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Sample records for gas-rich turbulent clumpy

  1. THE THICK DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES AS RELICS FROM GAS-RICH, TURBULENT, CLUMPY DISKS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Martig, Marie; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2009-12-10

    The formation of thick stellar disks in spiral galaxies is studied. Simulations of gas-rich young galaxies show formation of internal clumps by gravitational instabilities, clump coalescence into a bulge, and disk thickening by strong stellar scattering. The bulge and thick disks of modern galaxies may form this way. Simulations of minor mergers make thick disks too, but there is an important difference. Thick disks made by internal processes have a constant scale height with galactocentric radius, but thick disks made by mergers flare. The difference arises because in the first case, perpendicular forcing and disk-gravity resistance are both proportional to the disk column density, so the resulting scale height is independent of this density. In the case of mergers, perpendicular forcing is independent of the column density and the low-density regions get thicker; the resulting flaring is inconsistent with observations. Late-stage gas accretion and thin-disk growth are shown to preserve the constant scale heights of thick disks formed by internal evolution. These results reinforce the idea that disk galaxies accrete most of their mass smoothly and acquire their structure by internal processes, in particular through turbulent and clumpy phases at high redshift.

  2. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star-forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High-redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.; Kreckel, K.; Rabidoux, K.; Guzmán, R.

    2015-07-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%) (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%) and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  3. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  4. The quenching of star formation in accretion-driven clumpy turbulent tori of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, B.; Davies, R. I.

    2013-08-01

    Galactic gas-gas collisions involving a turbulent multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) share common ISM properties: dense extraplanar gas visible in CO, large linewidths (≳50 km s-1), strong mid-infrared H2 line emission, low star formation activity, and strong radio continuum emission. Gas-gas collisions can occur in the form of ram pressure stripping caused by the rapid motion of a spiral galaxy within the intracluster medium, galaxy head-on collisions, compression of the intragroup gas and/or galaxy ISM by an intruder galaxy which flies through the galaxy group at a high velocity, or external gas accretion on an existing gas torus in a galactic center. We suggest that the common theme of all these gas-gas interactions is adiabatic compression of the ISM leading to an increase of the turbulent velocity dispersion of the gas. The turbulent gas clouds are then overpressured and star formation is quenched. Within this scenario we developed a model for turbulent clumpy gas disks where the energy to drive turbulence is supplied by external infall or the gain of potential energy by radial gas accretion within the disk. The cloud size is determined by the size of a continuous (C-type) shock propagating in dense molecular clouds with a low ionization fraction at a given velocity dispersion. We give expressions for the expected volume and area filling factors, mass, density, column density, and velocity dispersion of the clouds. The latter is based on scaling relations of intermittent turbulence whose open parameters are estimated for the circumnuclear disk in the Galactic center. The properties of the model gas clouds (~0.1 pc, ~100 M⊙, Δv ≳ 6 km s-1) and the external mass accretion rate necessary for the quenching of the star formation rate due to adiabatic compression (Ṁ ~ 1-10 M⊙ yr-1) are consistent with those derived from high-resolution H2 2.12 μm line observations. Based on these findings, a scenario for the evolution of gas tori in galactic centers is

  5. EXTREME GAS FRACTIONS IN CLUMPY, TURBULENT DISK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Cooper, Erin Mentuch; Wisnioski, Emily; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ∼ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t {sub dep} ∼ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like α{sub CO}). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  6. FORMATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT: COLD STREAMS, CLUMPY DISKS, AND COMPACT SPHEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dekel, Avishai; Sari, Re'em; Ceverino, Daniel E-mail: sari@phys.huji.ac.i

    2009-09-20

    We present a simple theoretical framework for massive galaxies at high redshift, where the main assembly and star formation occurred, and report on the first cosmological simulations that reveal clumpy disks consistent with our analysis. The evolution is governed by the interplay between smooth and clumpy cold streams, disk instability, and bulge formation. Intense, relatively smooth streams maintain an unstable dense gas-rich disk. Instability with high turbulence and giant clumps, each a few percent of the disk mass, is self-regulated by gravitational interactions within the disk. The clumps migrate into a bulge in {approx}<10 dynamical times, or {approx}<0.5 Gyr. The cosmological streams replenish the draining disk and prolong the clumpy phase to several Gigayears in a steady state, with comparable masses in disk, bulge, and dark matter within the disk radius. The clumps form stars in dense subclumps following the overall accretion rate, {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and each clump converts into stars in {approx}0.5 Gyr. While the clumps coalesce dissipatively to a compact bulge, the star-forming disk is extended because the incoming streams keep the outer disk dense and susceptible to instability and because of angular momentum transport. Passive spheroid-dominated galaxies form when the streams are more clumpy: the external clumps merge into a massive bulge and stir up disk turbulence that stabilize the disk and suppress in situ clump and star formation. We predict a bimodality in galaxy type by z {approx} 3, involving giant-clump star-forming disks and spheroid-dominated galaxies of suppressed star formation. After z {approx} 1, the disks tend to be stabilized by the dominant stellar disks and bulges. Most of the high-z massive disks are likely to end up as today's early-type galaxies.

  7. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  8. Chemical evolution during gas-rich galaxy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Josefa; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Tissera, Patricia B.

    2011-10-01

    We perform and analyse a set of galaxy interactions performed by using a self-consistent chemo-hydrodynamical model which includes star formation, supernova (SN) feedback and chemical evolution. In agreement with previous works, we find that tidally induced low-metallicity gas inflows dilute the central oxygen abundance and contribute to the flattening of the metallicity gradients. The tidally induced inflows trigger starbursts which increase the impact of Type II supernova (SN II) feedback injecting new chemical elements and driving galactic winds which modulate the metallicity distribution. Although α-enhancement in the central regions is detected as a result of the induced starbursts in agreement with previous works, our simulations suggest that this parameter can only provide a timing of the first pericentre mainly for non-retrograde encounters. In order to reproduce wet major mergers at low and high redshifts, we have run simulations with respectively 20 and 50 per cent of the disc in the form of gas. We find that the more gas-rich encounters behave similarly to the less rich ones, between the first and second pericentre, where low-metallicity gas inflows are triggered. However, the higher strength of the inflows triggered in the more gas-rich interactions produces larger metal dilution factors, which are modulated afterwards by the new chemical production by SN. We find that the more gas-rich interaction develops violent and clumpy star formation triggered by local instabilities all over the disc before the first pericentre, so that if these galaxies were observed at these early stages where no important tidally induced inflows have been able to be developed yet, they would tend to show an excess of oxygen. We find a global mean correlation of both the central abundances and the gradients with the strength of the star formation activity. However, the correlations are affected by orbital parameters, gas inflows and outflows, suggesting that it might be

  9. DYNAMO survey: An upclose view of turbulent disks with massive starforming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will discuss properties of extremely gas rich, turbulent disk galaxies in the DYNAMO survey, an IFU survey of Halpha in ~100 galaxies at z~0.1. DYNAMO galaxies are selected to have the highest Halpha luminosity at their redshift, yet are not AGNs. Follow up results from HST, and kinematic maps from Keck and Gemini show that many DYNAMO galaxies are clumpy, rotating disks, with large internal velocity dispersion, similar to galaxies at z=1-2. In this talk I will show that gas fractions in DYNAMO galaxies are 20-40%, much higher than typical local Universe galaxies (1-8%). The gas fraction of DYNAMO galaxies is similar to that of z=1-2 disks (eg. PHIBBS survey). The DYNAMO galaxies offer a sample of galaxies gas rich, clumpy, turbulent disks at z~0.1. Using DYNAMO galaxies we can therefore constrain the properties of individual clumps with much higher precision than in z=2 galaxies. Unlike high redshift observations in our data the Jeans length is resolved, and we can therefore measure the size of star forming regions with much greater security. I will therefore show how effects from resolution are likely to affect the measurement of clump propoerties, and present an analysis of the sizes and luminosities of star forming regions of massive star forming clumps using HST maps of ionized gas. I will show that in gas rich disk galaxies the sizes of clumps is directly linked to the gas fraction and velocity dispersion of the disk, both predictions of the theory that instabilities lead to clumpy disks.

  10. On volatile element trends in gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bart, G.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Ten volatile elements (and non-volatile Co) in co-existing light and dark portions of 5 gas-rich chondrites were studied. Patterns of distinct but non-uniform enrichment by dark admixing material are revealed. The dark admixing material is enriched in Cs; Bi and Tl covary in it. It is compositionally unique from known types of primitive materials and is apparently not derived by secondary processes from such materials.

  11. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  12. Novel test of modified Newtonian dynamics with gas rich galaxies.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2011-03-25

    The current cosmological paradigm, the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, requires that the mass-energy of the Universe be dominated by invisible components: dark matter and dark energy. An alternative to these dark components is that the law of gravity be modified on the relevant scales. A test of these ideas is provided by the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR), an empirical relation between the observed mass of a galaxy and its rotation velocity. Here, I report a test using gas rich galaxies for which both axes of the BTFR can be measured independently of the theories being tested and without the systematic uncertainty in stellar mass that affects the same test with star dominated spirals. The data fall precisely where predicted a priori by the modified Newtonian dynamics. The scatter in the BTFR is attributable entirely to observational uncertainty, consistent with a single effective force law. PMID:21517295

  13. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  14. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies In Gas-rich Interacting Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy-galaxy interactions in gas-rich galaxy groups or pairs can form tidal bridges and tails. These tidal arms can contain kinematically decoupled structures with active star formation in the same mass range as dwarf galaxies, so-called tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). They differ from ordinary dwarf galaxies by their lack of dark matter and higher metallicity content. Compact groups of galaxies are an ideal environment to study the origin and evolution of TDGs since the high spatial volume density of member galaxies allows for frequent and efficient interactions between galaxies forming tidal tails. Hunsberger et al. (1996) identified 47 TDG candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) and estimated that more than 50% of all dwarf galaxies in compact groups are former TDGs. Statistical considerations based on observations of interacting galaxies illustrate that a significant fraction of today's dwarf galaxies could have had a tidal origin. In their early evolution, TDGs can easily be distinguished from classical dwarf galaxies as they are still embedded in large tidal structures and show ongoing star formation, identified via strong Hα emission in these aggregates. Simulations of interacting galaxies, and of TDGs in particular, have shown that TDGs can survive their first starburst event and turn into long-lived dwarf sized objects. Preliminary results from deep Hα imaging with the SOAR telescope to detect new TDGs in a sample of 10 Hickson compact groups will be presented.

  15. Characterizing Gas Rich Companion Galaxies of z~6 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Chiara; Banados, Eduardo; Bertoldi, Frank; Decarli, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Riechers, Dominik; Strauss, Michael; Venemans, Bram; Walter, Fabian; Wang, Ran

    2016-08-01

    Luminous QSOs at z>6 are formidable probes of the early Universe, and are believed to reside in overdense regions. However, previous UV-based observational searches did not provide concurring evidence for such galaxy overdensities. Our on-going ALMA Cycle 3 survey to detect [CII] and FIR dust emission in a large sample of high-z QSOs has revealed the presence of bright, close companion galaxies at the same redshift of six QSOs. These newly discovered gas-rich companion galaxies promise to shed new light on early structure formation at the very dawn of time. Now we want to unveil the properties of these companion sources. The ALMA measurement only inform us on the cool gas/dust content; observations of their rest-frame optical emission are needed to characterize the bulk of the stellar population. Spitzer/IRAC is the only instrument available to date which can provide these sensitive information at z>6. Here, we propose to collect deep photometry with Spitzer/IRAC of six companion sources to z>6 QSOs. Together with ALMA data in hand, they will allow us to assess, or place strong limits on, the shape of their spectral energy distributions and to obtain their stellar masses. The observations requested here will provide a unique observational benchmark for theoretical studies of early galaxy formation.

  16. Clumpy Accretion onto Black Holes. I. Clumpy-advection-dominated Accretion Flow Structure and Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Li, Yan-Rong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  17. CLUMPY ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES. I. CLUMPY-ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOW STRUCTURE AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianmin; Cheng Cheng; Li Yanrong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  18. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  19. Parameters of type IIP SN 2012A and clumpiness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Chugai, N. N.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The explosion energy and the ejecta mass of a type IIP supernova (SN IIP) derived from hydrodynamic simulations are principal parameters of the explosion theory. Few SNe IIP have been studied by hydrodynamic modeling so far, however. Some doubts exist about the reliability of the derived SN IIP parameters. Aims: We studied the well-observed type IIP SN 2012A with hydrodynamic modeling. We examined its early spectra for ejecta clumpiness. We also explored other observational effects of clumpiness. Methods: We determined the supernova parameters by means of standard hydrodynamic modeling. We used the early hydrogen Hα and Hβ lines as clumpiness diagnostics. We used a modified hydrodynamic code to study the clumpiness effect in the light curve and expansion kinematics. Results: We found that SN 20012A is the result of the explosion of a red supergiant with a radius of 715 ± 100 R⊙. The explosion energy is (5.25 ± 0.6) × 1050 erg, the ejecta mass is 13.1 ± 0.7 M⊙, and the total 56Ni mass is 0.012 ± 0.002 M⊙. The estimated mass of a progenitor, a main-sequence star, is 15 ± 1 M⊙. The Hα and Hβ lines in early spectra indicate that outer ejecta are clumpy. Hydrodynamic simulations show that the clumpiness modifies the early light curve and increases the maximum velocity of the outer layers. Conclusions: The pre-SN 2012A was a normal red supergiant with the progenitor mass of ≈ 15 M⊙. The outer layers of ejecta indicate the clumpy structure. The clumpiness of the external layers can increase the maximum expansion velocity.

  20. Ionization processes in a local analogue of distant clumpy galaxies: VLT MUSE IFU spectroscopy and FORS deep images of the TDG NGC 5291N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensch, J.; Duc, P.-A.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Boquien, M.; Zackrisson, E.

    2016-01-01

    Context. We present Integral Field Unit (IFU) observations with MUSE and deep imaging with FORS of a dwarf galaxy recently formed within the giant collisional HI ring surrounding NGC 5291. This Tidal Dwarf Galaxy (TDG) -like object has the characteristics of typical z = 1-2 gas-rich spiral galaxies: a high gas fraction, a rather turbulent clumpy interstellar medium, the absence of an old stellar population, and a moderate metallicity and star formation efficiency. Aims: The MUSE spectra allow us to determine the physical conditions within the various complex substructures revealed by the deep optical images and to scrutinize the ionization processes at play in this specific medium at unprecedented spatial resolution. Methods: Starburst age, extinction, and metallicity maps of the TDG and the surrounding regions were determined using the strong emission lines Hβ, [OIII], [OI], [NII], Hα, and [SII] combined with empirical diagnostics. Different ionization mechanisms were distinguished using BPT-like diagrams and shock plus photoionization models. Results: In general, the physical conditions within the star-forming regions are homogeneous, in particular with a uniform half-solar oxygen abundance. On small scales, the derived extinction map shows narrow dust lanes. Regions with atypically strong [OI] emission line immediately surround the TDG. The [OI]/ Hα ratio cannot be easily accounted for by the photoionization by young stars or shock models. At greater distances from the main star-foming clumps, a faint diffuse blue continuum emission is observed, both with the deep FORS images and the MUSE data. It does not have a clear counterpart in the UV regime probed by GALEX. A stacked spectrum towards this region does not exhibit any emission line, excluding faint levels of star formation, or stellar absorption lines that might have revealed the presence of old stars. Several hypotheses are discussed for the origin of these intriguing features. Based on observations

  1. Massive black hole binaries in gas-rich galaxy mergers; multiple regimes of orbital decay and interplay with gas inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio

    2013-12-01

    gas inflows in gas-rich galaxies undergoing major mergers. We derive a condition for the maximum inflow rate that a circumnuclear disc can host while still maintaining a sufficiently high gas density at large radii to sustain the decay of a BH binary. We find that gas inflows rates exceeding 10 M⊙ yr-1, postulated to form massive BH seeds in some direct collapse models, would stifle the sinking of massive BH binaries in gas-dominated galactic nuclei. Vice-versa, lower inflow rates, below a solar mass per year, as required to feed typical active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are compatible with a fast orbital decay of BH binaries across a wide range of masses.

  2. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN GOODS AND GEMS: MASSIVE ANALOGS OF LOCAL DWARF IRREGULARS

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Marcus, Max T.; Yau, Andrew; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Shahinyan, Karlen; Petersen, Michael E-mail: mamarcus@vassar.edu E-mail: bge@watson.ibm.com E-mail: mpetersen@students.colgate.edu

    2009-08-10

    Clumpy galaxies in the Galaxy Evolution from Morphology and SEDs and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields are examined for clues to their evolution into modern spirals. The magnitudes of the clumps and the surface brightnesses of the interclump regions are measured and fitted to models of stellar age and mass. There is an evolutionary trend from clump clusters with no evident interclump emission to clump clusters with faint red disks, to spiral galaxies of the flocculent or grand design types. Along this sequence, the interclump surface density increases and the mass surface density contrast between the clumps and the interclump regions decreases, suggesting a gradual dispersal of clumps to form disks. Also along this sequence, the bulge-to-clump mass ratios and age ratios increase, suggesting a gradual formation of bulges. All of these morphological types occur in the same redshift range, indicating that the clump cluster morphology is not the result of bandshifting. This redshift range also includes clear examples of interacting galaxies with tidal tails and other characteristic features, indicating that clump clusters, which do not have these features, are not generally interacting. Comparisons to local galaxies with the same rest wavelength and spatial resolution show that clump clusters are unlike local flocculent and spiral galaxies primarily because of the high clump/interclump contrasts in the clump clusters. They bear a striking resemblance to local dwarf irregulars, however. This resemblance is consistent with a model in which the clumpy morphology comes from gravitational instabilities in gas with a high turbulent speed compared to the rotation speed and a high mass fraction compared to the stars. The morphology does not depend on galaxy mass as much as it depends on evolutionary stage: clump clusters are 100 times more massive than local dwarfs. The apparent lack of star formation in damped Lyman alpha absorbers may result from fast turbulence.

  3. Star formation and chemical abundances in clumpy irregular galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Edwards, S.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-15

    Clumpy irregular galaxies consist of several bright clumps which are huge H II complexes (about 100 times brighter and more massive than 30 Doradus) and contain about 10/sup 5/ O and B stars. Image-tube spectrograms with 1--3 A resolution have been obtained of the brightest emission regions of three clumpy galaxies and one candidate clumpy galaxy with the Mauna Kea 2.24 m telescope. The electron temperatures were found to be in the range 7000--9000 K and electron densities a few hundred cm/sup 3/: quite typical for normal H II regions. The abundances of O, N. S in Mrk 432 are comparable to those in Orion, while the three clumpy galaxies are slightly deficient in O and S (by factors of 2 to 4) and N (by factors of 3 to 6). The galaxies appear to be normal (like Sc galaxies) in mass and composition. Supernovae remnants are indicated by the high (S II)/H..cap alpha.. ratio. Possible triggering mechanisms for the exceptional star formation activity are discussed.

  4. MAPPING THE CLUMPY STRUCTURES WITHIN SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES USING LASER-GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Blain, Andrew W.; Swinbank, Mark; Smail, Ian; Ivison, Rob J.; Chapman, Scott C.

    2013-04-20

    We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser-Guide Star Adaptive Optics. We target H{alpha} emission of three SMGs at redshifts z {approx} 1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The spatially resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad-H{alpha} line regions (FWHM >1000 km s{sup -1}) likely associated with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line H{alpha} emission (FWHM {approx}< 500 km s{sup -1}) dominated by multiple H{alpha}-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1%-30% of the total clump-integrated H{alpha} emission. We find that these SMGs host high star formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended H{alpha} emission over 4-16 kpc. H{alpha} kinematics show no evidence of ordered global motion as would be found in a disk, but rather large velocity offsets ({approx}few Multiplication-Sign 100 km s{sup -1}) between the distinct stellar clumps. Together with the asymmetric distribution of the stellar clumps around the AGN in these objects, it is unlikely that we are unveiling a clumpy disk structure as has been suggested in other high-redshift populations of star-forming galaxies. The SMG clumps in this sample may correspond to remnants of originally independent gas-rich systems that are in the process of merging, hence triggering the ultraluminous SMG phase.

  5. The dynamical and radiative evolution of clumpy supernova ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. C.; Jones, T. W.; Rudnick, L.; Tregillis, I. L.; Kang, Hyesung

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations describing the dynamical and radiative evolution of clumpy supernova ejecta are compared with observations of optical and radio emission knots in supernova remnant (SNR) Cassiopeia A. Three major phases are identified in the evolution of clumpy ejecta: a bow-shock phase, an instability phase, and a dispersal phase. The phenomenological and radiative signatures of each phase are discussed and compared with multi-epoch measurements of small-scale features in Cas A. Good correspondence is found between theory and observations. Both support the premise that compact radio emission features are controlled more by magnetic field amplification triggered in the instability phase than by in situ acceleration of new relativistic particles.

  6. Kinematic imprint of clumpy disk formation on halo objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2013-02-01

    Context. Clumpy disk galaxies in the distant universe, at redshift of z ≳ 1, have been observed to host several giant clumps in their disks. They are thought to correspond to early formative stages of disk galaxies. On the other hand, halo objects, such as old globular clusters and halo stars, are likely to consist of the oldest stars in a galaxy (age ≳ 10 Gyr), clumpy disk formation can thus be presumed to take place in a pre-existing halo system. Aims: Giant clumps orbit in the same direction in a premature disk and are so massive that they may be expected to interact gravitationally with halo objects and exercise influence on the kinematic state of the halo. Accordingly, I scrutinize the possibility that the clumps leave a kinematic imprint of the clumpy disk formation on a halo system. Methods: I perform a restricted N-body calculation with a toy model to study the kinematic influence on a halo by orbital motions of clumps and the dependence of the results on masses (mass loss), number, and orbital radii of the clumps. Results: I show that halo objects can catch clump motions and acquire disky rotation in a dynamical friction time scale of the clumps, ~0.5 Gyr. The influence of clumps is limited within a region around the disk, while the halo system shows vertical gradients of net rotation velocity and orbital eccentricity. The significance of the kinematic influence strongly depends on the clump masses; the lower limit of postulated clump mass would be ~5 × 108 M⊙. The result also depends on whether the clumps are subjected to rapid mass loss or not, which is an open question under debate in recent studies. The existence of such massive clumps is not unrealistic. I therefore suggest that the imprints of past clumpy disk formation could remain in current galactic halos.

  7. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  8. On the formation of polar ring galaxies and tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia; Sweet, Sarah; Meurer, Gerhardt; Drinkwater, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a study of the properties of galaxies and dwarfs in 16 gas-rich galaxy groups identified in the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG; Meurer et al. 2006). We have found a young gas-rich coalescing galaxy group, J1051-17. Key features of this system are gas-rich tidal tails, studded with dwarf galaxies extending 200 kpc which merge in to a low surface brightness polar disk orbiting a very red edge-on host hosting a central AGN. Accretion from the polar disk may be feeding the AGN and powering a galactic wind. The example of this system suggests that tidal interactions with gas rich satellites may be a key process that aligns satellites in to polar planes while fuelling accretion down to the very centres of the host. We discuss the formation scenario of this polar ring galaxy, and investigate the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies in the wider group sample.

  9. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  10. Properties of Three Gas-Rich Dwarfs in the Centaurus A Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Disney, M. J.; Minchin, R. F.; Pritzl, B. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Saha, A.; Gallagher, J. S.; Freeman, K. C.

    2004-12-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations (F555W, F814W) and ATCA high resolution HI maps of three gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered in two blind 21-cm surveys (HIPASS, HIDEEP). We compare their individual properties and discuss their star formation history. Although we can not constrain the age of the oldest population from the diagrams very well, the presence of an extended population of red giant stars suggests that these systems were not formed recently. The presence of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in two out of three dwarfs, sets a lower limit on the age of about 6 Gyr.

  11. SLOWLY ROTATING GAS-RICH GALAXIES IN MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS (MOND)

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Martinez-Garcia, E. E.; Hidalgo-Gamez, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    We have carried out a search for gas-rich dwarf galaxies that have lower rotation velocities in their outskirts than MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) predicts, so that the amplitude of their rotation curves cannot be fitted by arbitrarily increasing the mass-to-light ratio of the stellar component or by assuming additional undetected matter. With presently available data, the gas-rich galaxies UGC 4173, Holmberg II, ESO 245-G05, NGC 4861, and ESO 364-G029 deviate most from MOND predictions and, thereby, provide a sample of promising targets in testing the MOND framework. In the case of Holmberg II and NGC 4861, we find that their rotation curves are probably inconsistent with MOND, unless their inclinations and distances differ significantly from the nominal ones. The galaxy ESO 364-G029 is a promising target because its baryonic mass and rotation curve are similar to Holmberg II but presents a higher inclination. Deeper photometric and H I observations of ESO 364-G029, together with further decreasing systematic uncertainties, may provide a strong test to MOND.

  12. Clumpy Galaxies at High Redshifts: Insights from the FIRE Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Hopkins, Philip F.; Keres, Dusan; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-01-01

    It has been observationally established that star-forming galaxies at high redshifts have more irregular morphologies compared to the ones in the local Universe. The morphologies of these galaxies are often dominated by large clumps which are believed to form via gravitational instabilities in gas-rich disks. Typically, these clumps have masses on the order of 107-109 solar masses, and extend over kiloparsec scales. It has been proposed in a number of studies that giant clumps, provided that they live long enough, could have an important impact on the morphology and evolution of their host galaxy. For example, as clumps migrate inwards through dynamical friction, they can sink to the center of the galaxy and form a bulge. However, this picture holds only if clumps can survive sufficiently long to reach the center without being destroyed by feedback from intense star formation that takes place within them. Therefore, determining typical lifetime of a giant clump, while taking into account different modes of feedback from star formation, is crucial for understanding the role they play in the evolution of their host galaxy. In this study we use the results of the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) simulations of galaxy evolution - a suite of high-resolution cosmological simulations with explicit physical models of stellar feedback and the multi-phase interstellar medium (Hopkins et al. 2014) - to investigate how feedback affects the formation and evolution of giant clumps in massive, gas-rich galaxies around z~2.

  13. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  14. GAS-RICH MERGERS IN LCDM: DISK SURVIVABILITY AND THE BARYONIC ASSEMBLY OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.

    2009-09-01

    We use N-body simulations and observationally normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M>0.3) experienced by the Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshifts. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed early-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} M{sub sun}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high-baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Second, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas-poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is significant. Approximately {approx}20%-30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.5} M{sub sun} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas or stars via major mergers since z = 2, with most of this accretion in the form of cold gas. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (M {sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub sun}), the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers since z = 2 is even higher, {approx}40%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass

  15. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Oonk, J. B. Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R.; Davis, Timothy A.; McDonald, Michael A.; Edge, Alastair C.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R.; Quillen, Alice C.; Urry, C. Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds—a departure from the ‘hot mode’ accretion model—although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy’s centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing ‘shadows’ cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  16. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it. PMID:27279215

  17. THE SMALL ISOLATED GAS-RICH IRREGULAR DWARF (SIGRID) GALAXY SAMPLE: DESCRIPTION AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Jerjen, Helmut; Meurer, Gerhardt R.

    2011-09-15

    Using an optically unbiased selection process based on the HIPASS neutral hydrogen survey, we have selected a sample of 83 spatially isolated, gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the southern hemisphere with cz between 350 and 1650 km s{sup -1}, and with R-band luminosities and H I masses less than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The sample is an important population of dwarf galaxies in the local universe, all with ongoing star formation, and most of which have no existing spectroscopic data. We are measuring the chemical abundances of these galaxies, using the integral-field spectrograph on the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope, the Wide-Field Spectrograph. This paper describes our survey criteria and procedures, lists the survey sample, and reports on initial observations.

  18. A Unique Gas-Rich Debris Disk: Herschel Imaging and Spectroscopy of 49 Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from only one or two debris disks, Beta Pictoris being one of them. Here we present Herschel GASPS observations of a well-known debris disk system, 49 Ceti. The dust disk is spatially resolved in thermal emission at 70 _m. Most interestingly, weak far-IR gas emission is detected. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission seen from this system with the far-IR gas detection and upper limits requires a low gas-to-dust ratio and possibly an unusual gas composition.

  19. On the irradiation history and origin of gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope study of the track density gradients and irradiation geometries of track-rich grains and chondrules in sections of Fayetteville and Kapoeta, and in sections of lunar breccias and grains from lunar soil. A substantial fraction (50 to 90%) of the meteoritic track-rich grains and chondrules show evidence of having been irradiated anisotropically in their different faces, as would be expected for irradiation on the surface of a parent body. The observations thus support the hypothesis that the irradiation of these grains and chondrules took place on the regoliths of asteroidal-sized bodies. Measurements of steepest track density gradients indicate that, while there are finite differences between spectra exhibited by individual gas-rich meteorites, the average solar flare spectral shapes have been similar over the last 4 b.y. or so.

  20. Spiral galaxies in clusters. III. Gas-rich galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Schommer, R.A.; Sullivan, W.T. III

    1982-05-01

    We report the results of a 21-cm and optical survey of disk galaxies in the vicinity of the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies. The color--gas content relation (log(M/sub H//L/sub B/) vs (B-V)/sup T//sub 0/ ) for this particular cluster reveals the presence of a substantial number of blue, gas-rich galaxies. With few exceptions, the disk systems in Pegasus I retain large amounts of neutral hydrogen despite their presence in a cluster. This directly shows that environmental processes have not yet removed substantial amounts of gas from these disk galaxies. We conclude that the environment has had little or no observable effect upon the evolution of disk galaxies in Pegasus I. The overall properties of the Pegasus I spirals are consistent with the suggestion that this cluster is now at an early stage in its evolution.

  1. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Waddell, K.; Spekkens, K.; Chandra, P.; Patra, N.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Wang, J.; Haynes, M. P.; Cannon, J.; Stierwalt, S.; Sick, J.; Giovanelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dIrr. Both tidal knots are located within a prominent HI tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (M_gas~10^8 M_sol) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four HI knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer -- with a 0.28 mag g-r colour -- and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the HI properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic content of the gas-rich dwarfs clearly distinguish tidal features from their classical counterparts. We optimistically identify four potentially long-lived tidal objects associated to three separate pairs of interacting galaxies, implying that TDGs are not readily produced during interaction events as suggested by some recent simulations. The tidal objects examined in this survey also appear to have a wider variety of properties than TDGs of similar mass formed in current simulations of interacting galaxies, which could be the result of pre- or post-formation environmental influences.

  2. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Waddell, K.; Spekkens, K.; Chandra, P.; Patra, N.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Wang, J.; Haynes, M. P.; Cannon, J.; Stierwalt, S.; Sick, J.; Giovanelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H I observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr). Both tidal knots are located within a prominent H I tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (Mgas ≈ 108 M⊙) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four H I knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer - with a 0.28 mag g - r colour - and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the H I properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic content of the gas-rich dwarfs clearly distinguish tidal features from their classical counterparts. We optimistically identify four potentially long-lived tidal objects associated with three separate pairs of interacting galaxies, implying that TDGs are not readily produced during interaction events as suggested by some recent simulations. The tidal objects examined in this survey also appear to have a wider variety of properties than TDGs of similar mass formed in current simulations of interacting galaxies, which could be the result of pre- or post-formation environmental influences.

  3. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is

  4. Geochemical and geophysical properties of gas-rich sediment in the Arkona Basin (Baltic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thießen, O.; Mathys, M.; Qian, Y.; Klein, G.; Schmidt, M.; Theilen, F.

    2003-04-01

    Free gas zones with "seismic turbidity" were detected in shallow marine sediments of the Arkona Basin, Baltic Sea, by seismic reflection investigations. These sites were used in a combined geochemical and geophysical approach as a "Natural Laboratory" (NATLAB) to study physical and chemical properties of marine sediment in relation to gas content in pore water. The knowledge of the sedimentological parameters contributes to the understanding of the nature of seismic reflectors as well as of compressional (P-) and shear- (S-) wave reflectors in terms of physical sediment properties. Gravity cores were used to recover up to 10m of muddy and clayey sediment in gas-rich areas from the center of the basin and in areas with low gas content from the basin rim. The geological data were completed by the acquisition of seismic P- and S-wave data in the sampling areas. Mean gas content of about 180ml/l pore water was measured in organic-rich sediment samples (0.5-4 m sediment depth) of the central basin. Methane, usually the main component, was formed by bacterial CO_2 reduction at anoxic conditions indicated by δ13C-CH_4 values of about -90 ppm and δD-CH_4 values of about -150 ppm, respectively. Free gas bubble formation in the uppermost anoxic sediment (0.4-0.6 cm) was confirmed by calculating the methane solubility equilibrium using in-situ temperature and pressure conditions. Furthermore, "BSR"-like reflectors have been identified in seismic profiles at the same sediment depth where free gas was assumed by solubility calculations. Gas bubble imaging was strongly frequency dependent indicated by changes of the reflection characteristics of the gas reflectors for different seismic sources. Susceptibility, bulk density and (P-) wave velocity of sediment cores were measured using a MSCL core logger. P-wave velocities showed reduced values in the muddy gas-rich surface sediment compared to the underlying consolidated clay. Adjusting sedimentological stratigraphy to boomer

  5. Quantifying Hydrate Formation in Gas-rich Environments Using the Method of Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrates hold a vast amount of methane globally, and have huge energy potential. Methane hydrates in gas-rich environments are the most promising production targets. We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation in such environments (Figure 1). Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is constant with time and space in a homogeneous system. Hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic condition of the system, and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation increases with the initial distance from the hydrate phase boundary. Different gas fractional flows behind the hydrate solidification front lead to different gas saturations at the hydrate solidification front. The higher the gas saturation at the front, the less the volume available to be filled by hydrate, and hence the lower the hydrate saturation. The gas fractional flow depends on the relative permeability curves, and the forces that drive the flow. Viscous forces (the drive for flow induced from liquid pressure gradient) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation is independent on the gas supply rates and the flow directions at high gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation can be estimated as one minus the ratio of the initial to equilibrium salinity. Gravity forces (the drive for flow induced from the gravity) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation depends on the flow rates and the flow directions at low gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation is highest for upward flow, and lowest for downward flow. Hydrate saturation decreases with the flow rate for upward flow, and increases with the flow rate for downward flow. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) flowing into brine-saturated sediments at both the laboratory and geological scales (Figure 1). It provides an approach to generalize the understanding of hydrate solidification in gas-rich

  6. COLDz: KARL G. JANSKY VERY LARGE ARRAY DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH GALAXY IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentati, L.; Wagg, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Riechers, D.; Sharon, C.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N.; Walter, F.; Da Cunha, E.; Decarli, R.; Aravena, M.; Hodge, J. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Sargent, M.; Smolčć, V.

    2015-02-10

    The broad spectral bandwidth at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths provided by the recent upgrades to the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) has made it possible to conduct unbiased searches for molecular CO line emission at redshifts, z > 1.31. We present the discovery of a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy at z = 2.48 through the detection of CO J = 1-0 line emission in the COLDz survey and through a sensitive, Ka-band (31-39 GHz) VLA survey of a 6.5 arcmin{sup 2} region of the COSMOS field. We argue that the broad line (FWHM ∼ 570 ± 80 km s{sup –1}) is most likely to be CO J = 1-0 at z = 2.48, as the integrated emission is spatially coincident with an infrared-detected galaxy with a photometric redshift estimate of z {sub phot} = 3.2 ± 0.4. The CO J = 1-0 line luminosity is L{sub CO}{sup ′}=(2.2±0.3)×10{sup 10} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}, suggesting a cold molecular gas mass of M {sub gas} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} depending on the assumed value of the molecular gas mass to CO luminosity ratio α{sub CO}. The estimated infrared luminosity from the (rest-frame) far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is L {sub IR} = 2.5 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and the star formation rate is ∼250 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, with the SED shape indicating substantial dust obscuration of the stellar light. The infrared to CO line luminosity ratio is ∼114 ± 19 L {sub ☉}/(K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}), similar to galaxies with similar SFRs selected at UV/optical to radio wavelengths. This discovery confirms the potential for molecular emission line surveys as a route to study populations of gas-rich galaxies in the future.

  7. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Disney, M. J.; Pritzl, B. J.; Knezek, P. M.; Gallagher, J. S.; Minchin, R. F.; Freeman, K. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology, they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas rich (MHI/LB > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed colour magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs, we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas rich because their star formation rates have been very low (<~10-3Msolaryr-1) throughout. In such systems, star formation appears to have been sporadic and local, though one object (HIPASS J1321-31) has a peculiar red plume in its CMD suggesting that many of its stars were formed in a `miniburst' 300-500 Myr ago. The question of why there are no similar dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains open. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Associations of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; the Australia Telescope Compact Array which is part of the Australia Telescope, funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO. E-mail: marco.grossi@roma 1.infn.it ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatories, which is operated by the Association of Unicersities for for Reasearch in Astronomy. Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National

  8. Laboratory experiments of supersonic flows through clumpy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, M. R.; Wilde, B. H.; Blue, B. E.; Hansen, J. F.; Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.

    2010-11-01

    Supersonic flows through heterogeneous environments are common in astrophysics as evidenced by high resolution Hubble Space Telescope images of a variety of astrophysical objects, including supernova remnants and stellar jets. In many instances, the imaged flows exhibit a complex morphology consisting of multiple clumps, bow shocks, and filamentary structure extending over a range of spatial scales. To gain a better understanding of the dynamics occurring in such multi-clump flows, scaled laboratory experiments are being carried out at the Omega Laser Facility. In these experiments, a laser pulse is used to heat a halfraum to indirectly drive a near planar shock through a target that typically consists of many small dense spheres embedded in lower density foam. The evolution of the target is then imaged using x-ray radiography. Targets have been designed to span the parameter space of clump number and clump size distribution, as well as investigate the quantitative differences in shock propagation through a clumpy target with that of a uniform target of the same average density. An overview of the experiments and comparison with simulations will be presented.

  9. A SiO 2-1 SURVEY TOWARD GAS-RICH ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Jiangshui; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we performed a survey of SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) transition toward ten gas-rich active galaxies with the IRAM 30 m telescope. As the first survey of SiO in such galaxies, we detected SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) emission in six galaxies above the 3σ level and one galaxy (NGC 3690) at the 2.7σ level. The detection rate is not related to the AGN type or to star formation activity. In comparison with M82, which is a pure star-forming galaxy without nuclear activity, our SiO detections could not be completely ascribed to being due to star formation activity. This suggests that the AGN feedback may be efficient in producing SiO molecules in such galaxies. Further surveys with large single-dish millimeter telescopes and interferometers are necessary for understanding the origin of SiO in galaxies with nuclear activity.

  10. Snow Lines in Gas Rich Protoplanetary Disks and the Delivery of Volatiles to Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-06-01

    Compared to the Sun and to the gas+dust composition of the interstellar medium from which the solar system formed, the Carbon and Nitrogen content of the bulk silicate Earth (mantle+hydrosphere+atmosphere) is reduced by several orders of magnitude, relative to Silicon. Evidence from primitive bodies as a function of distance from the Sun suggests that at least part of this depletion must occur early in the process of planetesimal assembly. With combined infrared and (sub)mm observations such as those enabled by ground-based 8-10m class telescopes (and in future the James Webb Space Telescope) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), we can now examine the principal volatile reservoirs of gas rich disks as a function position within the disk and evolutionary state. Key to these studies is the concept of condensation fronts, or 'snow lines,' in disks - locations at which key volatiles such as water, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen first condense from the gas. This talk will review the observational characterization of snow lines in protoplanetary disks, especially recent ALMA observations, and highlight the laboratory astrophysics studies and theoretical investigations that are needed to tie the observational results to the delivery of volatiles to planetary surfaces in the habitable zones around Sun-like stars.

  11. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  12. A search for spectral alteration effects in chondritic gas-rich breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. F.; Keil, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    Several samples of gas-rich breccias were selected, including slabs of the Kapoeta howardite, the ordinary chondrites Dubrovnik, Cangas de Onis, and Dimmit. Numerous 0.8 to 2.5 micron reflection spectra of selected areas on sawed or broken surfaces were measured with the Planetary Geosciences Division spectrogoniometer. While these spectra are not directly comparable to those of powered samples, comparisons within the data set should reveal any spectral differences due to weathering. These results indicate that unknown regolith processes do not confer the ordinary-chondrite parent bodies with an altered layer exhibiting S-class spectral properties. This is consistent with recent interpretations of the new Q-class of asteroids as the ordinary-chondrite parent bodies. However, significant spectral effects do occur in asteroid regoliths: darkening and suppression of absorption bands in highly shocked material, as seen previously in the so-called black chondrites; and segregation of metal in large impact melt pools on chondritic asteroids, which may have achondritic spectra. Neither of these effects is likely to be significant in interpreting current integral-disk spectra, but should be searched for in spectral maps returned by future spacecraft.

  13. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  14. H I emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, S. N.; Sadler, E. M.; Allison, J. R.; Koribalski, B. S.; Curran, S. J.; Pracy, M. B.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of a targeted search for intervening H I absorption in six nearby, gas-rich galaxies using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The sightlines searched have impact parameters of 10-20 kpc. By targeting nearby galaxies, we are also able to map their H I emission, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the extended H I distribution. The continuum sightlines intersect the H I disc in four of the six galaxies, but no intervening absorption was detected. Of these four galaxies, we find that three of the non-detections are the result of the background source being too faint. In the fourth case, we find that the ratio of the spin temperature to the covering factor (TS/f) must be much higher than expected (≳5700 K) in order to explain the non-detection. We discuss how the structure of the background continuum sources may have affected the detection rate of H I absorption in our sample, and the possible implications for future surveys. Future work including an expanded sample, and very long baseline interferometry observations, would allow us to better investigate the expected detection rate, and influence of background source structure, on the results of future surveys.

  15. Local Counterparts to High-Redshift Turbulent Galaxies: What are the Stellar Kinematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Robert; Glazebrook, Karl; Fisher, David; Abraham, Roberto; Damjanov, Ivana

    2014-02-01

    We aim to measure the stellar kinematics of 4 low redshift turbulent, clumpy disks with the GMOS IFU. Recent observations of high redshift galaxies show that gaseous disks in high redshift (z 2) galaxies are turbulent. The source of this turbulence remains an open question. A possible scenario is that turbulent disks are fed by streams of cold gas, flowing along cosmic filaments, which drive the large H-alpha velocity dispersions and clumpy star formation observed (for example by the SINS survey). However, the recent discovery of low redshift disk galaxies with clumpy-high velocity dispersion disks shows that galaxies with similar properties to high-z clumpy disks can exists in absence of cold flows, therefore an alternate driver for turbulence seems likely to explain, at least these nearby galaxies. A contrasting scenario is that the turbulence is driven by feedback from extreme star formation originating from a thin stellar disk. These nearby star forming disks are very rare, yet they provide an oppurtunity to study clumpy disks with techniques which are impossible at high redshift (due to both resolution and surface brightness dimming). Here we propose one such study, to measure the stellar kinematics from Balmer absorption lines. If the stars and gas have similar velocity dispersion, this would favor externally driven turbulence by gas accretion (a rare thing in the low redshift Universe); conversely if the gas and stars have different dynamics then this would suggest that internally driven turbelence from feedback is a plausible scenario. We currently have GMOS IFU observations of two disk systems, and we propose here to extend our sample. To identify galaxies as disks we use lower resolution IFU emission line kinematics from AAO, surface photometry from UKIDSS and SDSS, and Halpha maps from Hubble Space Telescope.

  16. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN CANDELS. I. THE DEFINITION OF UV CLUMPS AND THE FRACTION OF CLUMPY GALAXIES AT 0.5 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lu, Yu; Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; McIntosh, Daniel M.; Primack, Joel R.; Ceverino, Daniel; and others

    2015-02-10

    Although giant clumps of stars are thought to be crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we carry out a study of the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the H II regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of star-forming galaxies that have at least one off-center clump (f {sub clumpy}) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q > 0.5. The redshift evolution of f {sub clumpy} changes with the stellar mass (M {sub *}) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant f {sub clumpy} of ∼60% from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their f {sub clumpy} from 55% at z ∼ 3 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z ∼ 0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the f {sub clumpy} trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the f {sub clumpy} trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z < 1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the f {sub clumpy} trend in all masses at z < 1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of star-forming galaxies shows a broad peak around galaxies with log (M {sub *}/M {sub

  17. Structure formation in gas-rich galactic discs with finite thickness: from discs to rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, M.; Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.

    2015-03-01

    Gravitational instabilities play an important role in structure formation of gas-rich high-redshift disc galaxies. In this paper, we revisit the axisymmetric perturbation theory and the resulting growth of structure by taking the realistic thickness of the disc into account. In the unstable regime, which corresponds for thick discs to a Toomre parameter below the critical value Q0, crit = 0.696, we find a fastest growing perturbation wavelength that is always a factor 1.93 times larger than in the classical razor-thin disc approximation. This result is independent of the adopted disc scaleheight and by this independent of temperature and surface density. In order to test the analytical theory, we compare it with a high-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of an isothermal gravitationally unstable gas disc with the typical vertical sech2 density profile and study its break up into rings that subsequently fragment into dense clumps. In the first phase, rings form, that organize themselves discretely, with distances corresponding to the local fastest growing perturbation wavelength. We find that the disc scaleheight has to be resolved initially with five or more grid cells in order to guarantee proper growth of the ring structures, which follow the analytical prediction. These rings later on contract to a thin and dense line, while at the same time accreting more gas from the inter-ring region. It is these dense, circular filaments, that subsequently fragment into a large number of clumps. Contrary to what is typically assumed, the clump sizes are therefore not directly determined by the fastest growing wavelength.

  18. Gas-rich mergers and feedback are ubiquitous amongst starbursting radio galaxies, as revealed by the VLA, IRAM PdBI and Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivison, R. J.; Smail, Ian; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; De Breuck, C.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Feain, I.; Greve, T. R.; Haas, M.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kovács, A.; Lehnert, M. D.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Seymour, N.; Wylezalek, D.

    2012-09-01

    We report new, sensitive observations of two z ˜ 3-3.5 far-infrared-luminous radio galaxies, 6C 1909+72 and B3 J2330+3927, in the 12CO J = 1-0 transition with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array and at 100-500 m using Herschel, alongside new and archival 12CO J = 4-3 observations from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We introduce a new colour-colour diagnostic plot to constrain the redshifts of several distant, dusty galaxies in our target fields. A bright SMG near 6C 1909+72 likely shares the same node or filament as the signpost active galactic nuclei (AGN), but it is not detected in 12CO despite ˜20 000 km s-1 of velocity coverage. Also in the 6C 1909+72 field, a large, red dust feature spanning ≈500 kpc is aligned with the radio jet. We suggest several processes by which metal-rich material may have been transported, favouring a collimated outflow reminiscent of the jet-oriented metal enrichment seen in local cluster environments. Our interferometric imaging reveals a gas-rich companion to B3 J2330+3927; indeed, all bar one of the eight z ≳ 2 radio galaxies (or companions) detected in 12CO provide some evidence that starburst activity in radio-loud AGN at high redshift is driven by the interaction of two or more gas-rich systems in which a significant mass of stars has already formed, rather than via steady accretion of cold gas from the cosmic web. We find that the 12CO brightness temperature ratios in radio-loud AGN host galaxies are significantly higher than those seen in similarly intense starbursts where AGN activity is less pronounced. Our most extreme example, where L CO 4-3'/L CO 1-0'>2.7, provides evidence that significant energy is being deposited rapidly into the molecular gas via X-rays and/or mechanical ('quasar-mode') feedback from the AGN, leading to a high degree of turbulence globally and a low optical depth in 12CO - feedback that may lead to the cessation of star formation on a time-scale commensurate with that of the jet activity,

  19. Clumpy tori around type II active galactic nuclei as revealed by X-ray fluorescent lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiren; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo; Xu, Weiwei; Gou, Lijun; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The reflection spectrum of a torus around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is characterized by X-ray fluorescent lines, which are most prominent for type II AGNs. A clumpy torus allows photons reflected from the back-side of the torus to leak through the front regions that are free of obscuration. The observed X-ray fluorescent lines are therefore sensitive to the clumpiness of the torus. We analysed a sample of type II AGNs observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), and measured the fluxes for the Si Kα and Fe Kα lines. The measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios, spanning a range between 5 and 60, are far smaller than the ratios predicted from simulations of smooth tori, indicating that the tori of the studied sources have clumpy distributions rather than smooth ones. We compared the measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios with simulation results of clumpy tori. The Circinus galaxy has a Fe Kα/Si Kα ratio of ˜60, which is close to the simulation results for N = 5, where N is the average number of clumps along the line of sight. The Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios of the other sources are all below the simulation results for N = 2. Overall, this shows that the non-Fe fluorescent lines in the soft X-ray band are a potentially powerful probe of the clumpiness of tori around AGNs.

  20. X-Ray Spectral Model of Reprocess by Smooth and Clumpy Molecular Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei with the Framework MONACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Shun'ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma

    2016-02-01

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  1. Discovery of an extremely gas rich dwarf triplet near the centre of the Lynx-Cancer void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H i observations, done as part of an ongoing study of dwarf galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void, resulted in the discovery of a triplet of extremely gas rich galaxies located near the centre of the void. The triplet members SDSS J0723+3621, SDSS J0723+3622 and SDSS J0723+3624 have absolute magnitudes MB of -14.2, -11.9 and -9.7 and M(H i)/LB of ˜2.9, ˜10 and ˜25, respectively. The gas mass fractions, as derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and the GMRT data, are 0.93, 0.997 and 0.997, respectively. The faintest member of this triplet, SDSS J0723+3624, is one of the most gas rich galaxies known. We find that all three galaxies deviate significantly from the Tully-Fisher relation, but follow the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. All three galaxies also have a baryon fraction that is significantly smaller than the cosmic baryon fraction. For the largest galaxy in the triplet, this is in contradiction to numerical simulations. The discovery of this very unique dwarf triplet lends further support to the idea that the void environment is conducive to the formation of galaxies with unusual properties. These observations provide further motivation to do deep searches of voids for a `hidden' very gas rich galaxy population with MB ≳ -11.

  2. Non-LTE line formation in clumpy and turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegmann, M.; Kegel, W. H.

    2000-07-01

    Extending previous work (Albrecht & Kegel \\cite{alb87}, Kegel et al. \\cite{keg93}, Piehler & Kegel \\cite{pie94}), we investigated the formation of interstellar molecular lines in a medium with stochastic density and velocity fluctuations. We solved the full NLTE-problem, i.e. the generalized radiative transfer equation simultaneously with the rate equations, for a 6-level CO molecule and a plane-parallel slab geometry. Our results indicate that accounting for a finite correlation length of both, the density and velocity field, strongly affects the line profile and the line width as well as the intensity ratios of different rotational transitions.

  3. Non-linear violent disc instability with high Toomre's Q in high-redshift clumpy disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Ceverino, Daniel; Bournaud, Frédéric; Primack, Joel

    2016-02-01

    We utilize zoom-in cosmological simulations to study the nature of violent disc instability in clumpy galaxies at high redshift, z = 1-5. Our simulated galaxies are not in the ideal state assumed in Toomre instability, of linear fluctuations in an isolated, uniform, rotating disc. There, instability is characterized by a Q parameter below unity, and lower when the disc is thick. Instead, the high-redshift discs are highly perturbed. Over long periods they consist of non-linear perturbations, compact massive clumps and extended structures, with new clumps forming in interclump regions. This is while the galaxy is subject to frequent external perturbances. We compute the local, two-component Q parameter for gas and stars, smoothed on a ˜1 kpc scale to capture clumps of 108-9 M⊙. The Q < 1 regions are confined to collapsed clumps due to the high surface density there, while the interclump regions show Q significantly higher than unity. Tracing the clumps back to their relatively smooth Lagrangian patches, we find that Q prior to clump formation typically ranges from unity to a few. This is unlike the expectations from standard Toomre instability. We discuss possible mechanisms for high-Q clump formation, e.g. rapid turbulence decay leading to small clumps that grow by mergers, non-axisymmetric instability, or clump formation induced by non-linear perturbations in the disc. Alternatively, the high-Q non-linear VDI may be stimulated by the external perturbations such as mergers and counter-rotating streams. The high Q may represent excessive compressive modes of turbulence, possibly induced by tidal interactions.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR A GAS-RICH MAJOR MERGER IN A PROTO-CLUSTER AT z = 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Hayashi, Masao; Koyama, Yusei; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Tanaka, Ichi

    2014-06-20

    Gas-rich major mergers in high-redshift proto-clusters are important events, perhaps leading to the creation of the slowly rotating remnants seen in the cores of clusters in the present day. Here, we present a deep Jansky Very Large Array observation of CO J = 1-0 emission line in a proto-cluster at z = 2.5, USS1558-003. The target field is an extremely dense region, where 20 Hα emitters (HAEs) are clustering. We have successfully detected the CO emission line from three HAEs and discovered a close pair of red and blue CO-emitting HAEs. Given their close proximity (∼30 kpc), small velocity offset (∼300 km s{sup –1}), and similar stellar masses, they could be in the early phase of a gas-rich major merger. For the red HAE, we derive a total infrared luminosity of L {sub IR} = 5.1 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} using MIPS 24 μm and radio continuum images. The L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} ratio is significantly enhanced compared to local spirals and high-redshift disks with a similar CO luminosity, which is indicative of a starburst mode. We find the gas depletion timescale is shorter than that of normal star-forming galaxies regardless of adopted CO-H{sub 2} conversion factors. The identification of such a rare event suggests that gas-rich major mergers frequently take place in proto-clusters at z > 2 and may involve the formation processes of slow rotators seen in local massive clusters.

  5. The baryon cycle of dwarf galaxies: dark, bursty, gas-rich polluters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Sijing; Madau, Piero; Conroy, Charlie; Governato, Fabio; Mayer, Lucio

    2014-09-10

    We present results from a fully cosmological, very high-resolution, ΛCDM simulation of a group of seven field dwarf galaxies with present-day virial masses in the range M {sub vir} = 4.4 × 10{sup 8}-3.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. The simulation includes a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback, a star-formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, a scheme for the turbulent diffusion of metals and thermal energy, and a uniform UV background. The properties of the simulated dwarfs are strongly modulated by the depth of the gravitational potential well. All three halos with M {sub vir} < 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} are devoid of stars, as they never reach the density threshold for star formation of 100 atoms cm{sup –3}. The other four, M {sub vir} > 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} dwarfs have blue colors, low star-formation efficiencies, high cold gas-to-stellar mass ratios, and low stellar metallicities. Their bursty star-formation histories are characterized by peak specific star-formation rates in excess of 50-100 Gyr{sup –1}, far outside the realm of normal, more massive galaxies. The median stellar age of the simulated galaxies decreases with decreasing halo mass, with the two M {sub vir} ≅ 2-3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} dwarfs being predominantly young, and the two more massive systems hosting intermediate and older populations. The cosmologically young dwarfs are lit up by tidal interactions, have compact morphologies, and have metallicities and cold gas fractions similar to the relatively quiescent, extremely metal-deficient dwarf population. Metal-enriched galactic outflows produce sub-solar effective yields and pollute with heavy elements a megaparsec-size region of the intergalactic medium, but are not sufficient to completely quench star-formation activity and are absent in the faintest dwarfs.

  6. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  7. Solar cosmic ray produced neon in lunar soils and their implication for gas-rich meteorite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristic neon isotopic ratios, produced due to solar cosmic ray spallation (SCR) in lunar soils, are useful in deciphering and estimating the relative contributions of SCR and GCR spallation. To delineate these features, etched mineral grains from mature and immature lunar soils (14148 and 61221 respectively) were analyzed using mass spectrometry. The SF-Ne composition deduced in this work agrees with that obtained from earlier etched lunar pyroxene studies. The data points for mature soil 14148 define a line which significantly deviates from the 61221 tie line. This deviation is attributed to the presence of SCR spallation component. In this context, neon isotopic compositions (step-wise heating) in Pantar and Leighton dark portions were studied and compared with that of Fayetteville. The meteorite data points deviate significantly from the tie line joining SF-Ne and GCR (pyroxene) end points. This deviation is attributed to SCR-spallation in gas-rich chondrites.

  8. Krypton and xenon in Apollo 14 samples - Fission and neutron capture effects in gas-rich samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas-rich Apollo 14 breccias and trench soil are examined for fission xenon from the decay of the extinct isotopes Pu-244 and I-129, and some samples have been found to have an excess fission component which apparently was incorporated after decay elsewhere and was not produced by in situ decay. Two samples have excess Xe-129 resulting from the decay of I-129. The excess is correlated at low temperatures with excess Xe-128 resulting from neutron capture on I-127. This neutron capture effect is accompanied by related low-temperature excesses of Kr-80 and Kr-82 from neutron capture on the bromine isotopes. Surface correlated concentrations of iodine and bromine are calculated from the neutron capture excesses.

  9. Spectral alteration effects in chondritic gas-rich breccias - Implications for S-Class and Q-Class asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey F.; Keil, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    Reflection spectra were obtained from sawed or freshly broken surfaces of gas-rich matrix regions in a number of ordinary chondrites (Dubrovnik, Cangas de Onis, Olivenza, and Dimmitt) which are believed to represent lithified portions of asteroid regoliths that were once directly exposed to space, with the purpose of relating these chondrites to Class S asteroids. However, the observations did not detect curved red continuum characteristic for Class S asteroid spectra, suggesting that it is unlikely for any well-observed Class S asteroid to be a source of ordinary chondrites. It is suggested that the newly discovered spectral class 'Q', of which asteroid 1982 Apollo is the prototype, provides a viable alternative of a parent body.

  10. The stochastic evolution of asteroidal regoliths and the origin of brecciated and gas-rich meteorites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    A model is constructed which views regolith evolution on asteroids as a stochastic process. Average values are shown to be poor descriptors of regolith depth. The utility of the average depth is not significantly increased by avoiding large craters or thick ejecta deposits, a procedure adopted in previous regolith studies. The statistical uncertainty associated with regolith depth severely limits the power of regolith models in predicting parent-body size for brecciated meteorites. A Monte Carlo algorithm was used to simulate the random walks and corresponding charged-particle irradiation histories of grains in regoliths. On rocky asteroids, only about 20 percent of the grains was exposed to solar cosmic ray ions. Results based on present-day conditions in the asteroid belt agree well with irradiation features observed in gas-rich meteorites. An origin during epochs of early solar system evolution is not required.

  11. Unbiased constraints on the clumpiness of the Universe from standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengxiang; Ding, Xuheng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-04-01

    We perform unbiased tests for the clumpiness of the Universe by confronting the Zel'dovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder luminosity distance, which describes the effect of local inhomogeneities on the propagation of light with the observational one estimated from measurements of standard candles, i.e., type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Methodologically, we first determine the light-curve fitting parameters which account for distance estimation in SNe Ia observations and the luminosity/energy relations which are responsible for distance estimation of GRBs in the global fit to reconstruct the Hubble diagrams in the context of a clumpy Universe. Subsequently, these Hubble diagrams allow us to achieve unbiased constraints on the matter density parameter Ωm , as well as the clumpiness parameter η which quantifies the fraction of homogeneously distributed matter within a given light cone. At a 1 σ confidence level, the constraints are Ωm=0.34 ±0.02 and η =1.0 0-0.02+0.00 from the joint analysis. The results suggest that the Universe full of Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker fluid is favored by observations of standard candles with very high statistical significance. On the other hand, they may also indicate that the Zel'dovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder approximation is a sufficiently accurate form to describe the effects of local homogeneity on the expanding Universe.

  12. A Game of Hide and Seek: Expectations of Clumpy Resources Influence Hiding and Searching Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Andreas; Minich, Steven; Panis, Megane; Langen, Tom A.; Skufca, Joseph D.; Todd, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Resources are often distributed in clumps or patches in space, unless an agent is trying to protect them from discovery and theft using a dispersed distribution. We uncover human expectations of such spatial resource patterns in collaborative and competitive settings via a sequential multi-person game in which participants hid resources for the next participant to seek. When collaborating, resources were mostly hidden in clumpy distributions, but when competing, resources were hidden in more dispersed (random or hyperdispersed) patterns to increase the searching difficulty for the other player. More dispersed resource distributions came at the cost of higher overall hiding (as well as searching) times, decreased payoffs, and an increased difficulty when the hider had to recall earlier hiding locations at the end of the experiment. Participants’ search strategies were also affected by their underlying expectations, using a win-stay lose-shift strategy appropriate for clumpy resources when searching for collaboratively-hidden items, but moving equally far after finding or not finding an item in competitive settings, as appropriate for dispersed resources. Thus participants showed expectations for clumpy versus dispersed spatial resources that matched the distributions commonly found in collaborative versus competitive foraging settings. PMID:26154661

  13. A Laboratory Investigation of Supersonic Clumpy Flows: Experimental Design and Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, A. Y.; Dannenberg, K. K.; Drake, R. P.; Frank, A.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Furnish, M.; Asay, J. R.; Mitran, S.

    2004-03-01

    We present a design for high energy density laboratory experiments studying the interaction of hypersonic shocks with a large number of inhomogeneities. These ``clumpy'' flows are relevant to a wide variety of astrophysical environments, including the evolution of molecular clouds, outflows from young stars, planetary nebulae, and active galactic nuclei. The experiment consists of a strong shock (driven by a pulsed-power machine or a high-intensity laser) impinging on a region of randomly placed plastic rods. We discuss the goals of the specific design and how they are met by specific choices of target components. An adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code is used to analyze the design and establish a predictive baseline for the experiments. The simulations confirm the effectiveness of the design in terms of articulating the differences between shocks propagating through smooth and clumpy environments. In particular, we find significant differences between the shock propagation speeds in a clumpy medium and those in a smooth one with the same average density. The simulation results are of general interest for foams in both inertial confinement fusion and laboratory astrophysics studies. Our results highlight the danger of using average properties of inhomogeneous astrophysical environments when comparing timescales for critical processes, such as shock crossing and gravitational collapse.

  14. A Game of Hide and Seek: Expectations of Clumpy Resources Influence Hiding and Searching Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Andreas; Minich, Steven; Panis, Megane; Langen, Tom A; Skufca, Joseph D; Todd, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Resources are often distributed in clumps or patches in space, unless an agent is trying to protect them from discovery and theft using a dispersed distribution. We uncover human expectations of such spatial resource patterns in collaborative and competitive settings via a sequential multi-person game in which participants hid resources for the next participant to seek. When collaborating, resources were mostly hidden in clumpy distributions, but when competing, resources were hidden in more dispersed (random or hyperdispersed) patterns to increase the searching difficulty for the other player. More dispersed resource distributions came at the cost of higher overall hiding (as well as searching) times, decreased payoffs, and an increased difficulty when the hider had to recall earlier hiding locations at the end of the experiment. Participants' search strategies were also affected by their underlying expectations, using a win-stay lose-shift strategy appropriate for clumpy resources when searching for collaboratively-hidden items, but moving equally far after finding or not finding an item in competitive settings, as appropriate for dispersed resources. Thus participants showed expectations for clumpy versus dispersed spatial resources that matched the distributions commonly found in collaborative versus competitive foraging settings. PMID:26154661

  15. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  16. Morphologies of ~190,000 Galaxies at z = 0–10 Revealed with HST Legacy Data. II. Evolution of Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ouchi, Masami; Kubo, Mariko; Harikane, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of clumpy galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) samples of ∼17,000 photo-z and Lyman break galaxies at z ≃ 0–8. We detect clumpy galaxies with off-center clumps in a self-consistent algorithm that is well tested with previous study results, and we measure the number fraction of clumpy galaxies at the rest-frame UV, {f}{{clumpy}}{{UV}}. We identify an evolutionary trend of {f}{{clumpy}}{{UV}} over z ≃ 0–8 for the first time: {f}{{clumpy}}{{UV}} increases from z ≃ 8 to z ≃ 1–3 and subsequently decreases from z ≃ 1 to z ≃ 0, which follows the trend of the Madau–Lilly plot. A low average Sérsic index of n ≃ 1 is found in the underlining components of our clumpy galaxies at z ≃ 0–2, indicating that typical clumpy galaxies have disk-like surface brightness profiles. Our {f}{{clumpy}}{{UV}} values correlate with physical quantities related to star formation activities for star-forming galaxies at z ≃ 0–7. We find that clump colors tend to be red at a small galactocentric distance for massive galaxies with {log}{M}*/{M}ȯ ≳ 11. All of these results are consistent with the picture that a majority of clumps form in the violent disk instability and migrate into the galactic centers.

  17. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  18. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  19. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  20. CLUMPY: Jeans analysis, γ-ray and ν fluxes from dark matter (sub-)structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnivard, Vincent; Hütten, Moritz; Nezri, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Aldée; Combet, Céline; Maurin, David

    2016-03-01

    We present an update of the CLUMPY code for the calculation of the astrophysical J-factors (from dark matter annihilation/decay) for any Galactic or extragalactic dark matter halo including substructures: halo-to-halo concentration scatter may now be enabled, boost factors can include several levels of substructures, and triaxiality is a new option for dark matter haloes. This new version takes advantage of the cfitsio and HEALPix libraries to propose fits output maps using the HEALPix pixelisation scheme. Skymaps for γ-ray and ν signals from generic annihilation/decay spectra are now direct outputs of CLUMPY. Making use of HEALPix routines, smoothing by a user-defined instrumental Gaussian beam and computing the angular power spectrum of the maps are now possible. In addition to these improvements, the main novelty is the implementation of a Jeans analysis module, to obtain dark matter density profiles from kinematic data in relaxed spherical systems (e.g., dwarf spheroidal galaxies). The code is also interfaced with the GreAT toolkit designed for Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses, from which probability density functions and credible intervals can be obtained for velocity dispersions, dark matter profiles, and J-factors.

  1. MASSIVE BLACK HOLE PAIRS IN CLUMPY, SELF-GRAVITATING CIRCUMNUCLEAR DISKS: STOCHASTIC ORBITAL DECAY

    SciTech Connect

    Fiacconi, Davide; Mayer, Lucio; Roškar, Rok; Colpi, Monica

    2013-11-01

    We study the dynamics of massive black hole pairs in clumpy gaseous circumnuclear disks. We track the orbital decay of the light, secondary black hole M {sub .2} orbiting around the more massive primary at the center of the disk, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the gravitational interaction of M {sub .2} with massive clumps M {sub cl} erratically perturbs the otherwise smooth orbital decay. In close encounters with massive clumps, gravitational slingshots can kick the secondary black hole out of the disk plane. The black hole moving on an inclined orbit then experiences the weaker dynamical friction of the stellar background, resulting in a longer orbital decay timescale. Interactions between clumps can also favor orbital decay when the black hole is captured by a massive clump that is segregating toward the center of the disk. The stochastic behavior of the black hole orbit emerges mainly when the ratio M {sub .2}/M {sub cl} falls below unity, with decay timescales ranging from ∼1 to ∼50 Myr. This suggests that describing the cold clumpy phase of the interstellar medium in self-consistent simulations of galaxy mergers, albeit so far neglected, is important to predict the black hole dynamics in galaxy merger remnants.

  2. Tracking the Partial Covering Absorbers in NGC 2110 with Suzaku: Constraints on Clumpy Absorber Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Richard

    How do matter, energy, space and time behave under the extraordinarily diverse conditions of the cosmos? How did the Universe originate and evolve to produce the galaxies we see today? These are some of the biggest unanswered questions in astronomy today. In our study of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) we want to explore these questions and ask more explicitly what is the accretion history of the Universe? How do supermassive black holes acquire material and what happens when it does? To answer this we need to know the physical conditions and geometry of the accreting circumnuclear material in the vicinity of the supermassive black holes in AGN. This is an important piece of the AGN puzzle that we are able to study through detailed X-ray spectroscopic observations of AGN. We herein request support for our analysis of two Suzaku observations of the AGN NGC 2110, an unpublished archival observation from 2005 and an upcoming observation. This type 2 Seyfert AGN shows significant obscuration in the soft X-ray band from a complex of multiple absorbers with different column densities and covering fractions. Studying these partial-covering absorbers can tell us about the material surrounding the central black hole. We can learn how much material there is by through the level of absorption and the location of the accreting gas from the black hole via measurements of the level of ionization. Additionally, covering fractions and particularly time variability of covering fractions can hint at the clumpiness of the medium. Taking advantage of Suzaku s large energy range we can also quantify the Compton reflection hump, a broad spectral feature which peaks around 20 30 keV and is indicative of reflection off Compton-thick material in the vicinity of the central black hole. most likely either the accretion disk itself or a geometrically thick torus of material further out. The nature of this material is still an open question and recent work has been done using infrared

  3. Evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 9.5} M {sub ☉} decreases with time from ∼0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ∼0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ☉} at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ∼ 0.9 to z ∼ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter.

  4. NGC 2548: clumpy spatial and kinematic structure in an intermediate-age Galactic cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Belén; Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2016-09-01

    NGC 2548 is a ˜400-500 Myr old open cluster with evidence of spatial substructures likely caused by its interaction with the Galactic disc. In this work we use precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando (CdC-SF) catalogue to study the clumpy structure in this cluster. We confirm the fragmented structure of NGC 2548 but, additionally, the relatively high precision of our kinematic data lead us to the first detection of substructures in the proper motion space of a stellar cluster. There are three spatially separated cores each of which has its own counterpart in the proper motion distribution. The two main cores lie nearly parallel to the Galactic plane whereas the third one is significantly fainter than the others and it moves towards the Galactic plane separating from the rest of the cluster. We derive core positions and proper motions, as well as the stars belonging to each core.

  5. Innermost structure and near-infrared radiation of dusty clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2012-12-01

    The dusty clumpy torus surrounds the central black hole (BH) and the accretion disk in active galactic nuclei, and governs the growth of super-massive BHs via gas fueling towards the central engine. Near-infrared (NIR) monitoring observations have revealed that the torus inner radius is determined by the dust sublimation process. However, the observed radii are systematically smaller than the theoretical predictions by a factor of three. We take into account the anisotropic illumination by the central accretion disk to the torus, and calculate the innermost structure of the torus and the NIR time variability. We then show that the anisotropy naturally solves the systematic discrepancy and that the viewing angle is the primary source to produce an object-to-object scatter of the NIR time delay. Dynamics of clumps at the innermost region of the torus will be unveiled via future high- resolution X-ray spectroscopy (e.g., Astro-H)

  6. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  7. Diverse Galaxies: Clumpy Regions In The UVUDF at 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Emmaris; de Mello, Duilia F.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Bond, Nicholas A.; Rafelski, Marc; Ravindranath, Swara; Scarlata, Claudia; Codoreanu, Alex; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Kurczynski, Peter; Uvudf Team

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation of clumpy galaxies using the deepest ultraviolet data in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) taken with Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS detector. We use 3 new post-flashed UV images taken with the F225W, F275W, and F336W filters. Here we present an analysis of all galaxies in the 0.5 to 1.5 redshift range. These galaxies show a variety of properties, with objects having just a single clump to galaxies littered with clumps. We perform an optical morphological study of ultraviolet-detected galaxies using a visual classification scheme similar to that employed by the Hubble CANDELS survey team. We find that the majority of the objects that are clumpy in the ultraviolet have optical morphologies that are disks, followed by irregulars. We measure galaxy luminosities in the rest-frame UV, clump sizes, and luminosities for each clump in 7 passbands from the UV to the optical. We find that the majority of these UV bright clumpy galaxies are classified as Scd and starburst spectral types and have clump sizes between 0.7 to 1.9 kpc. We quantify the contribution of the clumps to the global star formation rate of the galaxy.

  8. AN OCCULTATION EVENT IN CENTAURUS A AND THE CLUMPY TORUS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard

    2011-12-15

    We have analyzed 16 months of sustained monitoring observations of Centaurus A from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer to search for changes in the absorbing column in the line of sight to the central nucleus. We present time-resolved spectroscopy which indicates that a discrete clump of material transited the line of sight to the central illuminating source over the course of {approx}170 days between 2010 August and 2011 February with a maximum increase in the column density of about 8.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. This is the best quality data of such an event that has ever been analyzed with the shape of the ingress and egress clearly seen. Modeling the clump of material as roughly spherical with a linearly decreasing density profile and assuming a distance from the central nucleus commensurate with the dusty torus, we found that the clump would have a diameter of (1.4-2.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm with a central number density of n{sub H} = (1.8-3.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. This is consistent with previous results for a similar (though possibly much longer) occultation event inferred in this source in 2003-2004 and supports models of the molecular torus as a clumpy medium.

  9. Laboratory experiments to study supersonic astrophysical flows interacting with clumpy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Hartigan, P.; Blue, B. E.; Hansen, J. F.; Sorce, C.; Williams, R. J. R.; Coker, R.; Frank, A.

    2009-08-01

    A wide variety of objects in the universe drive supersonic outflows through the interstellar medium which is often highly clumpy. These inhomogeneities affect the morphology of the shocks that are generated. The hydrodynamics are difficult to model as the problem is inherently 3D and the clumps are subject to a variety of fluid instabilities as they are accelerated and destroyed by the shock. Over the last two years, we have been carrying out experiments at the University of Rochester’s Omega laser to address the interaction of a dense-plasma jet with a localised density perturbation. More recently, we have turned our attention to the interaction of a shock wave with a spherical particle. We use a 1.6-mm diameter, 1.2-mm length Omega hohlraum to drive a composite plastic ablator (which includes bromine to prevent M-band radiation from preheating the experiment). The ablator acts as a “piston” driving a shock into 0.3 g cm-3 foam containing a 0.5-mm diameter sapphire sphere. We radiograph along two orthogonal lines of sight, using nickel or zinc pinhole-apertured X-ray backlighters, to study the subsequent hydrodynamics. We present initial experimental results and two-dimensional simulations of the experiment.

  10. Laboratory experiments to study supersonic astrophysical flows interacting with clumpy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R.; Blue, B. E.; Williams, R. J. R.; Hansen, F.; Sorce, C.; Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Palmer, J.

    2008-11-01

    A wide variety of objects in the universe drive supersonic outflows through the interstellar medium which is often highly clumpy. These inhomogeneities affect the morphology of the shocks that are generated. The hydrodynamics is difficult to model as the problem is inherently 3D and the clumps are subject to a variety of fluid instabilities as they are accelerated and destroyed by the shock. We have been carrying out experiments on the University of Rochester's Omega laser to address the interaction of a shock wave with a single spherical particle. We use a 1.6-mm diameter, 1.2-mm length hohlraum to drive a composite plastic ablator (which includes bromine to prevent M-band radiation from preheating the experiment). The ablator acts as a ``piston'' driving a shock into 0.3 g/cc foam containing a 0.5-mm diameter sapphire or 1.0-mm diameter plastic sphere. We radiograph along two orthogonal lines of sight, using pinhole-apertured x-ray backlighters, to study the subsequent hydrodynamics. We present initial experimental results and multi-dimensional simulations of the experiment.

  11. Laboratory experiments to study supersonic astrophysical flows interacting with clumpy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R.; Blue, B. E.; Williams, R. J. R.; Hansen, F.; Sorce, C.; Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Palmer, J.

    2007-11-01

    A wide variety of objects in the universe drive supersonic outflows through the interstellar medium which is often highly clumpy. These inhomogeneities affect the morphology of the shocks that are generated. The hydrodynamics is difficult to model as the problem is inherently 3D and the clumps are subject to a variety of fluid instabilities as they are accelerated and destroyed by the shock. Over the last two years, we have been carrying out experiments on the University of Rochester's Omega laser to address the interaction of a dense-plasma jet with a localized density perturbation. More recently, we have turned our attention to the interaction of a shock wave with a spherical particle. We use a 1.6-mm diameter, 1.2-mm length Omega hohlraum to drive a composite plastic ablator (which includes bromine to prevent M-band radiation from preheating the experiment). The ablator acts as a ``piston'' driving a shock into 0.3 g/cc foam containing a 0.5-mm diameter sapphire sphere. We radiograph along two orthogonal lines of sight, using nickel or zinc pinhole-apertured x-ray backlighters, to study the subsequent hydrodynamics. We present initial experimental results and multi-dimensional simulations of the experiment.

  12. Laboratory experiments to study supersonic astrophysical flows interacting with clumpy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Paula; Foster, J. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R.; Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Palmer, J.; Blue, B. E.; Hansen, F.; Sorce, C.; Frank, A.

    2008-04-01

    A wide variety of objects in the universe drive supersonic outflows through the interstellar medium which is often highly clumpy. These inhomogeneities affect the morphology of the shocks that are generated. The hydrodynamics is difficult to model as the problem is inherently 3D and the clumps are subject to a variety of fluid instabilities as they are accelerated and destroyed by the shock. Over the last two years, we have been carrying out experiments on the Omega laser to address the interaction of a dense-plasma jet with a localized density perturbation. More recently, we have turned our attention to the interaction of a shock wave with a spherical particle. We use a 1.6-mm diameter, 1.2-mm length hohlraum to drive a composite plastic ablator (which includes bromine to prevent M-band radiation from preheating the experiment). The ablator acts as a ``piston'' driving a shock into 0.3 g/cc foam containing a 0.5-mm diameter sapphire sphere. We radiograph along two orthogonal lines of sight, using nickel or zinc pinhole-apertured x-ray backlighters, to study the subsequent hydrodynamics. We present initial experimental results and multi-dimensional simulations of the experiment.

  13. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  14. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  15. Molecular Gas, CO, and Star Formation in Galaxies: Emergent Empirical Relations, Feedback, and the Evolution of Very Gas-Rich Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelupessy, Federico I.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.

    2009-12-01

    We use time-varying models of the coupled evolution of the H I, H2 gas phases and stars in galaxy-sized numerical simulations to (1) test for the emergence of the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) and the H2-pressure relation, (2) explore a realistic H2-regulated star formation recipe which brings forth a neglected and potentially significant SF-regulating factor, and (3) go beyond typical galactic environments (for which these galactic empirical relations are deduced) to explore the early evolution of very gas-rich galaxies. In this work, we model low-mass galaxies (M baryon <= 109 M sun), while incorporating an independent treatment of CO formation and destruction, the most important tracer molecule of H2 in galaxies, along with that for the H2 gas itself. We find that both the K-S and the H2-pressure empirical relations can robustly emerge in galaxies after a dynamic equilibrium sets in between the various interstellar medium (ISM) states, the stellar component and its feedback (T gsim 1 Gyr). The only significant dependence of these relations seems to be for the CO-derived (and thus directly observable) ones, which show a strong dependence on the ISM metallicity. The H2-regulated star formation recipe successfully reproduces the morphological and quantitative aspects of previous numerical models while doing away with the star formation efficiency parameter. Most of the H I → H2 mass exchange is found taking place under highly non-equilibrium conditions necessitating a time-dependent treatment even in typical ISM environments. Our dynamic models indicate that the CO molecule can be a poor, nonlinear, H2 gas tracer. Finally, for early evolutionary stages (T lsim 0.4 Gyr), we find significant and systematic deviations of the true star formation from that expected from the K-S relation, which are especially pronounced and prolonged for metal-poor systems. The largest such deviations occur for the very gas-rich galaxies, where deviations of a factor ~3-4 in global star

  16. NEAR-INFRARED REVERBERATION BY DUSTY CLUMPY TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Mori, Masao

    2011-08-20

    According to recent models, the accretion disk and black hole in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are surrounded by a clumpy torus. We investigate the NIR flux variation of the torus in response to a UV flash for various geometries. Anisotropic illumination by the disk and the torus self-occultation contrast our study with earlier works. Both the waning effect of each clump and the torus self-occultation selectively reduce the emission from the region with a short delay. Therefore, the NIR delay depends on the viewing angle (where a more inclined angle leads to a longer delay), and the time response shows an asymmetric profile with negative skewness, opposing the results for optically thin tori. The range of the computed delay coincides with the observed one, suggesting that the viewing angle is primarily responsible for the scatter of the observed delay. We also propose that the red NIR-to-optical color of type 1.8/1.9 objects is caused not only by the dust extinction but also the intrinsically red color. Compared with the modest torus thickness, both a thick and a thin tori display weaker NIR emission. A selection bias is thus expected such that NIR-selected AGNs tend to possess moderately thick tori. A thicker torus shows a narrower and more heavily skewed time profile, while a thin torus produces a rapid response. A super-Eddington accretion rate leads to much weaker NIR emission due to the disk self-occultation and the disk truncation by self-gravity. A long delay is expected from an optically thin and/or a largely misaligned torus. Very weak NIR emission, such as in hot-dust-poor active nuclei, can arise from a geometrically thin torus, a super-Eddington accretion rate, or a slightly misaligned torus.

  17. Radiative Transfer in a Clumpy Universe. III. The Nature of Cosmological Ionizing Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero; Haardt, Francesco; Rees, Martin J.

    1999-04-01

    The history of the transition from a neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) to one that is almost fully ionized can reveal the character of cosmological ionizing sources. We study the evolution of the volume filling factors of H II and He III regions in a clumpy IGM and discuss the implications for rival reionization scenarios of the rapid decline observed at z>~3 in the space density of optical and radio-loud quasars and of the large population of star-forming galaxies recently discovered at the same epoch. The hydrogen component in a highly inhomogeneous universe is completely reionized when the number of photons emitted above 1 ryd in one recombination time equals the mean number of hydrogen atoms. If stellar sources are responsible for keeping the IGM ionized at z=5, the rate of star formation at this epoch must be comparable or greater than the one inferred from optical observations of galaxies at z~3 and the mean metallicity per baryon in the universe >~0.002 solar. An early generation of stars in dark matter halos with circular velocities, vcirc~50 km s-1, possibly one of the main sources of UV photons at high z, could be detectable with the Next Generation Space Telescope. Models in which the quasar emissivity declines rapidly at z>~3 predict a late He II reionization epoch, a feature that could explain the recent detection of patchy He II Lyα at z=2.9 by Reimers et al. and the abrupt change observed by Songaila at about the same epoch of the Si IV /C IV ratio, but appear unable to provide the required number of hydrogen-ionizing photons at z~5.

  18. Wing galaxies: A formation mechanism of the clumpy irregular galaxy Markarian 297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Noguchi, Masafumi

    1990-01-01

    In order to contribute to an understanding of collision-induced starburst activities, the authors present a detailed case study on the starburst galaxy Markarian 297 (= NGC 6052 = Arp 209; hereafter Mrk 297). This galaxy is classified as a clumpy irregular galaxy (CIG) according to its morphological properties (cf. Heidmann, 1987). Two major clumps and many small clumps are observed in the entire region of Mrk 297 (Hecquet, Coupinot, and Maucherat 1987). The overall morphology of Mrk 297 is highly chaotic and thus it seems difficult to determine possible orbits of galaxy-galaxy collision. However, the authors have serendipitously found a possible orbit during a course of numerical simulations for a radial-penetration collision between galaxies. The radial-penetration collision means that an intruder penetrates a target galaxy radially passing by its nucleus. This kind of collision is known to explain a formation mechanism of ripples around disk galaxies (Wallin and Struck-Marcell 1988). Here, the authors show that the radial-penetration collision between galaxies successfully explains both overall morphological and kinematical properties of Mrk 297. The authors made two kinds of numerical simulations for Mrk 297. One is N-body (1x10(exp 4) particles) simulations in which effects of self gravity of the stellar disk are taken into account. These simulations are used to study detailed morphological feature of Mrk 297. The response of gas clouds are also investigated in order to estimate star formation rates in such collisions. The other is test-particle simulations, which are utilized to obtain a rough picture of Mrk 297 and to analyze the velocity field of Mrk 297. The techniques of the numerical simulations are the same as those in Noguchi (1988) and Noguchi and Ishibashi (1986). In the present model, an intruding galaxy with the same mass of a target galaxy moves on a rectilinear orbit which passes the center of the target.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR A CLUMPY, ROTATING GAS DISK IN A SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Carilli, C. L.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Riechers, D.; Daddi, E.

    2012-11-20

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO(2-1) emission in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) GN20. These high-resolution data allow us to image the molecular gas at 1.3 kpc resolution just 1.6 Gyr after the big bang. The data reveal a clumpy, extended gas reservoir, 14 {+-} 4 kpc in diameter, in unprecedented detail. A dynamical analysis shows that the data are consistent with a rotating disk of total dynamical mass 5.4 {+-} 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }. We use this dynamical mass estimate to constrain the CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}), finding {alpha}{sub CO} = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We identify five distinct molecular gas clumps in the disk of GN20 with masses a few percent of the total gas mass, brightness temperatures of 16-31K, and surface densities of >3200-4500 Multiplication-Sign ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. Virial mass estimates indicate they could be self-gravitating, and we constrain their CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor to be <0.2-0.7 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. A multiwavelength comparison demonstrates that the molecular gas is concentrated in a region of the galaxy that is heavily obscured in the rest-frame UV/optical. We investigate the spatially resolved gas excitation and find that the CO(6-5)/CO(2-1) ratio is constant with radius, consistent with star formation occurring over a large portion of the disk. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of different fueling scenarios for SMGs.

  20. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  1. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  2. No More Active Galactic Nuclei in Clumpy Disks Than in Smooth Galaxies at z ~ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Juneau, Stéphanie; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Luo, Bin; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Bell, Eric F.; Brandt, W. N.; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Maseda, Michael; Mozena, Mark; Nandra, Kirpal; Rosario, David J.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ~ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ~ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ~ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  4. The evidence for clumpy accretion in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of IUE high- and low-dispersion spectra of the young Herbig Ae star HR 5999 (HD 144668) covering 1978-1992 revealed dramatic changes in the Mg II h and k (2795.5, 2802.7 A) emission profiles, changes in the column density and distribution in radial velocity of accreting gas, and flux in the Ly(alpha), O I, and C IV emission lines, which are correlated with the UV excess luminosity. Variability in the spectral type inferred from the UV spectral energy distribution, ranging from A5 IV-III in high state to A7 III in the low state, was also observed. The trend of earlier inferred spectral type with decreasing wavelength and with increasing UV continuum flux has previously been noted as a signature of accretion disks in lower mass pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and in systems undergoing FU Orionis-type outbursts. Our data represent the first detection of similar phenomena in an intermediate mass (M greater than or equal to 2 solar mass) PMS star. Recent IUE spectra show gas accreting toward the star with velocities as high as plus 300 km/s, much as is seen toward beta Pic, and suggest that we also view this system through the debris disk. The absence of UV lines with the rotational broadening expected given the optical data (A7 IV, V sini=180 plus or minus 20 km/s for this system) also suggests that most of the UV light originates in the disk, even in the low continuum state. The dramatic variability in the column density of accreting gas, is consistent with clumpy accretion, such as has been observed toward beta Pic, is a hallmark of accretion onto young stars, and is not restricted to the clearing phase, since detectable amounts of accretion are present for stars with 0.5 Myr less than t(sub age) less than 2.8 Myr. The implications for models of beta Pic and similar systems are briefly discussed.

  5. SHOCKED SUPERWINDS FROM THE z {approx} 2 CLUMPY STAR-FORMING GALAXY, ZC406690

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Davies, Ric; Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Kurk, Jaron; Wuyts, Stijn; Genel, Shy; Buschkamp, Peter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Lutz, Dieter; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Renzini, Alvio; Mancini, Chiara; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Hicks, Erin; and others

    2012-06-20

    We have obtained high-resolution data of the z {approx} 2 ring-like, clumpy star-forming galaxy (SFG) ZC406690 using the VLT/SINFONI with adaptive optics (in K band) and in seeing-limited mode (in H and J bands). Our data include all of the main strong optical emission lines: [O II], [O III], H{alpha}, H{beta}, [N II], and [S II]. We find broad, blueshifted H{alpha} and [O III] emission line wings in the spectra of the galaxy's massive, star-forming clumps ({sigma} {approx} 85 km s{sup -1}) and even broader wings (up to 70% of the total H{alpha} flux, with {sigma} {approx} 290 km s{sup -1}) in regions spatially offset from the clumps by {approx}2 kpc. The broad emission likely originates from large-scale outflows with mass outflow rates from individual clumps that are 1-8 Multiplication-Sign the star formation rate (SFR) of the clumps. Based on emission line ratio diagnostics ([N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) and photoionization and shock models, we find that the emission from the clumps is due to a combination of photoionization from the star-forming regions and shocks generated in the outflowing component, with 5%-30% of the emission deriving from shocks. In terms of the ionization parameter (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}, based on both the SFR and the O{sub 32} ratio), density (local electron densities of 300-1800 cm{sup -3} in and around the clumps, and ionized gas column densities of 1200-8000 M{sub Sun }pc{sup -2}), and SFR (10-40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}), these clumps more closely resemble nuclear starburst regions of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies and dwarf irregulars than H II regions in local galaxies. However, the star-forming clumps are not located in the nucleus as in local starburst galaxies but instead are situated in a ring several kpc from the center of their high-redshift host galaxy, and have an overall disk-like morphology. The two brightest clumps are quite different in terms of their internal properties

  6. The evidence for clumpy accretion in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of IUE high- and low-dispersion spectra of the young Herbig Ae star HR 5999 (HD 144668) covering 1978-1992 has revealed dramatic changes in the Mg II h and k (2795.5, 2802.7 A) emission profiles, changes in the column density and distribution in radial velocity of accreting gas, and flux in the Ly(alpha), O I and C IV emission lines, which are correlated with the UV excess luminosity. We also observe variability in the spectral type inferred from the UV spectral energy distribution, ranging from A5 IV-III in high state to A7 III in the low state. The trend of earlier inferred spectral type with decreasing wavelength and with increasing UV continuum flux has previously been noted as a signature of accretion disks in lower mass pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and in systems undergoing FU Orionis-type outbursts. Our data represent the first detection of similar phenomena in an intermediate mass (M equal to or greater than 2 solar mass) PMS star. Recent IUE spectra show gas accreting toward the star with velocities as high as +300 km/s, much as is seen toward beta Pic, and suggest that we also view this system through the debris disk. The absence of UV lines with the rotational broadening expected given the optical data (A7 IV, upsilon sin i = 180 plus or minus 20 km/s) for this system also suggests that most of the UV light originates in the disk, even in the low continuum state. The dramatic variability in the column density of accreting gas, consistent with clumpy accretion, such as has been observed toward beta Pic, is a hallmark of accretion onto young stars, and is not restricted to the clearing phase, since detectable amounts of accretion are present for stars, and is not restricted to the clearing phase, since detectable amounts of accretion are present for stars with 0.5 less than t(sub age) less than 2.8 Myr. The implications for models of beta Pic and similar systems are briefly discussed.

  7. A total and polarized infrared flux view of the AGN clumpy torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Rodriguez, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamical theories consider the torus of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) to be part of an outflow wind moving away from the central engine. In this framework, the torus is a particular region of the wind, where dusty and optically thick clouds are formed. The outflows are strongly related to the accretion rate and magnetic field strength, which play an important role in the creation, morphology and evolution of the torus. Through infrared (IR) imaging and polarimetry observations, this dissertation (1) searches for signatures of dusty tori in low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN); (2) explores the role and strength of magnetic field in the torus; and (3) investigates the nucleus of radio-loud AGN. Recent theoretical models predicted that LLAGN do not host a Seyfert-like torus, since low-luminosities (<1042 erg s-1 ) cannot sustain the required outflow rate. High-spatial resolution mid-IR (MIR) imaging and nuclear spectral energy distribution of 22 LLAGN reveals different IR characteristics by dividing the sample in terms of the Eddington ratio. These galaxies show a diversity of nuclear morphologies and have a high MIR/X-ray luminosity ratio compared to higher-luminosity AGN. Star formation, jets and/or truncated accretion disk can explain the MIR excess. Although several models have been made to account for the outflowing dusty winds from the central engine, the magnetic field strength at the position of the torus remains poorly characterized. Through a novel study using near-IR polarimetry, the magnetic field strength in the clumpy torus was estimated. Specifically, if paramagnetic alignment is assumed in the dusty clouds of the torus, the magnetic field strength of the torus of IC5063 is estimated to be in the range of 12--128 mG. Alternatively, Chandrasekhar-Fermi method suggests a lower-limit magnetic field strength of 13 mG. For the archetypical radio-loud AGN, Cygnus A, MIR polarimetry using CanariCam on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio de Canarias revealed a high

  8. Submillimeter and far infrared line observations of M17 SW: A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Stacey, G. J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, d. T.; Lugten, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far infrared spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are discussed. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. As a consequence, far ultraviolet radiation from the central OB stellar cluster can penetrate into the dense molecular cloud to a depth of several pc, thus creating bright and extended (CII) emission from the photodissociated surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clumps or sheets. The extended (CII) emission throughout the molecular cloud SW of the M17 complex has a level 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. This suggests that the molecular cloud as a whole is penetrated by ultraviolet radiation and has a clumpy or filamentary structure. The number of B stars expected to be embedded in the M17 molecular cloud probably can provide the UV radiation necessary for the extended (CII) emission. Alternatively, the UV radiation could be external, if the interstellar radiation in the vicinity of M17 is higher than in the solar neighborhood.

  9. Holographic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Chesler, Paul M; Liu, Hong

    2014-04-18

    We construct turbulent black holes in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime by numerically solving Einstein's equations. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we find that both the dual holographic fluid and bulk geometry display signatures of an inverse cascade with the bulk geometry being well approximated by the fluid-gravity gradient expansion. We argue that statistically steady-state black holes dual to d dimensional turbulent flows have horizons whose area growth has a fractal-like structure with fractal dimension D=d+4/3. PMID:24785028

  10. MOLECULAR GAS, CO, AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES: EMERGENT EMPIRICAL RELATIONS, FEEDBACK, AND THE EVOLUTION OF VERY GAS-RICH SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pelupessy, Federico I.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.

    2009-12-20

    We use time-varying models of the coupled evolution of the H I, H{sub 2} gas phases and stars in galaxy-sized numerical simulations to (1) test for the emergence of the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) and the H{sub 2}-pressure relation, (2) explore a realistic H{sub 2}-regulated star formation recipe which brings forth a neglected and potentially significant SF-regulating factor, and (3) go beyond typical galactic environments (for which these galactic empirical relations are deduced) to explore the early evolution of very gas-rich galaxies. In this work, we model low-mass galaxies (M{sub baryon} <= 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), while incorporating an independent treatment of CO formation and destruction, the most important tracer molecule of H{sub 2} in galaxies, along with that for the H{sub 2} gas itself. We find that both the K-S and the H{sub 2}-pressure empirical relations can robustly emerge in galaxies after a dynamic equilibrium sets in between the various interstellar medium (ISM) states, the stellar component and its feedback (T approx> 1 Gyr). The only significant dependence of these relations seems to be for the CO-derived (and thus directly observable) ones, which show a strong dependence on the ISM metallicity. The H{sub 2}-regulated star formation recipe successfully reproduces the morphological and quantitative aspects of previous numerical models while doing away with the star formation efficiency parameter. Most of the H I -> H{sub 2} mass exchange is found taking place under highly non-equilibrium conditions necessitating a time-dependent treatment even in typical ISM environments. Our dynamic models indicate that the CO molecule can be a poor, nonlinear, H{sub 2} gas tracer. Finally, for early evolutionary stages (T approx< 0.4 Gyr), we find significant and systematic deviations of the true star formation from that expected from the K-S relation, which are especially pronounced and prolonged for metal-poor systems. The largest such deviations occur for the

  11. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  12. Evolution of the Fraction of Clumpy Galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K. L.; Kajisawa, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Shioya, Y.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2014-05-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data in the COSMOS field, we systematically searched clumpy galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0 and investigated the fraction of clumpy galaxies and its evolution as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (SSFR). The fraction of clumpy galaxies in star-forming galaxies with M star > 109.5 M ⊙ decreases with time from ~0.35 at 0.8 < z < 1.0 to ~0.05 at 0.2 < z < 0.4, irrespective of the stellar mass, although the fraction tends to be slightly lower for massive galaxies with M star > 1010.5 M ⊙ at each redshift. On the other hand, the fraction of clumpy galaxies increases with increasing both SFR and SSFR in all the redshift ranges we investigated. In particular, we found that the SSFR dependences of the fractions are similar among galaxies with different stellar masses, and the fraction at a given SSFR does not depend on the stellar mass in each redshift bin. The evolution of the fraction of clumpy galaxies from z ~ 0.9 to z ~ 0.3 seems to be explained by such SSFR dependence of the fraction and the evolution of SSFRs of star-forming galaxies. The fraction at a given SSFR also appears to decrease with time, but this can be due to the effect of the morphological k correction. We suggest that these results are understood by the gravitational fragmentation model for the formation of giant clumps in disk galaxies, where the gas mass fraction is a crucial parameter. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  13. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  14. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  15. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy-Torus Models: Constraints from RXTEmonitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, Alex; Krumpe, Mirko; Nikutta, R.

    2016-06-01

    In two papers (Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta 2014, and Nikutta et al., in prep.), we derive the first X-ray statistical constraints for clumpy-torus models in Seyfert AGN by quantifying multi-timescale variability in line of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification.We systematically search for discrete absorption events in the vast archive of RXTE monitoring of 55 nearby type Is and Compton-thin type IIs. We are sensitive to discrete absorption events due to clouds of full-covering, neutral/mildly ionized gas transiting the line of sight. Our results apply to both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.We detect twelve eclipse events in eight Seyferts, roughly tripling the number previously published from this archive. Event durations span hours to years. Most of our detected clouds are Compton-thin, and most clouds' distances from the black hole are inferred to be commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori.We present the density profiles of the highest-quality eclipse events; the column density profile for an eclipsing cloud in NGC 3783 is doubly spiked, possibly indicating a cloud that is being tidallysheared. We discuss implications for cloud distributions in the context of clumpy-torus models. We calculate eclipse probabilities for orientation-dependent Type I/II unification schemes.We present constraints on cloud sizes, stability, and radial distribution. We infer that clouds' small angular sizes as seen from the SMBH imply 107 clouds required across the BLR + torus. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the black hole, hinting at the formation processes (e.g., disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces, such as magnetic fields or ambient pressure, are

  16. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  17. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  18. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. At high redshift, starburst galaxies present irregular morphologies with 10-20% of their star formation occurring in giant clumps. These clumpy galaxies are considered the progenitors of local disk galaxies. To understand the properties of starbursts at intermediate and low redshift, it is fundamental to track their evolution and the possible link with the systems at higher z. Aims: We present an extensive, systematic, and multiband search and analysis of the starburst galaxies at redshift (0 < z < 0.5) in the COSMOS field, as well as detailed characteristics of their star-forming clumps by using Hubble Space Telescope/Advance Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) images. Methods: The starburst galaxies are identified using a tailor-made intermediate-band color excess selection, tracing the simultaneous presence of Hα and [OIII] emission lines in the galaxies. Our methodology uses previous information from the zCOSMOS spectral database to calibrate the color excess as a function of the equivalent width of both spectral lines. This technique allows us to identify 220 starburst galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 0.5 using the SUBARU intermediate-band filters. Combining the high spatial resolution images from the HST/ACS with ground-based multi-wavelength photometry, we identify and parametrize the star-forming clumps in every galaxy. Their principal properties, sizes, masses, and star formation rates are provided. Results: The mass distribution of the starburst galaxies is remarkably similar to that of the whole galaxy sample with a peak around M/M⊙ ~ 2 × 108 and only a few galaxies with M/M⊙ > 1010. We classify galaxies into three main types, depending on their HST morphology: single knot (Sknot), single star-forming knot plus diffuse light (Sknot+diffuse), and multiple star-forming knots (Mknots/clumpy) galaxy. We found a fraction of Mknots/clumpy galaxy fclumpy = 0.24 considering out total sample of starburst galaxies up to z ~ 0.5. The individual star

  19. The Turbulent Fragmentation of the Interstellar Medium: The Impact of Metallicity on Global Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, S.; Wünsch, R.; Burkert, A.; Glover, S.; Whitworth, A.

    2011-05-01

    We study the influence of gas metallicity, turbulence, and non-equilibrium chemistry on the evolution of the two-phase interstellar medium (warm and cold atomic phases), and thereby constrain the initial conditions for star formation prevailing in turbulent gas. We perform high-resolution simulations in three dimensions, including a realistic non-equilibrium treatment of the ionization state of the gas, and examine both driven and decaying turbulence. This allows us to explore variations in the metallicity Z. In this paper, we study solar metallicity, Z = Z sun, and low-metallicity, Z = 10-3 Z sun, gas. For driven, large-scale turbulence, we find that the influence of the metallicity on the amount of mass in the cold gas component is small. However, in decaying turbulent conditions this picture is much changed. While cold regions survive in the case of solar metallicity, they are quickly heated and dispersed in low-metallicity gas. This result suggests that star formation can be suppressed in environments of low metallicity, unless a strong turbulent driver is acting on timescales shorter than a few turbulent crossing times. Inter alia this finding could explain the overall inefficient star formation as well as the burst-like mode of star formation found in metal-poor, gas-rich systems like dwarf galaxies.

  20. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy Torii Models: Constraints from RXTE monitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We summarize two papers providing the first X-ray-derived statistical constraints for both clumpy-torus model parameters and cloud ensemble properties. In Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta (2014), we explored multi-timescale variability in line-of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification. We examined 55 Seyferts monitored with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and found in 8 objects a total of 12 eclipses, with durations between hours and years. Most clouds are commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR, or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori. The detection of eclipses in type Is disfavors sharp-edged tori. We provide probabilities to observe a source undergoing an absorption event for both type Is and IIs, yielding constraints in [N_0, sigma, i] parameter space. In Nikutta et al., in prep., we infer that the small cloud angular sizes, as seen from the SMBH, imply the presence of >10^7 clouds in BLR+torus to explain observed covering factors. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the SMBH, hinting at the formation processes (e.g. disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces (e.g. magnetic fields, ambient pressure) are needed to contain them, or otherwise the clouds must be short-lived. Finally, we infer that the radial cloud density distribution behaves as 1/r^{0.7}, compatible with VLTI observations. Our results span both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for short-term eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.

  1. Gas burst vs. gas-rich magma recharge: A multidisciplinary study to reveal factors controlling triggering of the recent paroxysmal eruptions at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Garozzo, Ileana; Cannata, Andrea; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Gresta, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    the NSEC on the basis of the concordant or discordant behavior of anorthite and iron in plagioclase coupled with disequilibrium textures at the rim. Concordant anorthite and iron increases in plagioclase crystals with sieve-textured rims indicate recharge by more mafic, gas-rich magma. This textural-compositional behavior has been related to long-lasting eruptions, whose volcanic tremor amplitude evolution produced ramp-shaped increase of the volcanic tremor amplitude before the paroxysmal phase. On the contrary, crystals with sieve-textures at the rim, characterized by increasing iron at rather constant or decreasing anorthite, suggest the prominent role of gas injections into the residing system. In this instance, the compositional behavior has been linked with short-lasting eruptions, whose volcanic tremor amplitude evolution led to a sudden increase of the seismic amplitude before the climax of the eruption. Thus, our work put forward the idea that the evolution and duration of the Strombolian phase preceding the paroxysmal eruptions of 2011-2012 at Mt. Etna are strongly controlled by the eruption triggering mechanism, which can be either gas burst or gas-rich magma recharge.

  2. H I emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies - II. Sample completion and detection of intervening absorption in NGC 5156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, S. N.; Sadler, E. M.; Allison, J. R.; Koribalski, B. S.; Curran, S. J.; Pracy, M. B.; Phillips, C. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening 21 cm H I absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper, we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous H I emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the H I distribution. From this, we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the H I disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 (z = 0.01) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s-1. High-resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, TS/f, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using very long baseline interferometry would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  4. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    PubMed

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence. PMID:23829741

  5. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION. II. GAS-RICH DARK GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-10-10

    We present a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ∼> 2.5 using a physically motivated model for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation. Our simulation, performed using the Enzo code and reaching a peak resolution of 109 proper parsecs at z = 2.5, extends the results of Kuhlen et al. to significantly lower redshifts. We show that a star formation prescription regulated by the local H{sub 2} abundance leads to the suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxy halos with M{sub h} ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and to a large population of gas-rich 'dark galaxies' at z = 2.5 with low star formation efficiencies and gas depletion timescales >20 Gyr. The fraction of dark galaxies is 60% at M{sub h} ≅ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and increases rapidly with decreasing halo mass. Dark galaxies form late and their gaseous disks never reach the surface densities, ∼> 5700 M{sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (Z/10{sup –3} Z{sub ☉}){sup –0.88}, that are required to build a substantial molecular fraction. Despite this large population of dark galaxies, we show that our H{sub 2}-regulated simulation is consistent with both the observed luminosity function of galaxies and the cosmological mass density of neutral gas at z ∼> 2.5. Moreover, our results provide a theoretical explanation for the recent detection in fluorescent Lyα emission of gaseous systems at high redshift with little or no associated star formation. We further propose that H{sub 2}-regulation may offer a fresh solution to a number of outstanding 'dwarf galaxy problems' in ΛCDM. In particular, H{sub 2}-regulation leads galaxy formation to become effectively stochastic on mass scales of M{sub h} ∼ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, and thus these massive dwarfs are not 'too big to fail'.

  6. Discovery of concentric broken rings at sub-arcsec separations in the HD 141569A gas-rich, debris disk with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, C.; Boccaletti, A.; Pantin, E.; Augereau, J.-C.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Galicher, R.; Maire, A.-L.; Mazoyer, J.; Milli, J.; Rousset, G.; Gratton, R.; Bonnefoy, M.; Brandner, W.; Buenzli, E.; Langlois, M.; Lannier, J.; Mesa, D.; Peretti, S.; Salter, G.; Sissa, E.; Chauvin, G.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Vigan, A.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Péricaud, J.; Baudoz, P.; Benisty, M.; De Boer, J.; Garufi, A.; Girard, J. H.; Menard, F.; Olofsson, J.; Quanz, S. P.; Mouillet, D.; Christiaens, V.; Casassus, S.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Blanchard, P.; Carle, M.; Fusco, T.; Giro, E.; Hubin, N.; Maurel, D.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Sevin, A.; Weber, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Transition disks correspond to a short stage between the young protoplanetary phase and older debris phase. Along this evolutionary sequence, the gas component disappears leaving room for a dust-dominated environment where already-formed planets signpost their gravitational perturbations. Aims: We endeavor to study the very inner region of the well-known and complex debris, but still gas-rich disk, around HD 141569A using the exquisite high-contrast capability of SPHERE at the VLT. Recent near-infrared (IR) images suggest a relatively depleted cavity within ~200 au, while former mid-IR data indicate the presence of dust at separations shorter than ~100 au. Methods: We obtained multi-wavelength images in the near-IR in J, H2, H3 and Ks-bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 μm spectral data cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. Results: We discovered several new structures inside 1'', of which the most prominent is a bright ring with sharp edges (semi-major axis: 0.4'') featuring a strong north-south brightness asymmetry. Other faint structures are also detected from 0.4'' to 1'' in the form of concentric ringlets and at least one spiral arm. Finally, the VISIR data at 8.6 μm suggests the presence of an additional dust population closer in. Besides, we do not detect companions more massive than 1-3 mass of Jupiter. Conclusions: The performance of SPHERE allows us to resolve the extended dust component, which was previously detected at thermal and visible wavelengths, into very complex patterns with strong asymmetries; the nature of these asymmetries remains to be understood. Scenarios involving shepherding by planets or dust-gas interactions will have to be tested against these observations. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, ESO programs 095.C-0381 and 095.C-0298.

  7. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  8. Submillimeter and far-infrared line observations of M17 SW - A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Stacey, G. J.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1988-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far-IR spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are reported. Strong forbidden C II 158 micron and CO J = 7 - 6 line emission arises in an H II region/molecular cloud interface of several pc thickness. Weaker forbidden C II emission appears to be extended over 15 pc throughout the molecular cloud. CO J = 14 - 13 and forbidden O I 145 micron spectra indicate high temperatures and densities for both molecular and atomic gas in the interface. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. The extended forbidden C II emission throughout the molecular cloud has a level around 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. The high gas temperature of molecular material in the UV-illuminated interface region suggests that CO self-shielding and heating of CO by photoelectrons are important.

  9. Supernova feedback in a local vertically stratified medium: interstellar turbulence and galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Fielding, Drummond; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-07-01

    We use local Cartesian simulations with a vertical gravitational potential to study how supernova (SN) feedback in stratified galactic discs drives turbulence and launches galactic winds. Our analysis includes three disc models with gas surface densities ranging from Milky Way-like galaxies to gas-rich ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and two different SN driving schemes (random and correlated with local gas density). In order to isolate the physics of SN feedback, we do not include additional feedback processes. We find that, in these local box calculations, SN feedback excites relatively low mass-weighted gas turbulent velocity dispersions ≈3-7 km s-1 and low wind mass loading factors η ≲ 1 in all the cases we study. The low turbulent velocities and wind mass loading factors predicted by our local box calculations are significantly below those suggested by observations of gas-rich and rapidly star-forming galaxies; they are also in tension with global simulations of disc galaxies regulated by stellar feedback. Using a combination of numerical tests and analytic arguments, we argue that local Cartesian boxes cannot predict the properties of galactic winds because they do not capture the correct global geometry and gravitational potential of galaxies. The wind mass loading factors are in fact not well defined in local simulations because they decline significantly with increasing box height. More physically realistic calculations (e.g. including a global galactic potential and disc rotation) will likely be needed to fully understand disc turbulence and galactic outflows, even for the idealized case of feedback by SNe alone.

  10. Discovery of a compact gas-rich damped Lyman-α galaxy at z = 2.2: evidence of a starburst-driven outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Laursen, P.; Petitjean, P.; Vergani, S. D.; Maureira, M. J.; Ledoux, C.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; López, S.; Srianand, R.

    2012-04-01

    We present the detection of Ly α, [O iii], and H α emission associated with an extremely strong damped Lyman-α (DLA) system (N(H i) = 1022.10 cm-2) at z = 2.207 towards the quasar SDSS J113520.39 - 001053.56. This is the largest H I column density ever measured along a quasi-stellar object (QSO) line of sight, though typical of those often found in DLAs associated to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). This absorption system can also be classified as an ultra-strong Mg II system with W_rλ2796≃3.6 Å. The mean metallicity of the gas ( [Zn/H] = -1.1) and dust depletion factors ( [Zn/Fe] = 0.72, [Zn/Cr] = 0.49) are consistent with (and only marginally larger than) the mean values found in the general QSO-DLA population. The [O iii]-Hα emitting region has a very small impact parameter with respect to the QSO line of sight, b ≈ 0.1'' (0.9 kpc proper distance), and is unresolved. From the H α line, we measure a significant star formation rate (SFR) ≈ 25 M⊙ yr-1 (uncorrected for dust). The shape of the Ly α line is double-peaked, which is the signature of a resonant scattering of Ly α photons, and the Ly α emission is spatially extended. More strikingly, the blue and red Ly α peaks arise from distinct regions extended over a few kpc on either side of the star-forming region. We propose that this is the consequence of a Ly α transfer in outflowing gas. The presence of starburst-driven outflows is also in agreement with the high SFR together with the small size and low mass of the galaxy (Mvir ~ 1010 M⊙). By placing constraints on the stellar UV continuum luminosity of the galaxy, we estimate an age of at most a few 107 yr, again consistent with a recent starburst scenario. We interpret these data as the observation of a young, gas-rich, compact starburst galaxy, from which material is expelled through collimated winds powered by the vigorous star formation activity. We substantiate this picture by modelling the radiative transfer of Ly α photons in the galactic

  11. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  12. Geophysical and astrophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, H. K.

    Spiral structures in two-dimensional turbulence are studied and a theory (Moffatt, 1985, 1986) which regards fully three-dimensional turbulence as an agglomeration of 'random vortex sheets and coherent helical structures' is reviewed. Consideration is given to the process by which current-sheet discontinuities may appear during magnetic relaxation. Within the framework of dynamo theory, the determination of the generation coefficient and the turbulent diffusivity in mean-field electrodynamics for turbulence with helicity in the limit of a large magnetic Reynolds number is discussed. Certain features of 'chromospheric turbulence' (i.e., turbulence in the solar atmosphere outside the photosphere) are also examined.

  13. THE PROPERTIES OF THE STAR-FORMING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AT z = 0.8-2.2 FROM HiZELS: STAR FORMATION AND CLUMP SCALING LAWS IN GAS-RICH, TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Theuns, T.; Sobral, D.; Best, P. N.; Geach, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    We present adaptive optics assisted integral field spectroscopy of nine H{alpha}-selected galaxies at z = 0.84-2.23 drawn from the HiZELS narrowband survey. Our observations map the kinematics of these star-forming galaxies on {approx}kpc scales. We demonstrate that within the interstellar medium of these galaxies, the velocity dispersion of the star-forming gas ({sigma}) follows a scaling relation {sigma}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1/n} {sub SFR} + constant (where {Sigma}{sub SFR} is the star formation surface density and the constant includes the stellar surface density). Assuming the disks are marginally stable (Toomre Q = 1), this follows from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation ({Sigma}{sub SFR} = A{Sigma} {sup n} {sub gas}), and we derive best-fit parameters of n = 1.34 {+-} 0.15 and A = 3.4{sup +2.5} {sub -1.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, consistent with the local relation, and implying cold molecular gas masses of M {sub gas} = 10{sup 9-10} M {sub Sun} and molecular gas fractions of M {sub gas}/(M {sub gas} + M {sub *}) = 0.3 {+-} 0.1, with a range of 10%-75%. We also identify 11 {approx}kpc-scale star-forming regions (clumps) within our sample and show that their sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the fastest growing mode. The luminosities and velocity dispersions of these clumps follow the same scaling relations as local H II regions, although their star formation densities are a factor {approx}15 {+-} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than typically found locally. We discuss how the clump properties are related to the disk, and show that their high masses and luminosities are a consequence of the high disk surface density.

  14. The young low-mass star ISO-Oph-50: extreme variability induced by a clumpy, evolving circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander; Mužić, Koraljka; Geers, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    ISO-Oph-50 is a young low-mass object in the ˜1 Myr old Ophiuchus star-forming region undergoing dramatic changes in its optical/near/mid-infrared brightness by 2-4 mag. We present new multi-band photometry and near-infrared spectra, combined with a synopsis of the existing literature data. Based on the spectroscopy, the source is confirmed as a mid-M dwarf, with evidence for ongoing accretion. The near-infrared light curves show large-scale variations, with 2-4 mag amplitude in the bands IJHK, with the object generally being bluer when faint. Near its brightest state, the object shows colour changes consistent with variable extinction of ΔAV ˜ 7 mag. High-cadence monitoring at 3.6 μm reveals quasi-periodic variations with a typical time-scale of 1-2 weeks. The best explanation for these characteristics is a low-mass star seen through circumstellar matter, whose complex variability is caused by changing inhomogeneities in the inner parts of the disc. When faint, the direct stellar emission is blocked; the near-infrared radiation is dominated by scattered light. When bright, the emission is consistent with a photosphere strongly reddened by circumstellar dust. Based on the available constraints, the inhomogeneities have to be located at or beyond ˜0.1 au distance from the star. If this scenario turns out to be correct, a major portion of the inner disc has to be clumpy, structured, and/or in turmoil. In its observational characteristics, this object resembles other types of young stellar objects with variability caused in the inner disc. Compared to other objects, however, ISO-Oph-50 is clearly an extreme case, given the large amplitude of the brightness and colour changes combined with the erratic behaviour. ISO-Oph-50 has been near its brightest state since 2013; further monitoring is highly encouraged.

  15. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  16. Characterization of Turbulent Flows for Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Haire, S. L.

    1998-11-01

    A diagram for the characterization of turbulent flows using the invariants of the mean velocity gradient tensor is introduced. All mean flows, from irrotationally strained flows to shearing flows, to purely rotational flows, can be identified on this diagram. Different flow fields which occupy the same region on the diagram are said to be comprised of the same topological features. The current state of turbulence modeling can be identified on the diagram based on the type of mean flow fields which can be accurately computed. Regions on the diagram can be shown for which current capabilities in turbulence modeling fail to accurately resolve the turbulent structures. Relevant mean field topology is identified for future work in turbulence modeling. Using this analysis, we suggest a number of flows to be computed by DNS or LES and used as testing cases for new models.

  17. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays.

    PubMed

    Zhuravleva, I; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Arévalo, P; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2014-11-01

    The hot (10(7) to 10(8) kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius-it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies. PMID:25363764

  18. Introduction to quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Barenghi, Carlo F; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2014-03-25

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  19. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  20. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  1. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE INNER LAYERS OF CLUMPY CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVELOPES: FORMATION OF WATER IN C-RICH OBJECTS AND OF C-BEARING MOLECULES IN O-RICH OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Agundez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, Jose; Guelin, Michel

    2010-12-01

    A mechanism based on the penetration of interstellar ultraviolet photons into the inner layers of clumpy circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around asymptotic giant branch stars is proposed to explain the non-equilibrium chemistry observed in such objects. We show through a simple modeling approach that in CSEs with a certain degree of clumpiness or with moderately low mass loss rates (a few 10{sup -7} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}) a photochemistry can take place in the warm and dense inner layers, inducing important changes in the chemical composition. In carbon-rich objects water vapor and ammonia would be formed with abundances of 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} relative to H{sub 2}, while in oxygen-rich envelopes ammonia and carbon-bearing molecules such as HCN and CS would form with abundances of 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} relative to H{sub 2}. The proposed mechanism would explain the recent observation of warm water vapor in the carbon-rich envelope IRC+10216 with the Herschel Space Observatory and predict that H{sub 2}O should be detectable in other carbon-rich objects.

  2. Acceleration of thin flyer foils with a 1 MA pulsed power device for shock-wave experiments in clumpy foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of shock waves in clumpy media are important for understanding many astrophysical processes, including the triggering of star formation in interstellar gas clouds by passing shock waves. This phenomena can be studied in the laboratory by launching a flyer plate into a low density foam with clumps. Low density foams offer the advantage of relative low sound speeds (a few hundred meters per second) compared to normal solids, thus reducing the flyer speed required to create shock waves. In first experiments aluminum foils with thicknesses between 20 micrometer and 130 micrometer were accelerated to speeds up to 2.3 km/s. In addition, the impact of the flyers on plexiglas targets was studied. Additional measurements will focus on optimizing the flyer properties (thicker flyers, higher velocities) and on characterizing the flyer in more detail (temperature of the flyer and plasma ablation from the flyer). The results of these measurements will be used to design an experiment studying the dynamics of shock waves in clumpy foams, using the 100 TW laser system Leopard for back-lighting the foam target.

  3. Heating Saturn's Clumpy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    We model Cassini CIRS data using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer -- thermal balance technique first developed for protostellar disks, with the goals of:1. Exploring whether the A- and B-ring temperatures' variation with viewing angle is consistent with the wake structures suggested by the observed azimuthal asymmetry in optical depth, by analytic arguments, and by numerical N-body modeling.2. Better constraining the shape, size, spacing and optical depths of substructure in the A-ring, using the unexpectedly high temperatures observed at equinox. If the wake features have high enough contrast, Saturn-shine may penetrate the gaps between the wakes and heat thering particles both top and bottom.3. Determining how much of the heating of the A- and B-rings' unlit sides is due to radiative transport and how much is due to particle motions, especially vertical motions. This will help in constraining the rings' surface densities and masses.

  4. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  5. Turbulence in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.; Marino, R.

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind is ubiquitous. To understand the transport of low-frequency turbulence in the sub- and super-Alfvénic solar wind flow, Zank et al. 2012 developed an extensive turbulence transport model that describes the evolution of the energy in forward and backward propagating modes, the total turbulent energy, the cross-helicity, the residual energy, the correlation lengths corresponding to forward and backward propagating modes, and the correlation length of the residual energy. Adhikari et. al. 2015 presented the first detailed solution of Zank et al., and found good agreement between the Zank et al. model and observations. Here, we solve the 1D steady-state turbulence transport equations with and without sources of turbulence, and show that all the identified sources are required to reproduce the theoretical results to be consistent with the observations.

  6. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  7. Invariant turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Dos Santos Cardoso-Bihlo, Elsa Maria; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Popovych, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Various subgrid-scale closure models break the invariance of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations and thus violate the geometric structure of these equations. A method is shown which allows one to systematically derive invariant turbulence models starting from non-invariant turbulence models and thus to correct artificial symmetry-breaking. The method is illustrated by finding invariant hyperdiffusion schemes to be applied in the two-dimensional turbulence problem.

  8. String Theory and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  9. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  10. Inhomogeneous turbulence in magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is expected to play an essential role in enhancing magnetic reconnection. Turbulence associated with magnetic reconnection is highly inhomogeneous: it is generated by inhomogeneities of the field configuration such as the velocity shear, temperature gradient, density stratification, magnetic shear, etc. This self-generated turbulence affects the reconnection through the turbulent transport. In this reconnection--turbulence interaction, localization of turbulent transport due to dynamic balance between several turbulence effects plays an essential role. For investigating inhomogeneous turbulence in a strongly nonlinear regime, closure or turbulence modeling approaches provide a powerful tool. A turbulence modeling approach for the magnetic reconnection is introduced. In the model, the mean-field equations with turbulence effects incorporated are solved simultaneously with the equations of turbulent statistical quantities that represent spatiotemporal properties of turbulence under the effect of large-scale field inhomogeneities. Numerical simulations of this Reynolds-averaged turbulence model showed that self-generated turbulence enhances magnetic reconnection. It was pointed out that reconnection states may be divided into three category depending on the turbulence level: (i) laminar reconnection; (ii) turbulent reconnection, and (iii) turbulent diffusion. Recent developments in this direction are also briefly introduced, which includes the magnetic Prandtl number dependence, spectral evolution, and guide-field effects. Also relationship of this fully nonlinear turbulence approach with other important approaches such as plasmoid instability reconnection will be discussed.

  11. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  12. CHEMICALLY REACTING TURBULENT JETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports additional experimental evidence supporting a new description of the mechanism of turbulent entrainment, mixing, and chemical reactions that is emerging from experiments in the last few years which reveal the presence of large scale structures in turbulent shear...

  13. Superstatistics and atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, S.; Rapisarda, A.

    2005-08-01

    In this very short contribution we summarize some recent results on wind velocity data recorded at Florence airport. In particular we show that one can describe this example of atmospheric turbulence by means of the superstatistics approach proposed by Beck and Cohen (2003). The latter justifies the successful application of Tsallis generalized statistics in different fields, and more specifically in turbulence experiments.

  14. Elasto-inertial turbulence.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-06-25

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called "maximum drag reduction" asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  15. Turbulence beneath waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, J.; Farmer, D.

    2003-04-01

    Breaking surface waves are believed to provide a major pathway for the energy input from the atmosphere to the ocean and are a source of enhanced turbulent kinetic energy levels in the near-surface layer. Increased turbulence levels relate to enhanced air-sea exchange processes. The ocean surface is a complex system with a wide range of relevant scales. We use direct measurement of the small-scale velocity field as a first step to evaluate near-surface turbulence. At wind speed up to 14 m/s, velocity profiles were obtained with pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profilers. Based on wavenumber spectra calculated with the empirical mode decomposition, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy at ~1m beneath the free surface and 1 Hz sampling rate is estimated. In addition, bubble size distributions were obtained from acoustic resonator measurements and whitecap occurrence was monitored with video cameras. High turbulence levels with dissipation rates more than four orders larger than the background dissipation are linked to wave breaking. The decay and depth-dependence of the wave-induced turbulence are examined and implications for turbulence models are discussed. In individual breaking waves, the onset of enhanced dissipation occurs up to a quarter wave period prior to the air entrainment. Magnitude and occurrence of the pre-breaking turbulence are consistent with wave-turbulence interaction in a rotational wave field. The detailed structure of the turbulence and bubble field associated with breaking waves will be presented. Implications for air-sea exchange processes will be discussed.

  16. DUSTY STRUCTURE AROUND TYPE-I ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: CLUMPY TORUS NARROW-LINE REGION AND NEAR-NUCLEUS HOT DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, Rivay; Netzer, Hagai; Elitzur, Moshe

    2009-11-01

    We fitted Spitzer/IRS approx 2-35 mum spectra of 26 luminous quasi-stellar objects in an attempt to define the main emission components. Our model has three major components: a clumpy torus, dusty narrow-line region (NLR) clouds, and a blackbody-like dust. The models utilize the clumpy torus of Nenkova et al. and are the first to allow its consistent check in type-I active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Single torus models and combined torus-NLR models fail to fit the spectra of most sources, but three-component models adequately fit the spectra of all sources. We present torus inclination, cloud distribution, covering factor, and torus mass for all sources and compare them with bolometric luminosity, black hole mass, and accretion rate. The torus mass is found to be correlated with the bolometric luminosity of the sources. Torus-covering factor may also be (anti-)correlated, if some possibly anomalous points are omitted. We find that a substantial amount of the approx2-7 mum radiation originates from a hot dust component, which is likely situated in the innermost part of the torus. The luminosity radiated by this component and its covering factor are comparable to those of the torus. We quantify the emission by the NLR clouds and estimate their distance from the center. The distances are approx700 times larger than the dust sublimation radius, and the NLR-covering factor is about 0.07. The total covering factor by all components is in good agreement with the known AGN type-I:type-II ratio.

  17. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  18. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  19. Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rod

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on turbulence detection and mitigation technologies in weather accident prevention. The topics include: 1) Organization; 2) Scope of Turbulence Effort; 3) Background; 4) Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Program Metrics; 5) Approach; 6) Turbulence Team Relationships; 7) WBS Structure; 8) Deliverables; 9) TDAM Changes; 10) FY-01 Results/Accomplishments; 11) Out-year Plans; and 12) Element Status.

  20. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  1. Periodically kicked turbulence

    PubMed

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  2. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  3. Turbulence of swarming sperm.

    PubMed

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k^{-3} power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation. PMID:26465513

  4. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  5. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  6. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  7. Information content of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbus, R. T.; Goldburg, W. I.

    2013-11-01

    We treat a turbulent velocity field as a message in the same way as a book or a picture. All messages can be described by their entropy per symbol h, defined as in Shannon's theory of communication. In a turbulent flow, as the Reynolds number Re increases, more correlated degrees of freedom are excited and participate in the turbulent cascade. Experiments in a turbulent soap film suggest that the spatial entropy density h is a decreasing function of Re, namely h∝-logRe + const. In the logistic map, also analyzed here, increasing the control parameter r increases h. A modified logistic map with additional coupling to past iterations suggests the significance of correlations.

  8. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  9. Turbulent Flames in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1994-05-01

    First results of three-dimensional simulations of a thermonuclear flame in Type Ia supernovae are obtained using a new flame-capturing algorithm, and a PPM hydrodynamical code. In the absence of gravity, the flame is stabilized with respect to the Landau (1944) instability due to the difference in the behaviour of convex and concave portions of the perturbed flame front. The transition to turbulence in supernovae occurs on scales =~ 0.1 - 10 km in agreement with the non-linear estimate lambda =~ 2pi D(2_l/geff) based on the Zeldovich (1966) model for a perturbed flame when the gravity acceleration increases; D_l is the normal speed of the laminar flame, and geff is the effective acceleration. The turbulent flame is mainly spread by large scale motions driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Small scale turbulence facilitates rapid incineration of the fuel left behind the front. The turbulent flame speed D_t approaches D_t =~ U', where U' is the root mean square velocity of turbulent motions, when the turbulent flame forgets initial conditions and reaches a steady state. The results indicate that in a steady state the turbulent flame speed should be independent of the normal laminar flame speed D_l. The three-dimensional results are in sharp contrast with the results of previous two-dimensional simulations which underestimate flame speed due to the lack of turbulent cascade directed in three dimensions from big to small spatial scales. The work was supported by the NSF grants AST 92-18035 and AST 93-005P.

  10. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Harold N.

    1987-01-01

    Various types of atmospheric turbulence measurements are addressed for the purpose of stimulating discussion relative to available data. An outline of these various types of measurements are discussed. Some specific results of detailed characterization studies made at NASA Langley are emphasized. The most recent reports on statistics of turbulence encounters for various types of aircraft operations are summarized. Special severe encounter studies and reference to remote sensing are also included. Wind shear is considered to be a special topic and is not covered.

  11. Observations of ``Gas-Rich'' Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménard, François

    2004-06-01

    Accretion disks are pivotal elements in the formation and early evolution of solar-like stars. On top of supplying the raw material, their internal conditions also regulate the formation of planets. Their study therefore holds the key to solve the mystery of the formation of our Solar System. This chapter focuses on observational studies of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence solar-like stars. The direct measurement of disk parameters poses an obvious challenge: at the distance of typical star forming regions (e.g., ~140pc for Taurus), a planetary system like ours (with diameter ~= 50AU out to Pluto, but excluding the Kuiper belt) subtends only 0.35''. Yet its surface brightness is low in comparison to the bright central star and high angular and high contrast imaging techniques are required if one hopes to resolve and measure these protoplanetary disks. Fortunately, capable instruments providing 0.1'' resolution or better and high contrast have been available for just about 10 years now. They are covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the UV/Optical with HST and the near-infrared from ground-based adaptive optics systems, to the millimetric range with long-baseline radio interferometers. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge of the structure of the disks surrounding low-mass stars has made a gigantic leap forward in the last decade. In the following pages I will attempt to give an overview of the structural and physical parameters of protoplanetary disks that can be estimated today from direct observations.

  12. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Dust formation is thought to play an important role in the mass loss from stars at the asymptotic giant branch (AGB); however, where and how dust forms is still open to debate. Aims: We present visible polarimetric imaging observations of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL as well as high spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations taken with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Our goal is to spatially resolve the dust and molecule formation region within a few stellar radii. Methods: We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Hα line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 μm with a spectral resolution of 12000. Results: Taking advantage of the polarimetric imaging capability of SPHERE-ZIMPOL combined with the superb adaptive optics performance, we succeeded in spatially resolving three clumpy dust clouds located at ~50 mas (~2 R⋆) from the central star, revealing dust formation very close to the star. The AMBER data in the individual CO lines suggest a molecular outer atmosphere extending to ~3 R⋆. Furthermore, the SPHERE-ZIMPOL image taken over the Hα line shows emission with a radius of up to ~160 mas (~7 R⋆). We found that dust, molecular gas, and Hα-emitting hot gas coexist within 2-3 R⋆. Our modeling suggests that the observed polarized intensity maps can reasonably be explained by large (0.4-0.5 μm) grains of Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, or MgSiO3 in an optically thin shell (τ550nm = 0.1 ± 0.02) with an inner and outer boundary radius of 1.9-2.0 R⋆ and 3 ± 0.5R⋆, respectively. The observed clumpy structure can be reproduced by a density enhancement of a factor of 4 ± 1. Conclusions: The grain size derived from our modeling of the SPHERE-ZIMPOL polarimetric images is consistent with

  13. Recent advances in turbulence prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    Turbulence in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere (8-14 kilometers in altitude) is a well-known aviation hazard; it is the major cause of injuries and occasional fatalities to passengers and crew members on commercial aircraft. Jet streams, thunderstorms, flow over mountains, and even the passage of other aircraft cause turbulence. However, the lack of precise observational data (which is still mainly from pilots reporting turbulence) and a clear understanding of the processes that cause turbulence make it difficult to accurately forecast aviation-scale turbulence. Hence, upper troposphere and lower stratosphere turbulence forecasting is an area of active research.

  14. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  15. Swirl flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.; Jackson, T. W.; Lilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Confined turbulent swirling flow data obtained from a single hot-wire using a six-orientation technique are analyzed numerically. The effects of swirl strength and the presence of a strong contraction nozzle further downstream on deduced parameters is also presented and discussed for the case of chamber-to-inlet diameter ratio D/d = 2. Three swirl strengths are considered with inlet swirl vane angles of 0, 45 and 70 deg. A strong contraction nozzle with an area ratio of 4 is located two chamber-diameters downstream of the inlet to the flowfield. It is found that both the swirl strength and the contraction have strong effects on the turbulence parameters. Generally, the most dramatic effect of increase of swirl strength is the considerable increase in values of all the parameters considered, (rx-viscosity, kinetic energy of turbulence, length scales, and degree of nonisotropy). The presence of a strong contraction nozzle tends to increase the turbulence parameter values in regions of acceleration and to reduce them in deceleration regions. Based on similarity of viscosity and length scale profiles, a C sub mu formulation is deduced which is shown to improve the predictive capability of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model in swirling recirculating flows.

  16. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  17. Turbulent Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability—which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold—akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies—a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2 +1 )-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  18. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  19. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  20. UNVEILING THE MASK ON THE ULIRG-TO-QSO TRANSITION OBJECT [H89]1821+643 AT z = 0.3: A GAS-POOR/GAS-RICH GALAXY MERGER AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR CO-BASED DYNAMICAL MASS ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    Aravena, M.; Wagg, J.; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Feain, I. J.

    2011-08-20

    We report the detection of the {sup 12}CO J = 1-0 emission line in [H89]1821+643, one of the most optically luminous quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the local universe, and a template ULIRG-to-QSO transition object, located in a rich, cool-core cluster at z = 0.297. The CO emission is likely to be extended, highly asymmetric with respect to the center of the host elliptical where the QSO resides, and correspond with a molecular gas mass of {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}. The dynamical mass enclosed by the CO emission-line region could amount to {approx}1.7 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} (80% of the total mass of the elliptical host). The bulk of the CO emission is located at {approx}9 kpc southeast from the nuclei position, close to a faint optical structure, suggesting that the CO emission could either represent a gas-rich companion galaxy merging with the elliptical host or a tail-like structure reminiscent of a previous interaction. We argue that the first scenario is more likely given the large masses implied by the CO source, which would imply a highly asymmetric elliptical host. The close alignment between the CO emission's major axis and the radio plume suggests a possible role in the excitation of the ambient gas reservoir by the latter. The stacking technique was used to search for CO emission and 3-mm continuum emission from galaxies in the surrounding cluster. However, no detection was found toward individual galaxies or the stacked ensemble of galaxies, with a 3{sigma} limit of <1.1 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} for the molecular gas.

  1. Turbulence Modeling: A NASA Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents turbulence modeling from NASA's perspective. The topics include: 1) Hierarchy of Solution Methods; 2) Turbulence Modeling Focus; 3) Linear Eddy Viscosity Models; and 4) Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Algebraic Stress Models.

  2. Turbulence in pure superfluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, R.A.; Opatowsky, L.B.; Tough, J.T.

    1981-03-09

    A series of experiments is described which provide an unambiguous description of the steady-state properties of turbulence in pure superfluid flow. The turbulence is qualitatively different from that observed in counterflow but comparable to the homogeneous turbulence described by theory.

  3. Three-Dimensional Parallel Lattice Boltzmann Hydrodynamic Simulations of Turbulent Flows in Interstellar Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muders, Dirk

    1995-08-01

    Exploring the clumpy and filamentary structure of interstellar molecular clouds is one of the key problems of modern astrophysics. So far, we have little knowledge of the physical processes that cause the structure, but turbulence is suspected to be essential. In this thesis I study turbulent flows and how they contribute to the structure of interstellar dark clouds. To this end, three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations are needed since the detailed turbulent spatial and velocity structure cannot be analytically calculated. I employ the ``Lattice Boltzmann Method'', a recently developed numerical method which solves the Boltzmann equation in a discretized phase space. Mesoscopic particle packets move with fixed velocities on a Cartesian lattice and at each time step they exchange mass according to given rules. Because of its mainly local operations the method is well suited for application on parallel or clustered computers. As part of my thesis I have developed a parallelized ``Lattice Boltzmann Method'' hydrodynamics code. I have improved the numerical stability for Reynolds numbers of up to 104.5 and Mach numbers of up to 0.9 and I have extended the method to include a second miscible fluid phase. The code has been used on the three currently most powerful workstations at the ``Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie'' in Bonn and on the massively parallel mainframe CM-5 at the ``Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung'' in St. Augustin. The simulations consist of collimated shear flows and the motion of molecular clumps through an ambient medium. The dependence of the emerging structure on Reynolds and Mach numbers is studied. The main results are (1) that distinct clumps and filaments appear only at the transition between laminar and fully turbulent flow at Reynolds numbers between 500 and 5000 and (2) that subsonic viscous shear flows are capable of producing the dark cloud velocity structure. The unexpectedly low Reynolds numbers can

  4. The Theories of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J; Agostini, L

    1955-01-01

    The theory of turbulence reached its full growth at the end of the 19th century as a result of the work by Boussinesq and Reynolds. It then underwent a long period of stagnation which ended under the impulse given to it by the development of wind tunnels caused by the needs of aviation. Numerous researchers, attempted to put Reynolds' elementary statistical theory into a more precise form. During the war, some isolated scientists - von Weizsacker and Heisenberg in Germany, Kolmogoroff in Russia, Onsager in the U.S.A. - started a program of research. By a system of assumptions which make it possible to approach the structure of turbulence in well-defined limiting conditions quantitatively, they obtained a certain number of laws on the correlations and the spectrum. Since the late reports have improved the mathematical language of turbulence, it was deemed advisable to start with a detailed account of the mathematical methods applicable to turbulence, inspired at first by the work of the French school, above all for the basic principles, then the work of the foreigners, above all for the theory of the spectrum.

  5. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  6. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tziperman, E.

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  7. Turbulence compressibility corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.; Horstman, C. C.; Marvin, J. G.; Viegas, J. R.; Bardina, J. E.; Huang, P. G.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1994-01-01

    The basic objective of this research was to identify, develop and recommend turbulence models which could be incorporated into CFD codes used in the design of the National AeroSpace Plane vehicles. To accomplish this goal, a combined effort consisting of experimental and theoretical phases was undertaken. The experimental phase consisted of a literature survey to collect and assess a database of well documented experimental flows, with emphasis on high speed or hypersonic flows, which could be used to validate turbulence models. Since it was anticipated that this database would be incomplete and would need supplementing, additional experiments in the NASA Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (HWT) were also undertaken. The theoretical phase consisted of identifying promising turbulence models through applications to simple flows, and then investigating more promising models in applications to complex flows. The complex flows were selected from the database developed in the first phase of the study. For these flows it was anticipated that model performance would not be entirely satisfactory, so that model improvements or corrections would be required. The primary goals of the investigation were essentially achieved. A large database of flows was collected and assessed, a number of additional hypersonic experiments were conducted in the Ames HWT, and two turbulence models (kappa-epsilon and kappa-omega models with corrections) were determined which gave superior performance for most of the flows studied and are now recommended for NASP applications.

  8. One-dimensional wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Vladimir; Dias, Frédéric; Pushkarev, Andrei

    2004-08-01

    The problem of turbulence is one of the central problems in theoretical physics. While the theory of fully developed turbulence has been widely studied, the theory of wave turbulence has been less studied, partly because it developed later. Wave turbulence takes place in physical systems of nonlinear dispersive waves. In most applications nonlinearity is small and dispersive wave interactions are weak. The weak turbulence theory is a method for a statistical description of weakly nonlinear interacting waves with random phases. It is not surprising that the theory of weak wave turbulence began to develop in connection with some problems of plasma physics as well as of wind waves. The present review is restricted to one-dimensional wave turbulence, essentially because finer computational grids can be used in numerical computations. Most of the review is devoted to wave turbulence in various wave equations, and in particular in a simple one-dimensional model of wave turbulence introduced by Majda, McLaughlin and Tabak in 1997. All the considered equations are model equations, but consequences on physical systems such as ocean waves are discussed as well. The main conclusion is that the range in which the theory of pure weak turbulence is valid is narrow. In general, wave turbulence is not completely weak. Together with the weak turbulence component, it can include coherent structures, such as solitons, quasisolitons, collapses or broad collapses. As a result, weak and strong turbulence coexist. In situations where coherent structures cannot develop, weak turbulence dominates. Even though this is primarily a review paper, new results are presented as well, especially on self-organized criticality and on quasisolitonic turbulence.

  9. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  10. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow.

  11. Aircraft Dynamic Modeling in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunninham, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A method for accurately identifying aircraft dynamic models in turbulence was developed and demonstrated. The method uses orthogonal optimized multisine excitation inputs and an analytic method for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic modeling in turbulence. A turbulence metric was developed to accurately characterize the turbulence level using flight measurements. The modeling technique was demonstrated in simulation, then applied to a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft in flight. Comparisons of modeling results obtained in turbulent air to results obtained in smooth air were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  12. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  13. Turbulence Modeling Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R. (Editor); Rumsey, C. L. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor); Thomas, J. L. (Editor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advances in turbulence modeling are needed in order to calculate high Reynolds number flows near the onset of separation and beyond. To this end, the participants in this workshop made the following recommendations. (1) A national/international database and standards for turbulence modeling assessment should be established. Existing experimental data sets should be reviewed and categorized. Advantage should be taken of other efforts already under-way, such as that of the European Research Community on Flow, Turbulence, and Combustion (ERCOFTAC) consortium. Carefully selected "unit" experiments will be needed, as well as advances in instrumentation, to fill the gaps in existing datasets. A high priority should be given to document existing turbulence model capabilities in a standard form, including numerical implementation issues such as grid quality and resolution. (2) NASA should support long-term research on Algebraic Stress Models and Reynolds Stress Models. The emphasis should be placed on improving the length-scale equation, since it is the least understood and is a key component of two-equation and higher models. Second priority should be given to the development of improved near-wall models. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) would provide valuable guidance in developing and validating new Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. Although not the focus of this workshop, DNS, LES, and hybrid methods currently represent viable approaches for analysis on a limited basis. Therefore, although computer limitations require the use of RANS methods for realistic configurations at high Reynolds number in the foreseeable future, a balanced effort in turbulence modeling development, validation, and implementation should include these approaches as well.

  14. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  15. Fossils of big bang turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. H.

    2004-12-01

    A model is proposed connecting turbulence, fossil turbulence, and the big bang origin of the universe. While details are incomplete, the model is consistent with our knowledge of these processes and is supported by observations. Turbulence arises in a hot-big-bang quantum-gravitational-dynamics scenario at Planck scales. Chaotic, eddy-like-motions produce an exothermic Planck particle cascade from 10-35 m at 1032 K to 108 larger, 104 cooler, quark-gluon scales. A Planck-Kerr instability gives high-Reynolds-number (Re 106) turbulent combustion, space-time-energy-entropy and turbulent mixing. Batchelor-Obukhov-Corrsin turbulent-temperature fluctuations are preserved as the first fossil-turbulence by inflation stretching the patterns beyond the horizon ct of causal connection faster than light speed c in time t 10-33 seconds. Fossil-big-bang-temperature-turbulence re-enters the horizon and imprints nucleosynthesis of H-He densities that seed fragmentation by gravity at 1012 s in the low Reynolds number plasma before its transition to gas at t 1013 s and T 3000 K. Multi-scaling coefficients of the cosmic-microwave-background (CMB) temperature anisotropies closely match those for high Reynolds number turbulence, Bershadskii and Sreenivasan 2002, 2003. CMB spectra support the interpretation that big-bang-turbulence-fossils triggered fragmentation of the viscous plasma at supercluster to galaxy mass scales from 1046 to 1042 kg, Gibson 1996, 2000, 2004ab.

  16. Turbulent multiphase flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements and predictions of the structure of several multiphase flows are considered. The properties of dense sprays near the exits of pressure-atomizing injectors and of noncombusting and combusting dilute dispersed flows in round-jet configurations are addressed. It is found that the properties of dense sprays exhibit structure and mixing properties similar to variable-density single-phase flows at high Reynolds numbers within the atomization regime. The degree of development and turbulence levels at the injector exit have a surprisingly large effect on the structure and mixing properties of pressure-atomized sprays, particularly when the phase densities are large. Contemporary stochastic analysis of dilute multiphase flows provides encouraging predictions of turbulent dispersion for a wide variety of jetlike flows, particle-laden jets in gases and liquids, noncondensing and condensing bubbly jets, and nonevaporating, evaporating, and combusting sprays.

  17. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  18. Turbulence in HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'dell, C. R.

    1986-10-01

    It has been known for many decades that the Reynolds number in HII regions must be very high and that the corresponding fine scale flow must be turbulent. Even though the theoretical relation between turbulent element separation and random velocity was derived by Kolmogoroff over forty years ago, there have been only a few attempts to test this theory and its corresponding assumptions. An attempt by Munch for M42 with marginal velocity resolution lead to ambiguous results, although more recent studies by Jean Rene Roy and his colleagues have been more credible. The internal velocities of a number of HII regions were systematically studied and the theory was tested with considerable certainty. The results should be important for the determination of the energy balance of HII regions and the relation of small scale motion to the process of star formation.

  19. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  20. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  1. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  2. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian-Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  3. Turbulent bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Thomas H.; Luther, Stefan; Mazzitelli, Irene M.; Rensen, Judith M.; Toschi, Federico; Lohse, Detlef

    The effect of bubbles on fully developed turbulent flow is investigated numerically and experimentally, summarizing the results of our previous papers (Mazzitelli et al., 2003, Physics of Fluids15, L5. and Journal of Fluid Mechanics488, 283; Rensen, J. et al. 2005, Journal of Fluid Mechanics538, 153). On the numerical side, we simulate Navier Stokes turbulence with a Taylor Reynolds number of Re?˜60, a large large-scale forcing, and periodic boundary conditions. The point-like bubbles follow their Lagrangian paths and act as point forces on the flow. As a consequence, the spectral slope is less steep as compared to the Kolmogorov case. The slope decrease is identified as a lift force effect. On the experimental side, we do hot-film anemometry in a turbulent water channel with Re? ˜ 200 in which we have injected small bubbles up to a volume percentage of 3%. Here the challenge is to disentangle the bubble spikes from the hot-film velocity signal. To achieve this goal, we have developed a pattern recognition scheme. Furthermore, we injected microbubbles up to a volume percentage of 0.3%. Both in the counter flowing situation with small bubbles and in the co-flow situation with microbubbles, we obtain a less spectral slope, in agreement with the numerical result.

  4. Is Saturn's Magnetosphere Turbulent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Eriksson, Stefan; Weygand, James

    2016-04-01

    On February 12, 2008 the Cassini spacecraft passed through Saturn's dayside bow shock and spent 16 hours in the solar wind. The interval in the solar wind was characterized by a series of dynamic pressure pulses and a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field from southward to northward. We have used these Cassini solar observations to drive our global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction of solar wind with Saturn's magnetosphere and ionosphere. We found that large amplitude waves formed at the magnetopause in response to the changes in the dynamic pressure. The vorticity (both parallel and perpendicular) increased within the outer magnetosphere. The vorticity was mostly driven by pressure variations and not reconnection. The vortices frequently were nested with smaller vortices within the large scale vortices. This cascade in vorticity is suggestive of turbulent flows. In this presentation we will evaluate vorticity in our Saturn simulation to determine if the flows are turbulent. With Cassini in the solar wind there were no simultaneous observations within Saturn's magnetosphere. However we will examine the Cassini observations at other times to look for evidence of turbulence.

  5. Magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, P.

    1977-01-01

    The spectrum of electrostatic plasma waves in the terrestrial magnetosheath was studied using the plasma wave experiment on the IMP-6 satellite. Electrostatic plasma wave turbulence is almost continuously present throughout the magnetosheath with broadband (20 Hz- 70 kHz) r.m.s. field intensities typically 0.01 - 1.0 millivolts/m. Peak intensities of about 1.0 millivolts/m near the electron plasma frequency (30 - 60 kHz) were detected occasionally. The components usually identified in the spectrum of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence include a high frequency ( or = 30 kHz) component peaking at the electron plasma frequency f sub pe, a low frequency component with a broad intensity maximum below the nominal ion plasma frequency f sub pi (approximately f sub pe/43), and a less well defined intermediate component in the range f sub pi f f sub pe. The intensity distribution of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence clearly shows that the low frequency component is associated with the bow shock, suggesting that the ion heating begun at the shock continues into the downstream magnetosheath.

  6. Zooplankton intermittency and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, François G.

    2010-05-01

    Planktonic organisms usually live in a turbulent world. Since marine turbulence is characterized by very high Reynolds numbers, it possesses very intermittent fluctuations which in turn affect marine life. We consider here such influence on zooplankton on 2 aspects. First we consider zooplankton motion in the lab. Many copepods display swimming abilities. More and more species have been recently recorded using normal or high speed cameras, and many trajectories have been extracted from these movies and are now available for analysis. These trajectories can be complex, stochastic, with random switching from low velocity to high velocity events and even jumps. These complex trajectories show that an adequate modeling is necessary to understand and characterize them. Here we review the results published in the literature on copepod trajectories. We discuss the random walk, Levy walk modeling and introduce also multifractal random walks. We discuss the way to discriminate between these different walks using experimental data. Stochastic simulations will be performed to illustrate the different families. Second, we consider zooplankton contact rates in the framework of intermittent turbulence. Intermittency may have influence on plankton contact rates. We consider the Particle Stokes number of copepods, in a intermediate dissipation range affected by intermittent fluctuations. We show that they may display preferential concentration effects, and we consider the influence on contact rates of this effect in the intermediate dissipation range.

  7. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  8. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  9. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Howland, Gregory A.; Howell, John C.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; O'Sullivan-Hale, Colin; Rodenburg, Brandon; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Simon, D. S.; Sergienko, A. V.; Boyd, R. W.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling the entangled photon source from the ghost-imaging central image plane, we are able to dramatically increase the ghost-image quality. When imaging a test pattern through turbulence, this method increases the imaged pattern visibility from V=0.15{+-}0.04 to 0.42{+-}0.04.

  10. Predicting two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbus, R. T.; Goldburg, W. I.

    2015-04-01

    Prediction is a fundamental objective of science. It is more difficult for chaotic and complex systems like turbulence. Here we use information theory to quantify spatial prediction using experimental data from a turbulent soap film. At high Reynolds number, Re, where a cascade exists, turbulence becomes easier to predict as the inertial range broadens. The development of a cascade at low Re is also detected.

  11. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  12. An overview of the Icelandic Volcano Observatory response to the on-going rifting event at Bárðarbunga (Iceland) and the SO2 emergency associated with the gas-rich eruption in Holuhraun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Sara; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Roberts, Matthew J.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Vögfjord, Kristin; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Jónasdóttir, Elin B.

    2015-04-01

    On 16 August, 2014, Bárðarbunga volcano entered a new phase of unrest. Elevated seismicity in the area with up to thousands of earthquakes detected per day and significant deformation was observed around the Bárðarbunga caldera. A dike intrusion was monitored for almost two weeks until a small, short-lived effusive eruption began on 29 August in Holuhraun. Two days later a second, more intense, tremendously gas-rich eruption started that is still (as of writing) ongoing. The Icelandic Volcano Observatory (IVO), within the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), monitors all the volcanoes in Iceland. Responsibilities include evaluating their related hazards, issuing warnings to the public and Civil Protection, and providing information regarding risks to aviation, including a weekly summary of volcanic activity provided to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center in London. IVO has monitored the Bárðarbunga unrest phase since its beginning with the support of international colleagues and, in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Environment Agency of Iceland, provides scientific support and interpretation of the ongoing phenomena to the local Civil Protection. The Aviation Color Code, for preventing hazards to aviation due to ash-cloud encounter, has been widely used and changed as soon as new observations and geophysical data from the monitoring network have suggested a potential evolution in the volcanic crisis. Since the onset of the eruption, IVO is monitoring the gas emission by using different and complementary instrumentations aimed at analyzing the plume composition as well as estimating the gaseous fluxes. SO2 rates have been measured with both real-time scanning DOASes and occasional mobile DOAS traveses, near the eruption site and in the far field. During the first month-and-a-half of the eruption, an average flux equal to 400 kg/s was registered, with peaks exceeding 1,000 kg/s. Along with these measurements the dispersal model CALPUFF has

  13. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Disseau, M.; Chakravarthy, V. K.; Jagoda, J.

    1997-01-01

    Papers included address the following topics: (1) Turbulent premixed flame propagation in microgravity; (2) The effect of gravity on turbulent premixed flame propagation - a preliminary cold flow study; and (3) Characteristics of a subgrid model for turbulent premixed combustion.

  14. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  15. Turbulence modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir

    1992-01-01

    The best way of verifying turbulence is to do a direct comparison between the various terms and their models. The success of this approach depends upon the availability of the data for the exact correlations (both experimental and DNS). The other approach involves numerically solving the differential equations and then comparing the results with the data. The results of such a computation will depend upon the accuracy of all the modeled terms and constants. Because of this it is sometimes difficult to find the cause of a poor performance by a model. However, such a calculation is still meaningful in other ways as it shows how a complete Reynolds stress model performs. Thirteen homogeneous flows are numerically computed using the second order closure models. We concentrate only on those models which use a linear (or quasi-linear) model for the rapid term. This, therefore, includes the Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model; the isotropization of production (IP) model; and the Speziale, Sarkar, and Gatski (SSG) model. Which of the three models performs better is examined along with what are their weaknesses, if any. The other work reported deal with the experimental balances of the second moment equations for a buoyant plume. Despite the tremendous amount of activity toward the second order closure modeling of turbulence, very little experimental information is available about the budgets of the second moment equations. Part of the problem stems from our inability to measure the pressure correlations. However, if everything else appearing in these equations is known from the experiment, pressure correlations can be obtained as the closing terms. This is the closest we can come to in obtaining these terms from experiment, and despite the measurement errors which might be present in such balances, the resulting information will be extremely useful for the turbulence modelers. The purpose of this part of the work was to provide such balances of the Reynolds stress and heat

  16. Gyrokinetic microtearing turbulence.

    PubMed

    Doerk, H; Jenko, F; Pueschel, M J; Hatch, D R

    2011-04-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of microtearing modes in standard tokamak plasmas are investigated by means of ab initio gyrokinetic simulations. The saturation levels of the magnetic field fluctuations can be understood in the framework of a balance between (small poloidal wave number) linear drive and small-scale dissipation. The resulting heat transport is dominated by the electron magnetic component, and the transport levels are found to be experimentally relevant. Microtearing modes thus constitute another candidate for explaining turbulent transport in such toroidal systems. PMID:21568567

  17. Turbulent Plumes in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    This review describes a range of natural processes leading to the formation of turbulent buoyant plumes, largely relating to volcanic processes, in which there are localized, intense releases of energy. Phenomena include volcanic eruption columns, bubble plumes in lakes, hydrothermal plumes, and plumes beneath the ice in polar oceans. We assess how the dynamics is affected by heat transfer, particle fallout and recycling, and Earth's rotation, as well as explore some of the mixing of the ambient fluid produced by plumes in a confined geometry.

  18. Semiempirical methods for computing turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belov, I. A.; Ginzburg, I. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two semiempirical theories which provide a basis for determining the turbulent friction and heat exchange near a wall are presented: (1) the Prandtl-Karman theory, and (2) the theory utilizing an equation for the energy of turbulent pulsations. A comparison is made between exact numerical methods and approximate integral methods for computing the turbulent boundary layers in the presence of pressure, blowing, or suction gradients. Using the turbulent flow around a plate as an example, it is shown that, when computing turbulent flows with external turbulence, it is preferable to construct a turbulence model based on the equation for energy of turbulent pulsations.

  19. Conceptual dynamical models for turbulence.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Lee, Yoonsang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complexity of anisotropic turbulent processes in engineering and environmental fluid flows is a formidable challenge with practical significance because energy often flows intermittently from the smaller scales to impact the largest scales in these flows. Conceptual dynamical models for anisotropic turbulence are introduced and developed here which, despite their simplicity, capture key features of vastly more complicated turbulent systems. These conceptual models involve a large-scale mean flow and turbulent fluctuations on a variety of spatial scales with energy-conserving wave-mean-flow interactions as well as stochastic forcing of the fluctuations. Numerical experiments with a six-dimensional conceptual dynamical model confirm that these models capture key statistical features of vastly more complex anisotropic turbulent systems in a qualitative fashion. These features include chaotic statistical behavior of the mean flow with a sub-Gaussian probability distribution function (pdf) for its fluctuations whereas the turbulent fluctuations have decreasing energy and correlation times at smaller scales, with nearly Gaussian pdfs for the large-scale fluctuations and fat-tailed non-Gaussian pdfs for the smaller-scale fluctuations. This last feature is a manifestation of intermittency of the small-scale fluctuations where turbulent modes with small variance have relatively frequent extreme events which directly impact the mean flow. The dynamical models introduced here potentially provide a useful test bed for algorithms for prediction, uncertainty quantification, and data assimilation for anisotropic turbulent systems. PMID:24753605

  20. An overview of turbulence compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Klamer; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-09-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which type of scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  1. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, A. (Compiler); Shih, T.-H. (Compiler); Povinelli, L. A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Various turbulence models have been developed and applied to different turbulent flows over the past several decades and it is becoming more and more urgent to assess their performance in various complex situations. In order to help users in selecting and implementing appropriate models in their engineering calculations, it is important to identify the capabilities as well as the deficiencies of these models. This also benefits turbulence modelers by permitting them to further improve upon the existing models. This workshop was designed for exchanging ideas and enhancing collaboration between different groups in the Lewis community who are using turbulence models in propulsion related CFD. In this respect this workshop will help the Lewis goal of excelling in propulsion related research. This meeting had seven sessions for presentations and one panel discussion over a period of two days. Each presentation session was assigned to one or two branches (or groups) to present their turbulence related research work. Each group was asked to address at least the following points: current status of turbulence model applications and developments in the research; progress and existing problems; and requests about turbulence modeling. The panel discussion session was designed for organizing committee members to answer management and technical questions from the audience and to make concluding remarks.

  2. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  3. Conceptual dynamical models for turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Majda, Andrew J.; Lee, Yoonsang

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the complexity of anisotropic turbulent processes in engineering and environmental fluid flows is a formidable challenge with practical significance because energy often flows intermittently from the smaller scales to impact the largest scales in these flows. Conceptual dynamical models for anisotropic turbulence are introduced and developed here which, despite their simplicity, capture key features of vastly more complicated turbulent systems. These conceptual models involve a large-scale mean flow and turbulent fluctuations on a variety of spatial scales with energy-conserving wave–mean-flow interactions as well as stochastic forcing of the fluctuations. Numerical experiments with a six-dimensional conceptual dynamical model confirm that these models capture key statistical features of vastly more complex anisotropic turbulent systems in a qualitative fashion. These features include chaotic statistical behavior of the mean flow with a sub-Gaussian probability distribution function (pdf) for its fluctuations whereas the turbulent fluctuations have decreasing energy and correlation times at smaller scales, with nearly Gaussian pdfs for the large-scale fluctuations and fat-tailed non-Gaussian pdfs for the smaller-scale fluctuations. This last feature is a manifestation of intermittency of the small-scale fluctuations where turbulent modes with small variance have relatively frequent extreme events which directly impact the mean flow. The dynamical models introduced here potentially provide a useful test bed for algorithms for prediction, uncertainty quantification, and data assimilation for anisotropic turbulent systems. PMID:24753605

  4. Scaling in Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsuk, A. G.; Wagner, R.; Norman, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    An exact relation for third-order structure functions in isothermal compressible turbulence (Galtier & Banerjee 2011) is verified using numerical data from a simulation at Mach 6. The analysis supports a Kolmogorov-like cascade phenomenology and yields a reduced version of the relation for high Mach number turbulence.

  5. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  6. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  7. Theory of hydromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1983-01-01

    The present state of MHD turbulence theory as a possible solar wind research tool is surveyed. The theory is statistical, and does not make statements about individual events. The ensembles considered typically have individual realizations which differ qualitatively, unlike equilibrium statistical mechanics. Most of the theory deals with highly symmetric situations; most of these symmetries have yet to be tested in the solar wind. The applicability of MHD itself to solar wind parameters is highly questionable; yet it has no competitors, as a potentially comprehensive dynamical description. The purpose of solar wind research require sharper articulation. If they are to understand radial turbulent plasma flows from spheres, laboratory experiments and numerical solution of equations of motion may be cheap alternative to spacecraft. If "real life" information is demanded, multiple spacecraft with variable separation may be necessary to go further. The principal emphasis in the theory so far has been on spectral behavior for spatial covariances in wave number space. There is no respectable theory of these for highly anisotropic situations. A rather slow development of theory acts as a brake on justifiable measurement, at this point.

  8. Turbulence structure and turbulence kinetic energy transport in multiscale/fractal-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Inaba, Takuto; Suzuki, Hiroki; Terashima, Osamu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    The turbulence structure and turbulence kinetic energy transport in multiscale/fractal-generated turbulence in a wind tunnel are investigated. A low-blockage, space-filling square-type (i.e., fractal elements with square shapes) fractal grid is placed at the inlet of the test section. On the basis of the thickness of the biggest grid bar, t0, and the inflow velocity U∞, the Reynolds numbers (Re0) are set to 5900 and 11 400; these values are the same as those considered in previous experiments [D. Hurst and J. C. Vassilicos, "Scalings and decay of fractal-generated turbulence," Phys. Fluids 19, 035103 (2007), 10.1063/1.2676448; N. Mazellier and J. C. Vassilicos, "Turbulence without Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade," Phys. Fluids 22, 075101 (2010), 10.1063/1.3453708]. The turbulence characteristics are measured using hot-wire anemometry with I- and X-type probes. Generally, good agreements are observed despite the difference in the size of the test sections used: The longitudinal integral length-scale Lu and the Taylor microscale λ, and their ratio Lu/λ, are approximately constant during decay and are independent of the turbulent Reynolds number Reλ. Centerline statistical results support the finding of Mazellier and Vassilicos, namely, that the classical scaling of Lu/λ ˜ Reλ and the Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade are not universal to all boundary-free weakly sheared/strained turbulence. The cross-sectional profiles show that in the entire cross section of the tunnel, Lu/λ hardly changes in the decay region of the rms velocity, which implies that the turbulent field is self-similar. The production and transport of turbulence kinetic energy K in fractal grid turbulence are also investigated from cross-sectional profiles of the advection A^*, production P^*, triple-correlation transport T^*, pressure transport Π*, viscous diffusion D^*, and dissipation ɛ terms in the K transport equation. In the upstream region, turbulence produced by the biggest grid bar is

  9. Organized motion in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of organized motion in turbulent flow indicates that the transport properties of most shear flows are dominated by large-scale vortex nonrandom motions. The mean velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer consists of a viscous sublayer, buffer layer, and a logarithmic outer layer; an empirical formula of Coles (1956) applies to various pressure gradients. The boundary layer coherent structure was isolated by the correlation methods of Townsend (1956) and flow visualization by direct observations of complex unsteady turbulent motions. The near-wall studies of Willmart and Wooldridge (1962) used the space-time correlation for pressure fluctuations at the wall under a thick turbulent boundary layer; finally, organized motion in free shear flows and transition-control of mixing demonstrated that the Reynolds number invariance of turbulence shows wide scatter.

  10. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  11. Calculations of turbulent separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-08-01

    A numerical study of incompressible turbulent separated flows is carried out by using two-equation turbulence models of the K-epsilon type. On the basis of realizability analysis, a new formulation of the eddy-viscosity is proposed which ensures the positiveness of turbulent normal stresses - a realizability condition that most existing two-equation turbulence models are unable to satisfy. The present model is applied to calculate two backward-facing step flows. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model and a recently developed RNG-based K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. The calculations are performed with a finite-volume method. A second-order accurate differencing scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure the numerical accuracy of solutions. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data for both mean and turbulent quantities. The comparison shows that the present model performs quite well for separated flows.

  12. Wave Turbulence on Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Lukaschuk, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We overview the wave turbulence approach by example of one physical system: gravity waves on the surface of an infinitely deep fluid. In the theoretical part of our review, we derive the nonlinear Hamiltonian equations governing the water-wave system and describe the premises of the weak wave turbulence theory. We outline derivation of the wave-kinetic equation and the equation for the probability density function, and most important solutions to these equations, including the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra corresponding to a direct and an inverse turbulent cascades, as well as solutions for non-Gaussian wave fields corresponding to intermittency. We also discuss strong wave turbulence as well as coherent structures and their interaction with random waves. We describe numerical and laboratory experiments, and field observations of gravity wave turbulence, and compare their results with theoretical predictions.

  13. Magnetized turbulent dynamo in protogalaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified from insignificant seed values to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action driven by the plasma turbulent motions in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no the back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory that has been well developed in the past. However, the applicability of the kinematic dynamo theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time because of the dynamo action, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity, and the magnetic field starts to strongly affect the turbulent motions on the viscous scales. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to energy equipartition between the field and the turbulence; and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. The main purpose of this thesis is to lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten time larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory, and this could lead to the dynamo creation of cluster fields. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy, which happens after the energy equipartition time.

  14. Turbulent Fluid Motion 6: Turbulence, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Deterministic Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Several turbulent and nonturbulent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained. The unaveraged equations are used numerically in conjunction with tools and concepts from nonlinear dynamics, including time series, phase portraits, Poincare sections, Liapunov exponents, power spectra, and strange attractors. Initially neighboring solutions for a low-Reynolds-number fully developed turbulence are compared. The turbulence is sustained by a nonrandom time-independent external force. The solutions, on the average, separate exponentially with time, having a positive Liapunov exponent. Thus, the turbulence is characterized as chaotic. In a search for solutions which contrast with the turbulent ones, the Reynolds number (or strength of the forcing) is reduced. Several qualitatively different flows are noted. These are, respectively, fully chaotic, complex periodic, weakly chaotic, simple periodic, and fixed-point. Of these, we classify only the fully chaotic flows as turbulent. Those flows have both a positive Liapunov exponent and Poincare sections without pattern. By contrast, the weakly chaotic flows, although having positive Liapunov exponents, have some pattern in their Poincare sections. The fixed-point and periodic flows are nonturbulent, since turbulence, as generally understood, is both time-dependent and aperiodic.

  15. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  16. Transonic Turbulent Flow Predictions With Two-Equation Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for two well-documented transonic turbulent flows are compared in detail with existing experimental data. While the boundary layer in the first case remains attached, a region of extensive flow separation has been observed in the second case. Two recently developed k-epsilon, two-equation, eddy-viscosity models are used to model the turbulence field. These models satisfy the realizability constraints of the Reynolds stresses. Comparisons with the measurements are made for the wall pressure distribution, the mean streamwise velocity profiles, and turbulent quantities. Reasonably good agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  17. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  18. Numerical methods for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James C., Jr.

    1988-09-01

    It has generally become accepted that the Navier-Strokes equations predict the dynamic behavior of turbulent as well as laminar flows of a fluid at a point in space away form a discontinuity such as a shock wave. Turbulence is also closely related to the phenomena of non-uniqueness of solutions of the Navier-Strokes equations. These second order, nonlinear partial differential equations can be solved analytically for only a few simple flows. Turbulent flow fields are much to complex to lend themselves to these few analytical methods. Numerical methods, therefore, offer the only possibility of achieving a solution of turbulent flow equations. In spite of recent advances in computer technology, the direct solution, by discrete methods, of the Navier-Strokes equations for turbulent flow fields is today, and in the foreseeable future, impossible. Thus the only economically feasible way to solve practical turbulent flow problems numerically is to use statistically averaged equations governing mean-flow quantities. The objective is to study some recent developments relating to the use of numerical methods to study turbulent flow.

  19. Turbulent Inflow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.

    1996-01-01

    In the present research, tilt rotor aeroacoustics have been studied experimentally and computationally. Experimental measurements were made on a 1/12.5 scale model. A dimensional analysis showed that the model was a good aeroacoustic approximation to the full-scale aircraft, and scale factors were derived to extrapolate the model measurements to the full-scale XV-15. The experimental measurements included helium bubble flow visualization, silk tuft flow visualization, 2-component hot wire anemometry, 7-hole pressure probe measurements, vorticity measurements, and outdoor far field acoustic measurements. The hot wire measurements were used to estimate the turbulence statistics of the flow field into the rotors, such as length scales, velocity scales, dissipation, and turbulence intermittency. To date, these flow measurements are the only ones in existence for a hovering tilt rotor. Several different configurations of the model were tested: (1) standard configurations (single isolated rotor, two rotors without the aircraft, standard tilt rotor configuration); (2) flow control devices (the 'plate', the 'diagonal fences'); (3) basic configuration changes (increasing the rotor/rotor spacing, reducing the rotor plane/wing clearance, operating the rotors out of phase). Also, an approximation to Sikorsky's Variable Diameter Tilt Rotor (VDTR) configuration was tested, and some flow measurements were made on a semi-span configuration of the model. Acoustic predictions were made using LOWSON.M, a Mathematica code. This hover prediction code, from HOVER.FOR, used blade element theory for the aerodynamics, and Prandtl's Vortex theory to model the wake, along with empirical formulas for the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, and stall. Aerodynamic models were developed from 7-hole pressure probe measurements of the mean velocity into the model rotors. LOWSON.M modeled a rotor blade as a single force and source/sink combination separated in the chordwise direction, at an

  20. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    PubMed

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence. PMID:26382506

  1. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-01

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  2. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-11

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion. PMID:27015488

  3. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-11

    Here we report compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  4. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind-shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of how turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  5. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  6. Turbulence and turbulence spectra in complex fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.T.; Chen, Shi-Yi; Turner, L.; Zemach, C.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective was to develop a theoretical model of fluid turbulence in parallel with a series of direct numerical simulations of increasingly complex test environments to establish limits of error and regimes of applicability, and to guide improvements. The aim is to produce methods of tested accuracy, with tractable numerical approximations, for turbulent fluids of constant density, and then for variable densities and multimaterial flows. We proceed from a recent spectral model that describes turbulent energy and stress densities in terms of a range of length scales. This should lead not only to improved engineering models, but also to a basic conceptual improvement because the spectral approach accounts for the variation of evolution rates with turbulence length scales.

  7. Numerical measurement of turbulent responses in drift-Alfven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, E.; Terry, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    A drift-Alfven magnetoturbulence model that augments reduced magnetohydrodynamics with evolution of electron density under parallel compression and fluid advection has been studied numerically. In the Alfvenic regime, measurement of spectral transfer rates, frequency spectra, energy partitions, and the ensemble-averaged turbulent response reveals both Alfvenic and hydrodynamic characteristics. The rms turbulent frequency is Alfvenic, the energies are equipartitioned, and there is a fast, Alfven-time scale relaxation in the turbulent response. The mean frequency is hydrodynamic, with diamagnetic and eddy straining signatures, and there is an eddy straining decorrelation appearing as a distinct, long time scale branch in the turbulent response. The decay rates and relative fluctuation strengths associated with fast and slow time scale decorrelation are in good agreement with theoretical predictions that posit a Kolmogorov spectrum in the Alfvenic regime. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  9. Turbulent reconnection and its implications

    PubMed Central

    Lazarian, A.; Eyink, G.; Vishniac, E.; Kowal, G.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes happening in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments, the Reynolds numbers corresponding to plasma flows are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence, which can be pre-existing or driven by magnetic reconnection itself, must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection that attempts to describe the process in the aforementioned environments. This necessity is obvious as three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations show the transition to the turbulence state of initially laminar reconnecting magnetic fields. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (Lazarian & Vishniac 1999 Astrophys. J. 517, 700–718 ()) reconnection model. We present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the experimentally proven concept of Richardson dispersion/diffusion as well as to more recent advances in understanding of the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the generalized Ohm's law that accounts for turbulent motion predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for reconnection for realistically turbulent media. We show that one of the most dramatic consequences of turbulence is the violation of the generally accepted notion of magnetic flux freezing. This notion is a cornerstone of most theories dealing with magnetized plasmas, and therefore its change induces fundamental shifts in accepted paradigms, for instance, turbulent reconnection entails reconnection diffusion process that is essential for understanding star formation. We argue that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the process of tearing reconnection should transfer to turbulent reconnection. We discuss flares that are predicted by turbulent reconnection and relate this process to

  10. Turbulent reconnection and its implications.

    PubMed

    Lazarian, A; Eyink, G; Vishniac, E; Kowal, G

    2015-05-13

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes happening in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments, the Reynolds numbers corresponding to plasma flows are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence, which can be pre-existing or driven by magnetic reconnection itself, must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection that attempts to describe the process in the aforementioned environments. This necessity is obvious as three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations show the transition to the turbulence state of initially laminar reconnecting magnetic fields. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (Lazarian & Vishniac 1999 Astrophys. J. 517, 700-718 (doi:10.1086/307233)) reconnection model. We present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the experimentally proven concept of Richardson dispersion/diffusion as well as to more recent advances in understanding of the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the generalized Ohm's law that accounts for turbulent motion predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for reconnection for realistically turbulent media. We show that one of the most dramatic consequences of turbulence is the violation of the generally accepted notion of magnetic flux freezing. This notion is a cornerstone of most theories dealing with magnetized plasmas, and therefore its change induces fundamental shifts in accepted paradigms, for instance, turbulent reconnection entails reconnection diffusion process that is essential for understanding star formation. We argue that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the process of tearing reconnection should transfer to turbulent reconnection. We discuss flares that are predicted by turbulent reconnection and relate

  11. Bumblebee Flight in Heavy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, T.; Kolomenskiy, D.; Schneider, K.; Lehmann, F.-O.; Sesterhenn, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments, or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  12. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Martina; Kissmann, Ralf; Spanier, Felix; Spanier

    2013-10-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. However, while there are a number of simulations on the market, some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper, we examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving has an influence not only on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  13. Calculation of Turbulent Expansion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollmien, Walter

    1945-01-01

    On the basis of certain formulas recently established by L. Prandtl for the turbulent interchange of momentum in stationary flows, various cases of "free turbulence" - that is, of flows without boundary walls - are treated in the present report. Prandtl puts the apparent shearing stress introduced by the turbulent momentum interchange. This present report deals first with the mixing of an air stream of uniform velocity with the adjacent still air, than with the expansion or diffusion of an air jet in the surrounding air space.

  14. Turbulence in the First Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, Fabio; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples

    2007-09-28

    We present preliminary results of 2-D simulations of the effects of turbulence in the mixing of Pair Instability Supenovae. We make use of the FLASH code to evolve initial 1-D models of post-bounce PISNe and seed turbulence in form of velocity perturbations. We identify the energetic and spatial scale for the turbulence to have mixing effects on the metal shells inside the star. Under the conditions we examine, we observe some mixing but the onion structure of the metal distribution is not disrupted.

  15. Formation of young massive clusters from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Michiko; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2015-08-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and direct N-body methods. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 10^4 to 10^6 M_sun, and a density between 17 and 1700 cm^-3. We continue the SPH simulations for a free-fall time scale, and analyze the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution is very clumpy with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100 to 10000 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyze the results of the N-body simulations at 2 Myr and 10 Myr. From dense massive molecular clouds, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of beta = -1.73 at 2 Myr and beta = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of < -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of M_g scales with 6.1 M_g^0.51 which also agrees with recent observation in M51. The molecular clouds which can form massive clusters are much denser than those typical in the Milky Way. The velocity dispersion of such molecular clouds reaches 20 km/s and it is consistent with the relative velocity of the molecular clouds observed near NGC 3603

  16. Turbulence Modeling Verification and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been in routine use for more than a quarter of a century. It is currently employed not only for basic research in fluid dynamics, but also for the analysis and design processes in many industries worldwide, including aerospace, automotive, power generation, chemical manufacturing, polymer processing, and petroleum exploration. A key feature of RANS CFD is the turbulence model. Because the RANS equations are unclosed, a model is necessary to describe the effects of the turbulence on the mean flow, through the Reynolds stress terms. The turbulence model is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in RANS CFD, and most models are known to be flawed in one way or another. Alternative methods such as direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) rely less on modeling and hence include more physics than RANS. In DNS all turbulent scales are resolved, and in LES the large scales are resolved and the effects of the smallest turbulence scales are modeled. However, both DNS and LES are too expensive for most routine industrial usage on today's computers. Hybrid RANS-LES, which blends RANS near walls with LES away from walls, helps to moderate the cost while still retaining some of the scale-resolving capability of LES, but for some applications it can still be too expensive. Even considering its associated uncertainties, RANS turbulence modeling has proved to be very useful for a wide variety of applications. For example, in the aerospace field, many RANS models are considered to be reliable for computing attached flows. However, existing turbulence models are known to be inaccurate for many flows involving separation. Research has been ongoing for decades in an attempt to improve turbulence models for separated and other nonequilibrium flows. When developing or improving turbulence models, both verification and validation are important

  17. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  18. Advances in turbulence studies. [Magnetohydrodynamic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Branover, H.; Unger, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Important contemporary trends in both experimental and theoretical turbulence research are reported. Particular attention is given to vortex reconnection, cascade, and mixing in turbulent flows; intermittent turbulence from closures; tearing instabilities in 2D MHD turbulence; axisymmetric hydromagnetic dynamo; bifurcations in MHD flow generated by electric current discharge; renormalization group analysis of MHD turbulence with low magnetic Reynolds number; Solution for turbulent primary azimuthal velocity in liquid-metal flows in sliding electric contacts; analogies between geophysical and hydromagnetic flows; turbulent electrically-induced vortical flows; dissipation length scale dynamics; two-phase grid turbulence; abridged octave wavenumber ring models for 2D turbulence; rag theory of magnetic fluctuations in turbulent flow; and instabilities of the nonuniform flows of a low-temperature plasma in MHD channels.

  19. Turbulent mixing of a passive scalar in grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.; Sakai, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Fractal grids have attracted attention as a new-type of turbulence-generating grid due to their unique characteristics. Recent studies have revealed that such uniqueness appears in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence. Scalar transport in those flows is also of great interest as it is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigate the scalar mixing in the near field of regular grid-generated turbulence with various grid configurations. Experiments have been carried out in liquid mixing layers with a Reynolds number of 5000 based on the mesh size of the grid and uniform velocity. Simultaneous measurements of two-component velocities and concentration have been performed by particle image velocimetry and a planar laser-induced fluorescence technique, respectively. The results show that the scaling law using the wake-interaction length scale is applicable for the turbulence intensity in the grid turbulence with different mesh sizes and the same thickness of the grid bar. The turbulence intensity increases as the thickness of the grid bar increases; thus, consequently increasing the scalar diffusion. The streamwise development of the scalar mixing layer thickness collapses onto a single curve by normalization based on the thickness of the grid bar.

  20. Turbulent energy flux generated by shock/homogeneous-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Krishnendu; Quadros, Russell; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    High-speed turbulent flows with shock waves are characterized by high localized surface heat transfer rates. Computational predictions are often inaccurate due to the limitations in modeling of the unclosed turbulent energy flux in the highly non-equilibrium regions of shock interaction. In this paper, we investigate the turbulent energy flux generated when homogeneous isotropic turbulence passes through a nominally normal shock wave. We use linear interaction analysis where the incoming turbulence is idealized as being composed of a collection of two-dimensional planar vorticity waves, and the shock wave is taken to be a discontinuity. The nature of the post-shock turbulent energy flux is predicted to be strongly dependent on the incidence angle of the incoming waves. The energy flux correlation is also decomposed into its vortical, entropy and acoustic contributions to understand its rapid non-monotonic variation behind the shock. Three-dimensional statistics, calculated by integrating two-dimensional results over a prescribed upstream energy spectrum, are compared with available direct numerical simulation data. A detailed budget of the governing equation is also considered in order to gain insight into the underlying physics.

  1. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  2. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence may be represented by finite Fourier series, where the inherent periodic box serves as a surrogate for a bounded astrophysical plasma. Independent Fourier coefficients form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function containing a Hermitian covariance matrix with positive eigenvalues. The eigenvalues at lowest wave number can be very small, resulting in a large-scale coherent structure: a turbulent dynamo. This is seen in computations and a theoretical explanation in terms of 'broken ergodicity' contains Taylor s theory of force-free states. An important problem for future work is the case of real, i.e., dissipative flows. In real flows, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur in MHD turbulence at the largest scale, as suggested by low resolution simulations. One challenge is to incorporate coherent structure at the largest scale into the theory of turbulent fluctuations at smaller scales.

  3. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Povinelli, L.A.; Liou, W.W.; Shabbir, A.; Shih, T.H.

    1992-03-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  4. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, J. J. H.

    2012-12-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke, and fumes in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of turbulence at large Reynolds number as described by Kolmogorov. The model consists of Langevin and diffusion equations in which the damping and diffusivity are expressed by expansions in powers of the reciprocal Kolmogorov constant C0. We derive solutions of O(C00) and O(C0-1). We truncate at O(C0-2) which is shown to result in an error of a few percentages in predicted dispersion statistics for representative cases of turbulent flow. We reveal analogies and remarkable differences between the solutions of classical statistical mechanics and those of statistical turbulence.

  5. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  6. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  7. Unsteady turbulent boundary layer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, R. E.; Nash, J. F.; Carl, L. W.; Patel, V. C.

    1973-01-01

    The governing equations for an unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a swept infinite cylinder, composed of a continuity equation, a pair of momentum equations and a pair of turbulent energy equations which include upstream history efforts, are solved numerically. An explicit finite difference analog to the partial differential equations is formulated and developed into a computer program. Calculations were made for a variety of unsteady flows in both two and three dimensions but primarily for two dimensional flow fields in order to first understand some of the fundamental physical aspects of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. Oscillating free stream flows without pressure gradient, oscillating retarded free stream flows and monotonically time-varying flows have all been studied for a wide frequency range. It was found that to the lowest frequency considered, the lower frequency bound being determined by economic considerations (machine time), there were significant unsteady effects on the turbulent boundary layer.

  8. Mathematical representations of turbulent mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Audeh, B.

    1973-01-01

    A basic description is given of the mathematical tools and models which are presently used to represent turbulent, free shear layers. Recommendations are included for ways in which current modeling techniques can be improved.

  9. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The {open_quotes}vortex strings{close_quotes} scale l{sub s} {approximately} LRe{sup -3/10} (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES).

  10. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  11. One-Dimensional Grid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstein, Alan R.; Nilsen, Vebjørn

    1998-11-01

    To capture molecular mixing and other small scale phenomena such as chemical reactions and differential diffusion, it is essential to resolve all the length (and time) scales. For large Reynolds number flows this is impossible to do in three-dimensional turbulence simulations with the current and foreseeable future computer technology. To circumvent this problem the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model, as the name implies, considers only one spatial dimension in which all the length scales can be resolved even at very large Reynolds numbers. To incorporate the effect of advection on a one-dimensional domain, the evolution of the velocity and scalar profiles is randomly interrupted by a sequence of profile rearrangements representing the effect of turbulent eddies. Results obtained from ODT simulations of grid turbulence with a passive scalar are presented. The decay exponents for the velocity and passive scalar fluctuations, as predicted by ODT, compare favorably with experimental data.

  12. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  13. Blowing in the Wind: II. Creation and Redistribution of Refractory Inclusions in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Davis, Sanford S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    Ca-A1 rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1-6% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be 1-3 million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components which were accreted into the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We reassess the situation in terms of a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times on the order of 10(exp 6) years. CAIs can form early, when the inner nebula was hot, and persist in sufficient abundance to be incorporated into primitive planetesimals at a much later time. Small (less than or approximately 0.1 mm diameter) CAIs persist for longer times than large (greater than or approximately 5mm diameter ones. To obtain a quantitative match to the observed volume fractions of CAIs in chondrites, another process must be allowed for: a substantial enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, which we suggest was caused by rapid inward drift of meter-sized objects. This early in nebula history, the drifting rubble would have a carbon content probably an order of magnitude larger than even the most primitive (CI) carbonaceous chondrites. Abundant carbon in the evaporating material would help keep the nebula oxygen fugacity low, plausibly solar; as inferred for the formation environment of CAIs. The associated production of a larger than canonical amount of CO2 might also play a role in mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes, leaving the gas rich in O-16 as inferred from CAIs and other high temperature condensates.

  14. Blowing in the Wind: II. Creation and Redistribution of Refractory Inclusions in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Davis, Sanford S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    Ca-Al rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1-6% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be 1-3 million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components which were accreted into the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We reassess the situation in terms of a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times on the order of 10(exp 6) years. CAIs can form early, when the inner nebula was hot, and persist in sufficient abundance to be incorporated into primitive planetesimals at a much later time. Small (less than or approx. equal to 0.1 mm diameter) CAIs persist for longer times than large (greater than or approx. equal to 5mm diameter ones). To obtain a quantitative match t o the observed volume fractions of CAIs in chondrites, another process must be allowed for: a substantial enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, which we suggest was caused by rapid inward drift of meter-sized objects. This early in nebula history, the drifting rubble would have a carbon content probably an order of magnitude larger than even the most primitive (CI) carbonaceous chondrites. Abundant carbon in the evaporating material would help keep the nebula oxygen fugacity low, plausably solar, as inferred for the formation environment of CAIs. The associated production of a larger than canonical amount of CO2 might also play a role in mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes, leaving the gas rich in l60 as inferred from CAIs and other high temperature condensates.

  15. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  16. Variable density turbulence tunnel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, E.; Bewley, G. P.; Nobach, H.; Sinhuber, M.; Xu, H.

    2014-09-01

    The Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen, Germany, produces very high turbulence levels at moderate flow velocities, low power consumption, and adjustable kinematic viscosity between 10-4 m2/s and 10-7 m2/s. The Reynolds number can be varied by changing the pressure or flow rate of the gas or by using different non-flammable gases including air. The highest kinematic viscosities, and hence lowest Reynolds numbers, are reached with air or nitrogen at 0.1 bar. To reach the highest Reynolds numbers the tunnel is pressurized to 15 bars with the dense gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Turbulence is generated at the upstream ends of two measurement sections with grids, and the evolution of this turbulence is observed as it moves down the length of the sections. We describe the instrumentation presently in operation, which consists of the tunnel itself, classical grid turbulence generators, and state-of-the-art nano-fabricated hot-wire anemometers provided by Princeton University [M. Vallikivi, M. Hultmark, S. C. C. Bailey, and A. J. Smits, Exp. Fluids 51, 1521 (2011)]. We report measurements of the characteristic scales of the flow and of turbulent spectra up to Taylor Reynolds number Rλ ≈ 1600, higher than any other grid-turbulence experiment. We also describe instrumentation under development, which includes an active grid and a Lagrangian particle tracking system that moves down the length of the tunnel with the mean flow. In this configuration, the properties of the turbulence are adjustable and its structure is resolvable up to Rλ ≈ 8000.

  17. Turbulence modeling in aircraft icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    The Icing and Cryogenic Technology Branch develops computational tools which predict ice growth on aircraft surfaces and uses existing CFD technology to evaluate the aerodynamic changes associated with such accretions. Surface roughness, transition location, and laminar, transition, or turbulent convective heat transfer all influence the ice growth process on aircraft surfaces. Turbulence modeling is a critical element within the computational tools used for both ice shape prediction and for performance degradation evaluation.

  18. On turbulence in dilatant dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut Z.; Wessling, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new theory on the behaviour of shear-thickening (dilatant) fluids under turbulent conditions. The structure of a dilatant colloidal fluid in turbulent motion may be characterized by (at least) four characteristic length scales: (i) the ‘statistically largest’ turbulent scale, {λ }0, labeling the begin of the inertial part of the wavenumber spectrum; (ii) the energy-containing scale, { L }; (iii) Kolmogorov’s micro-scale, {λ }{ K }, related with the size of the smallest vortices existing for a given kinematic viscosity and forcing; (iv) the inner (‘colloidal’) micro-scale, {λ }i, typically representing a major stable material property of the colloidal fluid. In particular, for small ratios r={λ }i/{λ }{ K }∼ { O }(1), various interactions between colloidal structures and smallest turbulent eddies can be expected. In the present paper we discuss particularly that for ρ ={λ }0/{λ }{ K }\\to { O }(1) turbulence (in the narrow, inertial sense) is strangled and chaotic but less mixing fluid motions remain. We start from a new stochastic, micro-mechanical turbulence theory without empirical parameters valid for inviscid fluids as seen in publications by Baumert in 2013 and 2015. It predicts e.g. von Karman’s constant correctly as 1/\\sqrt{2 π }=0.399. In its generalized version for non-zero viscosity and shear-thickening behavior presented in this contribution, it predicts two solution branches for the steady state: The first characterizes a family of states with swift (inertial) turbulent mixing and small {λ }{ K }, potentially approaching {λ }i. The second branch characterizes a state family with ρ \\to { O }(1) and thus strangled turbulence, ρ ≈ { O }(1). Stability properties and a potential dynamic commuting between the two solution branches had to be left for future research.

  19. An introduction to quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vinen, W F

    2008-08-28

    This paper provides a brief introduction to quantum turbulence in simple superfluids, in which the required rotational motion in the superfluid component is due entirely to the topological defects that are identified as quantized vortices. Particular emphasis is placed on the basic dynamical behaviour of the quantized vortices and on turbulent decay mechanisms at a very low temperature. There are possible analogies with the behaviour of cosmic strings. PMID:18534939

  20. Enhanced Turbulent Mixing on Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Traffic emissions have a substantial effect on air quality and turbulence affects how these emissions mix with the surrounding air. In July and August of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada) as part of the ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways). The aim of this project was to study and parameterize the turbulent mixing of traffic emissions on highways as a function of traffic density, speed, and vehicle type. The mobile station CRUISER (Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research) was equipped with two sonic anemometers, an air flow probe (AIMMS-20), inertial motion sensing, GPS, video recording equipment, and various particle and gas measurement instrumentation. This allowed in-situ turbulence measurements while driving on the highway with traffic. These measurements differ from previous studies in that turbulence can be measured in realistic conditions, while traffic densities, vehicle types, and vehicle to measurement distances can be extracted from video recording by automated video processing software. Although the turbulent motion of air is often measured from aircraft and ship-based instrumentation, the analysis and interpretation of sonic anemometer measurements from a highway-speed vehicle, moving over uneven and often bumpy terrain presents a very different challenge. Various analytical approaches to process these measurements will be compared and the development of the video processing software to determine vehicle size and following distance will be discussed. Results will be presented which demonstrate a strong dependence of turbulent energy on vehicle type, speed, and following distance.

  1. Mountain Wave-Induced Turbulence - "Lower Turbulent Zones" Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Lukas; Grubišić, Vanda; Serafin, Stefano; Mühlgassner, Rita

    2014-05-01

    In their seminal 1974 paper on "Lower Turbulent Zones Associated with Mountain Lee Waves" P. F. Lester and W. A. Fingerhut attempted to characterize regions of low-level turbulence in the lee of mountain ranges that are commonly associated with large-amplitude mountain waves aloft. For their study, they made extensive use of airborne measurements with small research aircraft that penetrated into the "lower turbulent zone" (LTZ). The Lester and Fingerhut study complemented previous work on wave-induced LTZs by J. P. Kuettner and others in the 1950s who were among the first to employ sailplanes as scientific measurement platforms. Given the limitations of scientific instrumentation on research aircraft in the 1970s (e.g., no GPS) and, in particular, on sailplanes in the 1950s, credit has to be given to these authors for their remarkably detailed account and classification of LTZs. Ever since then, scientists have been trying to refine the conceptual model of the LTZ and shed more light on the origin of turbulence therein. The Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX, Sierra Nevada, California, 2006) is the most recent, major effort organized to investigate the characteristics of LTZs by studying the coupled mountain-wave, rotor, and boundary-layer system. During T-REX, comprehensive ground-based and airborne, in situ and remote sensing measurements were collected during 15 Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). In this study, we make use of the extensive T-REX datasets to revisit the LTZ concept. During T-REX IOPs, the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) research aircraft flew straight-and-level legs aligned with the mean wind direction to document the variation of flow and turbulence over and downwind of the Sierra Nevada. In order to characterize the structure and intensity of turbulence within the LTZ, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and eddy-dissipation rate (EDR) were computed from UWKA research flights. In contrast to the rough average values of TKE and EDR

  2. Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and

  3. MHD Turbulence through the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.

    Velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in a wide range of space and time scales have been directly detected in the interplanetary medium In the solar corona the presence of MHD turbulence is naturally generated by the mechanical and magnetic energy input from the photosphere and it could be related to coronal heating as well as to energy release events like micro and nanoflares A certain amount of fluctuations from the solar corona arrives in the solar wind mainly as Alfvénic turbulence i e strongly correlated velocity and magnetic field fluctuations with a very low level of compressible density magnetic field intensity temperature fluctuations The whole system formed by the solar corona and the solar wind represents a sort of wind tunnel extremely useful to study the MHD turbulence properties The presence of magnetic turbulence in the heliosphere is identified as the source of charged particle collisionless diffusion which according the values of parameters like the energy level on magnetic fluctuations or the turbulence correlation length can display both a normal gaussian random walk and an anomalous subdiffusive or super diffusive behavior The former case is obtained in a situation of global stochasticity high level of fluctuation energy while the latter in a situation of weak chaos low level of fluctuation energy The talk will discuss turbulence generation at photospheric level its propagation and its interaction with heliospheric structures and its effects on anomalous transport processes of charged

  4. Evidence of big bang turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2002-11-01

    Chaotic, eddy-like motions dominated by inertial-vortex forces begin at Planck scales in a hot big-bang-turbulence (BBT) cosmological model where this version of the quantum-gravitational-dynamics epoch produces not only the first space-time-energy of the universe but the first high Reynolds number turbulence and turbulent mixing with Kolmogorov and Batchelor-Obukhov-Corrsin velocity and temperature gradient spectra. Strong-force-freeze-out and inflation produced the first fossil-temperature-turbulence by stretching the fluctuations beyond the horizon scale ct of causal connection for light speed c and time t. Recent Cosmic Background Imager spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies at high wavenumbers support the prediction that fossil BBT fluctuation patterns imprinted by nucleosynthesis on light element densities and the associated Sachs-Wolfe temperature fluctuations should not decay by thermal diffusion as expected if the CMB anisotropies were acoustic as commonly assumed. Extended Self Similarity coefficients of the CMB anisotropies exactly match those of high Reynolds number turbulence (Bershadskii and Sreenivasan 2002), supporting the conclusion that fossil big-bang-turbulence seeded nucleosynthesis of light elements and the first hydro-gravitational structure formation.

  5. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  6. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  7. Seasonality in submesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Klymak, Jody M.; Gula, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although the strongest ocean surface currents occur at horizontal scales of order 100 km, recent numerical simulations suggest that flows smaller than these mesoscale eddies can achieve important vertical transports in the upper ocean. These submesoscale flows, 1–100 km in horizontal extent, take heat and atmospheric gases down into the interior ocean, accelerating air–sea fluxes, and bring deep nutrients up into the sunlit surface layer, fueling primary production. Here we present observational evidence that submesoscale flows undergo a seasonal cycle in the surface mixed layer: they are much stronger in winter than in summer. Submesoscale flows are energized by baroclinic instabilities that develop around geostrophic eddies in the deep winter mixed layer at a horizontal scale of order 1–10 km. Flows larger than this instability scale are energized by turbulent scale interactions. Enhanced submesoscale activity in the winter mixed layer is expected to achieve efficient exchanges with the permanent thermocline below. PMID:25897832

  8. Multidimensional Potential Burgers Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional generalised stochastic Burgers equation in the space-periodic setting: partial {u}/partial t+(nabla f({u}) \\cdot nabla) {u}-ν Δ {u}= nabla η, quad t ≥ 0, {x} in{T}^d=({R}/ {Z})^d, under the assumption that u is a gradient. Here f is strongly convex and satisfies a growth condition, ν is small and positive, while η is a random forcing term, smooth in space and white in time. For solutions u of this equation, we study Sobolev norms of u averaged in time and in ensemble: each of these norms behaves as a given negative power of ν. These results yield sharp upper and lower bounds for natural analogues of quantities characterising the hydrodynamical turbulence, namely the averages of the increments and of the energy spectrum. These quantities behave as a power of the norm of the relevant parameter, which is respectively the separation ℓ in the physical space and the wavenumber k in the Fourier space. Our bounds do not depend on the initial condition and hold uniformly in {ν}. We generalise the results obtained for the one-dimensional case in [10], confirming the physical predictions in [4, 30]. Note that the form of the estimates does not depend on the dimension: the powers of {ν, |{{k}}|, ℓ} are the same in the one- and the multi-dimensional setting.

  9. Turbulent AGN tori .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartmann, M.; Meisenheimer, K.; Klahr, H.; Camenzind, M.; Wolf, S.; Henning, Th.

    Recently, the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the VLTI has shown that dust tori in the two nearby Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy are geometrically thick and can be well described by a thin, warm central disk, surrounded by a colder and fluffy torus component. By carrying out hydrodynamical simulations with the help of the TRAMP code \\citep{schartmann_Klahr_99}, we follow the evolution of a young nuclear star cluster in terms of discrete mass-loss and energy injection from stellar processes. This naturally leads to a filamentary large scale torus component, where cold gas is able to flow radially inwards. The filaments open out into a dense and very turbulent disk structure. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions or images with the help of the 3D radiative transfer code MC3D \\citep{schartmann_Wolf_03}. Good agreement is found in comparisons with data due to the existence of almost dust-free lines of sight through the large scale component and the large column densities caused by the dense disk.

  10. Turbulent solutions of equations of fluid motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Some turbulent solutions of the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations (equations of fluid motion) are reviewed. Those equations are solved numerically in order to study the nonlinear physics of incompressible turbulent flow. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. The resulting solutions show characteristics of turbulence, such as the linear and nonlinear excitation of small-scale fluctuations. For the stronger fluctuations the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence. The cases considered include turbulence that is statistically homogeneous or inhomogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic. A statistically steady-state turbulence is obtained by using a spatially periodic body force. Various turbulence processes, including the transfer of energy between eddy sizes and between directional components and the production, dissipation, and spatial diffusion of turbulence, are considered. It is concluded that the physical processes occurring in turbulence can be profitably studied numerically.

  11. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  12. Characteristics of Turbulent/non-turbulent Interface in a Turbulent Planar Jet with a Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Kouji; Terashima, Osamu; Ito, Yasumasa; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Characteristics of chemical reaction (A + B --> P) near the turbulent/non-turbulent (T/NT) interface are investigated by using the direct numerical simulation of reactive planar jet. The reactants A and B are separately premixed into the jet and ambient flows, respectively. DNS is performed at three different Damköhler numbers. The conditional statistics conditioned on the distance from the T/NT interface is used to investigate the chemical reaction near the T/NT interface. The conditional mean concentration of product P shows a sharp jump near the T/NT interface, and the product P hardly exists in the non-turbulent region. This implies that the chemical reaction takes place in the turbulent region after the reactant B in the ambient flow is entrained into the turbulent region. The conditional mean scalar dissipation rate of mixture fraction has a large peak value slightly inside the T/NT interface. At the same point, the chemical reaction rate also has a peak value in the case of large Damköhler number. On the other hand, when the Damköhler number is small, the chemical reaction rate near the T/NT interface is smaller than that in the turbulent region. This work was carried out under the Collaborative Research Project of the Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. Part of this work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25002531 and MEXT KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25289030, 25289031, 2563005.

  13. Linear stability analysis of swirling turbulent flows with turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Juniper, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the growth of large scale coherent structures in turbulent flows by performing linear stability analysis around a mean flow. Turbulent flows are characterized by fine-scale stochastic perturbations. The momentum transfer caused by these perturbations affects the development of larger structures. Therefore, in a linear stability analysis, it is important to include the perturbations' influence. One way to do this is to include a turbulence model in the stability analysis. This is done in the literature by using eddy viscosity models (EVMs), which are first order turbulence models. We extend this approach by using second order turbulence models, in this case explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models (EARSMs). EARSMs are more versatile than EVMs, in that they can be applied to a wider range of flows, and could also be more accurate. We verify our EARSM-based analysis by applying it to a channel flow and then comparing the results with those from an EVM-based analysis. We then apply the EARSM-based stability analysis to swirling pipe flows and Taylor-Couette flows, which demonstrates the main benefit of EARSM-based analysis. This project is supported by EPSRC and Rolls-Royce through a Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  14. Turbulence production and turbulent pressure support in the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iapichino, L.; Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Merklein, J.

    2011-07-01

    The injection and evolution of turbulence in the intergalactic medium is studied by means of mesh-based hydrodynamical simulations, including a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for small-scale unresolved turbulence. The simulations show that the production of turbulence has a different redshift dependence in the intracluster medium (ICM) and the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We show that the turbulence in the ICM is produced chiefly by merger-induced shear flows, whereas the production in the WHIM is dominated by shock interactions. Secondly, the effect of dynamical pressure support on the gravitational contraction has been studied. This turbulent support is stronger in the WHIM gas at baryon overdensities 1 ≲δ≲ 100 and less relevant for the ICM. Although the relative mass fraction of the gas with large vorticity is considerable (52 per cent in the ICM), we find that for only about 10 per cent in mass this is dynamically relevant, namely not associated with an equally large thermal pressure support. According to this result, a significant non-thermal pressure support counteracting the gravitational contraction is a localized characteristic in the cosmic flow, rather than a widespread feature.

  15. Turbulence, Turbulence Suppression, and Velocity Shear in the Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentle, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Li, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The Helimak is an approximation to the infinite cylindrical slab with a size large compared with turbulence transverse scale lengths, but with open field lines of finite length. Radially-segmented isolated end plates allow application of radial electric fields that drive radial currents. Above a threshold in applied voltage (driven current), the fractional turbulent amplitude is greatly reduced. Reductions are observed for both positive and negative bias over a broad range of collisionality and parallel connection length. Concurrent measurements of the ion flow velocity profile are made by Doppler spectroscopy of the argon plasma ion. Turbulence reductions are broadly correlated with reductions in radial correlation length, but not with velocity flow shear. No evidence of zonal flows has been found. The turbulence -- density, potential, and temperature fluctuations, is compared with simulations from a two-fluid model for this geometry, which also show reduced turbulence with bias. Work supported by the Department of Energy OFES DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  16. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, D. S.; Kim, John; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    1988-01-01

    In wall-bounded shear flows the transition to turbulence through localized disturbances goes through a pattern starting with a development of shear layers. The localized normal velocity fluctuations induce normal vorticity through the lift-up effect. These shear layers become unstable to secondary disturbances, and if the amplitudes of the disturbances are large enough, a turbulent spot develops. Investigations of the spot in boundary layers has shown that the turbulent part of the spot is very similar to a fully developed boundary layer. Wygnanski et al. (1976) showed that the mean profile at the center-symmetry plane has a logarithmic region and Johansson et al. (1987) showed that both the higher-order statistics and flow structures in the spot were the same as in the corresponding fully developed flow. In what respects the turbulence inside the Poiseuille spot is similar to fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied. The numerically simulated spot is used, where the characteristics inside the spot are compared to those of the wave packet in the wingtip area. A recent experimental investigation of the velocity field associated with the Poiseuille spot by Klingmann et al. is used for comparison.

  17. Direct measurement of turbulent resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nornberg, M. D.

    2013-10-01

    We have directly measured the vector turbulent emf in a two-vortex flow of liquid sodium in the Madison Dynamo Experiment. Using a novel probe design, we simultaneously measure magnetic and flow fluctuations to determine their correlated effect on mean-field induction. Through our electromagnetic model for the flow-induced mean magnetic field, constrained by measurements throughout the flow, we construct the vector mean current density at the probe location. With this information we are able to construct the mean-field model for the α and β-effect terms of the turbulent emf and compare them with the direct measurement of the time averaged correlated fluctuations. The measured turbulent emf is anti-parallel with the mean current and is almost entirely described by an enhanced resistivity. The residual turbulent resistivity presents a difficulty for establishing the onset of the kinematic dynamo in a laboratory turbulent flow in that the effective magnetic Reynolds number is reduced making it more difficult to exceed the critical Rm . We have demonstrated that this enhanced resistivity can be mitigated by eliminating the largest-scale eddies. By tailoring the large-scale flow, we have achieved flows operating near threshold for dynamo self-excitation.

  18. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  19. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  20. Advancements in engineering turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Some new developments in two-equation models and second order closure models are presented. Two-equation models (k-epsilon models) have been widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for engineering problems. Most of low-Reynolds number two-equation models contain some wall-distance damping functions to account for the effect of wall on turbulence. However, this often causes the confusion and difficulties in computing flows with complex geometry and also needs an ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. A set of modified two-equation models is proposed to remove the aforementioned shortcomings. The calculations using various two-equation models are compared with direct numerical simulations of channel flow and flat boundary layers. Development of a second order closure model is also discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All the existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the 3-D effect of mean flow on the turbulence (e.g. decrease in the shear stress caused by the cross flow in the boundary layer). The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model is described and is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of 3-D mean flow on the turbulence.

  1. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  2. Turbulent character of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Milan, Patrick; Wächter, Matthias; Peinke, Joachim

    2013-03-29

    Wind turbines generate electricity from turbulent wind. Large fluctuations, and, more importantly, frequent wind gusts cause a highly fluctuating electrical power feed into the grid. Such effects are the hallmark of high-frequency turbulence. Here we show evidence that it is the complex structure of turbulence that dominates the power output for one single wind turbine as well as for an entire wind farm. We illustrate the highly intermittent, peaked nature of wind power fed into the grid. Multifractal scaling is observed, as described initially by Kolmogorov's 1962 theory of turbulence. In parallel, we propose a stochastic model that converts wind speed signals into power output signals with appropriate multifractal statistics. As more and more wind turbines become integrated into our electric grids, a proper understanding of this intermittent power source must be worked out to ensure grid stability in future networks. Thus, our results stress the need for a profound understanding of the physics of turbulence and its impact on wind energy. PMID:23581387

  3. Multiwave Interactions in Turbulent Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear wave-wave interactions in turbulent jets were investigated based on the integrated energy of each scale of motion in a cross section of the jet. The analysis indicates that two frequency components in the axisymmetric mode can interact with other background frequencies in the axisymmetric mode, thereby amplifying an enormous number of other frequencies. Two frequency components in a single helical mode cannot, by themselves, amplify other frequency components. But combinations of frequency components of helical and axisymmetric modes can amplify other frequencies in other helical modes. The present computations produce several features consistent with experimental observations such as: (1) dependency of the interactions on the initial phase differences, (2) enhancement of the momentum thickness under multifrequency forcing, and (3) the increase in background turbulence under forcing. In a multifrequency-excited jet, mixing enhancement was found to be a result of the turbulence enhancement rather than simply the amplification of forced wave components. The excitation waves pump energy from the mean flow to the turbulence, thus enhancing the latter. The high frequency waves enhance the turbulence close to the jet exit, but, the low frequency waves are most effective further downstream.

  4. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  5. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing. PMID:26274279

  6. The Turbulent Life of Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, S.; Rogers, M.; Wray, A.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoplankton is a generic name for photosynthesizing microscopic organisms that inhabit the upper sunlit layer (euphotic zone) of almost all oceans and bodies of freshwater. They are agents for "primary production," the incorporation of carbon from the environment into living organisms, a process that, sustains the aquatic food web. It is estimated that phytoplankton contribute about half of the global primary production, the other half being due to terrestrial plants. By sustaining the aquatic food web and controlling the biogeochemical cycles through primary production, phytoplankton exert a dominant influence on life on earth. Turbulence influences this process in three very important ways. First, essential mineral nutrients are transported from the deeper layers to the euphotic zone through turbulence. Second, turbulence helps to suspend phytoplankton in the euphotic zone since in still water, the phytoplankton, especially the larger species, tend to settle out of the sunlit layers. Third, turbulence transports phytoplankton from the surface to the dark sterile waters, and this is an important mechanism of loss. Thus, stable phytoplankton populations are maintained through a delicate dynamic balance between the processes of turbulence, reproduction, and sinking. The first quantitative model for this was introduced by Riley, Stommel and Bumpus in 1949. This is an attempt to extend their efforts through a combination of analysis and computer simulation in order to better understand the principal qualitative aspects of the physical/biological coupling of this natural system.

  7. Breaking waves, turbulence and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmrich, Johannes; Vagle, Svein; Thomson, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum, and gases are to a large extent affected by wave-induced turbulence in the near-surface ocean layer, and are generally increased over the fluxes in a law-of-the-wall type boundary layer. However, air-bubbles generated during the wave breaking process may affect the density stratification and in turn reduce turbulence intensity in the near-surface layer. The turbulence field beneath surface waves is rather complex and provides great challenges for detailed observations. We obtained high resolution near-surface velocity profiles, bubble cloud measurements and video recordings of the breaking activity in a coastal strait. Conditions ranged from moderate to strong wind forcing with wind speed ranging from 5 m/s to 20 m/s. Estimates of the dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are calculated from the in-situ velocity measurements. We find dissipation rates, fluctuating by more than two orders of magnitude, are closely linked to the air-fraction associated with micro-bubbles. Combining these turbulence estimates and the bubble cloud characteristics we infer differences in the strength of wave breaking and its effect on wave-induced mixing and air-sea exchange processes.

  8. Remote Sensing of Turbulence in Natural Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-11-01

    It is generally agreed that natural fluids including the atmosphere, ocean, and astrophysical objects are mixed by turbulence against the forces of gravity. However, the basic mechanisms, definition, and even the direction of the turbulence kinetic energy cascade remain controversial. Broadband remote sensing gives strong evidence to resolve such questions. Turbulence is found to be an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Irrotational flows are non-turbulent by definition. Because turbulent vorticity is always produced at the Kolmogorov scale, the direction of the turbulent energy cascade is always from small scales to large. Fossilization of the turbulence occurs at its largest scales. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation of a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. In the ocean, fossil vorticity turbulence internal waves carry bottom turbulence energy to the sea surface by means of beamed zombie turbulence maser action mixing chimneys, a generic process of natural fluids. Spectral analysis of the sea surface brightness from space satellites combined with simultaneous ocean microstructure sea truth reveals the generic mechanism, also supported by recent astrophysical observations http://arxiv.org/abs/1005.2772v4.

  9. Two-dimensional convective turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzinov, A.V.; Kukharkin, N.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-02-01

    We show that 2D {bold E{times}B} ionospheric turbulence of the electron density in the equatorial electrojet is isomorphic to the viscous convection of an ordinary fluid in a porous medium due to temperature gradients. Numerical simulations reveal the strong anisotropy in the turbulence, which consists of rising hot bubbles and falling cool bubbles. These bubbles break up into fingers leading to the formation of stable shear flows. After reaching a quasisteady state, the omnidirectional energy spectrum approaches a {ital k}{sup {minus}2} behavior, rather than {ital k}{sup {minus}5/3} as expected from isotropic turbulence. Physical mechanisms that lead to anisotropy are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  11. Turbulence in transient solar phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M.

    1982-01-01

    If theta dependence is kept in the Navier-Stokes equations for the solar wind, than a density enhancement will grow. This growth is followed in the nonlinear equations until a streamer is formed. Viscosity stops the streamer's growth when there is a large difference in speeds inside and outside of the streamer. Using classical fluid mechanics and a latitude dependent hydrodynamical model, it is shown that unmagnetized perturbed flow evolves into high and low density regions. The growth mechanisms for density enrichments are discussed along with a nonlinear solution for their large amplitude development. It was found that a higher Reynolds number is needed to start turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field because energy is required to bend the field lines attached to the fluid. If cosmological gas was turbulent shortly after the big bang, then galaxies could have been formed by turbulent eddies.

  12. Autonomic closure for turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Ryan N.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new approach to turbulence closure is presented that eliminates the need to specify a predefined turbulence model and instead provides for fully adaptive, self-optimizing, autonomic closures. The closure is autonomic in the sense that the simulation itself determines the optimal local, instantaneous relation between any unclosed term and resolved quantities through the solution of a nonlinear, nonparametric system identification problem. This nonparametric approach allows the autonomic closure to freely adapt to varying nonlinear, nonlocal, nonequilibrium, and other turbulence characteristics in the flow. Even a simple implementation of the autonomic closure for large eddy simulations provides remarkably more accurate results in a priori tests than do dynamic versions of traditional prescribed closures.

  13. Autonomic closure for turbulence simulations.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan N; Hamlington, Peter E; Dahm, Werner J A

    2016-03-01

    A new approach to turbulence closure is presented that eliminates the need to specify a predefined turbulence model and instead provides for fully adaptive, self-optimizing, autonomic closures. The closure is autonomic in the sense that the simulation itself determines the optimal local, instantaneous relation between any unclosed term and resolved quantities through the solution of a nonlinear, nonparametric system identification problem. This nonparametric approach allows the autonomic closure to freely adapt to varying nonlinear, nonlocal, nonequilibrium, and other turbulence characteristics in the flow. Even a simple implementation of the autonomic closure for large eddy simulations provides remarkably more accurate results in a priori tests than do dynamic versions of traditional prescribed closures. PMID:27078285

  14. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  15. Electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: universal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2015-02-01

    The energy cascade of electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) turbulence is considered. Fractal and multi-fractal models for the energy dissipation field are used to determine the spatial intermittency corrections to the scaling behavior in the high-wavenumber (electron hydrodynamic limit) and low-wavenumber (magnetization limit) asymptotic regimes of the inertial range. Extrapolation of the multi-fractal scaling down to the dissipative microscales confirms in these asymptotic regimes a dissipative anomaly previously indicated by the numerical simulations of EMHD turbulence. Several basic features of the EMHD turbulent system are found to be universal which seem to transcend the existence of the characteristic length scale d e (which is the electron skin depth) in the EMHD problem: equipartition spectrum; Reynolds-number scaling of the dissipative microscales; scaling of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the electron-flow velocity (or magnetic field) gradient (even with intermittency corrections); dissipative anomaly; and critical exponent scaling.

  16. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Timothy S; Forman, Miriam; Oughton, Sean

    2008-10-24

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wave numbers with a k(-2)_(||) spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wave vectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3. PMID:18999759

  17. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  18. Elastic wave turbulence and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the onset of intermittency for vibrating elastic plate turbulence in the framework of the weak wave turbulence theory using a numerical approach. The spectrum of the displacement field and the structure functions of the fluctuations are computed for different forcing amplitudes. At low forcing, the spectrum predicted by the theory is observed, while the fluctuations are consistent with Gaussian statistics. When the forcing is increased, the spectrum varies at large scales, corresponding to the oscillations of nonlinear structures made of ridges delimited by d cones. In this regime, the fluctuations exhibit small-scale intermittency that can be fitted via a multifractal model. The analysis of the nonlinear frequency shows that the intermittency is linked to the breakdown of the weak turbulence at large scales only.

  19. Elastic wave turbulence and intermittency.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the onset of intermittency for vibrating elastic plate turbulence in the framework of the weak wave turbulence theory using a numerical approach. The spectrum of the displacement field and the structure functions of the fluctuations are computed for different forcing amplitudes. At low forcing, the spectrum predicted by the theory is observed, while the fluctuations are consistent with Gaussian statistics. When the forcing is increased, the spectrum varies at large scales, corresponding to the oscillations of nonlinear structures made of ridges delimited by d cones. In this regime, the fluctuations exhibit small-scale intermittency that can be fitted via a multifractal model. The analysis of the nonlinear frequency shows that the intermittency is linked to the breakdown of the weak turbulence at large scales only. PMID:27575068

  20. Aircraft Cabin Turbulence Warning Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Larcher, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    New turbulence prediction technology offers the potential for advance warning of impending turbulence encounters, thereby allowing necessary cabin preparation time prior to the encounter. The amount of time required for passengers and flight attendants to be securely seated (that is, seated with seat belts fastened) currently is not known. To determine secured seating-based warning times, a consortium of aircraft safety organizations have conducted an experiment involving a series of timed secured seating trials. This demonstrative experiment, conducted on October 1, 2, and 3, 2002, used a full-scale B-747 wide-body aircraft simulator, human passenger subjects, and supporting staff from six airlines. Active line-qualified flight attendants from three airlines participated in the trials. Definitive results have been obtained to provide secured seating-based warning times for the developers of turbulence warning technology

  1. An approximation method for electrostatic Vlasov turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Electrostatic Vlasov turbulence in a bounded spatial region is considered. An iterative approximation method with a proof of convergence is constructed. The method is non-linear and applicable to strong turbulence.

  2. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plume Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a data base obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area, the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  3. Particle Settling in Low Energy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rachel; MacVean, Lissa; Tse, Ian; Mazzaro, Laura; Stacey, Mark; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    Particle settling velocities can be altered by turbulence. In turbulence, dense particles may get trapped in convergent flow regions, and falling particles may be swept towards the downward side of turbulent eddies, resulting in enhanced settling velocities. The degree of velocity enhancement may depend on the Stokes number, the Rouse number, and the turbulent Reynolds number. In a homogeneous, isotropic turbulence tank, we tested the effects of particle size and type, suspended sediment concentration, and level of turbulence on the settling velocities of particles typically found in muddy estuaries. Two Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs), separated vertically, measured turbulent velocities and suspended sediment concentrations, which yield condition dependent settling velocities, via ∂/á C ñ ∂ t = -∂/∂ z (ws á C ñ + á w ' C ' ñ) . These results are pertinent to fine sediment transport in estuaries, where high concentrations of suspended material are transported and impacted by low energy turbulence.

  4. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  5. Mixing in magnetized turbulent media

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Pan, Liubin E-mail: evan.scannapieco@asu.edu

    2014-04-01

    Turbulent motions are essential to the mixing of entrained fluids and are also capable of amplifying weak initial magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo action. Here we perform a systematic study of turbulent mixing in magnetized media, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include a scalar concentration field. We focus on how mixing depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm, from 1 to 4 and the Mach number, M, from 0.3 to 2.4. For all subsonic flows, we find that the velocity power spectrum has a k {sup –5/3} slope in the early kinematic phase, but steepens due to magnetic back reactions as the field saturates. The scalar power spectrum, on the other hand, flattens compared to k {sup –5/3} at late times, consistent with the Obukohov-Corrsin picture of mixing as a cascade process. At higher Mach numbers, the velocity power spectrum also steepens due to the presence of shocks, and the scalar power spectrum again flattens accordingly. Scalar structures are more intermittent than velocity structures in subsonic turbulence, whereas for supersonic turbulence, velocity structures appear more intermittent than the scalars only in the kinematic phase. Independent of the Mach number of the flow, scalar structures are arranged in sheets in both the kinematic and saturated phases of the magnetic field evolution. For subsonic turbulence, scalar dissipation is hindered in the strong magnetic field regions, probably due to Lorentz forces suppressing the buildup of scalar gradients, whereas for supersonic turbulence, scalar dissipation increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field strength. At all Mach numbers, mixing is significantly slowed by the presence of dynamically important small-scale magnetic fields, implying that mixing in the interstellar medium and in galaxy clusters is less efficient than modeled in hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Turbulence transport with nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, R.R.; Clark, T.T.; Harlow, F.H.; Turner, L.

    1998-03-01

    This preliminary report describes a variety of issues in turbulence transport analysis with particular emphasis on closure procedures that are nonlocal in wave-number and/or physical space. Anomalous behavior of the transport equations for large scale parts of the turbulence spectrum are resolved by including the physical space nonlocal interactions. Direct and reverse cascade processes in wave-number space are given a much richer potential for realistic description by the nonlocal formulations. The discussion also describes issues, many still not resolved, regarding new classes of self-similar form functions.

  7. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  8. Turbulent excitation of spontaneous reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeds, D.; Van Hoven, G.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term nonlinear evolution of a tearing-mode-unstable sheared-field plasma in a turbulent environment is explored. Two different physical configurations are modeled, and a different computational system is used for each. Results of both sets of calculations show that magnetic tearing arises spontaneously provided that the initial turbulence energy level is below the natural saturation level of the tearing instability. The relationship between these results and those of previous calculations are briefly discussed, concluding that there are no significant unexplainable disagreements.

  9. An Introduction to Ocean Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    2008-12-01

    In an address to the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 1932, Sir Horace Lamb commented, ``I am an old man now, and when I die and go to heaven there are two matters on which I hope for enlightenment. One is quantum electrodynamics, and the other is the turbulent motion of fluids. And about the former I am rather optimistic.'' Over the past century, understanding turbulent mixing in the ocean has been one of the most interesting and challenging problems of physical oceanography.

  10. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  11. Lacunarity and intermittency in fluid turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. A.; Fournier, J.-D.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that oscillations in the high-order moments of turbulent velocity fields are inherent to the fractal character of intermittent turbulence and are a feature of the lacunarity of fractal sets. Oscillations in simple Cantor sets are described, and a single parameter to measure lacunarity is identified. The connection between oscillations in fractals and in the turbulent velocity correlations is discussed using the phenomenological beta model of intermittent turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978).

  12. Formation of turbulence around flow singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of turbulence around singular points of a flow such as stagnation points, tangential jumps of velocity, are analyzed. It is proved that turbulence is inevitably generated by the rear stagnation point, but cannot be generated by the nose stagnation point of a streamlined body. Special attention is paid to an evolution of turbulence induced by a tangential jump of velocity. A qualitative analysis of a turbulent flow between two rotating concentric cylinders and around a streamlined cylinder is given.

  13. One-Equation Algebraic Model Of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B. S.; Barth, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    One-equation model of turbulence based on standard equations of k-epsilon model of turbulence, where k is turbulent energy and e is rate of dissipation of k. Derivation of one-equation model motivated partly by inaccuracies of flows computed by some Navier-Stokes-equations-solving algorithms incorporating algebraic models of turbulence. Satisfies need to avoid having to determine algebraic length scales.

  14. Statistical theory of electromagnetic weak turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2006-02-15

    The weak turbulence theory as commonly found in the literature employs electrostatic approximation and is applicable to unmagnetized plasmas only. To this date, fully electromagnetic generalization of the existing weak turbulence theory based upon statistical mechanical approach remains largely incomplete. Instead, electromagnetic effects are incorporated into the weak turbulence formalism by means of the semiclassical approach. The present paper reformulates the fully electromagnetic weak turbulence theory from classical statistical mechanical (i.e., the Klimontovich) approach.

  15. Experience with turbulence interaction and turbulence-chemistry models at Fluent Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, D.; Kim, S. E.; Tselepidakis, D. P.; Missaghi, M.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses (1) turbulence modeling: challenges in turbulence modeling, desirable attributes of turbulence models, turbulence models in FLUENT, and examples using FLUENT; and (2) combustion modeling: turbulence-chemistry interaction and FLUENT equilibrium model. As of now, three turbulence models are provided: the conventional k-epsilon model, the renormalization group model, and the Reynolds-stress model. The renormalization group k-epsilon model has broadened the range of applicability of two-equation turbulence models. The Reynolds-stress model has proved useful for strongly anisotropic flows such as those encountered in cyclones, swirlers, and combustors. Issues remain, such as near-wall closure, with all classes of models.

  16. Exploiting similarity in turbulent shear flows for turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David F.; Harris, Julius E.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that current k-epsilon models cannot predict the flow over a flat plate and its wake. In an effort to address this issue and other issues associated with turbulence closure, a new approach for turbulence modeling is proposed which exploits similarities in the flow field. Thus, if we consider the flow over a flat plate and its wake, then in addition to taking advantage of the log-law region, we can exploit the fact that the flow becomes self-similar in the far wake. This latter behavior makes it possible to cast the governing equations as a set of total differential equations. Solutions of this set and comparison with measured shear stress and velocity profiles yields the desired set of model constants. Such a set is, in general, different from other sets of model constants. The rational for such an approach is that if we can correctly model the flow over a flat plate and its far wake, then we can have a better chance of predicting the behavior in between. It is to be noted that the approach does not appeal, in any way, to the decay of homogeneous turbulence. This is because the asymptotic behavior of the flow under consideration is not representative of the decay of homogeneous turbulence.

  17. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  18. NON-PREMIXED TURBULENT JET FLAMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper, part of a general investigation of mixing and chemical reaction in turbulent jets, concerns the length of non-premixed turbulent jet flames in a stationary environment. Experimental results for the turbulent flame length of chemically reacting jets in water show both i...

  19. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  20. Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2008-01-01

    The preliminary Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA) concept of operations is described in this paper. The WTMA concept provides further detail to work initiated by the Wake Vortex Avoidance System Concept Evaluation Team and is an evolution of the Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Departure concept. Anticipated benefits about reducing wake turbulence separation standards in crosswind conditions, and candidate WTMA system considerations are discussed.

  1. The PDF method for turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Probability Density Function (PDF) methods provide a means of calculating the properties of turbulent reacting flows. They have been successfully applied to many turbulent flames, including some with finite rate kinetic effects. Here the methods are reviewed with an emphasis on computational issues and their application to turbulent combustion.

  2. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Carroll, Jonathan; Blackman, Eric G.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2009-02-01

    The link between turbulence in star-forming environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows, we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers'-type turbulence and produces a driving scale length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star-forming environments. In the last section, we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets cannot be the source of turbulence.

  3. Study Of Compressibility Corrections To Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    Effects on shear layers in simulated confined and unconfined flows studied. Report presents comparative study of some terms that correct for effects of compressibility in standard k-epsilon mathematical model of turbulence where k denotes turbulence kinetic energy and epsilon denotes rate of dissipation of turbulence kenetic energy. Involved simulation of flows by numerical solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Contributions to the simulation of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, J. A.; Kerman, B. R.; Petersen, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    The simulation modeling of turbulence in the boundary layer in consolidated in terms of boundary layer similarity principles and empirical results. The modeling is extended for some aspects of the nonlinear and non-Gaussian structure of the turbulence. Properties of the discrete gust form structure of the modeled turbulence are identified.

  5. Model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part II. Effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, B; Blackstock, D T

    1998-09-01

    A model experiment was reported to be successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through a turbulent atmosphere [B. Lipkens and D. T. Blackstock, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 148-158 (1998)]. In this study the effect on N wave characteristics of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence are investigated. The main parameters of interest are the rise time and the peak pressure. The effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance is to flatten the rise time and peak pressure distributions. Rise time and peak pressure distributions always have positive skewness after propagation through turbulence. Average rise time grows with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. The scattering of rise time data is one-sided, i.e., rise times are almost always increased by turbulence. Average peak pressure decreases slowly with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. For the reported data a threefold increase in average rise time is observed and a maximum decrease of about 20% in average peak pressure. Rise times more than ten times that of the no turbulence value are observed. At most, the maximum peak pressure doubles after propagation through turbulence, and the minimum peak pressure values are about one-half the no-turbulence values. Rounded waveforms are always more common than peaked waveforms. PMID:9745733

  6. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  7. Turbulent Mixing Chemistry in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    A gas-grain chemical model with surface reaction and 1D/2D turbulent mixing is available for protoplanetary disks and molecular clouds. Current version is based on the updated UMIST'95 database with gas-grain interactions (accretion, desorption, photoevaporation, etc.) and modified rate equation approach to surface chemistry (see also abstract for the static chemistry code).

  8. Turbulent resistivity, diffusion and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; Kennel, C. F.; Mackenzie, K.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kindel, J. M.; Stenzel, R.; Taylor, R. J.; White, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Bernstein, W.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are reported on ion acoustic and ion cyclotron turbulence and their roles in anomalous resistivity, viscosity, diffusion and heating and in the structure of collisionless electrostatic shocks. Resistance due to ion acoustic turbulence has been observed in experiments with a streaming cesium plasma in which electron current, potential rise due to turbulent resistivity, spectrum of unstable ion acoustic waves, and associated electron heating were all measured directly. Kinetic theory calculations for an expanding, unstable plasma, give results in agreement with the experiment. In a strong magnetic field, with T sub e/T sub i approximately 1 and current densities typical for present Tokomaks, the plasma is stable to ion acoustic but unstable to current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves. Relevant characteristics of these waves are calculated and it is shown that for ion, beta greater than m sub e/m sub i, the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave has a lower instability threshold than the electrostatic one. However, when ion acoustic turbulence is present experiments with double plasma devices show rapid anomalous heating of an ion beam streaming through a plasma.

  9. The problem of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.; HILL; MERRYFIELD; GOUGH

    1984-01-01

    All ground-based observations of the solar five-minute oscillations are affected by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere that leads to substantial refractive index variations. The turbulent motions serve to mix an air mass that is thermally stratified in the vertical, thereby producing intermittent thermal fluctuations over a wide range of heights in the atmosphere. These thermal structures yield refractive index changes that deflect the light path in a complicated way, producing intricate variations of amplitude and phase in what might have started out as simple plane waves. Since the fluid turbulence is statistical in nature, so too is the optical turbulence which is an integral measure of the refractive index changes along the light travel path. All of this produces what is usually called atmospheric seeing, which consists of image motion, blurring and distortion across the field of view. The effects of atmospheric seeing upon observations of five-minute oscillations carried out from the ground were assessed. This will help to provide a baseline estimate of the scienctific benefits that might accrue if one were able to observe the same oscillations from a space observatory unfettered by seeing effects.

  10. Evaluation of turbulence mitigation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Huebner, Claudia S.; Dijk, Judith; Schutte, Klamer; Schwering, Piet B. W.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric turbulence is a well-known phenomenon that diminishes the recognition range in visual and infrared image sequences. There exist many different methods to compensate for the effects of turbulence. This paper focuses on the performance of two software-based methods to mitigate the effects of low- and medium turbulence conditions. Both methods are capable of processing static and dynamic scenes. The first method consists of local registration, frame selection, blur estimation and deconvolution. The second method consists of local motion compensation, fore- /background segmentation and weighted iterative blind deconvolution. A comparative evaluation using quantitative measures is done on some representative sequences captured during a NATO SET 165 trial in Dayton. The amount of blurring and tilt in the imagery seem to be relevant measures for such an evaluation. It is shown that both methods improve the imagery by reducing the blurring and tilt and therefore enlarge the recognition range. Furthermore, results of a recognition experiment using simulated data are presented that show that turbulence mitigation using the first method improves the recognition range up to 25% for an operational optical system.

  11. Flexible fibers in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhille, Gautier; Brouzet, Christophe; Le Gal, Patrice; Irphe Team

    2014-11-01

    We describe, for the first time, an experiment devoted to the study of the spatial conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow. We propose a model for the transition from rigid to flexible regimes as the intensity of turbulence is increased or the elastic energy of the fiber is decreased. This transition occurs for a fiber typical length which is observed experimentally and recovered by our analysis. We also demonstrate that the conformations of flexible fibers in a turbulent flow are analog to conformations of flexible polymers in a good solvent. This last result opens some new and creative ways to model flexible fiber distortions in turbulent flows while addressing fundamental problems in polymer dynamics. This work has been carried out in the framework of the Labex MEC Project (No. ANR-10-LABX-0092) and of the A*MIDEX Project (No. ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02), funded by the `Investissements d'Avenir' French Government program managed by the French National Research.

  12. Turbulence in argon shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J. P.; I, L.

    1981-01-01

    Irregular density fluctuations with turbulent-like behaviors are found in ionizing shock fronts produced by an arc-driven shock tube. Electric probes are used as the primary diagnostic. Spectral analyses show statistical patterns which seem frozen-in and characterizable by a dominant mode and its harmonics.

  13. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency. PMID:24690788

  14. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  15. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakov, German V.; McClintock, Peter Vaughan Elsmere; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    Wave turbulence (WT) occurs in systems of strongly interacting nonlinear waves and can lead to energy flows across length and frequency scales much like those that are well known in vortex turbulence. Typically, the energy passes although a nondissipative inertial range until it reaches a small enough scale that viscosity becomes important and terminates the cascade by dissipating the energy as heat. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids is of particular interest, partly because revealing experiments can be performed on a laboratory scale, and partly because WT among the Kelvin waves on quantized vortices is believed to play a crucial role in the final stages of the decay of (vortex) quantum turbulence. In this short review, we provide a perspective on recent work on WT in quantum fluids, setting it in context and discussing the outlook for the next few years. We outline the theory, review briefly the experiments carried out to date using liquid H2 and liquid 4He, and discuss some nonequilibrium excitonic superfluids in which WT has been predicted but not yet observed experimentally. By way of conclusion, we consider the medium- and longer-term outlook for the field. PMID:24704881

  16. Turbulence and energy conversion research

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report examines the role of fluid mechanics research (particularly turbulence research) in improving energy conversion systems. In this report two of the listed application areas are selected as examples: fluidization and cavitation. Research needs in general, and research possibilities for ECUT in particular, are examined.

  17. Models for Turbulent Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Since the statistical theories of turbulence that have developed over the last twenty or thirty years are too abstract and unreliable to be of much use to chemical engineers, this paper introduces the techniques of single point models and suggests some areas of needed research. (BB)

  18. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures.

    PubMed

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions. PMID:25493875

  19. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  20. Perpendicular ion acceleration in whistler turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, S.; Nariyuki, Y.

    2014-04-15

    Whistler turbulence is an important contributor to solar wind turbulence dissipation. This turbulence contains obliquely propagating whistler waves at electron scales, and these waves have electrostatic components perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. In this paper, a full kinetic, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that whistler turbulence can accelerate ions in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. When the ions pass through wave-particle resonances region in the phase space during their cyclotron motion, the ions are effectively accelerated in the perpendicular direction. The simulation results suggest that whistler turbulence contributes to the perpendicular heating of ions observed in the solar wind.

  1. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  2. On the prediction of turbulent secondary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; So, R. M. C.; Younis, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of turbulent secondary flows, with Reynolds stress models, in circular pipes and non-circular ducts is reviewed. Turbulence-driven secondary flows in straight non-circular ducts are considered along with turbulent secondary flows in pipes and ducts that arise from curvature or a system rotation. The physical mechanisms that generate these different kinds of secondary flows are outlined and the level of turbulence closure required to properly compute each type is discussed in detail. Illustrative computations of a variety of different secondary flows obtained from two-equation turbulence models and second-order closures are provided to amplify these points.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Particle Deagglomeration using Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksoy, Çaǧatay; Ertunç, Özgür; Hüttner, Sebastian; Wachtel, Herbert; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The effect of turbulence on powder aerosol deagglomeration was investigated. Two impinging jets were used to generate turbulence. Lactose particles, whose fully dispersed fine particle fraction (FPF) - number percentage of the particles whose diameter smaller than 5 μm- is above 90 %, were applied as aerosol powder. The particle size distribution after the dispersion unit were measured by using phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) and turbulence level were quantified at the impingement point of two jets with laser Doppler anemometer. As the turbulence level increases turbulent time and length scales decrease, and the ratio of fine particle fraction (FPF) increases from 36% to 86%.

  4. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  5. Turbulence spreading in gyro-kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.; Stauffert, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new operative definition for the turbulence intensity in connection with magnetized plasmas is given. In contrast to previous definitions the new definition satisfies a Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov type equation. Furthermore, explicit expressions for the turbulence intensity and the turbulence intensity flux, that allow for the first time direct numerical evaluation, are derived. A carefully designed numerical experiment for the case of a tokamak is performed to study the impact of turbulence spreading. The effective turbulence diffusion coefficient is measured to be smaller than the heat conduction coefficient and the turbulence spreading length is found to be of the order of the turbulence correlation length. The results show that turbulence spreading can play a role in the non-local flux gradient relation, or in the scaling of transport coefficients with the normalized Larmor radius, only over lengths scale of the order of the turbulence correlation length. A new turbulence convection mechanism, due to the drift connected with the magnetic field inhomogeneities, is described. The convective flux integrates to zero under the flux surface average unless there is an up-down asymmetry in the tubulence intensity. The latter asymmetry can be generated through a radial inhomogeneity or plasma rotation. It is shown that the turbulence convection can lead to a spreading of the order of the correlation length.

  6. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  7. Turbulence in solar wind and laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.

    2010-06-16

    Recent studies of plasma turbulence based on measurements within solar wind and laboratory plasmas has been discussed. Evidences for the presence of a turbulent energy cascade, using the Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, has been provided through data from the Ulysses spacecraft. This allows, for the first time, a direct estimate of the turbulent energy transfer rate, which can contribute to the in situ heating of the solar wind. The energy cascade has been evidenced also for ExB electrostatic turbulence in laboratory magnetized plasmas using measurements of intermittent transport (bursty turbulence) at the edge of the RFX-mod reversed field pinch plasma device. Finally the problem of the dispersive region of turbulence in solar wind above the ion-cyclotron frequency, where a spectral break is usually observed, and the problem of dissipation in a collisionless fluid as the solar wind, are briefly discussed.

  8. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  9. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection: A New Approach of MHD-Turbulent Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Higashimori, Katsuaki

    2013-04-01

    Turbulent flows are often observed in association with magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas, and it is often hypothesized that the turbulence can contribute to the fast magnetic reconnection through the enhancement of magnetic dissipation. In this presentation, we demonstrate that an explosive turbulent reconnection can happen by using a new turbulent MHD simulation, in which the evolution of the turbulent transport coefficients are self-consistently solved together with the standard MHD equations. In our model, the turbulent electromotive force defined by the correlation of turbulent fluctuations between v and B is added to the Ohm's law. We discuss that the level of turbulent can control the topology of reconnection, namely the transition from the Sweet-Parker reconnection to the Petscheck reconnection occurs when the level of fluctuations becomes of order of the ambient physical quantities, and show that the growth of the turbulent Petscheck reconnection becomes much faster than the conventional one.

  10. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  11. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  12. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport. PMID:19792244

  13. Turbulent reacting flow computations including turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    A two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model has been extended to be applicable for compressible reacting flows. A compressibility correction model based on modeling the dilatational terms in the Reynolds stress equations has been used. A turbulence-chemistry interaction model is outlined. In this model, the effects of temperature and species mass concentrations fluctuations on the species mass production rates are decoupled. The effect of temperature fluctuations is modeled via a moment model, and the effect of concentration fluctuations is included using an assumed beta-pdf model. Preliminary results obtained using this model are presented. A two-dimensional reacting mixing layer has been used as a test case. Computations are carried out using the Navier-Stokes solver SPARK using a finite rate chemistry model for hydrogen-air combustion.

  14. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  15. Multifractal model for heliospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Anna

    Multifractal characteristics and models for astrophysical plasma at different regions of heliosphere are considered. We analyze the time series of the solar wind parameters measured in situby Helios 2 (0.3-1 AU), ACE (1 AU), and Voyager 2 (1-75 AU) spacecrafts [1]. We focus on the intermittent nature of the cascading eddies for solar wind turbulence. To look at intermittency we construct the multifractal measure describing energy transfer rate and we analyze its scaling properties [2,3]. This allows us to obtain generalized dimensions and multifractality spectra for different state of the solar wind depending on heliocentric distance and solar activity cycle. We also propose a generalization of the usual p-model [2] for the case when the turbulent cascade involves eddies of different sizes. Our model has two scaling parameters and a probability measure parameter allowing to decribe more intermittent data [4,5]. We compare the resulting generalized dimensions and singularity spectra for the solar wind with that for the generalized p-model. In this way we obtain a much better agreement with the solar wind data. Hence we hope that our model will be a useful tool to study complex nature of intermittent turbulence. [1] Burlaga, L. F.: Multifractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 2 observations near 25 AU, 1987-1988, Geophys. Res. Lett. 18, 69-72, 1991. [2] Meneveau, C., and Sreenivasan, K. R.: Simple multifractal cascade model for fully developed turbulence, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1424-1427, 1987. [3] Marsch, E., Tu, C.-Y., and Rosenbauer, H.: Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence, Ann. Geophys. 14, 259-269, 1996. [4] Macek, W. M. : Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind, Nonlinear Proc. Geophys., 14, 695-700, 2007. [5] Macek, W. M., and Szczepaniak, A.: Generalized two-scale weighted Cantor set model for solar wind turbulence, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L02108, doi:10.1029/2007GL032263, 2008.

  16. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases. 3: Proceedings of the 1990 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinks, Debra (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Papers that cover the following topics are presented: subgrid scale modeling; turbulence modeling; turbulence structure, transport, and control; small scales mixing; turbulent reacting flows; and turbulence theory.

  17. Turbulence Modeling for Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis will be placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by the SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the lag model will be run and compared to a new lag model. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), will be assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations. The basis of the lag and lagRST models are to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The affect this lag has on the results for SWBLI and massively separated flows will be determined. These computations will be done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the RANS equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the OVERFLOW code. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWBLI assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the

  18. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  19. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  20. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  1. Hot and turbulent gas in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Engels, J. F.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Almgren, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    The gas in galaxy clusters is heated by shock compression through accretion (outer shocks) and mergers (inner shocks). These processes additionally produce turbulence. To analyse the relation between the thermal and turbulent energies of the gas under the influence of non-adiabatic processes, we performed numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation in a box of 152 Mpc comoving size with radiative cooling, UV background, and a subgrid scale model for numerically unresolved turbulence. By smoothing the gas velocities with an adaptive Kalman filter, we are able to estimate bulk flows towards cluster cores. This enables us to infer the velocity dispersion associated with the turbulent fluctuation relative to the bulk flow. For haloes with masses above 1013 M⊙, we find that the turbulent velocity dispersions averaged over the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and the intracluster medium (ICM) are approximately given by powers of the mean gas temperatures with exponents around 0.5, corresponding to a roughly linear relation between turbulent and thermal energies and transonic Mach numbers. However, turbulence is only weakly correlated with the halo mass. Since the power-law relation is stiffer for the WHIM, the turbulent Mach number tends to increase with the mean temperature of the WHIM. This can be attributed to enhanced turbulence production relative to dissipation in particularly hot and turbulent clusters.

  2. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    SciTech Connect

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-07-25

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits.

  3. Turbulent viscosity in natural surf zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, F.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2012-12-01

    Waves breaking in the shallow surf zone near the shoreline inject turbulence into the water column that may reach the bed to suspend sediment. Breaking-wave turbulence in the surf zone is, however, poorly understood, which is one of the reasons why many process-based coastal-evolution models predict coastal change during severe storms inadequately. Here, we use data collected in two natural surf zones to derive a new parameterization for the stability function Cμ that determines the magnitude of the eddy viscosity νt in two-equation turbulent-viscosity models, νt = Cμk2/ε, where k is turbulent kinetic energy and ε is the turbulence dissipation rate. In both data sets, the ratio of turbulence production to dissipation is small (≈0.15), while vertical turbulence diffusion is significant. This differs from assumptions underlying existing Cμ parameterizations, which we show to severely overpredict observed Cμ for most conditions. Additionally, we rewrite our new Cμ parameterization into a formulation that accurately reproduces our Reynolds-stress based estimates of turbulence production. This formulation is linear with strain, consistent with earlier theoritical work for large strain rates. Also, it does not depend on ε and can, therefore, also be applied in one-equation turbulent-viscosity models. We anticipate our work to improve turbulence modeling in natural surf zones and to eventually lead to more reliable predictions of coastal evolution in response to severe storms.

  4. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Stefan; van den Berg, Thomas H.; Rensen, Judith; Lohse, Detlef

    2004-11-01

    The energy spectrum of single phase turbulent flow - apart from intermittency corrections - has been known since Kolomogorov 1941, E(k) ∝ k-5/3. How do bubbles modify this spectrum? To answer this question, we inject micro bubbles (radius 100 μm) in fully turbulent flow (Re_λ=200) up to volume concentrations of 0.3 %. Energy spectra and velocity structure functions are measured with hot-film anemometry. Under our experimental conditions, we find an enhancement of energy on small scales confirming numerical predictions by Mazzitelli, Lohse, and Toschi [Phys. Fluids 15, L5 (2003)]. They propose a mechanism in which bubbles are clustering most likely in downflow regions. This clustering is a lift force effect suppressing large vortical structures, while enhancing energy input on small scales.

  5. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  6. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  7. Singularities in fully developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2015-09-01

    Phenomenological arguments are used to explore finite-time singularity (FTS) development in different physical fully-developed turbulence (FDT) situations. Effects of spatial intermittency and fluid compressibility in three-dimensional (3D) FDT and the role of the divorticity amplification mechanism in two-dimensional (2D) FDT and quasi-geostrophic FDT and the advection-diffusion mechanism in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are considered to provide physical insights into the FTS development in variant cascade physics situations. The quasi-geostrophic FDT results connect with the 2D FDT results in the barotropic limit while they connect with 3D FDT results in the baroclinic limit and hence apparently provide a bridge between 2D and 3D.

  8. DNS of vibrating grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujadze, G.; Oberlack, M.

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulence generated at a grid vibrating normally to itself using spectral code [1] is presented. Due to zero mean shear there is no production of turbulence apart from the grid. Action of the grid is mimiced by the function implemented in the middle of the simulation box:f_i (x_1 ,x_2 ) = {n^2 S}/2left\\{ {left| {{δ _{i3} }/4\\cos left( {{2π }/Mx_1 } right)\\cos left. {left( {{2π }/Mx_2 } right)} right|} right.sin (nt) + {β _i }/4} right\\}, where M is the mesh size, S/2 - amplitude or stroke of the grid, n - frequency. β i are random numbers with uniform distribution. The simulations were performed for the following parameters: x 1, x 2 ∈ [-π; π], x 3 ∈ [-2π; 2π]; Re = nS 2/? = 1000; S/M = 2; Numerical grid: 128 × 128 × 256.

  9. DNS of vibrating grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujadze, G.; Oberlack, M.

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulence generated at a grid vibrating normally to itself using spectral code [1] is presented. Due to zero mean shear there is no production of turbulence apart from the grid. Action of the grid is mimiced by the function implemented in the middle of the simulation box:f_i (x_1 ,x_2 ) = {n^2 S}/2left{ {left| {{δ _{i3} }/4\\cos left( {{2π }/Mx_1 } right)\\cos left. {left( {{2π }/Mx_2 } right)} right|} right.sin (nt) + {β _i }/4} right}, where M is the mesh size, S/2 - amplitude or stroke of the grid, n - frequency. β i are random numbers with uniform distribution. The simulations were performed for the following parameters: x 1, x 2 ∈ [-π; π], x 3 ∈ [-2π; 2π]; Re = nS 2/? = 1000; S/M = 2; Numerical grid: 128 × 128 × 256.

  10. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion.

    PubMed

    Héas, Patrick; Herzet, Cédric; Mémin, Etienne; Heitz, Dominique; Mininni, Pablo D

    2013-06-01

    Based on physical laws describing the multiscale structure of turbulent flows, this paper proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyperparameters, and to select the most likely physical prior among a set of models. Hyperparameter and model inference are conducted by posterior maximization, obtained by marginalizing out non--Gaussian motion variables. The Bayesian estimator is assessed on several image sequences depicting synthetic and real turbulent fluid flows. Results obtained with the proposed approach exceed the state-of-the-art results in fluid flow estimation. PMID:23599051

  11. Review on atmospheric turbulence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Gianluca; Navarrete, Julio; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-07-01

    In the past years, intensive Site Characterization campaigns have been performed to chose the sites for the future giant ELTs. Various atmospheric turbulence profilers with different resolution and sensed altitude ranges have been used, as well as climatological tools and satellite data analysis. Mixing long term statistics at low altitude resolution with high resolution data collected during short term campaigns allows to produce the reference profiles as input to the Adaptive Optics instrument performance estimators. In this paper I will perform a brief review of the principal and most used instruments and tools in order to give to the reader a panorama of the work and the efforts to monitor the atmospheric turbulence for astronomical purposes.

  12. Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-12-15

    Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

  13. The onset of vortex turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, G. . Center for Polymer Studies Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1992-12-01

    It is the goal of this thesis to investigate some of the unusual and spectacular properties near the transition to turbulence in a two-dimensional field of limit-cycle oscillators. Of particular interest are the dynamics of topological defects (vortices) associated with the onset of turbulence. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describes an extended reaction-diffusion system close to the bifurcation of a steady state into a stable, periodic orbit. In the jargon of nonlinear dynamics, it is the amplitude equation corresponding to a Hopf bifurcation. Because of the generality of the assumptions under which it is derived, the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describes systems in contexts other than chemical reactions with diffusion. Examples include Rayleigh-Benard convection and the phase fields of multimode lasers. The reaction-diffusion model is however, a sufficiently general model to frame our discussion.

  14. Extreme events in computational turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhai, X. M.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,1923 grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on “extreme” events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more “chunky” for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  15. Energy spectra in microbubbly turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Thomas H.; Luther, Stefan; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-03-01

    Microbubbles (R0=100μm) are injected in fully developed turbulence (Reλ=200) up to a volume concentration of 0.3%. An enhancement of the energy on small scales and a reduction on the large scales is observed, confirming theoretical prediction by I. Mazzitelli, D. Lohse, and F. Toschi [Phys. Fluids 15, L5 (2003)]. The result is a (nonuniversal) less steep slope than -5/3 in the power spectrum.

  16. Turbulent Dispersion of Traffic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Gong, S.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from the transportation sector are a significant source of air pollution. Ongoing efforts to reduce the impacts require tools to provide guidance on policies regarding fuels, vehicle types and traffic control. The air quality models currently used to predict the effectiveness of policies typically treat traffic emissions as a source uniformly distributed across the surface of a model grid. In reality, emissions occur along lines above the surface, in an initially highly concentrated form, and are immediately mixed by traffic-enhanced turbulence. Differences between model and reality in terms of both chemistry and dispersion are to be expected. The ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways), conducted on multi-lane highways in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010, included measurements to quantify the evolution and dispersion of traffic emissions. Continuous micro-meteorological data (heat and momentum fluxes, temperature, humidity and incoming solar radiation) were collected 10m from the road, next to a traffic camera used to determine traffic density, composition and speed. Sonic anemometers and an aircraft turbulence probe mounted on a mobile lab provided measurements of turbulent dispersion both directly in traffic on the highway as well as on perpendicular side roads, as a function of distance from the highway. The mobile lab was equipped with instruments to characterize the aerosol size and mass distributions, aerosol composition including black carbon content, NO, NO2, CO2, CO, SO2 and VOCs at high time resolution. Preliminary results on the consequences of turbulent dispersion of traffic emissions levels under a variety of conditions will be disseminated.

  17. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated. PMID:24329368

  18. Geometry Dependence of Stellarator Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, P. Xanthopoulos and A.H. Boozer

    2009-08-10

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST, we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry-dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the 2D structure of the microturbulence over that surface, and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrodinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  19. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  20. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to continue to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models, which account for the effects of compressibility at high speeds, into a three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. Additionally, we plan to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into the NASP CFD codes.

  1. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  2. Locomotion in a turbulent world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.

    2014-11-01

    When organisms swim or crawl in aquatic habitats, the water through which they travel is usually moving. Therefore, an important part of understanding how aquatic organisms locomote is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents through which they move. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow or crawling on surfaces in spatially-complex habitats exposed to such flow. Using a combination of field studies, wave-flume experiments, experiments in fluidic devices, and mathematical modeling, we have discovered that small organisms swimming or crawling in turbulent flow are not subjected to steady velocities. The shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers and crawlers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values. Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement. Furthermore, the ability of small organisms to walk on surfaces without being dislodged by pulses of rapid flow constrains the microhabitats in which they can forage. Supported by NSF Grant #IOS-0842685.

  3. Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Jianying; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2006-10-01

    Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode (CTEM) turbulence is a likely canidate for explaining anomolous transport in tokamak discharges that have a strong density gradient relative to the ion temperature gradient. Here, CTEM turbulence is investigated using the Gyrokinetic δf GEM code. GEM is electromagnetic, includes full drift-kinetic electrons, generaly axisymmetric equilbria, collisions and minority species. Here, the flux-tube limit is taken and β is so small that the simulations are essentially electrostatic. Linear theory predicts that the instability occurs at √2ɛRLn>1, which agrees very well with the simulation results. With increasing density gradient, it is observed that the most unstable mode transitions from a CTEM to drift wave mode and the short-wavelength modes are most unstable ( 2 > kρi> 1). Nonlinear simulations are underway to address the parametric dependence of particle and energy transport. The importance of zonal flows for CTEM turbulence, is still not well understood and is under investigation. D. R. Ernst et. al., Phys. Plasma 11 (2004) 2637 T. Dannert and F. Jenko, Phys. Plasma 12 (2005) 072309 R. Gatto et. al., Phys. Plasma 13 (2006) 022306 Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 463 Y. Chen ad S.E. Parker, accepted, to appear in J. Comput. Phys. (2006) J. Wesson (1997) Tokamaks, Oxford Science

  4. Optimal beam focusing through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Beam spread and beam wandering are the most perceptible effects of atmospheric turbulence on propagating laser beams. The width of the mean irradiance profile is typically used to characterize the beam spread. This so-called long-term (LT) statistic allows for a relatively simple theoretical description. However, the LT beam size is not a very practical measure of the beam spread because its measurements are sensitive to the movements of the source and detector, and to the large-scale variations of the refractive index that are not associated with turbulence. The short-term (ST) beam spread is measured relative to the instantaneous position of the beam center and is free of these drawbacks, but has not been studied as thoroughly as the LT spread. We present a theoretical model for the ST beam irradiance that is based on the parabolic equation for the beam wave propagation in random media, and the Markov approximation for calculation of the statistics of the optical field, and discuss an approximation that allows introduction of the isoplanatic ST point spread function (PSF). Unlike the LT PSF, the ST PSF depends on the overall beam geometry. This allows optimization of the initial beam field in terms of minimizing the ST beam size at the observation plane. Calculations supporting this conjecture are presented for the simple case of the coherent Gaussian beam, and Kolmogorov turbulence. PMID:26560908

  5. Odor Landscapes in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celani, Antonio; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Vergassola, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system of male moths is exquisitely sensitive to pheromones emitted by females and transported in the environment by atmospheric turbulence. Moths respond to minute amounts of pheromones, and their behavior is sensitive to the fine-scale structure of turbulent plumes where pheromone concentration is detectible. The signal of pheromone whiffs is qualitatively known to be intermittent, yet quantitative characterization of its statistical properties is lacking. This challenging fluid dynamics problem is also relevant for entomology, neurobiology, and the technological design of olfactory stimulators aimed at reproducing physiological odor signals in well-controlled laboratory conditions. Here, we develop a Lagrangian approach to the transport of pheromones by turbulent flows and exploit it to predict the statistics of odor detection during olfactory searches. The theory yields explicit probability distributions for the intensity and the duration of pheromone detections, as well as their spacing in time. Predictions are favorably tested by using numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and field data for the atmospheric surface layer. The resulting signal of odor detections lends itself to implementation with state-of-the-art technologies and quantifies the amount and the type of information that male moths can exploit during olfactory searches.

  6. Probability distributions of turbulent energy.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Mahdi; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2008-05-01

    Probability density functions (PDFs) of scale-dependent energy fluctuations, P[deltaE(l)] , are studied in high-resolution direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. MHD flows with and without a strong mean magnetic field are considered. For all three systems it is found that the PDFs of inertial range energy fluctuations exhibit self-similarity and monoscaling in agreement with recent solar-wind measurements [Hnat, Geophys. Res. Lett. 29, 86 (2002)]. Furthermore, the energy PDFs exhibit similarity over all scales of the turbulent system showing no substantial qualitative change of shape as the scale of the fluctuations varies. This is in contrast to the well-known behavior of PDFs of turbulent velocity fluctuations. In all three cases under consideration the P[deltaE(l)] resemble Lévy-type gamma distributions approximately Delta;{-1} exp(-|deltaE|/Delta)|deltaE|;{-gamma} The observed gamma distributions exhibit a scale-dependent width Delta(l) and a system-dependent gamma . The monoscaling property reflects the inertial-range scaling of the Elsässer-field fluctuations due to lacking Galilei invariance of deltaE . The appearance of Lévy distributions is made plausible by a simple model of energy transfer. PMID:18643170

  7. Structure in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    1992-12-01

    Small-scale features of vorticity, strain rate, and temperature gradients are considered in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The results reported are from a direct numerical simulation of turbulent convection performed in a rectangular box of aspect ratio 2√2 at a Rayleigh number of 6.5×106 and a Prandtl number of 0.72. In agreement with earlier results [Ashurst et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 2343 (1987) and Ruetsch and Maxey, Phys. Fluids A 3, 1587 (1991)], the intermediate strain rate is on an average positive, but the ratio of alpha, beta, and gamma strain rates are measured to be 5.3:1.0:-6.3. This result differs from the earlier result of 3:1:-4 obtained in homogeneous isotropic and shear turbulences. Buoyancy-induced vorticity production makes significant contribution to the overall enstrophy balance, especially close to the boundaries. Vorticity production by buoyancy is exclusively in the horizontal direction and is balanced by preferred production by stretching and tilting in the vertical direction, due to the preferred alignment of extensional alpha strain rate with the vertical direction. Such directional alignment of vorticity, strain rate, and scalar gradient is explained on the basis of preferred spatial orientation of coherent structures in thermal turbulence.

  8. A clumpy stellar wind and luminosity-dependent cyclotron line revealed by the first Suzaku observation of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1538–522

    SciTech Connect

    Hemphill, Paul B.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Markowitz, Alex; Fürst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-09-01

    We present results from the first Suzaku observation of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1538–522. The broadband spectral coverage of Suzaku allows for a detailed spectral analysis, characterizing the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at 23.0 ± 0.4 keV and the iron Kα line at 6.426 ± 0.008 keV, as well as placing limits on the strengths of the iron Kβ line and the iron K edge. We track the evolution of the spectral parameters both in time and in luminosity, notably finding a significant positive correlation between cyclotron line energy and luminosity. A dip and spike in the light curve is shown to be associated with an order-of-magnitude increase in column density along the line of sight, as well as significant variation in the underlying continuum, implying the accretion of a overdense region of a clumpy stellar wind. We also present a phase-resolved analysis, with most spectral parameters of interest showing significant variation with phase. Notably, both the cyclotron line energy and the iron Kα line intensity vary significantly with phase, with the iron line intensity significantly out of phase with the pulse profile. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of recent work in the areas of accretion column physics and cyclotron resonance scattering feature formation.

  9. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  10. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  11. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  12. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  13. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  14. Dynamics of quantum turbulence of different spectra

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Paul; Zmeev, Dmitry; Pakpour, Fatemeh; Golov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence in a superfluid in the zero-temperature limit consists of a dynamic tangle of quantized vortex filaments. Different types of turbulence are possible depending on the level of correlations in the orientation of vortex lines. We provide an overview of turbulence in superfluid 4He with a particular focus on recent experiments probing the decay of turbulence in the zero-temperature regime below 0.5 K. We describe extensive measurements of the vortex line density during the free decay of different types of turbulence: ultraquantum and quasiclassical turbulence in both stationary and rotating containers. The observed decays and the effective dissipation as a function of temperature are compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations. PMID:24704876

  15. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  16. On the nature of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2007-02-15

    A novel model of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of a strong external magnetic field is proposed for the explanation of recent numerical results. According to the proposed model, in the presence of the strong external magnetic field, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence becomes nonlocal in the sense that low-frequency modes cause decorrelation of interacting high-frequency modes from the inertial interval. It is shown that the obtained nonlocal spectrum of the inertial range of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence represents an anisotropic analogue of Kraichnan's nonlocal spectrum of hydrodynamic turbulence. Based on the analysis performed in the framework of the weak-coupling approximation, which represents one of the equivalent formulations of the direct interaction approximation, it is shown that incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence could be both local and nonlocal, and therefore anisotropic analogues of both the Kolmogorov and Kraichnan spectra are realizable in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  17. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  18. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-01-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated. PMID:23155481

  19. The Effect of Freestream Turbulence on a Rough Surface Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzek, Brian; Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Lebron-Bosques, Jose; Cal, Raul; Meneveau, Charles; Castillo, Luciano

    2007-11-01

    Measurements are performed in the Stanley Corrsin Wind Tunnel Facility at The Johns Hopkins University to study the effects of freestream turbulence on a rough surface turbulent boundary layer. The upstream turbulence was generated with the use of an active grid, resulting in freestream turbulence levels of 6.2 % and 5.2 %. The effects of the freestream turbulence on this rough surface, alter the mean velocity deficit profiles. The effects of freestream turbulence are identifiable in the streamwise Reynolds stress profiles throughout the entire boundary layer, but not necessarily for the wall-normal and shear stress profiles. The reduced velocity gradient reduced the production term in the streamwise Reynolds stress despite the increase in the profiles. Thus, an important mechanism becomes the turbulent diffusion from the freestream turbulence as it relates to the Reynolds stress equations.

  20. Analysis of non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence effects on infrared imaging by atmospheric turbulence MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bindang; Cao, Lei; Cui, Linyan; Bai, Xiangzhi; Cao, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Fugen

    2013-07-01

    The atmospheric turbulence modulation transfer functions (MTF) can be used to describe the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence on an optical imaging system. In this study, new expressions of long exposure atmospheric turbulence MTF are derived with the generalized atmospheric spectral model for optical waves propagating through non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence with horizontal path. They consider the finite turbulence inner and outer scales, and have a general spectral power law value in the range of 3 to 4 instead of the standard power law value of 11/3. Numerical calculations are conducted to analyze the influence of non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence on the infrared imaging in term of atmospheric turbulence MTF, and results show that the non-Kolmogorov weak turbulence produces less effect on the far infrared imaging.

  1. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-11-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated.

  2. Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, N.; Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2013-12-15

    Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

  3. Turbulence and waves in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.A.; Goldstein, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of turbulence and waves in the solar wind is discussed. Consideration is given to the observations and theory concerning the origin and evolution of interplanetary MHD fluctuations and to the observations, theory, and simulations of compressive fluctuations. Particular attention is given to extrapolations to near-sun and polar fields regions. Results obtained on turbulence at comets and magnetic turbulence of low-frequency waves excited by unstable distributions of ions are discussed. 230 refs.

  4. Boltzmann kinetic equation for filtered fluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Girimaji, Sharath S

    2007-07-20

    We develop a kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing filtered fluid turbulence applicable for continuum and noncontinuum effects. The effect of unresolved turbulent motion on the resolved distribution function is elucidated and closure modeling issues of kinetic Boltzmann and Navier-Stokes descriptions are reconciled. This could pave the way for unifying turbulence modeling at kinetic and continuum levels and the development of numerical methods that are valid over a wide range of flow physics. PMID:17678288

  5. Numerical Study of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The specific case was encountered during one of NASA's flight tests and was characterized by severe turbulence. The event was associated with overshooting convective turrets that contained low to moderate radar reflectivity. Model comparisons with observations are quite favorable. Turbulence hazard metrics are proposed and applied to the numerical data set. Issues such as adequate grid size are examined.

  6. Oceanic turbulence - Big bangs or continuous creation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning the turbulence characteristics of 'microstructure' patches in the ocean is proposed in which a turbulence field is driven at the same time and scale at which it is observed. The driving energy is converted into turbulence kinetic energy in such a way that the observed overturning thickness scale is linearly related to the length scale. This hypothesis is contrasted with that of Gibson (1982), in which the 'patches' are produced by rare, powerful turbulence generators that have 'fossilized' prior to their observation. Careful attention is given to the sampling process and its assumptions.

  7. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  8. Wave turbulence in one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Guyenne, P.; Pushkarev, A. N.; Dias, F.

    2001-05-01

    A two-parameter nonlinear dispersive wave equation proposed by Majda, McLaughlin and Tabak is studied analytically and numerically as a model for the study of wave turbulence in one-dimensional systems. Our ultimate goal is to test the validity of weak turbulence theory. Although weak turbulence theory is independent on the sign of the nonlinearity of the model, the numerical results show a strong dependence on the sign of the nonlinearity. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is the strong influence of coherent structures - wave collapses and quasisolitons - in wave turbulence.

  9. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  10. Forced Turbulence in Relativistic Conformal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westernacher-Schneider, John Ryan; Green, Stephen; Lehner, Luis; Canon, Kipp; Oz, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    Given the renewed interest arising both from AdS/CFT and astrophysics, we revisit the phenomenon of relativistic turbulence. We build on some recent work which extends known non-relativistic results in turbulence to the case of relativistic (and thus compressible) fluids. In particular, we derive the scaling behaviour of two-point correlation functions in 2+1 dimensions--holographically dual to 3+1 dimensional gravity. Turbulence in 2+1 dimensions also approximates several astrophysical situations, such as thin accretion disks around black holes. We perform numerical simulations of forced steady-state turbulence to verify our derived correlation functions.

  11. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  12. Clear air turbulence - An airborne alert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, L. P.; Caracena, F.; Kuhn, P. M.; Kurkowski, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An infrared radiometer system has been developed that can alert a pilot of an aircraft 2 to 9 minutes in advance of an encounter with clear air turbulence. The time between the warning and the clear air turbulence event varies with the flight altitude of the aircraft. In turbulence-free areas, the incidence of false alarms is found to be less than one in 3.4 hours of flight time compared to less than one per 10 hours of flight time in areas with turbulence.

  13. Aspects of a turbulent-nonturbulent interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhamurthy, V. D.; Andersson, H. I.; Pettersen, B.

    2011-12-01

    Transport mechanisms at the interface between a laminar and a turbulent plane Couette flow are examined by means of DNS data of a statistically steady flow field. A mixing-layer is established which neither evolves in the streamwise direction nor in time. This novel flow configuration is perfectly suited for explorations of momentum transfer mechanisms, e.g. turbulent diffusion. Unexpected undulations characterize the large-scale interactions between the turbulent and the nominally non-turbulent part flow. However, surprisingly large velocity fluctuations are observed even in the low-Re half of the flow which otherwise would be laminar.

  14. Anisotropic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Bieber, J. W.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind turbulence has been viewed traditionally as composed of parallel propagating ('slab' fluctuations) or otherwise as isotropic turbulence. A variety of recent investigations, reviewed here, indicate that the spectrum may contain a significant admixture of two dimensional fluctuations, having variations mainly perpendicular to the local magnetic field. These indications come from simulations, from the theory of nearly incompressible MHD, from cosmic ray transport studies and from transport theory for solar wind turbulence, as well as from interpretations of direct observations. Thus, solar wind turbulence may be more like bundles of spaghetti than like parallel phase fronts.

  15. Optical Rogue Waves in Vortex Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Christopher J.; Yao, Alison M.; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2016-01-01

    We present a spatiotemporal mechanism for producing 2D optical rogue waves in the presence of a turbulent state with creation, interaction, and annihilation of optical vortices. Spatially periodic structures with bound phase lose stability to phase unbound turbulent states in complex Ginzburg-Landau and Swift-Hohenberg models with external driving. When the pumping is high and the external driving is low, synchronized oscillations are unstable and lead to spatiotemporal vortex-mediated turbulence with high excursions in amplitude. Nonlinear amplification leads to rogue waves close to turbulent optical vortices, where the amplitude tends to zero, and to probability density functions (PDFs) with long tails typical of extreme optical events.

  16. Will climate change increase transatlantic aviation turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Joshi, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

  17. Will Climate Change Increase Transatlantic Aviation Turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Joshi, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric storm tracks and jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

  18. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that turbulence played a major role in the evolution of the solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which our solar system formed. Relevant turbulent processes include the transport of angular momentum, mass, and heat, which were critically important to the formation of the solar system. This research will break ground in the modeling of compressible turbulence and its effects on the evolution of the solar nebula. The computational techniques which were developed should be of interest to researchers studying other astrophysical disk systems (e.g., active galactic nuclei), as well as turbulence modelers outside the astrophysics community.

  19. Characteristics of ultraviolet scattering and turbulent channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2013-08-01

    The nonline of sight (NLOS) ultraviolet (UV) scattering communication channel and atmospheric optical turbulent channel have been extensively but independently studied in the rich literature. However, the new characteristics of NLOS UV scattering and turbulent channels have not been comprehensively investigated. We propose a configurable framework, unifying the traditional line of sight turbulence theory and the Monte Carlo simulation framework for random scattering of photons. Results show that the scattering link geometry can significantly alter the received signal distribution. Irradiance fluctuations at the receiver may become much weaker due to the smoothing effect of impinging photons from different scattering paths, even though each scattering path undergoes strong turbulence. PMID:23903138

  20. Turbulence originating from convectively stable internal waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Forbes, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lindzen (1981) theory for the generation of turbulence by unstable tides and gravity omits consideration of the possibility that turbulence may be generated by gravity waves which are not convectively unstable, as suggested by the McComas and Bretherton (1977) demonstration that internal gravity waves are unstable to other gravity waves with shorter wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the estimation of the maximum turbulence that might be generated by such a process, and it is shown that even such turbulence would not significantly alter earlier results.

  1. Structure and scales in turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, W. C.; Langer, C. A.; Kassinos, S. C.

    2002-07-01

    The enstrophy of the large-scale energy-containing turbulence is proposed as the second turbulence scale for use, in conjunction with the turbulence energy, in two-scale one-point engineering turbulence models. Its transport equation is developed in general and modeled for homogeneous turbulence in terms of the two scales and our new one-point structure tensors. The model produces the correct behavior of the scales for both two- and three-dimensional turbulence. Constants in the high Reynolds number model are evaluated only by reference to asymptotic analysis for decaying turbulence in stationary and rotating frames, and this model is then shown to provide an excellent prediction of homogeneous turbulent shear flow when used with the structure tensors for that flow. The low Reynolds number constant in the model is evaluated using the asymptotic decay rate for isotropic turbulence at zero Reynolds number, and numerical simulations of decay for intermediate Reynolds numbers are used to establish one remaining constant, the value of which does not affect high Reynolds number predictions.

  2. New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

  3. Anisotropy in turbulent flows and in turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Procaccia, Itamar

    2005-07-01

    The problem of anisotropy and its effects on the statistical theory of high Reynolds number (Re) turbulence (and turbulent transport) is intimately related and intermingled with the problem of the universality of the (anomalous) scaling exponents of structure functions. Both problems had seen tremendous progress in the last 5 years. In this review we present a detailed description of the new tools that allow effective data analysis and systematic theoretical studies such as to separate isotropic from anisotropic aspects of turbulent statistical fluctuations. Employing the invariance of the equations of fluid mechanics to all rotations, we show how to decompose the (tensorial) statistical objects in terms of the irreducible representation of the SO(d) symmetry group (with d being the dimension, d=2 or 3). This device allows a discussion of the scaling properties of the statistical objects in well-defined sectors of the symmetry group, each of which is determined by the “angular momenta” sector numbers (j,m). For the case of turbulent advection of passive scalar or vector fields, this decomposition allows rigorous statements to be made: (i) the scaling exponents are universal, (ii) the isotropic scaling exponents are always leading, (iii) the anisotropic scaling exponents form a discrete spectrum which is strictly increasing as a function of j. This emerging picture offers a complete understanding of the decay of anisotropy upon going to smaller and smaller scales. Next, we explain how to apply the SO(3) decomposition to the statistical Navier-Stokes theory. We show how to extract information about the scaling behavior in the isotropic sector. Doing so furnishes a systematic way to assess the universality of the scaling exponents in this sector, clarifying the anisotropic origin of the many measurements that claimed the opposite. A systematic analysis of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations and of experiments provides a strong support

  4. Supernova-driven interstellar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M. K. Ryan

    To study how supernova feedback structures the turbulent interstellar medium, we construct 3D models of vertically stratified gas stirred by discrete supernova explosions, including vertical gravitational field and parametrized heating and cooling. The models reproduce many observed characteristics of the Galaxy such as global circulation of gas (i.e., galactic fountain) and the existence of cold dense clouds in the galactic disk. Global quantities of the model such as warm and hot gas filling factors in the midplane, mass fraction of thermally unstable gas, and the averaged vertical density profile are compared directly with existing observations, and shown to be broadly consistent. We find that energy injection occurs over a broad range of scales. There is no single effective driving scale, unlike the usual assumption for idealized models of incompressible turbulence. However, >90% of the total kinetic energy is contained in wavelengths shortward of 200 pc. The shape of the kinetic energy spectrum differs substantially from that of the velocity power spectrum, which implies that the velocity structure varies with the gas density. Velocity structure functions demonstrate that the phenomenological theory proposed by Boldyrev is applicable to the medium. We show that it can be misleading to predict physical properties such as the stellar initial mass junction based on numerical simulations that do not include self-gravity of the gas. Even if all the gas in turbulently Jeans unstable regions in our simulation is assumed to collapse and form stars in local freefall times, the resulting total collapse rate is significantly lower than the value consistent with the input supernova rate. Supernova-driven turbulence inhibits star formation globally rather than triggering it. Feedback from massive stars is perhaps the least understood aspect of the current scenario of large-scale structure formation. Many recent observations on both galactic and cosmological scales require

  5. Stochastic superparameterization in quasigeostrophic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Grooms, Ian; Majda, Andrew J.

    2014-08-15

    In this article we expand and develop the authors' recent proposed methodology for efficient stochastic superparameterization algorithms for geophysical turbulence. Geophysical turbulence is characterized by significant intermittent cascades of energy from the unresolved to the resolved scales resulting in complex patterns of waves, jets, and vortices. Conventional superparameterization simulates large scale dynamics on a coarse grid in a physical domain, and couples these dynamics to high-resolution simulations on periodic domains embedded in the coarse grid. Stochastic superparameterization replaces the nonlinear, deterministic eddy equations on periodic embedded domains by quasilinear stochastic approximations on formally infinite embedded domains. The result is a seamless algorithm which never uses a small scale grid and is far cheaper than conventional SP, but with significant success in difficult test problems. Various design choices in the algorithm are investigated in detail here, including decoupling the timescale of evolution on the embedded domains from the length of the time step used on the coarse grid, and sensitivity to certain assumed properties of the eddies (e.g. the shape of the assumed eddy energy spectrum). We present four closures based on stochastic superparameterization which elucidate the properties of the underlying framework: a ‘null hypothesis’ stochastic closure that uncouples the eddies from the mean, a stochastic closure with nonlinearly coupled eddies and mean, a nonlinear deterministic closure, and a stochastic closure based on energy conservation. The different algorithms are compared and contrasted on a stringent test suite for quasigeostrophic turbulence involving two-layer dynamics on a β-plane forced by an imposed background shear. The success of the algorithms developed here suggests that they may be fruitfully applied to more realistic situations. They are expected to be particularly useful in providing accurate and

  6. Direct simulation of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Several direct simulations of 3-D homogeneous, compressible turbulence are presented with emphasis on the differences with incompressible turbulent simulations. A fully spectral collocation algorithm, periodic in all directions coupled with a 3rd order Runge-Kutta time discretization scheme is sufficient to produce well-resolved flows at Taylor Reynolds numbers below 40 on grids of 128x128x128. A Helmholtz decomposition of velocity is useful to differentiate between the purely compressible effects and those effects solely due to vorticity production. In the context of homogeneous flows, this decomposition in unique. Time-dependent energy and dissipation spectra of the compressible and solenoidal velocity components indicate the presence of localized small scale structures. These structures are strongly a function of the initial conditions. Researchers concentrate on a regime characterized by very small fluctuating Mach numbers Ma (on the order of 0.03) and density and temperature fluctuations much greater than sq Ma. This leads to a state in which more than 70 percent of the kinetic energy is contained in the so-called compressible component of the velocity. Furthermore, these conditions lead to the formation of curved weak shocks (or shocklets) which travel at approximately the sound speed across the physical domain. Various terms in the vorticity and divergence of velocity production equations are plotted versus time to gain some understanding of how small scales are actually formed. Possible links with Burger turbulence are examined. To visualize better the dynamics of the flow, new graphic visualization techniques have been developed. The 3-D structure of the shocks are visualized with the help of volume rendering algorithms developed in-house. A combination of stereographic projection and animation greatly increase the number of visual cues necessary to properly interpret the complex flow.

  7. Wavelet analysis of atmospheric turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hudgins, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    After a brief review of the elementary properties of Fourier Transforms, the Wavelet Transform is defined in Part I. Basic results are given for admissable wavelets. The Multiresolution Analysis, or MRA (a mathematical structure which unifies a large class of wavelets with Quadrature Mirror Filters) is then introduced. Some fundamental aspects of wavelet design are then explored. The Discrete Wavelet Transform is discussed and, in the context of an MRA, is seen to supply a Fast Wavelet Transform which competes with the Fast Fourier Transform for efficiency. In Part II, the Wavelet Transform is developed in terms of the scale number variable s instead of the scale length variable a where a = 1/s. Basic results such as the admissibility condition, conservation of energy, and the reconstruction theorem are proven in this context. After reviewing some motivation for the usual Fourier power spectrum, a definition is given for the wavelet power spectrum. This `spectral density` is then intepreted in the context of spectral estimation theory. Parseval`s theorem for Wavelets then leads naturally to the Wavelet Cross Spectrum, Wavelet Cospectrum, and Wavelet Quadrature Spectrum. Wavelet Transforms are then applied in Part III to the analysis of atmospheric turbulence. Data collected over the ocean is examined in the wavelet transform domain for underlying structure. A brief overview of atmospheric turbulence is provided. Then the overall method of applying Wavelet Transform techniques to time series data is described. A trace study is included, showing some of the aspects of choosing the computational algorithm, and selection of a specific analyzing wavelet. A model for generating synthetic turbulence data is developed, and seen to yield useful results in comparing with real data for structural transitions. Results from the theory of Wavelet Spectral Estimation and Wavelength Cross-Transforms are applied to studying the momentum transport and the heat flux.

  8. Turbulent reconnection of magnetic bipoles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-07-01

    We consider strongly stratified forced turbulence in a plane-parallel layer with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower part and non-helical turbulence in the upper. The magnetic field is found to develop strongly concentrated bipolar structures near the surface. They form elongated bands with a sharp interface between opposite polarities. Unlike earlier experiments with imposed magnetic field, the inclusion of rotation does not strongly suppress the formation of these structures. We perform a systematic numerical study of this phenomenon by varying magnetic Reynolds number, scale-separation ratio, and Coriolis number. We focus on the formation of a current sheet between bipolar regions where reconnection of oppositely oriented field lines occurs. We determine the reconnection rate by measuring either the inflow velocity in the vicinity of the current sheet or by measuring the electric field in the reconnection region. We demonstrate that for large Lundquist numbers, S > 103, the reconnection rate is nearly independent of S in agreement with results of recent numerical simulations performed by other groups in simpler settings.

  9. Turbulent reconnection of magnetic bipoles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-04-01

    We consider strongly stratified forced turbulence in a plane-parallel layer with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower part and non-helical turbulence in the upper. The magnetic field is found to develop strongly concentrated bipolar structures near the surface. They form elongated bands with a sharp interface between opposite polarities. Unlike earlier experiments with imposed magnetic field, the inclusion of rotation does not strongly suppress the formation of these structures. We perform a systematic numerical study of this phenomenon by varying magnetic Reynolds number, scale separation ratio, and Coriolis number. We focus on the formation of a current sheet between bipolar regions where reconnection of oppositely oriented field lines occurs. We determine the reconnection rate by measuring either the inflow velocity in the vicinity of the current sheet or by measuring the electric field in the reconnection region. We demonstrate that for large Lundquist numbers, S > 103, the reconnection rate is nearly independent of S in agreement with results of recent numerical simulations performed by other groups in simpler settings.

  10. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatnikov, A.N.

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  11. Quenching and Anisotropy of Hydromagnetic Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Brandenburg, Axel; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the {\\boldsymbolΩ} × \\boldsymbol {{J}} effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  12. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  13. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Star Forming Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Adam

    Setting young stellar object jets and outflows in their broadest context requires an understanding of outflows as “feedback” in the development of molecular cloud turbulence and the determination of star formation efficiencies. In this contribution I review our group’s recent studies exploring relationships between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. We first present studies of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by YSO outflows using numerical simulations which track the evolution of single transient jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. These studies demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Next we present simulations of multiple interacting jets. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. Comparing the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of an isotropically forced control we show that in outflow driven turbulence a power law of the form E(k) ∝ k - β is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum β ˜ 3 is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations β ˜ 2. 0. Taken together both studies provide broad support for the conclusion that fossil cavities driven by decaying jets can provide a source of turbulence and feedback which mediate star formation processes in molecular clouds. Whether this does obtain in real clouds remains a point which must be demonstrated

  14. Strong turbulence of plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work related to modulational instability and wave envelope self-focusing in dynamical and statistical systems. After introductory remarks pertinent to nonlinear optics realizations of these effects, the author summarizes the status of the subject in plasma physics, where it has come to be called 'strong Langmuir turbulence'. The paper treats the historical development of pertinent concepts, analytical theory, numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and spacecraft observations. The role of self-similar self-focusing Langmuir envelope wave packets is emphasized, both in the Zakharov equation model for the wave dynamics and in a statistical theory based on this dynamical model.

  15. Turbulent Flow Computations in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, A.; Siddesha, H.

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents computations in ejectors using in-house code NUMBERS. Computations are carried out in a 2D ejector and in a cylindrical ejector. Computations on the cylindrical ejector are done for various nozzle pressure ratios. The ejector flow is dominated by complex mixing of primary and secondary jets. The Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST turbulence models are used. The results with the Menter SST model are superior to Spalart-Allmaras model at higher nozzle pressure ratios for the cylindrical ejector.

  16. Thermal Dissipation in Quantum Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2006-10-06

    The microscopic mechanism of thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence is numerically studied by solving the coupled system involving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. At low temperatures, the obtained dissipation does not work at scales greater than the vortex core size. However, as the temperature increases, dissipation works at large scales and it affects the vortex dynamics. We successfully obtain the mutual friction coefficients of the vortex in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates dynamics as functions of temperature.

  17. Turbulent flows near flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, R.; Imamura, T.; Doi, M.

    1980-08-01

    The method to study the effect of the plate moving in the homogeneous or isotropic turbulence is presented. The crucial point of this method is to solve the Orr-Sommerfeld like equation, which is satisfied by the kernel of the Wiener-Hermite expansion of the velocity field, under the inhomogeneous boundary condition. In the special case of constant mean flow, our method gives the same result as that of Hunt and Graham and succeeds in explaining the experimental results of Thomas and Hancock. The method is also applied to the case of nonuniform mean flow, where the shear effect comes up.

  18. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  19. The onset of Alfvenic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is conducted on how low-frequency MHD oscillations in a warm plasma may undergo a transition from a coherent state to one of turbulence. A driven/dissipative derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived from the fluid equations. The time evolution of an arbitrary spectrum of waves is analyzed in the case where one k-mode is unstable, with the rest damped. It is found that the transition from order to chaos in the driven/dissipative system is correlated with the existence or absence of 'breathing' solitons in the associated conservative system.

  20. Electromagnetic weak turbulence theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J.

    2012-10-15

    The statistical mechanical reformulation of weak turbulence theory for unmagnetized plasmas including fully electromagnetic effects was carried out by Yoon [Phys. Plasmas 13, 022302 (2006)]. However, the wave kinetic equation for the transverse wave ignores the nonlinear three-wave interaction that involves two transverse waves and a Langmuir wave, the incoherent analogue of the so-called Raman scattering process, which may account for the third and higher-harmonic plasma emissions. The present paper extends the previous formalism by including such a term.

  1. Scaling of turbulence and turbulent mixing using Terascale numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego A.

    Fundamental aspects of turbulence and turbulent mixing are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) of stationary isotropic turbulence, with Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers (Rlambda) ranging from 8 to 650 and Schmidt numbers (Sc) from 1/8 to 1024. The primary emphasis is on important scaling issues that arise in the study of intermittency, mixing and turbulence under solid-body rotation. Simulations up to 20483 in size have been performed using large resource allocations on Terascale computers at leading supercomputing centers. Substantial efforts in algorithmic development have also been undertaken and resulted in a new code based on a two-dimensional domain decomposition which allows the use of very large number of processors. Benchmark tests indicate very good parallel performance for resolutions up to 40963 on up to 32768 processors, which is highly promising for future simulations at higher resolutions and processor counts eventually to approach Petascale levels. Investigation of intermittency through the statistics of dissipation and enstrophy in a series of simulations at the same Reynolds number but different resolution indicate that accurate results in high-order moments require a higher degree of fine-scale resolution than commonly practiced. However, statistics up to fourth order are satisfactory if the grid spacing is not larger than Komogorov scale, without the requirement of a clear analytic range for corresponding structure functions as suggested by recent theories. Results from highly resolved simulations provide support for a modified resolution criterion derived in this work for structure functions of different orders and as a function of Rlambda. At the highest Reynolds number in our simulations (400 and 650) dissipation and enstrophy exhibit extreme fluctuations of O(1000) the mean which have not been studied in the literature before. The far tails of the probability density functions of dissipation and enstrophy appear to coincide

  2. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  3. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  4. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics. PMID:27627303

  5. Prediction of free turbulent mixing using a turbulent kinetic energy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsha, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Free turbulent mixing of two-dimensional and axisymmetric one- and two-stream flows is analyzed by a relatively simple turbulent kinetic energy method. This method incorporates a linear relationship between the turbulent shear and the turbulent kinetic energy and an algebraic relationship for the length scale appearing in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. Good results are obtained for a wide variety of flows. The technique is shown to be especially applicable to flows with heat and mass transfer, for which nonunity Prandtl and Schmidt numbers may be assumed.

  6. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  7. Rare-gas-rich separates from carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. H.; Frick, U.; Neil, J. M.; Phinney, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of carbon-rich separates prepared by demineralization of colloidal fractions after disaggregation of bulk samples of the type C2 meteorites Murray, Murchison, and Cold Bokkeveld, as well as a methanol colloid extracted from acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite (type C3V) obtained by dissolution of most of the minerals in HCl and HF acids. The carbonaceous separates, or lAlates (a coined word designating colloids prepared sometimes before and sometimes after acid treatment), are characterized incompletely and with difficulty. A stepwise heating experiment on a Murray lAlate is discussed which revealed bimodal release of all noble gases, with similar patterns for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Chemical reactions are suggested as the likely mechanism for gas release. The results are shown to support the concept of a carbonaceous gas carrier uniformly present in meteorites of various types.

  8. Andromeda IV, a solitary gas-rich dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Chengalur, J. N.; Tully, R. B.; Makarova, L. N.; Sharina, M. E.; Begum, A.; Rizzi, L.

    2016-03-01

    Observations are presented of the isolated dwarf irregular galaxy And IV made with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in the 21 cm H I line. We determine the galaxy distance of 7.17{±}0.31 Mpc using the Tip of Red Giant Branch method. The galaxy has a total blue absolute magnitude of -12.81 mag, linear Holmberg diameter of 1.88 kpc, and an H I-disk extending to 8.4 times the optical Holmberg radius. The H I mass-to-blue luminosity ratio for And IV amounts 12.9M⊙/L⊙. From the GMRT data we derive the rotation curve for the H I and fit it with different mass models. We find that the data are significantly better fit with an iso-thermal dark matter halo, than by an NFW halo. We also find that MOND rotation curve provides a very poor fit to the data. The fact that the iso-thermal dark matter halo provides the best fit to the data supports models in which star formation feedback results in the formation of a dark matter core in dwarf galaxies. The total mass-to-blue luminosity ratio of 162M⊙/L⊙ makes And IV among the darkest dIrr galaxies known. However, its baryonic-to-dark mass ratio (M_gas+M*)/M_T = 0.11 is close to the average cosmic baryon fraction of 0.15.

  9. Star forming regions in gas-rich SO galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogge, Richard W.; Eskridge, Paul B.

    1987-01-01

    The first results of an H alpha imaging survey of HI rich SO galaxies, which were searched for HII regions and other sources of emission, are presented. The charge coupled device H alpha interference filter images were made of 16 galaxies. Eight of these galaxies show evidence for on-going star formation, one has nuclear emission but no HII regions, and the remaining seven have no emissions detected within well defined upper limits. With the exception of one notably peculiar galaxy in which the emission from HII regions appears pervasive, the HII regions are either organized into inner-disk rings or randomly distributed throughout the disk. A few of these galaxies are found to be clearly not SO's; or peculiar objects atypical of the SO class. Using simple models star formation rates (SFRs) and gas depletion times from the observed H alpha fluxes were estimated. In general, the derived SFRs are much lower than those found in isolated field spiral galaxies and the corresponding gas depletion time scales are also longer.

  10. Gas-rich dwarf galaxies in dense and sparse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf irregular galaxies (generically labelled Im for the present purposes) pose an enigma to students of galaxy evolution. In nearby groups and the Virgo cluster, Im galaxies are at least as abundant as spiral galaxies, and their low surface brightnesses and high gas-to-stars ratios suggest that (at least in the stochastic self-propagating star formation scenario) there should be significant numbers of HI clouds with masses approaching 10(exp 8) solar mass which have undergone very little or no star formation. To date, however, no clouds with so little star formation that they would not be recognized as Im galaxies on high-quality photographic plates have been identified. There have been suggestions that such dwarfs may be tidally disrupted in regions of high galactic density, but may be prevalent in low density regions. We offer data from three parallel programs relevant to this issue. (1) A large number of Im galaxies throughout the Local Supercluster have been mapped in the HI spectral line using the Arecibo Radiotelescope, and we can establish the frequency with which HI disks much more extended than their optically visible portions are found. (2) Our extensive mapping of spiral and dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster allows us to set stringent limits on the density of star-free Hi clouds in that cluster. (3) We have conducted a sampling of the void in the distribution of galaxies toward the super galactic pole, optimized for finding low-mass HI clouds at redshifts out to approximately 2000 km/s.

  11. Energetics of the Beamed Zombie Turbulence Maser Action Mechanism for Remote Detection of Submerged Oceanic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. H.; Bondur, V. G.; Keeler, R. N.; Leung, P. T.

    2011-11-01

    Sea surface brightness spectral anomalies from a Honolulu municipal outfall have been detected from space satellites in 200 km2 areas extending 20 km from the wastewater diffuser (Bondur 2005, Keeler et al. 2005, Gibson et al. 2005). Dropsonde and towed body microstructure measurements show outfall enhanced viscous and temperature dissipation rates above the turbulence trapping layer. Fossil turbulence waves and secondary (zombie, zebra) turbulence waves break as they propagate near-vertically and then break again near the surface to produce wind ripple smoothing in narrow frequency band (zebra) patterns from soliton-like sources of secondary turbulence energy acting on fossils advected from the outfall. The 30-250 m solitons reflect a nonlinear cascade from tidal and current kinetic energy to boundary layer turbulence events, to fossil turbulence waves, to internal soliton and tidal waves. Secondary (zombie) turbulence acts on outfall fossil patches to amplify, channel in chimneys, and vertically beam ambient internal wave energy just as energized metastable molecules around stars amplify and beam quantum frequencies in astrophysical masers. Kilowatts of buoyancy power from the treatment plant produces fossil turbulence patches trapped below the thermocline. Beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) in mixing chimneys amplifies these kilowatts into the megawatts of surface turbulence dissipation required to affect brightness on wide sea surface areas by maser action vertical beaming of fossil-wave-power extracted from gigawatts dissipated by intermittent bottom turbulence events on topography from the tides and currents.

  12. Study on Turbulent Premixed Flame Regimes with Ignition Using a Reactor Assisted Turbulent Slot Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sang Hee; Reuter, Christopher; Windom, Bret; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent premixed flames of n-heptane/air and toluene/air mixtures affected by ignition have been experimentally investigated by using a reactor-assisted turbulent slot (RATS) burner at two burner temperatures, 450 K and 700 K. Turbulent burning velocities (ST) and flame structures have been measured by the simultaneous OH and CH2O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging at various equivalence ratios and turbulent Reynolds numbers. Three distinct turbulent premixed flame regimes are identified for n-heptane/air mixture; chemical frozen (CF) regime at low temperature, low temperature ignition (LTI) regime, and high temperature ignition (HTI) regime for respectively lean and rich conditions at 700 K. For CF regime, the measured turbulent burning velocities of n-heptane and toluene at 450 K follow a conventional correlation of turbulent intensity (defined as u'/SL). In LTI regime, substantial changes in chemical composition alter the laminar flame speed and transport property, leading to rapid increase of turbulent burning velocity. In HTI regime, it is found that the turbulent premixed flame structure is significantly modified by the appearance of volumetric ignition kernel structures associated with the transition from LTI to HTI. The turbulent premixed flame regime in HTI is no longer represented by the thin reaction zone regime. The measured turbulent burning velocities in HTI regime increase substantially as increasing ignition Damkőhler number over those in LTI regime.

  13. Simulations of turbulent mixing and reacting flows and their applications to turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferziger, J. H.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    The method of full simulation is applied to reacting turbulent flows. Full simulation has proven of great value as a complement to experiments for the study of nonreacting turbulent flows. It provides insight into the physics of turbulent flows and their modeling. It is natural to try to extend these methods to the simulation of reacting turbulent flows. Because this is one of the first attempts at this type of simulation, a subsidiary goal of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using simulation to study turbulent reacting flows. In addition, it is shown that such simulations can be used to provide physical insight into the nature of turbulent combustion and to provide data that will help to construct models that can be used in engineering simulations of turbulent reacting flows.

  14. Atmospheric turbulence MTF for infrared optical waves' propagation through marine atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2014-07-01

    Infrared optical wave's propagation in marine environment is particularly challenging, not only for scattering and absorption due to high humidity, but also for a different behavior of atmospheric turbulence with respect to terrestrial propagation. In this paper, the marine atmospheric turbulence modulation transfer functions (MTF), which describes the degrading effects of marine atmospheric turbulence on an optical imaging system, is investigated in detail both analytically and numerically. New analytic expressions of the MTF are derived for plane and spherical waves under marine atmospheric turbulence, and they consider physically the influences of finite turbulence inner and outer scales. The final results indicate that, the marine atmospheric turbulence brings more degrading effects on the imaging system than the terrestrial atmospheric turbulence.

  15. Computation of turbulent flows using an extended k-epsilon turbulence closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.-S.; Kim, S.-W.

    1987-01-01

    An extended kappa-epsilon turbulence model is proposed and tested with successful results. An improved transport equation for the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy, epsilon, is proposed. The proposed model gives more effective response to the energy production rate than does the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. An extra time scale of the production range is included in the dissipation rate equation. This enables the present model to perform equally well for several turbulent flows with different characteristics, e.g., plane and axisymmetric jets, turbulent boundary layer flow, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, and a confined turbulent swirling flow. A second-order accurate finite difference boundary layer code and a nearly second-order accurate finite difference elliptic flow solver are used for the present numerical computations.

  16. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  17. Swimming in turbulent flow - profitable or costly ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, E. C.; Roy, A. G.

    2004-05-01

    Fish swimming performance has long been of interest to researchers. Experiments on swimming performance are generally performed under conditions which minimise flow heterogeneity. However, fish live in environments were intense fluctuations of flow velocity and pressure occur. Only recently, studies emerged that consider the effect of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish. Research has shown that fish may benefit from turbulence. For example, rainbow trout swimming behind an obstacle which produced stable vortex shedding, profited from the energy of these vortices. Fish adjusted their swimming patterns to slalom between the vortices which resulted in a reduction in muscle activity suggesting that fish reduced energy expenditure of swimming. Similarly, sockeye salmon exploited recirculation zones during upriver spawning migration to minimise energy expenditure. In contrast to these investigations showing that fish may actually profit from turbulence, several studies suggested that turbulence increases energy expenditure of swimming. Sustained swimming speed of fish decreased with increasing turbulence intensity suggesting an increase in swimming costs. Similarly, Atlantic salmon swimming in turbulent flow have 2- to 4-fold increased energy expenditure in comparison to estimates obtained under minimised flow heterogeneity. We will give an overview of recent studies and of new experimental evidence showing how turbulence affects fish behaviour, energetics and distribution and we discuss the relevant scales at which turbulent flow structures affect fish depending on its size. These results are from special interest not only for fisheries management, habitat restoration and biodiversity conservation but also for conceptualisation and construction of migratory fish pathways.

  18. PROTOPLANETARY MIGRATION IN TURBULENT ISOTHERMAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, C.; Lin, D. N. C. E-mail: lin@ucolick.or

    2010-02-01

    In order to reproduce the statistical properties of the observed exoplanets, population synthesis models have shown that the migration of protoplanets should be significantly slowed down, and that processes stalling migration should be at work. Much current theoretical efforts have thus been dedicated to find physical effects that slow down, halt or even reverse migration. Many of these studies rely on the horseshoe drag, whose long-term evolution (saturated or not) is intimately related to the disk viscosity in laminar disk models. We investigate how the horseshoe drag exerted on a low-mass planet is altered by a more realistic treatment of the turbulence in protoplanetary disks. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed with a turbulence model that reproduces the main turbulence properties of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations. We find that the horseshoe drag can remain unsaturated on the long term, depending on the turbulence strength. We show that the desaturation of the horseshoe drag by turbulence can be modeled by vortensity diffusion across the time-averaged planet's horseshoe region. At low-turbulence, the running-time-averaged torque is in good agreement with the total torque obtained for an equivalent laminar model, with a similar vortensity diffusion coefficient. At high turbulence, differences arise due to the time evolution of the averaged density profile with turbulence.

  19. Dissipation range turbulent cascades in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Forest, C. B.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Sarff, J. S.; Fiksel, G.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Prager, S. C.; Ren, Y.

    2012-05-15

    Dissipation range cascades in plasma turbulence are described and spectra are formulated from the scaled attenuation in wavenumber space of the spectral energy transfer rate. This yields spectra characterized by the product of a power law and exponential fall-off, applicable to all scales. Spectral indices of the power law and exponential fall-off depend on the scaling of the dissipation, the strength of the nonlinearity, and nonlocal effects when dissipation rates of multiple fluctuation fields are different. The theory is used to derive spectra for MHD turbulence with magnetic Prandtl number greater than unity, extending previous work. The theory is also applied to generic plasma turbulence by considering the spectrum from damping with arbitrary wavenumber scaling. The latter is relevant to ion temperature gradient turbulence modeled by gyrokinetics. The spectrum in this case has an exponential component that becomes weaker at small scale, giving a power law asymptotically. Results from the theory are compared to three very different types of turbulence. These include the magnetic plasma turbulence of the Madison Symmetric Torus, the MHD turbulence of liquid metal in the Madison Dynamo Experiment, and gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence.

  20. Wave-Turbulence Interactions: a DPIV Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Lalinde, David

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies on wave-turbulence interactions, such as the one by Olmez & Milgram (JFM, 1992), supported the hypothesis that the dominant mechanism for the dissipation of non-breaking waves by turbulence is vertical mixing, rather than wave-to-turbulence energy transfer in the wave layer. In this study, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to study the increase in turbulence levels due to the presence of surface waves. Two types of turbulent fields were studied. A grid of cylindrical rods was placed in a water tunnel with smaller scale turbulence resulting in the wake of the grid. The second case used a flat plate grid, with the plates aligned parallel to the free-stream flow. This allowed for a range of scales to be generated within the turbulent flow-field in the test section. Next, a wave-generator was placed in the tunnel allowing waves to propagate into the area studied and interact with the grid-generated turbulence. Variation in wavelength and frequency of the surface waves was performed. Results will be presented.

  1. Angular distribution of turbulence in wave space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, G.; Ferziger, J. H.; Bertoglio, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative to the one-point closure model for turbulence, the large eddy simulation (LES), together with its more exact relative, direct numerical simulation (DNS) are discussed. These methods are beginning to serve as partial substitutes for turbulence experiments. The eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory is reviewed. Angular distribution of the converted data was examined in relationship to EDQNM.

  2. Transition phenomena in unstably stratified turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Bukai, M; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sapir-Katiraie, I

    2011-03-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the transition phenomena caused by external forcing from Rayleigh-Bénard convection with large-scale circulation (LSC) to the limiting regime of unstably stratified turbulent flow without LSC, where the temperature field behaves like a passive scalar. In the experiments we use the Rayleigh-Bénard apparatus with an additional source of turbulence produced by two oscillating grids located near the sidewalls of the chamber. When the frequency of the grid oscillations is larger than 2 Hz, the LSC in turbulent convection is destroyed, and the destruction of the LSC is accompanied by a strong change of the mean temperature distribution. However, in all regimes of the unstably stratified turbulent flow the ratio [(ℓ{x}∇{x}T)²+(ℓ{y}∇{y}T)² + (ℓ{z}∇{z}T)²]/<θ²> varies slightly (even in the range of parameters where the behavior of the temperature field is different from that of the passive scalar). Here ℓ{i} are the integral scales of turbulence along the x,y,z directions, and T and θ are the mean and fluctuating parts of the fluid temperature. At all frequencies of the grid oscillations we have detected long-term nonlinear oscillations of the mean temperature. The theoretical predictions based on the budget equations for turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent temperature fluctuations, and turbulent heat flux, are in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21517582

  3. LENGTH SCALE OF TURBULENCE ABOVE ROUGH SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of analyses of data for two urban sites and a rural site suggest that the mixing length can be represented by the integral length scale of the turbulence derived from vertical velocity spectra. The result is apparently universal and permits the shear production of turbule...

  4. Flames in fractal grid generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. H. H.; Geipel, P.; Hampp, F.; Lindstedt, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Twin premixed turbulent opposed jet flames were stabilized for lean mixtures of air with methane and propane in fractal grid generated turbulence. A density segregation method was applied alongside particle image velocimetry to obtain velocity and scalar statistics. It is shown that the current fractal grids increase the turbulence levels by around a factor of 2. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to show that the fractal grids produce slightly larger turbulent structures that decay at a slower rate as compared to conventional perforated plates. Conditional POD (CPOD) was also implemented using the density segregation technique and the results show that CPOD is essential to segregate the relative structures and turbulent kinetic energy distributions in each stream. The Kolmogorov length scales were also estimated providing values ∼0.1 and ∼0.5 mm in the reactants and products, respectively. Resolved profiles of flame surface density indicate that a thin flame assumption leading to bimodal statistics is not perfectly valid under the current conditions and it is expected that the data obtained will be of significant value to the development of computational methods that can provide information on the conditional structure of turbulence. It is concluded that the increase in the turbulent Reynolds number is without any negative impact on other parameters and that fractal grids provide a route towards removing the classical problem of a relatively low ratio of turbulent to bulk strain associated with the opposed jet configuration.

  5. A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Futterman, J A

    2008-09-16

    We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

  6. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  7. Introduction to Drift Wave Turbulence Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Garbet, X.

    2004-03-15

    This tutorial presents the techniques that are used to build a transport model from turbulence simulations. Achievements and limitations are reviewed. The main mechanisms leading to an improved confinement are also addressed. The results of turbulence modelling regarding this issue are assessed.

  8. Two-fluid models of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The defects of turbulence models are summarized and the importance of so-called nongradient diffusion in turbulent fluxes is discussed. The mathematical theory of the flow of two interpenetrating continua is reviewed, and the mathematical formulation of the two fluid model is outlined. Results from plane wake, axisymmetric jet, and combustion studies are shown.

  9. Neutral surface layer turbulence over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    Accurate turbulence estimates are important input to atmospheric dispersion models since they characterize downwind dispersion and hence, potential pollutant concentrations. When only basic wind information is available, an atmospheric modeler must first estimate roughness length (z{sub 0},) at the location of interest, ({mu}*) from similarity theory using average wind speed ({mu}) and z{sub 0}, and finally apply experimentally derived relationships to determine the turbulence intensities. Even when turbulence coefficients are measured, the turbulence profile must be estimated in the surface layer, using, for example, the power law recommended in a US Environmental Protection Agency guidance document. In this study, turbulent intensities and wind profiles are analyzed in eight direction sectors during near neutral stability. ``Local`` and ``regional`` roughness lengths are calculated from wind speed profiles and from longitudinal turbulence intensities ({sigma}{sub {mu}}) at both sites. With ``regional`` roughness length, complex terrain features are in effect the roughness elements. Profiles of median, 15-minute averaged turbulence intensities {sigma}{sub {mu}}, {sigma}{sub {nu}} and {sigma}{sub w} are calculated at both sites. Profiles of median {sigma}{sub {theta}} and {sigma}{sub {phi}} are also calculated using four mean values of regional z{sub 0} at both sites. Finally, differences between widely-used turbulence relationships and the relationships determined in this study, and their possible effect on model results, are discussed.

  10. CHARACTERIZING MAGNETIZED TURBULENCE IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin; Fletcher, Andrew; Beck, Rainer; Hildebrand, Roger H.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Stil, Jeroen M.

    2013-03-20

    We use previously published high-resolution synchrotron polarization data to perform an angular dispersion analysis with the aim of characterizing magnetized turbulence in M51. We first analyze three distinct regions (the center of the galaxy, and the northwest and southwest spiral arms) and can clearly discern the turbulent correlation length scale from the width of the magnetized turbulent correlation function for two regions and detect the imprint of anisotropy in the turbulence for all three. Furthermore, analyzing the galaxy as a whole allows us to determine a two-dimensional Gaussian model for the magnetized turbulence in M51. We measure the turbulent correlation scales parallel and perpendicular to the local mean magnetic field to be, respectively, {delta}{sub ||} = 98 {+-} 5 pc and {delta} = 54 {+-} 3 pc, while the turbulent-to-ordered magnetic field strength ratio is found to be B{sub t}/B{sub 0} = 1.01 {+-} 0.04. These results are consistent with those of Fletcher et al., who performed a Faraday rotation dispersion analysis of the same data, and our detection of anisotropy is consistent with current magnetized turbulence theories.

  11. Turbulent transport models for scramjet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, M. M.; Harsha, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulence modeling approaches were examined from the standpoint of their capability to predict the complex flowfield features observed in scramjet combustions. Thus, for example, the accuracy of each turbulence model, with respect to the prediction of recirculating flows, was examined. It was observed that for large diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansion flows, a choice of turbulence model was not critical because of the domination of their flowfields by pressure forces. For low diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansions and planar backward-facing steps flows, where turbulent shear stresses are of greater significance, the algebraic Reynolds stress approach, modified to increase its sensitivity to streamline curvature, was found to provide the best results. Results of the study also showed that strongly swirling flows provide a stringent test of turbulence model assumptions. Thus, although flows with very high swirl are not of great practical interest, they are useful for turbulence model development. Finally, it was also noted that numerical flowfields solution techniques have a strong interrelation with turbulence models, particularly with the turbulent transport models which involve source-dominated transport equations.

  12. Numerical tokamak turbulence project (OFES grand challenge)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M; Cohen, B I; Crotinger, J; Dawson, J; Decyk, V; Dimits, A M; Dorland, W D; Hammett, G W; Kerbel, G D; Leboeuf, J N; Lee, W W; Lin, Z; Nevins, W M; Reynders, J; Shumaker, D E; Smith, S; Sydora, R; Waltz, R E; Williams, T

    1999-08-27

    The primary research objective of the Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Project (NTTP) is to develop a predictive ability in modeling turbulent transport due to drift-type instabilities in the core of tokamak fusion experiments, through the use of three-dimensional kinetic and fluid simulations and the derivation of reduced models.

  13. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  14. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  15. Transport Coefficients in Rotating Weakly Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Analytical studies of compressible turbulence have found that compressible velocity fluctuations create both effective fluid transport properties and an effective equation of state. This paper investigates the effects of rotation on compressible turbulence. It is shown that rotation modifies the transport properties of compressible turbulence by replacing the turbulence time scale by a rotational time scale, much as rotation modifies the transport properties of incompressible turbulence. But thermal equilibrium properties are modified in a more complex manner. Two regimes are possible: one dominated by incompressible fluctuations, in which the sound speed is modified as it is in non-rotating turbulence, and a rotation dominated regime in which the sound speed enhancement is rotation dependent. The dimensionless parameter which discriminates between regimes is identified. In general, rotation is found to suppress the effects of compressibility. A novel feature of the present analysis is the use of a non-Kolmogorov steady state as the reference state of turbulence. introduction of such steady states expands the power and utility of analytical turbulence closures to a wider range of problems.

  16. Correction methods for underwater turbulence degraded imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Hou, W.; Restaino, S. R.; Matt, S.; Gładysz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques such as adaptive optics and image restoration post processing to correct for aberrations in a wavefront of light propagating through turbulent environment has become customary for many areas including astronomy, medical imaging, and industrial applications. EO imaging underwater has been mainly concentrated on overcoming scattering effects rather than dealing with underwater turbulence. However, the effects of turbulence have crucial impact over long image-transmission ranges and under extreme turbulence conditions become important over path length of a few feet. Our group has developed a program that attempts to define under which circumstances application of atmospheric remote sensing techniques could be envisioned. In our experiments we employ the NRL Rayleigh-Bénard convection tank for simulated turbulence environment at Stennis Space Center, MS. A 5m long water tank is equipped with heating and cooling plates that generate a well measured thermal gradient that in turn produces various degrees of turbulence. The image or laser beam spot can be propagated along the tank's length where it is distorted by induced turbulence. In this work we report on the experimental and theoretical findings of the ongoing program. The paper will introduce the experimental setup, the techniques used, and the measurements made as well as describe novel methods for postprocessing and correction of images degraded by underwater turbulence.

  17. TURBULENCE MODELING APPLIED TO BUOYANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A viable computer model was developed that is based on second-order closure of the turbulent correlation equations for predicting the fate of nonchemically reacting contaminants released in the atmospheric boundary layer. The invariant turbulence model discussed in previous repor...

  18. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulence characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen-La Plante, Imai; Ma, Yongfeng; Nurowska, Katarzyna; Gerber, Hermann; Khelif, Djamal; Karpinska, Katarzyna; Kopec, Marta K.; Kumala, Wojciech; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence observed during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) research campaign is analyzed. Using in-flight measurements of dynamic and thermodynamic variables at the interface between the stratocumulus cloud top and free troposphere, the cloud top region is classified into sublayers, and the thicknesses of these sublayers are estimated. The data are used to calculate turbulence characteristics, including the bulk Richardson number, mean-square velocity fluctuations, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), TKE dissipation rate, and Corrsin, Ozmidov and Kolmogorov scales. A comparison of these properties among different sublayers indicates that the entrainment interfacial layer consists of two significantly different sublayers: the turbulent inversion sublayer (TISL) and the moist, yet hydrostatically stable, cloud top mixing sublayer (CTMSL). Both sublayers are marginally turbulent, i.e., the bulk Richardson number across the layers is critical. This means that turbulence is produced by shear and damped by buoyancy such that the sublayer thicknesses adapt to temperature and wind variations across them. Turbulence in both sublayers is anisotropic, with Corrsin and Ozmidov scales as small as ˜ 0.3 and ˜ 3 m in the TISL and CTMSL, respectively. These values are ˜ 60 and ˜ 15 times smaller than typical layer depths, indicating flattened large eddies and suggesting no direct mixing of cloud top and free-tropospheric air. Also, small scales of turbulence are different in sublayers as indicated by the corresponding values of Kolmogorov scales and buoyant and shear Reynolds numbers.

  19. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  20. Small-scale universality in fluid turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jörg; Scheel, Janet D.; Krasnov, Dmitry; Donzis, Diego A.; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flows in nature and technology possess a range of scales. The largest scales carry the memory of the physical system in which a flow is embedded. One challenge is to unravel the universal statistical properties that all turbulent flows share despite their different large-scale driving mechanisms or their particular flow geometries. In the present work, we study three turbulent flows of systematically increasing complexity. These are homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box, turbulent shear flow between two parallel walls, and thermal convection in a closed cylindrical container. They are computed by highly resolved direct numerical simulations of the governing dynamical equations. We use these simulation data to establish two fundamental results: (i) at Reynolds numbers Re ∼ 102 the fluctuations of the velocity derivatives pass through a transition from nearly Gaussian (or slightly sub-Gaussian) to intermittent behavior that is characteristic of fully developed high Reynolds number turbulence, and (ii) beyond the transition point, the statistics of the rate of energy dissipation in all three flows obey the same Reynolds number power laws derived for homogeneous turbulence. These results allow us to claim universality of small scales even at low Reynolds numbers. Our results shed new light on the notion of when the turbulence is fully developed at the small scales without relying on the existence of an extended inertial range. PMID:25024175