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Sample records for gas-phase protein structure

  1. Amphipols Outperform Dodecylmaltoside Micelles in Stabilizing Membrane Protein Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Noncovalent mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as an invaluable technique to probe the structure, interactions, and dynamics of membrane proteins (MPs). However, maintaining native-like MP conformations in the gas phase using detergent solubilized proteins is often challenging and may limit structural analysis. Amphipols, such as the well characterized A8-35, are alternative reagents able to maintain the solubility of MPs in detergent-free solution. In this work, the ability of A8-35 to retain the structural integrity of MPs for interrogation by electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) is compared systematically with the commonly used detergent dodecylmaltoside. MPs from the two major structural classes were selected for analysis, including two β-barrel outer MPs, PagP and OmpT (20.2 and 33.5 kDa, respectively), and two α-helical proteins, Mhp1 and GalP (54.6 and 51.7 kDa, respectively). Evaluation of the rotationally averaged collision cross sections of the observed ions revealed that the native structures of detergent solubilized MPs were not always retained in the gas phase, with both collapsed and unfolded species being detected. In contrast, ESI-IMS-MS analysis of the amphipol solubilized MPs studied resulted in charge state distributions consistent with less gas phase induced unfolding, and the presence of lowly charged ions which exhibit collision cross sections comparable with those calculated from high resolution structural data. The data demonstrate that A8-35 can be more effective than dodecylmaltoside at maintaining native MP structure and interactions in the gas phase, permitting noncovalent ESI-IMS-MS analysis of MPs from the two major structural classes, while gas phase dissociation from dodecylmaltoside micelles leads to significant gas phase unfolding, especially for the α-helical MPs studied. PMID:25495802

  2. Native electrospray ionization and electron-capture dissociation for comparison of protein structure in solution and the gas phase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    The importance of protein and protein-complex structure motivates improvements in speed and sensitivity of structure determination in the gas phase and comparison with that in solution or solid state. An opportunity for the gas phase measurement is mass spectrometry (MS) combined with native electrospray ionization (ESI), which delivers large proteins and protein complexes in their near-native states to the gas phase. In this communication, we describe the combination of native ESI, electron-capture dissociation (ECD), and top-down MS for exploring the structures of ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase and their relation to those in the solid-state and solution. We probe structure by comparing the protein's flexible regions, as predicted by the B-factor in X-ray crystallography, with the ECD fragments. The underlying hypothesis is that maintenance of structure gives fragments that can be predicted from B-factors. This strategy may be applicable in general when X-ray structures are available and extendable to the study of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:24363606

  3. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-04-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting noncovalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas-phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase.

  4. Exploring Salt Bridge Structures of Gas-Phase Protein Ions using Multiple Stages of Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Browne, Shaynah J.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of protein ions have been studied by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) after electrospraying these proteins from native-like solutions into a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Because ETD can break covalent bonds while minimally disrupting non-covalent interactions, we have investigated the ability of this dissociation technique together with CID to probe the sites of electrostatic interactions in gas phase protein ions. By comparing spectra from ETD with spectra from ETD followed by CID, we find that several proteins, including ubiquitin, CRABP I, azurin, and β-2-microglobulin, appear to maintain many of the salt bridge contacts known to exist in solution. To support this conclusion, we also performed calculations to consider all possible salt bridge patterns for each protein, and we find that the native salt bridge pattern explains the experimental ETD data better than nearly all other possible salt bridge patterns. Overall, our data suggest that ETD and ETD/CID of native protein ions can provide some insight into approximate location of salt bridges in the gas phase. PMID:24496600

  5. Gas-Phase Photoionization Of A Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Giuliani, A.; Nicolas, C.; Gil, J.-F.; Lemaire, J.; Refregiers, M.; Nahon, L.

    2010-07-01

    We present preliminary results on gas phase photoionization of electrosprayproduced multiply protonated cytochrome c protein (104 amino acids; ˜12.4 kDa), which has been achieved with a newly developed experimental system for spectroscopy of electrosprayed ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap using a monochromatized vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and tandem mass spectrometry method. The investigation of proteins in the gas phase, where they are free of the influence of counterions and solvent molecules, offer a possibility to understand their intrinsic molecular properties. However, due to limited both ion densities and available number of photons, the use of synchrotron radiation for the trapped ions spectroscopy is a rather challenging task. The feasibility of coupling a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ion trap with soft x-ray synchrotron beamline and the first successful use of synchrotron radiation for spectroscopy of electrosprayed negative ions stored in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap have been demonstrated only recently (R. Thissen et al., 2008, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 223001; A. Giulliani et al., Proc. 57th ASMS Conf., Philadelphia, 2009). The present results are the first reported on photoionization of kDa species in the gas phase and are valuable regarding both a fundamental interest of accessing physical properties of large biological ions isolated in vacuo and potential development of a new technique for proteomics.

  6. Surface-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectra as a Tool for Distinguishing Different Structural Forms of Gas-Phase Multimeric Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Quintyn, Royston S; Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2015-12-01

    One attractive feature of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) lies in its ability to provide experimental collision cross section (CCS) measurements, which can be used to distinguish different conformations that a protein complex may adopt during its gas-phase unfolding. However, CCS values alone give no detailed information on subunit structure within the complex. Consequently, structural characterization typically requires molecular modeling, which can have uncertainties without experimental support. One method of obtaining direct experimental evidence on the structures of these intermediates is utilizing gas-phase activation techniques that can effectively dissociate the complexes into substructures while preserving the native topological information. The most commonly used activation method, collision-induced dissociation (CID) with low-mass target gases, typically leads to unfolding of monomers of a protein complex. Here, we describe a method that couples IM-MS and surface-induced dissociation (SID) to dissociate the source-activated precursors of three model protein complexes: C-reactive protein (CRP), transthyretin (TTR), and concanavalin A (Con A). The results of this study confirm that CID involves the unfolding of the protein complex via several intermediates. More importantly, our experiments also indicate that retention of similar CCS between different intermediates does not guarantee retention of structure. Although CID spectra (at a given collision energy) of source-activated, mass-selected precursors do not distinguish between native-like, collapsed, and expanded forms of a protein complex, dissociation patterns and/or average charge states of monomer products in SID of each of these forms are unique. PMID:26499904

  7. Capturing Polyradical Protein Cations after an Electron Capture Event: Evidence for their Stable Distonic Structures in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Takashi; Campbell, J. Larry

    2015-08-01

    We report on the formation and "capture" of polyradical protein cations after an electron capture event. Performed in a unique electron-capture dissociation (ECD) instrument, these experiments can generate reduced forms of multiply protonated proteins by sequential charge reduction using electrons with ~1 eV. The true structures of these possible polyradicals is considered: Do the introduced unpaired electrons recombine quickly to form a new two-electron bond, or do these unpaired electrons exist as radical sites with appropriate chemical reactivity? Using an established chemical probe—radical quenching with molecular oxygen—we demonstrate that these charge-reduced protein cations are indeed polyradicals that form adducts with up to three molecules of oxygen (i.e., tri-radical protein cations) that are stable for at least 100 ms.

  8. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S.; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M.; MacPhee, Cait E.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM‐MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM‐MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM‐MS data of two IDPs; α‐Synuclein (α‐Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C‐II (ApoC‐II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC‐II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α‐Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC‐II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM‐MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  9. Relating gas phase to solution conformations: Lessons from disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Phillips, Ashley S; Denbigh, Laetitia; Saleem, Hassan M; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-08-01

    In recent years both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have been developed as techniques with which to study proteins that lack a fixed tertiary structure but may contain regions that form secondary structure elements transiently, namely intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). IM-MS is a suitable method for the study of IDPs which provides an insight to conformations that are present in solution, potentially enabling the analysis of lowly populated structural forms. Here, we describe the IM-MS data of two IDPs; α-Synuclein (α-Syn) which is implicated in Parkinson's disease, and Apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) which is involved in cardiovascular diseases. We report an apparent discrepancy in the way that ApoC-II behaves in the gas phase. While most IDPs, including α-Syn, present in many charge states and a wide range of rotationally averaged collision cross sections (CCSs), ApoC-II presents in just four charge states and a very narrow range of CCSs, independent of solution conditions. Here, we compare MS and IM-MS data of both proteins, and rationalise the differences between the proteins in terms of different ionisation processes which they may adhere to. PMID:25920945

  10. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    guanidinium ion. Studies on the neuropeptide substance P illustrate the ability of cryo-IM-MS to elucidate information about heterogeneous ion populations. Results show that a kinetically trapped conformer is stabilized by a combination of hydration and specific intramolecular interactions, but upon dehydration, this conformer rearranges to form a thermodynamically favored gas-phase ion conformation. Finally, recent studies on hydration of the protein ubiquitin reveal water-mediated dimerization, thereby illustrating the extension of this approach to studies of large biomolecules. Collectively, these studies illustrate a new dimension to studies of biomolecules, resulting from the ability to monitor snapshots of the structural evolution of ions during the transition from solution to gas phase and provide unparalleled insights into the intricate interplay between competing effects that dictate conformational preferences. PMID:27334393

  11. CIUSuite: A Quantitative Analysis Package for Collision Induced Unfolding Measurements of Gas-Phase Protein Ions.

    PubMed

    Eschweiler, Joseph D; Rabuck-Gibbons, Jessica N; Tian, Yuwei; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-11-17

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a technology of growing importance for structural biology, providing complementary 3D structure information for biomolecules within samples that are difficult to analyze using conventional analytical tools through the near-simultaneous acquisition of ion collision cross sections (CCSs) and masses. Despite recent advances in IM-MS instrumentation, the resolution of closely related protein conformations remains challenging. Collision induced unfolding (CIU) has been demonstrated as a useful tool for resolving isocrossectional protein ions, as they often follow distinct unfolding pathways when subjected to collisional heating in the gas phase. CIU has been used for a variety of applications, from differentiating binding modes of activation state-selective kinase inhibitors to characterizing the domain structure of multidomain proteins. With the growing utilization of CIU as a tool for structural biology, significant challenges have emerged in data analysis and interpretation, specifically the normalization and comparison of CIU data sets. Here, we present CIUSuite, a suite of software modules designed for the rapid processing, analysis, comparison, and classification of CIU data. We demonstrate these tools as part of a series of workflows for applications in comparative structural biology, biotherapeutic analysis, and high throughput screening of kinase inhibitors. These examples illustrate both the potential for CIU in general protein analysis as well as a demonstration of best practices in the interpretation of CIU data. PMID:26489593

  12. Fragmentation of Integral Membrane Proteins in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are of great biophysical and clinical interest because of the key role they play in many cellular processes. Here, a comprehensive top down study of 152 IMPs and 277 soluble proteins from human H1299 cells including 11 087 fragments obtained from collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), 6452 from higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), and 2981 from electron transfer dissociation (ETD) shows their great utility and complementarity for the identification and characterization of IMPs. A central finding is that ETD is ∼2-fold more likely to cleave in soluble regions than threshold fragmentation methods, whereas the reverse is observed in transmembrane domains with an observed ∼4-fold bias toward CAD and HCD. The location of charges just prior to dissociation is consistent with this directed fragmentation: protons remain localized on basic residues during ETD but easily mobilize along the backbone during collisional activation. The fragmentation driven by these protons, which is most often observed in transmembrane domains, both is of higher yield and occurs over a greater number of backbone cleavage sites. Further, while threshold dissociation events in transmembrane domains are on average 10.1 (CAD) and 9.2 (HCD) residues distant from the nearest charge site (R, K, H, N-terminus), fragmentation is strongly influenced by the N- or C-terminal position relative to that site: the ratio of observed b- to y-fragments is ∼1:3 if the cleavage occurs >7 residues N-terminal and ∼3:1 if it occurs >7 residues C-terminal to the nearest basic site. Threshold dissociation products driven by a mobilized proton appear to be strongly dependent on not only relative position of a charge site but also N- or C-terminal directionality of proton movement. PMID:24689519

  13. Folding of Protein Ions in the Gas Phase after Cation-to-Anion Proton-Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Kenneth J; Munger, Eleanor B; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-08-01

    The structure and folding of a protein in solution depends on noncovalent interactions within the protein and those with surrounding ions and molecules. Decoupling these interactions in solution is challenging, which has hindered the development of accurate physics-based models for structure prediction. Investigations of proteins in the gas phase can be used to selectively decouple factors affecting the structures of proteins. Here, we use cation-to-anion proton-transfer reactions (CAPTR) to reduce the charge states of denatured ubiquitin ions in the gas phase, and ion mobility to probe their structures. In CAPTR, a precursor charge state is selected (P) and reacted with monoanions to generate charge-reduced product ions (C). Following each CAPTR event, denatured ubiquitin ions (13+ to 6+) yield products that rapidly isomerize to structures that have smaller collision cross sections (Ω). The Ω values of CAPTR product ions depend strongly on C and very weakly on P. Pre- and post-CAPTR activation was then used to probe the potential-energy surfaces of the precursor and product ions, respectively. Post-CAPTR activation showed that ions of different P fold differently and populate different regions of the potential-energy surface of that ion. Finally, pre-CAPTR activation showed that the structures of protein ions can be indirectly investigated using ion mobility of their CAPTR product ions, even for subtle structural differences that are not apparent from ion mobility characterization of the activated precursor ions. More generally, these results show that CAPTR strongly complements existing techniques for characterizing the structures and dynamics of biological molecules in the gas phase. PMID:27399988

  14. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  15. Gas-Phase Intramolecular Protein Crosslinking via Ion/Ion Reactions: Ubiquitin and a Homobifunctional sulfo-NHS Ester

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Ian K.; Mentinova, Marija; McGee, William M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase intra-molecular crosslinking of protein ubiquitin cations has been demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with anions of a homobifunctional N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) ester reagent. The ion/ion reaction between multiply-protonated ubiquitin and crosslinker monoanions produces a stable, charge reduced complex. Covalent crosslinking is indicated by the consecutive loss of two molecules of sulfo-NHS under ion trap collisional activation conditions. Covalent modification is verified by the presence of covalently crosslinked sequence ions produced by ion-trap collision-induced dissociation of the ion generated from the losses of sulfo-NHS. Analysis of the crosslinked sequence fragments allows for the localization of crosslinked primary amines, enabling proximity mapping of the gas-phase 3-D structures. The presence of two unprotonated reactive sites within the distance constraint of the crosslinker is required for successful crosslinking. The ability to covalently crosslink is therefore sensitive to protein charge state. As the charge state increases, fewer reactive sites are available and protein structure is more likely to become extended due to intramolecular electrostatic repulsion. At high charge states, the reagent shows little evidence for covalent crosslinking but does show evidence for ‘electrostatic crosslinking’ in that the binding of the sulfonate groups to the protein is sufficiently strong that backbone cleavages are favored over reagent detachment under ion trap collisional activation conditions. PMID:23463545

  16. Gas-phase intramolecular protein crosslinking via ion/ion reactions: ubiquitin and a homobifunctional sulfo-NHS ester.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian K; Mentinova, Marija; McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-05-01

    Gas-phase intra-molecular crosslinking of protein ubiquitin cations has been demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with anions of a homobifunctional N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) ester reagent. The ion/ion reaction between multiply-protonated ubiquitin and crosslinker monoanions produces a stable, charge-reduced complex. Covalent crosslinking is indicated by the consecutive loss of 2 molecules of sulfo-NHS under ion trap collisional activation conditions. Covalent modification is verified by the presence of covalently crosslinked sequence ions produced by ion-trap collision-induced dissociation of the ion generated from the losses of sulfo-NHS. Analysis of the crosslinked sequence fragments allows for the localization of crosslinked primary amines, enabling proximity mapping of the gas-phase 3-D structures. The presence of two unprotonated reactive sites within the distance constraint of the crosslinker is required for successful crosslinking. The ability to covalently crosslink is, therefore, sensitive to protein charge state. As the charge state increases, fewer reactive sites are available and protein structure is more likely to become extended because of intramolecular electrostatic repulsion. At high charge states, the reagent shows little evidence for covalent crosslinking but does show evidence for 'electrostatic crosslinking' in that the binding of the sulfonate groups to the protein is sufficiently strong that backbone cleavages are favored over reagent detachment under ion trap collisional activation conditions. PMID:23463545

  17. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  18. Reinvestigation of the gas-phase structure of tris(trifluoromethyl)arsine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Raphael J. F.; Mitzel, Norbert W.

    2010-08-01

    The gas-phase structure of tris(trifluoromethyl)arsine (As(CF)3) at ambient temperature has been re-investigated by means of electron diffraction. Substantial higher accuracy in structural parameters compared to the previous investigation has been achieved. In contrast to the previously reported C3v structure we found C3 symmetry. Selected r structure parameters are: As-C = 2.007(2) Å; C-As-C = 95.5(3)°. The experimental structure parameters are compared to parameters obtained in HF/TZVPP and MP2/TZVPP calculations, the latter being in excellent agreement with the experimental structure.

  19. Description and control of dissociation channels in gas-phase protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thachuk, Mark; Fegan, Sarah K.; Raheem, Nigare

    2016-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the charged apo-hemoglobin protein complex, this work expands upon our initial report [S. K. Fegan and M. Thachuk, J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 722-728 (2014)] about control of dissociation channels in the gas phase using specially designed charge tags. Employing a charge hopping algorithm and a range of temperatures, a variety of dissociation channels are found for activated gas-phase protein complexes. At low temperatures, a single monomer unfolds and becomes charge enriched. At higher temperatures, two additional channels open: (i) two monomers unfold and charge enrich and (ii) two monomers compete for unfolding with one eventually dominating and the other reattaching to the complex. At even higher temperatures, other more complex dissociation channels open with three or more monomers competing for unfolding. A model charge tag with five sites is specially designed to either attract or exclude charges. By attaching this tag to the N-terminus of specific monomers, the unfolding of those monomers can be decidedly enhanced or suppressed. In other words, using charge tags to direct the motion of charges in a protein complex provides a mechanism for controlling dissociation. This technique could be used in mass spectrometry experiments to direct forces at specific attachment points in a protein complex, and hence increase the diversity of product channels available for quantitative analysis. In turn, this could provide insight into the function of the protein complex in its native biological environment. From a dynamics perspective, this system provides an interesting example of cooperative behaviour involving motions with differing time scales.

  20. Gas-phase acidities of tetrahedral oxyacids from ab initio electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Kubicki, J.D.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-04

    Density functional calculations have been performed on several protonation states of the oxyacids of Si, P, V, As, Cr, and S. Structures and vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values where these are available. A reasonably well-defined correlation between the calculated gas-phase acidities and the measured pK{sub a} in aqueous solution has been found. The pK{sub a}/gas-phase acidity slopes are consistent with those derived from previous molecular mechanics calculations on ferric hydrolysis and the first two acidity constants for orthosilicic acid. The successive deprotonation of other H{sub n}TO{sub 4} species, for a given tetrahedral anion T are roughly consistent with this slope, but not to the extent that there is a universal correlation among all species.

  1. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory. PMID:27331660

  2. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold.

    PubMed

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T

    2013-12-21

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd(+) in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18(+), Au25(+), Au38(+) and Au102(+) ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag(+), Pt(2+), Pd(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Ni(2+) and Cr(3+)) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38(+). While other metal ions like Cu(2+) help forming Au25(+) selectively, Fe(2+) catalyzes the formation of Au25(+) over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution. PMID:24146135

  3. UV/Vis Action Spectroscopy and Structures of Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Emilie; Shaffer, Christopher J; Tureček, František

    2016-06-20

    We report the first application of UV/Vis photodissociation action spectroscopy for the structure elucidation of tyrosine peptide cation radicals produced by oxidative intramolecular electron transfer in gas-phase metal complexes. Oxidation of Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg (YAAAR) produces Tyr-O radicals by combined electron and proton transfer involving the phenol and carboxyl groups. Oxidation of Ala-Ala-Ala-Tyr-Arg (AAAYR) produces a mixture of cation radicals involving electron abstraction from the Tyr phenol ring and N-terminal amino group in combination with hydrogen-atom transfer from the Cα positions of the peptide backbone. PMID:27159034

  4. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment. PMID:27328020

  5. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field. PMID:23257901

  6. Nonstatistical UV Fragmentation of Gas-Phase Peptides Reveals Conformers and Their Structural Features.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Makarov, Alexander; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-03-17

    Solving the 3D structure of a biomolecule requires recognition of its conformers and measurements of their individual structural identities, which can be compared with calculations. We employ the phenomenon of nonstatistical photofragmentation, detected by a combination of UV cold ion spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry, to identify the main conformers of gas-phase peptides and to recover individual UV absorption and mass spectra of all of these conformers in a single laser scan. We first validate this approach with a benchmark dipeptide, Tyr-Ala, and then apply it to a decapeptide, gramicidin S. The revealed characteristic structural difference between the conformers of the latter identifies some of the previously calculated structures of gramicidin S as the most likely geometries of its remaining unsolved conformer. PMID:26950179

  7. Structural Isomerization of the Gas Phase 2-NORBORNYL Cation Revealed with Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauney, Daniel; Mosley, Jonathan; Duncan, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    The non-classical structure of the 2-norborny cation (C_7H11+) which was at the center of "the most heated chemical controversy of our time" has been observed in the condensed phase and recently using X-ray crystallography. However, no gas phase vibrational spectrum has been collected. The C_7H11+ cation is produced via H_3+ protonation of norbornene by pulsed discharge in a supersonic expansion of H_2/Ar. Ions are mass-selected and probed using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Due to high exothermicity, protonation via H_3+ leads to a structural isomerization to the global minimum structure 1,3-dimethylcyclopentenyl (DMCP+). Experiments are currently being conducted to find softer protonation techniques that could lead to the authentic 2-norbornyl cation. Schleyer,P.v.R. et. al.; Stable Carbocation Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons,Inc.; New York, 1997, Chapter 2

  8. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  9. Electronic Structure and Gas-Phase Behaviour of the Heaviest Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Jacob, T.; Borschevsky, A.

    2010-04-30

    Electronic structures and gas-phase adsorption behaviour of the heaviest elements 112, 113 and 114 and of their lighter homologs Hg, Tl and Pb is studied on the basis of ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic and four-component Density Functional Theory molecular and cluster calculations. The heaviest elements were shown to have low adsorption enthalpies on Teflon and should, therefore, be well transported through Teflon capillaries from the target chamber to the chemistry set up. Adsorption enthalpies of these elements on the Au(111) surface are predicted as -44.5 kJ/mol, -158.6 kJ/mol and -68.5 kJ/mol, respectively, giving the following sequence in the adsorption temperatures 113>114>112.

  10. Posttranslational modification of Birch and Ragweed allergen proteins by common gas phase pollutants, NO2 and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, M. A.; Pope, F.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades, however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence. Since atmospheric pollutants tend to have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Indeed, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas. Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies with changes in the chemical composition of the pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein. This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the environmentally relevant exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular, nitration occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. Possibly, these modifications may affect the immune response of the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such biologically altered protein. The laboratory-derived results will be supported with a time series analysis of asthma incidence rates for the London area, which take into account the pollen count, and pollutant concentrations. The implications of the results will be discussed

  11. Structure and reactivity of benzoylnitrene radical anion in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Neloni R; Wenthold, Paul G

    2007-12-01

    The open-shell benzoylnitrene radical anion, readily generated by electron ionization of benzoylazide, undergoes unique chemical reactivity with radical reagents and Lewis acids in the gas phase. Reaction with nitric oxide, NO, proceeds by loss of N2 and formation of benzoate ion. This novel reaction is also observed to occur with phenylnitrene anion, forming phenoxide. Similar reactivity was observed in the reaction between benzoylnitrene radical anion and NO2, forming benzoate ion and nitrous oxide. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the reaction has a high-energy barrier that is overcome by the energy released by bond formation. Benzoylnitrene radical anion also transfers oxygen anion to NO and NO2 as well as to CS2 and SO2. In contrast, phenylnitrene anion reacts with carbon disulfide by C+ or CS+ abstraction, forming S- or S2-. Electronic structure calculations indicate that benzoylnitrene in the ground state resembles a slightly polarized benzoate anion, but with a free radical localized on the nitrogen. PMID:18001090

  12. Hydrogen-bonded glycine-HCN complexes in gas phase: structure, energetics, electric properties and cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado da Silva, Arnaldo; Chakrabarty, Sumana; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2015-03-01

    Twelve hydrogen-bonded complexes of glycine and hydrogen cyanide have been studied using high-level quantum-chemical calculations in gas phase. In particular, six 1:1 glycine-HCN dimers and six 1:2 glycine-HCN trimers have been considered. Besides the characteristics of the hydrogen bonds and their effect on molecular structure and energetics, several molecular electric properties have been calculated utilising two different models: MP2/6-31++G(d,p) and DFT-B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p). Although the structural parameters calculated by the two models are similar, equilibrium electronic energies of the clusters show model dependence. The lowest energy dimer is same in both the models which is ca. 3.0 kcal/mol more stable than the highest energy dimer. However, the lowest energy trimer is different in two methods. The energetic difference of stability between the highest and lowest trimer is 4.2 kcal/mol (4.4 kcal/mol) at an MP2 (B3LYP) level of calculation. The bond angles of glycine, in particular, are quite sensitive to the hydrogen-bond formation. Four out of six trimers are found to be strongly cooperative in both the models. Significant changes of dipole moments and polarisabilities of isolated glycine and hydrogen cyanide are observed due to the formation of hydrogen bonding. The Rayleigh scattering intensities of all clusters are much larger than those of their constituent monomers.

  13. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    acidic conditions where the amide hydrogen exchange rate is slowed by many orders of magnitude). The ability to localize the individual deuterated residues (the spatial resolution) is determined by the size (typically ∼7-15 residues) and the number of peptic peptides. These peptides provide a relatively coarse-grained picture of the protein dynamics. A fundamental understanding of the relationship between protein function/dysfunction and conformational dynamics requires in many cases higher resolution and ultimately single-residue resolution. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to achieve single-residue deuterium levels in proteins by electron-based or laser-induced gas-phase fragmentation methods. A crucial analytical requirement for this approach is that the pattern of deuterium labeling from solution is retained in the gas-phase fragment ions. It is therefore essential to control and minimize any occurrence of gas-phase randomization of the solution deuterium label (H/D scrambling) during the MS experiment. For this purpose, we have developed model peptide probes to accurately measure the onset and extent of H/D scrambling. Our analytical procedures to control the occurrence of H/D scrambling are detailed along with the physical parameters that induce it during MS analysis. In light of the growing use of gas-phase dissociation experiments to measure the HDX of proteins in order to obtain a detailed characterization and understanding of the dynamic conformations and interactions of proteins at the molecular level, we discuss the perspectives and challenges of future high-resolution HDX-MS methodology. PMID:25171396

  14. Gas Phase Spectra and Structural Determination of Glucose 6 Phosphate Using Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Voss, Jonathan; Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate (G6P) is one member of a class of simple phosphorylated sugars that are relevant in biological processes. We have acquired a gas phase infrared spectrum of G6P- using cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) in a home-built spectrometer. The experimental spectrum was compared with calculated vibrational spectra from a systematic conformer search. For both of the α and β anomers, results show that only the lowest energy conformers are present in the gas phase. If spectral signatures for similar sugars could be cataloged, it would allow for conformer-specific determination of mixture composition, for example, for glycolyzation processes.

  15. Molecular structures of vinylarsine, vinyldichloroarsine and arsine studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L.; Rankin, David W. H.; Robertson, Heather E.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2010-08-01

    The molecular structures of vinylarsine (CH 2dbnd CHAsH 2), vinyldichloroarsine (CH 2dbnd CHAsCl 2) and arsine (AsH 3) have been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction data and, in the case of vinylarsine, rotation constants, employing the SARACEN method. The structure of vinylarsine represents the first complete gas-phase structure of a primary arsine. The experimental geometric parameters generally show good agreement with those obtained using ab initio calculations. Key structural parameters ( rh1) for vinylarsine are rAs-H = 150.5(4) pm, rAs-C = 195.1(1) pm and ∠C-C-As = 119.4(2)°. The bonding and conformational trends in both vinylarsine and vinyldichloroarsine are compared to those found in the analogous amines and phosphines.

  16. An enormous vibrational motion: the gas-phase structure of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Yezhov, Roman N; Gruener, Sergej V; Robertson, Heather E; Rankin, David W H

    2004-11-21

    The structure of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium has been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction utilising flexible restraints from quantum chemical calculations. Theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-311+G* and MP2/6-311+G*) predict a low barrier to rotation of the methoxy groups in the molecule in addition to low-frequency vibrations of the long ethynyl chains. In the equilibrium structure the Ge-C[triple bond]C angles of the two methoxyethynyl fragments in the molecule are computed to deviate by up to 4 degrees from the linear arrangement. As a consequence of low-frequency large-amplitude vibrational motion the experimental structure of these fragments without applying vibrational corrections deviates considerably from linearity, while the structure corrected for vibrational effects using the harmonic approximation and taking into account a non-linear transformation between internal and Cartesian coordinates (r(h1)) shows closer agreement with theory. The main experimental structural parameters of dimethyl-bis(methoxyethynyl) germanium (r(h1)) are: r(Ge-C)(mean), 192.5(1) pm; DeltaGeC =r(Ge-C(methyl))-r(Ge-C(ethynyl)), 4.5(5) pm, r(C[triple bond]C)(mean), 122.8(2) pm; r(C-O)(mean), 138.9(3) pm; DeltaCO =r(C(methyl)-O)-r(C(ethynyl)-O), 14.5(2) pm, r(C-H)(mean), 109.1(4) pm; [angle](X-C-H)(mean)(X = Ge,O), 109(1) degree; [angle]C(ethynyl)-Ge-C(ethynyl), 108.1(4) degree; [angle]C(methyl)-Ge-C(methyl), 113.4(5) degree; [angle]Ge-C[triple bond]C, 163(1) degree; [angle]C[triple bond]C-O, 176(2) degree; [angle]C-O-C, 115.2(6) degree; methoxy group torsion, tau, 36(9) degree from the position in which the C-O bond eclipses the further Ge-C(ethynyl) bond. PMID:15540132

  17. Gas-Phase Structures of Ketene and Acetic Acid from Acetic Anhydride Using Very-High-Temperature Gas Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sandra J; Noble-Eddy, Robert; Masters, Sarah L

    2016-03-31

    The gas-phase molecular structure of ketene has been determined using samples generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride (giving acetic acid and ketene), using one permutation of the very-high-temperature (VHT) inlet nozzle system designed and constructed for the gas electron diffraction (GED) apparatus based at the University of Canterbury. The gas-phase structures of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, and ketene are presented and compared to previous electron diffraction and microwave spectroscopy data to show improvements in data extraction and manipulation with current methods. Acetic anhydride was modeled with two conformers, rather than a complex dynamic model as in the previous study, to allow for inclusion of multiple pyrolysis products. The redetermined gas-phase structure of acetic anhydride (obtained using the structure analysis restrained by ab initio calculations for electron diffraction method) was compared to that from the original study, providing an improvement on the description of the low vibrational torsions compared to the dynamic model. Parameters for ketene and acetic acid (both generated by the pyrolysis of acetic anhydride) were also refined with higher accuracy than previously reported in GED studies, with structural parameter comparisons being made to prior experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:26916368

  18. Gas-Phase Neutral Binary Oxide Clusters: Distribution, Structure, and Reactivity toward CO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2012-09-01

    Neutral binary (vanadium-cobalt) oxide clusters are generated and detected in the gas phase for the first time. Their reactivities toward carbon monoxide (CO) are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Experimental results suggest that neutral VCoO4 can react with CO to generate VCoO3 and CO2. Density functional theory studies show parallel results as well as provide detailed reaction mechanisms. PMID:26292125

  19. Structure of olefin-imidacloprid and gas-phase fragmentation chemistry of its protonated form.

    PubMed

    Fusetto, Roberto; White, Jonathan M; Hutton, Craig A; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-02-01

    One of the major insect metabolites of the widely used neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, 1 (1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine), is the olefin 2. To better understand how the structure of olefin 2 relates to the gas-phase fragmentation of its protonated form, 2H(+), X-ray crystallography, tandem mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were carried out. Olefin 2 was found to be in a tautomeric form where the proton is on the N(1) position of the imidazole ring and forms a hydrogen bond to one of the oxygen atoms of the coplanar nitroamine group. Under conditions of low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a linear ion trap, 2H(+), formed via electrospray ionization (ESI), fragments via a major loss of water, together with minor competing losses of HNO2 and NO2•.This contrasts with 1H+, which mainly undergoes bond homolysis via NO2• loss. Thus, installation of the double bond in 2 plays a key role in facilitating the loss of water. DFT calculations, carried out using the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory, revealed that loss of water was energetically more favourable compared to HNO2 and NO2• loss. Three multistep, energetically accessible mechanisms were identified for loss of water from 2H(+), and these have the following barriers: (I) direct proton transfer from N(5) of the pyridine to O(1) on the NO2 group (119 kJ mol(-1)); (II) rotation of the N(2)-N(4) bond (117 kJ mol(-1)); (III) 1,3-intramolecular proton transfer between the two oxygen atoms of the NO2 group (145 kJ mol(-1)). Given that the lowest barrier for the losses of HNO2 and NO2• is 156 kJ mol(-1), it is likely that all three water loss mechanisms occur concurrently. PMID:26726997

  20. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-16

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field. PMID:26598600

  1. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field.

  2. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG˙(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ion–molecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG˙(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  3. Fluorine Bonding Enhances the Energetics of Protein-Lipid Binding in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Jalili, Nobar; Baergen, Alyson; Ng, Simon; Bailey, Justin; Derda, Ratmir; Klassen, John S.

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on the first experimental study of the energies of noncovalent fluorine bonding in a protein-ligand complex in the absence of solvent. Arrhenius parameters were measured for the dissociation of gaseous deprotonated ions of complexes of bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg), a model lipid-binding protein, and four fluorinated analogs of stearic acid (SA), which contained (X =) 13, 15, 17, or 21 fluorine atoms. In all cases, the activation energies (Ea) measured for the loss of neutral XF-SA from the (Lg + XF-SA)7- ions are larger than for SA. From the kinetic data, the average contribution of each > CF2 group to Ea was found to be ~1.1 kcal mol-1, which is larger than the ~0.8 kcal mol-1 value reported for > CH2 groups. Based on these results, it is proposed that fluorocarbon-protein interactions are inherently stronger (enthalpically) than the corresponding hydrocarbon interactions.

  4. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    PubMed

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow. PMID:25375223

  5. Analyte induced water adsorbability in gas phase biosensors: the influence of ethinylestradiol on the water binding protein capacity.

    PubMed

    Snopok, Borys; Kruglenko, Ivanna

    2015-05-01

    An ultra-sensitive gas phase biosensor/tracer/bio-sniffer is an emerging technology platform designed to provide real-time information on air-borne analytes, or those in liquids, through classical headspace analysis. The desired bio-sniffer measures gaseous 17α- ethinylestradiol (ETED) as frequency changes on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which is a result of the interactions of liquid sample components in the headspace (ETED and water) with a biorecognition layer. The latter was constructed by immobilization of polyclonal antiserum against a phenolic A-ring of estrogenic receptors through protein A. The QCM response exhibited stretched exponential kinetics of negative frequency shifts with reversible and "irreversible" components of mass uptake onto the sensor surface in static headspace conditions when exposed to water solutions of ETED over the sensor working range, from 10(-10) to 10(-17) g L(-1). It was shown that the variations in the QCM response characteristics are due to the change of the water-binding capacity of the sensing layer induced by protein transformations initiated by the binding of ETED molecules. This result is well correlated with the natural physiological function of estrogens in controlling the homeostasis of body fluids in living beings. PMID:25763411

  6. Microwave spectra and gas phase structural parameters for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adam M; Mitchell, Erik G; Sanchez, Daniel A; Block, Eric; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2011-12-22

    The microwave spectrum for N-hydroxypyridine-2(1H)-thione (pyrithione) was measured in the frequency range 6-18 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants and nitrogen quadrupole coupling strengths for three isotopologues, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH, C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOD, and C(5)H(4)(34)S(14)NOH. Pyrithione was found to be in a higher concentration in the gas phase than the other tautomer, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (MPO). Microwave spectroscopy is best suited to determine which structure predominates in the gas phase. The measured rotational constants were used to accurately determine the coordinates of the substituted atoms and provided sufficient data to determine some of the important structural parameters for pyrithione, the only tautomer observed in the present work. The spectra were obtained using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, with sufficient resolution to allow accurate measurements of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole hyperfine interactions. Ab initio calculations provided structural parameters and quadrupole coupling strengths that are in very good agreement with measured values. The experimental rotational constants for the parent compound are A = 3212.10(1), B = 1609.328(7), and C = 1072.208(6) MHz, yielding the inertial defect Δ(0) = -0.023 amu·Å(2) for the C(5)H(4)(32)S(14)NOH isotopologue. The observed near zero inertial defect clearly indicates a planar structure. The least-squares fit structural analysis yielded the experimental bond lengths R(O-H) = 0.93(2) Å, R(C-S) = 1.66(2) Å, and angle (N-O-H) = 105(4)° for the ground state structure. PMID:22070758

  7. Experimental observation of the transition between gas-phase and aqueous solution structures for acetylcholine, nicotine, and muscarine ions.

    PubMed

    Seydou, Mahamadou; Grégoire, Gilles; Liquier, Jean; Lemaire, J; Schermann, Jean Pierre; Desfrançois, Charles

    2008-03-26

    Structural information on acetylcholine and its two agonists, nicotine, and muscarine has been obtained from the interpretation of infrared spectra recorded in the gas-phase or in low pH aqueous solutions. Simulated IR spectra have been obtained using explicit water molecules or a polarization continuum model. The conformational space of the very flexible acetylcholine ions is modified by the presence of the solvent. Distances between its pharmacophoric groups cover a lower range in hydrated species than in isolated species. A clear signature of the shift of protonation site in nicotine ions is provided by the striking change of their infrared spectrum induced by hydration. On the contrary, structures of muscarine ions are only slightly influenced by the presence of water. PMID:18311975

  8. An Experimental and Computational Investigation into the Gas-Phase Acidities of Tyrosine and Phenylalanine: Three Structures for Deprotonated Tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bokatzian, Samantha S.; Stover, Michele L.; Plummer, Chelsea E.; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-06

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol.

  9. An experimental and computational investigation into the gas-phase acidities of tyrosine and phenylalanine: three structures for deprotonated tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Bokatzian, Samantha S; Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry and correlated molecular orbital theory, three deprotonated structures were revealed for the amino acid tyrosine. The structures were distinguished experimentally by ion/molecule reactions involving proton transfer and trimethylsilyl azide. Gas-phase acidities from proton transfer reactions and from G3(MP2) calculations generally agree well. The lowest energy structure, which was only observed experimentally using electrospray ionization from aprotic solvents, is deprotonated at the carboxylic acid group and is predicted to be highly folded. A second unfolded carboxylate structure is several kcal/mol higher in energy and primarily forms from protic solvents. Protic solvents also yield a structure deprotonated at the phenolic side chain, which experiments find to be intermediate in energy to the two carboxylate forms. G3(MP2) calculations indicate that the three structures differ in energy by only 2.5 kcal/mol, yet they are readily distinguished experimentally. Structural abundance ratios are dependent upon experimental conditions, including the solvent and accumulation time of ions in a hexapole. Under some conditions, carboxylate ions may convert to phenolate ions. For phenylalanine, which lacks a phenolic group, only one deprotonated structure was observed experimentally when electrosprayed from protic solvent. This agrees with G3(MP2) calculations that find the folded and unfolded carboxylate forms to differ by 0.3 kcal/mol. PMID:25299802

  10. Higher-order structure of nucleic acids in the gas phase: top-down analysis of base-pairing interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, D.; Kellersberger, K.A.; Wilhide, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-ergodic as well as ergodic activation methods are capable of maintaining the integrity of base pairs during the top-down analysis of nucleic acids. Here, we investigate the significance of this characteristic in the investigation of higher-order structures of increasing complexity. We show that cognate fragments produced by typical backbone cleavages may not be always detected as separate sequence ions, but rather as individual products that remain associated through mutual pairing contacts. This effect translates into unintended masking of cleavage events that take place in double-stranded regions, thus leading to the preferential detection of fragments originating from unpaired regions. Such effect is determined by the stability of the weak non-covalent association between complementary stretches, which is affected by base composition, length of the double-stranded structure, and charge of the precursor ion selected for analysis. Although such effect may prevent the achievement of full sequence coverage for primary structure determination, it may provide the key to correctly differentiate double- versus single-stranded regions, in what could be defined as gas-phase footprinting experiments. In light of the critical role played by base pairs in defining the higher-order structure of nucleic acids, these approaches will be expected to support an increased utilization of mass spectrometry for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. PMID:24027423

  11. PIV Measurement of Transient 3-D (Liquid and Gas Phases) Flow Structures Created by a Spreading Flame over 1-Propanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, M. I.; Kuwana, K.; Saito, K.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, we measured three-D flow structure in the liquid and gas phases that were created by a spreading flame over liquid fuels. In that effort, we employed several different techniques including our original laser sheet particle tracking (LSPT) technique, which is capable of measuring transient 2-D flow structures. Recently we obtained a state-of-the-art integrated particle image velocimetry (IPIV), whose function is similar to LSPT, but it has an integrated data recording and processing system. To evaluate the accuracy of our IPIV system, we conducted a series of flame spread tests using the same experimental apparatus that we used in our previous flame spread studies and obtained a series of 2-D flow profiles corresponding to our previous LSPT measurements. We confirmed that both LSPT and IPIV techniques produced similar data, but IPIV data contains more detailed flow structures than LSPT data. Here we present some of newly obtained IPIV flow structure data, and discuss the role of gravity in the flame-induced flow structures. Note that the application of IPIV to our flame spread problems is not straightforward, and it required several preliminary tests for its accuracy including this IPIV comparison to LSPT.

  12. Terpenes in the gas phase: The structural conformation of S-(-)-perillaldehyde investigated by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés Moreno, Juan Ramón; Partal Ureña, Francisco; López González, Juan Jesús; Huet, Thérèse R.

    2009-04-01

    S-(-)-perillaldehyde (C 10H 14O) has been characterized in the gas phase using a Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy experiment in a supersonic molecular beam. Two conformers - with the isopropenyl group in the equatorial position - have been detected and described by a set of molecular parameters including the principal rotational constants and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameters. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that a third conformer might not be observed due to relaxation processes in the jet. The gas phase results are compared with the liquid phase IR-Raman-VCD spectra. Our study shows that gas phase spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing monoterpenes.

  13. Probing the structures of gas-phase rhodium cluster cations by far-infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D. J.; Gruene, P.; Haertelt, M.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.; Hamilton, S. M.; Hopkins, W. S.; Mackenzie, S. R.; Neville, S. P.; Walsh, T. R.

    2010-12-07

    The geometric structures of small cationic rhodium clusters Rh{sub n}{sup +} (n = 6-12) are investigated by comparison of experimental far-infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra with spectra calculated using density functional theory. The clusters are found to favor structures based on octahedral and tetrahedral motifs for most of the sizes considered, in contrast to previous theoretical predictions that rhodium clusters should favor cubic motifs. Our findings highlight the need for further development of theoretical and computational methods to treat these high-spin transition metal clusters.

  14. Gas-Phase Structures of Linalool and Coumarin Studied by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. V. L.; Stahl, W.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2013-06-01

    The microwave spectra of two natural substances, linalool and coumarin, were recorded in the microwave range from 9 to 16 GHz and 8.5 to 10.5 GHz, respectively.Linalool is an acyclic monoterpene and the main component of lavender oil. It has a structure with many possible conformations. The geometry of the lowest energy conformer has been determined by a combination of microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Surprisingly, a globular rather than a prolate shape was found. This structure is probably stabilized by a π interaction between two double bonds which are arranged in two stacked layers of atoms within the molecule. A-E splittings due to the internal rotation of one methyl group could be resolved and the barrier to internal rotation was determined to be 400.20(64) cm^{-1}. The standard deviation of the fit was close to experimental accuracy. For an identification of the observed conformer not only the rotational constants but also the internal rotation parameters of one of the methyl groups were needed. Coumarin is a widely used flavor in perfumery as sweet woodruff scent. The aromatic structure allows solely for one planar conformer, which was found under molecular beam conditions and compared to other molecules with similar structures. Here, the rotational spectrum could be described by a set of parameters including the rotational constants and the centrifugal distortion constants using a semi-rigid molecule Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the rotational transitions of all nine ^{13}C isotopologues were measured in natural abundance. As a consequence, the microwave structure of coumarin could be almost completely determined.

  15. The gas-phase structure of azetidine: Microwave spectroscopy, and electron diffraction and normal coordinate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Horst; Schrem, Gisela; Oberhammer, Heinz

    1984-03-01

    The geometric structure of azetidine has been determined by a combined analysis of electron diffraction and microwave data, implementing the results of a normal coordinate analysis. The following geometric parameters ( rz values) for the ring skeleton have been obtained: C sbnd N = 1.473 (3), C sbnd C = 1.563 (3)Å, CNC = 91.2 (0.4)° and puckering angle θ = 29.7 (1.4)°. The microwave spectra were analyzed for the ground state of the parent and N-deuterated species and for the υ = 1 and υ = 2 states of the puckering vibration of the parent species. Dipole moments and nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants were determined. The structural parameters are compared to previous experimental and theoretical results for azetidine and are discussed in context with the isoelectronic cyclobutane and oxetane.

  16. Rotational spectra and gas phase structure of the maleimide - Formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-03-01

    Rotational transitions were measured for the maleimide - formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. No splittings caused by possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were observed. Experimental rotational constants (MHz), quadrupole coupling constants (MHz), and centrifugal distortion constants (kHz) were determined for the parent and three deuterium substituted isotopologues. The values for the parent are A = 2415.0297(10), B = 784.37494(38), C = 592.44190(33), DJ = 0.0616(64), DJK = -0.118(35), DK = -1.38(15), 1.5χaa = 2.083(14), and 0.25(χbb-χcc) = 1.1565(29). The hydrogen bond lengths were determined using a nonlinear least squares structure fitting program. Rotational constants for this complex are consistent with a planar structure, with an inertial defect of Δ = -0.528 amu Å2. The B3LYP calculation yielded rotational constants within 0.1% of the experimental values.

  17. Investigation of the gas-phase structure and rotational barrier of trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and comparison with covalent sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defonsi Lestard, María E.; Tuttolomondo, María E.; Varetti, Eduardo L.; Wann, Derek A.; Robertson, Heather E.; Rankin, David W. H.; Altabef, Aida Ben

    2010-12-01

    The molecular structure of trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate, CF 3SO 2OSi(CH 3) 3, has been determined in the gas phase from electron-diffraction data supplemented by ab initio (MP2) and DFT calculations using 6-31G(d), 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311G++(3df,3pd) basis sets. Both experimental and theoretical data indicate that only one gauche conformer is possible by rotating about the O-S bond. The anomeric effect is a fundamental stereoelectronic interaction and presents a profound influence on the electronic geometry. We have investigated the origin of the anomeric effect by means of NBO and AIM analysis. A natural bond orbital analysis showed that the lpπ[O bonded to Si)] → σ *[C-S] hyperconjugative interaction favors the gauche conformation. In addition, comparison of the structural and stereoelectronic properties of the title molecule with those of silyl trifluoromethanesulfonate and methyl trifluoromethanesulfonate has been carried out.

  18. Conformational Transformation of Five-Membered Rings: the Gas Phase Structure of 2-METHYLTETRAHYDROFURAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Vinh; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    2-Methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF) is a promising environmentally friendly solvent and biofuel component which is derived from renewable resources. Following the principles of Green Chemistry, 2-MeTHF has been evaluated in various fields like organometallics, metathesis, and biosynthesis on the way to more eco-friendly syntheses. Cyclopentane as the prototype of five-membered rings is well-known to exist as twist or envelope structures. However, the conformational analysis of its heterocyclic derivative 2-methyl-tetrahydrothiophene (MTTP) yielded two stable twist conformers and two envelope transition states. Here, we report on the heavy atom r_s structure of the oxygen-analog of MTTP, 2-MeTHF, studied by a combination of molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. One conformer of 2-MeTHF was observed and highly accurate molecular parameters were determined using the XIAM program. In addition, all 13C-isotopologues were assigned in natural abundance of 1%. A structural determination based on the r_s positions of all carbon atoms was achieved via Kraitchman's equations. The methyl group in 2-MeTHF undergoes internal rotation and causes A-E splittings of the rotational lines. The barrier was calculated to be 1142 wn at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, which is rather high. Accordingly, narrow A-E splittings could be observed for only a few transitions. However, the barrier height could be fitted while the angles between the internal rotor axis and the principal axes of inertia were taken from the experimental geometry. V. Pace, P. Hoyos, L. Castoldi, P. Domínguez de María, A. R. Alcántara, ChemSusChem 5 (2012), 1369-1379. a) D. F. Aycock, Org. Process Res. Dev. 11 (2007),156-159. b) M. Smoleń, M. Kȩdziorek, K. Grela, Catal. Commun. 44 (2014), 80-84. V. Van, C. Dindic, H.V.L. Nguyen, W. Stahl, ChemPhysChem 16 (2015), 291-294. H. Hartwig, H. Dreizler, Z. Naturforsch. A 51 (1996), 923-932. J. Kraitchman, Am. J. Phys. 21

  19. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  20. Structural variability in transition metal oxide clusters: gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of V3O(6-8)+.

    PubMed

    Asmis, Knut R; Wende, Torsten; Brümmer, Mathias; Gause, Oliver; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Stanca-Kaposta, E Cristina; Döbler, Jens; Niedziela, Andrzej; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-07-14

    We present gas phase vibrational spectra of the trinuclear vanadium oxide cations V(3)O(6)(+)·He(1-4), V(3)O(7)(+)·Ar(0,1), and V(3)O(8)(+)·Ar(0,2) between 350 and 1200 cm(-1). Cluster structures are assigned based on a comparison of the experimental and simulated IR spectra. The latter are derived from B3LYP/TZVP calculations on energetically low-lying isomers identified in a rigorous search of the respective configurational space, using higher level calculations when necessary. V(3)O(7)(+) has a cage-like structure of C(3v) symmetry. Removal or addition of an O-atom results in a substantial increase in the number of energetically low-lying structural isomers. V(3)O(8)(+) also exhibits the cage motif, but with an O(2) unit replacing one of the vanadyl oxygen atoms. A chain isomer is found to be most stable for V(3)O(6)(+). The binding of the rare gas atoms to V(3)O(6-8)(+) clusters is found to be strong, up to 55 kJ/mol for Ar, and markedly isomer-dependent, resulting in two interesting effects. First, for V(3)O(7)(+)·Ar and V(3)O(8)(+)·Ar an energetic reordering of the isomers compared to the bare ion is observed, making the ring motif the most stable one. Second, different isomers bind different number of rare gas atoms. We demonstrate how both effects can be exploited to isolate and assign the contributions from multiple isomers to the vibrational spectrum. The present results exemplify the structural variability of vanadium oxide clusters, in particular, the sensitivity of their structure on small perturbations in their environment. PMID:22499393

  1. Equilibrium structure and relative stability of glyceraldehyde conformers: Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) and quantum-chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Atavin, Evgenii G.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Popov, Evgenii V.; Vilkov, Lev V.

    2009-11-01

    For the first time, the five dimensional (5-D) analysis of potential energy surface (PES) from quantum-chemical calculations was carried out to predict reliably the various glyceraldehyde (GLA) conformers. 36 conformers with relative stabilities up to 38 kJ/mol were found in the B3LYP approximation. According to results of MP2/cc-pVQZ calculations, the molecule exists at the experimental temperature of 388 K as a mixture of five conformers in the ratio I:II:III:IV:V = 63:18:4:10:5. Contrary to the theoretical conclusion of Lovas et al., the conformer IV is predicted to be more stable than the conformer III. Our result can explain why the conformer IV could be detected in the microwave (MW) spectroscopic experiment by Lovas et al., whereas the conformer III could not. For the first time, thermal-average and equilibrium structural parameters of GLA (main conformer) have been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) data. Vibrational corrections to the experimental bond lengths were determined using quadratic and cubic force constants from high-level ab initio calculations (MP2/cc-pVTZ). It was shown that the experimental intensities are sensitive to the contribution of the second conformer (27(15)%). Rotational constants calculated from MP2/cc-pVQZ geometries were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental rotational constants corrected for anharmonic effects.

  2. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  3. Effects of Select Anions from the Hofmeister Series on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions Measured with Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Flick, Tawnya G.; Daly, Michael P.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase conformations of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ↦-lactalbumin ions, formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing 5 mM ammonium perchlorate, ammonium iodide, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium thiocyanate, or guanidinium chloride, are examined using traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). For ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and ↦-lactalbumin, adduction of multiple acid molecules results in no significant conformational changes to the highest and lowest charge states formed from aqueous solutions, whereas the intermediate charge states become more compact. The transition to more compact conformers for the intermediate charge states occurs with fewer bound H2SO4 molecules than HClO4 or HI molecules, suggesting ion-ion or salt-bridge interactions are stabilizing more compact forms of the gaseous protein. However, the drift time distributions for protein ions of the same net charge with the highest levels of adduction of each acid are comparable, indicating that these protein ions all adopt similarly compact conformations or families of conformers. No change in conformation is observed upon the adduction of multiple acid molecules to charge states of lysozyme. These results show that the attachment of HClO4, HI, or H2SO4 to multiply protonated proteins can induce compact conformations in the resulting gas-phase protein ions. In contrast, differing Hofmeister effects are observed for the corresponding anions in solution at higher concentrations. PMID:21952780

  4. Energetics and structural characterization of isomers using ion mobility and gas-phase H/D exchange: Learning from lasso peptides.

    PubMed

    Hanozin, Emeline; Morsa, Denis; De Pauw, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    State-of-the-art characterization of proteins using MS namely relies on fragmentation methods that allow exploring featured dissociative reaction pathways. These pathways are often initiated by a series of potentially informative mass-constant conformational changes that are nonetheless frequently overlooked by lack of adequate investigation techniques. In the present study, we propose a methodology to readily address both structural and energetic aspects of stereoisomerization reactions using ion mobility coupled with MS. To this end, a commercial spectrometer was used as a reactor comprising an energy resolved collisional activation step intended at promoting controlled conformational changes and a structural assignment step dedicated to the identification of the generated isomers. This identification relies on ion mobility and other on-line coupled techniques, namely an originally designed gas-phase H/D exchange experiment. We here apply this methodology to characterize the isomerization kinetics of capistruin, a 19-residue long lasso-folded peptide. We expect this approach to bring insights into the physical origin of global dissociation thresholds monitored in MS/MS experiments and to set a promising basis for quantitative investigations of the stability of different molecular folds. PMID:25821205

  5. Structures of protonated thymine and uracil and their monohydrated gas-phase ions from ultraviolet action spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sara Øvad; Byskov, Camilla Skinnerup; Turecek, Frantisek; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2014-06-19

    The strong UV chromophores thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) have identical heteroaromatic rings that only differ by one methyl substituent. While their photophysics has been elucidated in detail, the effect on the excited states of base protonation and single water molecules is less explored. Here we report gas-phase absorption spectra of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) and monohydrated ions and demonstrate that the substituent is not only responsible for spectral shifts but also influences the tautomer distribution, being different for bare and monohydrated ions. Spectra interpretation is aided by calculations of geometrical structures and transition energies. The lowest free-energy tautomer (denoted 178, enol-enol form) accounts for 230-280 nm (ThyH(+)) and 225-270 nm (UraH(+)) bands. ThyH(+) hardly absorbs above 300 nm, whereas a discernible band is measured for UraH(+) (275-320 nm), ascribed to the second lowest free-energy tautomer (138, enol-keto form) comprising a few percent of the UraH(+) population at room temperature. Band widths are similar to those measured of cold ions in support of very short excited-state lifetimes. Attachment of a single water increases the abundance of 138 relative to 178, 138 now clearly present for ThyH(+). 138 resembles more the tautomer present in aqueous solution than 178 does, and 138 may indeed be a relevant transition structure. The band of ThyH(+)(178) is unchanged, that of UraH(+)(178) is nearly unchanged, and that of UraH(+)(138) blue-shifts by about 10 nm. In stark contrast to protonated adenine, more than one solvating water molecule is required to re-establish the absorption of ThyH(+) and UraH(+) in aqueous solution. PMID:24874819

  6. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  7. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability. PMID:15949836

  8. Molecular structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane: a gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarset, Kirsten; Hagen, Kolbjørn; Stølevik, Reidar

    1997-09-01

    Gas-phase electron diffraction data obtained at 23°C, together with results from ab initio molecular orbital calculations ( {HF}/{6-31 G(d)}). were used to determine the structure and conformational composition of 1,1-dichlorobutane. Of the five distinguishable conformers (AA, G + A, AG +, G + G + and G + G -), the G + A conformer was found to be the low-energy form, and the investigation also indicated that certain amounts of the AA and G + G - conformers might be present. The symbols describing the conformers refer to torsion about the C 1C 2 and C 2C 3 bonds, anti (A) with H 5C 1C 2C 3 and C 1C 2C 3C 4 torsion angles of 180° and gauche (G + or G -) with torsion angles of + 60° or 300° (-60°) respectively. The results for the principal distances ( rg) and angles (∠ α) from the combined electron diffraction/ab initio study for the G + A conformer, with estimated 2σ uncertainties, were as follows: r( C1 C2) = 1.521(4) Å, r( C2 C3) = 1.539(4) Å, r( C3 C4) = 1.546(4) Å, r( C Cl6) = 1.782(3) Å, r( CCl7) = 1.782(3) Å, = 1.106(6) Å, ∠C 1C 2C 3 = 114.4(13)°, ∠C 2C 3C 4 = 112.5(13)°, ∠CCCl 6 = 110.4(7)°, ∠CCCl 7 = 111.9(7)°, <∠CCH> = 108.9(47)°. Only average values for r(CC), r(CCl), r(CH), ∠CCC, ∠CCX and ∠CCH were determined in the least-square refinements; the differences between the values for these parameters in the same conformer and between the different conformers were kept constant at the values obtained from the ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  9. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  10. A benchmark study of molecular structure by experimental and theoretical methods: Equilibrium structure of uracil from gas-phase electron diffraction data and coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Khaikin, Leonid S.; Grikina, Olga E.; Rykov, Anatolii N.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium structure of uracil, one of the nucleobases, which build nucleic acids, has been determined for the first time by the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) method. The necessary rovibrational corrections to the experimental internuclear distances have been calculated with quadratic and cubic force constants in the MP2(all)/cc-pVTZ approximation. For the first time, the equilibrium structure has been optimized by the very time-consuming coupled-cluster method with single and double excitations and perturbative treatment of connected triples using the correlation-consistent polarized weighted core-valence triple-zeta basis set with all electrons being correlated (CCSD(T)(all)/cc-pwCVTZ). The optimized structural parameters have been corrected for the diffuse-function effects and extrapolated to the higher basis set (cc-pwCVQZ) using results of MP2 computations (named as best ab initio structure). The GED equilibrium structure remarkably agrees with the best ab initio one as well as with that one derived from microwave (MW) rotational constants by Puzzarini and Barone. Thus, it has been revealed that the precise experiment and coupled-cluster calculations yield the same results when accurate vibrational corrections (including anharmonic ones) are considered in the experimental structural analysis. Moreover, it has been shown that the equilibrium structure derived from the GED data, being in general of one order less accurate than that determined from the MW rotational constants, is still reliable and accurate.

  11. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4 (-) and Al2O3-6 (-) are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm(-1). Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6 (-) anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3 (-). Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm(-1). Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm(-1)) and lower energies (850-570 cm(-1)), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm(-1) represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring. PMID:27369513

  12. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R.; Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4- and Al2O3-6- are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm-1. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6- anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3-. Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm-1. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm-1) and lower energies (850-570 cm-1), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm-1 represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring.

  13. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems.

  14. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-14

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems. PMID:26178129

  15. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  16. Charged supramolecular assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Ceraulo, Leopoldo; Indelicato, Sergio; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Indelicato, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to critically analyze recent literature on charged supramolecular assemblies formed by surfactant molecules in gas phase. Apart our specific interest on this research area, the stimuli to undertake the task arise from the widespread theoretical and applicative benefits emerging from a comprehensive view of this topic. In fact, the study of the formation, stability, and physicochemical peculiarities of non-covalent assemblies of surfactant molecules in gas phase allows to unveil interesting aspects such as the role of attractive, repulsive, and steric intermolecular interactions as driving force of supramolecular organization in absence of interactions with surrounding medium and the size and charge state dependence of aggregate structural and dynamical properties. Other interesting aspects worth to be investigated are joined to the ability of these assemblies to incorporate selected solubilizates molecules as well as to give rise to chemical reactions within a single organized structure. In particular, the incorporation of large molecules such as proteins has been of recent interest with the objective to protect their structure and functionality during the transition from solution to gas phase. Exciting fall-out of the study of gas phase surfactant aggregates includes mass and energy transport in the atmosphere, origin of life and simulation of supramolecular aggregation in the interstellar space. Moreover, supramolecular assemblies of amphiphilic molecules in gas phase could find remarkable applications as atmospheric cleaning agents, nanosolvents and nanoreactors for specialized chemical processes in confined space. Mass spectrometry techniques have proven to be particularly suitable to generate these assemblies and to furnish useful information on their size, size polydispersity, stability, and structural organization. On the other hand molecular dynamics simulations have been very useful to rationalize many experimental findings and to

  17. Probing the electronic structure and metal-metal bond of Re{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}} in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.B.; Wang, L.S.

    2000-03-08

    Re{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}, the classical metal complex with a metal-metal multiple bond, was observed in the gas phase for the first time using electrospray. Photodetachment photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) was used to probe its electronic structure, metal-metal bonding, and gas-phase molecular properties. The PES spectra provide a unique and direct picture about the occupied molecular orbitals (Mos) of Re{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}}. Detachments from the metal-metal and metal-ligand bonding Mos were clearly observed and distinguished. The authors found that the metal-metal bonding Mos from the d orbitals ({delta}, {pi}, and {sigma}) have low electron binding energies and yielded three well-resolved detachment bands. The metal-ligand or pure ligand Mos all have higher binding energies and give congested PES features. The ground state of Re{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}} with a configuration of {hor{underscore}ellipsis}{sigma}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 4}{delta}{sup 2} and a formal quadruple Re-Re bond is unequivocally confirmed. The PES spectra yielded a 1.00 eV adiabatic binding energy for the second excess electron in the doubly charged anion. The magnitude of the intramolecular Coulomb repulsion was estimated to be {approximately}2.3 eV using photo-energy-dependent PES spectra. Despite its electronic stability, Re{sub 2}Cl{sub 8}{sup 2{minus}} was found to be metastable against the loss of a Cl{sup {minus}} in the gas phase, suggesting that the Re-Cl bond strength is less than 2.3 eV.

  18. Cryogenic neon matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy of evaporated ionic liquids: geometrical structure of cation-anion 1:1 pair in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Akai, Nobuyuki; Parazs, David; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2009-04-01

    Low-temperature infrared spectra of thermally evaporated ionic liquids, 1-ethyl- and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide have been measured in a cryogenic Ne matrix. The experimental IR spectrum of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide can be reproduced theoretically by not B3LYP/6-31G* but MP2/6-31G* calculation, which suggests that the vibrational analysis for ionic liquids composed of bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anion would be more successfully performed using the MP2 calculation. By comparison of the matrix-isolation spectra of the ionic liquids with the MP2 calculation, their geometrical structures in the gas phase are determined to be of C(2-position)-H(+)...N(-) interaction structure, which corresponds to the geometry of the energetically second-lowest ion-pair structure. The present study may provide a valuable clue to understand a vaporization mechanism of ionic liquid. PMID:19281187

  19. Quantum Chemical Benchmark Studies of the Electronic Properties of the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore. 1. Electronically Excited and Ionized States of the Anionic Chromophore in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Polyakov, Igor; Grigorenko, Bella; Nemukhin, Alexander; Krylov, Anna I

    2009-07-14

    We present the results of quantum chemical calculations of the electronic properties of the anionic form of the green fluorescent protein chromophore in the gas phase. The vertical detachment energy of the chromophore is found to be 2.4-2.5 eV, which is below the strongly absorbing ππ* state at 2.6 eV. The vertical excitation of the lowest triplet state is around 1.9 eV, which is below the photodetachment continuum. Thus, the lowest bright singlet state is a resonance state embedded in the photodetachment continuum, whereas the lowest triplet state is a regular bound state. Based on our estimation of the vertical detachment energy, we attribute a minor feature in the action spectrum as due to the photodetachment transition. The benchmark results for the bright ππ* state demonstrated that the scaled opposite-spin method yields vertical excitation within 0.1 eV (20 nm) from the experimental maximum at 2.59 eV (479 nm). We also report estimations of the vertical excitation energy obtained with the equation-of-motion coupled cluster with the singles and doubles method, a multireference perturbation theory corrected approach MRMP2 as well as the time-dependent density functional theory with range-separated functionals. Expanding the basis set with diffuse functions lowers the ππ* vertical excitation energy by 0.1 eV at the same time revealing a continuum of "ionized" states, which embeds the bright ππ* transition. PMID:26610014

  20. A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesoporous structure prepared from larch sawdust for the gas-phase toluene adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shouxin; Huang, Zhanhua; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Network carbon foam containing a bimodal pore distribution was prepared from Larch. ► Liquefaction route was used for the preparation of morphology controllable carbon. ► Pore structure of carbon foam was controlled through KOH activation. - Abstract: A carbon foam with a bimodal micro–mesopore distribution, was prepared by submitting larch sawdust to liquefaction, resinification, foaming, carbonization and KOH activation. The morphology, pore texture and crystal microstructure was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. A honeycomb structure with adjacent cells was observed for the precursor of carbon foam. After KOH activation, the cell wall of precursor shrunk and broke. This lead to the formation of a well-connected 3D network and developed ligament pore structure (surface area of 554–1918 m{sup 2}/g) containing bimodal pores, 2.1 and 3.9 nm in diameter. The porous carbon foam prepared at 700 °C exhibited a much higher gas-phase toluene removal than commercial activated carbon fiber owing to the 3D network and bimodal pore structure.

  1. He I photoelectron spectra and gas-phase electronic structures of end-functionalized [3]- and [5]-ladderanes.

    PubMed

    Friscić, Tomislav; Klasinc, Leo; Kovac, Branka; Macgillivray, Leonard R

    2008-02-21

    [3]- and [5]-ladderanes obtained by way of template-controlled syntheses conducted in the organic solid state have been characterized via He I photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy. The results provide a first correlation with X-ray crystallographic structure data and establish the reliability of quantum chemical DFT (B3LYP/6-31G*) and ab initio HF calculations in predicting geometrical and electronic structures of molecular ladder frameworks. PMID:18225866

  2. Structural characterization of gas-phase cysteine and cysteine methyl ester complexes with zinc and cadmium dications by infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coates, Rebecca A; McNary, Christopher P; Boles, Georgia C; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2015-10-21

    Structural characterization of gas-phase ions of cysteine (Cys) and cysteine methyl ester (CysOMe) complexed to zinc and cadmium is investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using a free electron laser in combination with density functional theory calculations. IRMPD spectra are measured for [Zn(Cys-H)](+), [Cd(Cys-H)](+), [Zn(CysOMe-H)](+), [Cd(CysOMe-H)](+) and CdCl(+)(CysOMe) and are accompanied by quantum mechanical calculations of the predicted linear absorption spectra at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) (Zn(2+) complexes) and B3LYP/def2TZVP levels (Cd(2+) complexes). On the basis of these experiments and calculations, the conformation that best reproduces the IRMPD spectra for the complexes of the deprotonated amino acids, [M(Cys-H)](+) and [M(CysOMe-H)](+), is a charge-solvated (CS) tridentate structure where the metal dication binds to the amine and carbonyl groups of the amino acid backbone and the deprotonated sulfur atom of the side chain, [N,CO,S(-)]. The intact amino acid complex, CdCl(+)(CysOMe) binds in the equivalent motif [N,CO,S]. These binding motifs are in agreement with the predicted ground structures of these complexes at the B3LYP, B3LYP-GD3BJ (with empirical dispersion corrections), B3P86, and MP2(full) levels. PMID:25880327

  3. Structured Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst for gas-phase hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Han, Lupeng; Zhao, Guofeng; Chai, Ruijuan; Zhang, Qiaofei; Liu, Ye; Lu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Galvanic co-deposition of 0.5 wt% Au and 0.1 wt% Pd on a microfibrous-structure using 8 μm Cu-fibers delivers a Pd-Au/Cu-fiber catalyst, which is highly active, selective and stable for the hydrogenolysis of dimethyl oxalate to ethylene glycol. Au and Pd synergistically promote the hydrogenolysis activity of Cu(+) sites, while Au also critically stabilizes Cu(+) sites to prevent deep reductive deactivation. PMID:26040855

  4. Prioritizing testing of organic compounds detected as gas phase air pollutants: structure-activity study for human contact allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R; Macina, O T; Graham, C; Rosenkranz, H S; Cass, G R; Karol, M H

    1997-01-01

    Organic compounds that are used or generated anthropogenically in large quantities in cities can be identified through their presence in the urban atmosphere and in air pollutant source emissions. Compounds identified by this method were screened to evaluate their potential to act as contact allergens. The CASE and MULTICASE computer programs, which are based on the detection of structure-activity relationships (SAR), were used to evaluate this potential. These relationships first are determined by comparing chemical structures to biological activity within a learning set comprised of 458 compounds, each of which had been tested experimentally in human trials for its sensitization potential. Using the information contained in this learning set, CASE and MULTICASE predicted the activity of 238 compounds found in the atmosphere for their ability to act as contact allergens. The analysis finds that 21 of 238 compounds are predicted to be active contact allergens (probability >0.5), with potencies ranging from mild to very strong. The compounds come from chemical classes that include chlorinated aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons, N-containing compounds, phenols, alkenes, and an S-containing compound. Using the measured airborne concentrations or emission rates of these compounds as an indication of the extent of their use, together with their predicted potencies, provides an efficient method to prioritize the experimental assessment of contact sensitization of untested organic compounds that can be detected as air pollutants. Images Figure 1. PMID:9300925

  5. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  6. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  7. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  8. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  9. Microwave Spectrum for a Second Higher Energy Conformer of Cyclopropanecarboxylic Acid and Determination of the Gas Phase Structure of the Ground State.

    PubMed

    Pejlovas, Aaron M; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-10-01

    Microwave spectra for a higher-energy conformer of cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (CPCA) were measured using a Flygare-Balle-type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The rotational constants (in megahertz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kilohertz) for this higher-energy conformer are A = 7452.3132(57), B = 2789.8602(43), C = 2415.0725(40), DJ = 0.29(53), and DJK = 2.5(12). Differences between rotational constants for this excited-state conformation and the ground state are primarily due to the acidic OH bond moving from a position cis relative to the cyclopropyl group about the C1-C9 bond to the more stable trans conformation. Calculations indicate that the relative abundance of the higher-energy state should be 15% to 17% at room temperature, but the observed relative abundance for the supersonic expansion conditions is about 1%. The measurements of rotational transitions for the trans form of CPCA were extended to include all of the unique (13)C singly substituted positions. These measurements, along with previously measured transitions of the parent and -OD isotopologues, were used to determine a best-fit gas-phase structure. PMID:26359681

  10. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  11. Electrosonic spray ionization. A gentle technique for generating folded proteins and protein complexes in the gas phase and for studying ion-molecule reactions at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Takáts, Zoltán; Wiseman, Justin M; Gologan, Bogdan; Cooks, R Graham

    2004-07-15

    Electrosonic spray ionization (ESSI), a variant on electrospray ionization (ESI), employs a traditional micro ESI source with supersonic nebulizing gas. The high linear velocity of the nebulizing gas provides efficient pneumatic spraying of the charged liquid sample. The variable electrostatic potential can be tuned to allow efficient and gentle ionization. This ionization method is successfully applied to aqueous solutions of various proteins at neutral pH, and its performance is compared to that of the nanospray and micro ESI techniques. Evidence for efficient desolvation during ESSI is provided by the fact that the peak widths for various multiply charged protein ions are an order of magnitude narrower than those for nanospray. Narrow charge-state distributions compared to other ESI techniques are observed also; for most of the proteins studied, more than 90% of the protein ions can be accumulated in one charge state using ESSI when optimizing conditions. The fact that the abundant charge state is normally as low or lower than that recorded by ESI or nanospray indicates that folded protein ions are generated. The sensitivity of the ionization technique to high salt concentrations is comparable to that of nanospray, but ESSI is considerably less sensitive to high concentrations of organic additives such as glycerol or 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (Tris base). Noncovalent complexes are observed in the case of myoglobin, protein kinase A/ATP complex, and other proteins. The extent of dissociation of protein ions in ESSI is comparable to or even smaller than that in the case of nanospray, emphasizing the gentle nature of the method. The unique features of ESSI are ascribed to very efficient spraying and the low internal energy supplied to the ions. Evidence is provided that the method is capable of generating fully desolvated protein ions at atmospheric pressure. This allows the technique to be used for the study of ion-molecule reactions at atmospheric

  12. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Study of Multiply Negatively Charged, Gas-Phase NaAOT Micelles: How Does Charge State Affect Micellar Structure and Encapsulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Nan-zAOTn]z- ( n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Nan-1AOTnH2O]- of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Nan-zAOTn]z- aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Nan-zAOTn]z- of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Nan+zAOTn]z+ aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface.

  14. Mass spectrometry study of multiply negatively charged, gas-phase NaAOT micelles: how does charge state affect micellar structure and encapsulation?

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) (n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Na(n-1)AOT(n)H(2)O](-) of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Na(n+z)AOT(n)](z+) aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface. PMID:23247969

  15. The C 1s and N 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five azabenzenes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Vall-llosera, G; Gao, B; Kivimäki, A; Coreno, M; Alvarez Ruiz, J; de Simone, M; Agren, H; Rachlew, E

    2008-01-28

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been measured and interpreted by means of density functional theory for five different azabenzenes (pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine) in the gas phase. The experimental and theoretical spectra at the N 1s and C 1s edges show a strong resonance assigned to the transition of the 1s electron in the respective N or C atoms to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with pi(*) symmetry. As opposed to the N 1s edge, at the C 1s edge this resonance is split due to the different environments of the core hole atom in the molecule. The shift in atomic core-level energy due to a specific chemical environment is explained with the higher electronegativity of the N atom compared to the C atom. The remaining resonances below the ionization potential (IP) are assigned to sigma or pi [corrected] orbitals with mixed valence/Rydberg [corrected] character. Upon N addition, a reduction of intensity is observed in the Rydberg region at both edges as compared to the intensity in the continuum. Above the IP one or more resonances are seen and ascribed here to transitions to sigma(*) orbitals. Calculating the experimental and theoretical Delta(pi) term values at both edges, we observe that they are almost the same within +/-1 eV as expected for isoelectronic bonded pairs. The term values of the pi(*) and sigma(*) resonances are discussed in terms of the total Z number of the atoms participating in the bond. PMID:18247958

  16. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

  17. Liquid phase separation of proteins based on electrophoretic effects in an electrospray setup during sample introduction into a gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (CE–GEMMA/CE–ES–DMA)

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Kerul, Lukas; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle characterization is gaining importance in food technology, biotechnology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. An instrument to determine particle electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameters in the single-digit to double-digit nanometer range receiving increased attention is the gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA) separating electrophoretically single charged analytes in the gas-phase at ambient pressure. A fused-silica capillary is used for analyte transfer to the gas-phase by means of a nano electrospray (ES) unit. The potential of this capillary to separate analytes electrophoretically in the liquid phase due to different mobilities is, at measurement conditions recommended by the manufacturer, eliminated due to elevated pressure applied for sample introduction. Measurements are carried out upon constant feeding of analytes to the system. Under these conditions, aggregate formation is observed for samples including high amounts of non-volatile components or complex samples. This makes the EM determination of individual species sometimes difficult, if not impossible. With the current study we demonstrate that liquid phase electrophoretic separation of proteins (as exemplary analytes) occurs in the capillary (capillary zone electrophoresis, CE) of the nano ES unit of the GEMMA. This finding was consecutively applied for on-line desalting allowing EM diameter determination of analytes despite a high salt concentration within samples. The present study is to our knowledge the first report on the use of the GEMMA to determine EM diameters of analytes solubilized in the ES incompatible electrolyte solutions by the intended use of electrophoresis (in the liquid phase) during sample delivery. Results demonstrate the proof of concept of such an approach and additionally illustrate the high potential of a future on-line coupling of a capillary electrophoresis to a GEMMA instrument. PMID:25109866

  18. Charged states of proteins. Reactions of doubly protonated alkyldiamines with NH(3): solvation or deprotonation. Extension of two proton cases to multiply protonated globular proteins observed in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Michael; Blades, Arthur; Kebarle, Paul

    2002-09-25

    The apparent gas-phase basicities (GB(app)'s) of basic sites in multiply protonated molecules, such as proteins, can be approximately predicted. An approach used by Williams and co-workers was to develop an equation for a diprotonated system, NH(3)(CH(2))(7)NH(3)(2+), and then extend it with a summation of pairwise interactions to multiply protonated systems. Experimental determinations of the rates of deprotonation of NH(3)(CH(2))(7)NH(3)(2+) by a variety of bases B, in the present work, showed that GB(app) = GB(NH(3)) = 196 kcal/mol. This result is supported also by determinations of the equilibria: NH(3)(CH(2))(p)NH(3)(2+) + NH(3) = NH(3)(CH(2))(p)NH(3) x NH(3)(2+), for p = 7, 8, 10, 12. The described experimental GB(app) is 14 kcal/mol higher than the value predicted by the equation used by Williams and co-workers but in agreement with an ab initio result by Gronert. Equations based on electrostatics are developed for the two proton and multiproton systems which allow the evaluation of GB(app) of the basic sites on proteins. These are applied for the evaluation of GB(app) of the basic sites and of N(SB), the maximum number of protons that the nondenatured proteins, carbonic anhydrase (CAII), cytochrome c (CYC), and pepsin, can hold. The N(SB) values are compared with the observed charges, Z(obs)'s, when the nondenatured proteins are produced by electrospray and found in agreement with the proposal by de la Mora that Z(obs) is determined by the number of charges provided by the droplet that contains the protein, according to the charge residue model (CRM). The GB(app) values of proteins have many other applications. They can be compared with experimental measurements and are also needed for the understanding of the thermal denaturing of charged proteins and the thermal dissociation of charged protein complexes. PMID:12236767

  19. Development of a new Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) for gas-phase reactions of NO3 radicals with organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdouci, J.; Picquet-Varrault, B.; Doussin, J.

    2010-12-01

    kinetic database on NO3-oxidation rate constants. This allowed us to develop a new SAR for the gas-phase reactions of NO3 with organic compounds which is based exclusively on correlations between the molecular structures and the rate constants. This new SAR is based on experimental rate constants of 150 molecules and has been developed for alkanes, alkenes (simple and cyclic alkenes, dienes and terpenes) and saturated and unsaturated oxygenated species (alcohols, carbonyls, ethers and esters). Results and performances of this SAR will be discussed here. References [1] Geyer, A., et al., J. Geophys. Res., 108 (2003), 4368. [2] Grosjean, D. and E.L. Williams, Atmospheric Environment. Part A. General Topics, 26 (1992), 1395-1405. [3] Pfrang, C., et al., Atmospheric Environment, 40 (2006), 1180-1186. [4] Kwok, E.S.C. and R. Atkinson, Atmospheric Environment, 29 (1995), 1685-1695. [5] Jenkin, M.E., S.M. Saunders, and M.J. Pilling, Atmospheric Environment, 31(1997), 81-104. [6] Aumont, B., S. Szopa, and S. Madronich, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 5 (2005), 2497-2517.

  20. Structures of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Henderson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In reviewing the structures of membrane proteins determined up to the end of 2009, we present in words and pictures the most informative examples from each family. We group the structures together according to their function and architecture to provide an overview of the major principles and variations on the most common themes. The first structures, determined 20 years ago, were those of naturally abundant proteins with limited conformational variability, and each membrane protein structure determined was a major landmark. With the advent of complete genome sequences and efficient expression systems, there has been an explosion in the rate of membrane protein structure determination, with many classes represented. New structures are published every month and more than 150 unique membrane protein structures have been determined. This review analyses the reasons for this success, discusses the challenges that still lie ahead, and presents a concise summary of the key achievements with illustrated examples selected from each class. PMID:20667175

  1. Structure, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Behavior of a Fe-Cr-V Alloy Doped with Nitrogen by High-Temperature Gas-Phase Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Sergey A.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.; Denisenko, Kristina S.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and room-temperature mechanical properties of the corrosion-resistant Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy doped with nitrogen by high-temperature gas-phase nitriding under different conditions have been investigated. The nitriding of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at T = 1223 K to 1373 K (950 °C to 1100 °C) and subsequent annealing at T = 973 K (700 °C) lead to the precipitation of large vanadium nitride and disperse chromium nitride particles in the ferrite matrix. Such a treatment increases the strength of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at room temperature by 1.6 times, while maintaining the adequate relative elongation. The alloy in the initial state and after nitriding is highly resistant to corrosion.

  2. Gas-phase structures of sterically crowded disilanes studied by electron diffraction and quantum chemical methods: 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)disilane and 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)dimethyldisilane.

    PubMed

    Schwabedissen, Jan; Lane, Paul D; Masters, Sarah L; Hassler, Karl; Wann, Derek A

    2014-07-14

    The gas-phase structures of the disilanes 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)disilane [(Me3Si)2HSiSiH(SiMe3)2] (1) and 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)dimethyldisilane [(Me3Si)2MeSiSiMe(SiMe3)2] (2) have been determined by density functional theoretical calculations and by gas electron diffraction (GED) employing the SARACEN method. For each of 1 and 2 DFT calculations revealed four C2-symmetric conformers occupying minima on the respective potential-energy surfaces; three conformers were estimated to be present in sufficient quantities to be taken into account when fitting the GED data. For (Me3Si)2RSiSiR(SiMe3)2 [R = H (1), CH3 (2)] the lowest energy conformers were found by GED to have RSiSiR dihedral angles of 87.7(17)° for 1 and -47.0(6)° for 2. For each of 1 and 2 the presence of bulky and flexible trimethylsilyl groups dictates many aspects of the geometric structures in the gas phase, with the molecules often adopting structures that reduce steric strain. PMID:24873858

  3. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  4. Quantifying the stabilizing effects of protein–ligand interactions in the gas phase

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Reading, Eamonn; Liko, Idlir; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of protein–ligand interactions on protein stability are typically monitored by a number of established solution-phase assays. Few translate readily to membrane proteins. We have developed an ion-mobility mass spectrometry approach, which discerns ligand binding to both soluble and membrane proteins directly via both changes in mass and ion mobility, and assesses the effects of these interactions on protein stability through measuring resistance to unfolding. Protein unfolding is induced through collisional activation, which causes changes in protein structure and consequently gas-phase mobility. This enables detailed characterization of the ligand-binding effects on the protein with unprecedented sensitivity. Here we describe the method and software required to extract from ion mobility data the parameters that enable a quantitative analysis of individual binding events. This methodology holds great promise for investigating biologically significant interactions between membrane proteins and both drugs and lipids that are recalcitrant to characterization by other means. PMID:26440106

  5. Evidence for α-helices in the gas phase: a case study using Melittin from honey bee venom.

    PubMed

    Florance, Hannah V; Stopford, Andrew P; Kalapothakis, Jason M; McCullough, Bryan J; Bretherick, Andrew; Barran, Perdita E

    2011-09-01

    Gas phase methodologies are increasingly used to study the structure of proteins and peptides. A challenge to the mass spectrometrist is to preserve the structure of the system of interest intact and unaltered from solution into the gas phase. Small peptides are very flexible and can present a number of conformations in solution. In this work we examine Melittin a 26 amino acid peptide that forms the active component of honey bee venom. Melittin is haemolytic and has been shown to form an α-helical tetrameric structure by X-ray crystallography [M. Gribskov et al., The RCSB Protein Data Bank, 1990] and to be helical in high concentrations of methanol. Here we use ion mobility mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics and gas-phase HDX to probe its structure in the gas phase and specifically interrogate whether the helical form can be preserved. All low energy calculated structures possess some helicity. In our experiments we examine the peptide following nano-ESI from solutions with varying methanol content. Ion mobility gives collision cross sections (CCS) that compare well with values found from molecular modelling and from other reported structures, but with inconclusive results regarding the effect of solvent. There is only a slight increase in CCS with charge, showing minimal coloumbically driven unfolding. HDX supports preservation of some helical content into the gas phase and again shows little difference in the exchange rates of species sprayed from different solvents. The [M + 3H](3+) species has two exchanging populations both of which exhibit faster exchange rates than observed for the [M + 2H](2+) species. One interpretation for these results is that the time spent being analysed is sufficient for this peptide to form a helix in the 'ultimate' hydrophobic environment of a vacuum. PMID:21701716

  6. Base pair analogs in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, Joseph R; Pratt, David W

    2003-11-25

    A rotationally resolved electronic spectrum of the gas-phase dimer 2-aminopyridine.2-pyridone, an analog of the adenine.thymine base pair, has been observed and assigned, leading to precise measurements of its moments of inertia and preliminary determinations of its structure. A Watson-Crick configuration results, with N...H-N and N-H...O hydrogen bond lengths of 2.898 and 2.810 A, respectively. The two bases are found not to be coplanar; a dihedral angle of 6.1 degrees between the base planes is also estimated from the measured moments of inertia. Possible chemical and biological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:14612563

  7. Protein Structure Databases.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    Web-based protein structure databases come in a wide variety of types and levels of information content. Those having the most general interest are the various atlases that describe each experimentally determined protein structure and provide useful links, analyses, and schematic diagrams relating to its 3D structure and biological function. Also of great interest are the databases that classify 3D structures by their folds as these can reveal evolutionary relationships which may be hard to detect from sequence comparison alone. Related to these are the numerous servers that compare folds-particularly useful for newly solved structures, and especially those of unknown function. Beyond these are a vast number of databases for the more specialized user, dealing with specific families, diseases, structural features, and so on. PMID:27115626

  8. The molecular structures, conformations and force fields of bis(chloroimino)butanedinitrile as studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassen, H.; Gundersen, S.; Samdal, S.

    2009-06-01

    Quantum chemical calculations using levels up to MP2(Full)/aug-cc-pVTZ have been applied. B3LYP calculations using the 6-31G* basis set reveal that there are four conformations of bis(chloroimino)butanedinitrile. The planar anti-ZZ conformer with C2h symmetry is the most stable conformer. The non-planar EE conformer with C2 symmetry, the non-planar EZ conformer with C1 symmetry and the non-planar ZZ conformer with C2 symmetry are 16.8, 22.7, 27.2 kJ/mol, respectively, less stable than the planar anti-ZZ conformer according toB3LYP/6-31G* calculations. Calculated frequencies for the planar anti-ZZ conformer have been compared with observed frequencies, and some reassignments have been proposed. Several models have been used in the gas-phase electron diffraction analysis. The most reliable results are expected to be obtained using a dynamic model where the large amplitude motion is simulated by a harmonic angular motion using a Gaussian distribution about the central C sbnd C bond. Only the planar anti-ZZ conformer was used in the final refinements due to the high energy difference to the other conformers. The most important bond distances ( ra, Ångstrom) and bond angles (∠ α, degrees) are [GED/MP2(Full)/aug-cc-pVTZ]: rC 1sbnd C 2 = [1.509(15), 1.460], rC 2 = N 3 = [1.295(6), 1.292], rN 3sbnd Cl 5 = [1.706(5), 1.696], rC 2sbnd C 7 = [1.434(11), 1.421], rC 7tbnd N 9 = [1.165(4), 1.170], ∠C 1sbnd C 2dbnd N 3 = [114.5(11), 115.6], ∠C 2dbnd N 3sbnd Cl 5 = [115.0(4), 115.0], ∠C 1sbnd C 2sbnd C 7 = [118.8(8), 118.5], ∠C 2sbnd C 7tbnd N 9 = [178.2(15), 177.4]. The dihedral angle N 3C 2C 7N 9 is 0°, i.e. the cyano groups are bended towards the Cl atom. Error estimates from electron diffraction are given as: σr = 2.5[σ lsq2 + (0.001r) 2] ½ for bond distances and σ∠ = 2.5σ lsq for bond angles.

  9. Gas-phase Ion Isomer Analysis Reveals the Mechanism of Peptide Sequence Scrambling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B.; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M→cb) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored. PMID:24313304

  10. Negative ion gas-phase chemistry of arenes.

    PubMed

    Danikiewicz, Witold; Zimnicka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Reactions of aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds involving anions are of great importance in organic synthesis. Some of these reactions have been studied in the gas phase and are occasionally mentioned in reviews devoted to gas-phase negative ion chemistry, but no reviews exist that collect all existing information about these reactions. This work is intended to fill this gap. In the first part of this review, methods for generating arene anions in the gas phase and studying their physicochemical properties and fragmentation reactions are presented. The main topics in this part are as follows: processes in which gas-phase arene anions are formed, measurements and calculations of the proton affinities of arene anions, proton exchange reactions, and fragmentation processes of substituted arene anions, especially phenide ions. The second part is devoted to gas-phase reactions of arene anions. The most important of these are reactions with electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and related compounds (Michael acceptors). Other reactions including oxidation of arene anions and halogenophilic reactions are also presented. In the last part of the review, reactions of electrophilic arenes with nucleophiles are discussed. The best known of these is the aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SN Ar) reaction; however, other processes that lead to the substitution of a hydrogen atom in the aromatic ring are also very important. Aromatic substrates in these reactions are usually but not always nitroarenes bearing other substituents in the ring. The first step in these reactions is the formation of an anionic σ-adduct, which, depending on the substituents in the aromatic ring and the structure of the attacking nucleophile, is either an intermediate or a transition state in the reaction path. In the present review, we attempted to collect the results of both experimental and computational studies of the aforementioned reactions conducted since the

  11. Analysis of the gas phase reactivity of chlorosilanes.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Stefano; Masi, Maurizio; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2013-06-27

    Trichlorosilane is the most used precursor to deposit silicon for photovoltaic applications. Despite of this, its gas phase and surface kinetics have not yet been completely understood. In the present work, it is reported a systematic investigation aimed at determining what is the dominant gas phase chemistry active during the chemical vapor deposition of Si from trichlorosilane. The gas phase mechanism was developed calculating the rate constant of each reaction using conventional transition state theory in the rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator approximation. Torsional vibrations were described using a hindered rotor model. Structures and vibrational frequencies of reactants and transition states were determined at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, while potential energy surfaces and activation energies were computed at the CCSD(T) level using aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets extrapolating to the complete basis set limit. As gas phase and surface reactivities are mutually interlinked, simulations were performed using a microkinetic surface mechanism. It was found that the gas phase reactivity follows two different routes. The disilane mechanism, in which the formation of disilanes as reaction intermediates favors the conversion between the most stable monosilane species, and the radical pathway, initiated by the decomposition of Si2HCl5 and followed by a series of fast propagation reactions. Though both mechanisms are active during deposition, the simulations revealed that above a certain temperature and conversion threshold the radical mechanism provides a faster route for the conversion of SiHCl3 into SiCl4, a reaction that favors the overall Si deposition process as it is associated with the consumption of HCl, a fast etchant of Si. Also, this study shows that the formation of disilanes as reactant intermediates promotes significantly the gas phase reactivity, as they contribute both to the initiation of radical chain mechanisms and provide a catalytic route for

  12. The use of gas-phase substrates to study enzyme catalysis at low hydration.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Rachel V; Daniel, Roy M

    2004-01-01

    Although there are varying estimates as to the degree of enzyme hydration required for activity, a threshold value of ca. 0.2 g of water per gram of protein has been widely accepted. The evidence upon which this is based is reviewed here. In particular, results from the use of gas-phase substrates are discussed. Results using solid-phase enzyme-substrate mixtures are not altogether in accord with those obtained using gas-phase substrates. The use of gaseous substrates and products provides an experimental system in which the hydration of the enzyme can be easily controlled, but which is not limited by diffusion. All the results show that increasing hydration enhances activity. The results using gas-phase substrates do not support the existence of a critical hydration value below which enzymatic activity is absent, and suggest that enzyme activity is possible at much lower hydrations than previously thought; they do not support the notion that significant hydration of the surface polar groups is required for activity. However, the marked improvement of activity as hydration is increased suggests that water does play a role, perhaps in optimizing the structure or facilitating the flexibility required for maximal activity. PMID:15306385

  13. Inductive and steric effects on the gas-phase structure of tert-butyl acetate. Electron diffraction and ab initio MO investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Onozaki, Manabu; Egawa, Toru; Konaka, Shigehiro

    1994-09-01

    Gas electron diffusion and HF/4-21 G calculations on geometric parameters and harmonic force constants are used to study the molecular structure of tert-butyl acetate. This determined that C{sub 1} = O{sub 2} is (cis) to O{sub 4}-C{sub 5} and the tert-butyl group is staggered to the C{sub 1}-O{sub 4} bond. The structural parameters are also determined. C{sub 1}-O{sub 4} bond length shortening is rationalized in terms of the resonance effect and the electron-releasing inductive effect of substituents. 29 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Intramolecular structure and dynamics of mequinol and guaiacol in the gas phase: Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of their S{sub 1} states

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Matus, Marcela; Álvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Cabellos, José Luis; Merino, Gabriel E-mail: gmerino@mda.cinvestav.mx; Yi, John T.; Pratt, David W.; Schmitt, Michael

    2015-09-07

    The molecular structures of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and mequinol (4-methoxyphenol) have been studied using high resolution electronic spectroscopy in a molecular beam and contrasted with ab initio computations. Mequinol exhibits two low frequency bands that have been assigned to electronic origins of two possible conformers of the molecule, trans and cis. Guaiacol also shows low frequency bands, but in this case, the bands have been assigned to the electronic origin and vibrational modes of a single conformer of the isolated molecule. A detailed study of these bands indicates that guaiacol has a vibrationally averaged planar structure in the ground state, but it is distorted along both in-plane and out-of-plane coordinates in the first electronically excited state. An intramolecular hydrogen bond involving the adjacent   –OH and   –OCH{sub 3} groups plays a major role in these dynamics.

  15. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  16. Synthesis, structure and gas-phase reactivity of the mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4 (LPh = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavras, Athanasios; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N.; White, Jonathan M.; Mulder, Roger J.; Canty, Allan J.; O'Hair, Richard A. J.

    2015-10-01

    Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(i) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (LMe) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (LPh). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and LPh, cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (LMe and LPh) and DFT calculations (LMe) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ provides a change in geometry that facilitates subsequent loss of BH3 to produce the dihydride clusters, [Ag3(H)2Ln]+ (n = 1 and 2). Together with the results of previous studies (Girod et al., Chem. - Eur. J., 2014, 20, 16626), this provides a direct link between mixed silver hydride/borohydride nanoclusters, silver hydride nanoclusters, and silver nanoclusters.Borohydrides react with silver salts to give products that span multiple scales ranging from discrete mononuclear compounds through to silver nanoparticles and colloids. The cluster cations [Ag3(H)(BH4)L3]+ are observed upon electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of solutions containing sodium borohydride, silver(i) tetrafluoroborate and bis(dimethylphosphino)methane (LMe) or bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (LPh). By adding NaBH4 to an acetonitrile solution of AgBF4 and LPh, cooled to ca. -10 °C, we have been able to isolate the first mixed silver hydride borohydride nanocluster, [Ag3(μ3-H)(μ3-BH4)LPh3]BF4, and structurally characterise it via X-ray crystallography. Combined gas-phase experiments (LMe and LPh) and DFT calculations (LMe) reveal how loss of a ligand from the cationic complexes [Ag

  17. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Falvo, Cyril; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Mulas, Giacomo; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  18. Ab initio structural and spectroscopic study of HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = 0,+1,−1) in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yaghlane, Saida Ben; Cotton, C. Eric; Francisco, Joseph S. E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr; Linguerri, Roberto; Hochlaf, Majdi E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr

    2013-11-07

    Accurate ab initio computations of structural and spectroscopic parameters for the HPS/HSP molecules and corresponding cations and anions have been performed. For the electronic structure computations, standard and explicitly correlated coupled cluster techniques in conjunction with large basis sets have been adopted. In particular, we present equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, harmonic vibrational frequencies, adiabatic ionization energies, electron affinities, and, for the neutral species, singlet-triplet relative energies. Besides, the full-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for HPS{sup x} and HSP{sup x} (x = −1,0,1) systems have been generated at the standard coupled cluster level with a basis set of augmented quintuple-zeta quality. By applying perturbation theory to the calculated PESs, an extended set of spectroscopic constants, including τ, first-order centrifugal distortion and anharmonic vibrational constants has been obtained. In addition, the potentials have been used in a variational approach to deduce the whole pattern of vibrational levels up to 4000 cm{sup −1} above the minima of the corresponding PESs.

  19. OH radical formation from the gas-phase reaction of ozone with terminal alkenes and the relationship between structure and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S.E.; Chung, M.Y.; Hasson, A.S.

    1999-10-14

    The reactions of ozone with alkenes have been shown recently to lead to the direct production of OH radicals in quantities that vary from 7 to 100% depending on the structure of the alkene. OH radicals are the most important oxidizing species in the lower atmosphere, and the OH-alkene reaction is a large source of new OH radicals, important in urban and rural air during both day and night. Evidence for OH formation comes both from low-pressure direct measurements and from tracer experiments at high pressure. With the goal of measuring OH formation yields with good precision, a small-ratio relative rate technique was developed. This method uses small amounts of fast-reacting aromatics and aliphatic ethers to trace OH formation yields. Here, the authors report OH formation yields for a series of terminal alkenes reacting with ozone. Measured OH yields were 0.29 {+-} 0.05, 0.24 {+-} 0.05, 0.18 {+-} 0.04, and 0.10 {+-} 0.03 for 1-butene, 1-pentene, 1-hexene, and 1-octene, respectively. For the methyl-substituted terminal alkenes methyl propene and 2-methyl-1-butene, OH yields were 0.72 {+-} 0.12 and 0.67 {+-} 0.12, respectively. The results are discussed both in terms of their atmospheric implications and the relationship between structure and OH formation.

  20. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    SciTech Connect

    Bréchignac, Philippe Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Mulas, Giacomo

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  1. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation.

    PubMed

    Bréchignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A; Falvo, Cyril; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Mulas, Giacomo; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory. PMID:25362317

  2. Structures of [M(Ura-H)(H2 O)n ](+) (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba; n = 1-3) complexes in the gas phase by IRMPD spectroscopy and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Power, Barry; Haldys, Violette; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-03-01

    The structures of singly and doubly (and for Mg, triply) hydrated group 2 metal dications bound to deprotonated uracil were explored in the gas phase using infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (1000-1900 cm(-1) ) and the O-H/N-H stretching region (2700-3800 cm(-1) ) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were then compared with the computed IR spectra for various isomers. Calculations were performed using B3LYP with the 6-31 + G(d,p) basis set for all atoms except Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) , for which the LANL2DZ or the def2-TZVPP basis sets with relativistic core potentials were used. Atoms-in-molecules analysis was conducted for all lowest energy structures. The lowest energy isomers in all cases are those in which the one uracil is deprotonated at the N3 position, and the metal is coordinated to the N3 and O4 of uracil. Regardless of the degree of solvation, all water molecules are bound to the metal ion and participate in a hydrogen bond with a carbonyl of the uracil moiety. PMID:26956390

  3. Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy as a Tool to Study the Structures of Odorant Molecules and Weakly Bound Complexes in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, Sabrina; Betz, Thomas; Medcraft, Chris; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of trans-cinnamaldehyde ((2E)-3-phenylprop-2-enal) has been obtained with chirped-pulse microwave spectroscopy in the frequency range of 2 - 8.5 GHz. The odorant molecule is the essential component in cinnamon oil and causes the characteristic smell. In the measured high-resolution spectrum, we were able to assign the rotational spectra of two conformers of trans-cinnamaldehyde as well as all singly 13C-substituted species of the lowest-energy conformer in natural abundance. Two different methods were used to determine the structure from the rotational constants, which will be compared within this contribution. In addition, the current progress of studying ether-alcohol complexes, aiming at an improved understanding of the interplay between hydrogen bonding and dispersion interaction, will be reported. Here, a special focus is placed on the complexes of diphenylether with small aliphatic alcohols.

  4. X-Ray structural and gas phase studies of silver(i) perfluorinated carboxylate complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl as potential precursors for chemical vapour deposition (CVD).

    PubMed

    Szłyk, Edward; Szczesny, Robert; Wojtczak, Andrzej

    2010-02-21

    [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] (), [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] () and [Ag(2)(C(3)F(7)COO)(2)(bpy)] () were prepared and characterized by MS-EI, (1)H, (13)C NMR, variable-temperature IR (VT-IR) spectroscopy (solid sample and evolved volatile species) and thermal analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed the polymeric structure for [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] and [Ag(6)(C(3)F(7)COO)(6)(bpy)(4)], with bridging bpy ligand, whereas for [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] the dimeric system with monodentately linked carboxylate was noted. Mass spectra analysis of () over 30-300 degrees C indicates the presence of binuclear ions [(RCOO)Ag(2)](+) as a main volatile particles, which can be transported in CVD process. VT-IR studies of gases evolved during the thermal decomposition process, demonstrate the presence of fluorocarbon species and CO(2) as the most abundant molecules. Thermal analysis of () revealed a multi-stage decomposition mechanism resulting in Ag(0) formation below 290 degrees C. Compounds were tested for silver metal spray pyrolysis and obtained layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and XRD. PMID:20449428

  5. Electrothermal vaporization, part 1: gas phase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Vahid; Xu, Ning; Smith, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    This manuscript is the first of a two-part publication on evaluation of vaporization and atomization processes in electrothermal vaporizers (ETV). Part 1 is specifically focused on gas phase (and heterogeneous) chemistry in ETVs. Molecular absorption spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (in conjunction with gas-phase mass spectrometry) are used to investigate the vaporization of Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Co and Ni (chloride and nitrate salts). Graphite, Pt, and Ta were used as substrate material for vaporizers to elucidate some observations of gas-phase chemistry. The experiments in Part I and II of this series are intentionally performed using wall vaporization to closely mimic the conditions used when ETV is employed as a sample introduction device.

  6. Theoretical study of the gas-phase structure, thermochemistry, and decomposition mechanisms of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 4}N(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mebel, A.M.; Lin, M.C.; Morokuma, K.; Melius, C.F.

    1995-05-04

    The structures, energetics, and decomposition mechanisms of gaseous ammonium nitrite (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 2}) and ammonium dinitramide [ADN, NH{sub 4}N(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}] have been studied theoretically by different ab initio molecular orbital approaches. In the gas phase, both species have the structures of molecular complexes, [NH{sub 3}]-[HX]. The ionic geometries, [NH{sub 4}{sup +}][X{sup -}], are not local minima on the potential energy surface and would not be stable after vaporization. For NH{sub 4}NO{sub 2}, [NH{sub 3}]-[trans-HONO] is the most stable isomer, and [NH{sub 3}]-[cis-HONO] and [NH{sub 3}]-[HNO{sub 2}] structures lie higher by 1.4 and 8.4 kcal/mol at the G1 level of theory. For the gaseous ADN, [NH{sub 3}]-HN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} is the most stable structure, while the [NH{sub 3}]-[ON(O)NNO{sub 2}] isomer is 2.3 kcal/mol less favorable. The calculated dissociation energies of the [NH{sub 3}]-[HX] complex to NH{sub 3} and HX are 8-9 and 12-14 kcal/mol for NH{sub 4}NO{sub 2} and ADN, respectively. The energies for elimination of the NO{sub 2} group from HN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} and HON(O)NNO{sub 2} are found to be 38-40 kcal/mol, while the barrier for HON(O)NNO{sub 2} dissociation is about 42 kcal/mol. 27 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  8. On the interplay between geometrical structure and magnetic anisotropy: a relativistic density-functional study of mixed Pt-Co and Pt-Fe trimers and tetramers in the gas-phase and supported on graphene.

    PubMed

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of mixed Pt-Co and Pt-Fe trimers and tetramers in the gas-phase and supported on a free-standing graphene layer have been calculated using density-functional theory. The influence of the strong magnetic moments of the 3d atoms on the Pt atoms and the influence of the strong spin-orbit coupling contributed by the Pt atoms on the 3d atoms have been studied in detail. All mixed trimers form isocele triangles in the gas-phase. On a graphene layer the structure is influenced by the strong binding of the 3d atoms, leading to an asymmetric configuration for Pt-rich and more symmetric structures for 3d-rich clusters. The magnetic anisotropy energy defined as the energy difference for easy and hard magnetization directions varies between 5 and 13 meV/atom for the free trimers, but is strongly reduced to values between 0.7 and 6.6 meV/atom for the graphene-supported clusters. The saddle-point energy representing the barrier against magnetization reversal is on average 3 meV/atom for free trimers, it is reduced to 2 meV/atom for the more symmetric PtCo(Fe)(2) clusters, and to only about 0.3 meV/atom for the asymmetric Pt(2)Co(Fe) cluster on graphene. For the mixed tetramers the strong magnetism stabilizes a flat geometric structure, except for Pt(3)Co which forms a distorted trigonal pyramid. The geometry of the graphene-supported tetramers is very different due to the requirement of a good match to the substrate. Large magnetic anisotropy energies are found for free Pt(3)Co where the change of the magnetization direction also induces a transition from a high- to a low-moment magnetic isomer. For all other free tetramers the magnetic anisotropy energy ranges between 3 to 5 meV/atom only, it is further reduced to 0.4 to 3.8 meV/atom for the graphene-supported tetramers. The reduction is strongest for Pt(3)Fe/graphene because of the asymmetric structure of the adsorption complex. The barriers against magnetization reversal range between

  9. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  10. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  11. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  12. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  13. The gas-phase structure and some reactions of the bulky primary silane (Me(3)Si)(3)CSiH(3) and the solid-state structure of the bulky dialkyl disilane [(Me(3)Si)(3)CSiH(2)](2).

    PubMed

    Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H; Cordes, David B; Bätz, Karin; Lickiss, Paul D; Boag, Neil M; Redhouse, Alan D; Whittaker, Stephen M

    2010-10-21

    The molecular structure of the bulky primary silane, (Me(3)Si)(3)CSiH(3), in the gas phase has been determined by electron diffraction. Photolysis of (Me(3)Si)(3)CSiH(3) affords a convenient route to the bulky dialkyl disilane, [(Me(3)Si)(3)CSiH(2)](2), which is the first 1,2-dialkyldisilane to be structurally characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The disilane has an unusually large Si-Si-C angle of 120.05(9)°. PMID:20697646

  14. Gas phase chemistry of the transactinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the past few years the gas phase chemistry of the first three transactinide elements rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) has been studied experimentally using OLGA, the On-line Gas chemistry Apparatus, developed at Paul Scherrer Institute. In each experiment, the investigated transactinide element was identified by measuring the characteristic decay properties of its isotopes. In the chemistry of rutherfordium and dubnium evidence for relativistic effects were found, as predicted previously in theoretical calculations. For the first time, the volatility of Sg oxychlorides in comparison to its lighter homologues W and Mo was measured. Also, the half-lives and SF-branches of the nuclides 265Sg and 266Sg were determined. Finally, prospects for a chemical separation of bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108) using gas phase chemistry will be discussed.

  15. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  16. The gas-phase acidity of nitrocyclopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmess, John E.; Wilson, Burton; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Bloor, John E.

    1992-09-01

    Nitrocyclopropane is 10.5 kcal mol-1 weaker as an acid in the gas phase than its open-chain analog, 2-nitropropane. This is attributed to the conflicting hybridization requirements for carbanion stabilization by the cyclopropyl ring and by the nitro group. Based on reactivities, the deprotonated form does not ring-open to either the 2-nitroallyl anion or the 1-nitroallyl anion.

  17. Gas phase atomic and molecular processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng

    . that in interstellar clouds HF is the major form of gas phase fluorine.

  18. Protein structure mining using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M; de Brevern, A G; Srinivasan, N; Offmann, B

    2008-05-01

    We present a comprehensive evaluation of a new structure mining method called PB-ALIGN. It is based on the encoding of protein structure as 1D sequence of a combination of 16 short structural motifs or protein blocks (PBs). PBs are short motifs capable of representing most of the local structural features of a protein backbone. Using derived PB substitution matrix and simple dynamic programming algorithm, PB sequences are aligned the same way amino acid sequences to yield structure alignment. PBs are short motifs capable of representing most of the local structural features of a protein backbone. Alignment of these local features as sequence of symbols enables fast detection of structural similarities between two proteins. Ability of the method to characterize and align regions beyond regular secondary structures, for example, N and C caps of helix and loops connecting regular structures, puts it a step ahead of existing methods, which strongly rely on secondary structure elements. PB-ALIGN achieved efficiency of 85% in extracting true fold from a large database of 7259 SCOP domains and was successful in 82% cases to identify true super-family members. On comparison to 13 existing structure comparison/mining methods, PB-ALIGN emerged as the best on general ability test dataset and was at par with methods like YAKUSA and CE on nontrivial test dataset. Furthermore, the proposed method performed well when compared to flexible structure alignment method like FATCAT and outperforms in processing speed (less than 45 s per database scan). This work also establishes a reliable cut-off value for the demarcation of similar folds. It finally shows that global alignment scores of unrelated structures using PBs follow an extreme value distribution. PB-ALIGN is freely available on web server called Protein Block Expert (PBE) at http://bioinformatics.univ-reunion.fr/PBE/. PMID:18004784

  19. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  20. Toolbox for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; McGuffin, Liam James

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure prediction algorithms aim to predict, from amino acid sequence, the tertiary structure of a protein. In silico protein structure prediction methods have become extremely important, as in vitro-based structural elucidation is unable to keep pace with the current growth of sequence databases due to high-throughput next-generation sequencing, which has exacerbated the gaps in our knowledge between sequences and structures.Here we briefly discuss protein tertiary structure prediction, the biennial competition for the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and its role in shaping the field. We also discuss, in detail, our cutting-edge web-server method IntFOLD2-TS for tertiary structure prediction. Furthermore, we provide a step-by-step guide on using the IntFOLD2-TS web server, along with some real world examples, where the IntFOLD server can and has been used to improve protein tertiary structure prediction and aid in functional elucidation. PMID:26519323

  1. Molecular Simulation-Based Structural Prediction of Protein Complexes in Mass Spectrometry: The Human Insulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Rossetti, Giulia; Dreyer, Jens; Raugei, Simone; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Lüscher, Bernhard; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Protein electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are widely used to provide insight into structural proteomics under the assumption that non-covalent protein complexes being transferred into the gas phase preserve basically the same intermolecular interactions as in solution. Here we investigate the applicability of this assumption by extending our previous structural prediction protocol for single proteins in ESI-MS to protein complexes. We apply our protocol to the human insulin dimer (hIns2) as a test case. Our calculations reproduce the main charge and the collision cross section (CCS) measured in ESI-MS experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for 0.075 ms show that the complex maximizes intermolecular non-bonded interactions relative to the structure in water, without affecting the cross section. The overall gas-phase structure of hIns2 does exhibit differences with the one in aqueous solution, not inferable from a comparison with calculated CCS. Hence, care should be exerted when interpreting ESI-MS proteomics data based solely on NMR and/or X-ray structural information. PMID:25210764

  2. Molecular simulation-based structural prediction of protein complexes in mass spectrometry: the human insulin dimer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Rossetti, Giulia; Dreyer, Jens; Raugei, Simone; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Lüscher, Bernhard; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Protein electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques are widely used to provide insight into structural proteomics under the assumption that non-covalent protein complexes being transferred into the gas phase preserve basically the same intermolecular interactions as in solution. Here we investigate the applicability of this assumption by extending our previous structural prediction protocol for single proteins in ESI-MS to protein complexes. We apply our protocol to the human insulin dimer (hIns2) as a test case. Our calculations reproduce the main charge and the collision cross section (CCS) measured in ESI-MS experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations for 0.075 ms show that the complex maximizes intermolecular non-bonded interactions relative to the structure in water, without affecting the cross section. The overall gas-phase structure of hIns2 does exhibit differences with the one in aqueous solution, not inferable from a comparison with calculated CCS. Hence, care should be exerted when interpreting ESI-MS proteomics data based solely on NMR and/or X-ray structural information. PMID:25210764

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization, and gas-phase unimolecular reactivity of the silver hydride nanocluster [Ag3((PPh2)2CH2)3(μ3-H)](BF4)2.

    PubMed

    Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; Connell, Timothy U; White, Jonathan M; Edwards, Alison J; Mulder, Roger J; Donnelly, Paul S; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2014-07-21

    A bis(diphenylphosphino)methane-ligated trinuclear silver hydride nanocluster, [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-H)](BF4)2, featuring three silver(I) ions coordinated to a μ3-hydride, and its deuteride analogue, [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-D)](BF4)2, have been isolated and structurally characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), X-ray crystallography, NMR and IR spectroscopy. The position of the deuteride in [Ag3((Ph2P)2CH2)3(μ3-D)](BF4)2 was determined by neutron diffraction. ESI-MS of [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](BF4)2 [L = ((Ph2P)2CH2)2] produces [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](2+) and [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)(BF4)](+). A rich gas-phase ion chemistry of [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)](2+) is observed under conditions of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-capture dissociation (ECD). CID gives rise to the following complementary ion pairs: [Ag3L2](+) and [L+(H/D)](+); [Ag2(H/D)L2](+) and [AgL](+); [Ag2(H/D)L](+) and [AgL2](+). ECD gives rise to a number of dissociation channels including loss of the bis(phosphine) ligand, fragmentation of a coordinated bis(phosphine) ligand via C-P bond activation, and loss of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom with concomitant formation of [Ag3L3](+). Under CID conditions, [Ag3L3(μ3-H/D)(BF4)](+) fragments via ligand loss, the combined loss of a ligand and [H,B,F4], and cluster fragmentation to give [Ag2(BF4)L2](+) and [Ag2(L-H)L](+) [where (L-H) = (Ph2P)2CH(-)]. PMID:24991699

  4. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  5. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  6. Arterivirus structural proteins and assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews the structural characteristics of the Arteriviridae, including the basic molecular details of all of the proteins involved, the interactions of these proteins and where they occur, and further functional characterization. Most recent available literature has been focused on equi...

  7. Gas-Phase Dopant-Induced Conformational Changes Monitored with Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nicole Andrea; Root, Katharina; Zenobi, Renato; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo

    2016-02-16

    The potential of a Transversal Modulation Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TMIMS) instrument for protein analysis applications has been evaluated. The Collision Cross Section (CCS) of cytochrome c measured with the TMIMS is in agreement with values reported in the literature. Additionally, it enables tandem IMS-IMS prefiltration in dry gas and in vapor doped gas. The chemical specificity of the different dopants enables interesting studies on the structure of proteins as CCS changed strongly depending on the specific dopant. Hexane produced an unexpectedly high CCS shift, which can be utilized to evaluate the exposure of hydrophobic parts of the protein. Alcohols produced higher shifts with a dual behavior: an increase in CCS due to vapor uptake at specific absorption sites, followed by a linear shift typical for unspecific and unstable vapor uptake. The molten globule +8 shows a very specific transition. Initially, its CCS follows the trend of the compact folded states, and then it rapidly increases to the levels of the unfolded states. This strong variation suggests that the +8 charge state undergoes a dopant-induced conformational change. Interestingly, more sterically demanding alcohols seem to unfold the protein more effectively also in the gas phase. This study shows the capabilities of the TMIMS device for protein analysis and how tandem IMS-IMS with dopants could provide better understanding of the conformational changes of proteins. PMID:26845079

  8. Spectroscopic studies of kinetically trapped conformations in the gas phase: the case of triply protonated bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the relation between the gas-phase structure of biological molecules and their solution-phase structure is important when attempting to use gas-phase techniques to address biologically relevant questions. Directly after electrospray ionization, molecules can be kinetically trapped in a state that retains some "memory" of its conformation in solution and is separated from the lowest-energy gas-phase structure by barriers on the potential energy surface. In order to identify and characterize kinetically trapped structures, we have explored the conformational space of triply protonated bradykinin in the gas phase by combining field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) with cold ion spectroscopy. We isolate three distinct conformational families and characterize them by recording their UV-photofragment spectra and vibrational spectra. Annealing of the initial conformational distribution produced by electrospray reveals that one of the conformational families is kinetically trapped, while two others are stable, gas-phase structures. We compare our results to previously published results obtained using drift-tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and propose a correspondence between the conformational families separated by FAIMS and those by IMS. PMID:25940085

  9. Simplified procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c in silica aerogel nanoarchitectures while retaining gas-phase bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Iftikhar, Mariam; Ndoi, Adela; Scappaticci, Steven J; Lisi, George P; Buzard, Kaitlyn L; Garvey, Elizabeth M

    2012-10-16

    Cytochrome c (cyt. c) has been encapsulated in silica sol-gels and processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide through a simplified synthetic procedure. Previous reports demonstrated a need to adsorb cyt. c to metal nanoparticles prior to silica sol-gel encapsulation and processing to form aerogels. We report that cyt. c can be encapsulated in aerogels without added nanoparticles and retain structural stability and gas-phase activity for nitric oxide. While the UV-visible Soret absorbance and nitric oxide response indicate that cyt. c encapsulated with nanoparticles in aerogels remains slightly more stable and functional than cyt. c encapsulated alone, these properties are not very different in the two types of aerogels. From UV-visible and Soret circular dichroism results, we infer that cyt. c encapsulated alone self-organizes to reduce contact with the silica gel in a way that may bear at least some resemblance to the way cyt. c self-organizes into superstructures of protein within aerogels when nanoparticles are present. Both the buffer concentration and the cyt. c concentration of solutions used to synthesize the bioaerogels affect the structural integrity of the protein encapsulated alone within the dried aerogels. Optimized bioaerogels are formed when cyt. c is encapsulated from 40 mM phosphate buffered solutions, and when the loaded cyt. c concentration in the aerogel is in the range of 5 to 15 μM. Increased viability of cyt. c in aerogels is also observed when supercritical fluid used to produce aerogels is vented over relatively long times. PMID:22924640

  10. Gas-phase interaction of protonated lysine with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozman, Marko; Srzic, Dunja; Klasinc, Leo

    2006-07-01

    Gas-phase interaction of LysH+ with D2O has been investigated in order to elucidate the H/D exchange reaction mechanism and possibility of water assisted ion-zwitterion structure formation. The proceed of the interaction is modeled by DFT calculations. Potential energy profiles for: the perturbation from ion-molecule to ion-zwitterion structure, the "flip-flop" and the "bridging" mechanism are presented. Analysis of H/D exchange kinetics results for LysH+ with D2O and CD3OD measured in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer agree with ion-molecule structure of LysH+. Both experimental and theoretical findings suggest that during interaction of LysH+ with D2O isotopic exchange is favored over the water assisted conformational change from ion-molecule into ion-zwitterion structure.

  11. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2011-09-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO{2/-} anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO{2/-} rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples.

  12. Gas-Phase Acidities of Phosphorylated Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Stover, Michele L; Plummer, Chelsea E; Miller, Sean R; Cassady, Carolyn J; Dixon, David A

    2015-11-19

    Gas-phase acidities and heats of formation have been predicted at the G3(MP2)/SCRF-COSMO level of theory for 10 phosphorylated amino acids and their corresponding amides, including phospho-serine (pSer), -threonine (pThr), and -tyrosine (pTyr), providing the first reliable set of these values. The gas-phase acidities (GAs) of the three named phosphorylated amino acids and their amides have been determined using proton transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental and predicted GAs. The phosphate group is the deprotonation site for pSer and pThr and deprotonation from the carboxylic acid generated the lowest energy anion for pTyr. The infrared spectra were calculated for six low energy anions of pSer, pThr, and pTyr. For deprotonated pSer and pThr, good agreement is found between the experimental IRMPD spectra and the calculated spectra for our lowest energy anion structure. For pTyr, the IR spectra for a higher energy phosphate deprotonated structure is in good agreement with experiment. Additional experiments tested electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions for pTyr and determined that variations in solvent, temperature, and voltage can result in a different experimental GA value, indicating that ESI conditions affect the conformation of the pTyr anion. PMID:26492552

  13. Structure Prediction of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiche

    Membrane proteins play a central role in many cellular and physiological processes. It is estimated that integral membrane proteins make up about 20-30% of the proteome (Krogh et al., 2001b; Stevens and Arkin, 2000; von Heijne, 1999). They are essential mediators of material and information transfer across cell membranes. Their functions include active and passive transport of molecules into and out of cells and organelles; transduction of energy among various forms (light, electrical, and chemical energy); as well as reception and transduction of chemical and electrical signals across membranes (Avdonin, 2005; Bockaert et al., 2002; Pahl, 1999; Rehling et al., 2004; Stack et al., 1995). Identifying these transmembrane (TM) proteins and deciphering their molecular mechanisms, then, is of great importance, particularly as applied to biomedicine. Membrane proteins are the targets of a large number of pharmacologically and toxicologically active substances, and are directly involved in their uptake, metabolism, and clearance (Bettler et al., 1998; Cohen, 2002; Heusser and Jardieu, 1997; Tibes et al., 2005; Xu et al., 2005). Despite the importance of membrane proteins, the knowledge of their high-resolution structures and mechanisms of action has lagged far behind in comparison to that of water-soluble proteins: less than 1% of all three-dimensional structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are of membrane proteins. This unfortunate disparity stems from difficulties in overexpression and the crystallization of membrane proteins (Grisshammer and Tate, 1995; Michel, 1991).

  14. Structural and relative energy assessments of DFT functionals and the MP2 method to describe the gas phase methylation of nitronates: [R(1)R(2)CNO2](-) + CH3I.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ayyaz; Longo, Ricardo L

    2016-06-22

    The performances of 26 combinations of density-functional theory (DFT) functionals or second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) methods and basis sets were evaluated for the calculation of the activation energy (Δ(‡)E), the energy available (ΔRCE) to the reactant complex, the energy of reaction (ΔrE), and rotational constants of the main structures involved in the methylation reactions of nitronates, [R(1)R(2)CNO2](-) + CH3I, in the gas phase, where R(1) = R(2) = H, R(1) = H and R(2) = CH3, R(1) = R(2) = CH3, and R(1) + R(2) = c-(CH2)2. The separated reactants and products, the reactant and product complexes, and the transition states were considered, leading to 43 data points for the statistical analysis for each method under assessment. Five statistical quantifiers: the mean signed error (MSE), the mean unsigned error (MUE), the percent mean relative error (% MRE), best and worse (BW), and the confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the performance of methods relative to the CCSD(T)/CBS//MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ reference method. The DFT functionals included the widely applied B3LYP and M06-2X global-hybrids and the recently available DSD-PBEP86, DSD-PBEP86-D3BJ and PWPB95 double-hybrids. The basis sets involved an effective core potential (ECP) for describing the inner electrons of iodine such as LANL2DZdp and aug-cc-pVXZ-PP (X = D, T, and Q), and all-electron basis sets for the remaining atoms. The energy available to the reactant complex is described quite well by all methods, however, only the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP method provided values within 2 kcal mol(-1) (8.4 kJ mol(-1)) from the reference method for Δ(‡)E and ΔrE. Amongst the DFT methods, the global-hybrid M06-2X functional produced the best overall results including BW and CI. Notice that all methods yielded the smallest Δ(‡)E for the C-methylation pathway. The rotational constants of the reactant complexes and the transition state structures were compared, for which the MP2 method and the M06-2X

  15. De Novo Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Ngan, Shing-Chung; Samudrala, Ram

    An unparalleled amount of sequence data is being made available from large-scale genome sequencing efforts. The data provide a shortcut to the determination of the function of a gene of interest, as long as there is an existing sequenced gene with similar sequence and of known function. This has spurred structural genomic initiatives with the goal of determining as many protein folds as possible (Brenner and Levitt, 2000; Burley, 2000; Brenner, 2001; Heinemann et al., 2001). The purpose of this is twofold: First, the structure of a gene product can often lead to direct inference of its function. Second, since the function of a protein is dependent on its structure, direct comparison of the structures of gene products can be more sensitive than the comparison of sequences of genes for detecting homology. Presently, structural determination by crystallography and NMR techniques is still slow and expensive in terms of manpower and resources, despite attempts to automate the processes. Computer structure prediction algorithms, while not providing the accuracy of the traditional techniques, are extremely quick and inexpensive and can provide useful low-resolution data for structure comparisons (Bonneau and Baker, 2001). Given the immense number of structures which the structural genomic projects are attempting to solve, there would be a considerable gain even if the computer structure prediction approach were applicable to a subset of proteins.

  16. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Bouchoux, Guy; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-09-18

    The goal of this work was to obtain a detailed insight on the gas-phase protonation energetic of adenosine using both mass spectrometric experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The experimental approach used the extended kinetic method with nanoelectrospray ionization and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. This method provides experimental values for proton affinity, PA(adenosine) = 979 +/- 1 kJ.mol (-1), and for the "protonation entropy", Delta p S degrees (adenosine) = S degrees (adenosineH +) - S degrees (adenosine) = -5 +/- 5 J.mol (-1).K (-1). The corresponding gas-phase basicity is consequently equal to: GB(adenosine) = 945 +/- 2 kJ.mol (-1) at 298K. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of 974 kJ.mol (-1) after consideration of isodesmic proton transfer reactions with pyridine as the reference base. Moreover, computations clearly showed that N3 is the most favorable protonation site for adenosine, due to a strong internal hydrogen bond involving the hydroxyl group at the 2' position of the ribose sugar moiety, unlike observations for adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine, where protonation occurs on N1. The existence of negligible protonation entropy is confirmed by calculations (theoretical Delta p S degrees (adenosine) approximately -2/-3 J.mol (-1).K (-1)) including conformational analysis and entropy of hindered rotations. Thus, the calculated protonation thermochemical properties are in good agreement with our experimental measurements. It may be noted that the new PA value is approximately 10 kJ.mol (-1) lower than the one reported in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database, thus pointing to a correction of the tabulated protonation thermochemistry of adenosine. PMID:18720985

  17. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  18. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  19. Method for protein structure alignment

    DOEpatents

    Blankenbecler, Richard; Ohlsson, Mattias; Peterson, Carsten; Ringner, Markus

    2005-02-22

    This invention provides a method for protein structure alignment. More particularly, the present invention provides a method for identification, classification and prediction of protein structures. The present invention involves two key ingredients. First, an energy or cost function formulation of the problem simultaneously in terms of binary (Potts) assignment variables and real-valued atomic coordinates. Second, a minimization of the energy or cost function by an iterative method, where in each iteration (1) a mean field method is employed for the assignment variables and (2) exact rotation and/or translation of atomic coordinates is performed, weighted with the corresponding assignment variables.

  20. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  1. Protein Structure Comparison and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çamoǧlu, Orhan; Singh, Ambuj K.

    The success of genome projects has generated an enormous amount of sequence data. In order to realize the full value of the data, we need to understand its functional role and its evolutionary origin. Sequence comparison methods are incredibly valuable for this task. However, for sequences falling in the twilight zone (usually between 20 and 35% sequence similarity), we need to resort to structural alignment and comparison for a meaningful analysis. Such a structural approach can be used for classification of proteins, isolation of structural motifs, and discovery of drug targets.

  2. Transferring pharmaceuticals into the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Krause, Tim; Rademann, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The dissolution of molecules of biological interest in supercritical carbon dioxide is investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the mild processing temperatures of most supercritical fluids, their adiabatic expansion into vacuum permits to transfer even thermally very sensitive substances into the gas phase, which is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In addition, supercritical CO2constitutes a chemically inert solvent that is compatible with hydrocarbon-free ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Here, we report on the dissolution and pulsed supersonic jet expansion of caffeine (C8H10N4O2), the provitamin menadione (C11H8O2), and the amino acid derivative l-phenylalanine tert-butyl ester hydrochloride (C6H5CH2CH(NH2)COOC(CH3)3[dot operator]HCl), into vacuum. An on-axis residual gas analyzer is used to monitor the relative amounts of solute and solvent in the molecular beam as a function of solvent densityE The excellent selectivity and sensitivity provided by mass spectrometry permits to probe even trace amounts of solutes. The strong density variation of CO2 close to the critical point results in a pronounced pressure dependence of the relative ion currents of solute and solvent molecules, reflecting a substantial change in solubility.

  3. Gas-phase basicity of 2-furaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Ragno, Rino; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2012-11-01

    2-Furaldehyde (2-FA), also known as furfural or 2-furancarboxaldehyde, is an heterocyclic aldehyde that can be obtained from the thermal dehydration of pentose monosaccharides. This molecule can be considered as an important sustainable intermediate for the preparation of a great variety of chemicals, pharmaceuticals and furan-based polymers. Despite the great importance of this molecule, its gas-phase basicity (GB) has never been measured. In this work, the GB of 2-FA was determined by the extended Cooks's kinetic method from electrospray ionization triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometric experiments along with theoretical calculations. As expected, computational results identify the aldehydic oxygen atom of 2-FA as the preferred protonation site. The geometries of O-O-cis and O-O-trans 2-FA and of their six different protomers were calculated at the B3LYP/aug-TZV(d,p) level of theory; proton affinity (PA) values were also calculated at the G3(MP2, CCSD(T)) level of theory. The experimental PA was estimated to be 847.9 ± 3.8 kJ mol(-1), the protonation entropy 115.1 ± 5.03 J mol(-1) K(-1) and the GB 813.6 ± 4.08 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K. From the PA value, a ΔH°(f) of 533.0 ± 12.4 kJ mol(-1) for protonated 2-FA was derived. PMID:23147827

  4. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R; Brown, Jeffery M; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26810432

  5. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  6. Selective transport of amino acids into the gas phase: driving forces for amino acid solubilization in gas-phase reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Bennett, Andrew; Liu, Jianbo

    2011-01-28

    We report a study on encapsulation of various amino acids into gas-phase sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) reverse micelles, using electrospray ionization guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation of mass-selected reverse micellar ions with Xe was performed to probe structures of gas-phase micellar assemblies, identify solute-surfactant interactions, and determine preferential incorporation sites of amino acids. Integration into gas-phase reverse micelles depends upon amino acid hydrophobicity and charge state. For examples, glycine and protonated amino acids (such as protonated tryptophan) are encapsulated within the micellar core via electrostatic interactions; while neutral tryptophan is adsorbed in the surfactant layer. As verified using model polar hydrophobic compounds, the hydrophobic effect and solute-interface hydrogen-bonding do not provide sufficient driving force needed for interfacial solubilization of neutral tryptophan. Neutral tryptophan, with a zwitterionic structure, is intercalated at the micellar interface between surfactant molecules through complementary effects of electrostatic interactions between tryptophan backbone and AOT polar heads, and hydrophobic interactions between tryptophan side chain and AOT alkyl tails. Protonation of tryptophan could significantly improve its incorporation capacity into gas-phase reverse micelles, and displace its incorporation site from the micellar interfacial zone to the core; protonation of glycine, on the other hand, has little effect on its encapsulation capacity. Another interesting observation is that amino acids of different isoelectric points could be selectively encapsulated into, and transported by, reverse micelles from solution to the gas phase, based upon their competition for protonation and subsequent encapsulation within the micellar core. PMID:21140022

  7. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments1-7 and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example in potassium channels8. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity toward lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL), aquaporin Z (AqpZ), and the ammonia channel (AmtB) using ion mobility MS (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas-phase. By resolving lipid-bound states we then rank bound lipids based on their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Results show that lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability, the highest-ranking lipid however is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation9. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays, we discover that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Analogous experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that reposition AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Overall our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events enabling distinction of lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane protein structure and/or function. We anticipate that these

  8. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  9. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  10. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  11. Sucralose Destabilization of Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee; Shukla, Nimesh; Cho, Inha; Cohn, Erin; Taylor, Erika A; Othon, Christina M

    2015-04-16

    Sucralose is a commonly employed artificial sweetener that behaves very differently than its natural disaccharide counterpart, sucrose, in terms of its interaction with biomolecules. The presence of sucralose in solution is found to destabilize the native structure of two model protein systems: the globular protein bovine serum albumin and an enzyme staphylococcal nuclease. The melting temperature of these proteins decreases as a linear function of sucralose concentration. We correlate this destabilization to the increased polarity of the molecule. The strongly polar nature is manifested as a large dielectric friction exerted on the excited-state rotational diffusion of tryptophan using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. Tryptophan exhibits rotational diffusion proportional to the measured bulk viscosity for sucrose solutions over a wide range of concentrations, consistent with a Stokes-Einstein model. For sucralose solutions, however, the diffusion is dependent on the concentration, strongly diverging from the viscosity predictions, and results in heterogeneous rotational diffusion. PMID:26263149

  12. Gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of arginine.

    PubMed

    Bouchoux, Guy; Desaphy, Sylvain; Bourcier, Sophie; Malosse, Christian; Bimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum

    2008-03-20

    The gas-phase basicity (GB), proton affinity (PA), and protonation entropy (DeltapS degrees (M)=S degrees (MH+)-S degrees (M)) of arginine (Arg) have been experimentally determined by the extended kinetic method using an electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. This method provides GB(Arg)=1004.3+/-2.2 (4.9) kJ.mol(-1) (indicated errors are standard deviations, and in parentheses, 95% confidence limits are given). Consideration of previous experimental data using a fast atom bombardment ionization tandem sector mass spectrometer slightly modifies these estimates since GB(Arg)=1005.9+/-3.1 (6.6) kJ.mol(-1). Lower limits of the proton affinity, PA(Arg)=1046+/-4 (7) kJ.mol(-1), and of the "protonation entropy", DeltapS degrees (Arg)=S degrees (ArgH+)-S degrees (Arg)=-27+/-7 (15) J.mol(-1).K(-1), are also provided by the experiments. Theoretical calculations conducted at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, including 298 K enthalpy correction, predict a proton affinity value of ca. 1053 kJ.mol-1 after consideration of isodesmic proton-transfer reactions with guanidine as the reference base. Computations including explicit treatment of hindered rotations and mixing of conformers confirm that a noticeable entropy loss does occur upon protonation, which leads to a theoretical DeltapS degrees (Arg) term of ca. -45 J.mol(-1).K(-1). The following evaluated thermochemical parameter values are proposed: GB(Arg)=1005+/-3 kJ.mol(-1); PA(Arg)=1051+/-5 kJ.mol(-1), and DeltapS degrees (Arg)=-45+/-12 J.mol(-1).K(-1). PMID:18288831

  13. Polymerization in the gas phase, in clusters, and on nanoparticle surfaces.

    PubMed

    El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-07-01

    Gas phase and cluster experiments provide unique opportunities to quantitatively study the effects of initiators, solvents, chain transfer agents, and inhibitors on the mechanisms of polymerization. Furthermore, a number of important phenomena, unique structures, and novel properties may exist during gas-phase and cluster polymerization. In this regime, the structure of the growing polymer may change dramatically and the rate coefficient may vary significantly upon the addition of a single molecule of the monomer. These changes would be reflected in the properties of the oligomers deposited from the gas phase. At low pressures, cationic and radical cationic polymerizations may proceed in the gas phase through elimination reactions. In the same systems at high pressure, however, the ionic intermediates may be stabilized, and addition without elimination may occur. In isolated van der Waals clusters of monomer molecules, sequential polymerization with several condensation steps can occur on a time scale of a few microseconds following the ionization of the gas-phase cluster. The cluster reactions, which bridge gas-phase and condensed-phase chemistry, allow examination of the effects of controlled states of aggregation. This Account describes several examples of gas-phase and cluster polymerization studies where the most significant results can be summarized as follows: (1) The carbocation polymerization of isobutene shows slower rates with increasing polymerization steps resulting from entropy barriers, which could explain the need for low temperatures for the efficient propagation of high molecular weight polymers. (2) Radical cation polymerization of propene can be initiated by partial charge transfer from an ionized aromatic molecule such as benzene coupled with covalent condensation of the associated propene molecules. This novel mechanism leads exclusively to the formation of propene oligomer ions and avoids other competitive products. (3) Structural information

  14. A protein structure data and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Weber, Irene; Wang, Haibin; Yang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a protein structure data and analysis system that is only used in the lab for analyzing the proprietary data. It is capable of storing public protein data, such as the data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) [1], and life scientists' proprietary data. This toolkit is targeted at life scientists who want to maintain proprietary protein structure data (may be incomplete), to search and query publicly known protein structures and to compare their structure data with others. The comparison functions can be used to find structure differences between two proteins at atom level, especially in mutant versions of proteins. The system can also be used as a tool of choosing better protein structure template in new protein's tertiary structure prediction. The system is developed in Java and the protein data is stored in a relational database (Oracle 9i). PMID:17282836

  15. Introduction to Protein Structure through Genetic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Tanya L.; Linton, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An illuminating way to learn about protein function is to explore high-resolution protein structures. Analysis of the proteins involved in genetic diseases has been used to introduce students to protein structure and the role that individual mutations can play in the onset of disease. Known mutations can be correlated to changes in protein…

  16. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures. PMID:23486213

  17. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  18. Atomic and molecular physics in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.

    1990-09-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of energy deposition by high-linear-energy-transfer radiation play an important role in the subsequent chemical and biological processes leading to radiation damage. Because the spatial structures of energy deposition events are of the same dimensions as molecular structures in the mammalian cell, direct measurements of energy deposition distributions appropriate to radiation biology are infeasible. This has led to the development of models of energy transport based on a knowledge of atomic and molecular interactions process that enable one to simulate energy transfer on an atomic scale. Such models require a detailed understanding of the interactions of ions and electrons with biologically relevant material. During the past 20 years there has been a great deal of progress in our understanding of these interactions; much of it coming from studies in the gas phase. These studies provide information on the systematics of interaction cross sections leading to a knowledge of the regions of energy deposition where molecular and phase effects are important and that guide developments in appropriate theory. In this report studies of the doubly differential cross sections, crucial to the development of stochastic energy deposition calculations and track structure simulation, will be reviewed. Areas of understanding are discussed and directions for future work addressed. Particular attention is given to experimental and theoretical findings that have changed the traditional view of secondary electron production for charged particle interactions with atomic and molecular targets.

  19. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  20. ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICULATE AND GAS PHASE CONTRIBUTIONS TO VASCULAR TOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicular emissions (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6 h/d × 50 days, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein, 3-nitrotyrosine, and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  1. Substrate-free gas-phase synthesis of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dato, Albert Manglallan

    Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms tightly packed in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The material possesses remarkable properties and has been envisioned for use in numerous applications. Contemporary graphene production techniques require substrates or graphite crystals to create graphene. Furthermore, these approaches involve multiple steps, and sometimes non-ambient conditions, to produce atomically-thin sheets. This dissertation presents the first substrate-free gas-phase graphene synthesis method. The technique can synthesize graphene in a single step at atmospheric pressure, without the use of graphite or substrates. The novel synthesis method was discovered through experiments that tested the hypothesis that graphene could be synthesized through the delivery of alcohols into argon plasmas. The experiments presented in this dissertation were conducted in an atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Solid carbon materials were produced by delivering liquid ethanol droplets directly into argon plasmas. Numerous characterization techniques were used to unambiguously prove that the synthesized materials were clean and highly ordered graphene sheets. Additional studies investigated the effects of variable experimental parameters on the graphene synthesis process. The applied microwave power did not significantly affect the types of structures produced in the reactor. Lowering the volumetric flow rate of the plasma gas resulted in the synthesis of graphitic particles. The composition of the precursors delivered into the reactor also affected graphene synthesis. Graphene was not produced through the delivery of methanol or isopropyl alcohol droplets. However, graphene was obtained through dimethyl ether, which is an organic compound with the same atomic composition as ethanol. Thus, the flow rate and precursor composition significantly affected the nucleation, growth, and residence time of the materials created during experiments

  2. Structure Prediction of Protein Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Weng, Zhiping

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for biological function. They directly and indirectly influence the biological systems of which they are a part. Antibodies bind with antigens to detect and stop viruses and other infectious agents. Cell signaling is performed in many cases through the interactions between proteins. Many diseases involve protein-protein interactions on some level, including cancer and prion diseases.

  3. PDBFlex: exploring flexibility in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Thomas; Li, Zhanwen; Sedova, Mayya; Rotkiewicz, Piotr; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Godzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The PDBFlex database, available freely and with no login requirements at http://pdbflex.org, provides information on flexibility of protein structures as revealed by the analysis of variations between depositions of different structural models of the same protein in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). PDBFlex collects information on all instances of such depositions, identifying them by a 95% sequence identity threshold, performs analysis of their structural differences and clusters them according to their structural similarities for easy analysis. The PDBFlex contains tools and viewers enabling in-depth examination of structural variability including: 2D-scaling visualization of RMSD distances between structures of the same protein, graphs of average local RMSD in the aligned structures of protein chains, graphical presentation of differences in secondary structure and observed structural disorder (unresolved residues), difference distance maps between all sets of coordinates and 3D views of individual structures and simulated transitions between different conformations, the latter displayed using JSMol visualization software. PMID:26615193

  4. PDBFlex: exploring flexibility in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Thomas; Li, Zhanwen; Sedova, Mayya; Rotkiewicz, Piotr; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Godzik, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The PDBFlex database, available freely and with no login requirements at http://pdbflex.org, provides information on flexibility of protein structures as revealed by the analysis of variations between depositions of different structural models of the same protein in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). PDBFlex collects information on all instances of such depositions, identifying them by a 95% sequence identity threshold, performs analysis of their structural differences and clusters them according to their structural similarities for easy analysis. The PDBFlex contains tools and viewers enabling in-depth examination of structural variability including: 2D-scaling visualization of RMSD distances between structures of the same protein, graphs of average local RMSD in the aligned structures of protein chains, graphical presentation of differences in secondary structure and observed structural disorder (unresolved residues), difference distance maps between all sets of coordinates and 3D views of individual structures and simulated transitions between different conformations, the latter displayed using JSMol visualization software. PMID:26615193

  5. [Protein structure: Folding and prions].

    PubMed

    Rey-Gayo, Antonio; Calbo Torrecilla, Francisco

    2002-04-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies have become a subject of prime social concern in recent years because of its relation to "mad cow disease" and their potential for transmission to humans. Among the most important scientific aspects of these diseases are the peculiar characteristics of the agent involved in their transmission. In this article we briefly describe the outstanding features of prions, the most widely accepted hypothesis for these diseases. We focus on the molecular characteristics of this protein, coded in the genome of the affected host, and describe the conformational alterations in the protein's tertiary structure that have been blamed for its pathologic activity. Our aim is to summarize the state-of-the-art knowledge on prions, the hypotheses proposed to explain mechanisms of disease transmission without agents containing genetic material, and some specific peculiarities of this new infectious agent. The links between this knowledge and possible therapeutic strategies to overcome the disease justify, once again, close interaction among chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine. PMID:11996702

  6. Sucralose Destabilization of Protein Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Inha; Chen, Lee; Shukla, Nimesh; Othon, Christina

    2015-03-01

    Sucralose is a commonly employed artificial sweetener. Sucralose behaves very differently than its natural disaccharide counterpart, sucrose, in terms of its interaction with biomolecules. The presence of sucralose in solution is found to destabilize the native structure of the globular protein Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The melting temperature decreases as a linear function of sucralose concentration. We correlate this destabilization with the increased polarity of the sucralose molecule as compared to sucrose. The strongly polar nature is observed as a large dielectric friction exerted on the excited state rotational diffusion of tryptophan using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. Tryptophan exhibits rotational diffusion proportional to the measured bulk viscosity for sucrose solutions over a wide range of concentrations, consistent with a Stokes-Einstein diffusional model. For sucralose solutions however, the diffusion is linearly dependent with the concentration, strongly diverging from the viscosity predictions. The polar nature of sucralose causes a dramatically different interaction with biomolecules than natural disaccharide molecules. Connecticut Space Grant Consortium.

  7. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  8. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX. PMID:25318698

  9. Time-Resolved Pulsed Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Probes Gaseous Proteins Structural Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  10. Multidimensional Separations of Ubiquitin Conformers in the Gas Phase: Relating Ion Cross Sections to H/D Exchange Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Errol W.; Williams, Evan R.

    2009-01-01

    Investigating gas-phase structures of protein ions can lead to an improved understanding of intramolecular forces that play an important role in protein folding. Both hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and ion mobility spectrometry provide insight into the structures and stabilities of different gas-phase conformers, but how best to relate the results from these two methods has been hotly debated. Here, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is combined with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT/ICR MS) and is used to directly relate ubiquitin ion cross sections and H/D exchange extents. Multiple conformers can be identified using both methods. For the 9+ charge state of ubiquitin, two conformers (or unresolved populations of conformers) that have cross sections differing by 10% are resolved by FAIMS, but only one conformer is apparent using H/D exchange at short times. For the 12+ charge state, two conformers (or conformer populations) have cross sections differing by <1%, yet H/D exchange of these conformers differ significantly (6 versus 25 exchanges). These and other results show that ubiquitin ion collisional cross sections and H/D exchange distributions are not strongly correlated and that factors other than surface accessibility appear to play a significant role in determining rates and extents of H/D exchange. Conformers that are not resolved by one method could be resolved by the other, indicating that these two methods are highly complementary and that more conformations can be resolved with this combination of methods than by either method alone. PMID:16023362

  11. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  12. Gas phase synthesis of two ensembles of silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, A.; de Jong, M. M.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    Dusty plasmas provide a very favorable environment for the growth of silicon nanocrystals. For application of silicon nanocrystals in a solar cell, the fabrication of monodisperse silicon quantum dots has been challenging. We report a single step method to synthesize silicon (Si) nanoparticles in a custom designed dedicated plasma reactor. The nanoparticles produced in the gas phase belong to two different phases exhibiting different structural and optical properties. Particles made in the bulk of the plasma are aggregates of crystalline particles with a mean size of 100 nm. Particles made in locally enhanced plasma regions produced at holes present in the grounded electrode contain free-standing quantum sized particles with crystallites (with mean size of 2.95 nm) embedded within an amorphous matrix. We provide insight on different plasma processes leading to the formation of aggregates and free-standing particles. We hypothesize that the free standing particles are formed due to the excess energetic electrons present in locally enhanced discharges.

  13. Gas-phase electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, N.; Catani, K. J.; Sanelli, J. A.; Dryza, V.; Bieske, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    The visible and near-UV electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation is measured in the gas phase by photodissociation of indole+-Ar and indole+-He complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. A series of resolved vibronic transitions extending from 610 to 460 nm are assigned to the D2 ← D0 band system, while weak transitions between 390 and 360 nm are assigned to the D3 ← D0 system, and a stronger, broad, unresolved absorption between 350 and 300 nm is attributed to the D4 ← D0 system. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to assign vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system, and show that the main active vibrational modes correspond to in-plane ring deformations. The strongest D2 ← D0 vibronic transitions of indole+-He do not correspond with any catalogued diffuse interstellar bands, even considering band displacements of up to 50 cm-1possibly caused by the attached He atom.

  14. Practical lessons from protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ginalski, Krzysztof; Grishin, Nick V.; Godzik, Adam; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Despite recent efforts to develop automated protein structure determination protocols, structural genomics projects are slow in generating fold assignments for complete proteomes, and spatial structures remain unknown for many protein families. Alternative cheap and fast methods to assign folds using prediction algorithms continue to provide valuable structural information for many proteins. The development of high-quality prediction methods has been boosted in the last years by objective community-wide assessment experiments. This paper gives an overview of the currently available practical approaches to protein structure prediction capable of generating accurate fold assignment. Recent advances in assessment of the prediction quality are also discussed. PMID:15805122

  15. Structural templates for comparative protein docking

    PubMed Central

    Anishchenko, Ivan; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Tuzikov, Alexander V.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of protein-protein interactions is important for understanding life processes. Because of the inherent limitations of experimental techniques, such characterization requires computational approaches. Along with the traditional protein-protein docking (free search for a match between two proteins), comparative (template-based) modeling of protein-protein complexes has been gaining popularity. Its development puts an emphasis on full and partial structural similarity between the target protein monomers and the protein-protein complexes previously determined by experimental techniques (templates). The template-based docking relies on the quality and diversity of the template set. We present a carefully curated, non-redundant library of templates containing 4,950 full structures of binary complexes and 5,936 protein-protein interfaces extracted from the full structures at 12Å distance cut-off. Redundancy in the libraries was removed by clustering the PDB structures based on structural similarity. The value of the clustering threshold was determined from the analysis of the clusters and the docking performance on a benchmark set. High structural quality of the interfaces in the template and validation sets was achieved by automated procedures and manual curation. The library is included in the Dockground resource for molecular recognition studies at http://dockground.bioinformatics.ku.edu. PMID:25488330

  16. The Gas-Phase Deuterium Fractionation of Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Yoshihiro; Roberts, Helen; Herbst, Eric

    2005-03-01

    The dominant mechanism for the deuteration of formaldehyde in the gas phase of low-temperature interstellar cloud cores occurs via reaction with the deuterating ions H2D+, HD+2, and D+3. Until now, it has been assumed that deuteration leads to an ion that, on recombination with electrons, can produce a deuterated neutral species with a statistical branching fraction. Quantum chemical calculations reported here, however, show an entirely different picture, in which the deuteration of formaldehyde leads to the molecular ion H2COD+, where the deuterium binds only on the oxygen side of the molecule. The structure is quite stable, while an alternative structure, H2DCO+, cannot be produced in a straightforward manner. Dissociative recombination of H2COD+ to reproduce a formaldehyde structure then removes the deuteration if the dissociation is direct, i.e., it occurs without change of structure. There are several possible indirect mechanisms by which dissociative recombination can lead to HDCO, however. For example, if the direct products are HCOD+H, it is possible that subsequent isomerization to HDCO can occur, although this involved process is unlikely. Another possibility is isomerization during the actual dissociation of the H2COD intermediate. Models of deuterium fractionation in which dissociative recombination is predominantly direct are presented, and it is found that the deuterium fractionation of formaldehyde to form both HDCO and D2CO can still occur via other mechanisms, although with less efficiency than previously obtained. If the dissociative recombination is half indirect, however, then we can recover the previously calculated efficiency.

  17. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. PMID:26682969

  18. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  19. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue-residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein-protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  20. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  1. Structural alphabets for protein structure classification: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Le, Quan; Pollastri, Gianluca; Koehl, Patrice

    2009-03-27

    Finding structural similarities between proteins often helps reveal shared functionality, which otherwise might not be detected by native sequence information alone. Such similarity is usually detected and quantified by protein structure alignment. Determining the optimal alignment between two protein structures, however, remains a hard problem. An alternative approach is to approximate each three-dimensional protein structure using a sequence of motifs derived from a structural alphabet. Using this approach, structure comparison is performed by comparing the corresponding motif sequences or structural sequences. In this article, we measure the performance of such alphabets in the context of the protein structure classification problem. We consider both local and global structural sequences. Each letter of a local structural sequence corresponds to the best matching fragment to the corresponding local segment of the protein structure. The global structural sequence is designed to generate the best possible complete chain that matches the full protein structure. We use an alphabet of 20 letters, corresponding to a library of 20 motifs or protein fragments having four residues. We show that the global structural sequences approximate well the native structures of proteins, with an average coordinate root mean square of 0.69 A over 2225 test proteins. The approximation is best for all alpha-proteins, while relatively poorer for all beta-proteins. We then test the performance of four different sequence representations of proteins (their native sequence, the sequence of their secondary-structure elements, and the local and global structural sequences based on our fragment library) with different classifiers in their ability to classify proteins that belong to five distinct folds of CATH. Without surprise, the primary sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show that addition of either secondary-structure information or local information from the

  2. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  3. a Nucleoside Under Observation in the Gas Phase: a Rotational Study of Uridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoside of uridine has been placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and the most stable C2{'}-anti conformation characterized by broadband chirped pulse (CP-FTMW) and narrowband molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopies. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, originated by two 14N nuclei, has been completely resolved. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside.

  4. Comparative Protein Structure Modeling Using Modeller

    PubMed Central

    Eswar, Narayanan; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Madhusudhan, M.S.; Eramian, David; Shen, Min-yi; Pieper, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Functional characterization of a protein sequence is one of the most frequent problems in biology. This task is usually facilitated by accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structure of the studied protein. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, comparative or homology modeling can sometimes provide a useful 3-D model for a protein that is related to at least one known protein structure. Comparative modeling predicts the 3-D structure of a given protein sequence (target) based primarily on its alignment to one or more proteins of known structure (templates). The prediction process consists of fold assignment, target-template alignment, model building, and model evaluation. This unit describes how to calculate comparative models using the program MODELLER and discusses all four steps of comparative modeling, frequently observed errors, and some applications. Modeling lactate dehydrogenase from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvLDH) is described as an example. The download and installation of the MODELLER software is also described. PMID:18428767

  5. Leveraging ultraviolet photodissociation and spectroscopy to investigate peptide and protein three-dimensional structure with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Julian, Ryan R

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and lasers have facilitated the development of novel experiments combining the benefits of both technologies. This minireview focuses on the coupling of visible/ultraviolet photons with mass spectrometry for analysis of peptide and protein three-dimensional structure. Practical aspects of instrument design and the relationship between experiment and theory are discussed. Experiments utilizing spectroscopy, action spectroscopy, excitation energy transfer, photodissociation, and photoactivated radical chemistry are described. The strengths and weaknesses of each approach are discussed in relation to the type of information typically obtained. A significant body of data suggests that under appropriate source conditions, kinetically trapped structures are observed in these experiments rather than true gas phase minima, suggesting retention of solution phase structural features is possible. Further refinement and exploration of these methods promises to accelerate protein structure discovery in the near future. PMID:27270260

  6. Template-based structure modeling of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andras; Zhang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein complexes can be constructed by using the known structure of other protein complexes as a template. The complex structure templates are generally detected either by homology-based sequence alignments or, given the structure of monomer components, by structure-based comparisons. Critical improvements have been made in recent years by utilizing interface recognition and by recombining monomer and complex template libraries. Encouraging progress has also been witnessed in genome-wide applications of template-based modeling, with modeling accuracy comparable to high-throughput experimental data. Nevertheless, bottlenecks exist due to the incompleteness of the proteinprotein complex structure library and the lack of methods for distant homologous template identification and full-length complex structure refinement. PMID:24721449

  7. Gas phase acetaldehyde production in a continuous bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Soon Ook . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Trantolo, D.J. . Center for Biotechnology Engineering); Wise, D.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA . Center for Biotechnology Engineering)

    1993-08-20

    The gas phase continuous production of acetaldehyde was studied with particular emphasis on the development of biocatalyst (alcohol oxidase on solid phase support materials) for a fixed bed reactor. Based on the experimental results in a batch bioreactor, the biocatalysts were prepared by immobilization of alcohol oxidase on Amberlite IRA-400, packed into a column, and the continuous acetaldehyde production in the gas phase by alcohol oxidase was performed. The effects of the reaction temperature, flow rates of gaseous stream, and ethanol vapor concentration on the performance of the continuous bioreactor were investigated.

  8. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average. PMID:25343279

  9. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Greg Hura

    2010-01-08

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  10. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Hura, Greg

    2013-05-29

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  11. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  12. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Hura

    2009-07-09

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  13. Predicting protein dynamics from structural ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The biological properties of proteins are uniquely determined by their structure and dynamics. A protein in solution populates a structural ensemble of metastable configurations around the global fold. From overall rotation to local fluctuations, the dynamics of proteins can cover several orders of magnitude in time scales. We propose a simulation-free coarse-grained approach which utilizes knowledge of the important metastable folded states of the protein to predict the protein dynamics. This approach is based upon the Langevin Equation for Protein Dynamics (LE4PD), a Langevin formalism in the coordinates of the protein backbone. The linear modes of this Langevin formalism organize the fluctuations of the protein, so that more extended dynamical cooperativity relates to increasing energy barriers to mode diffusion. The accuracy of the LE4PD is verified by analyzing the predicted dynamics across a set of seven different proteins for which both relaxation data and NMR solution structures are available. Using experimental NMR conformers as the input structural ensembles, LE4PD predicts quantitatively accurate results, with correlation coefficient ρ = 0.93 to NMR backbone relaxation measurements for the seven proteins. The NMR solution structure derived ensemble and predicted dynamical relaxation is compared with molecular dynamics simulation-derived structural ensembles and LE4PD predictions and is consistent in the time scale of the simulations. The use of the experimental NMR conformers frees the approach from computationally demanding simulations.

  14. Insights into the structures of the gas-phase hydrated cations M⁺(H₂O)(n)Ar (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs; n = 3-5) using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M

    2015-03-12

    The hydration of alkali cations yields a variety of structural conformers with varying numbers of water molecules in the first solvation shell. How these ions move from the aqueous phase into biological systems, such as at the entrance of an ion channel, depends on the interplay between competing intermolecular forces, which first must involve ion-water and water-water interactions. New infrared action spectra, using argon as a messenger or "spy", for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), with up to five water molecules are reported, and new structural conformers determined from ab initio calculations, combined with previous results on Rb(+) and Cs(+), have identified structural transitions at each hydration level. These transitions are a result of the delicate balance between competing noncovalent interactions and represent a quantitative microscopic view of the macroscopic enthalpy-entropy competition between energy and structural variety. Smaller cations (Li(+) and Na(+)), with higher charge density, yield structural configurations with extended linear networks of hydrogen bonds. Larger cations (Rb(+) and Cs(+)), with lower charge density, generate configurations with cyclic hydrogen-bonded water subunits. It appears that K(+) is somewhat unique, with very simple (and predominantly) single structural conformers. This has led to the suggestion that K(+) can "move" easily in or through biological systems, concealing its identity as an ion, under the "appearance" or disguise of a water molecule. PMID:25651135

  15. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    temperature or below. For many spectroscopic measurements, low temperatures have been achieved by co-condensing the actinide vapor in rare gas or inert molecule host matrices. Spectra recorded in matrices are usually considered to be minimally perturbed. Trapping the products from gas-phase reactions that occur when trace quantities of reactants are added to the inert host gas has resulted in the discovery of many new actinide species. Selected aspects of the matrix isolation data were discussed in chapter 17. In the present chapter we review the spectroscopic matrix data in terms of its relationship to gas-phase measurements, and update the description of the new reaction products found in matrices to reflect the developments that have occurred during the past two years. Spectra recorded in matrix environments are usually considered to be minimally perturbed, and this expectation is borne out for many closed shell actinide molecules. However, there is growing evidence that significant perturbations can occur for open shell molecules, resulting in geometric distortions and/or electronic state reordering. Studies of actinide reactions in the gas phase provide an opportunity to probe the relationship between electronic structure and reactivity. Much of this work has focused on the reactions of ionic species, as these may be selected and controlled using various forms of mass spectrometry. As an example of the type of insight derived from reaction studies, it has been established that the reaction barriers for An+ ions are determined by the promotion energies required to achieve the 5fn6d7s configuration. Gas-phase reaction studies also provide fundamental thermodynamic properties such as bond dissociation and ionization energies. In recent years, an increased number of gas-phase ion chemistry studies of bare (atomic) and ligated (molecular) actinide ions have appeared, in which relevant contributions to fundamental actinide chemistry have been made. These studies were initiated

  16. Genome-wide Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Stefano; Suku, Eda; Garonzi, Marianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins allow cells to extensively communicate with the external world in a very accurate and specific way. They form principal nodes in several signaling pathways and attract large interest in therapeutic intervention, as the majority pharmaceutical compounds target membrane proteins. Thus, according to the current genome annotation methods, a detailed structural/functional characterization at the protein level of each of the elements codified in the genome is also required. The extreme difficulty in obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, calls for computational approaches. Here we review to which extent the efforts made in the last few years, combining the structural characterization of membrane proteins with protein bioinformatics techniques, could help describing membrane proteins at a genome-wide scale. In particular we analyze the use of comparative modeling techniques as a way of overcoming the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures in the human membrane proteome. PMID:24403851

  17. Protein structures in SDS micelle-protein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, W; Song, P S

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is used more often than any other detergent as an excellent denaturing or "unfolding" detergent. However, formation of ordered structure (alpha-helix or beta-sheet) in certain peptides is known to be induced by interaction with SDS micelles. The SDS-induced structures formed by these peptides are amphiphilic, having both a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic face. Previous work in this area has revealed that SDS induces helical folding in a wide variety of non-helical proteins. Here, we describe the interaction of several structurally unrelated proteins with SDS micelles and the correlation of these structures to helical amphiphilic regions present in the primary sequence. It is likely that the ability of native nonordered protein structures to form induced amphiphilic ordered structures is rather common. PMID:1600087

  18. Theoretical Study of the Pyrolysis of Methyltrichlorosilane in the Gas Phase. 1.Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Yingbin; Gordon, Mark S.; Battaglia, Francine; Fox, Rodney O.

    2007-03-01

    Structures and energies of the gas-phase species produced during and after the various unimolecular decomposition reactions of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) with the presence of H2 carrier gas were determined using second-order perturbation theory (MP2). Single point energies were obtained using singles + doubles coupled cluster theory, augmented by perturbative triples, CCSD(T). Partition functions were obtained using the harmonic oscillator-rigid rotor approximation. A 114-reaction mechanism is proposed to account for the gas-phase chemistry of MTS decompositions. Reaction enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs free energies for these reactions were obtained at 11 temperatures ranging from 0 to 2000 K including room temperature and typical chemical vapor deposition (CVD) temperatures. Calculated and experimental thermodynamic properties such as heat capacities and entropies of various species and reaction enthalpies are compared, and theory is found to provide good agreement with experiment.

  19. Elusive Sulfurous Acid: Gas-Phase Basicity and IR Signature of the Protonated Species.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Scuderi, Debora; Maitre, Philippe; Chiavarino, Barbara; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2015-05-01

    The ion corresponding to protonated sulfurous acid, H3SO3(+), has been successfully delivered into the gas phase by electrospray ionization of the solution of a suitable precursor and an in-source fragmentation process. The neutral acid is a highly elusive molecule. However, its gas-phase basicity has been ascertained by means of a kinetic study of proton-transfer reactivity. The structure of the H3SO3(+) sampled ion has been probed by IRMPD spectroscopy in two complementary IR frequency ranges in conjunction with density functional theory calculations and found to conform to a trihydroxosulfonium ion. The characteristic IR signatures may aid in deciphering the presence of this species in extraterrestrial atmospheres. PMID:26263321

  20. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  1. Protein-protein interface prediction based on hexagon structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Ding, Yijie; Li, Shuai Cheng; Shen, Chao; Wang, Lusheng

    2016-08-01

    Studies on protein-protein interaction are important in proteome research. How to build more effective models based on sequence information, structure information and physicochemical characteristics, is the key technology in protein-protein interface prediction. In this paper, we study the protein-protein interface prediction problem. We propose a novel method for identifying residues on interfaces from an input protein with both sequence and 3D structure information, based on hexagon structure similarity. Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein interface. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves F-measure value by at least 0.03. On a common dataset consisting of 41 complexes, our method has overall precision and recall values of 63% and 57%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has overall precision and recall values of 55% and 56%. On CAPRI targets, our method has overall precision and recall values of 52% and 55%. PMID:26936323

  2. Statistical and Microscopic Approach to Gas Phase Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, J. M.; Quereda, R.

    1983-01-01

    Describes advanced undergraduate laboratory exercise examining the dependence of the rate constants and the instantaneous concentrations with the nature and energy content in a gas-phase complex reaction. Computer program (with instructions and computation flow charts) used with the exercise is available from the author. (Author/JN)

  3. Apparatus for the premixed gas phase combustion of liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roffe, G.A.; Trucco, H.A.

    1981-04-21

    This invention relates to improvements in the art of liquid fuel combustion and, more particularly, concerns a method and apparatus for the controlled gasification of liquid fuels, the thorough premixing of the then gasified fuel with air and the subsequent gas-phase combustion of the mixture to produce a flame substantially free of soot, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and unburned fuel.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  5. Can the ordinary chondrites have condensed from a gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Suess, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    The conditions under which ordinary chondrites containing iron in three different chemical states can form in thermodynamic equilibrium with a gas phase are calculated. Hydrogen depletion factors of 100-1000 are obtained and the formation of liquid condensates from residual gases occurs at pressures (prior to hydrogen depletion) of roughly equal to or greater than 1 atm.

  6. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  7. Local backbone structure prediction of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Benros, Cristina; Gautier, Romain; Valadié, Héléne; Hazout, Serge; Etchebest, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the PDB structures has led us to define a new set of small 3D structural prototypes called Protein Blocks (PBs). This structural alphabet includes 16 PBs, each one is defined by the (phi, psi) dihedral angles of 5 consecutive residues. The amino acid distributions observed in sequence windows encompassing these PBs are used to predict by a Bayesian approach the local 3D structure of proteins from the sole knowledge of their sequences. LocPred is a software which allows the users to submit a protein sequence and performs a prediction in terms of PBs. The prediction results are given both textually and graphically. PMID:15724288

  8. The effect of denaturants on protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, J.; Yennawar, H. P.; Banerjee, S.; Luo, J.; Farber, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all studies of the protein-folding reaction add either heat, acid, or a chemical denaturant to an aqueous protein solution in order to perturb the protein structure. When chemical denaturants are used, very high concentrations are usually necessary to observe any change in protein structure. In a solution with such high denaturant concentrations, both the structure of the protein and the structure of the solvent around the protein can be altered. X-ray crystallography is the obvious experimental technique to probe both types of changes. In this paper, we report the crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase with urea and of ribonuclease A with guanidinium chloride. These two classic denaturants have similar effects on the native structure of the protein. The most important change that occurs is a reduction in the overall thermal factor. These structures offer a molecular explanation for the reduction in mobility. Although the reduction is observed only with the native enzyme in the crystal, a similar decrease in mobility has also been observed in the unfolded state in solution (Makhatadze G, Privalov PL. 1992. Protein interactions with urea and guanidinium chloride: A calorimetric study. PMID:9260285

  9. Optimized Null Model for Protein Structure Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lappe, Michael; Pržulj, Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Much attention has recently been given to the statistical significance of topological features observed in biological networks. Here, we consider residue interaction graphs (RIGs) as network representations of protein structures with residues as nodes and inter-residue interactions as edges. Degree-preserving randomized models have been widely used for this purpose in biomolecular networks. However, such a single summary statistic of a network may not be detailed enough to capture the complex topological characteristics of protein structures and their network counterparts. Here, we investigate a variety of topological properties of RIGs to find a well fitting network null model for them. The RIGs are derived from a structurally diverse protein data set at various distance cut-offs and for different groups of interacting atoms. We compare the network structure of RIGs to several random graph models. We show that 3-dimensional geometric random graphs, that model spatial relationships between objects, provide the best fit to RIGs. We investigate the relationship between the strength of the fit and various protein structural features. We show that the fit depends on protein size, structural class, and thermostability, but not on quaternary structure. We apply our model to the identification of significantly over-represented structural building blocks, i.e., network motifs, in protein structure networks. As expected, choosing geometric graphs as a null model results in the most specific identification of motifs. Our geometric random graph model may facilitate further graph-based studies of protein conformation space and have important implications for protein structure comparison and prediction. The choice of a well-fitting null model is crucial for finding structural motifs that play an important role in protein folding, stability and function. To our knowledge, this is the first study that addresses the challenge of finding an optimized null model for RIGs, by

  10. Mass Spectrometry of Protein Complexes: From Origins to Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Shahid; Allison, Timothy M.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-04-01

    Now routine is the ability to investigate soluble and membrane protein complexes in the gas phase of a mass spectrometer while preserving folded structure and ligand-binding properties. Several recent transformative developments have occurred to arrive at this point. These include advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation, particularly with respect to resolution; the ability to study intact membrane protein complexes released from detergent micelles; and the use of protein unfolding in the gas phase to obtain stability parameters. Together, these discoveries are providing unprecedented information on the compositional heterogeneity of biomacromolecules, the unfolding trajectories of multidomain proteins, and the stability imparted by ligand binding to both soluble and membrane-embedded protein complexes. We review these recent breakthroughs, highlighting the challenges that had to be overcome and the physicochemical insight that can now be gained from studying proteins and their assemblies in the gas phase.

  11. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org. PMID:27174930

  12. PSSweb: protein structural statistics web server

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Thomas; Stote, Roland H.; Dejaegere, Annick

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of protein structures available, there is a need for tools capable of automating the comparison of ensembles of structures, a common requirement in structural biology and bioinformatics. PSSweb is a web server for protein structural statistics. It takes as input an ensemble of PDB files of protein structures, performs a multiple sequence alignment and computes structural statistics for each position of the alignment. Different optional functionalities are proposed: structure superposition, Cartesian coordinate statistics, dihedral angle calculation and statistics, and a cluster analysis based on dihedral angles. An interactive report is generated, containing a summary of the results, tables, figures and 3D visualization of superposed structures. The server is available at http://pssweb.org. PMID:27174930

  13. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  14. Mapping membrane protein structure with fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins regulate many cellular processes including signaling cascades, ion transport, membrane fusion, and cell-to-cell communications. Understanding the architecture and conformational fluctuations of these proteins is critical to understanding their regulation and functions. Fluorescence methods including intensity mapping, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and photo-induced electron transfer, allow for targeted measurements of domains within membrane proteins. These methods can reveal how a protein is structured and how it transitions between different conformational states. Here, I will review recent work done using fluorescence to map the structures of membrane proteins, focusing on how each of these methods can be applied to understanding the dynamic nature of individual membrane proteins and protein complexes. PMID:22445227

  15. Structure based prediction of protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Xie, D; Freire, E

    1994-09-01

    The complete unfolding of a protein involves the disruption of non-covalent intramolecular interactions within the protein and the subsequent hydration of the backbone and amino acid side-chains. The magnitude of the thermodynamic parameters associated with this process is known accurately for a growing number of globular proteins for which high-resolution structures are also available. The existence of this database of structural and thermodynamic information has facilitated the development of statistical procedures aimed at quantifying the relationships existing between protein structure and the thermodynamic parameters of folding/unfolding. Under some conditions proteins do not unfold completely, giving rise to states (commonly known as molten globules) in which the molecule retains some secondary structure and remains in a compact configuration after denaturation. This phenomenon is reflected in the thermodynamics of the process. Depending on the nature of the residual structure that exists after denaturation, the observed enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes will deviate in a particular and predictable way from the values expected for complete unfolding. For several proteins, these deviations have been shown to exhibit similar characteristics, suggesting that their equilibrium folding intermediates exhibit some common structural features. Employing empirically derived structure-energetic relationships, it is possible to identify in the native structure of the protein those regions with the higher probability of being structured in equilibrium partly folded states. In this work, a thermodynamic search algorithm aimed at identifying the structural determinants of the molten globule state has been applied to six globular proteins; alpha-lactalbumin, barnase, IIIGlc, interleukin-1 beta, phage T4 lysozyme and phage 434 repressor. Remarkably, the structural features of the predicted equilibrium intermediates coincide to a large extent with the known

  16. Homology-Based Modeling of Protein Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Zhexin

    The human genome project has already discovered millions of proteins (http://www.swissprot.com). The potential of the genome project can only be fully realized once we can assign, understand, manipulate, and predict the function of these new proteins (Sanchez and Sali, 1997; Frishman et al., 2000; Domingues et al., 2000). Predicting protein function generally requires knowledge of protein three-dimensional structure (Blundell et al., 1978;Weber, 1990), which is ultimately determined by protein sequence (Anfinsen, 1973). Protein structure determination using experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy is very time consuming (Johnson et al. 1994). To date, fewer than 2% of the known proteins have had their structures solved experimentally. In 2004, more than half a million new proteins were sequenced that almost doubled the efforts in the previous year, but only 5300 structures were solved. Although the rate of experimental structure determination will continue to increase, the number of newly discovered sequences grows much faster than the number of structures solved (see Fig. 10.1).

  17. Protein structure prediction from sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Debora S; Hopf, Thomas A; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequences contain rich evolutionary information about functional constraints on macromolecules such as proteins. This information can be efficiently mined to detect evolutionary couplings between residues in proteins and address the long-standing challenge to compute protein three-dimensional structures from amino acid sequences. Substantial progress has recently been made on this problem owing to the explosive growth in available sequences and the application of global statistical methods. In addition to three-dimensional structure, the improved understanding of covariation may help identify functional residues involved in ligand binding, protein-complex formation and conformational changes. We expect computation of covariation patterns to complement experimental structural biology in elucidating the full spectrum of protein structures, their functional interactions and evolutionary dynamics. PMID:23138306

  18. Lessons from making the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) and their implications for protein structure modelling

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2016-01-01

    The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database has facilitated the development of many tools and algorithms and it has been successfully used in protein structure prediction and large-scale genome annotations. During the development of SCOP, numerous exceptions were found to topological rules, along with complex evolutionary scenarios and peculiarities in proteins including the ability to fold into alternative structures. This article reviews cases of structural variations observed for individual proteins and among groups of homologues, knowledge of which is essential for protein structure modelling. PMID:27284063

  19. Lessons from making the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) and their implications for protein structure modelling.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Antonina

    2016-06-15

    The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database has facilitated the development of many tools and algorithms and it has been successfully used in protein structure prediction and large-scale genome annotations. During the development of SCOP, numerous exceptions were found to topological rules, along with complex evolutionary scenarios and peculiarities in proteins including the ability to fold into alternative structures. This article reviews cases of structural variations observed for individual proteins and among groups of homologues, knowledge of which is essential for protein structure modelling. PMID:27284063

  20. Modeling Protein Aggregate Assembly and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun-tao; Hall, Carol K.; Xu, Ying; Wetzel, Ronald

    One might say that "protein science" got its start in the domestic arts, built around the abilities of proteins to aggregate in response to environmental stresses such as heating (boiled eggs), heating and cooling (gelatin), and pH (cheese). Characterization of proteins in the late nineteenth century likewise focused on the ability of proteins to precipitate in response to certain salts and to aggregate in response to heating. Investigations by Chick and Martin (Chick and Martin, 1910) showed that the inactivating response of proteins to heat or solvent treatment is a two-step process involving separate denaturation and precipitation steps. Monitoring the coagulation and flocculation responses of proteins to heat and other stresses remained a major approach to understanding protein structure for decades, with solubility, or susceptibility to aggregation, serving as a kind of benchmark against which results of other methods, such as viscosity, chemical susceptibility, immune activity, crystallizability, and susceptibility to proteolysis, were compared (Mirsky and Pauling, 1936;Wu, 1931). Toward the middle of the last century, protein aggregation studies were largely left behind, as improved methods allowed elucidation of the primary sequence of proteins, reversible unfolding studies, and ultimately high-resolution structures. Curiously, the field of protein science, and in particular protein folding, is now gravitating back to a closer look at protein aggregation and protein aggregates. Unfortunately, the means developed during the second half of the twentieth century for studying native, globular proteins have not proved immediately amenable to the study of aggregate structures. Great progress is being made, however, to modify classical methods, including NMR and X-ray diffraction, as well as to develop newer techniques, that together should continue to expand our picture of aggregate structure (Kheterpal and Wetzel, 2006; Wetzel, 1999).

  1. Self-Assembled Multimetallic/Peptide Complexes: Structures and Unimolecular Reactions of [Mn (GlyGly-H)2n-1 ](+) and Mn+1 (GlyGly-H2n ](2+) Clusters in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maryam B; Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Fridgen, Travis D

    2015-10-26

    The unimolecular chemistry and structures of self-assembled complexes containing multiple alkaline-earth-metal dications and deprotonated GlyGly ligands are investigated. Singly and doubly charged ions [Mn (GlyGly-H)n-1 ](+) (n=2-4), [Mn+1 (GlyGly-H)2n ](2+) (n=2,4,6), and [M(GlyGly-H)GlyGly](+) were observed. The losses of 132 Da (GlyGly) and 57 Da (determined to be aminoketene) were the major dissociation pathways for singly charged ions. Doubly charged Mg(2+) clusters mainly lost GlyGly, whereas those containing Ca(2+) or Sr(2+) also underwent charge separation. Except for charge separation, no loss of metal cations was observed. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectra were the most consistent with the computed IR spectra for the lowest energy structures, in which deprotonation occurs at the carboxyl acid groups and all amide and carboxylate oxygen atoms are complexed to the metal cations. The N-H stretch band, observed at 3350 cm(-1) , is indicative of hydrogen bonding between the amine nitrogen atoms and the amide hydrogen atom. This study represents the first into large self-assembled multimetallic complexes bound by peptide ligands. PMID:26279054

  2. Improvement of protein structure comparison using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Srinivasan, N; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-09-01

    The three dimensional structure of a protein provides major insights into its function. Protein structure comparison has implications in functional and evolutionary studies. A structural alphabet (SA) is a library of local protein structure prototypes that can abstract every part of protein main chain conformation. Protein Blocks (PBs) is a widely used SA, composed of 16 prototypes, each representing a pentapeptide backbone conformation defined in terms of dihedral angles. Through this description, the 3D structural information can be translated into a 1D sequence of PBs. In a previous study, we have used this approach to compare protein structures encoded in terms of PBs. A classical sequence alignment procedure based on dynamic programming was used, with a dedicated PB Substitution Matrix (SM). PB-based pairwise structural alignment method gave an excellent performance, when compared to other established methods for mining. In this study, we have (i) refined the SMs and (ii) improved the Protein Block Alignment methodology (named as iPBA). The SM was normalized in regards to sequence and structural similarity. Alignment of protein structures often involves similar structural regions separated by dissimilar stretches. A dynamic programming algorithm that weighs these local similar stretches has been designed. Amino acid substitutions scores were also coupled linearly with the PB substitutions. iPBA improves (i) the mining efficiency rate by 6.8% and (ii) more than 82% of the alignments have a better quality. A higher efficiency in aligning multi-domain proteins could be also demonstrated. The quality of alignment is better than DALI and MUSTANG in 81.3% of the cases. Thus our study has resulted in an impressive improvement in the quality of protein structural alignment. PMID:21569819

  3. Determination of the location of positive charges in gas-phase polypeptide polycations by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Adams, Christopher M.; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2006-06-01

    Location of protonated sites in electrospray-ionized gas-phase peptides and proteins was performed with tandem mass spectrometry using ion activation by both electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collisional activation dissociation (CAD). Charge-carrying sites were assigned based on the increment in the charge state of fragment ions compared to that of the previous fragment in the same series. The property of ECD to neutralize preferentially the least basic site was confirmed by the analysis of three thousand ECD mass spectra of doubly charged tryptic peptides. Multiply charged cations of bradykinin, neurotensin and melittin were studied in detail. For n+ precursors, ECD revealed the positions of (n - 1) most basic sites, while CAD could in principle locate alln charges. However, ECD introduced minimal proton mobilization and produced more conclusive data than CAD, for which N- and C-terminal data often disagreed. Consistent with the dominance of one charge conformer and its preservation in ECD, the average charge states of complementary fragments of n+ ions almost always added up to (n - 1)+, while the similar figure in CAD often deviated from n+, indicating extensive charge isomerization under collisional excitation. For bradykinin and neurotensin, the charge assignments were largely in agreement with the intrinsic gas-phase basicity of the respective amino acid residues. For melittin ions in higher charge states, ECD revealed the charging at both intrinsically basic as well as at less basic residues, which was attributed to charge sharing with other groups due to the presence of secondary and higher order structures in this larger polypeptide.

  4. The Decomposition of Hydrazine in the Gas Phase and over an Iridium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-09-30

    Hydrazine is an important rocket fuel, used as both a monopropellant and a bipropellant. This paper presents theoretical results to complement the extensive experimental studies of the gas phase and Ir catalyzed decompositions involved in the monopropellant applications of hydrazine. Gas phase electronic structure theory calculations that include electron correlation predict that numerous molecular and free radical reactions occur within the same energy range as the basic free radical pathways: NN bond breaking around 65 kcal/mol and NH bond breaking around 81 kcal/mol. The data suggest that a revision to existing kinetics modeling is desirable, based on the energetics and the new elementary steps reported herein. A supported Ir-6 octahedron model for the Shell 405 Iridium catalyst used in thrusters was developed. Self-Consistent Field and electron correlation calculations (with core potentials and associated basis sets) find a rich chemistry for hydrazine on this catalyst model. The model catalyst provides dramatically lower NN and NH bond cleavage energies and an even smaller barrier to breaking the NH bond by NH2 abstractions. Thus, the low temperature decomposition over the catalyst is interpreted in terms of consecutive NH2 abstractions to produce ammonia and nitrogen. The higher temperature channel, which has hydrogen and nitrogen products, may be due to a mixture of two mechanisms. These two mechanisms are successive NH cleavages with surface H + H recombinations, and the same type of assisted H-2 eliminations found to occur in the gas phase part of this study.

  5. Kinetics of gas phase oxygen control system (OCS) for stagnant and flowing Pb-Bi Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefhalm, C. H.; Knebel, J. U.; Mack, K. J.

    2001-07-01

    Pb and Pb-Bi are known to be very corrosive to structural materials at elevated temperatures. In recent studies, the necessity of measurement and control of the oxygen concentration in the liquid metal in order to safely operate a liquid Pb or Pb-Bi loop has been shown. The dynamic behaviour of the gas phase oxygen control system (OCS), which was developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), is investigated with respect to diffusion as the limiting process of oxygen exchange between the gas phase and the liquid metal. In this paper the development of a physical model for this diffusion process is described and compared to experimental results of a stagnant liquid Pb-Bi system. The experimental findings are in very good agreement with the theoretical equations describing the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of such a system. Recent investigations in a Pb-Bi loop at the Karlsruhe Lead Laboratory (KALLA) indicate that this gas phase OCS is a promising candidate system for an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS).

  6. Gas-Phase Photoluminescence Characterization of Stoichiometrically Pure Nonanuclear Lanthanoid Hydroxo Complexes Comprising Europium or Gadolinium.

    PubMed

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Klopper, Wim; Kappes, Manfred M; Schooss, Detlef

    2016-04-01

    Gas-phase photoluminescence measurements involving mass-spectrometric techniques enable determination of the properties of selected molecular systems with knowledge of their exact composition and unaffected by matrix effects such as solvent interactions or crystal packing. The resulting reduced complexity facilitates a comparison with theory. Herein, we provide a detailed report of the intrinsic luminescence properties of nonanuclear europium(III) and gadolinium(III) 9-hydroxyphenalen-1-one (HPLN) hydroxo complexes. Luminescence spectra of [Eu9(PLN)16(OH)10](+) ions reveal an europium-centered emission dominated by a 4-fold split Eu(III) hypersensitive transition, while photoluminescence lifetime measurements for both complexes support an efficient europium sensitization via a PLN-centered triplet-state manifold. The combination of gas-phase measurements with density functional theory computations and ligand-field theory is used to discuss the antiprismatic core structure of the complexes and to shed light on the energy-transfer mechanism. This methodology is also employed to fit a new set of parameters, which improves the accuracy of ligand-field computations of Eu(III) electronic transitions for gas-phase species. PMID:26974169

  7. Taking advantage of local structure descriptors to analyze interresidue contacts in protein structures and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Juliette; Regad, Leslie; Etchebest, Catherine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-11-15

    Interresidue protein contacts in proteins structures and at protein-protein interface are classically described by the amino acid types of interacting residues and the local structural context of the contact, if any, is described using secondary structures. In this study, we present an alternate analysis of interresidue contact using local structures defined by the structural alphabet introduced by Camproux et al. This structural alphabet allows to describe a 3D structure as a sequence of prototype fragments called structural letters, of 27 different types. Each residue can then be assigned to a particular local structure, even in loop regions. The analysis of interresidue contacts within protein structures defined using Voronoï tessellations reveals that pairwise contact specificity is greater in terms of structural letters than amino acids. Using a simple heuristic based on specificity score comparison, we find that 74% of the long-range contacts within protein structures are better described using structural letters than amino acid types. The investigation is extended to a set of protein-protein complexes, showing that the similar global rules apply as for intraprotein contacts, with 64% of the interprotein contacts best described by local structures. We then present an evaluation of pairing functions integrating structural letters to decoy scoring and show that some complexes could benefit from the use of structural letter-based pairing functions. PMID:18491388

  8. Embracing proteins: structural themes in aptamer-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gelinas, Amy D; Davies, Douglas R; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the structural rules that govern specific, high-affinity binding characteristic of aptamer-protein interactions is important in view of the increasing use of aptamers across many applications. From the modest number of 16 aptamer-protein structures currently available, trends are emerging. The flexible phosphodiester backbone allows folding into precise three-dimensional structures using known nucleic acid motifs as scaffolds that orient specific functional groups for target recognition. Still, completely novel motifs essential for structure and function are found in modified aptamers with diversity-enhancing side chains. Aptamers and antibodies, two classes of macromolecules used as affinity reagents with entirely different backbones and composition, recognize protein epitopes of similar size and with comparably high shape complementarity. PMID:26919170

  9. Principles for designing ideal protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Nobuyasu; Tatsumi-Koga, Rie; Liu, Gaohua; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Unlike random heteropolymers, natural proteins fold into unique ordered structures. Understanding how these are encoded in amino-acid sequences is complicated by energetically unfavourable non-ideal features—for example kinked α-helices, bulged β-strands, strained loops and buried polar groups—that arise in proteins from evolutionary selection for biological function or from neutral drift. Here we describe an approach to designing ideal protein structures stabilized by completely consistent local and non-local interactions. The approach is based on a set of rules relating secondary structure patterns to protein tertiary motifs, which make possible the design of funnel-shaped protein folding energy landscapes leading into the target folded state. Guided by these rules, we designed sequences predicted to fold into ideal protein structures consisting of α-helices, β-strands and minimal loops. Designs for five different topologies were found to be monomeric and very stable and to adopt structures in solution nearly identical to the computational models. These results illuminate how the folding funnels of natural proteins arise and provide the foundation for engineering a new generation of functional proteins free from natural evolution. PMID:23135467

  10. Protein Structure Is Related to RNA Structural Reactivity In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-02-27

    We assessed whether in vivo mRNA structural reactivity and the structure of the encoded protein are related. This is the first investigation of such a relationship that utilizes information on RNA structure obtained in living cells. Based on our recent genome-wide Structure-seq analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we report that, as a meta property, regions of individual mRNAs that code for protein domains generally have higher reactivity to DMS (dimethyl sulfate), a chemical that covalently modifies accessible As and Cs, than regions that encode protein domain junctions. This relationship is prominent for proteins annotated for catalytic activity and reversed in proteins annotated for binding and transcription regulatory activity. Upon analyzing intrinsically disordered proteins, we found a similar pattern for disordered regions as compared to ordered regions: regions of individual mRNAs that code for ordered regions have significantly higher DMS reactivity than regions that code for intrinsically disordered regions. Based on these effects, we hypothesize that the decreased DMS reactivity of RNA regions that encode protein domain junctions or intrinsically disordered regions may reflect increased RNA structure that may slow translation, allowing time for the nascent protein domain or ordered region of the protein to fold, thereby reducing protein misfolding. In addition, a drop in DMS reactivity was observed on portions of mRNA sequences that correspond to the C-termini of protein domains, suggesting ribosome protection at these mRNA regions. Structural relationships between mRNAs and their encoded proteins may have evolved to allow efficient and accurate protein folding. PMID:26598238

  11. Structural proteins of Herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed Central

    Keil, G; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1983-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri particles were purified from productively infected owl monkey kidney cell cultures, and the virion polypeptides were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 21 predominant proteins were found in lysates of H. saimiri 11 particles by Coomassie blue staining or by [35S]methionine labeling and autoradiography; all proteins were between 160,000 and 12,000 daltons in size. They are most probably virion constituents, as most of them were precipitated by immune sera, and no dominant proteins of equivalent sizes were found in mock-infected cultures. Four glycoproteins (gp 155/160, gp 128, gp 84/90, gp 55) and three polypeptides that appeared not to be glycosylated (p71, p35, p28) were assigned to the envelope or matrix of virions, whereas at least four phosphoproteins (pp132, pp118, pp55, pp13) and ten polypeptides without apparent secondary modification (p155/160, p106, p96, p67, p53, p36, p32, p15, p14, p12) were found in the nucleocapsid fraction. Analysis of virion proteins from different H. saimiri strains did not reveal appreciable differences in the migration behavior of most polypeptides, including all glycoproteins; however, determination of a strain-specific size pattern was possible for three of four phosphoproteins. The overall similarity in protein architecture of H. saimiri strains obviously does not reflect the variability in biology, such as oncogenic properties. In comparison, DNA sequence divergences appear to remain a better taxonomic criterion for strain distinction. Images PMID:6312078

  12. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%. PMID:12594078

  13. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  14. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  15. Unlocking the eukaryotic membrane protein structural proteome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John Kyongwon; Stroud, Robert Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most of the 231 unique membrane protein structures (as of 3/2010) are of bacterial membrane proteins (MPs) expressed in bacteria, or eukaryotic MPs from natural sources. However eukaryotic membrane proteins, especially those with more than three membrane crossings rarely succumb to any suitable expression in bacterial cells. They typically require expression in eukaryotic cells that can provide appropriate endoplasmic reticulum, chaperones, targeting and post-translational processing. In evidence, only ~20 eukaryotic MP structures have resulted from heterologous expression. This is required for a general approach to target particular human or pathogen membrane proteins of importance to human health. The first of these appeared in 2005. Our review addresses the special issues that pertain to the expression of eukaryotic and human membrane proteins, and recent advances in the tool kit for crystallization and structure determination. PMID:20739007

  16. AMASS: a database for investigating protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Clinton J.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Dinu, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Modern techniques have produced many sequence annotation databases and protein structure portals, but these Web resources are rarely integrated in ways that permit straightforward exploration of protein functional residues and their co-localization. Results: We have created the AMASS database, which maps 1D sequence annotation databases to 3D protein structures with an intuitive visualization interface. Our platform also provides an analysis service that screens mass spectrometry sequence data for post-translational modifications that reside in functionally relevant locations within protein structures. The system is built on the premise that functional residues such as active sites, cancer mutations and post-translational modifications within proteins may co-localize and share common functions. Availability and implementation: AMASS database is implemented with Biopython and Apache as a freely available Web server at amass-db.org. Contact: clinton.mielke@gmail.com PMID:24497503

  17. Protein structure database search and evolutionary classification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinn-Moon; Tung, Chi-Hua

    2006-01-01

    As more protein structures become available and structural genomics efforts provide structural models in a genome-wide strategy, there is a growing need for fast and accurate methods for discovering homologous proteins and evolutionary classifications of newly determined structures. We have developed 3D-BLAST, in part, to address these issues. 3D-BLAST is as fast as BLAST and calculates the statistical significance (E-value) of an alignment to indicate the reliability of the prediction. Using this method, we first identified 23 states of the structural alphabet that represent pattern profiles of the backbone fragments and then used them to represent protein structure databases as structural alphabet sequence databases (SADB). Our method enhanced BLAST as a search method, using a new structural alphabet substitution matrix (SASM) to find the longest common substructures with high-scoring structured segment pairs from an SADB database. Using personal computers with Intel Pentium4 (2.8 GHz) processors, our method searched more than 10 000 protein structures in 1.3 s and achieved a good agreement with search results from detailed structure alignment methods. [3D-BLAST is available at http://3d-blast.life.nctu.edu.tw]. PMID:16885238

  18. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  19. Contemporary Methodology for Protein Structure Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunkapiller, Michael W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature and capabilities of methods used to characterize protein and peptide structure, indicating that they have undergone changes which have improved the speed, reliability, and applicability of the process. Also indicates that high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis have made purifying proteins and peptides a…

  20. PEGylated nanoparticles: protein corona and secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runa, Sabiha; Hill, Alexandra; Cochran, Victoria L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles have important biological and biomedical applications ranging from drug and gene delivery to biosensing. In the presence of extracellular proteins, a "corona" of proteins adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles, altering their interaction with cells, including immune cells. Nanoparticles are often functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to reduce this non-specific adsorption of proteins. To understand the change in protein corona that occurs following PEGylation, we first quantified the adsorption of blood serum proteins on bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles using gel electrophoresis. We find a threefold decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed on PEGylated gold nanoparticles compared to the bare gold nanoparticles, showing that PEG reduces, but does not prevent, corona formation. To determine if the secondary structure of corona proteins was altered upon adsorption onto the bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles, we use CD spectroscopy to characterize the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin following incubation with the nanoparticles. Our results show no significant change in protein secondary structure following incubation with bare or PEGylated nanoparticles. Further examination of the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin, α2-macroglobulin, and transferrin in the presence of free PEG showed similar results. These findings provide important insights for the use of PEGylated gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  1. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes. PMID:25330973

  2. Exploring representations of protein structure for automated remote homology detection and mapping of protein structure space

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to rapid sequencing of genomes, there are now millions of deposited protein sequences with no known function. Fast sequence-based comparisons allow detecting close homologs for a protein of interest to transfer functional information from the homologs to the given protein. Sequence-based comparison cannot detect remote homologs, in which evolution has adjusted the sequence while largely preserving structure. Structure-based comparisons can detect remote homologs but most methods for doing so are too expensive to apply at a large scale over structural databases of proteins. Recently, fragment-based structural representations have been proposed that allow fast detection of remote homologs with reasonable accuracy. These representations have also been used to obtain linearly-reducible maps of protein structure space. It has been shown, as additionally supported from analysis in this paper that such maps preserve functional co-localization of the protein structure space. Methods Inspired by a recent application of the Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) model for conducting structural comparisons of proteins, we propose higher-order LDA-obtained topic-based representations of protein structures to provide an alternative route for remote homology detection and organization of the protein structure space in few dimensions. Various techniques based on natural language processing are proposed and employed to aid the analysis of topics in the protein structure domain. Results We show that a topic-based representation is just as effective as a fragment-based one at automated detection of remote homologs and organization of protein structure space. We conduct a detailed analysis of the information content in the topic-based representation, showing that topics have semantic meaning. The fragment-based and topic-based representations are also shown to allow prediction of superfamily membership. Conclusions This work opens exciting venues in designing novel

  3. Structural Characteristics of Novel Protein Folds

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Dybas, Joseph M.; Fiser, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Folds are the basic building blocks of protein structures. Understanding the emergence of novel protein folds is an important step towards understanding the rules governing the evolution of protein structure and function and for developing tools for protein structure modeling and design. We explored the frequency of occurrences of an exhaustively classified library of supersecondary structural elements (Smotifs), in protein structures, in order to identify features that would define a fold as novel compared to previously known structures. We found that a surprisingly small set of Smotifs is sufficient to describe all known folds. Furthermore, novel folds do not require novel Smotifs, but rather are a new combination of existing ones. Novel folds can be typified by the inclusion of a relatively higher number of rarely occurring Smotifs in their structures and, to a lesser extent, by a novel topological combination of commonly occurring Smotifs. When investigating the structural features of Smotifs, we found that the top 10% of most frequent ones have a higher fraction of internal contacts, while some of the most rare motifs are larger, and contain a longer loop region. PMID:20421995

  4. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  5. Gas-phase diffusion in porous media: Comparison of models

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.W.

    1998-09-01

    Two models are commonly used to analyze gas-phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy`s law and ordinary diffusion using Fick`s law with a porosity-tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or dust) to combine transport due to diffusion and advection that includes porous medium effects. The two approaches are compared in this paper.

  6. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  7. Gas-phase reactivity of ruthenium carbonyl cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Matthew A; Kwok, Samantha; McIndoe, J Scott

    2009-04-01

    Partially-ligated anionic ruthenium carbonyl clusters react with alkenes, arenes, and alkanes in the gas phase; the products undergo extensive C-H activation and lose dihydrogen and carbon monoxide under collision-induced dissociation conditions. Triethylsilane and phenylsilane are also reactive towards the unsaturated clusters, and oxygen was shown to rapidly break down the cluster core by oxidative cleavage of the metal-metal bonds. These qualitative gas-phase reactivity studies were conducted using an easily-installed and inexpensive modification of a commercial electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. Interpretation of the large amounts of data generated in these studies is made relatively straightforward by employing energy-dependent electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EDESI-MS). PMID:19185511

  8. Kinetics of gas phase tetramethyldioxetane decomposition and chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, B.D.; Crim, F.F.

    1981-11-04

    Pulsed-laser excitation of overtone vibrations or a weak electronic transition in gas-phase tetramethyldioxetane in combination with temporally and spectrally resolved detection of decomposition product luminescence reveals the presence, along with electronically excited acetone, of an additional emitting species which is not observed in solution studies. The emission is at shorter wavelengths than the acetone phosphorescence, and the emitting species has a zero-pressure decay rate of 0.019 +- 0.014 ..mu..s/sup -1/. The rapid collisional quenching which occurs on roughly every other encounter (k/sub q/ = 5.6 ..mu..s/sup -1/ torr/sup -1/) explains the inability of solution measurements to detect this feature of the tetramethyldioxetane decomposition kinetics. This newly observed component is likely to extend the interpretation of gas-phase decomposition experiments using infrared multiphoton absorption or collisions with fast Xe atoms to excite tetramethyldioxetane.

  9. Ionization of vitamin C in gas phase: Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the gas phase ionization energies and photoelectron spectra of four important conformers of vitamin C were calculated. Symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology employing the single and double excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R) along with D95++(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Thermochemistry calculations were also performed on all possible conformers of vitamin C to find the relative stability of conformers in the gas phase. The calculated ionization bands of each conformer were assigned by calculating the contribution of natural bonding orbital (NBO) in the calculated canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization. SAC-CI calculations showed that the first ionization band of vitamin C is related to the π electrons of CC bond of the ring of molecule although, there is the lone electron pairs of oxygen atoms and π electrons of CO bond in the molecule. PMID:27092998

  10. Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2004-11-01

    We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction f{sub s} between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a nontrivial function of the strangeness fraction.

  11. A gas-phase amplified quartz crystal microbalance immunosensor based on catalase modified immunoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-02-21

    A novel signal amplification strategy for quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based on catalytic gas generation was developed to construct an ultrasensitive immunosensor for the detection of proteins (immunoglobulin G, IgG, used as a model). A catalase modified immunoparticle was prepared to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex with the IgG and anti-IgG antibodies that were immobilized on the QCM sensor. The amount of immunoparticles on the sensor surface was thus controlled by the IgG concentration. Then H2O2 was added and catalyzed by catalase for oxygen generation. The generated oxygen replaced some of the liquid on the sensor surface, leading to the change in the shear modulus of the immunocomplex layer and the apparent viscosity and density of the liquid layer. Due to the ultrasensitive response of QCM to these changes, a significant frequency shift related to the IgG concentration was achieved. Different parameters, including the flow cell structure, operation temperature, immunoparticle concentration, and H2O2 concentration were optimized to achieve steady and efficient frequency shifts. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed gas-phase amplified QCM sensor could achieve up to 72 times improvement of detection sensitivity compared to the label-free sensor as a control, in the concentration range of 0.1-3.0 μg mL(-1). The detection limit was also reduced from 236 ng mL(-1) to 51.0 ng mL(-1) at the 3Sblank level. PMID:25519742

  12. Encapsulating Cytochrome c in Silica Aerogel Nanoarchitectures without Metal Nanoparticles while Retaining Gas-phase Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S.; Pacer, Elizabeth R.; Kosciuszek, Nina D.

    2016-01-01

    Applications such as sensors, batteries, and fuel cells have been improved through the use of highly porous aerogels when functional compounds are encapsulated within the aerogels. However, few reports on encapsulating proteins within sol–gels that are processed to form aerogels exist. A procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c (cyt. c) in silica (SiO2) sol-gels that are supercritically processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide (NO) is presented. Cyt. c is added to a mixed silica sol under controlled protein concentration and buffer strength conditions. The sol mixture is then gelled and the liquid filling the gel pores is replaced through a series of solvent exchanges with liquid carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is brought to its critical point and vented off to form dry aerogels with cyt. c encapsulated inside. These bioaerogels are characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and can be used to detect the presence of gas-phase nitric oxide. The success of this procedure depends on regulating the cyt. c concentration and the buffer concentration and does not require other components such as metal nanoparticles. It may be possible to encapsulate other proteins using a similar approach making this procedure important for potential future bioanalytical device development. PMID:26967257

  13. Encapsulating Cytochrome c in Silica Aerogel Nanoarchitectures without Metal Nanoparticles while Retaining Gas-phase Bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S; Pacer, Elizabeth R; Kosciuszek, Nina D

    2016-01-01

    Applications such as sensors, batteries, and fuel cells have been improved through the use of highly porous aerogels when functional compounds are encapsulated within the aerogels. However, few reports on encapsulating proteins within sol-gels that are processed to form aerogels exist. A procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c (cyt. c) in silica (SiO2) sol-gels that are supercritically processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide (NO) is presented. Cyt. c is added to a mixed silica sol under controlled protein concentration and buffer strength conditions. The sol mixture is then gelled and the liquid filling the gel pores is replaced through a series of solvent exchanges with liquid carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is brought to its critical point and vented off to form dry aerogels with cyt. c encapsulated inside. These bioaerogels are characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and can be used to detect the presence of gas-phase nitric oxide. The success of this procedure depends on regulating the cyt. c concentration and the buffer concentration and does not require other components such as metal nanoparticles. It may be possible to encapsulate other proteins using a similar approach making this procedure important for potential future bioanalytical device development. PMID:26967257

  14. Protein Block Expert (PBE): a web-based protein structure analysis server using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M; Sharma, P; Swamy, C S; Cadet, F; Srinivasan, N; de Brevern, A G; Offmann, B

    2006-07-01

    Encoding protein 3D structures into 1D string using short structural prototypes or structural alphabets opens a new front for structure comparison and analysis. Using the well-documented 16 motifs of Protein Blocks (PBs) as structural alphabet, we have developed a methodology to compare protein structures that are encoded as sequences of PBs by aligning them using dynamic programming which uses a substitution matrix for PBs. This methodology is implemented in the applications available in Protein Block Expert (PBE) server. PBE addresses common issues in the field of protein structure analysis such as comparison of proteins structures and identification of protein structures in structural databanks that resemble a given structure. PBE-T provides facility to transform any PDB file into sequences of PBs. PBE-ALIGNc performs comparison of two protein structures based on the alignment of their corresponding PB sequences. PBE-ALIGNm is a facility for mining SCOP database for similar structures based on the alignment of PBs. Besides, PBE provides an interface to a database (PBE-SAdb) of preprocessed PB sequences from SCOP culled at 95% and of all-against-all pairwise PB alignments at family and superfamily levels. PBE server is freely available at http://bioinformatics.univ-reunion.fr/PBE/. PMID:16844973

  15. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  16. Extracting knowledge from protein structure geometry

    PubMed Central

    Røgen, Peter; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure prediction techniques proceed in two steps, namely the generation of many structural models for the protein of interest, followed by an evaluation of all these models to identify those that are native-like. In theory, the second step is easy, as native structures correspond to minima of their free energy surfaces. It is well known however that the situation is more complicated as the current force fields used for molecular simulations fail to recognize native states from misfolded structures. In an attempt to solve this problem we follow an alternate approach and derive a new potential from geometric knowledge extracted from native and misfolded conformers of protein structures. This new potential, MPP, has two main features that are key to its success. Firstly, it is composite in that it includes local and non local geometric information on proteins. At the short range level it captures and quantifies the mapping between the sequences and structures of short (7-mer) fragments of protein backbones through the introduction of a new local energy term. The local energy term is then augmented with a non local residue-based pairwise potential, and a solvent potential. Secondly, it is optimized to yield a maximized correlation between the energy of a structural model and its RMS to the native structure of the corresponding protein. We have shown that MPP yields high correlation values between RMS and energy and that it is able to retrieve the native structure of a protein from a set of high-resolution decoys. PMID:23280479

  17. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  18. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    D&D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D&D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly.

  19. Electron transfer dissociation provides higher-order structural information of native and partially unfolded protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Lermyte, Frederik; Sobott, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Top-down sequencing approaches are becoming ever more popular for protein characterization, due to the ability to distinguish and characterize different protein isoforms. Under non-denaturing conditions, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) can furthermore provide important information on the exposed surface of proteins or complexes, thereby contributing to the characterization of their higher-order structure. Here, we investigate this approach using top-down ETD of tetrameric hemoglobin, concanavalin A, and alcohol dehydrogenase combined with ion mobility (IM) on a commercially available quadrupole/ion mobility/time-of-flight instrument (Waters Synapt G2). By applying supplemental activation in the transfer cell (post-IM), we release ETD fragments and attain good sequence coverage in the exposed terminal regions of the protein. We investigate the correlation between observed sites of fragmentation with regions of solvent accessibility, as derived from the crystal structure. Ion acceleration prior to ETD is also used to cause collision-induced unfolding (CIU) of the complexes without monomer ejection, as evidenced by the IM profiles. These partially unfolded tetramers show efficient fragmentation in some regions which are not sequenced under more gentle MS conditions. We show that by increasing CIU in small increments and monitoring the changes in the fragmentation pattern, it is possible to follow the initial steps of gas-phase protein unfolding. Fragments from partially unfolded protein complexes are released immediately after electron transfer, prior to IM (they do not share the drift time of their precursor), and observed without the need for supplemental activation. This is further evidence that the higher-order structure in these protein regions has been disrupted. PMID:26081219

  20. Multipass Membrane Protein Structure Prediction Using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Schonbrun, Jack; Baker, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe the adaptation of the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method for prediction of helical transmembrane protein structures. The membrane environment is modeled by embedding the protein chain into a model membrane represented by parallel planes defining hydrophobic, interface, and polar membrane layers for each energy evaluation. The optimal embedding is determined by maximizing the exposure of surface hydrophobic residues within the membrane and minimizing hydrophobic exposure outside of the membrane. Protein conformations are built up using the Rosetta fragment assembly method and evaluated using a new membrane-specific version of the Rosetta low-resolution energy function in which residue–residue and residue–environment interactions are functions of the membrane layer in addition to amino acid identity, distance, and density. We find that lower energy and more native-like structures are achieved by sequential addition of helices to a growing chain, which may mimic some aspects of helical protein biogenesis after translocation, rather than folding the whole chain simultaneously as in the Rosetta soluble protein prediction method. In tests on 12 membrane proteins for which the structure is known, between 51 and 145 residues were predicted with root-mean-square deviation <4Å from the native structure. PMID:16372357

  1. Protein folding: When ribosomes pick the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Elin M.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Anfinsen's principle tells us that the folded structure of a protein is determined solely by its sequence. Now, it has been shown that the rate at which a polypeptide chain is synthesized in the cell can affect which of two alternative folded structures it adopts.

  2. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  3. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    SciTech Connect

    Haibo Cao

    2003-12-12

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  4. Protein structure, spectral properties, and photobiological function of lumazine protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, John W.; Bradley, Elizabeth A.; O'Kane, Dennis J.

    1992-04-01

    Protein sequence analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, and fluorescence dynamics have been applied in a determination of the interactions of the lumazine derivative with the amino acid residues in the proposed ligand binding site of lumazine protein. It is these interactions that `tune' the excited state properties of the bound lumazine so that it can perform its photobiological function as the emitter of bioluminescence in Photobacterium species. A three- way sequence alignment shows that lumazine protein is homologous with the yellow- fluorescent protein of Vibrio fischeri and the riboflavin synthase from Bacillus subtilis. This last enzyme is ubiquitous in procaryotes, and utilizes two of these same lumazines as substrates for the production of riboflavin. By analogy with riboflavin synthase, a short sequence in the lumazine protein has been suggested as the ligand binding site. In riboflavin synthase there is a second binding site, but this is absent in lumazine protein, thus negating any synthase activity for this protein. Hydrogen bonds to the residues in this binding domain and `freeze' the lumazine structure into the highly polar tautomer deduced from NMR evidence. This also accounts for the rigidity of binding shown by the 23 ns (2 degree(s)C) rotational correlation time of the bound ligand as well as the strong blue shift of the fluorescence maximum, from 490 nm free to 475 nm when bound.

  5. SCOP: a structural classification of proteins database.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, T J; Murzin, A G; Brenner, S E; Chothia, C

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database provides a detailed and comprehensive description of the relationships of all known proteins structures. The classification is on hierarchical levels: the first two levels, family and superfamily, describe near and far evolutionary relationships; the third, fold, describes geometrical relationships. The distinction between evolutionary relationships and those that arise from the physics and chemistry of proteins is a feature that is unique to this database, so far. SCOP also provides for each structure links to atomic co-ordinates, images of the structures, interactive viewers, sequence data, data on any conformational changes related to function and literature references. The database is freely accessible on the World Wide Web (WWW) with an entry point at URL http://scop.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/scop/ PMID:9016544

  6. Native like helices in a specially designed β peptide in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Franziska; Pagel, Kevin; Rossi, Mariana; Warnke, Stephan; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; von Helden, Gert; Blum, Volker; Baldauf, Carsten; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-02-21

    In the natural peptides, helices are stabilized by hydrogen bonds that point backward along the sequence direction. Until now, there is only little evidence for the existence of analogous structures in oligomers of conformationally unrestricted β amino acids. We specifically designed the β peptide Ac-(β(2)hAla)6-LysH(+) to form native like helical structures in the gas phase. The design follows the known properties of the peptide Ac-Ala6-LysH(+) that forms a α helix in isolation. We perform ion-mobility mass-spectrometry and vibrational spectroscopy in the gas phase, combined with state-of-the-art density-functional theory simulations of these molecular systems in order to characterize their structure. We can show that the straightforward exchange of alanine residues for the homologous β amino acids generates a system that is generally capable of adopting native like helices with backward oriented H-bonds. By pushing the limits of theory and experiments, we show that one cannot assign a single preferred structure type due to the densely populated energy landscape and present an interpretation of the data that suggests an equilibrium of three helical structures. PMID:25611682

  7. Recurrent Structural Motifs in Non-Homologous Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Maria U.; Zoete, Vincent; Guex, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We have extracted an extensive collection of recurrent structural motifs (RSMs), which consist of sequentially non-contiguous structural motifs (4–6 residues), each of which appears with very similar conformation in three or more mutually unrelated protein structures. We find that the proteins in our set are covered to a substantial extent by the recurrent non-contiguous structural motifs, especially the helix and strand regions. Computational alanine scanning calculations indicate that the average folding free energy changes upon alanine mutation for most types of non-alanine residues are higher for amino acids that are present in recurrent structural motifs than for amino acids that are not. The non-alanine amino acids that are most common in the recurrent structural motifs, i.e., phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine and tyrosine and the less abundant methionine and tryptophan, have the largest folding free energy changes. This indicates that the recurrent structural motifs, as we define them, describe recurrent structural patterns that are important for protein stability. In view of their properties, such structural motifs are potentially useful for inter-residue contact prediction and protein structure refinement. PMID:23574940

  8. Structure and Non-Structure of Centrosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bertero, Michela G.; Boutin, Maïlys; Guarín, Nayibe; Méndez-Giraldez, Raúl; Nuñez, Alfonso; Pedrero, Juan G.; Redondo, Pilar; Sanz, María; Speroni, Silvia; Teichert, Florian; Bruix, Marta; Carazo, José M.; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Reina, José; Valpuesta, José M.; Vernos, Isabelle; Zabala, Juan C.; Montoya, Guillermo; Coll, Miquel; Bastolla, Ugo; Serrano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Here we perform a large-scale study of the structural properties and the expression of proteins that constitute the human Centrosome. Centrosomal proteins tend to be larger than generic human proteins (control set), since their genes contain in average more exons (20.3 versus 14.6). They are rich in predicted disordered regions, which cover 57% of their length, compared to 39% in the general human proteome. They also contain several regions that are dually predicted to be disordered and coiled-coil at the same time: 55 proteins (15%) contain disordered and coiled-coil fragments that cover more than 20% of their length. Helices prevail over strands in regions homologous to known structures (47% predicted helical residues against 17% predicted as strands), and even more in the whole centrosomal proteome (52% against 7%), while for control human proteins 34.5% of the residues are predicted as helical and 12.8% are predicted as strands. This difference is mainly due to residues predicted as disordered and helical (30% in centrosomal and 9.4% in control proteins), which may correspond to alpha-helix forming molecular recognition features (α-MoRFs). We performed expression assays for 120 full-length centrosomal proteins and 72 domain constructs that we have predicted to be globular. These full-length proteins are often insoluble: Only 39 out of 120 expressed proteins (32%) and 19 out of 72 domains (26%) were soluble. We built or retrieved structural models for 277 out of 361 human proteins whose centrosomal localization has been experimentally verified. We could not find any suitable structural template with more than 20% sequence identity for 84 centrosomal proteins (23%), for which around 74% of the residues are predicted to be disordered or coiled-coils. The three-dimensional models that we built are available at http://ub.cbm.uam.es/centrosome/models/index.php. PMID:23671615

  9. Deciphering Supramolecular Structures with Protein-Protein Interaction Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many biological molecules are assembled into supramolecules that are essential to perform complicated functions in the cell. However, experimental information about the structures of supramolecules is not sufficient at this point. We developed a method of predicting and modeling the structures of supramolecules in a biological network by combining structural data of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and interaction data in IntAct databases. Templates for binary complexes in IntAct were extracted from PDB. Modeling was attempted by assembling binary complexes with superposed shared subunits. A total of 3,197 models were constructed, and 1,306 (41% of the total) contained at least one subunit absent from experimental structures. The models also suggested 970 (25% of the total) experimentally undetected subunit interfaces, and 41 human disease-related amino acid variants were mapped onto these model-suggested interfaces. The models demonstrated that protein-protein interaction network modeling is useful to fill the information gap between biological networks and structures. PMID:26549015

  10. Protein structures by spallation neutron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Paul; Fisher, Zoë; Kovalevsky, Andrii; Mustyakimov, Marat; Sutcliffe Valone, Amanda; Unkefer, Cliff; Waltman, Mary Jo; Coates, Leighton; Adams, Paul D.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Bennett, Brad; Dealwis, Chris; Schoenborn, Benno P.

    2008-01-01

    The Protein Crystallography Station at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is a high-performance beamline that forms the core of a capability for neutron macromolecular structure and function determination. This capability also includes the Macromolecular Neutron Crystallography (MNC) consortium between Los Alamos (LANL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories for developing computational tools for neutron protein crystallography, a biological deuteration laboratory, the National Stable Isotope Production Facility, and an MNC drug design consortium between LANL and Case Western Reserve University. PMID:18421142

  11. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  12. Multiple gas-phase conformations of proline-containing peptides: is it always cis/trans isomerization?

    PubMed

    Lietz, Christopher B; Chen, Zhengwei; Yun Son, Chang; Pang, Xueqin; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2016-08-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is often employed to look at the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of naked peptides and proteins in the gas-phase. Recently, it has offered a unique glimpse into proline-containing peptides and their cis/trans Xxx-Pro isomers. An experimental "signature" has been identified wherein a proline-containing peptide has its Pro residues substituted with another amino acid and the presence or absence of conformations in the IM-MS spectra is observed. Despite the high probability that one could attribute these conformations to cis/trans isomers, it is also possible that cis/trans isomers are not the cause of the additional conformations in proline-containing peptides. However, the experimental evidence of such a system has not been demonstrated or reported. Herein, we present the IM-MS analysis of Neuropeptide Y's wild-type (WT) signal sequence and Leu7Pro (L7P) mutant. Although comparison of arrival times and collision cross-sections of [M + 4H](4+) ions yields the cis/trans "signature", molecular dynamics indicates that a cis-Pro7 is not very stable and that trans-Pro7 conformations of the same cross-section arise with equal frequency. We believe that this work further underscores the importance of theoretical calculations in IM-MS structural assignments. PMID:27434776

  13. An Experimental and Computational Study of the Gas-Phase Acidities of the Common Amino Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Chelsea E; Stover, Michele L; Bokatzian, Samantha S; Davis, John T M; Dixon, David A; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2015-07-30

    Using proton-transfer reactions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and correlated molecular orbital theory at the G3(MP2) level, gas-phase acidities (GAs) and the associated structures for amides corresponding to the common amino acids have been determined for the first time. These values are important because amino acid amides are models for residues in peptides and proteins. For compounds whose most acidic site is the C-terminal amide nitrogen, two ions populations were observed experimentally with GAs that differ by 4-7 kcal/mol. The lower energy, more acidic structure accounts for the majority of the ions formed by electrospray ionization. G3(MP2) calculations predict that the lowest energy anionic conformer has a cis-like orientation of the [-C(═O)NH](-) group whereas the higher energy, less acidic conformer has a trans-like orientation of this group. These two distinct conformers were predicted for compounds with aliphatic, amide, basic, hydroxyl, and thioether side chains. For the most acidic amino acid amides (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, histidine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid amides) only one conformer was observed experimentally, and its experimental GA correlates with the theoretical GA related to side chain deprotonation. PMID:26196065

  14. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Gas-phase Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. D.; Witt, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to produce fluorescence spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the gas-phase for comparison with blue luminescence (BL) emission observed in astrophysical sources Vijh et al. (2004, 2005a,b). The BL occurs roughly from 350 to 450 nm, with a sharp peak near 380 nm. PAHs with three to four rings, e.g. anthracene and pyrene, were found to produce luminescence in the appropriate spectral region, based on existing studies. Relatively few studies of the gas-phase fluorescence of PAHs exist; those that do exist have dealt primarily with the same samples commonly available for purchase such as pyrene and anthracene. In an attempt to understand the chemistry of the nebular environment we also obtained several nitrogen substituted PAHs from our colleagues at NASA Ames. In order to simulate the astrophysical environment we also took spectra by heating the PAHs in a flame. The flame environment counteracts the formation of eximers and permits the spectroscopy of free-flying neutral molecules. Experiments with coal tar demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy reveals primarily the presence of the smallest molecules, which are most abundant and which possess the highest fluorescence efficiencies. One gas-phase PAH that seems to fit the BL spectrum most closely is phenanthridine. In view of the results from the spectroscopy of coal tar, a compound containing a mixture of PAHs ranging from small to very large PAH molecules, we can not preclude the presence of larger PAHs in interstellar sources exhibiting BL.

  15. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  16. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  17. Gas-phase chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, P. K.; Chatha, J. P. S.; Vohra, K. G.

    1983-08-01

    Chemiluminescent reactions of ozone with monoterpenes such as linallol, geraniol, d-limonene and α-pinene have been studied in the gas phase at low pressures. Methylglyoxal phosphorescence has been observed in the first two reactions. Emissions from HCHO( 1A 2) and glyoxal ( 3A u) are observed in the reaction of ozone with d-limonene and formation of excited glyoxal is found to be first order in ozone. The reaction of ozone with β-pinene gives rise to emission from a α-dicarbonyl compound and this is found to be first order in ozone. The mechanisms for the formation of excited species are proposed.

  18. The solar system/interstellar medium connection - Gas phase abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    Gas-phase abundances in the outer solar system are presented as diagnostics of the interstellar medium at the time of the solar system formation, some 4.55 billion years ago. Possible influences of the thermal and chemical histories of the primitive solar nebula and of the processes which led to the formation and evolution of the outer planets and comets on the elemental and molecular composition of the primordial matter are outlined. The major components of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of the comae of comets are identified, and the cosmogonical and cosmological implications are discussed.

  19. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  20. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  1. IRMPD Spectroscopy: Evidence of Hydrogen Bonding in the Gas Phase Conformations of Lasso Peptides and their Branched-Cyclic Topoisomers.

    PubMed

    Jeanne Dit Fouque, Kevin; Lavanant, Hélène; Zirah, Séverine; Steinmetz, Vincent; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Maître, Philippe; Afonso, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Lasso peptides are natural products characterized by a mechanically interlocked topology. The conformation of lasso peptides has been probed in the gas phase using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) which showed differences in the lasso and their unthreaded branched-cyclic topoisomers depending on the ion charge states. To further characterize the evolution of gas phase conformations as a function of the charge state and to assess associated changes in the hydrogen bond network, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy was carried out on two representative lasso peptides, microcin J25 (MccJ25) and capistruin, and their branched-cyclic topoisomers. For the branched-cyclic topoisomers, spectroscopic evidence of a disruption of neutral hydrogen bonds were found when comparing the 3+ and 4+ charge states. In contrast, for the lasso peptides, the IRMPD spectra were found to be similar for the two charge states, suggesting very little difference in gas phase conformations upon addition of a proton. The IRMPD data were thus found consistent and complementary to IM-MS, confirming the stable and compact structure of lasso peptides in the gas phase. PMID:27171649

  2. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  3. Transition state for the gas-phase reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2008-06-19

    Density functional theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transition states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F 5, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structures and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the structure of the product complex was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF 4, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF 6 with water. PMID:18500792

  4. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins. PMID:27273628

  5. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Cross-Linked Intact Multiprotein Complexes: Enhanced Gas-Phase Stabilities and Altered Dissociation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Samulak, Billy M; Niu, Shuai; Andrews, Philip C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2016-05-17

    Analysis of protein complexes by ion mobility-mass spectrometry is a valuable method for the rapid assessment of complex composition, binding stoichiometries, and structures. However, capturing labile, unknown protein assemblies directly from cells remains a challenge for the technology. Furthermore, ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements of complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits are necessary to build complete models of intact assemblies, and such data can be difficult to acquire in a comprehensive fashion. Here, we present the use of novel mass spectrometry cleavable cross-linkers and tags to stabilize intact protein complexes for ion mobility-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that tags and linkers bearing permanent charges are superior stabilizers relative to neutral cross-linkers, especially in the context of retaining compact forms of the assembly under a wide array of activating conditions. In addition, when cross-linked protein complexes are collisionally activated in the gas phase, a larger proportion of the product ions produced are often more compact and reflect native protein subcomplexes when compared with unmodified complexes activated in the same fashion, greatly enabling applications in structural biology. PMID:27078797

  6. Structure of the Nitrosomonas Europaea Rh Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Jayachandran, S.; Nguyen, H.-H.T.; Chan, M.K.

    2009-06-01

    Amt/MEP/Rh proteins are a family of integral membrane proteins implicated in the transport of NH3, CH(2)NH2, and CO2. Whereas Amt/MEP proteins are agreed to transport ammonia (NH3/NH4+), the primary substrate for Rh proteins has been controversial. Initial studies suggested that Rh proteins also transport ammonia, but more recent evidence suggests that they transport CO2. Here we report the first structure of an Rh family member, the Rh protein from the chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. This Rh protein exhibits a number of similarities to its Amt cousins, including a trimeric oligomeric state, a central pore with an unusual twin-His site in the middle, and a Phe residue that blocks the channel for small-molecule transport. However, there are some significant differences, the most notable being the presence of an additional cytoplasmic C-terminal alpha-helix, an increased number of internal proline residues along the transmembrane helices, and a specific set of residues that appear to link the C-terminal helix to Phe blockage. This latter linkage suggests a mechanism in which binding of a partner protein to the C terminus could regulate channel opening. Another difference is the absence of the extracellular pi-cation binding site conserved in Amt/Mep structures. Instead, CO2 pressurization experiments identify a CO2 binding site near the intracellular exit of the channel whose residues are highly conserved in all Rh proteins, except those belonging to the Rh30 subfamily. The implications of these findings on the functional role of the human Rh antigens are discussed.

  7. Membrane protein structure from rotational diffusion☆

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    The motional averaging of powder pattern line shapes is one of the most fundamental aspects of sold-state NMR. Since membrane proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers undergo fast rotational diffusion, all of the signals reflect the angles of the principal axes of their dipole–dipole and chemical shift tensors with respect to the axis defined by the bilayer normal. The frequency span and sign of the axially symmetric powder patterns that result from motional averaging about a common axis provide sufficient structural restraints for the calculation of the three-dimensional structure of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer environment. The method is referred to as rotationally aligned (RA) solid-state NMR and demonstrated with results on full-length, unmodified membrane proteins with one, two, and seven trans-membrane helices. RA solid-state NMR is complementary to other solid-state NMR methods, in particular oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of stationary, aligned samples. Structural distortions of membrane proteins from the truncations of terminal residues and other sequence modifications, and the use of detergent micelles instead of phospholipid bilayers have also been demonstrated. Thus, it is highly advantageous to determine the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. RA solid-state NMR provides a general method for obtaining accurate and precise structures of membrane proteins under near-native conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: NMR Spectroscopy for Atomistic Views of Biomembranes and Cell Surfaces. PMID:24747039

  8. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature

  9. Utilization of Protein Crystal Structures in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kohki

    In industry, protein crystallography is used in mainly two technologies. One is structure-based drug design, and the other is structure-based enzyme engineering. Some successful cases together with recent advances are presented in this article. The cases include the development of an anti-influenza drug, and the introduction of engineered acid phosphatase to the manufacturing process of nucleotides used as umami seasoning.

  10. Reconstruction of SAXS Profiles from Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Daniel K.; Lowe, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used for low resolution structural characterization of proteins often in combination with other experimental techniques. After briefly reviewing the theory of SAXS we discuss computational methods based on 1) the Debye equation and 2) Spherical Harmonics to compute intensity profiles from a particular macromolecular structure. Further, we review how these formulas are parameterized for solvent density and hydration shell adjustment. Finally we introduce our solution to compute SAXS profiles utilizing GPU acceleration. PMID:24688746

  11. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  12. Repeating covalent structure of streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed Central

    Beachey, E H; Seyer, J M; Kang, A H

    1978-01-01

    We have attempted to identify the covalent structure of the M protein molecule of group A streptococci that is responsible for inducing type-specific, protective immunity. M protein was extracted from type 24 streptococci, purified, and cleaved with cyanogen bromide. Seven cyanogen bromide peptides were purified and further characterized. Together, the peptides account for the entire amino acid content of the M protein molecule. Each of the purified peptides possessed the type-specific determinant that inhibits opsonic antibodies for group A streptococci. The primary structures of the amino-terminal regions of each of the purified peptides was studied by automated Edman degradation. The partial sequences of two of the peptides were found to be identical to each other and to that of the uncleaved M protein molecule through at least the first 27 residues. The amino-terminal sequences of the remaining five peptides were identical to each other through the twentieth residue but completely different from the amino-terminal region of the other two peptides. However, the type-specific immunoreactivity and the incomplete analysis of the primary structure of the seven peptides suggest that the antiphagocytic determinant resides in a repeating amino acid sequence in the M protein molecule. PMID:80011

  13. Quantum Control of Femtochemistry in the Gas Phase, Liquid Phase and on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Gustav

    2008-03-01

    By using coherent control techniques we control the behavior of quantum systems on their natural fs-time scale by applying ultrashort coherent light fields in the wavelength range from the IR to the UV. These laser pulses can be variably shaped in space and time using a laser pulse shaper consisting of a liquid-crystal display [1]. Laser-optimized femtochemistry in the gas phase and liquid phase is one field in which this new technique is successfully employed. Automated optimization of branching ratios and total product yields of gas phase photodissociation reactions as well as chemically selective molecular excitation in the liquid phase is performed [2][3]. Structural changes of a molecule in the liquid phase have been controlled by laser-optimized photoisomerization of a cyanine dye molecule [4] and of retinal in bacteriorhodopsin [5]. So far, optimal control techniques have been restricted to gas phase and condensed phase optimization experiments. Recently we have demonstrated femtosecond laser-assisted catalytic reactions on a Pd(100) single crystal surface. By applying a closed-loop optimal control scheme, we manipulate these reactions and selectively optimize the ratio of different bond-forming reaction channels, in contrast to previous quantum control experiments aiming at bond-cleavage. The results represent a first step towards selective photocatalysis of molecules. [1] T. Baumert et al, Appl. Phys. B 65, 779 (1997) [2] A. Assion et al, Science 282, 919(1998); T. Brixner et al, J. Mod. Opt. 50, 539 (2003) [3] T. Brixner et al, Nature, Vol. 414, 57 (2001) and J. Chem. Phys. 118, 3692 (2003) [4] G. Krampert et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 068305 (2005) [5] G. Vogt et al, Chem. Phys. Lett. 433, 211 (2006) P. Nuernberger et al, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 2470 (2007)

  14. Carbonyl Compounds in the Gas Phase of Cigarette Mainstream Smoke and Their Pharmacological Properties.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Higashi, Tsunehito; Mazaki, Yuichi; Miwa, Soichi

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette mainstream smoke is composed of gas and tar phases and contains >4000 chemical constituents, including nicotine and tar. The substances in the gas phase but not in the tar phase can pass through the airway epithelial barrier, enter the systemic circulation via the pulmonary circulation, and increase systemic oxidative damage, leading to the development of cigarette smoking-related diseases such as atherosclerosis. Recently, we identified some stable carbonyl compounds, including acrolein (ACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), as major cytotoxic factors in nicotine- and tar-free cigarette smoke extract (CSE) of the gas phase. CSE, ACR, and MVK induce protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) and subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NOX, causing plasma membrane damage and cell apoptosis. CSE, ACR, and MVK also trigger carbonylation of PKC, which is an irreversible oxidative modification. Cell damage and PKC carbonylation in response to treatment with CSE, ACR, or MVK are abolished by thiol-containing antioxidants such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine and reduced glutathione. Thus pharmacological modulation of PKC and NOX activities and the trapping of ROS are potential strategies for the prevention of diseases related to cigarette smoking. PMID:27251492

  15. Gas-phase reactions of cyclopropenylidene with protonated alkyl amines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziqing; Tan, Lei; Yang, Yang; Dai, Mingji; Tureček, František; Ouyang, Zheng; Xia, Yu

    2016-04-21

    Vinylidene carbenes (C3H2) are of high interest to interstellar, combustion, and organic chemistry. Due to their high instability, the direct experimental investigation of their chemical reactivity has rarely been achieved. Herein, we report a first study on the reactions of cyclopropenylidene (c-C3H2) with protonated alkyl amines in the gas phase using a home-built ion trap mass spectrometer. The high gas-phase basicity (GB) of ((1)A1) c-C3H2 (calculated as 920 kJ mol(-1)) facilitates the formation of a proton-bound dimer with protonated amines as the first step in the reaction. The dimer can stay as it is or rearrange to a covalent product. The formation of the covalent complex is highly exothermic and its yield is affected by the GB of alkyl amines. The highest yield (82%) was achieved when the GB of the amine was slightly lower but comparable to that of c-C3H2. Our results demonstrate a new reaction pathway of c-C3H2, which has long been considered as a "dead end" in interstellar carbon chemistry. PMID:26978226

  16. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  17. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  18. Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoji; Li, Zhaofei; Hirai, Kei; Tassel, Cédric; Loyer, François; Ichikawa, Noriya; Abe, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; and others

    2013-11-15

    Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

  19. Gas-phase reactivity of novel Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alameddin, N.G.; Eyler, J.R.; Richardson, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The discovery of soluble group 4 metallocene-based catalysts for the Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins has generated considerable interest in the field. In particular, the versatility of the Cp (cyclopentadienyl) ligand has made practical the development of a host of novel catalysts which can produce extremely regiospecific and stereospecific polymers. With further improvements in activity and stability, these catalysts are expected to make a major impact on the polymerization industry. Presently, catalyst design is driven by using the steric and electronic properties of the ligands to guide the monomer addition. However, since these ligands have considerable steric bulk, the choice of solvent will significantly affect their catalytic properties. Therefore, an understanding of the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts independent of a solvent is one of the first steps to building a better catalyst. The work in progress is a study of the reactivity of zircononene-based catalysts in the gas phase. The authors are in the process of studying the rates of reaction of a series of these compounds with H{sub 2} as well as with a number of olefins. In the gas phase, the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts is revealed and their chemistry can be studied in detail.

  20. Protein crowding affects hydration structure and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The effect of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of water was examined from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of a series of protein G and protein G/villin systems at different protein concentrations. Hydration structure was analyzed in terms of radial distribution functions, three-dimensional hydration sites, and preservation of tetrahedral coordination. Analysis of hydration dynamics focused on self-diffusion rates and dielectric constants as a function of crowding. The results show significant changes in both structure and dynamics of water under highly crowded conditions. The structure of water is altered mostly beyond the first solvation shell. Diffusion rates and dielectric constants are significantly reduced following linear trends as a function of crowding reflecting highly constrained water in crowded environments. The reduced dynamics of diffusion is expected to be strongly related to hydrodynamic properties of crowded cellular environments while the reduced dielectric constant under crowded conditions has implications for the stability of biomolecules in crowded environments. The results from this study suggest a prescription for modeling solvation in simulations of cellular environments. PMID:22352398

  1. A structural alphabet for local protein structures: improved prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Etchebest, Catherine; Benros, Cristina; Hazout, Serge; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2005-06-01

    Three-dimensional protein structures can be described with a library of 3D fragments that define a structural alphabet. We have previously proposed such an alphabet, composed of 16 patterns of five consecutive amino acids, called Protein Blocks (PBs). These PBs have been used to describe protein backbones and to predict local structures from protein sequences. The Q16 prediction rate reaches 40.7% with an optimization procedure. This article examines two aspects of PBs. First, we determine the effect of the enlargement of databanks on their definition. The results show that the geometrical features of the different PBs are preserved (local RMSD value equal to 0.41 A on average) and sequence-structure specificities reinforced when databanks are enlarged. Second, we improve the methods for optimizing PB predictions from sequences, revisiting the optimization procedure and exploring different local prediction strategies. Use of a statistical optimization procedure for the sequence-local structure relation improves prediction accuracy by 8% (Q16 = 48.7%). Better recognition of repetitive structures occurs without losing the prediction efficiency of the other local folds. Adding secondary structure prediction improved the accuracy of Q16 by only 1%. An entropy index (Neq), strongly related to the RMSD value of the difference between predicted PBs and true local structures, is proposed to estimate prediction quality. The Neq is linearly correlated with the Q16 prediction rate distributions, computed for a large set of proteins. An "expected" prediction rate QE16 is deduced with a mean error of 5%. PMID:15822101

  2. Investigation of condensed and early stage gas phase hypergolic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Jacob Daniel

    Traditional hypergolic propellant combinations, such as those used on the space shuttle orbital maneuvering system first flown in 1981, feature hydrazine based fuels and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) based oxidizers. Despite the long history of hypergolic propellant implementation, the processes that govern hypergolic ignition are not well understood. In order to achieve ignition, condensed phase fuel and oxidizer must undergo simultaneous physical mixing and chemical reaction. This process generates heat, intermediate condensed phase species, and gas phase species, which then may continue to react and generate more heat until ignition is achieved. The process is not well understood because condensed and gas phase reactions occur rapidly, typically in less than 200 μs, on much faster timescales than traditional diagnostic methods can observe. A detailed understanding of even the gas phase chemistry is lacking, but is critical for model development. Initial research has provided confidence that a study of condensed phase hypergolic reactions is useful and possible. Results obtained using an impinging jet apparatus have shown a critical residence time of 0.3 ms is required for the reaction between monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA, ~85% HNO3 + 15% N2O4) to achieve conditions favorable for ignition. This critical residence time spans the time required for liquid phase reactions to occur at the fuel/oxidizer interface and can give some insight into the reaction rates for this propellant combination. Experiments performed in a forced mixing constant volume reactor have demonstrated that the chamber pressurization rate for MMH/RFNA can be significantly reduced by diluting the MMH with deionized water. This result indicates that propellant dilution can slow the chemical reaction rates to occur over observable time scales. The research described in this document consists of two efforts that contribute knowledge to the propulsion community regarding the

  3. Protein tertiary structure recognition using optimized Hamiltonians with local interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R A; Luthey-Schulten, Z A; Wolynes, P G

    1992-01-01

    Protein folding codes embodying local interactions including surface and secondary structure propensities and residue-residue contacts are optimized for a set of training proteins by using spin-glass theory. A screening method based on these codes correctly matches the structure of a set of test proteins with proteins of similar topology with 100% accuracy, even with limited sequence similarity between the test proteins and the structural homologs and the absence of any structurally similar proteins in the training set. PMID:1409599

  4. Structural mechanisms of chaperone mediated protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ClpB/Hsp104 and Hsp70 classes of molecular chaperones use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate protein aggregates and complexes, and to move proteins through membranes. ClpB/Hsp104 are members of the AAA+ family of proteins which form ring-shaped hexamers. Loops lining the pore in the ring engage substrate proteins as extended polypeptides. Interdomain rotations and conformational changes in these loops coupled to ATP hydrolysis unfold and pull proteins through the pore. This provides a mechanism that progressively disrupts local secondary and tertiary structure in substrates, allowing these chaperones to dissociate stable aggregates such as β-sheet rich prions or coiled coil SNARE complexes. While the ClpB/Hsp104 mechanism appears to embody a true power-stroke in which an ATP powered conformational change in one protein is directly coupled to movement or structural change in another, the mechanism of force generation by Hsp70s is distinct and less well understood. Both active power-stroke and purely passive mechanisms in which Hsp70 captures spontaneous fluctuations in a substrate have been proposed, while a third proposed mechanism—entropic pulling—may be able to generate forces larger than seen in ATP-driven molecular motors without the conformational coupling required for a power-stroke. The disaggregase activity of these chaperones is required for thermotolerance, but unrestrained protein complex/aggregate dissociation is potentially detrimental. Disaggregating chaperones are strongly auto-repressed, and are regulated by co-chaperones which recruit them to protein substrates and activate the disaggregases via mechanisms involving either sequential transfer of substrate from one chaperone to another and/or simultaneous interaction of substrate with multiple chaperones. By effectively subjecting substrates to multiple levels of selection by multiple chaperones, this may insure that these potent disaggregases are only activated in the appropriate context. PMID

  5. The Conformation of Pentanoates in the Solid and in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkens, Carina; Stadtmüller, Tom; Englert, Ulli; Mouhib, Halima; Stahl, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Suitable derivatives of the four isomeric pentanoates have been structurally characterized in the solid and the gas phase. For the latter, the volatile ethyl esters of valeric, isovaleric, methylbutyric, and pivalic acid were investigated by a combination of molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (MB-FTMW) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Crystalline salts rather than esters were formed by reaction between the carboxylic acids and trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane. For both gaseous and crystalline methylbutyrates, an essentially perpendicular arrangement of carboxylate and methyl group was observed; earlier structure determinations documented in the data base agree with this result. Two competing conformers of favourable energy were relevant for the corresponding isovalerates: They were associated with torsion angles around 20° and 50° between the carboxylate and the alkyl chain. Good agreements in conformation have also been achieved for our experimentally observed unbranched valerate derivatives and fully branched pivalates in solid and gas phase. Despite the apparent simplicity of the pentanoates, the identification of their lowest energy conformers represents a challenge for different methods and levels of theory.

  6. Structural neighboring property for identifying protein-protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The protein-protein interaction plays a key role in the control of many biological functions, such as drug design and functional analysis. Determination of binding sites is widely applied in molecular biology research. Therefore, many efficient methods have been developed for identifying binding sites. In this paper, we calculate structural neighboring property through Voronoi diagram. Using 6,438 complexes, we study local biases of structural neighboring property on interface. Results We propose a novel statistical method to extract interacting residues, and interacting patches can be clustered as predicted interface residues. In addition, structural neighboring property can be adopted to construct a new energy function, for evaluating docking solutions. It includes new statistical property as well as existing energy items. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves overall Fnat value by at least 3%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has average Irmsd value of 3.31Å and overall Fnat value of 63%, which improves upon Irmsd of 3.89 Å and Fnat of 49% for ZRANK, and Irmsd of 3.99Å and Fnat of 46% for ClusPro. On the CAPRI targets, our method has average Irmsd value of 3.46 Å and overall Fnat value of 45%, which improves upon Irmsd of 4.18 Å and Fnat of 40% for ZRANK, and Irmsd of 5.12 Å and Fnat of 32% for ClusPro. Conclusions Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein binding sites, with the prediction quality improved in terms of CAPRI evaluation criteria. PMID:26356630

  7. Solving coiled-coil protein structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-02-26

    With the availability of more than 100,000 entries stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that can be used as search models, molecular replacement (MR) is currently the most popular method of solving crystal structures of macromolecules. Significant methodological efforts have been directed in recent years towards making this approach more powerful and practical. This resulted in the creation of several computer programs, highly automated and user friendly, that are able to successfully solve many structures even by researchers who, although interested in structures of biomolecules, are not very experienced in crystallography.

  8. Electronic Relaxation of the Phenylalanine Residue in Gas Phase Peptides: Role of the Neighbouring Amide Groups in the Photophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loquais, Y.; Biswal, H. S.; Tardivel, B.; Brenner, V.; Mons, M.; Gloaguen, E.; Jouvet, C.; Broquier, M.; Malis, M.; Ljubic, I.; Doslic, N.

    2012-06-01

    Protein absorption in the near UV is mainly due to the presence of aromatic systems on the side chain of three residues: phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. It is generally expected that the photophysics of these UV chromophores depends on their immediate environment within the molecule and thus on the conformation of these flexible molecules. This property may in particular be used as an optical diagnostic of the conformational state of the peptide chain. The structure of peptide chains isolated in the gas phase can be characterized by UV and IR laser spectroscopy. These measurements allow us to distinguish the spectral contributions of the different conformers and thus provide us with an elegant way to address the issue of the conformational dependence on the photophysics. For this purpose, the dynamics of relaxation of the ππ* excited state of several peptides containing a phenylalanine residue have been studied using two-colour resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) in the ns time scale at CEA and ps at CLUPS and laser-induced fluorescence as well. The lifetime of the ππ* excited state is found to strongly depend on the conformation adopted by the molecule and on the excess energy in the excited state, with measured lifetimes ranging from 1 ns to 80 ns. W. Chin; F. Piuzzi; I. Dimicoli and M. Mons, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, pp 1033-1048 (2006)

  9. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  10. Exploiting Microbeams for Membrane Protein Structure Determination.

    PubMed

    Warren, Anna J; Axford, Danny; Paterson, Neil G; Owen, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    A reproducible, and sample independent means of predictably obtaining large, well-ordered crystals has proven elusive in macromolecular crystallography. In the structure determination pipeline, crystallisation often proves to be a rate-limiting step, and the process of obtaining even small or badly ordered crystals can prove time-consuming and laborious. This is particularly true in the field of membrane protein crystallography and this is reflected in the limited number of unique membrane protein structures deposited in the protein data bank (less than 650 by June 2016 - http://blanco.biomol.uci.edu/mpstruc ). Over recent years the requirement for, and time and cost associated with obtaining, large crystals has been partially alleviated through the development of beamline instrumentation allowing data collection, and structure solution, from ever-smaller crystals. Advances in several areas have led to a step change in what might be considered achievable during a synchrotron trip over the last decade. This chapter will briefly review the current status of the field, the tools available to ease data collection and processing, and give some examples of exploitation of these for membrane protein microfocus macromolecular crystallography. PMID:27553238

  11. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  12. 1-Phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane, 1-Ph-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11). Synthesis, Characterization, and Structure As Determined in the Gas Phase by Electron Diffraction, in the Crystalline Phase at 199 K by X-ray Diffraction, and by ab Initio Computations.

    PubMed

    Brain, Paul T.; Cowie, Jill; Donohoe, David J.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Rankin, David W. H.; Reed, David; Reid, Bruce D.; Robertson, Heather E.; Welch, Alan J.; Hofmann, Matthias; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    1996-03-13

    The compound 1-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12), 1-C(6)H(5)-1,2-closo-C(2)B(10)H(11) (1), has been synthesized and characterized by a complete assignment of its (11)B NMR spectrum via (11)B{(1)H}/(11)B{(1)H} (COSY), (1)H{(11)B(selective)} and (1)H{(11)B}/(1)H{(11)B} (COSY) spectroscopy. An electron- and X-ray diffraction investigation of 1, complemented by ab initio calculations, has been undertaken. The gas-phase electron-diffraction (GED) data can be fitted by several models describing conformations which differ in the position of the phenyl ring with respect to the carborane cage. Local symmetries ofC(2)(v)() and D(6)(h)() for the 1,2-C(2)B(10) and C(6) moieties, respectively, were adopted in the GED model in order to simplify the problem. In addition, constraints among the close-lying C-C and B-B bonds were employed. However, even though such simplifications led to satisfactory refinements (R(G) = 0.069-0.071), a unique, definitive solution could not be gained. The (C-C)(mean), (C-B)(mean) and (B-B)(mean) bond lengths,r(a), are ca. 1.44, 1.72, and 1.78 Å, respectively. The C(6) hexagon, with r(a)(C-C) = ca. 1.394 Å, either eclipses the C(1)-C(2) vector (overall C(s)() symmetry) or more or less eclipses the C(1)-B(4) cluster bond (overall C(1) symmetry). In contrast, in the solid at 199 K, the ring lies at a position intermediate between the two GED positions, as determined by X-ray crystallography [C(8)H(16)B(10), monoclinic P2(1)/a: a = 12.047(3) Å, b = 18.627(4) Å, c = 12.332(5) Å, beta = 110.09(4) degrees, Z = 8]. The C-B distances span the range 1.681(6)-1.743(5) Å, and B-B lengths lie between 1.756(6) and 1.795(6) Å. A similar conformation was found for the theoretical (RHF/6-31G level) structure which was fully optimized in C(1) symmetry. The r(e) distances are consistent with the dimensions derived in the experimental studies. IGLO calculations of the (11)B chemical shifts, in addition to SCF single-point energies of the GED structures

  13. Dynamic Structure in Artificial Protein Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Scott B.; Hong, Mei; de Azevedo, Eduardo; Tirrell, David A.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2000-03-01

    Artificial proteins that form reversible hydrogels have been designed and synthesized using recombinant DNA methodologies. Proteins are designed such that two helical, leucine zipper domains flank a central, water soluble domain. Under proper conditions of concentration, pH, and temperature the helical domains aggregate as coiled coils and act as physical crosslinks. Small angle x-ray and neutron scattering have been used to elucidate the gel structure, and NMR and fluorescence exchange experiments have been used to probe the dynamics of the gel system.

  14. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  15. A Phosphohistidine Proteomics Strategy Based on Elucidation of a Unique Gas-Phase Phosphopeptide Fragmentation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein histidine phosphorylation is increasingly recognized as a critical posttranslational modification (PTM) in central metabolism and cell signaling. Still, the detection of phosphohistidine (pHis) in the proteome has remained difficult due to the scarcity of tools to enrich and identify this labile PTM. To address this, we report the first global proteomic analysis of pHis proteins, combining selective immunoenrichment of pHis peptides and a bioinformatic strategy based on mechanistic insight into pHis peptide gas-phase fragmentation during LC–MS/MS. We show that collision-induced dissociation (CID) of pHis peptides produces prominent characteristic neutral losses of 98, 80, and 116 Da. Using isotopic labeling studies, we also demonstrate that the 98 Da neutral loss occurs via gas-phase phosphoryl transfer from pHis to the peptide C-terminal α-carboxylate or to Glu/Asp side chain residues if present. To exploit this property, we developed a software tool that screens LC–MS/MS spectra for potential matches to pHis-containing peptides based on their neutral loss pattern. This tool was integrated into a proteomics workflow for the identification of endogenous pHis-containing proteins in cellular lysates. As an illustration of this strategy, we analyzed pHis peptides from glycerol-fed and mannitol-fed Escherichia coli cells. We identified known and a number of previously speculative pHis sites inferred by homology, predominantly in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar transferase system (PTS). Furthermore, we identified two new sites of histidine phosphorylation on aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) enzymes, previously not known to bear this modification. This study lays the groundwork for future pHis proteomics studies in bacteria and other organisms. PMID:25156620

  16. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  17. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase Imidazolium and Pyridinium Ionic Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2015-06-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a highly variable and potentially game-changing class of molecules for a number of Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition, the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, and especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here we describe the gas-phase spectroscopy of a series of imidazolium- and pyridinium-based ILs, using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory to establish the intermolecular interactions present in various ILs, to assess how well they are described by theory, and to relate microscopic structure to macroscopic properties.

  18. Gas-phase electronic transitions of C₁₇H₁₂N⁺ at 15 K.

    PubMed

    Hardy, F-X; Rice, C A; Gause, O; Maier, J P

    2015-03-01

    The electronic spectrum of C17H12N(+), phenanthrene with a side chain, was measured in the gas phase at a vibrational and rotational temperature of ∼15 K in an ion trap using a resonant multiphoton dissociation technique. The C17H12N(+) structure was produced in a chemical ionization source and identified by a comparison with theoretical calculations of stable structures and excitation energies. The (3), (2), (1) (1)A ← X (1)A electronic transitions of this nitrogen-containing aromatic species with 30 atoms have origin band maxima at 23,586 ± 1 cm(-1), 16,120 ± 50 cm(-1), and 14,519 ± 30 cm(-1). Distinct vibrational structure in the (3) (1)A state is observed, and assignments are made. Astronomical aspects are considered. PMID:25264926

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie

    Ultrafast electron diffraction has emerged since the end of last century, and has become an increasingly important tool for revealing great details of molecular dynamics. In comparison to spectroscopic techniques, ultrafast electron diffraction directly probes time-resolved structure of target molecules, and therefore can potentially provide "molecular movies" of the reactions being studied. These molecular movies are critical for understanding and ultimately controlling the energy conversion pathways and efficiencies of photochemical processes. In this dissertation, I have focused on ultrafast electron diffraction from gas-phase molecules, and have investigated several long-standing challenges that have been preventing researchers from being able to achieve 3-D molecular movies of photochemical reactions. The first challenge is to resolve the full 3-D structure for molecules in the gas phase. The random orientation of molecules in the gas phase smears out the diffraction signal, which results in only 1-D structural information being accessible. The second challenge lies in temporal resolution. In order to resolve coherent nuclear motions on their natural time scale, a temporal resolution of ˜200 femtosecond or better is required. However, due to experimental limitations the shortest temporal resolution that had been achieved was only a few picoseconds in early 2000, by Zewail group from Caltech. The first challenge is tackled by laser-alignment. In the first half of the dissertation, I approach this method both theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrate that by using a short laser pulse to transiently align target molecules in space, 3-D molecular structure can be reconstructed ab-initio from diffraction patterns. The second half of the dissertation presents two experiments, both of which are important steps toward imaging coherent nuclear motions in real time during photochemical reactions. The first experiment simultaneously resolves molecular alignment

  20. Accurate Prediction of Docked Protein Structure Similarity.

    PubMed

    Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Pomplun, Marc; Haspel, Nurit

    2015-09-01

    One of the major challenges for protein-protein docking methods is to accurately discriminate nativelike structures. The protein docking community agrees on the existence of a relationship between various favorable intermolecular interactions (e.g. Van der Waals, electrostatic, desolvation forces, etc.) and the similarity of a conformation to its native structure. Different docking algorithms often formulate this relationship as a weighted sum of selected terms and calibrate their weights against specific training data to evaluate and rank candidate structures. However, the exact form of this relationship is unknown and the accuracy of such methods is impaired by the pervasiveness of false positives. Unlike the conventional scoring functions, we propose a novel machine learning approach that not only ranks the candidate structures relative to each other but also indicates how similar each candidate is to the native conformation. We trained the AccuRMSD neural network with an extensive dataset using the back-propagation learning algorithm. Our method achieved predicting RMSDs of unbound docked complexes with 0.4Å error margin. PMID:26335807

  1. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  2. Recognizing the fold of a protein structure.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew; Pearl, Frances; Sillitoe, Ian; Slidel, Tim; Mott, Richard; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2003-09-22

    This paper reports a graph-theoretic program, GRATH, that rapidly, and accurately, matches a novel structure against a library of domain structures to find the most similar ones. GRATH generates distributions of scores by comparing the novel domain against the different types of folds that have been classified previously in the CATH database of structural domains. GRATH uses a measure of similarity that details the geometric information, number of secondary structures and number of residues within secondary structures, that any two protein structures share. Although GRATH builds on well established approaches for secondary structure comparison, a novel scoring scheme has been introduced to allow ranking of any matches identified by the algorithm. More importantly, we have benchmarked the algorithm using a large dataset of 1702 non-redundant structures from the CATH database which have already been classified into fold groups, with manual validation. This has facilitated introduction of further constraints, optimization of parameters and identification of reliable thresholds for fold identification. Following these benchmarking trials, the correct fold can be identified with the top score with a frequency of 90%. It is identified within the ten most likely assignments with a frequency of 98%. GRATH has been implemented to use via a server (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/cath/Grath.pl). GRATH's speed and accuracy means that it can be used as a reliable front-end filter for the more accurate, but computationally expensive, residue based structure comparison algorithm SSAP, currently used to classify domain structures in the CATH database. With an increasing number of structures being solved by the structural genomics initiatives, the GRATH server also provides an essential resource for determining whether newly determined structures are related to any known structures from which functional properties may be inferred. PMID:14512345

  3. Mass spectrometric study of gas-phase ions of acid β-glucosidase (Cerezyme) and iminosugar pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2014-10-01

    The effect on the conformations and stability of gas-phase ions of Cerezyme, a glycoprotein, when bound to three small-molecule chaperones has been studied using intact ESI MS, collision cross section and MS/MS measurements. To distinguish between the peaks from apo and small-molecule complex ions, Cerezyme is deglycosylated (dg-Cer). ESI MS of dg-Cer reveals that glycosylation accounts for 8.5% of the molecular weight. When excess chaperone, either covalent (2FGF) or noncovalent (A and B iminosugars), is added to solutions of dg-Cer, mass spectra show peaks from 1:1 chaperone-enzyme complexes as well as free enzyme. On average, ions of the apoenzyme have 1.6 times higher cross sections when activated in the source region of the mass spectrometer. For a given charge state, ions of complexes of 2FGF and B have about 30% and 8.4% lower cross sections, respectively, compared to the apoenzyme. Thus, binding the chaperones causes the gas-phase protein to adopt more compact conformations. The noncovalent complex ions dissociate by the loss of charged chaperones. In the gas phase, the relative stability of dg-Cer with B is higher than that with the A, whereas in solution A binds enzyme more strongly than B. Nevertheless, the disagreement is explained based on the greater number of contacts between the B and dg-Cer than the A and dg-Cer (13 vs. 8), indicating the importance of noncovalent interactions within the protein-chaperone complex in the absence of solvent. Findings in this work suggest a hypothesis towards predicting a consistent correlation between gas-phase properties to solution binding properties. PMID:25303390

  4. Metal-ligand redox reactions in gas-phase quaternary peptide-metal complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisar, T.; Gatlin, C. L.; Turecek, F.

    1997-03-01

    The dipeptides Phe-Leu, Leu-Phe, Leu-Ala, and Ala-Leu form quaternary complexes of the type [Cu(II)(peptide - 2H+M)bpy]+ in the gas phase when electrosprayed in the presence of Cu(II) salts, 2.2'-bipyridyl (bpy), and an alkali hydroxide (MOH). The gas-phase complexes decarboxylate on collisional activation at low ion kinetic energies. The resulting ions undergo unusual eliminations of neutral Na, K, and Rb, which depend on the peptide structure. The ionization energy of the decarboxylated Phe-Leu-Cu-bpy complex was bracketed at 4.2 eV. Other collision-induced dissociations also depend on the alkali metal ion and the peptide structure. Ab initio calculations on a model system are reported and used to discuss the electronic properties of the peptide complexes.

  5. Detection of the Elusive Triazane Molecule (N3 H5 ) in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Förstel, Marko; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Jones, Brant M; Sun, Bing-Jian; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chang, Agnes H-H; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2015-10-26

    We report the detection of triazane (N3 H5 ) in the gas phase. Triazane is a higher order nitrogen hydride of ammonia (NH3 ) and hydrazine (N2 H4 ) of fundamental importance for the understanding of the stability of single-bonded chains of nitrogen atoms and a potential key intermediate in hydrogen-nitrogen chemistry. The experimental results along with electronic-structure calculations reveal that triazane presents a stable molecule with a nitrogen-nitrogen bond length that is a few picometers shorter than that of hydrazine and has a lifetime exceeding 6±2 μs at a sublimation temperature of 170 K. Triazane was synthesized through irradiation of ammonia ice with energetic electrons and was detected in the gas phase upon sublimation of the ice through soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization coupled with a reflectron-time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Isotopic substitution experiments exploiting [D3 ]-ammonia ice confirmed the identification through the detection of its fully deuterated counterpart [D5 ]-triazane (N3 D5 ). PMID:26331382

  6. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  7. Conformational Study of Taurine in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Vanessa; Sanz, M. Eugenia; López, Juan C.; Alonso, José L.

    2009-08-01

    The conformational preferences of the amino sulfonic acid taurine (NH2-CH2-CH2-SO3H) have been investigated in the gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW) in the 6-14 GHz frequency range. One conformer has been observed, and its rotational, centrifugal distortion, and hyperfine quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of its rotational spectrum. Comparison of the experimental constants with those calculated theoretically identifies the detected conformer unambiguously. The observed conformer of taurine is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond O-H···N between the hydrogen of the sulfonic acid group and the nitrogen atom of the amino group.

  8. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields. PMID:25422410

  9. Chemistry inside molecular containers in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tung-Chun; Kalenius, Elina; Lazar, Alexandra I.; Assaf, Khaleel I.; Kuhnert, Nikolai; Grün, Christian H.; Jänis, Janne; Scherman, Oren A.; Nau, Werner M.

    2013-05-01

    Inner-phase chemical reactions of guest molecules encapsulated in a macromolecular cavity give fundamental insight into the relative stabilization of transition states by the surrounding walls of the host, thereby modelling the situation of substrates in enzymatic binding pockets. Although in solution several examples of inner-phase reactions are known, the use of cucurbiturils as macrocyclic hosts and bicyclic azoalkanes as guests has now enabled a systematic mass spectrometric investigation of inner-phase reactions in the gas phase, where typically the supply of thermal energy results in dissociation of the supramolecular host-guest assembly. The results reveal a sensitive interplay in which attractive and repulsive van der Waals interactions between the differently sized hosts and guests need to be balanced with a constrictive binding to allow thermally activated chemical reactions to compete with dissociation. The results are important for the understanding of supramolecular reactivity and have implications for catalysis.

  10. Reduced-background gas-phase absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R

    1998-08-15

    We propose and demonstrate a new method for single-shot multiplex absorption spectroscopy that permits enhanced sensitivity in the simultaneous measurement of multiple spectral lines in rapidly changing gas-phase media, such as turbulent flames. It uses an ultrashort laser pulse that propagates through the absorbing medium, for which the relevant absorption information resides in the free-induction decay that is trailing behind the transmitted pulse. Time gating out most of the transmitted pulse, but not the free-induction decay, enhances the relative fraction of light that contains absorption information when the spectrum is measured. This procedure reduces the background associated with the input light, thus enhancing detection sensitivity. PMID:18087501

  11. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    Using the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, dissociative attachment coefficients [beta] for reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4], HRh(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] and carbonyl hydride complexes HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 5] have been determined under thermal conditions over the approximate temperature range 300[approximately]550 K. The superacids react relatively slowly (<1/20 of [beta][sub max]) with free electrons in a thermal plasma, and the values of [beta] obtained this far do not show a correlation between acidity and [beta]. The pioneer researchers in this field had speculated that any superacid would be a rapid attacher of electrons; it was found that this speculation is not true in general. The product distribution of electron attachment reaction to HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] was found to be independent of temperature even though the [beta][HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4

  12. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  13. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  14. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  15. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  16. Printing nanoparticles from the liquid and gas phases using nanoxerography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Chad R.; Steward, Michael G.; Lwin, Nyein Z.; Jacobs, Heiko O.

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports on the directed self-assembly of nanoparticles onto charged surface areas with a resolution of 200 nm from the liquid phase and 100 nm from the gas phase. The charged areas required for this type of nanoxerographic printing were fabricated using a parallel method that employs a flexible, electrically conductive, electrode to charge a thin-film electret. As electrodes, we used metal-coated polymeric stamps and 10 µm thick doped silicon wafers carrying a pattern in topography. Each electrode was brought in contact with a thin-film electret on an n-doped silicon substrate. The charge pattern was transferred into the thin-film electret by applying a voltage pulse between the conductive electrode and the silicon substrate. Areas as large as 1 cm2 were patterned with charge with 100 nm scale resolution in 10 s. These charge patterns attract nanoparticles. A liquid-phase assembly process where electrostatic forces compete with disordering forces due to ultrasonication has been developed to assemble nanoparticles onto charged based receptors in 10 s from a liquid suspension. A gas-phase assembly process was developed that uses a transparent particle assembly module to direct particles towards the charged surface while monitoring the total charge of assembled particles. Nanoparticles were generated using a tube furnace by evaporation and condensation at the outlet. The electrostatically directed assembly of 10-100 nm sized metal (gold, silver) and 30 nm sized carbon particles was accomplished with a resolution 500-1000 times greater than the resolution of existing xerographic printers.

  17. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  18. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N.; Lathem, Terry L.; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-01-01

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8–10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas–aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  19. Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

  20. Foldons, Protein Structural Modules, and Exons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Anna R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Wolynes, Peter G.

    1996-03-01

    Foldons, which are kinetically competent, quasi-independently folding units of a protein, may be defined using energy landscape analysis. Foldons can be identified by maxima in a scan of the ratio of a contiguous segment's energetic stability gap to the energy variance of that segment's molten globule states, reflecting the requirement of minimal frustration. The predicted foldons are compared with the exons and structural modules for 16 of the 30 proteins studied. Statistical analysis indicates a strong correlation between the energetically determined foldons and Go's geometrically defined structural modules, but there are marked sequence-dependent effects. There is only a weak correlation of foldons to exons. For γ II-crystallin, myoglobin, barnase, α -lactalbumin, and cytochrome c the foldons and some noncontiguous clusters of foldons compare well with intermediates observed in experiment.

  1. Structural Determinants of Misfolding in Multidomain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Pengfei; Best, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent single molecule experiments, using either atomic force microscopy (AFM) or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have shown that multidomain proteins containing tandem repeats may form stable misfolded structures. Topology-based simulation models have been used successfully to generate models for these structures with domain-swapped features, fully consistent with the available data. However, it is also known that some multidomain protein folds exhibit no evidence for misfolding, even when adjacent domains have identical sequences. Here we pose the question: what factors influence the propensity of a given fold to undergo domain-swapped misfolding? Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we can reproduce the known propensities of multidomain proteins to form domain-swapped misfolds, where data is available. Contrary to what might be naively expected based on the previously described misfolding mechanism, we find that the extent of misfolding is not determined by the relative folding rates or barrier heights for forming the domains present in the initial intermediates leading to folded or misfolded structures. Instead, it appears that the propensity is more closely related to the relative stability of the domains present in folded and misfolded intermediates. We show that these findings can be rationalized if the folded and misfolded domains are part of the same folding funnel, with commitment to one structure or the other occurring only at a relatively late stage of folding. Nonetheless, the results are still fully consistent with the kinetic models previously proposed to explain misfolding, with a specific interpretation of the observed rate coefficients. Finally, we investigate the relation between interdomain linker length and misfolding, and propose a simple alchemical model to predict the propensity for domain-swapped misfolding of multidomain proteins. PMID:27163669

  2. Proton assisted recoupling and protein structure determination

    PubMed Central

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a homonuclear version of third spin assisted recoupling, a second-order mechanism that can be used for polarization transfer between 13C or 15N spins in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments, particularly at high spinning frequencies employed in contemporary high field MAS experiments. The resulting sequence, which we refer to as proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a cross-term between 1H–13C (or 1H–15N) couplings to mediate zero quantum 13C–13C (or 15N–15N recoupling). In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive an effective Hamiltonian for PAR and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form C1±C2∓HZ for 13C–13C recoupling experiments (or N1±N2∓HZ for 15N–15N). We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAR optimization maps and to delineate the PAR matching conditions. We also detail the PAR polarization transfer dependence with respect to the local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of PAR in structural studies of proteins with 13C–13C spectra of uniformly 13C, 15N labeled microcrystalline Crh, a 85 amino acid model protein that forms a domain swapped dimer (MW=2×10.4 kDa). The spectra, which were acquired at high MAS frequencies (ωr2π>20 kHz) and magnetic fields (750–900 MHz 1H frequencies) using moderate rf fields, exhibit numerous cross peaks corresponding to long (up to 6–7 Å) 13C–13C distances which are particularly useful in protein structure determination. Using results from PAR spectra we calculate the structure of the Crh protein. PMID:19123534

  3. Proton assisted recoupling and protein structure determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a homonuclear version of third spin assisted recoupling, a second-order mechanism that can be used for polarization transfer between 13C or 15N spins in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments, particularly at high spinning frequencies employed in contemporary high field MAS experiments. The resulting sequence, which we refer to as proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a cross-term between 1H-13C (or 1H-15N) couplings to mediate zero quantum 13C-13C (or 15N-15N recoupling). In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive an effective Hamiltonian for PAR and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form C1+/-C2-/+HZ for 13C-13C recoupling experiments (or N1+/-N2-/+HZ for 15N-15N). We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAR optimization maps and to delineate the PAR matching conditions. We also detail the PAR polarization transfer dependence with respect to the local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of PAR in structural studies of proteins with 13C-13C spectra of uniformly 13C, 15N labeled microcrystalline Crh, a 85 amino acid model protein that forms a domain swapped dimer (MW=2×10.4 kDa). The spectra, which were acquired at high MAS frequencies (ωr2π>20 kHz) and magnetic fields (750-900 MHz 1H frequencies) using moderate rf fields, exhibit numerous cross peaks corresponding to long (up to 6-7 A˚) 13C-13C distances which are particularly useful in protein structure determination. Using results from PAR spectra we calculate the structure of the Crh protein.

  4. Structural Determinants of Misfolding in Multidomain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Pengfei; Best, Robert B

    2016-05-01

    Recent single molecule experiments, using either atomic force microscopy (AFM) or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have shown that multidomain proteins containing tandem repeats may form stable misfolded structures. Topology-based simulation models have been used successfully to generate models for these structures with domain-swapped features, fully consistent with the available data. However, it is also known that some multidomain protein folds exhibit no evidence for misfolding, even when adjacent domains have identical sequences. Here we pose the question: what factors influence the propensity of a given fold to undergo domain-swapped misfolding? Using a coarse-grained simulation model, we can reproduce the known propensities of multidomain proteins to form domain-swapped misfolds, where data is available. Contrary to what might be naively expected based on the previously described misfolding mechanism, we find that the extent of misfolding is not determined by the relative folding rates or barrier heights for forming the domains present in the initial intermediates leading to folded or misfolded structures. Instead, it appears that the propensity is more closely related to the relative stability of the domains present in folded and misfolded intermediates. We show that these findings can be rationalized if the folded and misfolded domains are part of the same folding funnel, with commitment to one structure or the other occurring only at a relatively late stage of folding. Nonetheless, the results are still fully consistent with the kinetic models previously proposed to explain misfolding, with a specific interpretation of the observed rate coefficients. Finally, we investigate the relation between interdomain linker length and misfolding, and propose a simple alchemical model to predict the propensity for domain-swapped misfolding of multidomain proteins. PMID:27163669

  5. Membrane protein structure determination by electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Stokes, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the past year, electron crystallography of membrane proteins has provided structural insights into the mechanism of several different transporters and into their interactions with lipid molecules within the bilayer. From a technical perspective there have been important advances in high-throughput screening of crystallization trials and in automated imaging of membrane crystals with the electron microscope. There have also been key developments in software, and in molecular replacement and phase extension methods designed to facilitate the process of structure determination. PMID:22572457

  6. Protein Structure Prediction with Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Krasnogor, N.; Pelta, D.A.; Smith, J.

    1999-02-08

    Evolutionary algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of molecular structure prediction problems. In this paper we reconsider the design of genetic algorithms that have been applied to a simple protein structure prediction problem. Our analysis considers the impact of several algorithmic factors for this problem: the confirmational representation, the energy formulation and the way in which infeasible conformations are penalized, Further we empirically evaluated the impact of these factors on a small set of polymer sequences. Our analysis leads to specific recommendations for both GAs as well as other heuristic methods for solving PSP on the HP model.

  7. Proteins with Highly Similar Native Folds Can Show Vastly Dissimilar Folding Behavior When Desolvated**

    PubMed Central

    Schennach, Moritz; Breuker, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Proteins can be exposed to vastly different environments such as the cytosol or membranes, but the delicate balance between external factors and intrinsic determinants of protein structure, stability, and folding is only poorly understood. Here we used electron capture dissociation to study horse and tuna heart Cytochromes c in the complete absence of solvent. The significantly different stability of their highly similar native folds after transfer into the gas phase, and their strikingly different folding behavior in the gas phase, can be rationalized on the basis of electrostatic interactions such as salt bridges. In the absence of hydrophobic bonding, protein folding is far slower and more complex than in solution. PMID:24259450

  8. Photoinduced intermolecular cross-linking of gas phase triacylglycerol lipid ions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuai; Pham, Huong T; Blanksby, Stephen J; Reid, Gavin E

    2015-01-01

    Complex mixtures of plant derived triglycerol (TG) lipids are commonly used as feedstock components for the production of industrial polymers. However, there remains a need for the development of analytical strategies to investigate the intrinsic intermolecular cross-linking reactivity of individual TG molecules within these mixtures as a function of their structures and physicochemical properties, and for the characterization of the resultant products. Here, to address this need, we describe a novel multistage tandem mass spectrometry based method for intermolecular cross-linking and subsequent structural characterization of TG lipid ions in the gas phase. Cross-linking reactions were initiated using 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation tandem mass spectrometry (UVPD-MS/MS) of saturated or unsaturated TG dimers introduced via electrospray ionization into a linear ion trap mass spectrometer as noncovalent complexes with protonated 3,4-, 2,4- or 3,5- diiodoaniline (diIA). UVPD resulted in the initial formation of an anilinyl biradical via the sequential loss of two iodine radicals, which underwent further reaction to yield multiple cross-linked TG products along with competing noncross-linking processes. These chemistries are proposed to occur via sequential combinations of hydrogen abstraction (H-abstraction), radical addition and radical recombination. Multistage collision induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS(n)) was used to obtain evidence for the structures and mechanisms of formation for these products, as a function of both the TG lipid and diIA ion structures. The efficiency of the UVPD reaction was shown to be dependent on the number of unsaturation sites present within the TG lipids. However, when unsaturation sites were present, formation of the cross-linked and noncross-linked product ions via H-abstraction and radical addition mechanisms was found to be competitive. Finally, the identity of the anilinyl biradical (e.g., 3,4- versus 2

  9. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  10. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  11. Gas-phase lithium cation basicity of histamine and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, M.; Raczynska, E. D.; Gal, J. F.; Maria, P. C.

    2007-11-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation basicities (LCBs) were obtained for histamine (HA) and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine (AEP) from collision-induced dissociation of lithium adducts using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). For measurements, MeO(CH2)2OMe, Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO (HMPA) were used as the reference compounds. The experimental LCB of AEP was located between those of Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO. The experimental LCB of HA was found to be higher than those of AEP and HMPA by more than 2 kcal mol-1 clearly indicating that the LCB of HA is higher than any LCB for a neutral base yet measured (crown-ethers excepted). The experimental LCBs of the parent bases (pyridine and imidazole) are lower by more than 10 kcal mol-1. In parallel, DFT calculations {B3LYP/6-31G*//B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-311+G**//B3LYP/6-31G*} were performed for HA, AEP and their lithium adducts. Among the 22 reasonable conformations of the HA-Li+ adduct, only one appears to be significantly more stable than the others. This is also the case for one structure among seven conformations of the AEP-Li+ adduct. These two stable structures have the [`]scorpion' conformation, in which the Li+ cation is almost equally chelated by two basic nitrogen atoms, the ring N-aza and the chain N-amino. Other HA-Li+ and AEP-Li+ conformations have noticeably higher energies than the [`]scorpion' structures. The difference between the DFT calculated LCBs of HA and AEP (about 4 kcal mol-1) is in agreement with that experimentally obtained (>2 kcal mol-1). The high experimental and theoretical values of LCB for HA and AEP militate in favor of a strong chelation of Li+ by both ligands in the gas-phase. This chelation effect was also evidenced previously for the proton gas-phase basicity.

  12. Gas-phase Mechanisms of Sulfur Isotope Mass-independent Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in sulfur isotopes in ancient sulfur-bearing rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000a) is interpreted as evidence for gas-phase MIF processes in the early Earth atmosphere. This interpretation is made by analogy with oxygen isotope MIF in the modern atmosphere (produced during ozone formation), and by laboratory photolysis experiments on SO2 (Farquhar et al. 2001; Wing et al. 2004) that yield both elemental sulfur and sulfate with S MIF signatures at wavelengths above and below the SO2 dissociation limit. What is lacking is a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of gas-phase S MIF. Quantification is essential in order to extract the full implications of sulfur MIF throughout Earth history, including for bacterial sulfate reduction processes which largely conserve D33S and D36S. Several sulfur MIF mechanisms are possible. The most obvious is the gas-phase thiozone reaction, which is isovalent to the ozone formation reaction. Ozone formation produces a well-known MIF signature in oxygen isotopes (Thiemens and Heidenreich 1983), and a symmetry-dependent non-RRKM mechanism has been proposed as the origin of O MIF (Gao and Marcus 2001). It is possible and perhaps likely that S3 formation also proceeds by a non-RRKM process. Data are lacking on isotopic (an even non-isotopic) rates of S3 formation, so it is not possible to make definitive statements about MIF in S3 at this time. However modeling results suggest that the vapor pressure of S2 is too low for gas-phase S3 formation to be significant. Two additional species that may exhibit a non-RRKM MIF signature are S2O2 and S4. Again, there is a lack of isotopomer-specific kinetic data for these reactions, and gas-phase formation of S4 is likely inconsequential. Perhaps the most obvious mechanism is simply the primary act of SO2 photolysis. The SO2 absorption spectrum is highly structured, with strong vibronic bands above and below the dissociation limit. In contrast H2S, with its mostly

  13. Molecular mechanism of the hydration of Candida antarctica lipase B in the gas phase: Water adsorption isotherms and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Branco, Ricardo J F; Graber, Marianne; Denis, Vinciane; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2009-12-14

    Hydration is a major determinant of activity and selectivity of enzymes in organic solvents or in gas phase. The molecular mechanism of the hydration of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) and its dependence on the thermodynamic activity of water (a(w)) was studied by molecular dynamics simulations and compared to experimentally determined water sorption isotherms. Hydration occurred in two phases. At low water activity, single water molecules bound to specific water binding sites at the protein surface. As the water activity increased, water networks gradually developed. The number of protein-bound water molecules increased linearly with a(w), until at a(w)=0.5 a spanning water network was formed consisting of 311 water molecules, which covered the hydrophilic surface of CALB, with the exception of the hydrophobic substrate-binding site. At higher water activity, the thickness of the hydration shell increased up to 10 A close to a(w)=1. Above a limit of 1600 protein-bound water molecules the hydration shell becomes unstable and the formation of pure water droplets occurs in these oversaturated simulation conditions. While the structure and the overall flexibility of CALB was independent of the hydration state, the flexibility of individual loops was sensitive to hydration: some loops, such as those part of the substrate-binding site, became more flexible, while other parts of the protein became more rigid upon hydration. However, the molecular mechanism of how flexibility is related to activity and selectivity is still elusive. PMID:19847841

  14. Antiplasmodial Drugs in the Gas Phase: A CID and DFT Study of Quinolon-4( 1H)-Imine Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim Madeira, Paulo J.; Sitoe, Ana Raquel Fernandes; Gonçalves, Daniel; Rodrigues, Tiago; Guedes, Rita C.; Lopes, Francisca; Moreira, Rui; Bronze, M. Rosário

    2014-09-01

    The gas-phase behavior of 12 quinolon-4( 1H)-imine derivatives with antiplasmodial activity was investigated using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry together with collision induced dissociation and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most probable protonation site was predicted by calculating the proton affinity (PA) values for each possible protonation site and it was found to be the imine nitrogen for all compounds under study. Fragmentation pathways of the protonated molecules were proposed and the assignment of product ion structures was performed taking into account theoretical calculations. The nature of the quinoline substituent was found to influence the gas-phase behavior of the compounds under study. The data acquired allowed to bracket the proton affinity of the quinolin-4-imine scaffold, which can be a useful starting point to choose appropriate references for determining PA values of this scaffold.

  15. Generation and Characterization of a Distonic Biradical Anion Formed from an Enediynone Prodrug in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linan; Bekele, Tefsit; Lipton, Mark A.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2013-04-01

    A negatively charged biradical intermediate was successfully generated in the gas phase via cyclization of the deprotonated bicyclo[8.3.0]trideca-12-ene-2,7-diyn-1-one precursor. The inherent negative charge of this biradical allows its characterization via collision-activated dissociation and reactions with a variety of neutral substrates in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Although the biradical is unreactive toward reagents that usually react rapidly with positively charged biradicals, such as dimethyl disulfide, it reacts with the halogen-containing substrates carbon tetrachloride, carbon tetrabromide, and bromotrichloromethane via bromine or chlorine atom abstraction, which supports its biradical structure. The results presented in this study indicate that cyclizations commonly used in solution to form biradical intermediates from enediyne compounds may also occur in the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Generation and Characterization of a Distonic Biradical Anion Formed from an Enediynone Prodrug in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linan; Bekele, Tefsit; Lipton, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    A negatively charged biradical intermediate was successfully generated in the gas phase via cyclization of the deprotonated bicyclo[8.3.0]trideca-12-ene-2,7-diyn-1-one precursor. The inherent negative charge of this biradical allows its characterization via collision-activated dissociation and reactions with a variety of neutral substrates in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Although the biradical is unreactive toward reagents that usually react rapidly with positively charged biradicals, such as dimethyl disulfide, it reacts with the halogen-containing substrates carbon tetrachloride, carbon tetrabromide and bromotrichloromethane via bromine or chlorine atom abstraction, which supports its biradical structure. The results presented in this study indicate that cyclizations commonly used in solution to form biradical intermediates from enediyne compounds may also occur in the gas phase. PMID:23512422

  17. Quaternion maps of global protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew J; Thakur, Sidharth

    2012-09-01

    The geometric structures of proteins are vital to the understanding of biochemical interactions. However, there is much yet to be understood about the spatial arrangements of the chains of amino acids making up any given protein. In particular, while conventional analysis tools like the Ramachandran plot supply some insight into the local relative orientation of pairs of amino acid residues, they provide little information about the global relative orientations of large groups of residues. We apply quaternion maps to families of coordinate frames defined naturally by amino acid residue structures as a way to expose global spatial relationships among residues within proteins. The resulting visualizations enable comparisons of absolute orientations as well as relative orientations, and thus generalize the framework of the Ramachandran plot. There are a variety of possible quaternion frames and visual representation strategies that can be chosen, and very complex quaternion maps can result. Just as Ramachandran plots are useful for addressing particular questions and not others, quaternion tools have characteristic domains of relevance. In particular, quaternion maps show great potential for answering specific questions about global residue alignment in crystallographic data and statistical orientation properties in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data that are very difficult to treat by other methods. PMID:23099777

  18. Structures of the agouti signaling protein.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Joseph C; Jackson, Pilgrim J; Thompson, Darren A; Chai, Biaoxin; Gantz, Ira; Barsh, Gregory S; Dawson, Philip E; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2005-03-01

    Expression of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) during hair growth produces the red/yellow pigment pheomelanin. ASIP, and its neuropeptide homolog the agouti-related protein (AgRP) involved in energy balance, are novel, paracrine signaling molecules that act as inverse agonists at distinct subsets of melanocortin receptors. Ubiquitous ASIP expression in mice gives rise to a pleiotropic phenotype characterized by a uniform yellow coat color, obesity, overgrowth, and metabolic derangements similar to type II diabetes in humans. Here we report the synthesis and NMR structure of ASIP's active, cysteine-rich, C-terminal domain. ASIP adopts the inhibitor cystine knot fold and, along with AgRP, are the only known mammalian proteins in this structure class. Moreover, ASIP populates two distinct conformers resulting from a cis peptide bond at Pro102-Pro103 and a coexistence of cis/trans isomers of Ala104-Pro105. Pharmacologic studies of Pro-->Ala mutants demonstrate that the minor conformation with two cis peptide bonds is responsible for activity at all MCRs. The loop containing the heterogeneous Ala-Pro peptide bond is conserved in mammals, and suggests that ASIP is either trapped by evolution in this unusual configuration or possesses function outside of strict MCR antagonism. PMID:15701517

  19. DAPS: Database of Aligned Protein Structures

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mallick, Parag; Rice, Danny; Eisenberg, David

    DAPS is based on the FSSP, DSSP, PDB and CATH databases. There also exists a subset of DAPS known as DDAPS (also pronounced DAPS) - Database of Distant Aligned Protein Structures. It is a database of structures that have low sequence similarity but share a similar fold. There are a number of filters used to make the DDAPS list more useful. The algorithm requires that an FSSP file exists for one of the members of a pair and that the other member is listed in that FSSP file. It requires that each member of the pair be within the CATH database and share a common CAT classification. It also requires that the secondary structure can be determined by DSSP. How is DAPS constructed? We begin with the set of all chains from the current release of the PDB. An all on all search is done on the list to find pairs that have the same fold acoording to both the FSSP and CATH databases and clustered into groups by a representative structure (representative structures have less than 25% sequence identity to each other). For each protein pair, regions aligned by the DALI program are extracted from the corresponding FSSP file, or recomputed using DALI-lite. In domain DAPS, only regions that are called "domains" by CATH are included in the alignment. The amino acid type, secondary structure type, and solvent accessibility are extracted from the DSSP file and written pairwise into the database. DAPS is updated with updates of CATH.[Taken from http://nihserver.mbi.ucla.edu/DAPS/daps_help.html

  20. Post-translational modification in the gas phase: mechanism of cysteine S-nitrosylation via ion-molecule reactions

    PubMed Central

    Osburn, Sandra; O'Hair, Richard A.J.; Black, Stephen M.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase mechanism of S-nitrosylation of thiols was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. This was done via ion-molecule reactions of protonated cysteine and many of its derivatives and other thiol ions with neutral tert-butyl nitrite or nitrous acid. Our results showed that the presence of the carboxylic acid functional group, –COOH, in the vicinity of the thiol group is essential for the gas-phase nitrosylation of thiols. When the carboxyl proton is replaced by a methyl group (cysteine methyl ester) no nitrosylation was observed. Other thiols lacking a carboxylic acid functional group displayed no S-nitrosylation, strongly suggesting that the carboxyl hydrogen plays a key role in the nitrosylation process. These results are in excellent agreement with a solution-phase mechanism proposed by Stamler et al. (J. S. Stamler, E. J. Toone, S. A. Lipton, N. J. Sucher. Neuron 1997, 18, 691–696) who suggested a catalytic role for the carboxylic acid group adjacent to cysteine residues and with later additions by Ascenzi et al. (P. Ascenzi, M. Colasanti, T. Persichini, M. Muolo, F. Polticelli, G. Venturini, D. Bordo, M. Bolognesi. Biol. Chem. 2000, 381, 623–627) who postulated that the presence of the carboxyl in the cysteine microenvironment in proteins is crucial for S-nitrosylation. A concerted mechanism for the gas-phase S-nitrosylation was proposed based on our results and was further studied using theoretical calculations. Our calculations showed that this proposed pathway is exothermic by 44.0 kJ mol−1. This is one of the few recent examples when a gas-phase mechanism matches one in solution. PMID:22006383

  1. Post-translational modification in the gas phase: mechanism of cysteine S-nitrosylation via ion-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Osburn, Sandra; O'Hair, Richard A J; Black, Stephen M; Ryzhov, Victor

    2011-11-15

    The gas-phase mechanism of S-nitrosylation of thiols was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. This was done via ion-molecule reactions of protonated cysteine and many of its derivatives and other thiol ions with neutral tert-butyl nitrite or nitrous acid. Our results showed that the presence of the carboxylic acid functional group, -COOH, in the vicinity of the thiol group is essential for the gas-phase nitrosylation of thiols. When the carboxyl proton is replaced by a methyl group (cysteine methyl ester) no nitrosylation was observed. Other thiols lacking a carboxylic acid functional group displayed no S-nitrosylation, strongly suggesting that the carboxyl hydrogen plays a key role in the nitrosylation process. These results are in excellent agreement with a solution-phase mechanism proposed by Stamler et al. (J. S. Stamler, E. J. Toone, S. A. Lipton, N. J. Sucher. Neuron 1997, 18, 691-696) who suggested a catalytic role for the carboxylic acid group adjacent to cysteine residues and with later additions by Ascenzi et al. (P. Ascenzi, M. Colasanti, T. Persichini, M. Muolo, F. Polticelli, G. Venturini, D. Bordo, M. Bolognesi. Biol. Chem. 2000, 381, 623-627) who postulated that the presence of the carboxyl in the cysteine microenvironment in proteins is crucial for S-nitrosylation. A concerted mechanism for the gas-phase S-nitrosylation was proposed based on our results and was further studied using theoretical calculations. Our calculations showed that this proposed pathway is exothermic by 44.0 kJ mol(-1). This is one of the few recent examples when a gas-phase mechanism matches one in solution. PMID:22006383

  2. Structural characterization of soy protein nanoparticles from high shear microfluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticles were produced with a microfluidizer and characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, morphology, rheological properties, and aggregate structure. Three stages of structure breakdown were observed when the soy protein dispersion was passed through the microflu...

  3. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region - the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models' overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  4. An overview of the structures of protein-DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luscombe, Nicholas M; Austin, Susan E; Berman , Helen M; Thornton, Janet M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a structural analysis of 240 protein-DNA complexes contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), we have classified the DNA-binding proteins involved into eight different structural/functional groups, which are further classified into 54 structural families. Here we present this classification and review the functions, structures and binding interactions of these protein-DNA complexes. PMID:11104519

  5. Structure based alignment and clustering of proteins (STRALCP)

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.; Zhou, Carol E.; Smith, Jason R.; Lam, Marisa W.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed are computational methods of clustering a set of protein structures based on local and pair-wise global similarity values. Pair-wise local and global similarity values are generated based on pair-wise structural alignments for each protein in the set of protein structures. Initially, the protein structures are clustered based on pair-wise local similarity values. The protein structures are then clustered based on pair-wise global similarity values. For each given cluster both a representative structure and spans of conserved residues are identified. The representative protein structure is used to assign newly-solved protein structures to a group. The spans are used to characterize conservation and assign a "structural footprint" to the cluster.

  6. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  7. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  8. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  9. Course 12: Proteins: Structural, Thermodynamic and Kinetic Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, A. V.

    1 Introduction 2 Overview of protein architectures and discussion of physical background of their natural selection 2.1 Protein structures 2.2 Physical selection of protein structures 3 Thermodynamic aspects of protein folding 3.1 Reversible denaturation of protein structures 3.2 What do denatured proteins look like? 3.3 Why denaturation of a globular protein is the first-order phase transition 3.4 "Gap" in energy spectrum: The main characteristic that distinguishes protein chains from random polymers 4 Kinetic aspects of protein folding 4.1 Protein folding in vivo 4.2 Protein folding in vitro (in the test-tube) 4.3 Theory of protein folding rates and solution of the Levinthal paradox

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of zwitterionic histidine: Effects of gas phase hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Yuna; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sungyul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations for histidine-(H2O)n (n = 0-6) to examine the effects of micro-hydrating water molecules on the relative stability of the zwitterionic vs. canonical forms of histidine. We calculate the structures and Gibbs free energies of the conformers at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We find that six water molecules are required to produce the thermodynamically stable histidine zwitterion. By calculating the barriers of canonical ↔ zwitterionic transformation, we predict that both the most stable canonical and zwitterionic forms of histidine-(H2O)6 may be observed in low temperature gas phase environment.

  11. Laser-driven synthesis of nanocrystalline alumina powders from gas-phase precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsella, E.; Botti, S.; Giorgi, R.; Martelli, S.; Turtù, S.; Zappa, G.

    1993-09-01

    Carbon dioxide laser synthesis from gaseous precursors has been successfully applied to produce nanosized Al2O3 particles. Trimethylaluminum [Al(CH3)3] and nitrous-oxide (N2O) were used as gas phase reactants. Ethylene (C2H4) was added as sensitizer gas. The as-synthesized powder particles showed considerable carbon contamination and an amorphouslike structure. After thermal treatment at 1200-1400 °C, the powder transformed to hexagonal α-Al2O3 with very low carbon contamination, confirmed by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. The thermally treated powder was composed of spherical single-crystal nanoparticles with a mean size of 15-20 nm, as determined by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface measurements. The laser synthesized Al2O3 particles are suitable dispersoids for intermetallic alloy technology.

  12. Process Conditions and Microstructures of Ceramic Coatings by Gas Phase Deposition Based on Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Hospach, A.; Zotov, N.; Vaßen, R.

    2013-03-01

    Plasma spraying at very low pressure (50-200 Pa) is significantly different from atmospheric plasma conditions (APS). By applying powder feedstock, it is possible to fragment the particles into very small clusters or even to evaporate the material. As a consequence, the deposition mechanisms and the resulting coating microstructures could be quite different compared to conventional APS liquid splat deposition. Thin and dense ceramic coatings as well as columnar-structured strain-tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity can be achieved offering new possibilities for application in energy systems. To exploit the potential of such a gas phase deposition from plasma spray-based processes, the deposition mechanisms and their dependency on process conditions must be better understood. Thus, plasma conditions were investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. Coating experiments were performed, partially at extreme conditions. Based on the observed microstructures, a phenomenological model is developed to identify basic growth mechanisms.

  13. Detection of unknown gas-phase chemical plumes in hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theiler, James; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2013-05-01

    Gas-phase chemical plumes exhibit, particularly in the infrared, distinctive emission signatures as a function of wavelength. Hyperspectral imagery can exploit this distinctiveness to detect specific chemicals, even at low concentrations, using matched filters that are tailored both the the specific structure of the chemical signature and to the statistics of the background clutter. But what if the chemical species is unknown? One can apply matched filters to a long list of candidate chemicals (or chemical mixtures), or one can treat the problem as one of anomaly detection. In this case, however, the anomalous signals of interest are not completely unknown. Gas spectra are generically sparse (absorbing or emitting at only a few wavelengths), and this property can be exploited to enhance the sensitivity of anomaly detection algorithms. This paper investigates the utility of sparse signal anomaly detection for the problem of finding plumes of gas with unknown chemistry in hyperspectral imagery.

  14. MOGADOC (Molecular Gas Phase Documentation) — An interactive computerised search/retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, A.; Mez-Starck, B.; Schirdewahn, H.-G.; Watson, D. G.

    1983-02-01

    For 22 years the Section for Structure Documentation (SSD), University of Ulm, has provided a documentation service covering the literature of molecules studied in the gas phase by electron diffraction, microwave spectroscopy and other techniques. Much of the information which has been accumulated over these years has now been keyboarded to constitute a computerised database. An interactive search/retrieval system, MOGADOC, has been written using the SIMULA language implemented on the UNIVAC 1100/82 computer at the University of Freiburg. MOGADOC enables the user to search the database on the basis of bibliographic, chemical and physical search terms. SIMULA is claimed to be the only general purpose high level programming language which is reasonable wide spread and allows direct implementation of abstract data types.

  15. Gas-phase pyrolysis mechanisms of 3-anilino-1-propanol: Density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Tang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Dong-Hui; Zhao, Chu-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Ming

    The gas-phase pyrolytic decomposition mechanisms of 3-anilino-1-propanol with the products of aniline, ethylene, and formaldehyde or N-methyl aniline and aldehyde were studied by density functional theory. The geometries of the reactant, transition states, and intermediates were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level. Vibration analysis was carried out to confirm the transition state structures, and the intrinsic reaction coordinate method was performed to search the minimum energy path. Four possible reaction channels are shown, including two concerted reactions of direct pyrolytic decomposition and two indirect channels in which the reactant first becomes a ring-like intermediate, followed by concerted pyrogenation. One of the concerted reactions in the direct pyrolytic decomposition has the lowest activation barrier among all the four channels, and so, it occurs more often than others. The results appear to be consistent with the experimental outcomes.

  16. Visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations.

    PubMed

    Daly, Steven; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    The visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy of gas phase rhodamine 575 cations has been studied experimentally by action-spectroscopy in a modified linear ion trap between 220 and 590 nm and by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. Three bands are observed that can be assigned to the electronic transitions S0 → S1, S0 → S3, and S0 → (S8,S9) according to the theoretical prediction. While the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent for the S3 and S8/S9 transitions, a large shift in the value of the calculated S1 transition energy is observed. A theoretical analysis of thermochromism, potential vibronic effects, and-qualitatively-electron correlation revealed it is mainly the latter that is responsible for the failure of TDDFT to accurately reproduce the S1 transition energy, and that a significant thermochromic shift is also present. Finally, we investigated the nature of the excited states by analyzing the excitations and discussed their different fragmentation behavior. We hypothesize that different contributions of local versus charge transfer excitations are responsible for 1-photon versus 2-photon fragmentation observed experimentally. PMID:25961329

  17. Hydration of potassiated amino acids in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2007-12-01

    The thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of several potassiated amino acids was studied by measuring the gas-phase equilibria, AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n-1) + H(2)O = AAK(+)(H(2)O)(n) (AA = Gly, AL, Val, Met, Pro, and Phe), using a high-pressure mass spectrometer. The AAK(+) ions were obtained by electrospray and the equilibrium constants K(n-1,n) were measured in a pulsed reaction chamber at 10 mbar bath gas, N(2), containing a known partial pressure of water vapor. Determination of the equilibrium constants at different temperatures was used to obtain the DeltaH(n)(o), DeltaS(n)(o), and DeltaG(n)(o) values. The results indicate that the water binding energy in AAK(+)(H(2)O) decreases as the K(+) affinity to AA increases. This trend in binding energies is explained in terms of changes in the side-chain substituent, which delocalize the positive charge from K(+) to AA in AAK(+) complexes, varying the AAK(+)-H(2)O electrostatic interaction. PMID:17928233

  18. Gas phase chromatography of halides of elements 104 and 105

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerler, A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Hannink, N.J.; Henderson, R.A.; Hoffman, D.C.; Kacher, C.D.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Kreek, S.A.; Lee, D.M.; Leyba, J.D.; Nurmia, M.J. ); Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Kovacs, J.; Scherer, U.W.; Vermeulen, D.; Weber, A. , Villigen ); Barth, H.; Gober, M.K.; Kratz, J.V. (Philipps-Univ., Marburg

    1991-04-01

    On-line isothermal gas phase chromatography was used to study halides of {sup 261}104 (T{sub {1/2}} = 65 s) and {sup 262,263}105 (T{sub {1/2}} = 34 s and 27 s) produced an atom-at-a time via the reactions {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) and {sup 249}Bk({sup 18}O, 5n, 4n), respectively. Using HBr and HCl gas as halogenating agents, we were able to produce volatile bromides and chlorides of the above mentioned elements and study their behavior compared to their lighter homologs in Groups 4 or 5 of the periodic table. Element 104 formed more volatile bromides than its homolog Hf. In contrast, element 105 bromides were found to be less volatile than the bromides of the group 5 elements Nb and Ta. Both 104 and Hf chlorides were observed to be more volatile than their respective bromides. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Tracking Gas Phase Composition in Oil evaporation and Oxidation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Zhang, H.; Misztal, P. K.; Worton, D.; Drozd, G.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Primary Organic Aerosol (POA) is emitted directly by anthropogenic or natural sources, whereas Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere through chemical reactions that result from conversion of more volatile species into lower volatility oxidized products and their subsequent condensation to the particulate phase. We studied SOA formation from evaporation of Macondo crude oil (MC 252) using a wind tunnel coupled to a flow tube oxidation reactor. Ozone, UV lights, and water vapor were used to make OH radicals. Organic compounds in the gas phase, both those evaporated from the wind tunnel and those formed in the flow tube oxidation experiments, were monitored using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-qMS and PTR-TOF-MS). We observed approximately 400 different species. Compounds with less than C10 were mostly evaporated in the first 5 hours when maximum SOA formation was also obtained. Hydrocarbons with carbon number (11-14) were still present in the oil after 12 h of continuous evaporation at wind speed of 2 m s-1. We will show the implications of these results for the production of SOA related to the range of evaporated chemical size and reactivity.

  20. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. PMID:26213024

  1. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  2. Synthesis of Cu nanopowders by condensation from the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepkasov, IV; Gafner, Yu Ya; Zobov, K. V.; Batoroev, S. B.; Bardakhanov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to determine the most efficient regimes of copper nanoparticles synthesis, a series of experiments were conducted by evaporation and subsequent condensation of the raw material in an argon atmosphere. During the tests it was found that an increase of evaporation rate increases significantly the average size of the synthesized particles. However, the study of the dependence of dimensional parameters of the produced clusters on the intensity of the buffer gas flow rate has encountered significant difficulties associated because the results significantly divergent from the previously conducted experiments on the synthesis of transition metal oxides. In order to solve this contradiction the computer simulation was held of copper atoms condensation from the gas phase for the three different cooling rates and for the two final temperatures T = 373 K and T = 77 K. It was found after analysis that the rate of cooling of the gas mixture and the final temperature directly influences the number and the size of particles produced. For instance, with the 10 times of cooling rate decreases the average size of the particles obtained had increased by 2.7 times at a final temperature of 77 K and by 3.1 times at Tf = 373 K.

  3. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  4. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  5. Gas-phase Chemistry of the Cyanate Ion, OCN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2015-10-01

    Cyanate (OCN-) is the only ion to date whose presence has been confirmed in the icy mantles that coat interstellar dust grains. Understanding the chemical behavior of cyanate at a fundamental level is therefore integral to the advancement of astrochemistry. We seek to unravel the chemistry of this intriguing anion through a combination of gas-phase experiments and theoretical explorations. Our approach is twofold: first, employing a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus, the reactions between OCN- and three of the most abundant atomic species in the interstellar medium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen, are examined. Hydrogen atoms readily react by associative detachment, but the remarkable stability of OCN- does not give rise to an observable reaction with either nitrogen or oxygen atoms. To explain these results, the potential energy surfaces of several reactions are investigated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Second, collision induced dissociation experiments involving deprotonated uracil, thymine, and cytosine in an ion trap mass spectrometer reveal an interesting connection between these pyrimidine nucleobase anions and OCN-. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and explore the possible role of OCN- as a biomolecule precursor.

  6. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  7. Protein flexibility in the light of structural alphabets.

    PubMed

    Craveur, Pierrick; Joseph, Agnel P; Esque, Jeremy; Narwani, Tarun J; Noël, Floriane; Shinada, Nicolas; Goguet, Matthieu; Leonard, Sylvain; Poulain, Pierre; Bertrand, Olivier; Faure, Guilhem; Rebehmed, Joseph; Ghozlane, Amine; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Barnoud, Jonathan; Téletchéa, Stéphane; Jallu, Vincent; Cerny, Jiri; Schneider, Bohdan; Etchebest, Catherine; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2015-01-01

    Protein structures are valuable tools to understand protein function. Nonetheless, proteins are often considered as rigid macromolecules while their structures exhibit specific flexibility, which is essential to complete their functions. Analyses of protein structures and dynamics are often performed with a simplified three-state description, i.e., the classical secondary structures. More precise and complete description of protein backbone conformation can be obtained using libraries of small protein fragments that are able to approximate every part of protein structures. These libraries, called structural alphabets (SAs), have been widely used in structure analysis field, from definition of ligand binding sites to superimposition of protein structures. SAs are also well suited to analyze the dynamics of protein structures. Here, we review innovative approaches that investigate protein flexibility based on SAs description. Coupled to various sources of experimental data (e.g., B-factor) and computational methodology (e.g., Molecular Dynamic simulation), SAs turn out to be powerful tools to analyze protein dynamics, e.g., to examine allosteric mechanisms in large set of structures in complexes, to identify order/disorder transition. SAs were also shown to be quite efficient to predict protein flexibility from amino-acid sequence. Finally, in this review, we exemplify the interest of SAs for studying flexibility with different cases of proteins implicated in pathologies and diseases. PMID:26075209

  8. Protein flexibility in the light of structural alphabets

    PubMed Central

    Craveur, Pierrick; Joseph, Agnel P.; Esque, Jeremy; Narwani, Tarun J.; Noël, Floriane; Shinada, Nicolas; Goguet, Matthieu; Leonard, Sylvain; Poulain, Pierre; Bertrand, Olivier; Faure, Guilhem; Rebehmed, Joseph; Ghozlane, Amine; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Bhaskara, Ramachandra M.; Barnoud, Jonathan; Téletchéa, Stéphane; Jallu, Vincent; Cerny, Jiri; Schneider, Bohdan; Etchebest, Catherine; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein structures are valuable tools to understand protein function. Nonetheless, proteins are often considered as rigid macromolecules while their structures exhibit specific flexibility, which is essential to complete their functions. Analyses of protein structures and dynamics are often performed with a simplified three-state description, i.e., the classical secondary structures. More precise and complete description of protein backbone conformation can be obtained using libraries of small protein fragments that are able to approximate every part of protein structures. These libraries, called structural alphabets (SAs), have been widely used in structure analysis field, from definition of ligand binding sites to superimposition of protein structures. SAs are also well suited to analyze the dynamics of protein structures. Here, we review innovative approaches that investigate protein flexibility based on SAs description. Coupled to various sources of experimental data (e.g., B-factor) and computational methodology (e.g., Molecular Dynamic simulation), SAs turn out to be powerful tools to analyze protein dynamics, e.g., to examine allosteric mechanisms in large set of structures in complexes, to identify order/disorder transition. SAs were also shown to be quite efficient to predict protein flexibility from amino-acid sequence. Finally, in this review, we exemplify the interest of SAs for studying flexibility with different cases of proteins implicated in pathologies and diseases. PMID:26075209

  9. Molecular Basis for Structural Heterogeneity of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Bound to a Partner by Combined ESI-IM-MS and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urzo, Annalisa; Konijnenberg, Albert; Rossetti, Giulia; Habchi, Johnny; Li, Jinyu; Carloni, Paolo; Sobott, Frank; Longhi, Sonia; Grandori, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) form biologically active complexes that can retain a high degree of conformational disorder, escaping structural characterization by conventional approaches. An example is offered by the complex between the intrinsically disordered NTAIL domain and the phosphoprotein X domain (PXD) from measles virus (MeV). Here, distinct conformers of the complex are detected by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ion mobility (IM) techniques yielding estimates for the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) in solution and the average collision cross-section (CCS) in the gas phase. Computational modeling of the complex in solution, based on experimental constraints, provides atomic-resolution structural models featuring different levels of compactness. The resulting models indicate high structural heterogeneity. The intermolecular interactions are predominantly hydrophobic, not only in the ordered core of the complex, but also in the dynamic, disordered regions. Electrostatic interactions become involved in the more compact states. This system represents an illustrative example of a hydrophobic complex that could be directly detected in the gas phase by native mass spectrometry. This work represents the first attempt to modeling the entire NTAIL domain bound to PXD at atomic resolution.

  10. The continuity of protein structure space is an intrinsic property of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Arakaki, Adrian K.; Lee, Seung Yup; Brylinski, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The classical view of the space of protein structures is that it is populated by a discrete set of protein folds. For proteins up to 200 residues long, by using structural alignments and building upon ideas of the completeness and continuity of structure space, we show that nearly any structure is significantly related to any other using a transitive set of no more than 7 intermediate structurally related proteins. This result holds for all structures in the Protein Data Bank, even when structural relationships between evolutionary related proteins (as detected by threading or functional analyses) are excluded. A similar picture holds for an artificial library of compact, hydrogen-bonded, homopolypeptide structures. The 3 sets share the global connectivity features of random graphs, in which the local connectivity of each node (i.e., the number of neighboring structures per protein) is preserved. This high connectivity supports the continuous view of single-domain protein structure space. More importantly, these results do not depend on evolution, rather just on the physics of protein structures. The fact that evolutionary divergence need not be invoked to explain the continuous nature of protein structure space has implications for how the universe of protein structures might have originated, and how function should be transferred between proteins of similar structure. PMID:19805219

  11. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region – the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure–function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models’ overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs. PMID:24523717

  12. Structure-Based Druggability Assessment of the Mammalian Structural Proteome with Inclusion of Light Protein Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Loving, Kathryn A.; Lin, Andy; Cheng, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets. PMID:25079060

  13. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific (13)C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)(+) ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H](+) ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26817657

  14. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  15. Magnetic field dependence of the product yields of cycloheptanone photolysis in the dilute gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, E. M.; Baumeister, W. F.; Huber, J. Robert

    1984-07-01

    The product yields of the gas-phase photolysis of cycloheptanone were measured in magnetic fields up to 10 kG. The magnetic-field effect is explained in terms of the radical pair model. A reaction mechanism is proposed that explains the magnetic field dependence, pressure dependence, and excitation enegy dependence of the gas-phase photochemistry of cycloheptanone.

  16. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  17. Novel protein folds and their nonsequential structural analogs

    PubMed Central

    Guerler, Aysam; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2008-01-01

    Newly determined protein structures are classified to belong to a new fold, if the structures are sufficiently dissimilar from all other so far known protein structures. To analyze structural similarities of proteins, structure alignment tools are used. We demonstrate that the usage of nonsequential structure alignment tools, which neglect the polypeptide chain connectivity, can yield structure alignments with significant similarities between proteins of known three-dimensional structure and newly determined protein structures that possess a new fold. The recently introduced protein structure alignment tool, GANGSTA, is specialized to perform nonsequential alignments with proper assignment of the secondary structure types by focusing on helices and strands only. In the new version, GANGSTA+, the underlying algorithms were completely redesigned, yielding enhanced quality of structure alignments, offering alignment against a larger database of protein structures, and being more efficient. We applied DaliLite, TM-align, and GANGSTA+ on three protein crystal structures considered to be novel folds. Applying GANGSTA+ to these novel folds, we find proteins in the ASTRAL40 database, which possess significant structural similarities, albeit the alignments are nonsequential and in some cases involve secondary structure elements aligned in reverse orientation. A web server is available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/gplus for pairwise alignment, visualization, and database comparison. PMID:18583523

  18. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Kruppa, Gary; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  19. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments. ᅟ PMID:26369778

  20. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A.; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments.

  1. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  2. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    shown that ring-opening reactions play a vital role in characterizing the reaction chemistry. On the other hand, exocyclic Si-H(CH3) bond cleavages are more important in the less-puckered disilacyclobutane molecules. Metal filaments are essential in HWCVD since they serve as catalysts to decompose precursor gases to reactive species, which initiate gas-phase reaction chemistry and thin film growth. We discuss the structural changes in metal filaments when exposed to various precursor gases. Depending on the nature of the radical intermediates formed from the hot-wire decomposition and subsequent gas-phase reactions, metal silicides and carbides can be formed. Overall, study of the gas-phase reaction chemistry in HWCVD provides important knowledge of the chemical species produced prior to their deposition on a substrate surface. This helps in identifying the major contributor to alloy formation on the filament itself and the film growth, and consequently, in determining the properties of the deposited films. An integrated knowledge of the gas-phase reaction chemistry, filament alloy formation, and thin film deposition is required for an efficient deposition of high-quality thin films and nanomaterials. PMID:25586211

  3. Protein folding, protein structure and the origin of life: Theoretical methods and solutions of dynamical problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical methods and solutions of the dynamics of protein folding, protein aggregation, protein structure, and the origin of life are discussed. The elements of a dynamic model representing the initial stages of protein folding are presented. The calculation and experimental determination of the model parameters are discussed. The use of computer simulation for modeling protein folding is considered.

  4. Germanium-silicon alloy and core-shell nanocrystals by gas phase synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehringer, Christian; Kloner, Christian; Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into the second reactor stage (HWR II) and a mixture of SiH4 and GeH4 is added. The ratio of the precursors in the feed, their partial pressures, the synthesis temperature in HWR II and the overall pressure are varied depending on the desired morphology and composition. Alloy particle production is achieved in the heterogeneous surface reaction regime, meaning that germanium (Ge) and Si are deposited on the seed surface simultaneously. The NCs can be synthesized with any desired composition, whilst maintaining a mean diameter around 30 nm with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) around 1.25. The absorption behavior and the related fundamental optical band gap energy in dependence on the alloy composition are exemplarily presented. They prove the possibility to tailor NC properties for electronical and opto-electronical applications. In the homogeneous gas phase reaction regime facetted Ge-Si core-shell structures are accessible. The Ge deposition on the seeds precedes the Si deposition due to different gas phase reaction kinetics of the precursors. The Si layer grows epitaxially on the Ge core and is around 5 nm thick.In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into

  5. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  6. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  7. Dissociative Attachment Reactions of Electrons with Gas Phase Superacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xifan

    Using the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, dissociative attachment coefficients beta for reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids HCo(PF_3)_4, HRh(PF _3)_4 and carbonyl hydride complexes HMn(CO)_5, HRe(CO) _5 have been determined under thermal conditions over the approximate temperature range 300~ 550 K. The superacids react relatively slowly (< 1/20 of beta_{rm max}) with free electrons in a thermal plasma, and the values of beta obtained this far do not show a correlation between acidity and beta. The pioneer researchers in this field had speculated that any superacid would be a rapid attacher of electrons; we found that this speculation is not true in general. The product distribution of electron attachment reaction to HCo(PF_3)_4 was found to be independent of temperature even though the beta (HCo(PF_3)_4 ) increases with temperature. This leads us to propose that the electron attachment process occurs well before the excited complex dissociates. In addition, the activation energy of HCo(PF_3)_4 for electron attachment has been derived from the Arrhenius plots. The carbonyl hydride complexes, HMn(CO) _5 and HRe(CO)_5, react relatively rapidly (>1/4 of beta_{rm max}) with free electrons in thermal plasma. This indicates that these reactions cannot be significantly endothermic. Observation of rapid attachment for these non-superacids shows that the Mn-CO and Re-CO bonds are weaker than the Mn-H and Re-H bonds, respectively. Comparisons between the carbonyl and trifluorophosphine cases implies that fast electron capture is related more to the CO ligand than to the transition -metal species.

  8. Phototransformation of polychlorinated aromatics in gas phase and on aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinzhong

    1999-12-01

    A number of polychlorinated aromatics have been shown to pose health risks even at very low concentration levels. However, routes of introduction of these toxic congeners into the environment remain unclear. It is speculated that some of the toxic congeners may evolve, in part, from transformation of other less toxic congeners. The most likely route for these transformations is photolysis during atmospheric transport. An investigation of this phenomenon was undertaken in this study, and phototransformation of selected polychlorinated aromatics, representing the compound of environmental concern, such as PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs, in gas phase were examined. The study involved monitoring the effect of various atmospheres on phototransformation mechanism and kinetics. The experimental setup consisted of the photoreactor coupled to a vapor generator, a particle generator, an electrostatic classifier, and a particle counter. This arrangement permitted introduction of contaminants at known concentrations in vapor or aerosol form. The contaminants were irradiated for varied periods and the disappearance kinetics was studied as a function of irradiation time. The correlation between congeners and the photodegradation pathway was also investigated. The first order kinetic constants and the quantum yields were measured. The experimental results showed that the vapor phase phototransformation rates are affected by the atmospheric parameters, e.g., phototransformation rates are significantly enhanced in the presence of oxygen. In general, less chlorinated compounds decomposed faster than higher chlorinated ones. The reductive dechlorination was evidenced through the formation of products with less chlorine substitution. The presence of hydrogen donors significantly increased the yield of the reductive dechlorination products. The oxygen dominated the phototransformation rates by the mechanisms other than reductive dechlorination. The phototransformation rates of the PCDDs

  9. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  10. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  11. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  12. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  13. Gas-phase uranyl, neptunyl, and plutonyl: hydration and oxidation studied by experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Rios, Daniel; Michelini, Maria C; Lucena, Ana F; Marçalo, Joaquim; Bray, Travis H; Gibson, John K

    2012-06-18

    The following monopositive actinyl ions were produced by electrospray ionization of aqueous solutions of An(VI)O(2)(ClO(4))(2) (An = U, Np, Pu): U(V)O(2)(+), Np(V)O(2)(+), Pu(V)O(2)(+), U(VI)O(2)(OH)(+), and Pu(VI)O(2)(OH)(+); abundances of the actinyl ions reflect the relative stabilities of the An(VI) and An(V) oxidation states. Gas-phase reactions with water in an ion trap revealed that water addition terminates at AnO(2)(+)·(H(2)O)(4) (An = U, Np, Pu) and AnO(2)(OH)(+)·(H(2)O)(3) (An = U, Pu), each with four equatorial ligands. These terminal hydrates evidently correspond to the maximum inner-sphere water coordination in the gas phase, as substantiated by density functional theory (DFT) computations of the hydrate structures and energetics. Measured hydration rates for the AnO(2)(OH)(+) were substantially faster than for the AnO(2)(+), reflecting additional vibrational degrees of freedom in the hydroxide ions for stabilization of hot adducts. Dioxygen addition resulted in UO(2)(+)(O(2))(H(2)O)(n) (n = 2, 3), whereas O(2) addition was not observed for NpO(2)(+) or PuO(2)(+) hydrates. DFT suggests that two-electron three-centered bonds form between UO(2)(+) and O(2), but not between NpO(2)(+) and O(2). As formation of the UO(2)(+)-O(2) bonds formally corresponds to the oxidation of U(V) to U(VI), the absence of this bonding with NpO(2)(+) can be considered a manifestation of the lower relative stability of Np(VI). PMID:22656318

  14. Gas Phase Thz Spectroscopy of Organosulfide and Organophosphorous Compounds Using a Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Smirnova, Irina; Bocquet, Robin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    This study concerns the gas phase rovibrational spectroscopy of organosulfide and organophosphorous which are considered as non toxic model compounds in the analysis of chemical weapon materials, high pathogenic and mutagenic agents, and other environmentally interesting air-borne species. The coupling of the synchrotron radiation with multipass cells and the FTIR spectrometer allowed to obtain very conclusive results in term of sensitivity and resolution and improved the previous results obtained with classical sources. For DMSO, using an optical path of 150 m the spectra have been recorded at the ultimate resolution of 0.001 Cm-1 allowing to fully resolve the rotational structure of the lowest vibrational modes observed in the THz region. In the 290 - 420 Cm-1 region, the rovibrational spectrum of the "perpendicular" and "parallel" vibrational bands associated with, respectively, the asymmetric ν23 and symmetric ν11 bending modes of DMSO have been recorded with a resolution of 1.5× 10-3 Cm-1. The gas phase vibrational spectra of organophosphorous compounds were measured by FTIR spectroscopy using the vapor pressure of the compounds. Except for TBP, the room temperature vapor pressure was sufficient to detect all active vibrational modes from THz to NIR domain. Contrary to DMSO, the rotational patterns of alkyl phosphates and alkyl phosphonates could not be resolved; only a vibrational analysis may be performed. Nevertheless, the spectral fingerprints observed in the THz region allowed a clear discrimination between the molecules and between the different molecular conformations. A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, F. Cazier, H. Nouali, J. Demaison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112:, 12516-12525 A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy and D. A. Sadovskií, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2010, 492: 30-34 I. Smirnova, A. Cuisset, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2010, 114: 16936-16947.

  15. Germanium-silicon alloy and core-shell nanocrystals by gas phase synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mehringer, Christian; Kloner, Christian; Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-12

    In this work we present a novel route to synthesize well defined germanium-silicon alloy (GexSi1-x) and core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) employing monosilane (SiH4) and monogermane (GeH4) as precursors in a continuously operated two-stage hot-wall aerosol reactor setup. The first hot-wall reactor stage (HWR I) is used to produce silicon (Si) seed particles from SiH4 pyrolysis in Argon (Ar). The resulting seeding aerosol is fed into the second reactor stage (HWR II) and a mixture of SiH4 and GeH4 is added. The ratio of the precursors in the feed, their partial pressures, the synthesis temperature in HWR II and the overall pressure are varied depending on the desired morphology and composition. Alloy particle production is achieved in the heterogeneous surface reaction regime, meaning that germanium (Ge) and Si are deposited on the seed surface simultaneously. The NCs can be synthesized with any desired composition, whilst maintaining a mean diameter around 30 nm with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) around 1.25. The absorption behavior and the related fundamental optical band gap energy in dependence on the alloy composition are exemplarily presented. They prove the possibility to tailor NC properties for electronical and opto-electronical applications. In the homogeneous gas phase reaction regime facetted Ge-Si core-shell structures are accessible. The Ge deposition on the seeds precedes the Si deposition due to different gas phase reaction kinetics of the precursors. The Si layer grows epitaxially on the Ge core and is around 5 nm thick. PMID:25700152

  16. Visualizing and Clustering Protein Similarity Networks: Sequences, Structures, and Functions.

    PubMed

    Mai, Te-Lun; Hu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Research in the recent decade has demonstrated the usefulness of protein network knowledge in furthering the study of molecular evolution of proteins, understanding the robustness of cells to perturbation, and annotating new protein functions. In this study, we aimed to provide a general clustering approach to visualize the sequence-structure-function relationship of protein networks, and investigate possible causes for inconsistency in the protein classifications based on sequences, structures, and functions. Such visualization of protein networks could facilitate our understanding of the overall relationship among proteins and help researchers comprehend various protein databases. As a demonstration, we clustered 1437 enzymes by their sequences and structures using the minimum span clustering (MSC) method. The general structure of this protein network was delineated at two clustering resolutions, and the second level MSC clustering was found to be highly similar to existing enzyme classifications. The clustering of these enzymes based on sequence, structure, and function information is consistent with each other. For proteases, the Jaccard's similarity coefficient is 0.86 between sequence and function classifications, 0.82 between sequence and structure classifications, and 0.78 between structure and function classifications. From our clustering results, we discussed possible examples of divergent evolution and convergent evolution of enzymes. Our clustering approach provides a panoramic view of the sequence-structure-function network of proteins, helps visualize the relation between related proteins intuitively, and is useful in predicting the structure and function of newly determined protein sequences. PMID:27267620

  17. The Intrinsic Geometric Structure of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks for Protein Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Sun, Mengtian; Dai, Guoxian; Ramain, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in high-throughput technologies for measuring protein-protein interaction (PPI) have profoundly advanced our ability to systematically infer protein function and regulation. However, inherently high false positive and false negative rates in measurement have posed great challenges in computational approaches for the prediction of PPI. A good PPI predictor should be 1) resistant to high rate of missing and spurious PPIs, and 2) robust against incompleteness of observed PPI networks. To predict PPI in a network, we developed an intrinsic geometry structure (IGS) for network, which exploits the intrinsic and hidden relationship among proteins in network through a heat diffusion process. In this process, all explicit PPIs participate simultaneously to glue local infinitesimal and noisy experimental interaction data to generate a global macroscopic descriptions about relationships among proteins. The revealed implicit relationship can be interpreted as the probability of two proteins interacting with each other. The revealed relationship is intrinsic and robust against individual, local and explicit protein interactions in the original network. We apply our approach to publicly available PPI network data for the evaluation of the performance of PPI prediction. Experimental results indicate that, under different levels of the missing and spurious PPIs, IGS is able to robustly exploit the intrinsic and hidden relationship for PPI prediction with a higher sensitivity and specificity compared to that of recently proposed methods. PMID:26886733

  18. Fold assessment for comparative protein structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco; Sali, Andrej

    2007-11-01

    Accurate and automated assessment of both geometrical errors and incompleteness of comparative protein structure models is necessary for an adequate use of the models. Here, we describe a composite score for discriminating between models with the correct and incorrect fold. To find an accurate composite score, we designed and applied a genetic algorithm method that searched for a most informative subset of 21 input model features as well as their optimized nonlinear transformation into the composite score. The 21 input features included various statistical potential scores, stereochemistry quality descriptors, sequence alignment scores, geometrical descriptors, and measures of protein packing. The optimized composite score was found to depend on (1) a statistical potential z-score for residue accessibilities and distances, (2) model compactness, and (3) percentage sequence identity of the alignment used to build the model. The accuracy of the composite score was compared with the accuracy of assessment by single and combined features as well as by other commonly used assessment methods. The testing set was representative of models produced by automated comparative modeling on a genomic scale. The composite score performed better than any other tested score in terms of the maximum correct classification rate (i.e., 3.3% false positives and 2.5% false negatives) as well as the sensitivity and specificity across the whole range of thresholds. The composite score was implemented in our program MODELLER-8 and was used to assess models in the MODBASE database that contains comparative models for domains in approximately 1.3 million protein sequences. PMID:17905832

  19. Graph Theory In Protein Sequence Clustering And Tertiary Structural Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Rosni; Rashid, Nur'Aini Abdul; Othman, Fazilah

    2008-01-01

    The principle of graph theory which has been widely used in computer networks is now being adopted for work in protein clustering, protein structural matching, and protein folding and modeling. In this work, we present two case studies on the use of graph theory for protein clustering and tertiary structural matching. In protein clustering, we extended a clustering algorithm based on a maximal clique while in the protein tertiary structural matching we explored the bipartite graph matching algorithm. The results obtained in both the case studies will be presented.

  20. Structural hot spots for the solubility of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ashok; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Beerten, Jacinte; Brams, Marijke; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Van der Kant, Rob; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ramakers, Meine; Langenberg, Tobias; Wilkinson, Hannah; De Smet, Frederik; Ulens, Chris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Natural selection shapes protein solubility to physiological requirements and recombinant applications that require higher protein concentrations are often problematic. This raises the question whether the solubility of natural protein sequences can be improved. We here show an anti-correlation between the number of aggregation prone regions (APRs) in a protein sequence and its solubility, suggesting that mutational suppression of APRs provides a simple strategy to increase protein solubility. We show that mutations at specific positions within a protein structure can act as APR suppressors without affecting protein stability. These hot spots for protein solubility are both structure and sequence dependent but can be computationally predicted. We demonstrate this by reducing the aggregation of human α-galactosidase and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis through mutation. Our results indicate that many proteins possess hot spots allowing to adapt protein solubility independently of structure and function. PMID:26905391

  1. Structural hot spots for the solubility of globular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Ashok; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Beerten, Jacinte; Brams, Marijke; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Van der Kant, Rob; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ramakers, Meine; Langenberg, Tobias; Wilkinson, Hannah; De Smet, Frederik; Ulens, Chris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Natural selection shapes protein solubility to physiological requirements and recombinant applications that require higher protein concentrations are often problematic. This raises the question whether the solubility of natural protein sequences can be improved. We here show an anti-correlation between the number of aggregation prone regions (APRs) in a protein sequence and its solubility, suggesting that mutational suppression of APRs provides a simple strategy to increase protein solubility. We show that mutations at specific positions within a protein structure can act as APR suppressors without affecting protein stability. These hot spots for protein solubility are both structure and sequence dependent but can be computationally predicted. We demonstrate this by reducing the aggregation of human α-galactosidase and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis through mutation. Our results indicate that many proteins possess hot spots allowing to adapt protein solubility independently of structure and function. PMID:26905391

  2. Connectivity independent protein-structure alignment: a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolbeck, Bjoern; May, Patrick; Schmidt-Goenner, Tobias; Steinke, Thomas; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein-structure alignment is a fundamental tool to study protein function, evolution and model building. In the last decade several methods for structure alignment were introduced, but most of them ignore that structurally similar proteins can share the same spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSE) but differ in the underlying polypeptide chain connectivity (non-sequential SSE connectivity). Results We perform protein-structure alignment using a two-level hierarchical approach implemented in the program GANGSTA. On the first level, pair contacts and relative orientations between SSEs (i.e. α-helices and β-strands) are maximized with a genetic algorithm (GA). On the second level residue pair contacts from the best SSE alignments are optimized. We have tested the method on visually optimized structure alignments of protein pairs (pairwise mode) and for database scans. For a given protein structure, our method is able to detect significant structural similarity of functionally important folds with non-sequential SSE connectivity. The performance for structure alignments with strictly sequential SSE connectivity is comparable to that of other structure alignment methods. Conclusion As demonstrated for several applications, GANGSTA finds meaningful protein-structure alignments independent of the SSE connectivity. GANGSTA is able to detect structural similarity of protein folds that are assigned to different superfamilies but nevertheless possess similar structures and perform related functions, even if these proteins differ in SSE connectivity. PMID:17118190

  3. 3-Dimensional Protein Structure of Influenza

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The loss of productivity due to flu is staggering. Costs range as much as $20 billio a year. High mutation rates of the flu virus have hindered development of new drugs or vaccines. The secret lies in a small molecule which is attached to the host cell's surface. Each flu virus, no matter what strain, must remove this small molecule to escape the host cell to spread infection. Using data from space and earth grown crystals, researchers from the Center of Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) are desining drugs to bind with this protein's active site. This lock and key fit reduces the spread of flu in the body by blocking its escape route. In collaboration with its corporate partner, the CMC has refined drug structure in preparation for clinical trials. Tested and approved relief is expected to reach drugstores by year 2004.

  4. Ensemble-based evaluation for protein structure models

    PubMed Central

    Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Comparing protein tertiary structures is a fundamental procedure in structural biology and protein bioinformatics. Structure comparison is important particularly for evaluating computational protein structure models. Most of the model structure evaluation methods perform rigid body superimposition of a structure model to its crystal structure and measure the difference of the corresponding residue or atom positions between them. However, these methods neglect intrinsic flexibility of proteins by treating the native structure as a rigid molecule. Because different parts of proteins have different levels of flexibility, for example, exposed loop regions are usually more flexible than the core region of a protein structure, disagreement of a model to the native needs to be evaluated differently depending on the flexibility of residues in a protein. Results: We propose a score named FlexScore for comparing protein structures that consider flexibility of each residue in the native state of proteins. Flexibility information may be extracted from experiments such as NMR or molecular dynamics simulation. FlexScore considers an ensemble of conformations of a protein described as a multivariate Gaussian distribution of atomic displacements and compares a query computational model with the ensemble. We compare FlexScore with other commonly used structure similarity scores over various examples. FlexScore agrees with experts’ intuitive assessment of computational models and provides information of practical usefulness of models. Availability and implementation: https://bitbucket.org/mjamroz/flexscore Contact: dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307633

  5. PSSARD: protein sequence-structure analysis relational database.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Kunchur; Srikanth, K; Babu, A V N

    2005-09-15

    We have implemented a relational database comprising a representative dataset of amino acid sequences and their associated secondary structure. The representative amino acid sequences were selected according to the PDB_SELECT program by choosing proteins corresponding to protein crystal structure data deposited in the protein data bank that share less than 25% overall pair-wise sequence identity. The secondary structure was extracted from the protein data bank website. The information content in the database includes the protein description, PDB code, crystal structure resolution, total number of amino acid residues in the protein chain, amino acid sequence, secondary structure conformation and its summary. The database is freely accessible from the website mentioned below and is useful to query on any of the above fields. The database is particularly useful to quickly retrieve amino acid sequences that are compatible to any super-secondary structure conformation from several proteins simultaneously. PMID:16054209

  6. A new method for measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Perraud, V. M.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately predicting particle formation and growth from gas phase precursors is an essential component of modeling the impact of particulate matter on human health, visibility and climate. While the reactions of ammonia with nitric and sulfuric acids to form particulate nitrate and sulfate particles is well known, it has been recently recognized that gas-phase amines, even at low ppb levels, significantly enhance particle formation from common atmospheric acids. As a result, accurate data on the sources, sinks and typical background concentrations of gas-phase amines, are crucial to predicting new particle formation in the atmosphere. However, gas-phase amines are notoriously difficult to measure, as they have a tendency to stick to surfaces, including sampling lines and inlets. In addition, background amine concentrations in the atmosphere are typically a few ppb or lower, requiring low detection limits for ambient sampling techniques. Here we report the development of a simple, reliable method for detection of gas-phase amines at atmospherically relevant concentrations using collection on a cation exchange sorbent followed by in-line extraction and ion chromatography. Gas-phase standards of several amines and ammonia are used to characterize the technique and results from ambient samples in an agricultural area are presented. The application of this technique to field measurements as well as to laboratory measurements of new particle formation from gas-phase ammonia and amines are discussed.

  7. Prediction of protein folding rates from simplified secondary structure alphabet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-10-21

    Protein folding is a very complicated and highly cooperative dynamic process. However, the folding kinetics is likely to depend more on a few key structural features. Here we find that secondary structures can determine folding rates of only large, multi-state folding proteins and fails to predict those for small, two-state proteins. The importance of secondary structures for protein folding is ordered as: extended β strand > α helix > bend > turn > undefined secondary structure>310 helix > isolated β strand > π helix. Only the first three secondary structures, extended β strand, α helix and bend, can achieve a good correlation with folding rates. This suggests that the rate-limiting step of protein folding would depend upon the formation of regular secondary structures and the buckling of chain. The reduced secondary structure alphabet provides a simplified description for the machine learning applications in protein design. PMID:26247139

  8. Influences of Membrane Mimetic Environments on Membrane Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of membrane protein structures in the Protein Data Bank is becoming significant and growing. Here, the transmembrane domain structures of the helical membrane proteins are evaluated to assess the influences of the membrane mimetic environments. Toward this goal, many of the biophysical properties of membranes are discussed and contrasted with those of the membrane mimetics commonly used for structure determination. Although the mimetic environments can perturb the protein structures to an extent that potentially gives rise to misinterpretation of functional mechanisms, there are also many structures that have a native-like appearance. From this assessment, an initial set of guidelines is proposed for distinguishing native-like from nonnative-like membrane protein structures. With experimental techniques for validation and computational methods for refinement and quality assessment and enhancement, there are good prospects for achieving native-like structures for these very important proteins. PMID:23451886

  9. On lattice protein structure prediction revisited.

    PubMed

    Dotu, Ivan; Cebrián, Manuel; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Protein structure prediction is regarded as a highly challenging problem both for the biology and for the computational communities. In recent years, many approaches have been developed, moving to increasingly complex lattice models and off-lattice models. This paper presents a Large Neighborhood Search (LNS) to find the native state for the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) model on the Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) lattice or, in other words, a self-avoiding walk on the FCC lattice having a maximum number of H-H contacts. The algorithm starts with a tabu-search algorithm, whose solution is then improved by a combination of constraint programming and LNS. The flexible framework of this hybrid algorithm allows an adaptation to the Miyazawa-Jernigan contact potential, in place of the HP model, thus suggesting its potential for tertiary structure prediction. Benchmarking statistics are given for our method against the hydrophobic core threading program HPstruct, an exact method which can be viewed as complementary to our method. PMID:21358007

  10. Gas-phase lithium cation affinity of glycine.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, Sophie; Chiaa, Ru Xuan; Mimbong, Rosa Ngo Biboum; Bouchoux, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation binding thermochemistry of glycine has been determined theoretically by quantum chemical calculations at the G4 level and experimentally by the extended kinetic method using electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. The lithium cation affinity of glycine, ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY), i.e. the∆(Li)H°(298) of the reaction GlyLi(+)→ Gly + Li(+)) given by the G4 method is equal to 241.4 kJ.mol(-1) if only the most stable conformer of glycine is considered or to 242.3 kJ.mol(-1) if the 298K equilibrium mixture of neutral conformers is included in the calculation. The ∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) deduced from the extended kinetic method is obviously dependent on the choice of the Li(+) affinity scale, thus∆(Li)H°(298)(GLY) is equal to 228.7±0.9(2.0) kJ.mol(- 1) if anchored to the recently re-evaluated lithium cation affinity scale but shifted to 235.4±1.0 kJ.mol(-1) if G4 computed lithium cation affinities of the reference molecules is used. This difference of 6.3 kJ.mol(-1) may originate from a compression of the experimental lithium affinity scale in the high ∆(Li)H°(298) region. The entropy change associated with the reaction GlyLi(+)→Gly + Li(+) reveals a gain of approximately 15 J.mol(-) 1.K(-1) with respect to monodentate Li(+) acceptors. The origin of this excess entropy is attributed to the bidentate interaction between the Li(+) cation and both the carbonyl oxygen and the nitrogen atoms of glycine. The computed G4 Gibbs free energy,∆(Li)G°(298)(GLY) is equal to 205.3 kJ.mol(-1), a similar result, 201.0±3.4 kJ.mol(-1), is obtained from the experiment if the∆(Li)G°(298) of the reference molecules is anchored on the G4 results. PMID:26307695

  11. Detection methods for atoms and radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, W.

    This report lists atoms and free radicals in the gas phase which are of interest for environmental and flame chemistry and have been detected directly. The detection methods which have been used are discussed with respect to their range of application, specificity and sensitivity. In table 1, detection methods for the five atoms of group IV (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and about 60 radicals containing at least one atom of group IV are summarized (CH, Cd, Cf, CC1, CBr, Cn, Cs, CSe, CH2, CD2, Chf, Cdf, CHC1, CHBr, CF2, CC12, CBr2, CFC1, CFBr, CH3, CD3, CF3, CH2F, CH2C1, CH2Br, CHF2, CHC12, CHBr2, Hco, Fco, CH30, CD30, CH2OH, CH3S, Nco, CH4N, CH302, CF302; C2, C2N, C2H, C20, C2HO, C2H3, C2F3, C2H5, C2HsO, C2H4OH, CH3CO, CD3CO, C2H3O, C2H502, CH3COO2, C2H4N, C2H6N, C3; Si, SiF, SiF2, SiO, SiC, Si2; Ge, GeC, GeO, GeF, GeF2, GeCl2, Sn, SnF, SnO, SnF2, Pb, PbF, PbF2, PbO, PbS). In table 2 detection methods for about 25 other atoms and 60 radicals are listed: (H, D, O, O2, Oh, Od, HO2, DO2, F, Ci, Br, I, Fo, Cio, BrO, Io, FO2, C1O2, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, N, N3, Nh, Nd, Nf, Nci, NBr, NH2, ND2, Nhd, Nhf, NF2, NC12, N2H3, No, NO2, NO3, Hno, Dno, P, Ph, Pd, Pf, Pci, PH2, PD2, PF2, Po, As, AsO, AsS, Sb, Bi, S, S2, Sh, Sd, Sf, SF2, So, Hso, Dso, Sn, Se, Te, Se2, SeH, SeD, SeF, SeO, SeS, SeN, TeH, TeO, Bh, BH2, Bo, Bn, B02, Cd, Hg, UF5). The tables also cite some recent kinetic applications of the various methods.

  12. Ligand field spectroscopy of Cu(II) and Ag(II) complexes in the gas phase: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Cox, Hazel; Goren, Alan; Aitken, Georgina D C; Stace, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    Ligand field spectra have been recorded in the gas phase for the two series of complexes containing either Cu(II) or Ag(II) in association with pyridine. Where comparisons are possible, the gas phase spectra match those recorded in the condensed phase; however, for Ag(II) systems the results differ in interpretation. The Ag(II) data are attributed to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer process, and the Cu(II) data (spectral region and extinction coefficient) match the characteristics of a d-d transition. A detailed theoretical analysis of two complexes. [Cu(py)4]2+ and [Ag(py)4]2+ provides evidence of a minimum energy, D4h structure and two less stable D2h and D2d structures within approximately 60 kJ mol(-1). From these structures it is possible to identify a range of optically and vibronically allowed transitions that could contribute to spectra observed in the gas phase. In the case of calculations on [Ag(py)4]2+ there is strong evidence of an electronic transition that would account for the observation of charge transfer in the experiments. Less detailed calculations on [Cu(py)6]2+ and [Ag(py)6]2+ show structural evidence of extensive Jahn Teller distortion. Taken together with incremental binding energies calculated for complexes containing between two and six pyridine molecules, these results show that the level of theory adopted is capable of providing a semi-quantitative understanding of the experimental data. PMID:14527220

  13. Protein Structure, Function Set for Explosive Increase in Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Cites advances in x-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, computer modeling, and display to guide the design and analysis of protein structures. Reviews recent advances in knowledge, synthesis techniques, and theory of proteins. (JM)

  14. The gas-phase thermal chemistry of tetralin and related model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malandra, J.

    1993-05-01

    The thesis is divided into 5 papers: gas-phase thermal decomposition of tetralin; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 3-benzocycloheptenone and 1,3, 4,5-tetrahydro-2-benzothiepin-2,2-dioxide (model systems for gas-phase pyrolysis of tetralin); high-temperature gas-phase reactions of o-allylbenzyl radicals generated by flash vacuum pyrolysis of is(o-allylbenzyl) oxalate; flash vacuum pyrolysis of 1,4-diphenylbutane; and flash vacuum pyrolysis of o-allyltoluene, o-(3-butenyl)toluene and o-(pentenyl)toluene were also used.

  15. Algorithms, applications, and challenges of protein structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental problem in computational structure biology, protein structure alignment has attracted the focus of the community for more than 20 years. While the pairwise structure alignment could be applied to measure the similarity between two proteins, which is a first step for homology search and fold space construction, the multiple structure alignment could be used to understand evolutionary conservation and divergence from a family of protein structures. Structure alignment is an NP-hard problem, which is only computationally tractable by using heuristics. Three levels of heuristics for pairwise structure alignment have been proposed, from the representations of protein structure, the perspectives of viewing protein as a rigid-body or flexible, to the scoring functions as well as the search algorithms for the alignment. For multiple structure alignment, the fourth level of heuristics is applied on how to merge all input structures to a multiple structure alignment. In this review, we first present a small survey of current methods for protein pairwise and multiple alignment, focusing on those that are publicly available as web servers. In more detail, we also discuss the advancements on the development of the new approaches to increase the pairwise alignment accuracy, to efficiently and reliably merge input structures to the multiple structure alignment. Finally, besides broadening the spectrum of the applications of structure alignment for protein template-based prediction, we also list several open problems that need to be solved in the future, such as the large complex alignment and the fast database search. PMID:24629187

  16. Dramatically Stabilizing Multiprotein Complex Structure in the Absence of Bulk Water using Tuned Hofmeister Salts

    PubMed Central

    Han, Linjie; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2012-01-01

    The role that water plays in the salt-based stabilization of proteins is central to our understanding of protein biophysics. Ion hydration and the ability of ions to alter water surface tension are typically invoked, along with direct ion-protein binding, to describe Hofmeister stabilization phenomena observed for proteins experimentally, but the relative influence of these forces has been extraordinarily difficult to measure directly. Recently, we have used gas-phase measurements of proteins and large multiprotein complexes, using a combination of innovative ion mobility (IM) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques, to assess the ability of bound cations and anions to stabilize protein ions in the absence of the solvation forces described above. Our previous work has studied a broad set of 12 anions bound to a range of proteins and protein complexes, and while primarily motivated by the analytical challenges surrounding the gas-phase measurement of solution-phase relevant protein structures, our work has also lead to a detailed physical mechanism of anion-protein complex stabilization in the absence of bulk solvent. Our more-recent work has screened a similarly-broad set of cations for their ability to stabilize gas-phase protein structure, and we have discovered surprising differences between the operative mechanisms for cations and anions in gas-phase protein stabilization. In both cases, cations and anions affect protein stabilization in the absence of solvent in a manner that is generally reversed relative to their ability to stabilize the same proteins in solution. In addition, our evidence suggests that the relative solution-phase binding affinity of the anions and cations studied here is preserved in our gas-phase measurements, allowing us to study the influence of such interactions in detail. In this report, we collect and summarize such gas-phase measurements to distill a generalized picture of salt-based protein stabilization in the absence of bulk water

  17. A hidden markov model derived structural alphabet for proteins.

    PubMed

    Camproux, A C; Gautier, R; Tufféry, P

    2004-06-01

    Understanding and predicting protein structures depends on the complexity and the accuracy of the models used to represent them. We have set up a hidden Markov model that discretizes protein backbone conformation as series of overlapping fragments (states) of four residues length. This approach learns simultaneously the geometry of the states and their connections. We obtain, using a statistical criterion, an optimal systematic decomposition of the conformational variability of the protein peptidic chain in 27 states with strong connection logic. This result is stable over different protein sets. Our model fits well the previous knowledge related to protein architecture organisation and seems able to grab some subtle details of protein organisation, such as helix sub-level organisation schemes. Taking into account the dependence between the states results in a description of local protein structure of low complexity. On an average, the model makes use of only 8.3 states among 27 to describe each position of a protein structure. Although we use short fragments, the learning process on entire protein conformations captures the logic of the assembly on a larger scale. Using such a model, the structure of proteins can be reconstructed with an average accuracy close to 1.1A root-mean-square deviation and for a complexity of only 3. Finally, we also observe that sequence specificity increases with the number of states of the structural alphabet. Such models can constitute a very relevant approach to the analysis of protein architecture in particular for protein structure prediction. PMID:15147844

  18. Implementation of a parallel protein structure alignment service on cloud.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform. PMID:23671842

  19. Implementation of a Parallel Protein Structure Alignment Service on Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform. PMID:23671842

  20. The Potato leafroll virus structural proteins manipulate overlapping, yet distinct protein interaction networks during infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) produces a readthrough protein (RTP) via translational readthrough of the coat protein amber stop codon. The RTP functions as a structural component of the virion and as a non-incorporated protein in concert with numerous insect and plant proteins to regulate virus movem...

  1. The Alba protein family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manish; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Nag, Shiladitya; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-05-01

    Alba family proteins are small, basic, dimeric nucleic acid-binding proteins, which are widely distributed in archaea and a number of eukaryotes. This family of proteins bears the distinct features of regulation through acetylation/deacetylation, hence named as acetylation lowers binding affinity (Alba). Alba family proteins bind DNA cooperatively with no apparent sequence specificity. Besides DNA, Alba proteins also interact with diverse RNA species and associate with ribonucleo-protein complexes. Initially, Alba proteins were recognized as chromosomal proteins and supposed to be involved in the maintenance of chromatin architecture and transcription repression. However, recent studies have shown increasing evidence of functional plasticity among Alba family of proteins that widely range from genome packaging and organization, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA metabolism, and development and differentiation processes. In recent years, Alba family proteins have attracted growing interest due to their widespread occurrence in large number of organisms. Presence in multiple copies, functional crosstalk, differential binding affinity, and posttranslational modifications are some of the key factors that might regulate the biological functions of Alba family proteins. In this review article, we present an overview of the Alba family proteins, their salient features and emphasize their functional role in different organisms reported so far. PMID:26900088

  2. Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Crawford, Oakly H.; Xu, Dong; Larimer, Frank W.; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-09-02

    In this project, we proposed (i) identification of metal-reduction genes, (ii) development of new threading techniques and (iii) fold recognition and structure prediction of metal-reduction proteins. However, due to the reduction of the budget, we revised our plan to focus on two specific aims of (i) developing a new threading-based protein structure prediction method, and (ii) developing an expert system for protein structure prediction.

  3. Hydration of gas-phase ytterbium ion complexes studied by experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, Philip X; Michelini, Maria C.; Bray, Travis H.; Russo, Nino; Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2011-02-11

    Hydration of ytterbium (III) halide/hydroxide ions produced by electrospray ionization was studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and by density functional theory (DFT). Gas-phase YbX{sub 2}{sup +} and YbX(OH){sup +} (X = OH, Cl, Br, or I) were found to coordinate from one to four water molecules, depending on the ion residence time in the trap. From the time dependence of the hydration steps, relative reaction rates were obtained. It was determined that the second hydration was faster than both the first and third hydrations, and the fourth hydration was the slowest; this ordering reflects a combination of insufficient degrees of freedom for cooling the hot monohydrate ion and decreasing binding energies with increasing hydration number. Hydration energetics and hydrate structures were computed using two approaches of DFT. The relativistic scalar ZORA approach was used with the PBE functional and all-electron TZ2P basis sets; the B3LYP functional was used with the Stuttgart relativistic small-core ANO/ECP basis sets. The parallel experimental and computational results illuminate fundamental aspects of hydration of f-element ion complexes. The experimental observations - kinetics and extent of hydration - are discussed in relationship to the computed structures and energetics of the hydrates. The absence of pentahydrates is in accord with the DFT results, which indicate that the lowest energy structures have the fifth water molecule in the second shell.

  4. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R; Hopkins, W Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)-a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry-actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27094827

  5. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  6. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  7. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  8. Reexamination of CO formation during formic acid decomposition on the Pt(1 1 1) surface in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Peng; Liu, Chengbu

    2016-08-01

    Existing theoretical results for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) cannot rationalize the easy CO poisoning of the catalysts in the gas phase. The present work reexamined HCOOH decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) by considering the effect of the initial adsorption structure of the reactant on the reactivity. Our calculations present a new adsorption configuration of HCOOH on Pt(1 1 1), from which the formation of CO is found to be competing with the formation of CO2. The newly proposed mechanism improves our understanding for the mechanism of HCOOH decomposition catalyzed by Pt-based catalysts.

  9. Spectroscopic Characterization and Reactivity of Triplet and Quintet Iron(IV) Oxo Complexes in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Andris, Erik; Jašík, Juraj; Gómez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Closely structurally related triplet and quintet iron(IV) oxo complexes with a tetradentate aminopyridine ligand were generated in the gas phase, spectroscopically characterized, and their reactivities in hydrogen‐transfer and oxygen‐transfer reactions were compared. The spin states were unambiguously assigned based on helium tagging infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of the mass‐selected iron complexes. It is shown that the stretching vibrations of the nitrate counterion can be used as a spectral marker of the central iron spin state. PMID:26878833

  10. The conformational flexibility of nucleic acid bases paired in gas phase: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiyan; Liang, Haojun

    2012-05-01

    The flexibilities of pyrimidine and imidazole rings in the paired nucleobases are investigated using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation in gas phase. The pairing influence on the stiffness of rings is analyzed based on the molecular structure of the nucleobases and constraints caused by pairing. We prove that the flexibilities of pyrimidine rings in isolated state have subtle correlation with the degree of aromaticity of the rings. The pairings in nucleic base pairs cause the rings to be more rigid for G, T, and U but more flexible for A and the same for C.

  11. Protein Structure and Function Prediction Using I-TASSER

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    I-TASSER is a hierarchical protocol for automated protein structure prediction and structure-based function annotation. Starting from the amino acid sequence of target proteins, I-TASSER first generates full-length atomic structural models from multiple threading alignments and iterative structural assembly simulations followed by atomic-level structure refinement. The biological functions of the protein, including ligand-binding sites, enzyme commission number, and gene ontology terms, are then inferred from known protein function databases based on sequence and structure profile comparisons. I-TASSER is freely available as both an on-line server and a stand-alone package. This unit describes how to use the I-TASSER protocol to generate structure and function prediction and how to interpret the prediction results, as well as alternative approaches for further improving the I-TASSER modeling quality for distant-homologous and multi-domain protein targets. PMID:26678386

  12. Protein structure prediction and analysis using the Robetta server

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David E.; Chivian, Dylan; Baker, David

    2004-01-01

    The Robetta server (http://robetta.bakerlab.org) provides automated tools for protein structure prediction and analysis. For structure prediction, sequences submitted to the server are parsed into putative domains and structural models are generated using either comparative modeling or de novo structure prediction methods. If a confident match to a protein of known structure is found using BLAST, PSI-BLAST, FFAS03 or 3D-Jury, it is used as a template for comparative modeling. If no match is found, structure predictions are made using the de novo Rosetta fragment insertion method. Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) constraints data can also be submitted with a query sequence for RosettaNMR de novo structure determination. Other current capabilities include the prediction of the effects of mutations on protein–protein interactions using computational interface alanine scanning. The Rosetta protein design and protein–protein docking methodologies will soon be available through the server as well. PMID:15215442

  13. Structural Assessment of the Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions on Protein Stability and Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shaolei; Wang, Liangjiang; Srivastava, Anand K.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A structure-based approach is described for predicting the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein function. Structures were predicted using a homology modelling method. Folding and binding energy differences between wild-type and mutant structures were computed to quantitatively assess the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein stability and protein–protein interaction, respectively. We demonstrated that pathogenic mutations at the interaction interface could affect binding energy and destabilise protein complex, whereas mutations at the non-interface might reduce folding energy and destabilise monomer structure. The results suggest that the structure-based analysis can provide useful information for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases. PMID:21297231

  14. GAS PHASE EXPOSURE HISTORY DERIVED FROM MATERIAL PHASE CONCENTRATION PROFILES USING SOLID PHASE MICRO-EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P31059
    Title: Gas Phase Exposure History Derived from Material Phase Concentration Profiles Using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Jonathan Lewis McKinney
    Institution: University of Missouri - ...

  15. Gas-phase water-mediated equilibrium between methylglyoxal and its geminal diol

    PubMed Central

    Axson, Jessica L.; Takahashi, Kaito; De Haan, David O.; Vaida, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    In aqueous solution, aldehydes, and to a lesser extent ketones, hydrate to form geminal diols. We investigate the hydration of methylglyoxal (MG) in the gas phase, a process not previously considered to occur in water-restricted environments. In this study, we spectroscopically identified methylglyoxal diol (MGD) and obtained the gas-phase partial pressures of MG and MGD. These results, in conjunction with the relative humidity, were used to obtain the equilibrium constant, KP, for the water-mediated hydration of MG in the gas phase. The Gibbs free energy for this process, ΔG°, obtained as a result, suggests a larger than expected gas-phase diol concentration. This may have significant implications for understanding the role of organics in atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20142510

  16. Structural evolution during protein denaturation as induced by different methods.

    PubMed

    Chodankar, S; Aswal, V K; Kohlbrecher, J; Vavrin, R; Wagh, A G

    2008-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to perturbation in its native structure as induced by varying temperature and pressure, and in presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. BSA has prolate ellipsoidal shape at ambient temperature and we observe no effect of temperature on its structure up to a temperature of about 60 degrees C . At temperatures beyond 60 degrees C , protein denaturation leads to aggregation. The protein solution exhibits a fractal structure at temperatures above 64 degrees C , and its fractal dimension increases with temperature. This is an indication of aggregation followed by gelation that evolves with increasing temperature. It is known for some of the proteins (e.g., Staphylococcal Nuclease) that pressure of 200 MPa can unfold the protein, whereas BSA does not show any protein unfolding even up to the pressure of 450 MPa . In presence of urea, the BSA protein unfolds for urea concentrations greater than 4M and acquires a random coil configuration. We make use of the dilution method to show the reversibility of protein unfolding with urea. The addition of surfactant denaturates the protein by the formation of micellelike aggregates of surfactants along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. We show such structure of the protein-surfactant complex can be stabilized at higher temperatures, which is not the case for pure protein. PMID:18517416

  17. Structural evolution during protein denaturation as induced by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodankar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Vavrin, R.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to perturbation in its native structure as induced by varying temperature and pressure, and in presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. BSA has prolate ellipsoidal shape at ambient temperature and we observe no effect of temperature on its structure up to a temperature of about 60°C . At temperatures beyond 60°C , protein denaturation leads to aggregation. The protein solution exhibits a fractal structure at temperatures above 64°C , and its fractal dimension increases with temperature. This is an indication of aggregation followed by gelation that evolves with increasing temperature. It is known for some of the proteins (e.g., Staphylococcal Nuclease) that pressure of 200MPa can unfold the protein, whereas BSA does not show any protein unfolding even up to the pressure of 450MPa . In presence of urea, the BSA protein unfolds for urea concentrations greater than 4M and acquires a random coil configuration. We make use of the dilution method to show the reversibility of protein unfolding with urea. The addition of surfactant denaturates the protein by the formation of micellelike aggregates of surfactants along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. We show such structure of the protein-surfactant complex can be stabilized at higher temperatures, which is not the case for pure protein.

  18. Dissecting the relationship between protein structure and sequence variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Wilke, Claus; Wilke Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade several independent works have shown that some structural properties of proteins are capable of predicting protein evolution. The strength and significance of these structure-sequence relations, however, appear to vary widely among different proteins, with absolute correlation strengths ranging from 0 . 1 to 0 . 8 . Here we present the results from a comprehensive search for the potential biophysical and structural determinants of protein evolution by studying more than 200 structural and evolutionary properties in a dataset of 209 monomeric enzymes. We discuss the main protein characteristics responsible for the general patterns of protein evolution, and identify sequence divergence as the main determinant of the strengths of virtually all structure-evolution relationships, explaining ~ 10 - 30 % of observed variation in sequence-structure relations. In addition to sequence divergence, we identify several protein structural properties that are moderately but significantly coupled with the strength of sequence-structure relations. In particular, proteins with more homogeneous back-bone hydrogen bond energies, large fractions of helical secondary structures and low fraction of beta sheets tend to have the strongest sequence-structure relation. BEACON-NSF center for the study of evolution in action.

  19. Systematic analysis of the use of amphipathic polymers for studies of outer membrane proteins using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, Thomas G.; Calabrese, Antonio N.; Giusti, Fabrice; Zoonens, Manuela; Radford, Sheena E.; Ashcroft, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are essential for numerous important biological processes. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS), coupled with an array of related techniques, has been used to probe the structural properties of MPs and their complexes. Typically, detergent micelles have been employed for delivering MPs into the gas-phase, but these complexes have intrinsic properties that can limit the utility of structural studies of MPs using MS methods. Amphipols (APols) have advantages over detergent micelles and have been shown to be capable of delivering native MPs into the gas-phase. Comparing six different APols which vary in mass and charge, and the detergent n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside, we aimed to determine which APols are most efficient for delivery of native outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the gas-phase. We show that maintaining the solution-phase folding and global structures of three different OMPs (PagP, OmpT and tOmpA) are independent of the APol used, but differences in OMP activity can result from the different APol:OMP complexes. ESI-IMS–MS analysis of OMP:APol complexes shows that the A8-35 APol is most proficient at liberating all three OMPs into the gas-phase, without altering their gas-phase conformations. PMID:26869850

  20. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  1. GWIDD: a comprehensive resource for genome-wide structural modeling of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are a key component of life processes. The knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of these interactions is important for understanding protein function. Genome-Wide Docking Database (http://gwidd.bioinformatics.ku.edu) offers an extensive source of data for structural studies of protein-protein complexes on genome scale. The current release of the database combines the available experimental data on the structure and characteristics of protein interactions with structural modeling of protein complexes for 771 organisms spanned over the entire universe of life from viruses to humans. The interactions are stored in a relational database with user-friendly interface that includes various search options. The search results can be interactively previewed; the structures, downloaded, along with the interaction characteristics. PMID:23245398

  2. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  3. Sulfur hexafluoride: Optimal use as a gas-phase, infrared sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, A.E.; Ludwick, L.M.; White, D.; Andrews, D.E.; Godbey, S.E. )

    1992-12-01

    Investigations into the use of sulfur hexafluoride, SF[sub 6], as a gas-phase, infrared photochemical sensitizer have revealed several interesting phenomena. The expedient use of SF[sub 6] can produce an optimal quantity of nitrated product in the gas-phase, laser-induced nitration of cyclopentane. The optimal utilization of sulfur hexafluoride required critical optimization of both frequency and quantity. The results are described herein. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  5. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  6. Conformational preferences of flavone and isoflavone in the gas phase, aqueous solution and organic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiki, Hamilton Mitsugu; Alemán, Carlos; Galembeck, Sérgio Emanuel

    1998-05-01

    Flavone and isoflavone are an important class of secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in nature. In this Letter we have determined the conformational preferences of each compound in the gas phase, aqueous solution and organic solution. Gas-phase calculations were performed using AM1, MNDO, HF/3-21G, HF/6-31G(d) and B3-LYP/6-31G(d) calculations. Besides solution calculations were performed using the MST solvation model.

  7. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  8. The mechanism of 2-furaldehyde formation from D-xylose dehydration in the gas phase. A tandem mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of D-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing D-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the D-xylose→2-FA conversion. ᅟ PMID:23690250

  9. Hydrothermal transformation of Chinese privet seed biomass to gas-phase and semi-volatile products.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Thomas L; Catallo, W James; Shupe, Todd F

    2010-06-01

    Hydrothermal (HT) treatment of seeds from Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), a non-native and invasive species in the southeastern United States, was examined with respect to the generation of gas-phase and semi-volatile organic chemicals of industrial importance from a lipid-rich biomass resource. Aqueous seed slurries were transformed into biphasic liquid systems comprised of a milky aqueous phase overlain by a black organic layer. Present in the headspace were elevated levels of CO(2) and acetic acid. Analysis of the semi-volatiles by GC-MS showed the formation of alkyl substituted benzenes, oxygenated cyclic alkenes, phenol, substituted phenolics, and alkyl substituted pyridines. Compared to immature seeds, mature seeds gave high relative amounts of oxygenated cyclic alkenes (cyclopentenones) and alkyl pyridines. The presence of fatty acids in the HT products likely resulted from both lipid hydrolysis reactions and the inherent stability of fatty acids under HT treatment conditions. Estimates of lignin and protein contents showed no definite trend that could be linked to the HT data. The proportion of aromatic HT products appeared to derive primarily from the proportion of extractives. Thus, variations in extractives yields impact HT product yields and thereby demonstrate the importance of timing in feedstock collection to favor targeted HT products. PMID:20149648

  10. The unexpected structure of the designed protein Octarellin V.1 forms a challenge for protein structure prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Maximiliano; Sleutel, Mike; Vandevenne, Marylene; Parvizi, Gregory; Attout, Sophie; Jacquin, Olivier; Vandenameele, Julie; Fischer, Axel W; Damblon, Christian; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Durand, Dominique; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Minard, Philippe; Maes, Dominique; Meiler, Jens; Matagne, André; Martial, Joseph A; Van de Weerdt, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Despite impressive successes in protein design, designing a well-folded protein of more 100 amino acids de novo remains a formidable challenge. Exploiting the promising biophysical features of the artificial protein Octarellin V, we improved this protein by directed evolution, thus creating a more stable and soluble protein: Octarellin V.1. Next, we obtained crystals of Octarellin V.1 in complex with crystallization chaperons and determined the tertiary structure. The experimental structure of Octarellin V.1 differs from its in silico design: the (αβα) sandwich architecture bears some resemblance to a Rossman-like fold instead of the intended TIM-barrel fold. This surprising result gave us a unique and attractive opportunity to test the state of the art in protein structure prediction, using this artificial protein free of any natural selection. We tested 13 automated webservers for protein structure prediction and found none of them to predict the actual structure. More than 50% of them predicted a TIM-barrel fold, i.e. the structure we set out to design more than 10years ago. In addition, local software runs that are human operated can sample a structure similar to the experimental one but fail in selecting it, suggesting that the scoring and ranking functions should be improved. We propose that artificial proteins could be used as tools to test the accuracy of protein structure prediction algorithms, because their lack of evolutionary pressure and unique sequences features. PMID:27181418

  11. A New Hidden Markov Model for Protein Quality Assessment Using Compatibility Between Protein Sequence and Structure

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiquan; Ma, Wenji; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein structure Quality Assessment (QA) is an essential component in protein structure prediction and analysis. The relationship between protein sequence and structure often serves as a basis for protein structure QA. In this work, we developed a new Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to assess the compatibility of protein sequence and structure for capturing their complex relationship. More specifically, the emission of the HMM consists of protein local structures in angular space, secondary structures, and sequence profiles. This model has two capabilities: (1) encoding local structure of each position by jointly considering sequence and structure information, and (2) assigning a global score to estimate the overall quality of a predicted structure, as well as local scores to assess the quality of specific regions of a structure, which provides useful guidance for targeted structure refinement. We compared the HMM model to state-of-art single structure quality assessment methods OPUSCA, DFIRE, GOAP, and RW in protein structure selection. Computational results showed our new score HMM.Z can achieve better overall selection performance on the benchmark datasets. PMID:26221066

  12. Layer-modulated synthesis of uniform tungsten disulfide nanosheet using gas-phase precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jusang; Lee, Wonseon; Choi, Taejin; Hwang, Sung-Hwan; Myoung, Jae Min; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of layered transition-metal-disulfide (MS2, M = Mo, W) nanosheets with layer controllability and large-area uniformity is an essential requirement for their application in electronic and optical devices. In this report, we describe a synthesis process of WS2 nanosheets with layer controllability and high uniformity using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and WCl6 and H2S as gas-phase precursors. Through this process, we can systematically modulate the thickness of WS2 nanosheets by controlling the duration of the reaction between WCl6 and H2S. The CVD-grown WS2 nanosheets exhibit good stoichiometry as well as dependencies of a clear Raman shift and bandgap on the number of layers. These properties are confirmed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. The number of layers of WS2 nanosheets is confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a photodetector based on a hybrid structure consisting of graphene and a WS2 nanosheet.The synthesis of layered transition-metal-disulfide (MS2, M = Mo, W) nanosheets with layer controllability and large-area uniformity is an essential requirement for their application in electronic and optical devices. In this report, we describe a synthesis process of WS2 nanosheets with layer controllability and high uniformity using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and WCl6 and H2S as gas-phase precursors. Through this process, we can systematically modulate the thickness of WS2 nanosheets by controlling the duration of the reaction between WCl6 and H2S. The CVD-grown WS2 nanosheets exhibit good stoichiometry as well as dependencies of a clear Raman shift and bandgap on the number of layers. These properties are confirmed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements. The number of layers of WS2 nanosheets is confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication

  13. Identification of local conformational similarity in structurally variable regions of homologous proteins using protein blocks.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-01-01

    Structure comparison tools can be used to align related protein structures to identify structurally conserved and variable regions and to infer functional and evolutionary relationships. While the conserved regions often superimpose well, the variable regions appear non superimposable. Differences in homologous protein structures are thought to be due to evolutionary plasticity to accommodate diverged sequences during evolution. One of the kinds of differences between 3-D structures of homologous proteins is rigid body displacement. A glaring example is not well superimposed equivalent regions of homologous proteins corresponding to α-helical conformation with different spatial orientations. In a rigid body superimposition, these regions would appear variable although they may contain local similarity. Also, due to high spatial deviation in the variable region, one-to-one correspondence at the residue level cannot be determined accurately. Another kind of difference is conformational variability and the most common example is topologically equivalent loops of two homologues but with different conformations. In the current study, we present a refined view of the "structurally variable" regions which may contain local similarity obscured in global alignment of homologous protein structures. As structural alphabet is able to describe local structures of proteins precisely through Protein Blocks approach, conformational similarity has been identified in a substantial number of 'variable' regions in a large data set of protein structural alignments; optimal residue-residue equivalences could be achieved on the basis of Protein Blocks which led to improved local alignments. Also, through an example, we have demonstrated how the additional information on local backbone structures through protein blocks can aid in comparative modeling of a loop region. In addition, understanding on sequence-structure relationships can be enhanced through our approach. This has been

  14. Core Level Spectroscopy and Tautomerism of Key Biomolecules in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyer, V.; Plekan, O.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Coreno, M.; Giuliano, B. M.; Evangelisti, L.; Melandri, S.; Caminati, W.; Trofimov, A. B.; Zaytseva, I. L.; Moskovskaya, T. E.; Gromov, E. V.; Schirmer, J.

    2010-06-01

    The nucleobases cytosine, thymine and uracil are pyrimidine derivatives. They pair with their complementary purines, guanine and adenine, through hydrogen bonding to form DNA and RNA chains. The tautomeric forms of DNA bases are capable of unusual base pairing like thymine-guanine and cytosine-adenine and create mutations, which are the precursors of some molecular-based diseases. Low energy spectroscopies such as microwave, laser and infrared techniques are commonly used as methods to investigate the conformatonal and tautomeric equilibria of biomolecules, while the high energy technique of x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has yielded a smaller amount of significant structural information about biomolecules in the gas phase. In the present studies we successfully apply XPS to the study of five nucleic acid base tautomers, as well as the prototypical system 2-hydroxypyridimine and the related molecules S-methyl-2-thiouracil and 2-thiouracil in the vapor phase. XPS is a quantitative technique, allowing the experimental determination of the populations of keto and enol tautomers at known equilibrium temperatures: it is difficult to obtain this information otherwise. The effect of different substituents on stability of tautomers has been revealed. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out in order to obtain information about the structure, relative stability and difference in populations of the tautomers and conformers under study.

  15. NMR properties of hydrogen-bonded glycine cluster in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Jorge R.; da Silva, Arnaldo Machado; Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2016-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) parameters of hydrogen-bonded clusters of glycine molecules in gas-phase. DFT predicted isotropic chemical shifts of H, C, N and O of the isolated glycine with respect to standard reference materials are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The variations of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts for all atoms constituting these clusters containing up to four glycine molecules have been investigated systematically employing gradient corrected hybrid B3LYP functional with three different types of extended basis sets. The clusters are mainly stabilized by a network of strong hydrogen bonds among the carboxylic (COOH) groups of glycine monomers. The formation of hydrogen bond influences the molecular structure of the clusters significantly which, on the other hand, gets reflected in the variations of NMR properties. The carbon (C) atom of the sbnd COOH group, the bridging hydrogen (H) and the proton-donor oxygen (O) atom of the Osbnd H bond suffer downfield shift due to the formation of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond lengths and the structural complexity of the clusters are found to vary with the number of participating monomers. A direct correlation between the hydrogen bond length and isotropic chemical shift of the bridging hydrogen is observed in all cases. The individual variations of the principal axis elements in chemical shift tensor provide additional insight about the different nature of the monomers within the cluster.

  16. Molecular geometry of 2-nitrotoluene from gas phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, Igor F.; Vilkov, Lev V.; Kovács, Attila; Hargittai, István

    1998-04-01

    The molecular geometry of 2-nitrotoluene has been determined by gas phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical computations at the MP2/6-31G∗ and Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3-LYP)/6-31G∗ levels of theory. Computed differences in CC bond lengths were utilized as constraints in the electron diffraction structure analysis. The scaled B3-LYP/6-31G∗ force field was used to generate the initial set of vibrational amplitudes. The electron diffraction study yielded the following bond lengths ( rg) and bond angles: C 1C 2, 1.405(8) Å; NO, 1.231(3) Å; C 1C 7, 1.508(8) Å; CN, 1.490(9) Å; C 7C 1C 2, 127.3(7)°; NC 2C 3, 113.8(6)°; C 1C 2C 3, 124.2(9)°; C 6C 1C 2, 114.8(6)°; C 5C 6C 1, 123.1(10)°; O-N-O, 124.9(3)°; ϕ(CN), 38(1)°. The structural features of the molecule point to steric interactions prevailing between the methyl and nitro groups.

  17. Isomers and conformational barriers of gas phase nicotine, nornicotine and their protonated forms

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tomoki; Farone, William A.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-07-17

    We report extensive conformational searches of the neutral nicotine, nornicotine and their protonated analogs that are based on ab-initio second order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) electronic structure calculations. Initial searches were performed with the 6-31G(d,p) and the energetics of the most important structures were further refined from geometry optimizations with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Based on the calculated free energies at T=298 K for the gas phase molecules, neutral nicotine has two dominant trans conformers, whereas neutral nornicotine is a mixture of several conformers. For nicotine, the protonation on both the pyridine and the pyrrolidine sites is energetically competitive, whereas nornicotine prefers protonation on the pyridine nitrogen. The protonated form of nicotine is mainly a mixture of two pyridine-protonated trans conformers and two pyrrolidine-protonated trans conformers, whereas the protonated form of nornicotine is a mixture of four pyridine-protonated trans conformers. Nornicotine is conformationally more flexible than nicotine, however it is less protonated at the biologically important pyrrolidine nitrogen site. The lowest energy isomers for each case were found to interconvert via low (< 6 kcal/mol) rotational barriers around the pyridine-pyrrolidine bond.

  18. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M.; De Groot, F.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretatio