculated from void fraction estimated using the modified drift-flux model. The deviation of the analytical results of the flow rates from the experimental ones was less than 10%.

  15. Investigation on Two-phase Flow Dynamics with Discrete Bubble Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ami, Takeyuki; Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Shoji, Masahiro

    Conventional modeling including drift-flux model and two-fluid model is based on “continuous flow hypothesis”, being constructed by time-averaging, and thus both phases are defined in every spatio-temporal space. This makes it possible to apply to a variety of two-phase flow dynamics, while the intrinsic void fraction fluctuations, typically observed in slug and churn flows, are hardly simulated. In order to break through such a problem caused by time-averaging, discrete bubble model based on one-dimensional mass conservation equation, i.e. void propagation equation, has been developed. This model takes into account, as momentum effects, the wake effect induced by preceding bubbles, the local pressure fluctuation and the compressibility of gas phase together with the phase re-distribution due to geometrical constrains. Thus obtained spatio-temporal fluctuation characteristics of void fraction well simulated inherent two-phase behavior not only in a steady flow but also in an oscillatory flow.

  16. Central Upwind Scheme for a Compressible Two-Phase Flow Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Munshoor; Saleem, M. Rehan; Zia, Saqib; Qamar, Shamsul

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS) and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme. PMID:26039242

  17. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Fields by Application of Dynamic Electrical Impedance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, KyungYoun; Kang, Sook In; Kim, Ho Chan; Kim, Sin; Lee, Yoon Joon; Kim, Min Chan; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-07-01

    This study presents a visualization technique for the phase distribution in a two-phase flow field with an electrical impedance imaging technique, which reconstructs the resistivity distribution with electrical responses that are determined by corresponding excitations. Special emphasis is placed on the development of dynamic imaging technique for two-phase system undergoing a rapid transient, which could not be visualized with conventional static imaging techniques. The proposed algorithm treats the image reconstruction problem as a nonlinear state estimation problem and the unknown state (resistivity distribution, i.e. phase distribution) is estimated with the aid of a Kalman filter in a minimum mean square error sense. Several illustrative examples with computer simulations are successfully provided to verify the reconstruction performance of the proposed algorithm. (authors)

  18. Flow regimes of adiabatic gas-liquid two-phase under rolling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chaoxing; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Wang, Yang; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics of adiabatic air/water two-phase flow regimes under vertical and rolling motion conditions were investigated experimentally. Test sections are two rectangular ducts with the gaps of 1.41 and 10 mm, respectively, and a circular tube with 25 mm diameter. Flow regimes were recorded by a high speed CCD-camera and were identified by examining the video images. The experimental results indicate that the characteristics of flow patterns in 10 mm wide rectangular duct under vertical condition are very similar to those in circular tube, but different from the 1.41 mm wide rectangular duct. Channel size has a significant influence on flow pattern transition, boundary of which in rectangular channels tends asymptotically towards that in the circular tube with increasing the width of narrow side. Flow patterns in rolling channels are similar to each other, nevertheless, the effect of rolling motion on flow pattern transition are significantly various. Due to the remarkable influences of the friction shear stress and surface tension in the narrow gap duct, detailed flow pattern maps of which under vertical and rolling conditions are indistinguishable. While for the circular tube with 25 mm diameter, the transition from bubbly to slug flow occurs at a higher superficial liquid velocity and the churn flow covers more area on the flow regime map as the rolling period decreases.

  19. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  20. Effects of dynamic load on flow and heat transfer of two-phase boiling water in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiu-Ping; Song, Bao-Yin; Zhao, Mei; Cao, Xi

    2009-07-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to obtain the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single-phase water flow and two-phase pipe boiling water flow under high gravity (Hi-G) in present work. The experiments were conducted on a rotating platform, and boiling two-phase flow state was obtained by means of electric heating. The data were collected specifically in the test section, which was a lucite pipe with inner diameter of 20 mm and length of 400 mm. By changing the parameters, such as rotation speed, inlet temperature, flow rate, and etc., and analyzing the fluid resistance, effective heat and heat transfer coefficient of the experimental data, the effects of dynamic load on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single phase water and two-phase boiling water flow were investigated and obtained. The two-phase flow patterns under Hi-G condition were obtained with a video camera. The results show that the dynamic load significantly influences the flow characteristic and boiling heat transfer of the two-phase pipe flow. As the direction of the dynamic load and the flow direction are opposite, the greater the dynamic load, the higher the outlet pressure and the flow resistance, and the lower the flow rate, the void fraction, the wall inner surface temperature and the heat transfer capability. Therefore, the dynamic load will block the fluid flow, enhance heat dissipation toward the ambient environment and reduce the heat transfer to the two-phase boiling flow.

  1. Two-phase Flow Characteristics in a Gas-Flow Channel of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Chan

    Fuel cells, converting chemical energy of fuels directly into electricity, have become an integral part of alternative energy and energy efficiency. They provide a power source of high energy-conversion efficiency and zero emission, meeting the critical demands of a rapidly growing society. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also called polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), are the major type of fuel cells for transportation, portable and small-scale stationary applications. They provide high-power capability, work quietly at low temperatures, produce only water byproduct and no emission, and can be compactly assembled, making them one of the leading candidates for the next generation of power sources. Water management is one of the key issues in PEM fuel cells: appropriate humidification is critical for the ionic conductivity of membrane while excessive water causes flooding and consequently reduces cell performance. For efficient liquid water removal from gas flow channels of PEM fuel cells, in-depth understanding on droplet dynamics and two-phase flow characteristics is required. In this dissertation, theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental testing with visualization are carried out to understand the two-phase flow characteristics in PEM fuel cell channels. Two aspects of two-phase phenomena will be targeted: one is the droplet dynamics at the GDL surface; the other is the two-phase flow phenomena in gas flow channels. In the former, forces over a droplet, droplet deformation, and detachment are studied. Analytical solutions of droplet deformation and droplet detachment velocity are obtained. Both experiments and numerical simulation are conducted to validate analytical results. The effects of contact angle, channel geometry, superficial air velocity, properties of gas phase fluids are examined and criteria for the detachment velocity are derived to relate the Reynolds number to the Weber number. In the latter, two-phase flow

  2. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  3. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  4. Formation of parallel two-phase flow in nanochannel and application to solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Ugajin, Takuya; Ohta, Ryoichi; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; The University of Tokyo Team

    2015-11-01

    Micro chemical systems have realized high-throughput analysis in ultra small volumes. Our group has established unit operations such as extraction, separation and reaction, and a concept of integration of chemical processes using parallel multi-phase flows in microchannels. Recently, the research field has been extended to 10-1000 nm space (extended-nanospace). Exploiting extended-nanospace, we developed ultra high performance chemical operations such as aL-chromatography and single molecule immunoassay. However, formation of parallel multi-phase flow in nanochannels has been difficult. The challenge is to control liquid-liquid/gas-liquid interfaces in 100 nm-scale. For this purpose, this study developed a partial surface modification method of nanochannel and verified formation of parallel two-phase flow. We achieved partial hydrophobic modification using focused ion beam (FIB). Using this method, formation of parallel water/dodecane two-phase flow in a nanochannel of 1500 nm width and 890 nm depth was succeeded. Solvent extraction of lipid, which is a basic separation in bioanalysis, was achieved in 25 fL volume much smaller than single cell. This study will greatly contribute to develop novel nanofluidic devices for chemical analysis and chemical synthesis. This work was supported by Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology.

  5. Cryogenic Boiling and Two-Phase Flow during Pipe Chilldown in Earth and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kun; Ji, Yan; Chung, J. N.; Shyy, Wei

    2008-01-01

    For many industrial, medical and space technologies, cryogenic fluids play indispensable roles. An integral part of the cryogenic transport processes is the chilldown of the system components during initial applications. In this paper, we report experimental results for a chilldown process that is involved with the unsteady two-phase vapor-liquid flow and boiling heat transfer of the cryogen coupled with the transient heat conduction inside pipe walls. We have provided fundamental understanding on the physics of the two-phase flow and boiling heat transfer during cryogenic quenching through experimental observation, measurement and analysis. Based on the temperature measurement of the tube wall, the terrestrial cryogenic chilldown process is divided into three stages of film boiling, nucleate boiling and single-phase convection that bears a close similarity to the conventional pool boiling process. In earth gravity, cooling rate is non-uniform circumferentially due to a stratified flow pattern that gives rise to more cooling on the bottom wall by liquid filaments. In microgravity, there is no stratified flow and the absence of the gravitational force sends liquid filaments to the central core and replaces them by low thermal conductivity vapor that significantly reduces the heat transfer from the wall. Thus, the chilldown process is axisymmetric, but longer in microgravity.

  6. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood. PMID:22734751

  7. Code System to Calculate Three-Dimensional Extension Two-Phase Flow Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-04-28

    Version 00 This package consists of two programs K-FIX(3D) and K-FIX(3D, FLX) which extend the transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid program K-FIX to perform three-dimensional calculations. The transient dynamics of three-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. The application is to flow in the annulus between two cylinders where the inner cylinder moves periodically perpendicular to its axis. K-FIX(3D)more » is easily adaptable to a variety of two phase flow problems while K-FIX (3D,FLX) combines KFIX(3D), the three-dimensional version of the KFIX code, with the three-dimensional, elastic shell code FLX for application to a very specific class of problems. KFIX(3D,FLX) was developed specifically to calculate the coupled fluid-structure dynamics of a light water reactor core support barrel under accident conditions. Motion may be induced by blowdown, prescribed displacement, or seismic action. This package was released by NESC in 1982 then transferred to ESTSC and then to RSICC in January 1999. Files were not retrievable from the media, but the NEA Data Bank in France graciously submitted their package which was obtained from NESC. Hence, the files in this package are from the NEADB NESC-0877/01 package.« less

  8. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood.

  9. Two-phase flow numerical simulation of infiltration and groundwater drainage in a rice field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugomela, G. V.

    Farming of rice normally uses a substantially larger amount of water than other cereal grain crops mainly due to the traditional flooding of rice fields. Flooding of the fields result in a seepage flow condition whereby infiltration occurs at a potential rate. The potential infiltration rate obstructs the free movement of pore-air through the ground surface and gradually compresses the pore-air between the infiltrating wetting front and the groundwater table under which subsurface drains are installed. The Galerkin finite element method (FEM) simulation of two-phase flow of air and water in the porous media of the rice field shows that the subsequent increase in the pore-air pressure makes the pore-air act as a link phase which transfers the effects of the processes taking place in the wetting front above and the saturated zone below the groundwater table. This phenomenon is clearly demonstrated when the results of the two-phase flow simulation are compared to the corresponding single-phase flow simulation which neglects the effect of the pore-air. It is concluded that the ‘ponding’ which appears in rice fields can partly be explained by the resistance offered by the pore-air to the percolation process. The study demonstrates that flooding of rice fields during most of its growth time is not necessary rather it is enough to keep the ground surface just saturated and the rest of the water can be saved.

  10. Gas-water two-phase flow characterization with Electrical Resistance Tomography and Multivariate Multiscale Entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chao; Zhao, Jia; Dong, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Flow behavior characterization is important to understand gas-liquid two-phase flow mechanics and further establish its description model. An Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) provides information regarding flow conditions at different directions where the sensing electrodes implemented. We extracted the multivariate sample entropy (MSampEn) by treating ERT data as a multivariate time series. The dynamic experimental results indicate that the MSampEn is sensitive to complexity change of flow patterns including bubbly flow, stratified flow, plug flow and slug flow. MSampEn can characterize the flow behavior at different direction of two-phase flow, and reveal the transition between flow patterns when flow velocity changes. The proposed method is effective to analyze two-phase flow pattern transition by incorporating information of different scales and different spatial directions. PMID:25304040

  11. Dynamics of coupled and uncoupled two-phase flows in a slab mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pérez, R.; García-Demedices, L.; Ramos, J. Palafox; Díaz-Cruz, M.; Morales, R. D.

    2004-02-01

    Two-phase flows in a mold of a slab caster are studied using water modeling, particle-image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid-dynamics techniques. Two-way coupled flows are observed in liquidgas systems, because both phases influence each other’s momentum transfer. In addition to this concept, PIV measurements indicate the existence of structurally coupled flows, where the velocity vectors of both phases observe similar orientations. When the drag forces of the liquid, exerted on the bubbles, exceed a certain value of the inertial forces of the liquid phase, at high mass loads of gas (ratio of mass flow rates of the gas phase and the liquid phase), the flow becomes structurally coupled. These types of flows promote large oscillations of the meniscus level. Two jets, liquid and bubble, were identified; the latter always reported larger angles than the first, independent of the gas load. Thus, a gas-rich jet is located closer to the lower edge of the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) port, and the liquid-rich jet is found above this position. The liquid-jet angle approaches that of the SEN port when the flow becomes structurally coupled. Structurally uncoupled flows report gas jets that follow torrent-type patterns which are well explained using a multiphase fluid-dynamics model. Structurally coupled flows yield gas jets with a continuous pattern.

  12. Laboratory experiment on poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone under two-phase fluid flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Aichi, M.; Tokunaga, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Ogawa, T.; Aoki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and deformation of Berea sandstone was discussed through laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. In the experiment, a triaxial compression apparatus with flow pipes to pass fluids through a rock sample was used. The experimental procedures were as follows. Firstly, external stresses close to hydrostatic condition were applied to a water saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample. Then, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of the sample. During the experiment, both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample and volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were measured. Both strains showed sudden extensions after a few seconds, and monotonically extended thereafter. The volumetric discharge of water showed that air breakthrough occurred in around 100 seconds after the commencement of the air injection. Numerical simulations based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations were conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation in which the material was assumed to be homogeneous isotropic, the axial strain at half the height of the sample and the volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters, while that was not the case with the circumferential strain at half the height of the sample. On the other hand, in a simulation in which anisotropy of the material was introduced, all experimental data were reproduced well by using reasonable parameters. This result is reasonable because Berea sandstone is well known to be anisotropic under such Terzaghi effective stress condition as used in our experiment, i.e., 3.0 MPa (Hart and Wang, 1999; Hart, 2000). Our results indicate that the theory of poroelasticity for two-phase fluid system can explain the strain behavior of porous media for two-phase fluid flow observed in laboratory experiments.

  13. Localized electric field induced transition and miniaturization of two-phase flow patterns inside microchannels.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Abhinav; Tiwari, Vijeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    Strategic application of external electrostatic field on a pressure-driven two-phase flow inside a microchannel can transform the stratified or slug flow patterns into droplets. The localized electrohydrodynamic stress at the interface of the immiscible liquids can engender a liquid-dielectrophoretic deformation, which disrupts the balance of the viscous, capillary, and inertial forces of a pressure-driven flow to engender such flow morphologies. Interestingly, the size, shape, and frequency of the droplets can be tuned by varying the field intensity, location of the electric field, surface properties of the channel or fluids, viscosity ratio of the fluids, and the flow ratio of the phases. Higher field intensity with lower interfacial tension is found to facilitate the oil droplet formation with a higher throughput inside the hydrophilic microchannels. The method is successful in breaking down the regular pressure-driven flow patterns even when the fluid inlets are exchanged in the microchannel. The simulations identify the conditions to develop interesting flow morphologies, such as (i) an array of miniaturized spherical or hemispherical or elongated oil drops in continuous water phase, (ii) "oil-in-water" microemulsion with varying size and shape of oil droplets. The results reported can be of significance in improving the efficiency of multiphase microreactors where the flow patterns composed of droplets are preferred because of the availability of higher interfacial area for reactions or heat and mass exchange. PMID:25044128

  14. Vertically stratified two-phase flow in a curved channel: Insights from a domain perturbation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2014-07-15

    In this work, we investigate the fully developed flow field of two vertically stratified fluids (one phase flowing above the other) in a curved channel of rectangular cross section. The domain perturbation technique is applied to obtain an analytical solution in the asymptotic limit of low Reynolds numbers and small curvature ratios (the ratio of the width of the channel to its radius of curvature). The accuracy of this solution is verified by comparison with numerical simulations of the nonlinear equations. The flow is characterized by helical vortices within each fluid, which are driven by centrifugal forces. The number of vortices and their direction of circulation varies with the parameters of the system (the volume fraction, viscosity ratio, and Reynolds numbers). We identify nine distinct flow patterns and organize the parameter space into corresponding flow regimes. We show that the fully developed interface between the fluids is not horizontal, in general, but is deformed by normal stresses associated with the circulatory flow. The results are especially significant for flows in microchannels, where the Reynolds numbers are small. The mathematical results in this paper include an analytical solution to two coupled biharmonic partial differential equations; these equations arise in two-phase, two-dimensional Stokes flows.

  15. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  16. Zero-G experiments in two-phase fluids flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; King, C. D.; Littles, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The two-phase flows studied were liquid and gas mixtures in a straight flow channel of circular cross-section. Boundaries between flow regimes have been defined for normogravity on coordinates of gas quality and total mass velocity; and, when combined with boundary expressions having a Froude number term, an analytical model was derived predicting boundary shifts with changes in gravity level. Experiments with air and water were performed, first in the normogravity environment of a ground laboratory and then in 'zero gravity' aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Data reduction confirmed regime boundary shifts in the direction predicted, although the magnitude was a little less than predicted. Pressure drop measurements showed significant increases for the low gravity condition.

  17. Volcanic tremor induced by gas-liquid two-phase flow: Implications of density wave oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Eisuke; Araki, Kazuhiro; Nagano, Katsuhiro

    2011-09-01

    We model the source mechanism of volcanic tremor at shallow depths of a volcano by hydrothermal dynamics. Steam-water two-phase flow in the pipe is formulated, and its instability, known as density wave oscillation, can produce monotonic characteristics similar to those of a volcanic tremor. The oscillation is closely related to the heat supplied to the system and we quantitatively obtain the upper and lower limits of the heating quantity to realize this monotonic oscillation. This source mechanism can be realized only when the effect of gravity is small (i.e., horizontal flow), since the effect of depressurization due to upwelling is significant for bubble growth with vertical flow including gravity, and heating and vaporization are less important.

  18. High-resolution algorithms of sharp interface treatment for compressible two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueying; Yang, Haiting

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a kind of arbitrary high order derivatives (ADER) scheme based on the generalised Riemann problem is proposed to simulate multi-material flows by a coupling ghost fluid method. The states at cell interfaces are reconstructed by interpolating polynomials which are piece-wise smooth functions. The states are treated as the equivalent of the left and right states of the Riemann problem. The contact solvers are extrapolated in the vicinity of contact points to facilitate ghost fluids. The numerical method is applied to compressible flows with sharp discontinuities, such as the collision of two fluids of different physical states and gas-liquid two-phase flows. The numerical results demonstrate that unexpected physical oscillations through the contact discontinuities can be prevented effectively and the sharp interface can be captured efficiently.

  19. Bubble dynamics, two-phase flow, and boiling heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-phase bubbly flow and boiling heat transfer in microgravity represents a substantial challenge to scientists and engineers and yet there is an urgent need to seek fundamental understanding in this area for future spacecraft design and space missions. At Washington State University, we have successfully designed, built and tested a 2.1 second drop tower with an innovation airbag deceleration system. Microgravity boiling experiments performed in our 0.6 second Drop Tower produced data flow visualizations that agree with published results and also provide some new understanding concerning flow boiling and microgravity bubble behavior. On the analytical and numerical work, the edge effects of finite divergent electrode plates on the forces experienced by bubbles were investigated. Boiling in a concentric cylinder microgravity and an electric field was numerically predicted. We also completed a feasibility study for microgravity boiling in an acoustic field.

  20. A modified Rusanov scheme for shallow water equations with topography and two phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Kamel; Benkhaldoun, F.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we introduce a finite volume method for numerical simulation of shallow water equations with source terms in one and two space dimensions, and one-pressure model of two-phase flows in one space dimension. The proposed method is composed of two steps. The first, called predictor step, depends on a local parameter allowing to control the numerical diffusion. A strategy based on limiters theory enables to control this parameter. The second step recovers the conservation equation. The scheme can thus be turned to order 1 in the regions where the flow has a strong variation, and order 2 in the regions where the flow is regular. The numerical scheme is applied to several test cases in one and two space dimensions. This scheme demonstrates its well-balanced property, and that it is an efficient and accurate approach for solving shallow water equations with and without source terms, and water faucet problem.

  1. Behavior of embedded phase in shock-driven two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehner, Garrett; Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Corbin, Clint; Bernard, Tennille; Vorobieff, Peter; Truman, C. Randall

    2013-11-01

    We present an experimental study of droplet acceleration in a shock-driven two-phase flow (air with embedded liquid droplets). The droplets (propylene glycol, diameter 0.5-3 μm) were pre-mixed with the air in the test section of a shock tube, then impulsively accelerated with planar shock wave with a Mach number of 1.7. A cross-section of the flow is illuminated with multiple pulses from Nd:YAG lasers, producing time-resolved visualizations of the seeded volume. The images are then analyzed to quantify droplet velocity and acceleration from the shock passage to about 1.5 ms after the shock. Based on the velocity measurements, we can resolve the droplet lag after the shock, when the massive droplets ``catch up'' with the flow of the surrounding air, as well as validate our earlier estimates of boundary layer growth. This research is supported by NNSA (US National Nuclear Security Agency).

  2. Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Distribution in a Multipass Evaporator with Vertical Upward Main Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Manabu; Katasuta, Masafumi

    In this article, a calculation model that enables to predict two-phaseflow distribution in a multipass evaporator is proposed. The model considers the multipass evaporator as the combination of simple elements, i. e. straight pipes and T-junctions, and utilizes the correlations to predict the pressure drop at the elements. For the T-junction, however, we have so little knowledge, especially for the small diameter T-junction, that we make some experiments to evaluate the existing correlations for the junction pressure drop. We also do not have reliable model for predicting the phase separation characteristics, so that we used the empirical equations for liquid division ratio derived in our previous papers. By this model, gas phase flow distribution to each pass is determined as it makes the pressure at the outlet of each pass equal. Calculation results well predict the previously presented experimental data that were obtained under the condition of larger quality at the header inlet. The suitableness of this model suggests that the complexity of the two-phase flow distribution in multipass tube attributes to the phase separation phenomena in dividing two-phase flow at a T-junction

  3. MODIFIED CHOKE FLOW CRITERION FOR THE TWO-PHASE TWO-FLUID MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Suneet Singh; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2009-05-01

    A choked condition exists when mass flow rate becomes independent of the downstream conditions. In other words, no information can propagate in the upstream direction under this condition. The real part of the solution of the characteristic equation for the model represents velocity of the signal propagation and the imaginary part is the growth (or decay) rate of that signal. Therefore, if the real part of these eigenvalues is positive then no signal propagates in the upstream direction (choosing downstream direction to be the positive direction) resulting in the choke flow. In order to develop the choke criterion, a non-dimensional form of the characteristic equation is derived for the standard two-phase two-fluid model. The equation is in the terms of a slip Mach number Ms. It can be shown that the slip Mach number is small for many applications including nuclear reactor safety simulations. The eigenvalues of the characteristic equation are obtained as a power series expansion about the point Ms = 0. These eigenvalues are used to develop a choking criterion for the compressible two-phase flows.

  4. Effective parameters for two-phase flow in a porous medium with periodic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataie-Ashtiani, B.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Oostrom, M.; Celia, M. A.; White, M. D.

    2001-05-01

    Computational simulations of two-phase flow in porous media are used to investigate the feasibility of replacing a porous medium containing heterogeneities with an equivalent homogeneous medium. Simulations are performed for the case of infiltration of a dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in a water-saturated, heterogeneous porous medium. For two specific porous media, with periodic and rather simple heterogeneity patterns, the existence of a representative elementary volume (REV) is studied. Upscaled intrinsic permeabilities and upscaled nonlinear constitutive relationships for two-phase flow systems are numerically calculated and the effects of heterogeneities are evaluated. Upscaled capillary pressure-saturation curves for drainage are found to be distinctly different from the lower-scale curves for individual regions of heterogeneity. Irreducible water saturation for the homogenized medium is found to be much larger than the corresponding lower-scale values. Numerical simulations for both heterogeneous and homogeneous representations of the considered porous media are carried out. Although the homogenized model simulates the spreading behavior of DNAPL reasonably well, it still fails to match completely the results form the heterogeneous simulations. This seems to be due, in part, to the nonlinearities inherent to multiphase flow systems. Although we have focussed on a periodic heterogeneous medium in this study, our methodology is applicable to other forms of heterogeneous media. In particular, the procedure for identification of a REV, and associated upscaled constitutive relations, can be used for randomly heterogeneous or layered media as well.

  5. Pressure Drop Correlations of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow in Rolling Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xia-xin Cao; Chang-qi Yan; Pu-zhen Gao; Zhong-ning Sun

    2006-07-01

    A series of experimental studies of frictional pressure drop for single phase and two-phase bubble flow in smooth rolling tubes were carried out. The tube inside diameters were 15 mm, 25 mm and 34.5 mm respectively, the rolling angles of tubes could be set as 10 deg. and 20 deg., and the rolling periods could be set as 5 s, 10 s and 15 s. Combining with the analysis of single-phase water motion, it was found that the traditional correlations for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient were not suitable for the rolling condition. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for calculating single-phase frictional coefficient under rolling condition was presented, and the calculations not only agreed well with the experimental data, but also could display the periodically dynamic characteristics of frictional coefficients. Applying the new correlation to homogeneous flow model, two-phase frictional pressure drop of bubble flow in rolling tubes could be calculated, the results showed that the relative error between calculation and experimental data was less than {+-} 25%. (authors)

  6. Numerical simulation of gas-solid two-phase flow in U-beam separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Zhang, H. Z.; Chen, X. P.; Ruan, J. M.; Dou, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out for gas-solid two-phase flow in a U-beam separator. In this study, the U-beam is altered with the inlet fins in order to improve the performance of the separator. The inlet fin angle of the separator are 30°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55 ° and 60°. The governing equations are the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with the standard k-epsilon model and the discrete phase model (DPM) describing the discrete two - phase flow as well as stochastic tracking model. Results show that the pressure drop deviation with fins is within 3% from those without fins. It is found that there is a maximum separation efficiency at the fin angle of 35°. Fin induces generation of a stagnation region which could collect particles and lead to change of vortical structures. The fin induced flow also causes the turbulent intensity inside the baffle to decrease to facilitate separation.

  7. Two-phase flow modeling for the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chaozhong; Rensink, Dirk; Fell, Stephan; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid water flooding in micro gas channels is an important issue in the water management of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). However, in most previous numerical studies liquid water transport in the gas channels (GC) has been simplified by the mist flow assumption. In this work, we present a two-phase flow model for the cathode side of a PEFC. The GC is assumed to be a structured porous medium with the porosity of 1.0. The two-phase Darcy's law is applied to both diffusion layers and GC. Based on the developed model, the liquid water flooding in the GC and its impact on the liquid water distribution in the diffusion layers are explored in detail. Furthermore, we study the effect of the immobile saturation on the predicted liquid water distribution in the diffusion layers. The results show that neglecting the GC flooding leads to an incorrect prediction of liquid water distribution in the diffusion layers and an overestimation of the cell performance. The gas flow rate in the GC can be optimized to achieve the best cell performance. Finally, when considering the immobile saturation in the model, more liquid water is predicted in the diffusion layers.

  8. Constant-fractional-lag model for axisymmetric two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Chow; Fendell, Francis; Brent, David

    1991-10-01

    The suitability of the constant-fractional-lag model for axisymmetric two-phase flow with small particle loading is examined for an inviscid incompressible counterflow. A counterflow is a low-order approximation for the flow within a solid-rocket motor with a long bore of constant radius. In the model, each component of the particle-phase velocity is expressed as a certain multiple of the corresponding component of the gas-phase velocity. A different lag constant is required for the radial and the axial components of the particle-velocity field. For light particle loading, the constant-fractional-lag model yields mathematically accurate solutions (of the formulation) for both small and finite values of the interphase-velocity-slip parameter. Comparisons with results from the Lagrangian-particle-tracking method show excellent agreement at sites outside the Stokes layer holding in that portion of the two-phase flow immediately contiguous to the gas-grain interface; i.e., the agreement holds independently of the initial particle velocity at the solid-gas interface. The constant-fractional-lag model is easier to apply than the Lagrangian-particle-tracking method, and results are conveniently obtained in Eulerian form.

  9. Study on law of negative corona discharge in microparticle-air two-phase flow media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bo; Li, Tianwei; Xiu, Yaping; Zhao, Heng; Peng, Zongren; Meng, Yongpeng

    2016-03-01

    To study the basic law of negative corona discharge in solid particle-air two-phase flow, corona discharge experiments in a needle-plate electrode system at different voltage levels and different wind speed were carried out in the wind tunnel. In this paper, the change law of average current and current waveform were analyzed, and the observed phenomena were systematically explained from the perspectives of airflow, particle charging, and particle motion with the help of PIV (particle image velocity) measurements and ultraviolet observations.

  10. Analysis of permeability for transient two-phase flow in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiao-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Jian-Yi; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Zhang, Lie-Hui

    2014-03-01

    A relative permeability model for transient two-phase flow in fractal porous media is derived based on the fractal characteristics of pore size distribution and the assumption that porous media consists of capillary bundles. The functions in this model are tortuosity fractal dimension, pore fractal dimension, and maximum and minimum pore diameters. Every parameter has clear physical meaning without the use of empirical constants. Good agreement between model predictions and experimental data is obtained, the sensitive parameters that influence the relative permeability are specified and their effects on relative permeability are discussed.

  11. Riemann-problem-based techniques for computing reactive two-phased flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, E. F.

    We consider Riemann-problem based (RPB) numerical techniques for two-phase reactive flows with moving boundaries. Given the still unresolved problem of hyperbolicity we adopt a mixed hyperbolic-elliptic mathematical model. A successful strategy consists of identifying two hyperbolic homogeneous systems, one for each phase. The remaining terms are regarded as (stiff) source terms. The associated Riemann problems are solved exactly and approximately. Two RPB methods are then used, namely Roe's method and a Weighted Average Flux Method (WAF) due to the author. Application of the technioues to a shock tube problem and a ballistics problem are carried out.

  12. Nonequilibrium, Drift-Flux Code System for Two-Phase Flow Network Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-08-01

    Version: 00 SOLA-LOOP is designed for the solution of transient two-phase flow in networks composed of one-dimensional components. The fluid dynamics is described by a nonequilibrium, drift-flux formulation of the fluid conservation laws. Although developed for nuclear reactor safety analysis, SOLA-LOOP may be used as the basis for other types of special-purpose network codes. The program can accommodate almost any set of constitutive relations, property tables, or other special features required for different applications.

  13. An efficient pressure-velocity procedure for gas-droplet two-phase flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Jiang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a noniterative numerical technique for computing time-dependent gas-droplet flows. The method is a fully interacting combination of Eulerian fluid and Lagrangian particle calculations. The interaction calculations between the two phases are formulated on a pressure-velocity-coupling procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. This procedure eliminates the global iterations required in the conventional particle-source-in-cell procedure. Turbulent dispersion calculations are treated by a stochastic procedure. Numerical calculations and comparisons with available experimental data as well as efficiency assessments are given for some sprays typical of spray combustion applications.

  14. Capillary Dynamics of Elastic-Wave-Enhanced Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilpert, Markus; Guo, Chunyan; Katz, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    Elastic waves may enhance two-phase flow in porous media. We investigate the role and dynamics of capillary forces during the enhancement process. We present a theory that allows us to estimate the response of trapped nonwetting phase blobs to variable frequency excitation. According to this theory capillary trapped oil blobs may exhibit resonance, depending on the properties of the fluids and the pore space. Using this theory we estimate the resonant frequencies of crude oil and gasoline blobs in sphere packings. We will also present experimental evidence showing that capillary trapped liquid blobs exhibit resonance.

  15. Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Harihar Rajaram; Robert J. Glass; Michael J. Nicholl; Thomas R. Wood

    2007-06-24

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or 'structure' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface.

  16. Two-Phase Flow Research on the ISS for Thermal Control Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    With the era of full utilization of the ISS now upon us, this presentation will discuss some of the highest-priority areas for two-phase flow systems with thermal control applications. These priorities are guided by recommendations of a 2011 NRC Decadal Survey report, Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration, Life and Physical Sciences for a New Era as well as an internal NASA exercise in response to the NRC report conducted in early 2012. Many of these proposals are already in various stages of development, while others are still conceptual.

  17. Viscous singular shock profiles for a system of conservation laws modeling two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ting-Hao

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with singular shocks for a system of conservation laws via the Dafermos regularization ut + f(u)x = ɛtuxx. For a system modeling incompressible two-phase fluid flow, the existence of viscous profiles is proved using Geometric Singular Perturbation Theory. The weak convergence and the growth rate of the viscous solution are also derived; the weak limit is the sum of a piecewise constant function and a δ-measure supported on a shock line, and the maximum value of the viscous solution is of order exp ⁡ (1 / ɛ).

  18. A combined experimental-numerical approach for two-phase flow boiling in a minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Mirosław

    2016-03-01

    The paper addresses experimental and numerical modeling of the two-phase flows in an asymmetrically heated horizontal minichannel. Experimental measurements concerned flows of evaporating ethanol in a minichannel with rectangular cross section 1.8mm × 2 mm. In order to observe the flows, measuring system was designed and built. The system measured and recorded basic heat and flow parameters of flowing fluid, and the temperature of external surface of the heater by using infrared camera and recorded images of flow with high-speed camera. The second aim of the paper was to formulate appropriate flow boiling heat transfer model, which would minimises the use of experimentally determined constants. The procedure of calculating the temperature of the ethanol is coupled with concurrent process of determining the temperature distributions in the isolating foil and the heating surface. The two-dimensional temperature distributions in three subsequent domains were calculated with Trefftz method. Due to the Robin condition, heat transfer coefficient at the heating surface-ethanol interface was calculated based on the known temperature distributions of the foil and liquid. Additionally, the paper describes the relation between two sets of functions used in the calculation. Numerical calculations made by Trefftz method were performed with using experimental data.

  19. Experimental study of liquid-solid two phase flow over a step using PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cando, E. H.; Luo, X. W.; Hidalgo, V. H.; Zhu, L.; Aguinaga, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation focuses on the water-sand flow through a rectangular tunnel with a step using the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two cameras with appropriate optical filters have been used to capture each phase image separately. The optical filters were selected according to the optical properties of the sand and fluorescent tracers. Through data processing the experimental flow field such as the velocity profiles of sand and water had been obtained. In order to compare with the experiment, the steady state two phase flow fields were simulated using RANS method with k-ω SST turbulence model. It is noted that the numerical results matches the experimental results fairly good. Furthermore, the flow rates obtained from experimental and numerical velocity profiles also have a good match with the measurement by flow meter. The flow analysis shows that the water velocity variation induced by the presence of the step in the water-sand flow is equivalent to those cases with low sand concentration. However, the sand velocity in downstream region is 5% greater than the water velocity when the cross section is reduced in 25%.

  20. NMR studies of granular media and two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu

    This dissertation describes two experimental studies of a vibrofluidized granular medium and a preliminary study of two-phase fluid flow in a porous medium using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The first study of granular medium is to test a scaling law of the rise in center of mass in a three-dimensional vibrofluidized granular system. Our granular system consisted of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 40 Hz from 0g to 14g. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to measure density profile in vibrated direction. We observed that the rise in center of mass scaled as nu 0alpha/Nlbeta with alpha = 1.0 +/- 0.2 and beta = 0.5 +/- 0.1, where nu 0 is the vibration velocity and Nl is the number of layers of grains in the container. A simple theory was proposed to explain the scaling exponents. In the second study we measured both density and velocity information in the same setup of the first study. Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG)-NMR combined with MRI was used to do this measurement. The granular system was fully fluidized at 14.85g 50 Hz with Nl ≤ 4. The velocity distributions at horizontal and vertical direction at different height were measured. The distributions were nearly-Gaussian far from sample bottom and non-Gaussian near sample bottom. Granular temperature profiles were calculated from the velocity distributions. The density and temperature profile were fit to a hydrodynamic theory. The theory agreed with experiments very well. A temperature inversion near top was also observed and explained by additional transport coefficient from granular hydrodynamics. The third study was the preliminary density measurement of invading phase profile in a two-phase flow in porous media. The purpose of this study was to test an invasion percolation with gradient (IPG) theory in two-phase flow of porous media. Two phases are dodecane and water doped with CuSO4. The porous medium was packed glass beads. The front tail width sigma and front width of invading phase were

  1. Theoretical and pragmatic modeling of governing equations for two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Ajuha, S.; Sengpiel, W.

    1994-12-31

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy derived for a two-phase flow by volume-averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration; bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities makes the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modeling of these terms is discussed.

  2. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M.; Sengpiel, W.

    1992-12-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  3. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bottoni, M. . Materials and Components Technology Div.); Sengpiel, W. . Inst. fuer Reaktorsicherheit)

    1992-01-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs.

  4. Studies of Two-Phase Flow Dynamics and Heat Transfer at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Bousman, W. Scott; Fore, Larry B.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to predict gas-liquid flow patterns is crucial to the design and operation of two-phase flow systems in the microgravity environment. Flow pattern maps have been developed in this study which show the occurrence of flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities as well as tube diameter, liquid viscosity and surface tension. The results have demonstrated that the location of the bubble-slug transition is affected by the tube diameter for air-water systems and by surface tension, suggesting that turbulence-induced bubble fluctuations and coalescence mechanisms play a role in this transition. The location of the slug-annular transition on the flow pattern maps is largely unaffected by tube diameter, liquid viscosity or surface tension in the ranges tested. Void fraction-based transition criteria were developed which separate the flow patterns on the flow pattern maps with reasonable accuracy. Weber number transition criteria also show promise but further work is needed to improve these models. For annular gas-liquid flows of air-water and air- 50 percent glycerine under reduced gravity conditions, the pressure gradient agrees fairly well with a version of the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation but the measured film thickness deviates from published correlations at lower Reynolds numbers. Nusselt numbers, based on a film thickness obtained from standard normal-gravity correlations, follow the relation, Nu = A Re(sup n) Pr(exp l/3), but more experimental data in a reduced gravity environment are needed to increase the confidence in the estimated constants, A and n. In the slug flow regime, experimental pressure gradient does not correlate well with either the Lockhart-Martinelli or a homogeneous formulation, but does correlate nicely with a formulation based on a two-phase Reynolds number. Comparison with ground-based correlations implies that the heat transfer coefficients are lower at reduced gravity than at normal gravity under the same

  5. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Two-Phase Flows With Charged Droplets in Electrostatic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1996-01-01

    A numerical method to solve two-phase turbulent flows with charged droplets in an electrostatic field is presented. The ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the electrostatic potential equation are solved using a finite volume method. The transitional turbulence field is described using multiple-time-scale turbulence equations. The equations of motion of droplets are solved using a Lagrangian particle tracking scheme, and the inter-phase momentum exchange is described by the Particle-In-Cell scheme. The electrostatic force caused by an applied electrical potential is calculated using the electrostatic field obtained by solving a Laplacian equation and the force exerted by charged droplets is calculated using the Coulombic force equation. The method is applied to solve electro-hydrodynamic sprays. The calculated droplet velocity distributions for droplet dispersions occurring in a stagnant surrounding are in good agreement with the measured data. For droplet dispersions occurring in a two-phase flow, the droplet trajectories are influenced by aerodynamic forces, the Coulombic force, and the applied electrostatic potential field.

  7. Final Report - Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, Michael J.

    2006-07-10

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or ''structure'' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface. It has also been shown that even under steady boundary conditions, the influence of fractures can lead to complex and dynamic phase structure that controls system behavior, with or without the presence of a porous rock matrix. Complicated phase structures within the fracture network can facilitate rapid transport, and lead to a sparsely populated and widespread distribution of concentrated contaminants; these qualities are highly difficult to describe with current conceptual models. The focus of our work is to improve predictive modeling through the development of advanced conceptual models for two-phase flow in fractured rock.

  8. One-Dimensional, Two-Phase Flow Modeling Toward Interpreting Motor Slag Expulsion Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum oxide slag accumulation and expulsion was previously shown to be a player in various solid rocket motor phenomena, including the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) pressure perturbation, or "blip," and phantom moment. In the latter case, such un ]commanded side accelerations near the end of burn have also been identified in several other motor systems. However, efforts to estimate the mass expelled during a given event have come up short. Either bulk calculations are performed without enough physics present, or multiphase, multidimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic analyses are performed that give a snapshot in time and space but do not always aid in grasping the general principle. One ]dimensional, two ]phase compressible flow calculations yield an analytical result for nozzle flow under certain assumptions. This can be carried further to relate the bulk motor parameters of pressure, thrust, and mass flow rate under the different exhaust conditions driven by the addition of condensed phase mass flow. An unknown parameter is correlated to airflow testing with water injection where mass flow rates and pressure are known. Comparison is also made to full ]scale static test motor data where thrust and pressure changes are known and similar behavior is shown. The end goal is to be able to include the accumulation and flow of slag in internal ballistics predictions. This will allow better prediction of the tailoff when much slag is ejected and of mass retained versus time, believed to be a contributor to the widely-observed "flight knockdown" parameter.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Two-phase Flow in a Microchannel with Air Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Meinhart, Carl D.

    2001-11-01

    Fluid transport in nano- and micro-scale devices becomes more and more important. The potential advantages of micro-channel with air gap are studied. A simple one-dimensional model of air-water two-phase flow is investigated theoretically. The flow of water is driven by pressure drop. The air in the gap is driven by surface tension and friction forces that exist at the interface between the water and air. With the limitation that air flow rate is zero, the theoretical results are obtained based on continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. Because the viscosity of air is much less than that of water, under same pressure drop, the flow rate of water can be increased to as 4.76 times as that of normal channel without air gap. The theoretical results are tested by numerical simulation with three different software package (CFD2000, FEMLab and CFDRC) using a two-dimensional model. The interface shape, interface velocity, water flow rate and optimum height ratio are studied. Thenumerical results for different package match each other very well. The numerical results show that increasing water flow rate by adding air gap in the micro channel is practicable.

  10. Experimental Study of Overtopping Induced Landslide Dam Break Flow and Two Layer Two Phase Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Duan, J. G.; Zhong, D.; Zhang, H.

    2013-12-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate flood flow generated by the failure of landslide dams due to overtopping. These experiments aim to quantify the influences of inflow discharge, downstream slope, width of dam crest, dam height, and dam material on the flood flow. Images from high-speed cameras are used to determine the profiles of dam body and flow discharge during the failure processes. Results showed that the water level in the upstream reservoir and the erosion of dam body are the dominant factors affecting the downstream flood flow. A physical-based model is established to calculate the arriving time and the peak discharge of dam break flow using two phase mixture model. Both analytical and numerical solutions were derived for the model. The modelling results were verified using data from this and several other laboratory experimental datasets. The agreement between the calculated and measured data showed the applicability of the proposed model for predicting the peak discharge of overtopping induced dam break flow.

  11. Numerical investigation of two-phase flow in solid rocket thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the research is to develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code which can accurately and efficiently predict the effects of metallized particles in the multiphase turbulent flow on solid rocket motor performance. The time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, including a second-order turbulence model, are numerically integrated by using a four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme to predict the internal gas flowfield of solid rockets. A recently developed statistical transport model for particle dispersion was adopted to describe the metallized particle trajectory. The current status of the developed CFD code allows for prediction of non reacting two-dimensional, two phase, internal solid rocket combustor flows with a low particle loading ratio. Calculations for trajectories of different-sized particles within a simplified solid rocket combustor are presented.

  12. Switching moving boundary models for two-phase flow evaporators and condensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Javier; Dormido, Sebastián; Cellier, François E.

    2015-03-01

    The moving boundary method is an appealing approach for the design, testing and validation of advanced control schemes for evaporators and condensers. When it comes to advanced control strategies, not only accurate but fast dynamic models are required. Moving boundary models are fast low-order dynamic models, and they can describe the dynamic behavior with high accuracy. This paper presents a mathematical formulation based on physical principles for two-phase flow moving boundary evaporator and condenser models which support dynamic switching between all possible flow configurations. The models were implemented in a library using the equation-based object-oriented Modelica language. Several integrity tests in steady-state and transient predictions together with stability tests verified the models. Experimental data from a direct steam generation parabolic-trough solar thermal power plant is used to validate and compare the developed moving boundary models against finite volume models.

  13. Channel orientation and geometry influence on heat transfer with two-phase forced flow of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Fyodorov, M. V.; Fomichyov, Yu. A.

    The results of an investigation of tube diameter and orientation influence on two-phase forced flow heat transfer of nitrogen are presented. In vertical channels a diameter effect is revealed in a transition from convective to less intensive nucleate boiling when the Froude number of a mixture, Fr m = w m(gd) - 1/2 decreases from 40 to 10. On the contrary, in horizontal non-stratified flow, the reduction of the Frm number is accompanied by heat transfer enhancement in the upper part of the channel because of the formation of a thin liquid film there. This leads to a notable increase (20-30%), averaged over the cross-section, of heat transfer coefficient in the nucleate boiling region. If Frm ≳ 40 then geometry and orientation do not affect the heat transfer coefficient which can be calculated using the Klimenko correlation.

  14. Visualization and quantification of two-phase flow in transparent miniature packed beds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peixi; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos D

    2012-10-01

    Optical microscopy was used to visualize the flow of two phases [British Petroleum (BP) oil and an aqueous surfactant phase] in confined space, three-dimensional, transparent, natural porous media. The porous media consisted of water-wet cryolite grains packed inside cylindrical, glass microchannels, thus producing microscopic packed beds. Primary drainage of BP oil displacing an aqueous surfactant phase was studied at capillary numbers that varied between 10(-6) and 10(-2). The confinement space had a significant effect on the flow behavior. Phenomena of burst motion and capillary fingering were observed for low capillary numbers due to the domination of capillary forces. It was discovered that breakthrough time and capillary number bear a log-log scale linear relationship, based on which a generalized correlation between oil travel distance x and time t was found empirically. PMID:23214683

  15. Visualization and quantification of two-phase flow in transparent miniature packed beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peixi; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos D.

    2012-10-01

    Optical microscopy was used to visualize the flow of two phases [British Petroleum (BP) oil and an aqueous surfactant phase] in confined space, three-dimensional, transparent, natural porous media. The porous media consisted of water-wet cryolite grains packed inside cylindrical, glass microchannels, thus producing microscopic packed beds. Primary drainage of BP oil displacing an aqueous surfactant phase was studied at capillary numbers that varied between 10-6 and 10-2. The confinement space had a significant effect on the flow behavior. Phenomena of burst motion and capillary fingering were observed for low capillary numbers due to the domination of capillary forces. It was discovered that breakthrough time and capillary number bear a log-log scale linear relationship, based on which a generalized correlation between oil travel distance x and time t was found empirically.

  16. Wall model effects on two phase flows and pressure distribution in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Nadia

    Molecular simulations of single phase bounded nanoflows, especially at high density, showed discrepancies from the classical Navier Stokes solutions: the failure of predicting the slip value at the wall, stratification of the density close to the wall and excessive heating which affects the natural thermal fluctuations of the atomistic system (NVE ensemble). These discrepancies are a direct consequence of the importance of the surface effects for such scales as the surface to volume ratio increases dramatically at the nanoscale. To alleviate some of these observed phenomena, the modeling of the solid boundaries progressed from implicit mathematical wall models to explicit multi-layered atomistic structure including temperature/pressure control mechanisms and heat transfer exchanges. However, the wall models used in molecular simulations vary greatly in physical characteristics such as the wetting property (under static conditions) or momentum and heat exchange (under flow conditions) and consequently, the equilibrium and steady state conditions reached depend on the complexity of the model and the application it is developed for. This work investigates the characteristics of different wall models found in the literature and compares their effects for the specific applications of single phase flows and nanojets (two-phase flows). It is found that the system thermodynamic pressure varies considerably depending on the parameters and complexity of the surface models and consequently alters both the flow and the jet behaviors. Assessments of these differences in terms of the system pressure, slip value at the surface and the injection velocity for different wall categories (atomistic, stochastic/diffuse and functional wall models) and parameters are provided. Another important consequence is the dependency of nanojet stability on the dense flow-surface interactions and liquid-gas-solid surface interactions. A new integrated and sinusoidal wall model was developed to

  17. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role for the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm

  18. A multilevel multiscale mimetic (M 3) method for two-phase flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, K.; Moulton, J. D.; Svyatskiy, D.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a multilevel multiscale mimetic (M 3) method for solving two-phase flow (water and oil) in a heterogeneous reservoir. The governing equations are the elliptic equation for the reservoir pressure and the hyperbolic equation for the water saturation. On each time step, we first solve the pressure equation and then use the computed flux in an explicit upwind finite volume method to update the saturation. To reduce the computational cost, the pressure equation is solved on a much coarser grid than the saturation equation. The coarse-grid pressure discretization captures the influence of multiple scales via the subgrid modeling technique for single-phase flow recently proposed in [Yu. A. Kuznetsov. Mixed finite element method for diffusion equations on polygonal meshes with mixed cells. J. Numer. Math., 14 (4) (2006) 305-315; V. Gvozdev. discretization of the diffusion and Maxwell equations on polyhedral meshes. Technical Report Ph.D. Thesis, University of Houston, 2007; Yu. Kuznetsov. Mixed finite element methods on polyhedral meshes for diffusion equations, in: Computational Modeling with PDEs in Science and Engineering, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, in press]. We extend significantly the applicability of this technique by developing a new robust and efficient method for estimating the flux coarsening parameters. Specifically, with this advance the M 3 method can handle full permeability tensors and general coarsening strategies, which may generate polygonal meshes on the coarse grid. These problem dependent coarsening parameters also play a critical role in the interpolation of the flux, and hence, in the advection of saturation for two-phase flow. Numerical experiments for two-phase flow in highly heterogeneous permeability fields, including layer 68 of the SPE Tenth Comparative Solution Project, demonstrate that the M 3 method retains good accuracy for high coarsening factors in both directions, up to 64 for the considered models. Moreover, we demonstrate

  19. A connectivity-based modeling approach for representing hysteresis in macroscopic two-phase flow properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Trevisan, Luca; Bianchi, Marco; Zhou, Quanlin; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2014-12-31

    During CO2 injection and storage in deep reservoirs, the injected CO2 enters into an initially brine saturated porous medium, and after the injection stops, natural groundwater flow eventually displaces the injected mobile-phase CO2, leaving behind residual non-wetting fluid. Accurate modeling of two-phase flow processes are needed for predicting fate and transport of injected CO2, evaluating environmental risks and designing more effective storage schemes. The entrapped non-wetting fluid saturation is typically a function of the spatially varying maximum saturation at the end of injection. At the pore-scale, distribution of void sizes and connectivity of void space play a major role formore » the macroscopic hysteresis behavior and capillary entrapment of wetting and non-wetting fluids. This paper presents development of an approach based on the connectivity of void space for modeling hysteretic capillary pressure-saturation-relative permeability relationships. The new approach uses void-size distribution and a measure of void space connectivity to compute the hysteretic constitutive functions and to predict entrapped fluid phase saturations. Two functions, the drainage connectivity function and the wetting connectivity function, are introduced to characterize connectivity of fluids in void space during drainage and wetting processes. These functions can be estimated through pore-scale simulations in computer-generated porous media or from traditional experimental measurements of primary drainage and main wetting curves. The hysteresis model for saturation-capillary pressure is tested successfully by comparing the model-predicted residual saturation and scanning curves with actual data sets obtained from column experiments found in the literature. A numerical two-phase model simulator with the new hysteresis functions is tested against laboratory experiments conducted in a quasi-two-dimensional flow cell (91.4cm×5.6cm×61cm), packed with homogeneous and

  20. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Katsumata, Yoshikazu

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy by natural convective circulation without any external power supply. Therefore, it has been paid attention as a heat transfer equipment for saving energy. A basic investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics in the thermosyphon was performed both experimentally and theoretically. The circulation flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, and heat transfer coefficients in the heated section were measured using water, ethanol and Freon 113 as the working liquids. And, the effects of the heat input and liquid physical properties on the flow and heat transfer characteristics were examined. In the theoretical study, the circulation flow rate was calculated from the force balance between the driving force arising from density differences and the pressure drop in the loop. The comparison of the calculated with experimental results was made concerning the circulation flow rate and pressure and temperature distributions. For water and ethanol, the comparison presented the considerably close agreement. But, for Freon 113, the agreement was insufficient and further detailed investigation is needed.

  1. Two-phase electro-hydrodynamic flow modeling by a conservative level set model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    The principles of electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) flow have been known for more than a century and have been adopted for various industrial applications, for example, fluid mixing and demixing. Analytical solutions of such EHD flow only exist in a limited number of scenarios, for example, predicting a small deformation of a single droplet in a uniform electric field. Numerical modeling of such phenomena can provide significant insights about EHDs multiphase flows. During the last decade, many numerical results have been reported to provide novel and useful tools of studying the multiphase EHD flow. Based on a conservative level set method, the proposed model is able to simulate large deformations of a droplet by a steady electric field, which is beyond the region of theoretic prediction. The model is validated for both leaky dielectrics and perfect dielectrics, and is found to be in excellent agreement with existing analytical solutions and numerical studies in the literature. Furthermore, simulations of the deformation of a water droplet in decyl alcohol in a steady electric field match better with published experimental data than the theoretical prediction for large deformations. Therefore the proposed model can serve as a practical and accurate tool for simulating two-phase EHD flow. PMID:23161380

  2. Two-Fluid Large-Eddy Simulation Approach for Two-Phase Turbulent Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayek, F.; Pandya, R. V. R.

    2002-11-01

    In recent years, large-eddy simulation (LES) is emerging as a predictive tool for particle/droplet-laden turbulent flows. In common practice, LES of two-phase flows involves tracking a large number of particles in a Lagrangian framework while using the Eulerian flow field generated by LES of the carrier fluid phase and proper forms for various forces acting on the particle. The two-way coupling effects (i.e. the effects of the particles on the LES flow field and subgrid scales motion and vice versa) have yet to be accounted for fully and in rigorous manner in these Eulerian-Lagrangian approaches. Recently, a new Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been proposed(R.V.R. Pandya and F. Mashayek, ``Two-fluid large-eddy simulation approach for particle-laden turbulent flows,'' to appear in Int. J. Heat and Mass Transfer.) in which Eulerian `fluid' equations are derived for the dispersed phase using the kinetic or probability density function (pdf) modeling approach after solving the closure problems arising in the filtered pdf equation. The solution to the closure accounts properly for the effects of the subgrid scales on the particles. The two-way coupling effects are modeled in a rigorous manner and included in the dynamic localization model for the subgrid stresses of the carrier phase. The `fluid' equations are supposed to capture the preferential distribution of the particles.

  3. Two Phase Flow Modeling: Summary of Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop Correlations in Reduced and Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rame, E.; Kizito, J.; Kassemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of state-of-the-art predictions for two-phase flows relevant to Advanced Life Support. We strive to pick out the most used and accepted models for pressure drop and flow regime predictions. The main focus is to identify gaps in predictive capabilities in partial gravity for Lunar and Martian applications. Following a summary of flow regimes and pressure drop correlations for terrestrial and zero gravity, we analyze the fully developed annular gas-liquid flow in a straight cylindrical tube. This flow is amenable to analytical closed form solutions for the flow field and heat transfer. These solutions, valid for partial gravity as well, may be used as baselines and guides to compare experimental measurements. The flow regimes likely to be encountered in the water recovery equipment currently under consideration for space applications are provided in an appendix.

  4. Two-phase flow instability and dryout in parallel channels in natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Hughes, E.D.

    1993-06-01

    The unique feature of parallel channel flows is that the pressure drop or driving head for the flow is maintained constant across any given channel by the flow in all the others, or by having a large downcomer or bypass in a natural circulation loop. This boundary condition is common in all heat exchangers, reactor cores and boilers, it is well known that the two-phase flow in parallel channels can exhibit both so-called static and dynamic instability. This leads to the question of the separability of the flow and pressure drop boundary conditions in the study of stability and dryout. For the areas of practical interest, the flow can be considered as incompressible. The dynamic instability is characterized by density (kinematic) or continuity waves, and the static instability by inertial (pressure drop) or manometric escalations. The static has been considered to be the zero-frequency or lowest mode of the dynamic case. We briefly review the status of the existing literature on both parallel channel static and dynamic instability, and the latest developments in theory and experiment. The difference between the two derivations lies in the retention of the time-dependent terms in the conservation equations. The effects and impact of design options are also discussed. Since dryout in parallel systems follows instability, it has been traditional to determine the dryout power for a parallel channel by testing a single channel with a given (inlet) flow boundary condition without particular regard for the pressure drop. Thus all modern dryout correlations are based on constant or fixed flow tests, a so-called hard inlet, and subchannel and multiple bundle effects are corrected for separately. We review the thinking that lead to this approach, and suggest that for all multiple channel and natural circulation systems close attention should be paid to the actual (untested) pressure drop conditions. A conceptual formulation is suggested as a basis for discussion.

  5. Study on solid-liquid two-phase unsteady flow characteristics with different flow rates in screw centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. N.; Y Wang, H.; Han, W.; Ma, W.; Shen, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    The screw centrifugal pump is used as an object, and the unsteady numerical simulation of solid-liquid two-phase flow is carried out under different flow rate conditions in one circle by choosing the two-phase flow of sand and water as medium, using the software FLUENT based on the URANS equations, combining with sliding mesh method, and choosing the Mixture multiphase flow model and the SIMPLE algorithm. The results show that, with the flow rate increasing, the change trends for the pressure on volute outlet are almost constant, the fluctuation trends of the impeller axial force have a little change, the pressure and the axial force turn to decrease on the whole, the radial force gradually increases when the impeller maximum radius passes by half a cycle near the volute outlet, and the radial force gradually decreases when the maximum radius passes by the other half a cycle in a rotation cycle. The distributions of the solid particles are very uneven under a small flow rate condition on the face. The solid particles under a big flow rate condition are distributed more evenly than the ones under a small flow rate condition on the back. The theoretical basis and reference are provided for improving its working performance.

  6. A monotonicity preserving conservative sharp interface flow solver for high density ratio two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for solving the conservative form of the incompressible two-phase Navier-Stokes equations. In order to overcome the numerical instability induced by the potentially large density ratio encountered across the interface, the proposed method includes a Volume-of-Fluid type integration of the convective momentum transport, a monotonicity preserving momentum rescaling, and a consistent and conservative Ghost Fluid projection that includes surface tension effects. The numerical dissipation inherent in the Volume-of-Fluid treatment of the convective transport is localized in the interface vicinity, enabling the use of a kinetic energy conserving discretization away from the singularity. Two- and three-dimensional tests are presented, and the solutions shown to remain accurate at arbitrary density ratios. The proposed method is then successfully used to perform the detailed simulation of a round water jet emerging in quiescent air, therefore suggesting the applicability of the proposed algorithm to the computation of realistic turbulent atomization.

  7. A monotonicity preserving conservative sharp interface flow solver for high density ratio two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chenadec, Vincent; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-09-15

    This paper presents a novel approach for solving the conservative form of the incompressible two-phase Navier–Stokes equations. In order to overcome the numerical instability induced by the potentially large density ratio encountered across the interface, the proposed method includes a Volume-of-Fluid type integration of the convective momentum transport, a monotonicity preserving momentum rescaling, and a consistent and conservative Ghost Fluid projection that includes surface tension effects. The numerical dissipation inherent in the Volume-of-Fluid treatment of the convective transport is localized in the interface vicinity, enabling the use of a kinetic energy conserving discretization away from the singularity. Two- and three-dimensional tests are presented, and the solutions shown to remain accurate at arbitrary density ratios. The proposed method is then successfully used to perform the detailed simulation of a round water jet emerging in quiescent air, therefore suggesting the applicability of the proposed algorithm to the computation of realistic turbulent atomization.

  8. An Eulerian interface sharpening algorithm for compressible two-phase flow: The algebraic THINC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyue, Keh-Ming; Xiao, Feng

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel interface-sharpening approach for efficient numerical resolution of a compressible homogeneous two-phase flow governed by a quasi-conservative five-equation model of Allaire et al. (2001) [1]. The algorithm uses a semi-discrete wave propagation method to find approximate solution of this model numerically. In the algorithm, in regions near the interfaces where two different fluid components are present within a cell, the THINC (Tangent of Hyperbola for INterface Capturing) scheme is used as a basis for the reconstruction of a sub-grid discontinuity of volume fractions at each cell edge, and it is complemented by a homogeneous-equilibrium-consistent technique that is derived to ensure a consistent modeling of the other interpolated physical variables in the model. In regions away from the interfaces where the flow is single phase, standard reconstruction scheme such as MUSCL or WENO can be used for obtaining high-order interpolated states. These reconstructions are then used as the initial data for Riemann problems, and the resulting fluctuations form the basis for the spatial discretization. Time integration of the algorithm is done by employing a strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta method. Numerical results are shown for sample problems with the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state for characterizing the materials of interests in both one and two space dimensions that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for interface-sharpening of compressible two-phase flow. To demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach, we have also included results obtained using the anti-diffusion interface sharpening method.

  9. Anti-diffusion method for interface steepening in two-phase incompressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, K. K.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method for obtaining sharp interfaces in two-phase incompressible flows by an anti-diffusion correction, that is applicable in a straight-forward fashion for the improvement of two-phase flow solution schemes typically employed in practical applications. The underlying discretization is based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) interface-capturing method on unstructured meshes. The key idea is to steepen the interface, independently of the underlying volume-fraction transport equation, by solving a diffusion equation with reverse time, i.e. an anti-diffusion equation, after each advection time step of the volume fraction. As the solution of the anti-diffusion equation requires regularization, a limiter based on the directional derivative is developed for calculating the gradient of the volume fraction. This limiter ensures the boundedness of the volume fraction. In order to control the amount of anti-diffusion introduced by the correction algorithm we propose a suitable stopping criterion for interface steepening. The formulation of the limiter and the algorithm for solving the anti-diffusion equation are applicable to 3-dimensional unstructured meshes. Validation computations are performed for passive advection of an interface, for 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional rising-bubbles, and for a rising drop in a periodically constricted channel. The results demonstrate that sharp interfaces can be recovered reliably. They show that the accuracy is similar to or even better than that of level-set methods using comparable discretizations for the flow and the level-set evolution. Also, we observe a good agreement with experimental results for the rising drop where proper interface evolution requires accurate mass conservation.

  10. Optical Measurement of Mass Flow of a Two-Phase Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John; Pedersen, Kevin; Koman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    An optoelectronic system utilizes wavelength-dependent scattering of light for measuring the density and mass flow of a two-phase fluid in a pipe. The apparatus was invented for original use in measuring the mass flow of a two-phase cryogenic fluid (e.g., liquid hydrogen containing bubbles of hydrogen gas), but underlying principles of operation can readily be adapted to non-cryogenic two-phase fluids. The system (see figure) includes a laser module, which contains two or more laser diodes, each operating at a different wavelength. The laser module also contains beam splitters that combine the beams at the various wavelengths so as to produce two output beams, each containing all of the wavelengths. One of the multiwavelength output beams is sent, via a multimode fiberoptic cable, to a transmitting optical coupler. The other multiwavelength output beam is sent, via another multimode fiber-optic cable, to a reference detector module, wherein fiber-optic splitters split the light into several multiwavelength beams, each going to a photodiode having a spectral response that is known and that differs from the spectral responses of the other photodiodes. The outputs of these photodiodes are digitized and fed to a processor, which executes an algorithm that utilizes the known spectral responses to convert the photodiode outputs to obtain reference laser-power levels for the various wavelengths. The transmitting optical coupler is mounted in (and sealed to) a hole in the pipe and is oriented at a slant with respect to the axis of the pipe. The transmitting optical coupler contains a collimating lens and a cylindrical lens that form the light emerging from the end of the fiber-optic cable into a fan-shaped beam in a meridional plane of the pipe. Receiving optical couplers similar to the transmitting optical couplers are mounted in the same meridional plane at various longitudinal positions on the opposite side of the pipe, approximately facing the transmitting optical

  11. Interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation model for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Qin; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an interface-capturing lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model is proposed for two-phase flows. In the model, a Lax-Wendroff propagation scheme and a properly chosen equilibrium distribution function are employed. The Lax-Wendroff scheme is used to provide an adjustable Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number, and the equilibrium distribution is presented to remove the dependence of the relaxation time on the CFL number. As a result, the interface can be captured accurately by decreasing the CFL number. A theoretical expression is derived for the chemical potential gradient by solving the LBE directly for a two-phase system with a flat interface. The result shows that the gradient of the chemical potential is proportional to the square of the CFL number, which explains why the proposed model is able to capture the interface naturally with a small CFL number, and why large interface error exists in the standard LBE model. Numerical tests, including a one-dimensional flat interface problem, a two-dimensional circular droplet problem, and a three-dimensional spherical droplet problem, demonstrate that the proposed LBE model performs well and can capture a sharp interface with a suitable CFL number.

  12. Thermal effects in two-phase flow through face seals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Prithwish

    1988-01-01

    When liquid is sealed at high temperature, it flashes inside the seal due to pressure drop and/or viscous heat dissipation. Two-phase seals generally exhibit more erratic behavior than their single phase counterparts. Thermal effects, which are often neglected in single phase seal analyses, play an important role in determining seal behavior under two-phase operation. It is necessary to consider the heat generation due to viscous shear, conduction into the seal rings and convection with the leakage flow. Analytical models developed work reasonably well at the two extremes - for low leakage rates when convection is neglected and for higher leakage rates when conduction is neglected. A preliminary model, known as the Film Coefficient Model, is presented which considers conduction and convection both, and allows continuous boiling over an extended region unlike the previous low-leakage rate model which neglects convection and always forces a discrete boiling interface. Another simplified, semi-analytical model, based on the assumption of isothermal conditions along the seal interafce, has been developed for low leakage rates. The Film Coefficient Model may be used for more accurate and realistic description.

  13. Measuring two phase flow parameters using impedance cross-correlation flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamedsalih, Y.; Lucas, G.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an impedance cross correlation flow meter which can be used in solids-water pipe flows to measure the local solids volume fraction distribution and the local solids velocity distribution. The system is composed of two arrays of electrodes, separated by an axial distance of 50 mm and each array contains eights electrodes mounted over the internal circumference of the pipe carrying the flow. Furthermore every electrode in each array can be selected to be either"excitation", "measurement" or "earth". Changing the electrode configuration leads to a change in the electric field, and hence in the region of the flow cross section which is interrogated. The local flow velocity in the interrogated region is obtained by cross correlation between the two electrode arrays. Additionally, the local solids volume fraction can be obtained from the mean mixture conductivity in the region under interrogation. The system is being integrated with a microcontroller to measure the velocity distribution of the solids and the volume fraction distribution of the solids in order to create a portable flow meter capable of measuring the multi-phase flow parameters without the need of a PC to control it. Integration of the product of the local solids volume fraction and the local solids velocity in the flow cross section enables the solids volumetric flow rate to be determined.

  14. Condensation of Forced Convection Two-Phase Flow in a Miniature Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begg, E.; Faghri, A.; Krustalev, D.

    1999-01-01

    A physical/mathematical model of annular film condensation at the inlet of a miniature tube has been developed. In the model, the liquid flow is coupled with the vapor flow along the liquid-vapor interface through the interfacial temperature, heat flux, shear stress, and pressure jump conditions due to surface tension effects. The model predicts the shape of the liquid-vapor interface along the condenser and leads to the conclusion that there is complete condensation at a certain distance from the condenser inlet. The numerical results show that complete condensation of the incoming vapor is possible at comparatively low heat loads and that this is a special case of a more general condensation regime with two-phase bubbly flow downstream of the initial annular film condensation region. Observations from the flow visualization experiment confirm the existence and qualitative features of annular film condensation leading to the complete condensation phenomenon in a small diameter (3.25 mm) circular tube condenser.

  15. Two-phase flow research using the DC-9/KC-135 apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Neumann, Eric S.; Shoemaker, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Low-gravity gas-liquid flow research can be conducted aboard the NASA Lewis Research Center DC-9 or the Johnson Space Center KC-135. Air and water solutions serve as the test liquids in cylindrical test sections with constant or variable inner diameters of approximately 2.54 cm and lengths of up to 3.0 m. Superficial velocities range from 0.1 to 1.1 m/sec for liquids and from 0.1 to 25 m/sec for air. Flow rate, differential pressure, void fraction, film thickness, wall shear stress, and acceleration data are measured and recorded at data rates of up to 1000 Hz throughout the 20-sec duration of the experiment. Flow is visualized with a high-speed video system. In addition, the apparatus has a heat-transfer capability whereby sensible heat is transferred between the test-section wall and a subcooled liquid phase so that the heat-transfer characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flows can be determined.

  16. PTV implementation on two-phase flow in a forced impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulinti, Rahul; Kiger, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    Two-phase flow experiments have been conducted to predict particle suspension and sedimentation within coupled particle-laden flows relevant to rotorcraft brownout conditions. A hybrid PIV/PTV technique has been implemented to improve the performance in high concentration regions, while still retaining the flexibility inherent to PTV to resolve multi-valued velocity displacements within a given interrogation region. These processing tools have been optimized and their reliability has been validated using synthetic particle images in a prescribed Taylor-Green vortex flow model. The parametric space of investigation included particle image density, Stokes number and image delay times. Experiments have been conducted to study the interaction of a mobile sediment bed with characteristic flow structures similar to those within a rotor wake. The mobilization conditions and wall-normal flux of particulates by the vortex-wall interaction will be reported for different particle size classes, and are correlated to the local vortex conditions such as vortex decay and its subsequent three dimensionalization. The effect of turbulent coupling between the particle and fluid momentum, as based on a point-particle drag law valid for dilute concentrations of particles has been examined. Work supported by AFOSR under grant FA9550-08-1-0406.

  17. The stability of two-phase flow over a swept-wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coward, Adrian; Hall, Philip

    1994-01-01

    We use numerical and asymptotic techniques to study the stability of a two-phase air/water flow above a flat porous plate. This flow is a model of the boundary layer which forms on a yawed cylinder and can be used as a useful approximation to the air flow over swept wings during heavy rainfall. We show that the interface between the water and air layers can significantly destabilize the flow, leading to traveling wave disturbances which move along the attachment line. This instability occurs for lower Reynolds numbers than in the case of the absence of a water layer. We also investigate the instability of inviscid stationary modes. We calculate the effective wavenumber and orientation of the stationary disturbance when the fluids have identical physical properties. Using perturbation methods we obtain corrections due to a small stratification in viscosity, thus quantifying the interfacial effects. Our analytical results are in agreement with the numerical solution which we obtain for arbitrary fluid properties.

  18. Migration of rigid particles in two-phase shear flow of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Patrick; Jaensson, Nick; Hulsen, Martien

    2015-11-01

    In the Stokes regime, non-Brownian, rigid particles in a shear flow will not migrate across streamlines if the fluid is Newtonian. In viscoelastic fluids, however, particles will migrate across streamlines away from areas of higher elastic stresses, e.g. towards the outer cylinder in a wide-gap Couette flow. This migration is believed to be due to a difference in normal stresses. We simulate the two-phase case where this difference in normal stresses is not due to the flow field, but rather due to the properties of the fluids. We apply the diffuse-interface model for the interface between the two fluids, which can naturally handle a changing topology of the interface, e.g. during particle adsorption. Furthermore, the diffuse-interface model includes an accurate description of surface tension and can be used for a moving contact line. A sharp interface is assumed between the particles and the fluids. Initially, a particle is placed close to an interface of two fluids with different viscoelastic properties in a shear flow. We show that based on the properties of the fluids and the interfacial tension, four regimes can be defined: 1) migration away from the interface, 2) halted migration towards the interface, 3) adsorption of the particle at the interface and 4) penetration of the particle into the other fluid. This research forms part of the research programme of the Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), Project #746.

  19. Two-phase unsaturated flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A report on current understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruess, Karsten

    Thick unsaturated zones in semi-arid regions have some unique attributes that are favorable for long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. The disposal concept at Yucca Mountain takes advantage of low ambient water fluxes. Evaluation of site suitability must be based on an understanding of two-phase (liquid-gas) fluid flow and heat transfer processes in a heterogeneous, fractured rock mass. A large body of relevant knowledge has been accumulated in various fields, including petroleum and geothermal reservoir engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, and soil science. Complications at Yucca Mountain arise from the partly episodic and localized nature of water seepage in fracture networks. This limits the applicability of spatial and temporal averaging, and poses great challenges for numerical modeling. Significant flow and heat transfer effects may occur in the gas phase. Observations of natural and man-made chemical tracers as well as controlled field experiments have provided much useful information on mass transport at Yucca Mountain, including the occurrence of fast preferential flow. It is now clear that fracture-matrix interactions are considerably weaker than would be expected from a concept of water flowing in fractures as areally extensive sheets. The Yucca Mountain system is expected to be quite robust in coping with larger seepage rates, as may occur under future more pluvial climatic conditions.

  20. Two-phase flow measurement by chemical tracer technique for Uenotai geothermal field in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tatsuya; Osato, Kazumi; Hirtz, P.

    1996-12-31

    A tracer flow-test (TFT) survey of three production wells was performed in February, 1996, for Akita Geothermal Energy Co., Ltd. (AGECO) at the Uenotai geothermal field in the Akita prefecture of northern Honshu, Japan. The survey was conducted as a demonstration test of the chemical tracer method for two-phase flow measurement. Although the tracer method has been in commercial use for about 4 years this was the first time the technique had been applied on wells with mixing runs of less than 12 meters. The tracers were injected through the wing valve on the side of the wellheads to maximize the tracer dispersion through the 9 meters of pipeline available before sample collection. The three wells tested had steam fractions at the wellhead of 38 to 99.4 % by weight and total flow rates of 31.5 to 51.5 tons/hr. Based on the test results the chemical tracer method is considered accurate under the conditions experienced at the Uenotai geothermal field and has been adopted for routine flow rate and enthalpy monitoring.

  1. A simplified approach for the computation of steady two-phase flow in inverted siphons.

    PubMed

    Diogo, A Freire; Oliveira, Maria C

    2016-01-15

    Hydraulic, sanitary, and sulfide control conditions of inverted siphons, particularly in large wastewater systems, can be substantially improved by continuous air injection in the base of the inclined rising branch. This paper presents a simplified approach that was developed for the two-phase flow of the rising branch using the energy equation for a steady pipe flow, based on the average fluid fraction, observed slippage between phases, and isothermal assumption. As in a conventional siphon design, open channel steady uniform flow is assumed in inlet and outlet chambers, corresponding to the wastewater hydraulic characteristics in the upstream and downstream sewers, and the descending branch operates in steady uniform single-phase pipe flow. The proposed approach is tested and compared with data obtained in an experimental siphon setup with two plastic barrels of different diameters operating separately as in a single-barrel siphon. Although the formulations developed are very simple, the results show a good adjustment for the set of the parameters used and conditions tested and are promising mainly for sanitary siphons with relatively moderate heights of the ascending branch. PMID:26517278

  2. A combined experimental and theoretical study of supercooling by two-phase mist flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zhihua.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of cooling enhancement by mist flow was performed for a square channel with a smooth wall. A new method is proposed for the turbulent deposition of droplets from two-phase mist flow into the wall of the channel. The proposed analytical model shows satisfactory agreement with observations from an experimental measurement using a particle-sizing two-dimensional reference-model laser-Doppler anemometry technique. Supercooling is defined as the simultaneous attainment of high heat flux and a low temperature of a surface to be cooled. Surface cooling is by evaporation from the exposed side of the film. The film is maintained by the continuous deposition of a stream of turbulent mist. An analytical model is provided for the heat-transfer enhancement coefficient due to mist supercooling. Also, experiments were carried out to investigate cooling enhancement. A substantial supercooling by mist flow is reported. The effects on supercooling of flow rate, droplet concentration and size, and wall heat flux are also reported.

  3. High-performance Integrated numerical methods for Two-phase Flow in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueh, Chih-Che; Djilali, Ned; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Modelling of two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media has been playing a decisive role in a variety of areas. However, how to efficiently and accurately solve the governing equation in the flow in porous media remains a challenge. In order to ensure the accurate representative flow field and simultaneously increase the computational efficiency, we incorporate a number of state-of-the-art techniques into a numerical framework on which more complicated models in the field of multi-phase flow in porous media will be based. Such a numerical framework consists of a h-adaptive refinement method, an entropy-based artificial diffusive term, a new adaptive operator splitting method and efficient preconditioners. In particular, it is emphasized that we propose a new efficient adaptive operator splitting to avoid solving a time-consuming pressure-velocity part every saturation time step and, most importantly, we also provide a theoretically numerical analysis as well as proof. A few benchmarks will be demonstrated in the presentation.

  4. An alternating direction algorithm for two-phase flow visualization using gamma computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Wang, Huaxiang; Cui, Ziqiang; Yang, Chengyi

    2012-12-01

    In order to build high-speed imaging systems with low cost and low radiation leakage, the number of radioactive sources and detectors in the multiphase flow computed tomography (CT) system has to be limited. Moreover, systematic and random errors are inevitable in practical applications. The limited and corrupted measurement data have made the tomographic inversion process the most critical part in multiphase flow CT. Although various iterative reconstruction algorithms have been developed based on least squares minimization, the imaging quality is still inadequate for the reconstruction of relatively complicated bubble flow. This paper extends an alternating direction method (ADM), which is originally proposed in compressed sensing, to image two-phase flow using a low-energy γ-CT system. An l1 norm-based regularization technique is utilized to treat the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, and the image reconstruction model is reformulated into one having partially separable objective functions, thereafter a dual-based ADM is adopted to solve the resulting problem. The feasibility is demonstrated in prototype experiments. Comparisons between the ADM and the conventional iterative algorithms show that the former has obviously improved the space resolution in reasonable time.

  5. Experimental Study of Two Phase Flow Behavior Past BWR Spacer Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnayake, Ruwan K.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Ivanov, K.N.; Cimbala, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    Performance of best estimate codes used in the nuclear industry can be significantly improved by reducing the empiricism embedded in their constitutive models. Spacer grids have been found to have an important impact on the maximum allowable Critical Heat Flux within the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor core. Therefore, incorporation of suitable spacer grids models can improve the critical heat flux prediction capability of best estimate codes. Realistic modeling of entrainment behavior of spacer grids requires understanding the different mechanisms that are involved. Since visual information pertaining to the entrainment behavior of spacer grids cannot possibly be obtained from operating nuclear reactors, experiments have to be designed and conducted for this specific purpose. Most of the spacer grid experiments available in literature have been designed in view of obtaining quantitative data for the purpose of developing or modifying empirical formulations for heat transfer, critical heat flux or pressure drop. Very few experiments have been designed to provide fundamental information which can be used to understand spacer grid effects and phenomena involved in two phase flow. Air-water experiments were conducted to obtain visual information on the two-phase flow behavior both upstream and downstream of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spacer grids. The test section was designed and constructed using prototypic dimensions such as the channel cross-section, rod diameter and other spacer grid configurations of a typical BWR fuel assembly. The test section models the flow behavior in two adjacent sub channels in the BWR core. A portion of a prototypic BWR spacer grid accounting for two adjacent channels was used with industrial mild steel rods for the purpose of representing the channel internals. Symmetry was preserved in this practice, so that the channel walls could effectively be considered as the channel boundaries. Thin films were established on the rod surfaces

  6. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value.

  7. Modeling of Two-Phase Immiscible Flow with Moving Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Alsaud, Moataz; Soulaine, Cyprien; Riaz, Amir; Tchelepi, Hamdi; Stanford University Collaboration; University of Maryland, College Park Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A new numerical method based on the implicit interface approach on Cartesian grids is proposed for modeling two-phase immiscible flow with moving contact lines. The reinitialization of level-set function by computing the minimum distance to linearly reconstructed interface to obtain signed distance function is extended to include the contact angle boundary condition. The physics of contact line dynamics is implemented using the Cox-Voinov hydrodynamic theory that efficiently captures the effect of the microscopic contact line region. The numerical method is validated through various examples. Parasitic currents are studied in the case of static and constantly advected parabolic interface intersecting the domain boundary with an imposed contact angle. Moving contact line in the viscous dominated regime is studied and verified through comparison with experiments.

  8. A diffuse-interface method for two-phase flows with soluble surfactants.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Song, Peng; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2011-01-20

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving soluble surfactants. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with equations for the bulk and interfacial surfactant concentrations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate the surface tension to the interfacial surfactant concentration. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite difference or finite element techniques. Here, finite difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Results are presented for a drop in shear flow in both 2D and 3D, and the effect of solubility is discussed. PMID:21218125

  9. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  10. A diffuse-interface method for two-phase flows with soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Song, Peng; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving soluble surfactants. The incompressible Navier–Stokes equations are solved along with equations for the bulk and interfacial surfactant concentrations. A non-linear equation of state is used to relate the surface tension to the interfacial surfactant concentration. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite difference or finite element techniques. Here, finite difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Results are presented for a drop in shear flow in both 2D and 3D, and the effect of solubility is discussed. PMID:21218125

  11. Effects of porosity and mixed convection on MHD two phase fluid flow in an inclined channel.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Jafar; Abbas, Zaheer; Sajid, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the flow and heat transfer analysis of two immiscible fluids in an inclined channel embedded in a porous medium. The channel is divided in two phases such that a third grade fluid occupies the phase I and a viscous fluid occupies the phase II. Both viscous and third grade fluids are electrically conducting. A constant magnetic field is imposed perpendicular to the channel walls. The mathematical model is developed by using Darcy's and modified Darcy's laws for viscous and third grade fluids respectively. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The obtained results are presented graphically and influence of emerging parameters is discussed in detail. PMID:25803360

  12. On two-phase flow solvers in irregular domains with contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepilliez, Mathieu; Popescu, Elena Roxana; Gibou, Frederic; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2016-09-01

    We present numerical methods that enable the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows in irregular domains. A method is presented to account for surface tension effects in a mesh cell containing a triple line between the liquid, gas and solid phases. Our numerical method is based on the level-set method to capture the liquid-gas interface and on the single-phase Navier-Stokes solver in irregular domain proposed in [35] to impose the solid boundary in an Eulerian framework. We also present a strategy for the implicit treatment of the viscous term and how to impose both a Neumann boundary condition and a jump condition when solving for the pressure field. Special care is given on how to take into account the contact angle, the no-slip boundary condition for the velocity field and the volume forces. Finally, we present numerical results in two and three spatial dimensions evaluating our simulations with several benchmarks.

  13. Effects of Porosity and Mixed Convection on MHD Two Phase Fluid Flow in an Inclined Channel

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Jafar; Abbas, Zaheer; Sajid, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the flow and heat transfer analysis of two immiscible fluids in an inclined channel embedded in a porous medium. The channel is divided in two phases such that a third grade fluid occupies the phase I and a viscous fluid occupies the phase II. Both viscous and third grade fluids are electrically conducting. A constant magnetic field is imposed perpendicular to the channel walls. The mathematical model is developed by using Darcy's and modified Darcy's laws for viscous and third grade fluids respectively. The transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The obtained results are presented graphically and influence of emerging parameters is discussed in detail. PMID:25803360

  14. Probabilistic formalism and hierarchy of models for polydispersed turbulent two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirano, Eric; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2002-04-01

    This paper deals with a probabilistic approach to polydispersed turbulent two-phase flows following the suggestions of Pozorski and Minier [Phys. Rev. E 59, 855 (1999)]. A general probabilistic formalism is presented in the form of a two-point Lagrangian PDF (probability density function). A new feature of the present approach is that both phases, the fluid as well as the particles, are included in the PDF description. It is demonstrated how the formalism can be used to show that there exists a hierarchy between the classical approaches such as the Eulerian and Lagrangian methods. It is also shown that the Eulerian and Lagrangian models can be obtained in a systematic way from the PDF formalism. Connections with previous papers are discussed.

  15. Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Annual technical report for program renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.C.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report details the theoretical development, numerical results, experimental design (mechanical), experimental design (electronic), and experimental results for the research program for the development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flow analyzer.

  16. Pseudo Dynamic Visualization of Boiling Two-phase Flow under Oscillatory Flow Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umekawa, H.; Ami, T.; Fujiyoshi, S.; Saito, Y.

    Although the flow oscillation strongly affects the characteristic of the critical heat flux, the detailed feature of these phenomena had not been fully understood, so far. One of the reasons of the lack of the reports is owing to the characteristics of the flow oscillation, i.e. the flow oscillation is strongly influenced by the operating condition. This means the oscillatory condition changes by the heating condition, thus general discussion becomes difficult. In this series of investigations, the critical heat flux (CHF) was investigated under artificial flow oscillation generated by a mechanical flow oscillator. By using these means, the influence of the flow oscillation was systematically obtained, and several results and model were presented. In this investigation, the similar experimental investigation was conducted to estimate the dynamic movement of the void fraction. In the visualization procedure, 0.03 second exposure image which synchronized with the flow oscillator was taken, and by using the ensemble averaging of 34 images, the image which had enough dynamic range could be reconstructed.

  17. Dependence of charge transfer phenomena during solid-air two-phase flow on particle disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Ken-ichiro; Suedomi, Yuuki; Honda, Hirotaka; Furutani, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuo; Masuda, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    An experimental investigation of the tribo-electrification of particles has been conducted during solid-air two-phase turbulent flow. The current induced in a metal plate by the impact of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a high-speed air flow was measured for two different plate materials. The results indicated that the contact potential difference between the particles and a stainless steel plate was positive, while for a nickel plate it was negative. These results agreed with theoretical contact charge transfer even if not only the particle size but also the kind of metal plate was changed. The specific charge of the PMMA particles during solid-air two-phase flow using an ejector, a stainless steel branch pipe, and a stainless steel straight pipe was measured using a Faraday cage. Although the charge was negative in the ejector, the particles had a positive specific charge at the outlet of the branch pipe, and this positive charge increased in the straight pipe. The charge decay along the flow direction could be reproduced by the charging and relaxation theory. However, the proportional coefficients in the theory changed with the particle size and air velocity. Therefore, an unexpected charge transfer occurred between the ejector and the branch pipe, which could not be explained solely by the contact potential difference. In the ejector, an electrical current in air might have been produced by self-discharge of particles with excess charge between the nickel diffuser in the ejector and the stainless steel nozzle or the stainless steel pipe due to a reversal in the contact potential difference between the PMMA and the stainless steel. The sign of the current depended on the particle size, possibly because the position where the particles impacted depended on their size. When dual coaxial glass pipes were used as a particle disperser, the specific charge of the PMMA particles became more positive along the particle flow direction due to the contact

  18. Challenges in modeling unstable two-phase flow experiments in porous micromodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Ferrari, A.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; Le Borgne, T.; Lunati, I.

    2014-12-01

    The simulation of unstable invasion patterns in porous media flow is challenging since small perturbations tend to grow in time, so that slight differences in geometry or initial conditions potentially give rise to significantly different solutions. Here we present a detailed comparison of pore scale simulations and experiments of unstable primary drainage in porous micromodels. The porous medium consists of a Hele-Shaw cell containing cylindrical obstacles. Two experimental flow cells have been constructed by soft lithography, with different degrees of heterogeneity in the grain size distribution. To model two-phase flow at the pore scale, we solve Navier-Stokes equations for mass and momentum conservation in the discretized pore space and employ the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to track the evolution of the interface. During drainage, if the defending fluid is the most viscous, viscous forces destabilize the interface, giving rise to the formation of preferential flow paths, in the form of a branched fingering structure. We test different numerical models (a 2D vertical integrated model and a full 3D model) and different initial conditions, studying their impact on the simulated spatial distributions of the fluid phases. Although due to the unstable nature of the invasion, small discrepancies between the experimental setup and the numerical model can result in different fluids patterns (see figure), simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the structures observed experimentally. To estimate the ability of the numerical approach to reproduce unstable displacement, we compare several quantities in both the statistical and deterministic sense. We demonstrate the impact of three main sources of uncertainty : i) the uncertainty on the pore space geometry, ii) the interface initialization and ii) three dimensional effects [1]. Simulations in weakly heterogeneous geometries are found to be more challenging because uncertainties on pore neck widths are on the same

  19. Multiphase turbulence in vertical wall-bounded collisional gas-particle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Wall-bounded particle-laden flows are common in many environmental and industrial applications, and are often turbulent. In vertical flows, strong coupling between the phases leads to the spontaneous generation of dense clusters that fall due to gravity at the walls, while dilute suspensions of particles rise in the central region. Sustained volume fraction and velocity fluctuations caused by the clusters result in the production of fluid-phase turbulent kinetic energy, referred to as cluster-induced turbulence (CIT). To better understand the nature of CIT in wall-bounded flows, Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations of statistically stationary three-dimensional gas-solid flows in vertical pipes are performed. To extract useful information consistent with Eulerian turbulence models, a separation of length scales is introduced to decompose correlated and uncorrelated granular motion. To accomplish this, an adaptive spatial filter is employed on the particle data with an averaging volume that varies with the local particle-phase volume fraction. Radial profiles of turbulence statistics are generated from the Eulerian-Lagrangian results. Details on the nature of the turbulence are described, as well as the challenges they present to turbulence modeling. Marie-Curie Senior Fellow, Ecole Centrale Paris.

  20. Investigation of two-phase flow processes in coal slurry/hydrogen heaters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sam, R.G.; Crowley, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for two-phase slug flow in a horizontal, transparent pipe at large diameter (6.75 in.) at high gas density (20 times the density of air at atmospheric pressure) and at liquid viscosities ranging from 1 to 1000 centipoise. The test section replicates 1 1/2 rectangular coils (40 ft by 10 ft) of a fired heater in a coal liquefaction plant. Regime transtion, pressure drop, void fraction, and slug characteristic data have been obtained for liquid superficial velocities ranging from 0.2 to 6 ft/s and gas superficial velocities ranging from 0.2 to 12 ft/s. Regime transition results have been compared with the Taitel-Dukler analytical flow regime map. The transition from stratified to slug flow, which is underpredicted by the original analysis, has been studied in particular. Comparison with the dimensionless transition criterion (gas Froude number) shows that increased liquid viscosity increases the liquid level at which the transition occurs. Pressure drop data at the transition have been used to evaluate the interfacial shear and to show that it is greater than is assumed in the Taitel-Dukler analysis. Sensitivity studies for the transition criterion and interfacial shear illustrate exactly why the transition is underpredicted on the flow regime map and how the predictions can be improved. Photos of the flow patterns illustrate the mechanism of slug formation at high viscosity compared with low viscosity. Pressure drop, void fraction, and slug characteristic results are compared with an analysis for pressure drop in slug flow, demonstrating better predictive capability of this model at large pipe size, high gas density, and high viscosity, compared with correlations from the literature. The pressure drop model is also shown to be in excellent agreement with coal liquefaction pilot plant data. 34 refs.

  1. Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Predicting Its Dependence on Capillary Number and Viscosity Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ferer, M.; Anna, Shelley L.; Tortora, Paul; Kadambi, J. R.; Oliver, M.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Smith, Duane H.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the need to determine the dependencies of two-phase flow in a wide range of applications from carbon dioxide sequestration to enhanced oil recovery, we have developed a standard two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous and capillary effects. This model has been validated through comparison with several experiments. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (M=μinjected,nwfdefending,wf ≥ 1), we had increased the capillary number, Nc and studied the way in which the flows deviate from fractal capillary fingering at a characteristic time and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. This crossover has enabled predictions for the dependence of the flow behavior upon capillary number and viscosity ratio. Our results for the crossover agreed with earlier theoretical predictions, including the universality of the leading power-law indicating its independence of details of the porous medium structure. In this article, we have observed a similar crossover from initial fractal viscous fingering (FVF) to compact flow, for large capillary numbers and unstable viscosity ratios M < 1. In this case, we increased the viscosity ratio from infinitesimal values, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from FVF at a characteristic time and become compact for non-zero viscosity ratios. This crossover has been studied using both our pore-level model and micro-fluidic flow-cell experiments. The same characteristic time, τ = 1/M0.7, satisfactorily describes both the pore-level results.

  2. A discontinuous Galerkin numerical model for the simulation of multiphase gas-particle flows in explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Bonaventura, Luca

    2014-05-01

    During explosive volcanic eruptions a mixture of gases, magma fragments, crystals and eroded rocks is injected in the atmosphere at high velocity, pressure and temperature. In the proximity of the volcanic vent, the erupted underexpanded multiphase mixture can manifest the features of supersonic flows, while the subsequent column behaviour is controlled by the (subsonic) turbulent mixing and mass and thermal exchange between the gas-particle mixture and the atmosphere. One of the main difficulties of the numerical simulation of explosive volcanic eruptions is therefore the need of modeling a multiphase process where different fluid dynamic regimes coexist and develop on on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. From a computational point of view, this requires robust numerical techniques able to resolve supersonic regimes and to capture flow discontinuities (shock waves), as well as to reduce, where needed, the so-called numerical diffusion (while increasing the numerical accuracy) in order to simulate gas-particle non-equilibrium phenomena. Several examples of numerical approximation of multiphase gas-particle equations based on finite volume approach have been proposed in the literature, able to simulate the multiphase mixture up to second-order accuracy in space and time. However, achieving higher order of accuracy in the finite volume framework implies an increasing computational cost related to the extension of the computational stencil, in particular when a parallel implementation has to be employed. In this work, a mixture of gas and solid particles is described with a set of coupled partial differential equations for the mass, momentum and energy of each phase. Solid particles and the gas phase are considered as non-equilibrium interpenetrating continua, following an Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Each phase is compressible and inviscid. The gas and particles dynamics are coupled through the drag term in the momentum equations and the heat exchange term

  3. Field testing the role of heterogeneity at the inter-well scale during two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, S. D.; Gulf Coast Carbon Center; Geoseq

    2011-12-01

    relative permeability evolution guide flow. Plume evolution was highly non-linear, demonstration dominance of preferential flow though fast paths. CO2 continued to access new flow paths as rate increased and through time; pressure was not linear with injection rate. Over a one year test period at the inter-well test scale, reservoir properties seem more important than either pressure or buoyancy in controlling plume evolution. Three intensively monitored two-phase injection experiments across ranges of inter-well reservoir heterogeneity and flow rate provide data to explore methods for bounding uncertainty. More than 20 fluid flow models from these tests have been or are being built to test approaches to history matching.

  4. Non-equilibrium model of two-phase porous media flow with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The efficient simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow through geologic porous media is challenging and computationally intensive, yet quantitative modeling of these processes is essential in engineering and the geosciences. Multiphase flow with phase change and complex phase behavior arises in numerous applications, including enhanced oil recovery, steam injection in groundwater remediation, geologic CO2 storage and enhanced geothermal energy systems. A challenge of multiphase compositional simulation is that the number of existing phases varies with position and time, and thus the number of state variables in the saturation-based conservation laws is a function of space and time. The tasks of phase-state identification and determination of the composition of the different phases are performed assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we investigate a thermodynamically consistent formulation for non-isothermal two-phase flow, in systems where the hypothesis of instantaneous local equilibrium does not hold. Non-equilibrium effects are important in coarse-scale simulations where the assumption of complete mixing in each gridblock is not realistic. We apply our model to steam injection in water-saturated porous media.

  5. Comparison of simplified models in the prediction of two phase flow in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez-Carrizales, M.; Jaramillo, J. E.; Fuentes, D.

    2014-06-01

    Prediction of two phase flow in pipelines is a common task in engineering. It is a complex phenomenon and many models have been developed to find an approximate solution to the problem. Some old models, such as the Hagedorn & Brown (HB) model, have been highlighted by many authors to give very good performance. Furthermore, many modifications have been applied to this method to improve its predictions. In this work two simplified models which are based on empiricism (HB and Mukherjee and Brill, MB) are considered. One mechanistic model which is based on the physics of the phenomenon (AN) and it still needs some correlations called closure relations is also used. Moreover, a drift flux model defined in steady state that is flow pattern dependent (HK model) is implemented. The implementation of these methods was tested using published data in the scientific literature for vertical upward flows. Furthermore, a comparison of the predictive performance of the four models is done against a well from Campo Escuela Colorado. Difference among four models is smaller than difference with experimental data from the well in Campo Escuela Colorado.

  6. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Parameters using Infrared Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kommer, Eric; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Kim, Jungho

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique to measure heat transfer and liquid film thickness distributions over relatively large areas for two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena using infrared (IR)thermometry is described. IR thermometry is an established technology that can be used to measure temperatures when optical access to the surface is available in the wavelengths of interest. In this work, a midwave IR camera (3.6-5.1 microns) is used to determine the temperature distribution within a multilayer consisting of a silicon substrate coated with a thin insulator. Since silicon is largely transparent to IR radiation, the temperature of the inner and outer walls of the multilayer can be measured by coating selected areas with a thin, IR opaque film. If the fluid used is also partially transparent to IR, the flow can be visualized and the liquid film thickness can be measured. The theoretical basis for the technique is given along with a description of the test apparatus and data reduction procedure. The technique is demonstrated by determining the heat transfer coefficient distributions produced by droplet evaporation and flow boiling heat transfer.

  7. CORRELATION FOR LIQUID ENTRAINMENT IN ANNULAR TWO-PHASE FLOW OF LOW VISCOUS FLUID

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Mishima, Kaichiro

    1981-03-01

    The droplet entrainment from a liquid film by gas flow is important to mass, momentum, and energy transfer in annular two-phase flow. The amount of entrainment can significantly affect occurrences of the dryout and post-dryout heat flux as well as the rewetting phenomena of a hot dry surface. In view of these, a correlation for the amount of entrained liquid in annular flow has been developed from a simple model and experimental data. There are basically two different regions of entrainment, namely, the entrance and quasiequilibrium regions. The correlation for the equilibrium region is expressed in terms of the dimensionless gas flux, diameter, and total liquid Reynolds number. The entrance effect is taken into account by an exponential relaxation function. It has been shown that this new model can satisfactorily correlate wide ranges of experimental data for water. Furthermore, the necessary distance for the development of entrainment is identified. These correlations, therefore, can supply accurate information on entrainment which have not been available previously. (author)

  8. "Hypothetical" Heavy Particles Dynamics in LES of Turbulent Dispersed Two-Phase Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorokhovski, M.; Chtab, A.

    2003-01-01

    The extensive experimental study of dispersed two-phase turbulent flow in a vertical channel has been performed in Eaton's research group in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University. In Wang & Squires (1996), this study motivated the validation of LES approach with Lagrangian tracking of round particles governed by drag forces. While the computed velocity of the flow have been predicted relatively well, the computed particle velocity differed strongly from the measured one. Using Monte Carlo simulation of inter-particle collisions, the computation of Yamamoto et al. (2001) was specifically performed to model Eaton's experiment. The results of Yamamoto et al. (2001) improved the particle velocity distribution. At the same time, Vance & Squires (2002) mentioned that the stochastic simualtion of inter-particle collisions is too expensive, requiring significantly more CPU resources than one needs for the gas flow computation. Therefore, the need comes to account for the inter-particle collisions in a simpler and still effective way. To present such a model in the framework of LES/Lagrangian particle approach, and to compare the calculated results with Eaton's measurement and modeling of Yamamoto is the main objective of the present paper.

  9. The Annular Two-phase Flow on Rod Bundle: The Effects of Spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2013-11-01

    The annular two-phase flow on rod bundle keeps an important role in many heat exchange systems but our knowledge about it, especially the interaction between the liquid film flowing on the rods' surfaces and the spacers is very limited. This study is aimed to the investigation of how the spacer affects the disturbance waves of the flow in a 3 × 3 simulating BWR fuel rod bundle test section. Firstly, the characteristics of the disturbance waves at both upstream and downstream locations of the spacer were obtained by using reflected light arrangement with a high speed camera Phantom V7.1 (Vision Research Inc.) and a Nikon macro lens 105mm f/2.8. The data showed that the parameters such as frequency and circumferential coherence of the disturbance waves are strongly modified when they go through the spacer. Then, the observations at the locations right before and after the spacer were performed by using the back light arrangement with the same high speed camera and a Cassegrain optical system (Seika Cooperation). The obtained images at micro-scale of time and space provided the descriptions of the wavy interface behaviors right before and after the spacer as well as different droplets creation processes caused by the presence of this spacer.

  10. CFD simulation of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an Eulerian multiphase flow model that characterizes gas mixing in anaerobic digesters. In the model development, liquid manure is assumed to be water or a non-Newtonian fluid that is dependent on total solids (TS) concentration. To establish the appropriate models for different TS levels, twelve turbulence models are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from a correlation analysis. The commercial CFD software, Fluent12.0, is employed to simulate the multiphase flow in the digesters. The simulation results in a small-sized digester are validated against the experimental data from literature. Comparison of two gas mixing designs in a medium-sized digester demonstrates that mixing intensity is insensitive to the TS in confined gas mixing, whereas there are significant decreases with increases of TS in unconfined gas mixing. Moreover, comparison of three mixing methods indicates that gas mixing is more efficient than mixing by pumped circulation while it is less efficient than mechanical mixing. PMID:20627353

  11. Hydrodynamic Dryout in Two-Phase Flows: Observations of Low Bond Number Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.; McQuillen, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Dryout occurs readily in certain slug and annular two-phase flows for systems that exhibit partial wetting. The mechanism for the ultimate rupture of the film is attributed to van der Waals forces, but the pace towards rupture is quickened by the surface tension instability (Rayleigh-type) of the annular film left by the advancing slug and by the many perturbations of the free surface present in the Re(sub g) approximately 0(10(exp 3)), Re(sub l) approximately 0(10(exp 4)), and Ca approximately 0(10(exp -1) flows. Results from low-gravity experiments using three different test fluids are presented and discussed. For the range of tests conducted, the effect of increasing viscosity is shown to eliminate the film rupture while the decrease of surface tension via a surfactant additive is shown to dramatically enhance it. Laboratory measurements using capillary tubes are presented which reveal the sensitivity of the dryout phenomena to particulate and surfactant contamination. Rom such observations, dryout due to the hydrodynamic-van der Waals instability can be expected in a certain range of flow parameters in the absence of heat transfer. The addition of heat transfer may only exacerbate the problem by producing thermal transport lines replete with "hot spots." A caution to this effect is issued to future space systems designers concerning the use of partially wetting working fluids.

  12. Hybrid Two-phase Flow Measurements in a Narrow Channel Using Neutron Radiography and Liquid Film Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yasushi; Kawabata, Yuji

    Gas-liquid two-phase flow in a narrow gap has been studied to develop a solid target cooling system for an accelerator driven system. Flow measurements are important to understand two-phase flow dynamics also in such a narrow channel. Although contact methods can measure detailed structure of two-phase flow, the intrusive effect on the flow becomes relatively larger in such a small channel. Therefore, non-intrusive measurement would be desirable. Neutron radiography (NRG) is one of the powerful tools for gas-liquid two-phase flow measurement and void fraction distribution can be estimated from the acquired images. However, the temporal resolution of NRG is about 100∼1,000 Hz depending on the neutron flux and it should be increased to investigate flow dynamics. So the authors focused on a hybrid measurement of the NRG and a conductance liquid film sensor (LFS). The combination of these methods can complement the spatial and temporal information of the flow. In this study, the hybrid measurements were performed by NRG and LFS to visualize the detailed structure of narrow two-phase flow.

  13. Modeling two-phase flow with stochastic coalescence/breakage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ki Sun

    Gas-particle flows were modeled to account for coalescence and breakup of liquid metal oxide droplets dispersed within the gas phase. The one-way coupled population balance equation (PBE) describing the evolution of number concentration due to particle-particle interactions and aerodynamic forces was solved using the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) along with Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equation (RANS). The turbulent feature was assessed by Wilcox's k-ω equations. The fast Eulerian method was used to assess the slip velocity of the dispersed phase which holds a significant inertia. Orthokinetic collision was considered under laminar and turbulent flow where the radial component of relative velocity between two colliding particles is a source of collision. Hydrodynamic and aerodynamic collision frequency functions for turbulent flow were obtained from prior studies and modified to take into account inertia of particles. For a general laminar movement of flow, hydrodynamic and aerodynamic collision frequency functions were derived for spherical particles. The laminar hydrodynamic collision frequency kernel was derived for application to high speed (high Reynolds number) flows. The inclusion of influence of multidimensional and mean flow behavior permits application to flows in which shear layers are present and high Reynolds number flow which necessitates inclusion of compressibility effects. The new model agrees well with prior incompressible formulations. Results indicate that the compressible part of new shearing collision frequency has a significant effect on the collision kernel due to the contraction and dilatation effects of a fluid element. The model was validated using historical data from particle collection experiments (and a correlation based on these data) in solid rocket motors. Considering the error bounds of correlation, the predicted mass mean diameter was in agreement with the measurements/correlation. Further validations performed

  14. An extended pressure finite element space for two-phase incompressible flows with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groß, Sven; Reusken, Arnold

    2007-05-01

    We consider a standard model for incompressible two-phase flows in which a localized force at the interface describes the effect of surface tension. If a level set (or VOF) method is applied then the interface, which is implicitly given by the zero level of the level set function, is in general not aligned with the triangulation that is used in the discretization of the flow problem. This non-alignment causes severe difficulties w.r.t. the discretization of the localized surface tension force and the discretization of the flow variables. In cases with large surface tension forces the pressure has a large jump across the interface. In standard finite element spaces, due to the non-alignment, the functions are continuous across the interface and thus not appropriate for the approximation of the discontinuous pressure. In many simulations these effects cause large oscillations of the velocity close to the interface, so-called spurious velocities. In this paper, for a simplified model problem, we give an analysis that explains why known (standard) methods for discretization of the localized force term and for discretization of the pressure variable often yield large spurious velocities. In the paper [S. Groß, A. Reusken, Finite element discretization error analysis of a surface tension force in two-phase incompressible flows, Preprint 262, IGPM, RWTH Aachen, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. (accepted for publication)], we introduce a new and accurate method for approximation of the surface tension force. In the present paper, we use the extended finite element space (XFEM), presented in [N. Moes, J. Dolbow, T. Belytschko, A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 46 (1999) 131-150; T. Belytschko, N. Moes, S. Usui, C. Parimi, Arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Eng. 50 (2001) 993-1013], for the discretization of the pressure. We show that the size of spurious velocities is reduced substantially, provided we

  15. Effect of Pressure with Wall Heating in Annular Two-Phase Flow

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kumar; T.A. Trabold

    2000-10-31

    The local distributions of void fraction, interfacial frequency and velocity have been measured in annular flow of R-134a through a wall-heated, high aspect ratio duct. High aspect ratio ducts provide superior optical access to tubes or irregular geometries. This work expands upon earlier experiments conducted with adiabatic flows in the same test section. Use of thin, transparent heater films on quartz windows provided sufficient electrical power capacity to produce the full range of two-phase conditions of interest. With wall vapor generation, the system pressure was varied from 0.9 to 2.4 MPa, thus allowing the investigation of flows with liquid-to-vapor density ratios covering the range of about 7 to 27, far less than studied in air-water and similar systems. There is evidence that for a given cross-sectional average void fraction, the local phase distributions can be different depending on whether the vapor phase is generated at the wall, or upstream of the test section inlet. In wall-heated flows, local void fraction profiles measured across both the wide and narrow test section dimensions illustrate the profound effect that pressure has on the local flow structure; notably, increasing pressure appears to thin the wall-bounded liquid films and redistribute liquid toward the edges of the test section. This general trend is also manifested in the distributions of mean droplet diameter and interfacial area density, which are inferred from local measurements of void fraction, droplet frequency and velocity. At high pressure, the interfacial area density is increased due to the significant enhancement in droplet concentration.

  16. Unfitted Two-Phase Flow Simulations in Pore-Geometries with Accurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Felix; Engwer, Christian; Ippisch, Olaf; Bastian, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The development of better macro scale models for multi-phase flow in porous media is still impeded by the lack of suitable methods for the simulation of such flow regimes on the pore scale. The highly complicated geometry of natural porous media imposes requirements with regard to stability and computational efficiency which current numerical methods fail to meet. Therefore, current simulation environments are still unable to provide a thorough understanding of porous media in multi-phase regimes and still fail to reproduce well known effects like hysteresis or the more peculiar dynamics of the capillary fringe with satisfying accuracy. Although flow simulations in pore geometries were initially the domain of Lattice-Boltzmann and other particle methods, the development of Galerkin methods for such applications is important as they complement the range of feasible flow and parameter regimes. In the recent past, it has been shown that unfitted Galerkin methods can be applied efficiently to topologically demanding geometries. However, in the context of two-phase flows, the interface of the two immiscible fluids effectively separates the domain in two sub-domains. The exact representation of such setups with multiple independent and time depending geometries exceeds the functionality of common unfitted methods. We present a new approach to pore scale simulations with an unfitted discontinuous Galerkin (UDG) method. Utilizing a recursive sub-triangulation algorithm, we extent the UDG method to setups with multiple independent geometries. This approach allows an accurate representation of the moving contact line and the interface conditions, i.e. the pressure jump across the interface. Example simulations in two and three dimensions illustrate and verify the stability and accuracy of this approach.

  17. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  18. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  19. Non-isothermal flow in low permeable porous media: A comparison of Richards' and two-phase flow approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Rutqvist, J.; Gorke, U.-J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kolditz, O.

    2010-03-15

    The present work compares the performance of two alternative flow models for the simulation of thermal-hydraulic coupled processes in low permeable porous media: non-isothermal Richards and two-phase flow concepts. Both models take vaporization processes into account: however, the Richards model neglects dynamic pressure variations and bulk flow of the gaseous phase. For the comparison of the two approaches first published data from a laboratory experiment is studied involving thermally driven moisture flow in a partially saturated bentonite sample. Then a benchmark test of longer-term thermal-hydraulic behavior in the engineered barrier system of a geological nuclear waste repository is analyzed (DECOVALEX project). It was found that both models can be used to reproduce the vaporization process if the intrinsic permeability is relative high. However, when a thermal-hydraulic coupled problem has the same low intrinsic permeability for both the liquid and the gas phase, only the two-phase flow approach provides reasonable results.

  20. Ice melting and downward transport of meltwater by two-phase flow in Europa's ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousová, Klára; Souček, Ondřej; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël.; Čadek, Ondřej

    2014-03-01

    With its young surface, very few impact craters, and the abundance of tectonic and cryovolcanic features, Europa has likely been subjected to relatively recent endogenic activity. Morphological analyses of chaos terrains and double ridges suggest the presence of liquid water within the ice shell a few kilometers below the surface, which may result from enhanced tidal heating. A major issue concerns the thermal/gravitational stability of these water reservoirs. Here we investigate the conditions under which water can be generated and transported through Europa's ice shell. We address particularly the downward two-phase flow by solving the equations for a two-phase mixture of water ice and liquid water in one-dimensional geometry. In the case of purely temperate ice, we show that water is transported downward very efficiently in the form of successive porosity waves. The time needed to transport the water from the subsurface region to the underlying ocean varies between ˜1 and 100 kyr, depending mostly on the ice permeability. We further show that water produced in the head of tidally heated hot plumes never accumulates at shallow depths and is rapidly extracted from the ice shell (within less than a few hundred kiloyears). Our calculations indicate that liquid water will be largely absent in the near subsurface, with the possible exception of cold conductive regions subjected to strong tidal friction. Recently active double ridges subjected to large tidally driven strike-slip motions are perhaps the most likely candidates for the detection of transient water lenses at shallow depths on Europa.

  1. Calculation of Two-Phase Navier-Stokes Flows Using Phase-Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1999-10-01

    Phase-field models provide a way to model fluid interfaces as having finite thickness. This can allow the computation of interface movement and deformation on fixed grids. This paper applies phase-field modeling to the computation of two-phase incompressible Navier-Stokes flows. The Navier-Stokes equations are modified by the addition of the continuum forcing -C∇→φ, where C is the composition variable and φ is C's chemical potential. The equation for interface advection is replaced by a continuum advective-diffusion equation, with diffusion driven by C's chemical potential gradients. The paper discusses how solutions to these equations approach those of the original sharp-interface Navier-Stokes equations as the interface thickness ɛ and the diffusivity both go to zero. The basic flow-physics of phase-field interfaces is discussed. Straining flows can thin or thicken an interface and this must be resisted by a high enough diffusion. On the other hand, too large a diffusion will overly damp the flow. These two constraints result in an upper bound for the diffusivity of O(ɛ) and a lower bound of O(ɛ2). Within these two bounds, the phase-field Navier-Stokes equations appear to generate an O(ɛ) error relative to the exact sharp-interface equations. An O(h2/ɛ2) numerical method is introduced that is energy conserving in the sense that creation of interface energy by convection is always balanced by an equal decrease in kinetic energy caused by surface tension forcing. An O(h4/ɛ4) compact scheme is introduced that takes advantage of the asymptotic, comparatively smooth, behavior of the chemical potential. For O(ɛ) accurate phase-field models the optimum path to convergence for this scheme appears to be ɛ∝h4/5. The asymptotic rate of convergence corresponding to this is O(h4/5) but results at practical resolutions show that the practical convergence of the method is generally considerably faster than linear. Extensive analysis and computations show that

  2. Study on Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Porous Media by Light Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, W.

    2015-12-01

    The non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) released to the subsurface can form residual ganglia and globules occupying pores and also accumulate and form pools, in which multiphase system forms. Determining transient fluid saturations in a multiphase system is essential to understand the flow characteristics of systems and to perform effective remediation strategies. As a non-destructive and non-invasive laboratory technique utilized for the measurement of liquid saturation in porous media, light transmission is of the lowest cost and safe. Utilization of Coupled Charge Device camera in light transmission systems provides a nearly instantaneous high-density array of spatial measurements over a very large dynamic range. The migration of NAPL and air spariging technique applied to remove NAPL in aquifer systems are typically two-phase flow problem. Because of the natural aquifer normally being heterogeneous, two 2-D sandboxes (Length55cm×width1.3cm×hight45cm) are set up to study the migration of gas and DNAPL in heterogeneous porous media based on light transmission method and its application in two-phase flow. Model D for water/gas system developed by Niemet and Selker (2001) and Model NW-A for water/NAPL system developed by Zhang et al. (2014) are applied for the calculation of fluid saturation in the two experiments, respectively. The gas injection experiments show that the gas moves upward in the irregular channels, piling up beneath the low permeability lenses and starting lateral movement. Bypassing the lenses, the gas moves upward and forms continuous distribution in the top of the sandbox. The faster of gas injects, the wider of gas migration will be. The DNAPL infiltration experiment shows that TCE mainly moves downward as the influence of gravity, stopping vertical infiltration when reaching the low permeability lenses because of its failure to overcome the capillary pressure. Then, TCE accumulates on the surface and starts transverse movement. Bypassing the

  3. Multilevel Monte Carlo for Two Phase Flow and Transport in a Subsurface Reservoir with Random Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Florian; Jenny, Patrick; Daniel, Meyer

    2014-05-01

    To a large extent, the flow and transport behaviour within a subsurface reservoir is governed by its permeability. Typically, permeability measurements of a subsurface reservoir are affordable at few spatial locations only. Due to this lack of information, permeability fields are preferably described by stochastic models rather than deterministically. A stochastic method is needed to asses the transition of the input uncertainty in permeability through the system of partial differential equations describing flow and transport to the output quantity of interest. Monte Carlo (MC) is an established method for quantifying uncertainty arising in subsurface flow and transport problems. Although robust and easy to implement, MC suffers from slow statistical convergence. To reduce the computational cost of MC, the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method was introduced. Instead of sampling a random output quantity of interest on the finest affordable grid as in case of MC, MLMC operates on a hierarchy of grids. If parts of the sampling process are successfully delegated to coarser grids where sampling is inexpensive, MLMC can dramatically outperform MC. MLMC has proven to accelerate MC for several applications including integration problems, stochastic ordinary differential equations in finance as well as stochastic elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations. In this study, MLMC is combined with a reservoir simulator to assess uncertain two phase (water/oil) flow and transport within a random permeability field. The performance of MLMC is compared to MC for a two-dimensional reservoir with a multi-point Gaussian logarithmic permeability field. It is found that MLMC yields significant speed-ups with respect to MC while providing results of essentially equal accuracy. This finding holds true not only for one specific Gaussian logarithmic permeability model but for a range of correlation lengths and variances.

  4. Gas–liquid two-phase flow patterns in rectangular polymeric microchannels: effect of surface wetting properties

    PubMed Central

    Huh, D; Kuo, C-H; Grotberg, J B

    2010-01-01

    Here we map gas–liquid two-phase flow regimes observed in polymeric microchannels with different wetting properties. We utilized video and confocal microscopy to examine two-phase flow patterns produced by parallel injection of air and water through a Y-shaped junction into a rectangular microchannel made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We observed seven flow regimes in microchannels with hydrophobic walls, whereas only two flow patterns were identified in hydrophilic microchannels. Our study demonstrates that surface wettability has a profound influence on the spatial distribution of air and water moving in microchannels. PMID:20126421

  5. Magnetic flux distortion in two-phase liquid metal flow: Model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Arinero, R.; Paumel, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the model experiments in order to study the magnetic flux distortion of a two-phase liquid metal flow excited by an AC magnetic field in a range of pulsation where Faraday induction and Lorentz force effects are significant. These experiments realized with solid aluminum rods allow to characterize the effects of flow velocity ( 0 ≲ U ≤1 ms-1 ), void fraction ( 0 ≤α≤6.9 % ), pulsation of the AC magnetic field ( 1.5 ×103≤ω≤12.5 ×103 rad s-1 ), and of two different void geometries. The results are analyzed on the basis of a first order expansion of magnetic flux in U and α. Despite the strong coupling between Faraday induction and Lorentz force effects, the results show that the contributions of U and α on a magnetic flux distortion can be well separated at both low magnetic Reynolds number and α values. These results are independent of void geometry.

  6. Two-Phase Flow Technology Developed and Demonstrated for the Vision for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.; McQuillen, John B.; Lekan, Jack F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s vision for exploration will once again expand the bounds of human presence in the universe with planned missions to the Moon and Mars. To attain the numerous goals of this vision, NASA will need to develop technologies in several areas, including advanced power-generation and thermal-control systems for spacecraft and life support. The development of these systems will have to be demonstrated prior to implementation to ensure safe and reliable operation in reduced-gravity environments. The Two-Phase Flow Facility (T(PHI) FFy) Project will provide the path to these enabling technologies for critical multiphase fluid products. The safety and reliability of future systems will be enhanced by addressing focused microgravity fluid physics issues associated with flow boiling, condensation, phase separation, and system stability, all of which are essential to exploration technology. The project--a multiyear effort initiated in 2004--will include concept development, normal-gravity testing (laboratories), reduced gravity aircraft flight campaigns (NASA s KC-135 and C-9 aircraft), space-flight experimentation (International Space Station), and model development. This project will be implemented by a team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, QSS Group, Inc., ZIN Technologies, Inc., and the Extramural Strategic Research Team composed of experts from academia.

  7. Two-Phase Flow Within Porous Media Analogies: Application Towards CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M. Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.

    2007-04-20

    Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCO2S) involves the capture of large quantities of CO2 from point-source emitters and pumping this greenhouse gas to subsurface reservoirs (USDOE, 2006). The mechanisms of two-phase fluid displacement in GCO2S, where a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid in a heterogeneous porous domain is similar to enhanced oil recovery activities. Direct observation of gas-liquid interface movement in geologic reservoirs is difficult due to location and opacity. Over the past decades, complex, interconnected pore-throat models have been developed and used to study multiphase flow interactions in porous media, both experimentally (Buckley, 1994) and numerically (Blunt, 2001). This work expands upon previous experimental research with the use of a new type of heterogeneous flowcell, created with stereolithography (SL). Numerical solutions using the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) model with the same flowcell geometry, are shown to be in good agreement with the drainage experiments, where the defending fluid wets the surface. This computational model is then used to model imbibition, the case of the invading fluid preferentially wetting the surface. Low capillary flows and imbibition conditions are shown to increase the storage volume of the invading fluid in the porous medium.

  8. Modeling and testing of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    2001-02-01

    Previous work relating to two-phase flow in manifolds has dealt primarily with 1-g phase distribution at each junction. Understanding the redistribution of gas and liquid at each junction in microgravity allows the investigator to calculate specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each branch or run. A model was developed at Texas A&M to determine the phasic distribution in an arbitrary manifold. Previously developed phase distribution equations are used to describe the redistribution at a dividing T-junction (Young et al., 1999). Mass flow rate, void fraction, and pressure drop are calculated iteratively for the entire manifold. Output from the model was compared to data taken from tests aboard NASA's KC-135. The test manifold consisted of a run with three branches. The system allowed the output to be directed to a phase separator or to collection bags. The distribution of liquid and gas in each collection bag could be used to determine the mass fraction in each branch and run. Results show good agreement between predicted mass fraction and flight data. .

  9. Gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method for incompressible two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fu; Shi-Yu, Wu; Kai-Xin, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by inconveniences of present hybrid methods, a gradient-augmented hybrid interface capturing method (GAHM) is presented for incompressible two-phase flow. A front tracking method (FTM) is used as the skeleton of the GAHM for low mass loss and resources. Smooth eulerian level set values are calculated from the FTM interface, and are used for a local interface reconstruction. The reconstruction avoids marker particle redistribution and enables an automatic treatment of interfacial topology change. The cubic Hermit interpolation is employed in all steps of the GAHM to capture subgrid structures within a single spacial cell. The performance of the GAHM is carefully evaluated in a benchmark test. Results show significant improvements of mass loss, clear subgrid structures, highly accurate derivatives (normals and curvatures) and low cost. The GAHM is further coupled with an incompressible multiphase flow solver, Super CE/SE, for more complex and practical applications. The updated solver is evaluated through comparison with an early droplet research. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10972010, 11028206, 11371069, 11372052, 11402029, and 11472060), the Science and Technology Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP), China (Grant No. 2014B0201030), and the Defense Industrial Technology Development Program of China (Grant No. B1520132012).

  10. Unconditionally convergent nonlinear solver for immiscible two-phase flow dominated by buoyancy and capillary forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchelepi, H. A.; Wang, X.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a Newton-based nonlinear solver for immiscible two-phase Darcy flow and transport in the presence of significant viscous, buoyancy, and capillary forces. The evolution of CO2 plumes in heterogeneous saline aquifers, especially during the post-injection period, is an important example of this class of problem. The total flux (fractional flow) function is split into two parts: one part accounts for the viscous and buoyancy forces, and the other part accounts for capillarity. These flux functions, which are strongly nonlinear functions of saturation, are divided into trust regions. The delineation of the regions is dictated by the inflection, sonic, and end points present in the two flux functions. Within each trust region, the standard Newton iterative scheme is guaranteed to converge. For problems where the dynamics are dominated by buoyancy and capillary forces, the proposed scheme allows for taking much larger time steps than existing Newton based solvers. The nonlinear solver is demonstrated using challenging CO2-brine problems in heterogeneous domains with emphasis on the post-injection period.

  11. Measurement of velocities in gas-liquid two-phase flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Kirouac, G.J.

    1992-09-01

    Measurements of bubble and liquid velocities in two-phase flow have been made using a new forward/backward scattering Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) technique. This work was performed in a 6.4 by 11.1 mm vertical duct using known air/water mixtures. A standard LDV fiber optic probe was used to measure the bubble velocity, using direct backscattered light. A novel retro-reflector and lens assembly permitted the same probe to measure the liquid velocity with direct forward-scattered light. The bubble velocity was confirmed by independent measurements with a high-speed video system. The liquid velocity was confirmed by demonstrating the dominance of the liquid seed data rate in the forward-scatter measurement. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the technique for a wide range of flow conditions, from bubbles as small as 0.75-mm-diam to slugs as large as 10-mm wide by 30-mm long. In the slug regime, the LDV technique performed velocity measurements for both phases, for void fractions up to 50%, which was the upper limit of our experimental investigation.

  12. Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows Through Packed Bed Reactors in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2001-01-01

    The simultaneous flow of gas and liquid through a fixed bed of particles occurs in many unit operations of interest to the designers of space-based as well as terrestrial equipment. Examples include separation columns, gas-liquid reactors, humidification, drying, extraction, and leaching. These operations are critical to a wide variety of industries such as petroleum, pharmaceutical, mining, biological, and chemical. NASA recognizes that similar operations will need to be performed in space and on planetary bodies such as Mars if we are to achieve our goals of human exploration and the development of space. The goal of this research is to understand how to apply our current understanding of two-phase fluid flow through fixed-bed reactors to zero- or partial-gravity environments. Previous experiments by NASA have shown that reactors designed to work on Earth do not necessarily function in a similar manner in space. Two experiments, the Water Processor Assembly and the Volatile Removal Assembly have encountered difficulties in predicting and controlling the distribution of the phases (a crucial element in the operation of this type of reactor) as well as the overall pressure drop.

  13. An adaptive level set approach for incompressible two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, M.; Almgren, A.S.; Bell, J.B.

    1997-04-01

    In Sussman, Smereka and Osher, a numerical method using the level set approach was formulated for solving incompressible two-phase flow with surface tension. In the level set approach, the interface is represented as the zero level set of a smooth function; this has the effect of replacing the advection of density, which has steep gradients at the interface, with the advection of the level set function, which is smooth. In addition, the interface can merge or break up with no special treatment. The authors maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface in order to robustly compute flows with high density ratios and stiff surface tension effects. In this work, they couple the level set scheme to an adaptive projection method for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in order to achieve higher resolution of the interface with a minimum of additional expense. They present two-dimensional axisymmetric and fully three-dimensional results of air bubble and water drop computations.

  14. Two-phase flow measurements of a spray in a turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Houser, M. J.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of spray drop interaction with a turbulent coflowing air stream were investigated using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer that determines both drop size and velocity. Detailed measurements obtained included spray drop size, axial and radial velocity, angle of trajectory, drop Reynolds number, and size-velocity correlations. The gas-phase flow field was also ascertained via the behavior of the smallest drops. Also investigated were the drag coefficients of droplets in a turbulent air cross flow for both monodispersions and polydispersions. Most notable aspects of the coflow included the effect of air streams with velocities significantly different from the spray sheet. Local changes in number density were produced as a result of lateral convection and streamwise accelerations and decelerations of various drop size classes. The complexity of the spray field interaction illustrated by this data effectively describes the development of the spray due to the influence of the airflow. The droplet drag measurements showed similar behavior for monodispersed and polydispersed flows and similar trends to previously obtained data. The measurements also pointed out further studies which would assist in creating an improved drag law for polydispersed drops in a turbulent environment.

  15. Study of flow regimes in two-phase pipeline flow using computer-based digital-image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    A new unobtrusive method for liquid-liquid two-phase flow data collection was proven reliable in this research. Drop-size distributions and concentration profiles were determined for a dilute water-in-kerosene system under horizontal straight pipe flow using this technique. The drop-size distributions were found to follow a Rosin-Rammler function for a limited droplet-diameter range, and the average value of the exponent in the Rosin-Rammler equation was determined to be 2.0. The velocity where the flow-regime transitions from stratified to adequately dispersed was found to be between 6.6 and 7.3 ft/s. Concentration profiles predicted by the Segev model were in general agreement with the profiles determined in this work. Using the experimentally determined Rosin-Rammler exponent value of 2.0 and using the proper choice of the dimensionless lateral diffusivity, the Segev model predicts very well the profiles found in this work. The new experimental method developed in this work will be useful to future researchers in two-phase flow. The data generated is useful both for theoretical modeling efforts and for application to industry sampling problems.

  16. Characterization of Horizontal Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow Using Markov Model-Based Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Dan; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2013-05-01

    Horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow widely exists in many physical systems and chemical engineering processes. Compared with vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow, investigations on dynamic behavior underlying horizontal gas-liquid flows are quite limited. Complex network provides a powerful framework for time series analysis of complex dynamical systems. We use a network generation method based on Markov transition probability to infer directed weighted complex networks from signals measured from horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow experiment and find that the networks corresponding to different flow patterns exhibit different network structure. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of horizontal gas-liquid flows, we construct a number of complex networks under different flow conditions, and explore the network indices for each constructed network. In addition, we investigate the sample entropy of different flow patterns. Our results suggest that the network statistic can well represent the complexity in the transition among different flow patterns and further allows characterizing the interface fluctuation behavior in horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow.

  17. Tutorial on Quantification of Differences between Single- and Two-Component Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Single-component two-phase systems are envisaged for aerospace thermal control applications: Mechanically Pumped Loops, Vapour Pressure Driven Loops, Capillary Pumped Loops and Loop Heat Pipes. Thermal control applications are foreseen in different gravity environments: Micro-g, reduced-g for Mars or Moon bases, 1-g during terrestrial testing, and hyper-g in rotating spacecraft, during combat aircraft manoeuvres and in systems for outer planets. In the evaporator, adiabatic line and condenser sections of such single-component two-phase systems, the fluid is a mixture of the working liquid (for example ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethanol, or other refrigerants, etc.) and its saturated vapour. Results of two-phase two-component flow and heat transfer research (pertaining to liquid-gas mixtures, e.g. water/air, or argon or helium) are often applied to support research on flow and heat transfer in two-phase single-component systems. The first part of the tutorial updates the contents of two earlier tutorials, discussing various aerospace-related two-phase flow and heat transfer research. It deals with the different pressure gradient constituents of the total pressure gradient, with flow regime mapping (including evaporating and condensing flow trajectories in the flow pattern maps), with adiabatic flow and flashing, and with thermal-gravitational scaling issues. The remaining part of the tutorial qualitatively and quantitatively determines the differences between single- and two-component systems: Two systems that physically look similar and close, but in essence are fully different. It was already elucidated earlier that, though there is a certain degree of commonality, the differences will be anything but negligible, in many cases. These differences (quantified by some examples) illustrates how careful one shall be in interpreting data resulting from two-phase two-component simulations or experiments, for the development of single-component two-phase thermal control

  18. Single- and two-phase flow in microfluidic porous media analogs based on Voronoi tessellation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Mengjie; Xiao, Feng; Johnson-Paben, Rebecca; Retterer, Scott T; Yin, Xiaolong; Neeves, Keith B

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a microfluidic model of complex porous media for studying single and multiphase flows. Most experimental porous media models consist of periodic geometries that lend themselves to comparison with well-developed theoretical predictions. However, most real porous media such as geological formations and biological tissues contain a degree of randomness and complexity that is not adequately represented in periodic geometries. To design an experimental tool to study these complex geometries, we created microfluidic models of random homogeneous and heterogeneous networks based on Voronoi tessellations. These networks consisted of approximately 600 grains separated by a highly connected network of channels with an overall porosity of 0.11 0.20. We found that introducing heterogeneities in the form of large cavities within the network changed the permeability in a way that cannot be predicted by the classical porosity-permeability relationship known as the Kozeny equation. The values of permeability found in experiments were in excellent agreement with those calculated from three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann simulations. In two-phase flow experiments of oil displacement with water we found that the surface energy of channel walls determined the pattern of water invasion, while the network topology determined the residual oil saturation. These results suggest that complex network topologies lead to fluid flow behavior that is difficult to predict based solely on porosity. The microfluidic models developed in this study using a novel geometry generation algorithm based on Voronoi tessellation are a new experimental tool for studying fluid and solute transport problems within complex porous media.

  19. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    SciTech Connect

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-07-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz.

  20. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 1: A theoretical analysis and development of the numerical solution. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The overall contractual effort and the theory and numerical solution for the Reacting and Multi-Phase (RAMP2) computer code are described. The code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. Fundamental equations for steady flow of reacting gas-particle mixtures, method of characteristics, mesh point construction, and numerical integration of the conservation equations are considered herein.

  1. Two-phase air/oil flow in aero engine bearing chambers: Characterization of oil film flows

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Wittig, S.

    1996-07-01

    For the design of secondary air and lubrication oil systems, a sufficient knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena under bearing chamber flow conditions is required. The characterization of oil film flows at the bearing chamber walls is one of the major tasks for a better understanding of these processes and, therefore, a necessity for improvements of the efficiency of aero engines. The present paper gives a contribution to this subject. Utilizing a fiber-optic LDV setup, measurements of oil film velocity profiles have been performed in the high-speed bearing chamber rig simulating real engine conditions. All data have been compared with different theoretical approaches, which have been derived from a force balance at a liquid film element, including geometric conditions and temperature dependent fluid properties, and by approaches for the eddy viscosity available in the literature.

  2. High-frame rate imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel using fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zboray, R; Mor, I; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 ms exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and mean bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed. PMID:24709611

  3. Proposal of experimental setup on boiling two-phase flow on-orbit experiments onboard Japanese experiment module "KIBO"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, S.; Sakai, T.; Sawada, K.; Kubota, C.; Wada, Y.; Shinmoto, Y.; Ohta, H.; Asano, H.; Kawanami, O.; Suzuki, K.; Imai, R.; Kawasaki, H.; Fujii, K.; Takayanagi, M.; Yoda, S.

    2011-12-01

    Boiling is one of the efficient modes of heat transfer due to phase change, and is regarded as promising means to be applied for the thermal management systems handling a large amount of waste heat under high heat flux. However, gravity effects on the two-phase flow phenomena and corresponding heat transfer characteristics have not been clarified in detail. The experiments onboard Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" in International Space Station on boiling two-phase flow under microgravity conditions are proposed to clarify both of heat transfer and flow characteristics under microgravity conditions. To verify the feasibility of ISS experiments on boiling two-phase flow, the Bread Board Model is assembled and its performance and the function of components installed in a test loop are examined.

  4. Characterizing the correlations between local phase fractions of gas-liquid two-phase flow with wire-mesh sensor.

    PubMed

    Tan, C; Liu, W L; Dong, F

    2016-06-28

    Understanding of flow patterns and their transitions is significant to uncover the flow mechanics of two-phase flow. The local phase distribution and its fluctuations contain rich information regarding the flow structures. A wire-mesh sensor (WMS) was used to study the local phase fluctuations of horizontal gas-liquid two-phase flow, which was verified through comparing the reconstructed three-dimensional flow structure with photographs taken during the experiments. Each crossing point of the WMS is treated as a node, so the measurement on each node is the phase fraction in this local area. An undirected and unweighted flow pattern network was established based on connections that are formed by cross-correlating the time series of each node under different flow patterns. The structure of the flow pattern network reveals the relationship of the phase fluctuations at each node during flow pattern transition, which is then quantified by introducing the topological index of the complex network. The proposed analysis method using the WMS not only provides three-dimensional visualizations of the gas-liquid two-phase flow, but is also a thorough analysis for the structure of flow patterns and the characteristics of flow pattern transition. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185959

  5. Monosegmented flow analysis exploiting aqueous two-phase systems for the determination of cobalt.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Guilherme Dias; de Lemos, Leandro Rodrigues; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes; da Silva, Maria C Hespanhol

    2012-01-01

    An environmentally safe procedure has been developed for the extraction, separation and determination of metal ions using a monosegmented flow analysis technique that exploits an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS-MSFA). The ATPS-MSFA method was applied for the determination of cobalt, based on the reaction between Co(II) and KSCN, which produces a metallic complex that spontaneously partitions to the top phase of the ATPS composed of poly(ethylene oxide), ammonium sulfate and water. The linear range was 5.00 to 500 μmol kg(-1) (R = 0.9998; n = 13) with a coefficient of variation equal to 1.14% (n = 7). The method yielded a limit of detection and a limit of quantification of 2.17 and 7.24 μmol kg(-1), respectively. The ATPS-MSFA method was applied to the determination of cobalt in a nickel-cadmium battery sample and the results were validity with flame atomic absorption spectrometry using addition standard. PMID:23232244

  6. Effect of liquid viscosity on wave behavior in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Koji; Yagishita, Takuya; Nakabo, Akinobu

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of time-spatial distributions of liquid holdups for the vertical upward gas-liquid two-phase flow were carried out by using the supermultiple cross-sectional mean liquid holdup probes (S-CHOP) and the semi-supermultiple point-electrode probes (SS-PEP) in the wide range of superficial gas and liquid velocity, j{sub g} and j{sub {ell}}, and the liquid kinematic viscosities were {nu}{sub {ell}} = 1 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} and 20 x 10{sup {minus}6} m{sup 1}/s. The time-spatial maps of wave behavior and the interfacial profiles were presented. Close inspection of these results reveals that there also exist huge waves and disturbance waves in the higher liquid viscosity conditions. To clarify the characteristics of these waves, the wave-vein analysis and the cluster analysis by K-mean algorithm were applied. These methods distinguished huge wave and disturbance wave objectively. The appearance regions of liquid slug, huge wave, and disturbance wave for each liquid viscosity condition were presented and the effects of liquid viscosity on them were discussed. Furthermore, velocity, width and height of these waves were determined, and the effects of liquid viscosity on them were clarified.

  7. An implicit numerical model for multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidane, Ali; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new implicit approach to model multicomponent compressible two-phase flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. In the implicit discretization of the species transport equation in our formulation we calculate for the first time the derivative of the molar concentration of component i in phase α (cα, i) with respect to the total molar concentration (ci) under the conditions of a constant volume V and temperature T. The species transport equation is discretized by the finite volume (FV) method. The fluxes are calculated based on powerful features of the mixed finite element (MFE) method which provides the pressure at grid-cell interfaces in addition to the pressure at the grid-cell center. The efficiency of the proposed model is demonstrated by comparing our results with three existing implicit compositional models. Our algorithm has low numerical dispersion despite the fact it is based on first-order space discretization. The proposed algorithm is very robust.

  8. The use of wavelet transformations in the solution of two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Nikolaou, M.; You, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors present the use of wavelets to solve the non-linear Partial Differential Equation (PDE) of two-phase flow in one dimension. The wavelet transforms allow a drastically different approach in the discretization of space. In contrast to the traditional trigonometric basis functions, wavelets approximate a function not by cancellation but by placement of wavelets at appropriate locations. When an abrupt change, such as a shock wave or a spike, occurs in a function, only local coefficients in a wavelet approximation will be affected. The unique feature of wavelets is their Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) property, which allows seamless investigation at nay spatial resolution. The use of wavelets is tested in the solution of the one-dimensional Buckley-Leverett problem against analytical solutions and solutions obtained from standard numerical models. Two classes of wavelet bases (Daubechies and Chui-Wang) and two methods (Galerkin and collocation) are investigated. The authors determine that the Chui-Wang wavelets and a collection method provide the optimum wavelet solution for this type of problem. Increasing the resolution level improves the accuracy of the solution, but the order of the basis function seems to be far less important. The results indicate that wavelet transforms are an effective and accurate method which does not suffer from oscillations or numerical smearing in the presence of steep fronts.

  9. The use of wavelet transforms in the solution of two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Nikolaou, M.; You, Yong

    1994-10-01

    In this paper we present the use of wavelets to solve the nonlinear Partial Differential.Equation (PDE) of two-phase flow in one dimension. The wavelet transforms allow a drastically different approach in the discretization of space. In contrast to the traditional trigonometric basis functions, wavelets approximate a function not by cancellation but by placement of wavelets at appropriate locations. When an abrupt chance, such as a shock wave or a spike, occurs in a function, only local coefficients in a wavelet approximation will be affected. The unique feature of wavelets is their Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA) property, which allows seamless investigational any spatial resolution. The use of wavelets is tested in the solution of the one-dimensional Buckley-Leverett problem against analytical solutions and solutions obtained from standard numerical models. Two classes of wavelet bases (Daubechies and Chui-Wang) and two methods (Galerkin and collocation) are investigated. We determine that the Chui-Wang, wavelets and a collocation method provide the optimum wavelet solution for this type of problem. Increasing the resolution level improves the accuracy of the solution, but the order of the basis function seems to be far less important. Our results indicate that wavelet transforms are an effective and accurate method which does not suffer from oscillations or numerical smearing in the presence of steep fronts.

  10. Large Eddy Simulations of Two-phase Turbulent Reactive Flows in IC Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2008-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method. In this method, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved with a generalized, high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme. The spray and the FMDF are implemented with Lagrangian methods. The reliability and the consistency of the numerical methods are established for different IC engines and the complex interactions among mean and turbulent velocity fields, fuel droplets and combustion are shown to be well captured with the LES/FMDF. In both spark-ignition/direct-injection and diesel engines, the droplet size and velocity distributions are found to be modified by the unsteady, vortical motions generated by the incoming air during the intake stroke. In turn, the droplets are found to change the in-cylinder flow structure. In the spark-ignition engine, flame propagation is similar to the experiment. In the diesel engine, the maximum evaporated fuel concentration is near the cylinder wall where the flame starts, which is again consistent with the experiment.

  11. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  12. Effect of spray cooling on heat transfer in a two-phase helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, S.; Puech, L.; Thibault, P.; Rousset, B.; Wolf, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    We describe an experimental study of the phenomenon of spray cooling in the case of liquid helium, either normal or superfluid, and its relationship to the heat transfer between an atomized two-phase flow contained in a long pipe, and the pipe walls. This situation is discussed in the context of the cooling of the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Experiments were conducted in a test loop reproducing the LHC cooling system, in which the vapor velocity and temperature could be varied in a large range. Shear induced atomization results in the generation of a droplet mist which was characterized by optical means. The thickness of the thin liquid film deposited on the walls by the mist was measured using interdigitated capacitors. The cooling power of the mist was measured using thermal probes, and correlated to the local mist density. Analysis of the results shows that superfluidity has only a limited influence on both the film thickness and the mist cooling power. Using a simple model, we show that the phenomenon of spray cooling accounts for the measured non-linearity of the global heat transfer. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results for cooling the final focus magnets in an upgraded version of the LHC.

  13. Effect of Compressibility on Hyperbolicity and Choke Flow Criterion of the Two-phase Two-fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    Suneet Singh; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-09-01

    The standard two-phase two-fluid model lacks hyperbolicity which results in oscillations in the numerical solutions. For the incompressible two-phase flows an exact correction term can be derived which when added to the momentum equations makes the model hyperbolic. No such straightforward approach exists for the similar compressible flows. In the current work, the effect of the compressibility on the characteristic equation is analyzed. It is shown that the hyperbolicity of the system depends only on the slip velocity and not on the phasic velocities, independently. Moreover, a slip Mach number is defined and a non-dimensional characteristic equation is derived. It is shown that for the small values of slip Mach number the effect of the compressibility on the hyperbolicity can be ignored. To verify the above analysis, the characteristic equation for the two-phase compressible flows is numerically solved and results compared with the values obtained with the analytical solution for incompressible flows. Numerical solution of the two-phase two-fluid model for the benchmark problem is used to further verify the abovementioned analysis. Furthermore, the eigenvalues of the characteristic equation are obtained as a power series expansion about the point where the slip Mach number is zero. These eigenvalues are used to develop a choking criterion for the compressible two-phase flows.

  14. A Eulerian-Lagrangian Model to Simulate Two-Phase/Particulate Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apte, S. V.; Mahesh, K.; Lundgren, T.

    2003-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a snapshot of liquid fuel spray coming out of an injector nozzle in a realistic gas-turbine combustor. Here the spray atomization was simulated using a stochastic secondary breakup model (Apte et al. 2003a) with point-particle approximation for the droplets. Very close to the injector, it is observed that the spray density is large and the droplets cannot be treated as point-particles. The volume displaced by the liquid in this region is significant and can alter the gas-phase ow and spray evolution. In order to address this issue, one can compute the dense spray regime by an Eulerian-Lagrangian technique using advanced interface tracking/level-set methods (Sussman et al. 1994; Tryggvason et al. 2001; Herrmann 2003). This, however, is computationally intensive and may not be viable in realistic complex configurations. We therefore plan to develop a methodology based on Eulerian-Lagrangian technique which will allow us to capture the essential features of primary atomization using models to capture interactions between the fluid and droplets and which can be directly applied to the standard atomization models used in practice. The numerical scheme for unstructured grids developed by Mahesh et al. (2003) for incompressible flows is modified to take into account the droplet volume fraction. The numerical framework is directly applicable to realistic combustor geometries. Our main objectives in this work are: Develop a numerical formulation based on Eulerian-Lagrangian techniques with models for interaction terms between the fluid and particles to capture the Kelvin- Helmholtz type instabilities observed during primary atomization. Validate this technique for various two-phase and particulate flows. Assess its applicability to capture primary atomization of liquid jets in conjunction with secondary atomization models.

  15. Anti-diffusion interface sharpening technique for two-phase compressible flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, K. K.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we propose an interface sharpening technique for two-phase compressible-flow simulations based on volume-of-fluid methods. The idea of sharpening the two-fluid interface is to provide a correction algorithm which can be applied as post-processing to the volume-fraction field after each time step. For this purpose an anti-diffusion equation, i.e. a diffusion equation with a positive diffusion coefficient, is solved to counter-act the numerical diffusion resulting from the underlying VOF discretization. The numerical stability and volume-fraction boundedness in solving the anti-diffusion equation are ensured by a specified discretization scheme. No interface reconstruction and interface normal calculation are required in this method. All flow variables are updated with the sharpened volume-fraction field for ensuring the consistency of the variables, and the update of the phase mass, momentum and energy is conservative. Numerical results for shock-tube and shock-bubble interactions based on the ideal-gas EOS and shock contact problems based on the Mie-Grüneisen EOS show an improved interface resolution. The large-scale interface structures are in good agreement with reference results, and finer small-scale interface structures are recovered in a consistent manner as the grid resolution increases. As compared with reference high grid-resolution numerical results based on AMR algorithms, the interface roll-up phenomena due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are recovered reliably for shock-bubble interactions involving different ideal gases.

  16. Coupled thermodynamic and two-phase flow modelling of partially melting crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, Nicolas; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; van Hunen, Jeroen; Velic, Mirko

    2016-04-01

    How magmas are formed, transferred and interact in the lower crust to form mid-crust plutonic belts remain a fundamental question to understand the chemical and mechanical evolution of continents. To assess this question we developed a 2-D two-phase flow code using finite volume method. Our formulation takes into account: (i) an extended Darcy's law for fluid flow with first order temperature- and fluid-content dependency for the host-rock viscosity and silica-dependent viscosity for the fluid, (ii) the heat equation assuming thermal equilibrium for both solid and liquid and temperature-dependent diffusivity, (iii) thermodynamic modelling of stable phases via a dynamic coupling with Perple_X, and (iv) chemical advection of both the solid and liquid composition. To model chemical interactions with the host rock during magma transport, the melt is assumed to be either in thermodynamic equilibrium or in thermodynamic disequilibrium, or as function of these two endmembers. We applied our modelling approach to investigate the behaviour and composition of magma during lower crust melting. Our goal is to better understand the formation of felsic crust through melting, segregation and assimilation of lower crustal lithologies, applied to Archaean systems. Our preliminary results show the ascend of silica-rich magmas is slow, occurring on the timescale of millions of years, and is highly controlled by (i) the melting curve of the protolith and (ii) by its chemical degree of interaction with the host rock. The resulting transferred magmas are in good accordance with observed composition forming the grey gneisses of Archean terranes (i.e SiO2-rich > 62%, Mg# = 40-50, Na2O ~6%, MgO = 0.5-1%).

  17. Numerical and Experimental study of secondary flows in a rotating two-phase flow: the tea leaf paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderer, Antoni; Neal, Douglas; Prevost, Richard; Mayrhofer, Arno; Lawrenz, Alan; Foss, John; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Secondary flows in a rotating flow in a cylinder, resulting in the so called ``tea leaf paradox'', are fundamental for understanding atmospheric pressure systems, developing techniques for separating red blood cells from the plasma, and even separating coagulated trub in the beer brewing process. We seek to gain deeper insights in this phenomenon by integrating numerical simulations and experiments. We employ the Curvilinear Immersed boundary method (CURVIB) of Calderer et al. (J. Comp. Physics 2014), which is a two-phase flow solver based on the level set method, to simulate rotating free-surface flow in a cylinder partially filled with water as in the tea leave paradox flow. We first demonstrate the validity of the numerical model by simulating a cylinder with a rotating base filled with a single fluid, obtaining results in excellent agreement with available experimental data. Then, we present results for the cylinder case with free surface, investigate the complex formation of secondary flow patterns, and show comparisons with new experimental data for this flow obtained by Lavision. Computational resources were provided by the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  18. A simulation of rainfall infiltration based on two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xi, Niannian; Liu, Gang; Hao, Shuang

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall infiltration in slope usually is one of major reasons cause landslide, which involves multiphase flow coupling with soil, water and gas. In order to study the mechanism of landslide caused by rainfall infiltration, a simulation of rainfall infiltration of DaPing slope, which locates in the Three Gorges Region of China, is presented based on the numerical solution of governing equations of two-phase flow in this paper. The results of this research suggest that there are two sections can be divided in the surface of slope, one is inflow area and the other is overflow area, according to where it is infiltration and discharge. The general inflow area is on the upside of slope, while the overflow area is on the underside. The middle section of slope is on a fluctuant position between inflow and overflow area, which is dramatically affected by the water content inside of slope. Moreover, the average rate of infiltration is more stable in both inflow and overflow area, whose numerical value is depend on the geometry and transmission characteristics of slope. And the factors of rainfall characteristics, surface flow and temperature have little effect on them. Furthermore, in the inflow area, when rainfall intensity is higher than infiltration the rain on the surface of slope will run off, otherwise water and gas will completely infiltrate through soil. The situation is different in the overflow area whose overland flow condition is depended on whether it is saturated or not inside of slope. When it is saturated in the slope, there is no infiltration in the overflow area. But when it is unsaturated, the infiltration intensity will equal to rainfall intensity. In a summary, the difference from inflow and overflow area is the evidence that the landslide may likely to happen on the slope of overflow area when it comes to a rainfall. It is disadvantageous for slope stability when transmitting the pressure of saturated water weight at the top of slope through the pore

  19. Fundamental Studies on Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Beds in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakotaiah, Vemuri; McCready, Mark J.; Motil, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In the typical operation of a packed-bed reactor, gas and liquid flow simultaneously through a fixed bed of solid particles. Depending on the application, the particles can be of various shapes and sizes and provide for intimate contact and high rates of transport between the phases needed to sustain chemical or biological reactions. The packing may also serve as either a catalyst or as a support for growing biological material. NASA has flown two of these packed-bed systems in a microgravity environment with limited or no success. The goal of this research is to develop models (with scale-up capability) needed for the design of the physicochemical equipment to carry out these unit operations in microgravity. New insight will also lead to improvements in normal gravity operations. Our initial experiment was flown using an existing KC-135 two-phase flow rig with a modified test section. The test section is a clear polycarbonate rectangular column with a depth of 2.54 cm, a width of 5.08 cm, and 60 cm long. The column was randomly packed with spherical glass beads by slowly dropping the beads into the bed. Even though care was taken in handling the column after it was filled with packing, the alternating high and low gravity cycles with each parabola created a slightly tighter packed bed than is typically reported for this type. By the usual method of comparing the weight difference of a completely dry column versus a column filled with water, the void fraction was found to be .345 for both sizes of beads used. Five flush mounted differential pressure transducers are spaced at even intervals with the first location 4 cm from the inlet port and the subsequent pressure transducers spaced at 13 cm intervals along the column. Differential pressure data was acquired at 1000 Hz to adequately observe pulse formation and characteristics. Visual images of the flow were recorded using a high-speed SVHS system at 500 frames per second. Over 250 different test conditions were

  20. Boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion: experimental research in the evolution of the two-phase flow and over-pressure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sining; Sun, Jinhua; Wan, Wei

    2008-08-15

    In a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), the superheating and boiling of the liquefied gas inside the vessel as it fails is important information necessary to understand the mechanism of this type of disaster. In this paper, a small-scale experiment was developed to investigate the possible processes that could lead to a BLEVE. Water was used as the test fluid. High-speed video was utilized to observe the two-phase flow swelling which occurred immediately following the partial loss of containment through a simulated crack. The velocity of the two-phase swelling was measured along with pressure and temperature. It was observed that initially a mist-like two-phase layer was rapidly formed on the liquid surface (~3-4 ms) after the vessel opened. The superheated liquid rapidly boiled and this accelerated upwards the two-phase layer, the whole liquid boiled after about 17 ms form opening. It was supposed that the swelling of the two-phase layer was the possible reason for the first over-pressure measured at the top and bottom of the vessel. From 38 ms to 168 ms, the boiling of the superheated liquid weakened. And from 170 ms, the original drop/mist-like two-phase flow turned into a churn-turbulent bubbly two-phase flow, rose quickly in the field of the camera and eventually impacted the vessel top wall. The force of its impact and "cavitation" and "choke" following with the two-phase ejection were maybe main reasons for the second obvious pressure increasing. PMID:18261848

  1. Multivariate multiscale complex network analysis of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow in a small diameter pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Dang, Wei-Dong; Yu, Jia-Liang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-02-01

    High water cut and low velocity vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow is a typical complex system with the features of multiscale, unstable and non-homogenous. We first measure local flow information by using distributed conductance sensor and then develop a multivariate multiscale complex network (MMCN) to reveal the dispersed oil-in-water local flow behavior. Specifically, we infer complex networks at different scales from multi-channel measurements for three typical vertical oil-in-water flow patterns. Then we characterize the generated multiscale complex networks in terms of network clustering measure. The results suggest that the clustering coefficient entropy from the MMCN not only allows indicating the oil-in-water flow pattern transition but also enables to probe the dynamical flow behavior governing the transitions of vertical oil-water two-phase flow.

  2. Multivariate multiscale complex network analysis of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow in a small diameter pipe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Dang, Wei-Dong; Yu, Jia-Liang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    High water cut and low velocity vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow is a typical complex system with the features of multiscale, unstable and non-homogenous. We first measure local flow information by using distributed conductance sensor and then develop a multivariate multiscale complex network (MMCN) to reveal the dispersed oil-in-water local flow behavior. Specifically, we infer complex networks at different scales from multi-channel measurements for three typical vertical oil-in-water flow patterns. Then we characterize the generated multiscale complex networks in terms of network clustering measure. The results suggest that the clustering coefficient entropy from the MMCN not only allows indicating the oil-in-water flow pattern transition but also enables to probe the dynamical flow behavior governing the transitions of vertical oil-water two-phase flow. PMID:26833427

  3. Multivariate multiscale complex network analysis of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow in a small diameter pipe

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Dang, Wei-Dong; Yu, Jia-Liang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    High water cut and low velocity vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow is a typical complex system with the features of multiscale, unstable and non-homogenous. We first measure local flow information by using distributed conductance sensor and then develop a multivariate multiscale complex network (MMCN) to reveal the dispersed oil-in-water local flow behavior. Specifically, we infer complex networks at different scales from multi-channel measurements for three typical vertical oil-in-water flow patterns. Then we characterize the generated multiscale complex networks in terms of network clustering measure. The results suggest that the clustering coefficient entropy from the MMCN not only allows indicating the oil-in-water flow pattern transition but also enables to probe the dynamical flow behavior governing the transitions of vertical oil-water two-phase flow. PMID:26833427

  4. A depth-averaged, two-phase flow code for hazard mapping that satisfies both hydraulic and granular flow extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoba, G. A.; Sheridan, M. F.; Pitman, B.

    2009-12-01

    Ground-hugging particle-laden flows constitute some of the most dangerous natural phenomena on Earth. Such currents, in the form of snow avalanches, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, lahars, and landslides, are among the most destructive processes in nature. Humans tend to settle in areas near rich soils, volcanoes, or watercourses, all of which could be strongly affected by these dangerous flows. In order to improve risk preparedness and site management in potentially affected zones, an appropriate knowledge of these natural hazardous phenomena is required. Their evolution in time, flow dynamics and run out distance are key aspects that help in the planning for hazardous events, development of hazardous regions and design of management policy to prepare in advance of potential natural disasters. This paper describes a depth-averaged model for two-phase flow that is currently under development at the University at Buffalo. It is being implemented within the TITAN2D framework that presently simulates dry geophysical mass flows over natural-scale terrains. The initial TITAN2D code was created to simulate granular flow. But because the presence of an interstitial fluid strongly modifies the dynamics of the flow, a new, more general, two-phase model is needed to account for the broad range in volume fraction of solids that occurs in nature. The mathematical model depth-integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for each phase, solid and fluid. The solid phase is modeled assuming a Coulomb constitutive behavior at the theoretical limit of pure solids. In contrast, the fluid phase conforms to a typical hydraulic approach at the limit of pure fluid and uses the Darcy-Weisbach approach to account for bed friction. The linkage for compositions between the pure end-member single phases is accommodated by the inclusion of a phenomenological-based drag coefficient. The model is capable of simulating the whole range of particle volumetric fractions, from pure fluid flows to pure

  5. Optic imaging of single and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihua; Ok, Jeong Tae; Sun, Yongpeng; Retterer, S T; Neeves, Keith B; Yin, Xiaolong; Bai, Baojun; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-03-21

    Microfluidic and nanofluidic devices have undergone rapid development in recent years. Functions integrated onto such devices provide lab-on-a-chip solutions for many biomedical, chemical, and engineering applications. In this paper, a lab-on-a-chip technique for direct visualization of the single- and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels was developed. The nanofluidic chip was designed and fabricated; concentration dependent fluorescence signal correlation was developed for the determination of flow rate. Experiments of single and two-phase flow in nano-scale channels with 100 nm depth were conducted. The linearity correlation between flow rate and pressure drop in nanochannels was obtained and fit closely into Poiseuille's Law. Meanwhile, three different flow patterns, single, annular, and stratified, were observed from the two-phase flow in the nanochannel experiments and their special features were described. A two-phase flow regime map for nanochannels is presented. Results are of critical importance to both fundamental study and many applications. PMID:23370894

  6. Simulation of two-phase fluid mixture flow in rectangular two-inlet cavity using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ruofan; Wang, Anlin; Gong, Qiwei; Jiang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, two-phase fluid mixture flow in rectangular two-inlet cavity is studied using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). To simulate two-phase fluids with large viscosity difference, the pseudo-potential model is improved. The improved model is verified for surface tension through Laplace's law and shown much better performance in simulating fluids with large viscosity difference than pseudo-potential model. The multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) scheme is used to enhance numerical stability. Then the two-phase fluid mixture flow with same and different viscosity in two-inlet cavity is simulated by present lattice Boltzmann (LB) model, pseudo-potential LB model and volume-of-fluid (VOF) method, respectively. The comparison of these numerical results shows that LB model is more suitable for such kind of flow than VOF method, since it can reflect repulsive forces and transitional region of two-phase fluids in dynamic process. Moreover, it also shows that present LB model has better dynamic stability than pseudo-potential model. Furthermore, simulations of the two-phase fluid mixture flow with different fluid viscosities, inlet velocities, inlet heights and outlet positions using present LB model are presented, exhibiting their effect to contact area of fluids.

  7. Invasion Patterns During Two-phase Flow In Deformable Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik

    2016-04-01

    , when normalized by obtained power laws with time N(t) ∝ tα and r(t) ∝ tβ. [1] Eriksen F.K., Toussaint R., Måløy K.J. and Flekkøy E.G. (2015) Invasion patterns during two-phase flow in deformable porous media. Front. Phys. 3:81. doi: 10.3389/fphy.2015.00081

  8. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Dong, S.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  9. Two-phase flow bubbly mixing for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, G.; Kwack, E.; Harstad, K.; Back, L. H.

    Experiments aimed at improving mixer design and investigating the effects of surfactants on the two-phase mixture in two-phase liquid metal MHD (LMMHD) energy conversion systems are described. In addition to conventional photography, flash X-ray imaging was used as a diagnostic tool. It was demonstrated that a high void fraction (0.8) and low velocity slip ratio (1.2) two-phase homogeneous bubbly mixture can be created. It is expected that such a two-phase mixture can be further expanded in a LMMHD generator while maintaining low velocity slip. In such a way, high generator and overall system efficiency would be achieved, making LMMHD systems competitive for a number of commercial applications.

  10. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dong, S; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  11. Two-phase flow bubbly mixing for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, G.; Kwack, E.; Harstad, K.; Back, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments aimed at improving mixer design and investigating the effects of surfactants on the two-phase mixture in two-phase liquid metal MHD (LMMHD) energy conversion systems are described. In addition to conventional photography, flash X-ray imaging was used as a diagnostic tool. It was demonstrated that a high void fraction (0.8) and low velocity slip ratio (1.2) two-phase homogeneous bubbly mixture can be created. It is expected that such a two-phase mixture can be further expanded in a LMMHD generator while maintaining low velocity slip. In such a way, high generator and overall system efficiency would be achieved, making LMMHD systems competitive for a number of commercial applications.

  12. Two-Phase Flow in Packed Columns and Generation of Bubbly Suspensions for Chemical Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Green, R. D.; Nahra, H. K.; Sridhar, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    For long-duration space missions, the life support and In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems necessary to lower the mass and volume of consumables carried from Earth will require more sophisticated chemical processing technologies involving gas-liquid two-phase flows. This paper discusses some preliminary two-phase flow work in packed columns and generation of bubbly suspensions, two types of flow systems that can exist in a number of chemical processing devices. The experimental hardware for a co-current flow, packed column operated in two ground-based low gravity facilities (two-second drop tower and KC- 135 low-gravity aircraft) is described. The preliminary results of this experimental work are discussed. The flow regimes observed and the conditions under which these flow regimes occur are compared with the available co-current packed column experimental work performed in normal gravity. For bubbly suspensions, the experimental hardware for generation of uniformly sized bubbles in Couette flow in microgravity conditions is described. Experimental work was performed on a number of bubbler designs, and the capillary bubble tube was found to produce the most consistent size bubbles. Low air flow rates and low Couette flow produce consistent 2-3 mm bubbles, the size of interest for the "Behavior of Rapidly Sheared Bubbly Suspension" flight experiment. Finally the mass transfer implications of these two-phase flows is qualitatively discussed.

  13. Measurement of Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Micro-Pipes by a Capacitance Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haifeng; Li, Huajun; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    A capacitance measurement system is developed for the measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow in glass micro-pipes with inner diameters of 3.96, 2.65 and 1.56 mm, respectively. As a typical flow regime in a micro-pipe two-phase flow system, slug flow is chosen for this investigation. A capacitance sensor is designed and a high-resolution and high-speed capacitance measurement circuit is used to measure the small capacitance signals based on the differential sampling method. The performance and feasibility of the capacitance method are investigated and discussed. The capacitance signal is analyzed, which can reflect the voidage variation of two-phase flow. The gas slug velocity is determined through a cross-correlation technique using two identical capacitance sensors. The simulation and experimental results show that the presented capacitance measurement system is successful. Research work also verifies that the capacitance sensor is an effective method for the measurement of gas liquid two-phase flow parameters in micro-pipes. PMID:25587879

  14. Two-phase flow pressure drop and heat transfer during condensation in microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching Yi; Pan, Chin

    2010-09-01

    This study experimentally investigates steam condensation in rectangular microchannels with uniform and converging cross-sections and a mean hydraulic diameter of 135 µm. The steam flow in the microchannels was cooled by water cross-flowing along its bottom surface, which is different from other methods reported in the literature. The flow patterns, two-phase flow pressure drop and condensation heat transfer coefficient are determined. The microchannels with the uniform cross-section design have a higher heat transfer coefficient than those with the converging cross-section under condensation in the mist/annular flow regimes, although the latter work best for draining two-phase fluids composed of uncondensed steam and liquid water, which is consistent with the result of our previous study. From the experimental results, dimensionless correlations of condensation heat transfer for the mist and annular flow regions and a two-phase frictional multiplier are developed for the microchannels with both types of cross-section designs. The experimental data agree well with the obtained correlations, with the maximum mean absolute errors of 6.4% for the two-phase frictional multiplier and 6.0% for the condensation heat transfer.

  15. Stability of finite difference approximations of two fluid, two phase flow equations

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the basic single pressure, two fluid model for two phase flow has complex characteristics and is dynamically unstable. Nevertheless, common nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics codes use variants of this model for reactor safety calculations. In these codes, the non-physical instabilities of the model may be damped by the numerical method and/or additional momentum interchange terms. Both of these effects are investigated using the linearized Von Neumann stability analysis. The stability of the semi-implicit method is of primary concern, because of its computational efficiency and popularity. It is shown that there is likely no completely stable numerical method, including fully implicit methods, for the basic single pressure model. Additionally, the momentum interchange terms commonly added to the basic single pressure model do not result in stable numerical methods for all the physically interesting reference conditions. Although practical stable approximations may be realized on a coarse computational grid, it is concluded that the assumption of instantaneously equilibrated phasic pressures must be relaxed in order to develop a generally stable numerical solution of a two fluid model. The numerical stability of the semi-implicit discretization of the true two pressure models of Ransom and Hicks, and Holm and Kupershmidt is analyzed. The semi-implicit discretization of these models, which possess real characteristics, are found to be numerically stable as long as certain convective limits are satisfied. Based on the form of these models, the general form of a numerically stable, basic two pressure model is proposed. The evolution equation required for closure is a volume fraction transport equation, which may possibly be determined based on void wave propagation considerations. 43 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Preliminary Modeling of Two-Phase Flow at the Main Endeavour Vent Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2011-12-01

    The high temperature hydrothermal vents of Main Endeavour Field (MEF), Juan de Fuca ridge exhibited quasi-steady North-South trending spatial gradients of both temperature and salinity for more than a decade before a magmatic event changed the vent characteristics. In order to explain these observations, we construct two-dimensional numerical models of two-phase hydrothermal flow of the MEF. We consider both along-axis and across-axis simulations, taking into account the vent field geometry and incorporating various parameters, such as different basal temperature distributions and permeability structures that might affect the vent fluid temperature and chemistry. Preliminary results from across-axis models, in which the basal temperature decreases linearly away from the ridge axis and results in a single high-temperature plume, indicate that basal temperature alone does not affect steady-state vent temperature and salinity of the vents. Simulations that include the presence of a high-permeability extrusive layer 2A atop the spreading ridge results in a zone of narrower and lower temperature venting. The effect of a low permeability zone of anhydrite would tend to mitigate the decrease in temperature, however. Along-axis simulations performed to date, with an extended uniform high temperature basal boundary, produce multiple plumes; but the plumes do not exhibit a strong along-axis gradient in vent salinity or temperature as observed at the MEF. These preliminary results suggest that the observed N-S gradient in temperature and salinity at MEF reflects interplay between heat source and either near the surface or deep-seated heterogeneous permeability structures. Three-dimensional simulations might ultimately be required to understand hydrothermal circulation at the MEF.

  17. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  18. Measurement of off-diagonal transport coefficients in two-phase flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, T S; Goode, P A

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent description of low capillary number two-phase flow in porous media relies on the independence of phase transport. An extended Darcy's law with a saturation dependent effective permeability is used for each phase. The driving force for each phase is given by its pressure gradient and the body force. This diagonally dominant form neglects momentum transfer from one phase to the other. Numerical and analytical modeling in regular geometries have however shown that while this approximation is simple and acceptable in some cases, many practical problems require inclusion of momentum transfer across the interface. Its inclusion leads to a generalized form of extended Darcy's law in which both the diagonal relative permeabilities and the off-diagonal terms depend not only on saturation but also on the viscosity ratio. Analogous to application of thermodynamics to dynamical systems, any of the extended forms of Darcy's law assumes quasi-static interfaces of fluids for describing displacement problems. Despite the importance of the permeability coefficients in oil recovery, soil moisture transport, contaminant removal, etc., direct measurements to infer the magnitude of the off-diagonal coefficients have been lacking. The published data based on cocurrent and countercurrent displacement experiments are necessarily indirect. In this paper, we propose a null experiment to measure the off-diagonal term directly. For a given non-wetting phase pressure-gradient, the null method is based on measuring a counter pressure drop in the wetting phase required to maintain a zero flux. The ratio of the off-diagonal coefficient to the wetting phase diagonal coefficient (relative permeability) may then be determined. The apparatus is described in detail, along with the results obtained. We demonstrate the validity of the experimental results and conclude the paper by comparing experimental data to numerical simulation. PMID:25748636

  19. Studies of Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flow in Microgravity. Ph.D. Thesis, Dec. 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William Scott

    1995-01-01

    Two-phase gas-liquid flows are expected to occur in many future space operations. Due to a lack of buoyancy in the microgravity environment, two-phase flows are known to behave differently than those in earth gravity. Despite these concerns, little research has been conducted on microgravity two-phase flow and the current understanding is poor. This dissertation describes an experimental and modeling study of the characteristics of two-phase flows in microgravity. An experiment was operated onboard NASA aircraft capable of producing short periods of microgravity. In addition to high speed photographs of the flows, electronic measurements of void fraction, liquid film thickness, bubble and wave velocity, pressure drop and wall shear stress were made for a wide range of liquid and gas flow rates. The effects of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the behavior of these flows were also assessed. From the data collected, maps showing the occurrence of various flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid flow rates were constructed. Earth gravity two-phase flow models were compared to the results of the microgravity experiments and in some cases modified. Models were developed to predict the transitions on the flow pattern maps. Three flow patterns, bubble, slug and annular flow, were observed in microgravity. These patterns were found to occur in distinct regions of the gas-liquid flow rate parameter space. The effect of liquid viscosity, surface tension and tube diameter on the location of the boundaries of these regions was small. Void fraction and Weber number transition criteria both produced reasonable transition models. Void fraction and bubble velocity for bubble and slug flows were found to be well described by the Drift-Flux model used to describe such flows in earth gravity. Pressure drop modeling by the homogeneous flow model was inconclusive for bubble and slug flows. Annular flows were found to be complex systems of ring-like waves and a

  20. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers’ works. PMID:26828488

  1. A New Void Fraction Measurement Method for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Small Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Ji, Haifeng; Huang, Zhiyao; Wang, Baoliang; Li, Haiqing; Wu, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Based on a laser diode, a 12 × 6 photodiode array sensor, and machine learning techniques, a new void fraction measurement method for gas-liquid two-phase flow in small channels is proposed. To overcome the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement, the flow pattern of the two-phase flow is firstly identified by Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA). Then, according to the identification result, a relevant void fraction measurement model which is developed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) is selected to implement the void fraction measurement. A void fraction measurement system for the two-phase flow is developed and experiments are carried out in four different small channels. Four typical flow patterns (including bubble flow, slug flow, stratified flow and annular flow) are investigated. The experimental results show that the development of the measurement system is successful. The proposed void fraction measurement method is effective and the void fraction measurement accuracy is satisfactory. Compared with the conventional laser measurement systems using standard laser sources, the developed measurement system has the advantages of low cost and simple structure. Compared with the conventional void fraction measurement methods, the proposed method overcomes the influence of flow pattern on the void fraction measurement. This work also provides a good example of using low-cost laser diode as a competent replacement of the expensive standard laser source and hence implementing the parameter measurement of gas-liquid two-phase flow. The research results can be a useful reference for other researchers' works. PMID:26828488

  2. Measurements of liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Doup, Benjamin; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Liquid-phase turbulence measurements were performed in an air-water two-phase flow loop with a circular test section of 50 mm inner diameter using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. An optical phase separation method--planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique—which uses fluorescent particles and an optical filtration technique, was employed to separate the signals of the fluorescent seeding particles from those due to bubbles and other noises. An image pre-processing scheme was applied to the raw PIV images to remove the noise residuals that are not removed by the PLIF technique. In addition, four-sensor conductivity probes were adopted to measure the radial distribution of the void fraction. Two benchmark tests were performed: the first was a comparison of the PIV measurement results with those of similar flow conditions using thermal anemometry from previous studies; the second quantitatively compared the superficial liquid velocities calculated from the local liquid velocity and void fraction measurements with the global liquid flow rate measurements. The differences of the superficial liquid velocity obtained from the two measurements were bounded within ±7% for single-phase flows and two-phase bubbly flows with the area-average void fraction up to 18%. Furthermore, a preliminary uncertainty analysis was conducted to investigate the accuracy of the two-phase PIV measurements. The systematic uncertainties due to the circular pipe curvature effects, bubble surface reflection effects and other potential uncertainty sources of the PIV measurements were discussed. The purpose of this work is to facilitate the development of a measurement technique (PIV-PLIF) combined with image pre-processing for the liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows of relatively high void fractions. The high-resolution data set can be used to more thoroughly understand two-phase flow behavior, develop liquid-phase turbulence models, and assess high

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-13

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  4. Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

  5. Efficiency Enhancement of Chiller and Heat Pump Using Natural Working Fluids with Two-phase Flow Ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Choiku; Hattori, Kazuhiro; Jeong, Jongsoo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    An ejector can transform the expansion energy of the driving flow into the pressure build-up energy of the suction flow. Therefore, by utilizing the ejector instead of the expansion valve for the absorption and the compression cycle, the performance of the refrigerator can be greatly improved. Until now, many studies have been conducted with regard to the single-phase flow ejector. But, single or two component two-phase flow ejector which needs for the compression and absorption cycle has not been examined sufficiently. This paper constructs the simulation model of single and two component two-phase flow ejector and investigates the characteristics of that ejector by the simulation. Working fluids are ammonia, CO2 and ammonia-water mixture. As a result, the optimum mixing section inlet pressure exists to maximize the performance of the ejector. And the ejector performance is analyzed in detail.

  6. CFD analysis of the two-phase bubbly flow characteristics in helically coiled rectangular and circular tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Alamin; Fsadni, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their ease of manufacture, high heat transfer efficiency and compact design, helically coiled heat exchangers are increasingly being adopted in a number of industries. The higher heat transfer efficiency over straight pipes is due to the secondary flow that develops as a result of the centrifugal force. In spite of the widespread use of helically coiled heat exchangers, and the presence of bubbly two-phase flow in a number of systems, very few studies have investigated the resultant flow characteristics. This paper will therefore present the results of CFD simulations for the two-phase bubbly flow in helically coiled heat exchangers as a function of the volumetric void fraction and the tube cross-section design. The CFD results are compared to the scarce flow visualisation experimental results available in the open literature.

  7. The Finite Element Analysis for a Mini-Conductance Probe in Horizontal Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weihang; Kong, Lingfu; Li, Lei; Liu, Xingbin; Xie, Ronghua; Li, Jun; Tang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow is widespread in petroleum industry processes. The study of oil-water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes and the liquid holdup measurement of oil-water two-phase flow are of great importance for the optimization of the oil production process. This paper presents a novel sensor, i.e., a mini-conductance probe (MCP) for measuring pure-water phase conductivity of oil-water segregated flow in horizontal pipes. The MCP solves the difficult problem of obtaining the pure-water correction for water holdup measurements by using a ring-shaped conductivity water-cut meter (RSCWCM). Firstly, using the finite element method (FEM), the spatial sensitivity field of the MCP is investigated and the optimized MCP geometry structure is determined in terms of the characteristic parameters. Then, the responses of the MCP for the oil-water segregated flow are calculated, and it is found that the MCP has better stability and sensitivity to the variation of water-layer thickness in the condition of high water holdup and low flow velocity. Finally, the static experiments for the oil-water segregated flow were carried out and a novel calibration method for pure-water phase conductivity measurements was presented. The validity of the pure-water phase conductivity measurement with segregated flow in horizontal pipes was verified by experimental results. PMID:27563907

  8. Numerical modeling of immiscible two-phase flow in micro-models using a commercial CFD code

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadia, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf CFD software is being used to analyze everything from flow over airplanes to lab-on-a-chip designs. So, how accurately can two-phase immiscible flow be modeled flowing through some small-scale models of porous media? We evaluate the capability of the CFD code FLUENT{trademark} to model immiscible flow in micro-scale, bench-top stereolithography models. By comparing the flow results to experimental models we show that accurate 3D modeling is possible.

  9. An experimental study of fluidelastic instability and draf force on a tube in two-phase cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Youngcheol

    1994-12-31

    Two-phase cross flow over heat exchanger tubes creates vibrations which contribute greatly to the wear on the tubes. Fluidelastic instability is a major mechanism by which tubes can fail. In this work, the fluidelastic instability of a tube placed in an array subjected to two-phase cross flow has been studied. For the determination of fluidelastic instability, a triangular tube array was used. The tubes were made of acrylic and were 2.2 cm or 2.37 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. Eighteen tubes and 4 half tubes formed 5 rows with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.4. All of the tubes except the test tube were rigidly supported at the text section wall. The test tube was flexibly supported with two cantilever beams. By installing cantilever beams horizontally and vertically, drag and lift direction tube vibration were studied. Parameters of tube mass, structural stiffness, natural frequency, and pitch to diameter ratio were varied. The drag coefficients on a rigidly held tube in an array subjected to two-phase cross flow were measured. The tube in an array was located at displaced positions as well as at the normal position in order to study the variation of fluid force as the tube vibrates. In the experiments, gap Reynolds numbers up to 1 x 10{sup 5} were obtained, while void fraction was varied from zero to 0.5. The drag coefficients in two-phase flow are much higher than those in single phase flow. The ratio of two-phase to single phase drag coefficient decreases as Reynolds number increases. The drag coefficient on a tube in an array increases as the tube is displaced in the direction of flow. The drag coefficient increases rapidly when the tube is displaced more than a certain critical distance.

  10. Inertial Coupling in Two-Phase Flow: a Few Test Cases and Their Impacts on Two-Fluid Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaolong

    Two-phase flow makes up about one-half of all industrial, biological and environmental fluid mechanics. Analytical methods that are presently useful in these are still mostly ad hoc. Unlike in (single phase) fluid mechanics, there are no universal macroscopic fundamental equations existing yet, although the Navier-Stokes equations describe the microscopic details of the motion of each phase. One promising recent theoretical development in two-phase flow is the two-fluid theory. The modeling of the interfacial interaction force terms are very crucial in this theory since they govern the interfacial momentum transfer and couple the two phases together. One of the interaction forces is the inertial coupling force, or the added (virtual) mass force, which plays a significant role in deciding the well -posedness of the model, especially when dynamic interactions (relative acceleration) between phases are important (Drew, 1983). Attention is focused on the inertial coupling aspect of two-phase modeling in this thesis, following Wallis (1989). Although the concept is classic, there is still much to be known about added mass effects in two -phase flow. The boundary (be it fluid boundary or other surfaces) effect on the added mass coefficient of a sphere is studied, resulting in several new, essentially exact solutions which are valuable contributions to the understanding of hydrodynamic interaction in potential flow. The added masses for isotropic and nonisotropic dispersions of spheres in an unbounded flow are studied. Among the new results are: (i) the "conditional" convergence experienced is physically meaningful; (ii) Geurst's conjecture (1985) is correct, contrary to Smereka & Milton's (1991) finding; (iii) predictions from the "tube model" proposed in Cai & Wallis (1992) are further validated by predictions from the image method. Some new phenomena about the added mass of dispersed flow in finite pipes with different end conditions are also studied. Experimental

  11. Scale dependent dynamic capillary pressure effect for two-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidoye, Luqman K.; Das, Diganta B.

    2014-12-01

    Causes and effects of non-uniqueness in capillary pressure and saturation (Pc-S) relationship in porous media are of considerable concern to researchers of two-phase flow. In particular, a significant amounts of discussion have been generated regarding a parameter termed as dynamic coefficient (τ) which has been proposed for inclusion in the functional dependence of Pc-S relationship to quantify dynamic Pc and its relation with time derivative of saturation. While the dependence of the coefficient on fluid and porous media properties is less controversial, its relation to domain scale appears to be dependent on artefacts of experiments, mathematical models and the intra-domain averaging techniques. In an attempt to establish the reality of the scale dependency of the τ-S relationships, we carry out a series of well-defined laboratory experiments to determine τ-S relationships using three different sizes of cylindrical porous domains of silica sand. In this paper, we present our findings on the scale dependence of τ and its relation to high viscosity ratio (μr) silicone oil-water system, where μr is defined as the viscosity of non-wetting phase over that of the wetting phase. An order of magnitude increase in the value of τ was observed across various μr and domain scales. Also, an order of magnitude increase in τ is observed when τ at the top and the bottom sections in a domain are compared. Viscosity ratio and domain scales are found to have similar effects on the trend in τ-S relationship. We carry out a dimensional analysis of τ which shows how different variables, e.g., dimensionless τ and dimensionless domain volume (scale), may be correlated and provides a means to determine the influences of relevant variables on τ. A scaling relationship for τ was derived from the dimensionless analysis which was then validated against independent literature data. This showed that the τ-S relationships obtained from the literature and the scaling

  12. Study of hydrodynamics and heat transfer in non-Newtonian liquid-gas two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Non-Newtonian liquid-gas stratified flow data in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes were obtained. Interfacial level gradients between the two phases were observed. The Heywood-Charles model is found to be valid for pseudoplastic liquid-gas uniform stratified flow. Two-phase drag reduction in non-Newtonian systems was not achieved as the transition to semi-slug flow occurred before the model criteria were reached. Interfacial liquid and gas shear stresses were compared. A new parameter ..sigma../sup 2/ is introduced which is a numerical indication of the interfacial level gradient. Two-phase drag reduction was experimentally observed in polymer solution-air plug-slug flow in 0.026- and 0.052-m-diameter pipes. The Hubbard-Dukler pressure drop model was extended to non-Newtonian systems. Reasonable agreement between the experiment and the model predictions is obtained. However, more work needs to be done in order to better understand the two-phase drag reduction phenomena. Liquid holdup correlations were developed for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian systems which successfully correlate the holdup over a wide range of parameters. The Petukhov correlation is found to be better than the Dittus-Boelter correlation in predicting the single-phase water heat-transfer coefficients.

  13. Two-Phase Flow Modelling Perspectives Based on Novel High-Resolution Acoustic Measurements of Uniform Steady Sheet-Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.; Hurther, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sheet flow is believed to be a major process for morphological evolution of natural systems. An important research effort has been dedicated to laboratory and numerical studies of sheet flow regime that have allowed to make some progress in the understanding of the underlying physical processes. Recent advances made in high resolution measurement techniques allows to give new insights into the small scale physical processes. In this contribution, a novel uniform and steady sheet flow dataset based on an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) is presented. Profile of colocated velocities (streamwise and wall-normal) and sediment concentration has been measured at high-resolution (3 mm ; 78 Hz for the velocities and 4.9 Hz for the concentration). The measured profiles extend over the whole water column, from the free surface down to the fixed bed and an ensemble averaging over eleven realisations of the same experimental conditions has been used to obtain mean profiles of streamwise velocity, concentration, sediment flux and turbulent shear stress. The present experiment corresponds to a Shields number of θ=0.44 and a suspension number of ws/u*=1.1 corresponding to the lower limit of the no-suspension sheet flow regime. The analysis of the mixing length profile allows to identify two layers, a dilute suspension layer dominated by turbulence and a dense moving bed layer dominated by granular interactions. Our measurements show that the Von Karman parameter is reduced by a factor of more than two and that the Schmidt number is almost constant with a mean value of σs=0.44. Frictional and collisional interactions are encountered in the bed layer. Frictional interactions dominate close to the fixed bed interface whereas collisional interactions seems to control the flow at the transition between the dense and dilute layers. The relevancy of different constitutive laws for two-phase flow models are discussed.

  14. Pressure drop of two-phase plug flow in round mini-channels: Influence of surface wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2008-09-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of two-phase plug flows in round mini-channels was investigated for three different tube materials, i.e., glass, polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. Air and water were used as the test fluids. In the wet-plug flow regime (wet wall condition at the gas portions), the pressure drop was reasonably predicted by the homogeneous flow model or by the correlations of Mishima and Hibiki [K. Mishima, T. Hibiki, Some characteristics of air-water two-phase flow in small diameter vertical tubes, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 22 (1996) 703-712] and Chisholm [D. Chisholm, A theoretical basis for the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for two-phase flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 10 (1967) 1767-1778]. On the other hand, in the dry-plug flow regime (dry wall condition at the gas portions), the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. To take into account the effect of the moving contact lines, a modified Lockhart-Martinelli type correlation was proposed, which fitted the measured pressure-drop data within the mean deviation of 6%. (author)

  15. A low Mach number preconditioned scheme for a two-phase liquid-gas compressible flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelanti, Marica

    2015-11-01

    The simulation of liquid-gas flows such as cavitating flows demands numerical methods efficient for a wide range of Mach number regimes, due to the large and rapid variation of the speed of sound in these two-phase flows. When classical upwind finite volume discretizations for compressible flow models are employed, suitable strategies are needed to overcome the well known difficulty of loss of accuracy encountered at low Mach number by these methods. In this work we present a novel finite volume wave propagation scheme with low Mach number preconditioning for the numerical approximation of a six-equation two-phase liquid-gas compressible flow model with stiff mechanical relaxation. A Turkel-type preconditioner is designed to correct the acoustic fields at low Mach number, by altering the numerical dissipation tensor of the scheme. We present numerical results for two-dimensional liquid-gas nozzle flow tests both for low Mach number regimes and for transonic regimes with shock formation, which show the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed preconditioned method. In particular, in the low Mach number limit the order of pressure perturbations at the discrete level agrees with the theoretical results for the continuous two-phase flow model.

  16. Development of an analytic model to determine pump performance under two-phase flow conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, O.

    1984-05-01

    During a hypothetical LOCA (loss of coolant accident), the recirculating coolant of PWR (pressurized water reactor) may flash into steam due to a loss of line pressure. Under such two-phase flow conditions, it is well known that the recirculation pump becomes unable to generate the same head as that of the single-phase flow case. Based on the one dimensional control volume method, an analytical method has been developed to determine the performance of pumps operating under two-phase flow conditions. The analytical method has incorporated pump geometry, void fraction, flow slippage and flow regime into the basic formula, but neglected the compressibility and condensation effects. During the course of model development, it has been found that the head degradation is mainly caused by higher acceleration on liquid phase and deceleration on gas phase than in the case of single-phase flows. The numerical results for head and torque degradations were obtained with the model and favorably compared with the test data of air/water two-phase flow pumps of Babcock and Wilcox (1/3 scale) and Creare (1/20 scale).

  17. Two-Phase Acto-Cytosolic Fluid Flow in a Moving Keratocyte: A 2D Continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Nikmaneshi, M R; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2015-09-01

    The F-actin network and cytosol in the lamellipodia of crawling cells flow in a centripetal pattern and spout-like form, respectively. We have numerically studied this two-phase flow in the realistic geometry of a moving keratocyte. Cytosol has been treated as a low viscosity Newtonian fluid flowing through the high viscosity porous medium of F-actin network. Other involved phenomena including myosin activity, adhesion friction, and interphase interaction are also discussed to provide an overall view of this problem. Adopting a two-phase coupled model by myosin concentration, we have found new accurate perspectives of acto-cytosolic flow and pressure fields, myosin distribution, as well as the distribution of effective forces across the lamellipodia of a keratocyte with stationary shape. The order of magnitude method is also used to determine the contribution of forces in the internal dynamics of lamellipodia. PMID:26403420

  18. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  19. Research on the two-phase flow and separation mechanism in the oil-gas cyclone separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. Z.; Gao, X.; Feng, J. M.; Peng, X. Y.

    2015-08-01

    The cyclone separator has attracted increasing attention due to its small size, rapid construction and high separation efficiency. This study investigated its gas-liquid two-phase flow and separation characteristics experimentally and numerically. A numerical model of two- phase flow in the cyclone separator was proposed using the Euler-Lagrange method. The distribution of pressure, tangential and axial velocity in the gas-phase flow field was obtained, and the oil droplet movement was traced. Separation efficiency was also studied experimentally, and the diameter distributions of oil droplets at the inlet and the outlet of the separator were measured by a Malvern laser particle size analyser to verify the simulation model. Based on high-speed photography technology, the oil film distribution and flow pattern on the wall of the cyclone separator were visualised. The variation of oil-gas two-phase flow in the cyclone separator was compared under various inlet flow rates. Based on the results, an improved structure was proposed, and the performance of the improved separator was investigated experimentally.

  20. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  1. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Mishima, K; Tobita, Y; Suzuki, T; Matsubayashi, M

    2004-10-01

    To establish reasonable safety concepts for the realization of commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors, it is indispensable to demonstrate that the release of excessive energy due to re-criticality of molten core could be prevented even if a severe core damage accident took place. Two-phase flow due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the molten core pool has a larger liquid-to-gas density ratio and higher surface tension in comparison with those of ordinary two-phase flows such as air-water flow. In this study, to investigate the effect of the recirculation flow on the bubble behavior, visualization and measurement of nitrogen gas-molten lead bismuth in a rectangular tank was performed by using neutron radiography and particle image velocimetry techniques. Measured flow parameters include flow regime, two-dimensional void distribution, and liquid velocity field in the tank. The present technique is applicable to the measurement of velocity fields and void fraction, and the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. PMID:15246418

  2. The Effect of Subcooling on the Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Doi, Kyoji; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon is used as a heat transfer device in an energy-saving heat transportation system and so forth, because it transports thermal energy without any external power supply such as a pump under a body force field. We previously performed a fundamental study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with a single heated tube evaporator both experimentally and theoretically which was made under the condition of near saturation temperature of liquid in a reservoir. In the present study, the effects of liquid subcooling and the heat input on the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions, and heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were examined experimentally using water, ethanol, benzene and Freon 113 as the working fluids. On the other hand, the circulation mass flow rates, pressure and temperature distributions were theoretically calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  3. Some aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and dynamic instabilities in medium and high pressure steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental data for void fraction, incipient point of boiling, initial point of net vapor generation, bubble dynamics, dryout, two-phase flow pressure drop and density-wave oscillations were obtained in long, sodium heated steam generator tubes of different geometries for a wide range of operating conditions and at medium and high pressures. These data and data from literature taken in sodium and electrically heated steam generator tubes were correlated. Aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and density-wave oscillations in these steam generators disclosed include the distribution factor in small- and medium-size diameter steam generator tubes, the characteristic of the transitions at the incipient point of boiling and initial point of net vapor generation, bubble growth during subcooled nucleate flow boiling, the importance of the equivalent length for dryout in non-uniformly heated steam generator tubes and the mechanisms of density-wave oscillations in once-through steam generator tubes.

  4. Probabilistic determination of two-phase flow regimes in horizontal tubes utilizing an automated image recognition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassim, Emad W.; Newell, Ty A.; Chato, John C.

    2007-04-01

    Probabilistic two-phase flow map data is experimentally obtained for R134a at 25.0, 35.0, and 49.7°C, R410A at 25.0°C, mass fluxes from 100 to 600 kg/m2-s, qualities from 0 to1 in 8.00, 5.43, 3.90, and 1.74 mm I.D. single, smooth, adiabatic, horizontal tubes in order to extend probabilistic two-phase flow map modeling techniques to single tubes. A new web camera based flow visualization technique utilizing an illuminated diffuse striped background was used to enhance images, detect fine films, and aid in the automated image recognition process developed in the present study. This technique has an average time fraction classification error of less than 0.01.

  5. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  6. Modeling analysis of bubble flow regime in a closed two-phase thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhi-Wei; Han, Ya-Fang; Liu, Ai-Jie; Song, Wei-Gang

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of the operating liquid level in the evaporator of a closed two-phase thermosyphon (gravity heat pipe) are given throughout a simplified analysis which takes the influence of the dimension and condensation heat transfer in the condenser of the heat pipe into account. In order to verify the accuracy of our model comparison of the present study with some published results is made by means of computational examples.

  7. The growth of vapor bubble and relaxation between two-phase bubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Subba Reddy Gorla, Rama

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the behavior of the bubble growth and relaxation between vapor and superheated liquid. The growth and thermal relaxation time between the two-phases are obtained for different levels of superheating. The heat transfer problem is solved numerically by using the extended Scriven model. Results are compared with those of Scriven theory and MOBY DICK experiment with reasonably good agreement for lower values of superheating.

  8. Experimental two-phase flow measurement using ultra fast limited-angle-type electron beam X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, M.; Fischer, F.; Schleicher, E.; Koch, D.; Menz, H.-J.; Mayer, H.-G.; Hampel, U.

    2009-09-01

    An experimental evaluation of a novel limited-angle-type ultra fast electron beam X-ray computed tomography approach for the visualization and measurement of a gas-liquid two-phase flow is reported here. With this method, a simple linear electron beam scan is used to produce instantaneous radiographic views of a two-phase flow in a pipe segment of a flow loop. Electron beam scanning can be performed very rapidly, thus a frame rate of 5 kHz is achieved. Radiographic projections are recorded by a very fast detector arc made of zink-cadmium-telluride elements. This detector records the X-ray radiation passing through the object with a sampling rate of 1 MHz. The reconstruction of slice images from the recorded detector data is a limited-angle problem since in our scanning geometry the object’s Radon space is only incompletely sampled. It was investigated here, whether this technology is able to produce accurate gas fraction data from bubbly two-phase flow. Experiments were performed both on a Perspex phantom with known geometry and an experimental flow loop operated under vacuum conditions in an electron beam processing box.

  9. Motif distributions in phase-space networks for characterizing experimental two-phase flow patterns with chaotic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The dynamics of two-phase flows have been a challenging problem in nonlinear dynamics and fluid mechanics. We propose a method to characterize and distinguish patterns from inclined water-oil flow experiments based on the concept of network motifs that have found great usage in network science and systems biology. In particular, we construct from measured time series phase-space complex networks and then calculate the distribution of a set of distinct network motifs. To gain insight, we first test the approach using time series from classical chaotic systems and find a universal feature: motif distributions from different chaotic systems are generally highly heterogeneous. Our main finding is that the distributions from experimental two-phase flows tend to be heterogeneous as well, suggesting the underlying chaotic nature of the flow patterns. Calculation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent provides further support for this. Motif distributions can thus be a feasible tool to understand the dynamics of realistic two-phase flow patterns. PMID:20866710

  10. Visualization of Liquid Metal Two-phase Flows in a Physical Model of the Continuous Casting Process of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmel, Klaus; Shevchenko, Natalia; Röder, Michael; Anderhuber, Marc; Gardin, Pascal; Eckert, Sven; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental study concerned with investigations of the two-phase flow in a mock-up of the continuous casting process of steel. A specific experimental facility was designed and constructed at HZDR for visualizing liquid metal two-phase flows in the mold and the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) by means of X-ray radioscopy. This setup operates with the low melting, eutectic alloy GaInSn as model liquid. The argon gas is injected through the tip of the stopper rod into the liquid metal flow. The system operates continuously under isothermal conditions. First results will be presented here revealing complex flow structures in the SEN widely differing from a homogeneously dispersed bubbly flow. The patterns are mainly dominated by large bubbles and large-area detachments of the liquid metal flow from the inner nozzle wall. Various flow regimes can be distinguished depending on the ratio between the liquid and the gas flow rate. Smaller gas bubbles are produced by strong shear flows near the nozzle ports. The small bubbles are entrained by the submerged jet and mainly entrapped by the lower circulation roll in the mold. Larger bubbles develop by coalescence and ascend toward the free surface.

  11. Two phase flow of liquids in a narrow gap: Phase interference and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Salim; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Gates, Ian D.

    2016-07-01

    Co-current flow of two immiscible liquids, such as oil and water in a planar fracture, exhibits nonlinear structures which become important in many natural and engineering systems such as subsurface flows, multiphase flows in lubrication joints, and coating flows. In this context, co-current flow of oil and water with variable rates is experimentally studied in a Hele-Shaw cell, various flow regimes are classified, and relative permeabilities for the phases are analysed thoroughly. Similar to multiphase pipe flows, multiphase flow in planar gaps shows various flow regimes, each having different flow rate/pressure gradient behaviour. As well as recovering the known results in the immiscible displacements in Hele-Shaw cell where the fluid-fluid interface remains stable/unstable for favorable/adverse viscosity ratios, it is found that the co-current flow of two fluids with different viscosities results in three distinct flow regimes. Before breakthrough of non-wetting phase, i.e, water, a "linear displacement" flow regime initially establishes at very low water injection rates. This stable movement turns into a "fingering advancement" flow regime at high water flow rates and Saffman-Taylor instability develops normal to the direction of the flow. After the breakthrough, a "droplet formation" flow regime is identified where the droplets of wetting phase, oil, are trapped in the water phase. For subsurface flow applications, we quantify these regimes through relative permeability curves. It is reported that as the water flow rate increases, the relative permeabilities and flow channels become smooth and regular. This behaviour of relative permeability and saturations shows dominance of capillary forces at low flow rates and viscous forces at higher flow rates. Variable injection rates provide the interface structures for both drainage and imbibition process, where the wetting phase saturation decreases and increases respectively. It is shown that relative permeability

  12. Self potential generated by two-phase flow in a porous medium: Experimental study and volcanological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Antraygues, P.; Aubert, M.

    1993-12-01

    In order to characterize the relationships between self-potential generation and hydrothermal convection, laboratory measurements of electric potential and temperature are made along a vertical cylindrical column of porous material where a two-phase flow (wet steam) occurs. For steady state convection, the vertical distributions of vapor and water flow rates are calculated from thermal balance. At the initiation of convection, a positive electrical charge flux is related to the convective front. For isothermal and steady state columns, a positive electric potential gradient is observed along the vapor flow direction. These electric potentials are mainly a function of the vapor flow rates and of the medium permeability. A sudden and large increase in the vapor flow rate and in the volume fraction of vapor can induce a large and long-lived increase in the potential differences along the vapor flow direction. An electrokinetic effect related to the saturated vapor flow is the best candidate for this electric potential generation. The experimental resutls obtained in the present study are applied to self-potential generation in rising two-phase convective cells on active volcanoes. The observed positive self-potential anomalies close to active fissures depend on the electrical charge flux related to the upward saturated vapor flow. These results also demonstrate the value of self-potential monitoring in the early stages preceding a volcanic eruption.

  13. A coupling concept for two-phase compositional porous-medium and single-phase compositional free flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosthaf, K.; Baber, K.; Flemisch, B.; Helmig, R.; Leijnse, A.; Rybak, I.; Wohlmuth, B.

    2011-10-01

    Domains composed of a porous part and an adjacent free-flow region are of special interest in many fields of application. So far, the coupling of free flow with porous-media flow has been considered only for single-phase systems. Here we extend this classical concept to two-component nonisothermal flow with two phases inside the porous medium and one phase in the free-flow region. The mathematical modeling of flow and transport phenomena in porous media is often based on Darcy's law, whereas in free-flow regions the (Navier-) -Stokes equations are used. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the employed subdomain models. The main contribution is the developed coupling concept, which is able to deal with compositional (miscible) flow and a two-phase system in the porous medium. It is based on the continuity of fluxes and the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium, and uses the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition. The phenomenological explanations leading to a simple, solvable model, which accounts for the physics at the interface, are laid out in detail. Our model can account for evaporation and condensation processes at the interface and is used to model evaporation from soil influenced by a wind field in a first numerical example.

  14. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  15. Design manual for microgravity two-phase flow and heat transfer. Final report, September 1988-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, C.J.; Izenson, M.G.

    1989-10-01

    This report documents two-phase fluid flow and heat-transfer methods for microgravity environments. The applications of the work are thermal management, propulsion, and fluid storage and transfer systems for spacecraft. In the near future, these systems will include two-phase, vapor-liquid flows. This Design Manual is intended for use by designers of these systems. Design methods are presented for predicting two-phase flow regimes and pressure drops in pipe flows from earth gravity to microgravity conditions. Forced-convection boiling-heat transfer methods for pipes with uniform heat flux are included. Also included are methods for analyzing high-vapor-shear condensation in pipes. The analysis methods are mechanistic; that is, based upon fundamental physical principles which should apply to heat-transfer liquids with Pr approx = 1 and scale with pipe size and fluid properties. This manual incorporates simplified methods (easy-to-use design charts), detailed descriptions of the analysis methods, comparisons with existing microgravity data, and recommended approaches to quantify the range of uncertainty in design calculations.

  16. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  17. Advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Two Phase Flow in a Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, Adrian; Lo, Simon; Ioilev, Andrey; Melnikov, Vladimir; Samigulin, Maskhud; Ustinenko, Vasily; Kozlov, Valentin

    2006-07-01

    A new code, CFD-BWR, is being developed for the simulation of two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. CFD-BWR is a specialized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. New models describing the inter-phase mass, momentum, and energy transfer phenomena specific for BWRs have been developed and implemented in the CFD-BWR module. A set of experiments focused on two-phase flow and phase-change phenomena has been identified for the validation of the CFD-BWR code and results of two experiment analyses focused on the radial void distribution are presented. The close agreement between the computed results, the measured data and the correlation results provides confidence in the accuracy of the models. (authors)

  18. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  19. Prediction of performance of two-phase flow nozzle and Liquid Metal Magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) generator for no slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, G.; Back, L.

    Two-phase LMMHD energy conversion systems have potentially significant advantages over conventional systems such as higher thermal efficiency and substantial simplicity with lower capital and maintenance costs. Maintenance of low velocity slip is of importance for achieving high generator efficiency. A bubbly flow pattern ensures very low velocity slip. The full governing equations were written out, and a computer prediction code was developed to analyze performance of a two-phase flow LMMHD generator and nozzle under conditions of no slip. Three different shapes of a LMMHD generator has been investigated. Electrical power outputs are in the 20 kW range. Generator efficiency exceeds 71 percent at an average void fraction of about 70 percent. This is an appreciable performance for a short generator without insulating vanes for minimizing electrical losses in the end regions.

  20. Prediction of performance of two-phase flow nozzle and liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) generator for no slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabris, G.; Back, L.

    Two-phase LMMHD energy conversion systems have potentially significant advantages over conventional systems such as higher thermal efficiency and substantial simplicity with lower capital and maintenance costs. Maintenance of low velocity slip is of importance for achieving high generator efficiency. A bubbly flow pattern ensures very low velocity slip. The full governing equations have been written out, and a computer prediction code has been developed to analyze performance of a two-phase flow LMMHD generator and nozzle under conditions of no slip. Three different shapes of a LMMHD generator have been investigated. Electrical power outputs are in the 20 kW range. Generator efficiency exceeds 71 percent at an average void fraction of about 70 percent. This is an appreciable performance for a short generator without insulating vanes for minimizing electrical losses in the end regions.