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Sample records for gasb-based iii-v alloys

  1. III-V alloy heterostructure high speed avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, H. D.; Nakano, K.; Tomasetta, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Heterostructure avalanche photodiodes have been successfully fabricated in several III-V alloy systems: GaAlAs/GaAs, GaAlSb/GaAlSb, and InGaAsP/InP. These diodes cover optical wavelengths from 0.4 to 1.8 micron. Early stages of development show very encouraging results. High speed response of less than 35 ps and high quantum efficiency more than 95 percent have been obtained. The dark currents and the excess avalanche noise are also dicussed. A direct comparison of GaAlSb, GaAlAsSb, and In GaAsP avalanche photodiodes is given.

  2. Method for preparing homogeneous single crystal ternary III-V alloys

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A method for producing homogeneous, single-crystal III-V ternary alloys of high crystal perfection using a floating crucible system in which the outer crucible holds a ternary alloy of the composition desired to be produced in the crystal and an inner floating crucible having a narrow, melt-passing channel in its bottom wall holds a small quantity of melt of a pseudo-binary liquidus composition that would freeze into the desired crystal composition. The alloy of the floating crucilbe is maintained at a predetermined lower temperature than the alloy of the outer crucible, and a single crystal of the desired homogeneous alloy is pulled out of the floating crucible melt, as melt from the outer crucible flows into a bottom channel of the floating crucible at a rate that corresponds to the rate of growth of the crystal.

  3. Atomistic modeling of bond lengths in random and ordered III-V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detz, H.; Strasser, G.

    2013-09-01

    This work provides comprehensive modeling for the bond length and angle distributions in random and spontaneously ordered ternary III-V alloys using empirical interaction potentials. The compounds InxGa1-xAs, GaAs1-xSbx, and InxGa1-xP were used as model systems due to their technological importance and the fact that ordered structures were observed experimentally in these materials. For random alloys, we reproduce the bimodal bond length distribution, which allows linear fits with slopes between 0.087 Å and 0.1059 Å for all bond types. The calculated values for dilute compositions slightly deviate from these functions, causing stronger deformations. In the case of CuPt-ordered structures, the bond length distribution is shown to collapse to four sharp peaks with an area ratio of 1:3:3:1, which originate from a different atom to atom distance within the different (111) planes and perpendicular to these. An essential consequence of this atomic arrangement is the different spacings for the different stacked binaries along the (111) direction, which also leads to strain values up to -0.819% for In0.5Ga0.5P and -1.827% for GaAs0.5Sb0.5. Furthermore, the broad bond angle distributions of random alloys collapse into two peaks for CuPt-like structures. On the other hand, CuAu-type ordering is shown to lead to a sharp bimodal bond length distribution but with five different groups of bond angles, which can be identified with the different atomic configurations in ternary zincblende crystals.

  4. Theory of band gap bowing of disordered substitutional II-VI and III-V semiconductor alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourad, D.; Czycholl, G.

    2012-05-01

    For a wide class of technologically relevant compound III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials AC and BC mixed crystals (alloys) of the type A x B1- x C can be realized. As the electronic properties like the bulk band gap vary continuously with x, any band gap in between that of the pure AC and BC systems can be obtained by choosing the appropriate concentration x, granted that the respective ratio is miscible and thermodynamically stable. In most cases the band gap does not vary linearly with x, but a pronounced bowing behavior as a function of the concentration is observed. In this paper we show that the electronic properties of such A x B1- x C semiconductors and, in particular, the band gap bowing can well be described and understood starting from empirical tight-binding models for the pure AC and BC systems. The electronic properties of the A x B1- x C system can be described by choosing the tight-binding parameters of the AC or BC system with probabilities x and 1 - x, respectively. We demonstrate this by exact diagonalization of finite but large supercells and by means of calculations within the established coherent potential approximation (CPA) We apply this treatment to the II-VI system Cd x Zn1- x Se, to the III-V system In x Ga1- x As and to the III-nitride system Ga x Al1- x N.

  5. Structural Characterization of CuPt-ordered III-V Semiconductor Ternary Alloys by Synchrotron X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. H.; Kulik, J.; Zhong, Z.; Moss, S. C.; Holý, V.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.; Bai, J.

    2001-03-01

    A model has been developed to describe x-ray scattering from CuPt-type ordered III-V semiconductor ternary alloys. The model takes into account the size distribution of the two different laminae-shaped variants, the random distribution of the anti-phase domain boundaries in each variant, and the atomic displacement due to the bond length difference between the two constitutive binary materials. A synchrotron x-ray source was employed to measure the weak ordering reflections from Ga_0.5In_0.5P and Al_0.5In_0.5As samples. Our model explains quite well the wavy diffraction pattern in reciprocal space and yields useful structural parameters including the order parameters of the two variants. Research supported by NSF on DMR 97-29297 and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH).

  6. Annealing group III-V compound doped silicon-germanium alloy for improved thermo-electric conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W. (inventor); Wood, Charles (inventor); Draper, Susan L. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The thermoelectric conversion efficiency of a GaP doped SiGe alloy is improved about 30 percent by annealing the alloy at a temperature above the melting point of the alloy, preferably stepwise from 1200 C to 1275 C in air to form large grains having a size over 50 microns and to form a GeGaP rich phase and a silicon rich phase containing SiP and SiO2 particles.

  7. Progress and Continuing Challenges in GaSb-based III-V Alloys and Heterostructures Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-05-06

    This paper discusses progress in the preparation of mid-IR GaSb-based III-V materials grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The growth of these materials is complex, and fundamental and practical issues associated with their growth are outlined. Approaches that have been explored to further improve the properties and performance are briefly reviewed. Recent materials and device results on GaInAsSb bulk layers and GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb heterostructures, grown lattice matched to GaSb, are presented. State-of-the-art GaInAsSb materials and thermophotovoltaic devices have been achieved. This progress establishes the high potential of OMVPE for mid-IR GaSb-based devices.

  8. Modeling the elastic properties of the ternary III-V alloys InGaAs, InAlAs and GaAsSb using Tersoff potentials for binary compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detz, H.; Strasser, G.

    2013-08-01

    This work evaluates the suitability of the empirical Tersoff potential for structural calculations in ternary III-V alloys, using parameter sets for the corresponding binary compounds. In particular, the elastic properties of randomly alloyed InxGa1 - xAs, InxAl1 - xAs and GaAs1 - xSbx are compared to values obtained experimentally over the whole composition range. Different In-As interactions were evaluated for InxGa1 - xAs to provide an optimum fit around the technologically relevant composition of 53% In, required for lattice-matching with InP substrates. The experimental values of the bulk modulus were reproduced with an error well below 5% for all three ternaries, while the calculations led to deviations in the shear modulus of up to 13%. For the particular compositions, lattice-matched to InP, the error in the bulk modulus is well below 2%, while for the shear modulus an error around 10% has to be expected, according to this analysis.

  9. Engineering InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP/ZnSe III-V alloyed core/shell quantum dots for the near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Zimmer, John P; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Tracy, Joseph B; Frangioni, John V; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2005-08-01

    Quantum dots with a core/shell/shell structure consisting of an alloyed core of InAs(x)P(1-x), an intermediate shell of InP, and an outer shell of ZnSe were developed. The InAs(x)P(1-x) alloyed core has a graded internal composition with increasing arsenic content from the center to the edge of the dots. This compositional gradient results from two apparent effects: (1) the faster reaction kinetics of the phosphorus precursor compared to the arsenic precursor, and (2) a post-growth arsenic-phosphorus exchange reaction that increases the arsenic content. The cores have a zinc blend structure for all compositions and show tunable emission in the near-infrared (NIR) region. A first shell of InP leads to a red-shift and an increase in quantum yield. The final shell of ZnSe serves to stabilize the dots for applications in aqueous environments, including NIR biomedical fluorescence imaging. These NIR-emitting core/shell/shell InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP/ZnSe were successfully used in a sentinel lymph node mapping experiment. PMID:16045339

  10. Synthesis of III-V nitride nanowires with controlled structure, morphology, and composition

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Samuel Curtis

    2014-01-01

    The III-V nitride materials system offers tunable electronic and optical properties that can be tailored for specific electronic and optoelectronic applications by varying the (In,Ga,Al)N alloy composition. While nitride ...

  11. Antimony Based III-V Thermophotovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-06-09

    Antimony-based III-V thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells are attractive converters for systems with low radiator temperature around 1100 to 1700 K, since these cells potentially can be spectrally matched to the thermal source. Cells under development include GaSb and the lattice-matched GaInAsSb/GaSb and InPAsSb/InAs quaternary systems. GaSb cell technology is the most mature, owing in part to the relative ease in preparation of the binary alloy compared to quaternary GaInAsSb and InPAsSb alloys. Device performance of 0.7-eV GaSb cells exceeds 90% of the practical limit. GaInAsSb TPV cells have been the primary focus of recent research, and cells with energy gap E{sub g} ranging from {approx}0.6 to 0.49 eV have been demonstrated. Quantum efficiency and fill factor approach theoretical limits. Open-circuit voltage factor is as high as 87% of the practical limit for the higher-E{sub g} cells, but degrades to below 80% with decreasing E{sub g} of the alloy, which might be due to Auger recombination. InPAsSb cells are the least studied, and a cell with E{sub g} = 0.45-eV has extended spectral response out to 4.3 {micro}m. This paper briefly reviews the main contributions that have been made for antimonide-based TPV cells, and suggests additional studies for further performance enhancements.

  12. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  13. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Misra, Mira (Arlington, MA)

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  14. Monolithic III-V/Si Integration

    E-print Network

    Unknown author

    We summarize our work on creating substrate platforms, processes, and devices for the monolithic integration of silicon CMOS circuits with III-V optical and electronic devices. Visible LEDs and InP HBTs have been integrated ...

  15. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  16. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  17. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  18. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  19. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  20. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  1. Structural and thermochemical Aspects of (III-V)IV3 Material Assembly from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmeshya, Andrew; Kouvetakis, John

    2014-03-01

    Alloys with (III-V)-(IV) compositions, including Si3(AlP), Si5-2y(AlP)y, Si3Al(As1-xNx), Si5-2yAl(P1-xNx)y and Ge5-2y(InP)y and have recently been synthesized as mono-crystalline films on Si substrates, using a synthesis route specifically designed to avoid phase separation between the III-V and IV constituents. Molecular ``building blocks'' containing group-V-centered III-V-IV3 cores, formed via interactions of group-III atoms and reactive silyly/germyl hydride precursors of desired composition (e.g, P(SiH3)3 , P(GeH3)3 , etc), assemble to form stable, covalent, diamond-like materials with the inherent tetrahedral symmetry and composition of the III-V-IV3 units. The resulting systems may provide access to a broad range of new semiconductor systems with extended optoelectronic properties, provided that the required molecular sources are available, the thermodynamic processes are viable, and the resulting alloy composition can be tuned to lattice-match the growth substrate. Molecular/solid-state simulations are used to identify promising synthetic pathways and guide the epitaxial creation of new (III-V)-(IV) materials. The thermodynamics of gas phase synthesis reactions, energetic stability of the alloys, and their epitaxial/chemical compatibility with the substrate are combined to form a global figure of merit. The latter corroborates the synthesis of known systems and predicts that formation of GaPSi3/Si(100), GaAsSi3/SiGe(100), AlPGe3/Ge(100) and InAsSi3/Ge(100) may also be favorable. Supported by NSF-DMR under SusChEM award #1309090.

  2. Electron g-factor Engineering in III-V Semiconductors for Quantum Communications

    E-print Network

    Hideo Kosaka; Andrey A. Kiselev; Filipp A. Baron; Ki Wook Kim; Eli Yablonovitch

    2001-02-22

    An entanglement-preserving photo-detector converts photon polarization to electron spin. Up and down spin must respond equally to oppositely polarized photons, creating a requirement for degenerate spin energies, ge=0 for electrons. We present a plot of ge-factor versus lattice constant, analogous to bandgap versus lattice constant, that can be used for g-factor engineering of III-V alloys and quantum wells

  3. III-V nanowires and nanowire optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Wu, Jiang; Aagesen, Martin; Liu, Huiyun

    2015-11-01

    III-V nanowires (NWs) have been envisioned as nanoscale materials for next-generation technology with good functionality, superior performance, high integration ability and low cost, because of their special growth modes and unique 1D structure. In this review, we summarize the main challenges and important progress of the fabrication and applications of III-V NWs. We start with the III-V NW growth, that significantly influences the NW morphology and crystal quality. Attention is then given to the fabrication of some advanced III-V structures composed of axial and radial junctions. After that, we review the advantages, challenges, and major breakthroughs of using III-V NWs as solar energy harvesters and light emitters. Finally, we attempt to give a perspective look on the future development trends and the remaining challenges in the research field of III-V NWs.

  4. III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon III-V semiconductor devices integrated with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, Mark; Martin, Trevor; Smowton, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The integration of III-V semiconductor devices with silicon is one of the most topical challenges in current electronic materials research. The combination has the potential to exploit the unique optical and electronic functionality of III-V technology with the signal processing capabilities and advanced low-cost volume production techniques associated with silicon. Key industrial drivers include the use of high mobility III-V channel materials (InGaAs, InAs, InSb) to extend the performance of Si CMOS, the unification of electronics and photonics by combining photonic components (GaAs, InP) with a silicon platform for next-generation optical interconnects and the exploitation of large-area silicon substrates and high-volume Si processing capabilities to meet the challenges of low-cost production, a challenge which is particularly important for GaN-based devices in both power management and lighting applications. The diverse nature of the III-V and Si device approaches, materials technologies and the distinct differences between industrial Si and III-V processing have provided a major barrier to integration in the past. However, advances over the last decade in areas such as die transfer, wafer fusion and epitaxial growth have promoted widespread renewed interest. It is now timely to bring some of these topics together in a special issue covering a range of approaches and materials providing a snapshot of recent progress across the field. The issue opens a paper describing a strategy for the epitaxial integration of photonic devices where Kataria et al describe progress in the lateral overgrowth of InP/Si. As an alternative, Benjoucef and Reithmaier report on the potential of InAs quantum dots grown direct onto Si surfaces whilst Sandall et al describe the properties of similar InAs quantum dots as an optical modulator device. As an alternative to epitaxial integration approaches, Yokoyama et al describe a wafer bonding approach using a buried oxide concept, Corbett et al describe the transfer printing and bonding of III-V die on to CMOS wafers and Dastjerdi et al describe the optical performance of free-standing InGaAsP tube optical cavities which may be transferred to silicon substrates. Finally, describing important recent progress on GaN-based devices Jiang et al describe their work on InGaN light-emitting diodes on Si (1?1?1) substrates, Wallis et al describe similar structures with the emphasis on x-ray methods for the control of AlGaN buffer layer strain, Kumar et al describe low leakage current, large-area Schottky barrier photodetectors on Si, whilst Soltani et al describe their recent progress on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on (1?0?0) and (1?1?0) silicon substrates. Overall, we think that this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides a timely overview of progress and the opportunities in this exciting and important field. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank all contributors for their efforts in making this special issue possible.

  5. MOVPE growth mechanisms of dilute bismide III/V alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, P.; Nattermann, L.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper summarizes the present understanding of the growth of Ga(AsBi) on GaAs substrates using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). A growth model including Bi segregation is developed and the influence of several growth parameters, such as the applied growth temperature, the growth rate and the partial pressures of the precursors, are investigated in detail. Also, effects, beyond pure source decomposition, of the low growth temperature needed for the deposition of the highly metastable material system are summarized. Optimizing the growth conditions enables the deposition of Ga(AsBi) layers with more than 7% Bi that show strong room temperature photoluminescence without the necessity of annealing. Bi acts as a surfactant during the growth that reduces the defect density and unintentional carbon doping of the crystals. Besides using the established Bi precursor trimethylbismuth (TMBi), the growth of Ga(AsBi) with alternative Bi precursors tritertiarybutylbismuth (TTBBi) and triisopropylbismuth (TIPBi) is discussed. Furthermore, first results on Ga(AsBi) containing an electrically pumped single quantum well laser grown with MOVPE are presented. These devices might enable high efficiency infrared laser devices in future.

  6. Silicon CMOS Ohmic Contact Technology for Contacting III-V Compound Materials

    E-print Network

    Pacella, Nan Y.

    Silicon (Si)-encapsulated III-V compound (III-V) device layers enable Si-complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) friendly ohmic contact formation to III-V compound devices, allowing for the ultimate seamless planar ...

  7. New Approaches to Direct Bandgap III-V Materials for LWIR Detector Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarney, W. L.; Svensson, S. P.; Hier, H.; Donetsky, D.; Wang, D.; Shterengas, L.; Suchalkin, S.; Belenky, G.

    2011-12-01

    Infrared (IR) detector materials based on III-V semiconductors are an affordable alternative to HgCdTe, which is the current material of choice for most high performance IR focal plane array systems fielded in the Army. Based on the assumption that III-V compounds do not have an inherently small bandgap enabling operation out to 10 ?m, the long wave infrared (LWIR) range, there has been substantial research investment in superlattice (SL) approaches. For this reason, quantum structures such as quantum well IR photodetectors (QWIPs) and type-II strained-layer superlattices (SLS) are grown to take advantage of confinement effects and to induce an effective bandgap in the desired range. The drawbacks of these approaches include inherently low quantum efficiencies and operating temperature for QWIPs, and very short minority carrier lifetimes for SLS detectors. In this presentation, we will discuss approaches for developing III-V, direct bandgap, dilute N and Bi alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for LWIR applications.

  8. III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for III-V High-Efficiency Multijunction Photovoltaics at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  9. Progress Towards III-V Photovoltaics on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; Clark, Eric B.; Sayir, Ali; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Maurer, William F.; Fritzemeier, Les

    2008-01-01

    Presented here is the recent progress of the NASA Glenn Research Center OMVPE group's efforts in the development of high efficiency thin-film polycrystalline III-V photovoltaics on optimum substrates. By using bulk polycrystalline germanium (Ge) films, devices of high efficiency and low mass will be developed and incorporated onto low-cost flexible substrates. Our progress towards the integration of high efficiency polycrystalline III-V devices and recrystallized Ge films on thin metal foils is discussed.

  10. Electronic band structure calculations for biaxially strained Si, Ge, and III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiseok; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2010-07-01

    Electronic band structure and effective masses for relaxed and biaxially strained Si, Ge, III-V compound semiconductors (GaAs, GaSb, InAs, InSb, InP) and their alloys (InxGa1-xAs, InxGa1-xSb) on different interface orientations, (001), (110), and (111), are calculated using nonlocal empirical pseudopotential with spin-orbit interaction. Local and nonlocal pseudopotential parameters are obtained by fitting transport-relevant quantities, such as band gap and deformation potentials, to available experimental data. A cubic-spline interpolation is used to extend local form factors to arbitrary q and to obtain correct workfunctions. The nonlocal and spin-orbit terms are linearly interpolated between anions and cations for III-V semiconductors. The virtual crystal approximation is employed for the InxGa1-xAs and InxGa1-xSb alloys and deformation potentials are determined using linear deformation-potential theory. Band gap bowing parameters are extracted using least-square fitting for relaxed alloys and for strained InxGa1-xAs on (001), (110), and (111) InP. The dependence on biaxial strain of the electron and hole effective masses at the symmetry points ?, X, and L exhibits a continuous variation at ? and L but sudden changes appear at ? minima caused by the flatness of the dispersion along the ? line near the minimum.

  11. Influence of Bi-related impurity states on the bandgap and spin-orbit splitting energy of dilute III-V-Bi alloys: InP1-xBix, InAs1-xBix, InSb1-xBix and GaSb1-xBix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samajdar, D. P.; Dhar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Valence Band Anticrossing (VBAC) Model is used to calculate the changes in band structure of Bi containing alloys such as InP1-xBix, InAs1-xBix, InSb1-xBix and GaSb1-xBix due to the incorporation of dilute concentrations of bismuth. The coupling parameter CBi which gives the magnitude of interaction of Bi impurity states with the LH, HH and SO sub bands in VBAC depends on the increase in the HH/LH related energy level EHH/LH+, location of the Bi related impurity level EBi and valence band offset ?EVBM between the endpoint compounds in the corresponding III-V-Bi. The reduction in band gap as well as the enhancement of the spin-orbit splitting energy is well explained using this model and the calculated results are compared with the results of Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, as well as with the available experimental data and are found to have good agreement. The incorporation of Bi mainly perturbs the valence band due to the interaction of the Bi impurity states with the HH, LH and SO bands. The lowering of the conduction band minimum (CBM) due to VCA is added with the upward movement of the HH/LH bands to get the total reduction in band gap for the bismides. The valence band shifts of 31.9, 32.5, 20.8 and 12.4 meV/at%Bi for InP1-xBix, InAs1-xBix, InSb1-xBix and GaSb1-xBix respectively constitute 65, 76, 59 and 31% of the total band gap reduction and the rest is the contribution of the conduction band shift. The spin-orbit splitting energy also shows significant increase with the maximum change in InPBi and the minimum in InSbBi. The same is true for Ga containing bismides if we make a comparison with the available values for GaAsBi and GaPBi with that of GaSbBi. It has also been observed that the increase in splitting energy is greater in case of the bismides such as InAsBi, InPBi and GaAsBi than the bismides such as InSbBi and GaSbBi with the parent substrates having higher values of splitting energy. This may be due to the proximity of the Bi related impurity level EBi with the SO bands of InAs, InP and GaAs.

  12. Monolithic III-V and hybrid polysilicon-III-V microelectromechanical tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Edward M.; Lott, James A.; Nelson, Thomas R., Jr.; Harvey, M. C.; Raley, J. A.; Stintz, Andreas; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2003-04-01

    We report our progress on the design and fabrication of electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical (MEM) tunable wavelength filters and vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). We investigate both an all-semiconductor monolithic approach and a hybrid approach based on the combination of conventional polysilicon microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and III-V semiconductor thin-film distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and VCSEL structures. In the tunable hybrid structures the III-V semiconductor layers are flip-bonded onto specially designed polysilicon foundry MEMS structures and separated from their lattice-matched parent substrates by a novel post-bonding lift-off process.

  13. III-V aresenide-nitride semiconductor materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor crystals, methods for producing such crystals and devices employing such crystals. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  14. BAs-GaAs Semiconductor Alloys as a Photovoltaic Alternative to Nitride Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, G. L. W.; Zunger, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen alloyed III-V semiconductor compounds have been intensely studied in recent years due to unusual effects caused by nitrogen alloying. These effects are exploited in band gap engineering for specific applications such as solar cells and blue lasers.

  15. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  16. Investigation of new semiinsulating behavior of III-V compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, Jacek

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of defect interactions and properties related to semiinsulating behavior of III-V semiconductors resulted in about twenty original publications, six doctoral thesis, one masters thesis and numerous conference presentations. The studies of new compensation mechanisms involving transition metal impurities have defined direct effects associated with deep donor/acceptor levels acting as compensating centers. Electrical and optical properties of vanadium and titanium levels were determined in GaAs, InP and also in ternary compounds InGaAs. The experimental data provided basis for the verification of chemical trends and the VRBE method. They also defined compositional range for III-V mixed crystals whereby semiinsulating behavior can be achieved using transition elements deep levels and a suitable codoping with shallow donor/acceptor impurities.

  17. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  18. Super-High Iii-V Tandem and Multijunction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Principles of super-high-efficiency multijunction solar cells * Epitaxial technologies for growing III-V compound cells * Monolithic vs. multi-terminal connection modes * Key issues for realising high-efficiency multijunction solar cells * High-efficiency InGaP/GaAs/Ge three-junction solar cells and their space applications * Multijunction solar cells: recent results * Future directions * Acknowledgements * References

  19. Novel planarization and passivation in the integration of III-V semiconductor devices

    E-print Network

    Miller, David A. B.

    Novel planarization and passivation in the integration of III-V semiconductor devices Jun-Fei Zheng and Photonoic Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA 94306 ABSTRACT III-V semiconductor devices, planarization, III-V semiconductor, optoelectronics, diode, integration, monolithic 1. INTRODUCTION 1

  20. Electronic bands and excited states of III-V semiconductor polytypes with screened-exchange density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2014-03-31

    The electronic band structures and excited states of III-V semiconductors such as GaP, AlP, AlAs, and AlSb for various polytypes are determined employing the screened-exchange density functional calculations implemented in the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave methods. We demonstrate that GaP and AlSb in the wurtzite (WZ) structure have direct gap while III-V semiconductors in the zinc blende, 4H, and 6H structures considered in this study exhibit an indirect gap. Furthermore, we find that inclusion of Al atoms less than 17% and 83% in the hexagonal Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}P and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As alloys, respectively, leads to a direct transition with a gap energy of ?2.3 eV. The feasibility of III-V semiconductors with a direct gap in WZ structure offers a possible crystal structure engineering to tune the optical properties of semiconductor materials.

  1. Type-I GaSb based diode lasers operating at room temperature in 2 to 3.5 ?m spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hosoda, T.; Tsvid, G.; Liang, R.; Westerfeld, D.; Kipshidze, G.; Shterengas, L.; Belenky, G.

    2010-04-01

    Recent progress and state of GaSb based type-I lasers emitting in spectral range from 2 to 3.5 ?m is reviewed. For lasers emitting near 2 ?m an optimization of waveguide core width and asymmetry allowed reduction of far field divergence angle down to 40-50 degrees which is important for improving coupling efficiency to optical fiber. As emission wavelength increases laser characteristics degrade due to insufficient hole confinement, increased Auger recombination and deteriorated transport through the waveguide layer. While Auger recombination is thought to be an ultimate limiting factor to the performance of these narrow bandgap interband lasers we demonstrate that continuous improvements in laser characteristics are still possible by increasing hole confinement and optimizing transport properties of the waveguide layer. We achieved 190, 170 and 50 mW of maximum CW power at 3.1, 3.2 and 3.32 ?m wavelengths respectively. These are the highest CW powers reported to date in this spectral range and constitute 2.5-fold improvement compared to previously reported devices.

  2. III-V Infrared Research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Ting, D. Z.; Hill, C. J.; Soibel, A.; Liu, John; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Keo, S. A.; Nguyen, J.; Bandara, S. V.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2009-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory is actively developing the III-V based infrared detector and focal plane arrays (FPAs) for NASA, DoD, and commercial applications. Currently, we are working on multi-band Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs), Superlattice detectors, and Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIPs) technologies suitable for high pixel-pixel uniformity and high pixel operability large area imaging arrays. In this paper we report the first demonstration of the megapixel-simultaneously-readable and pixel-co-registered dual-band QWIP focal plane array (FPA). In addition, we will present the latest advances in QDIPs and Superlattice infrared detectors at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  3. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  4. Prospects of III-V Tunnel FETs for Logic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Suman

    2015-03-01

    In order to continue and maintain the pace of energy efficient transistor scaling, it is imperative to scale the supply voltage of operation concurrently. In this invited paper, we discuss a promising III-V device architecture such as III-V Heterojunction Tunnel FETs that may break the seemingly inflexible energy vs. performance limit of silicon CMOS transistors and provide high performance, low leakage and low operating voltage for future logic transistor technology. Unlike conventional MOSFETs, the Tunnel FET (TFET) architecture employs a gate modulated Zener tunnel junction at the source which controls the transistor ON and OFF states. This scheme fundamentally eliminates the high-energy tail present in the Fermi-Dirac distribution of the valence band electrons in the p + source region and allows sub-kT/q steep slope device operation near the OFF state. This allows Tunnel FETs to achieve a much higher ION -IOFF ratio over a small gate voltage swing. A major challenge in the demonstration of high performance Tunnel FET is the limited rate of tunneling across the Zener junction which results in low drive current. Our results show, for the first time, that the on-current bottleneck in Tunnel FETs can be overcome by careful bandgap engineering. This work is supported by Intel, NRI/SRC and NSF through ASSIST NERC.

  5. Applications of ion implantation in III-V device technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.; Chu, S. N. G.; Hobson, W. S.; Abernathy, C. R.; Fullowan, T. R.; Lothian, J. R.; Elliman, R. G.; Jacobson, D. C.; Poate, J. M.

    1993-06-01

    The use of implantation for doping and isolation of a variety of electronic and photonic III-V compound semiconductor devices will be reviewed. Complex multilayer heterostructure devices like heterojunction bipolar transistors and strained InGaAs-GaAs quantum well lasers rely on keV or MeV isolation implants, requiring thick, easily removed masks and post-implant annealing treatments to achieve high isolation resistances ( ? 10 8 ? cm). The effectiveness of the implant isolation technique varies as a function of the bandgap and elemental composition of the semiconductor. Devices based on GaAs, Al xGa 1-xAs and InGaP are particularly suited to the implant isolation method. The prime dopant species for III-V materials are Si for n-type layers and Be for p-type layers, although there is increasing interest in the use of C as an acceptor because of its low diffusivity. In the latter case, a group III species must be co-implanted with the C + ion to enhance the occupation of the group V lattice site.

  6. Carbon doping of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Focus of the study is C acceptor doping of GaAs, since C diffusion coefficient is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of other common p-type dopants in GaAs. C ion implantation results in a concentration of free holes in the valence band < 10% of that of the implanted C atoms for doses > 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Rutherford backscattering, electrical measurements, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were amonth the techniques used. Ga co-implantation increased the C activation in two steps: first, the additional radiation damage creates vacant As sites that the implanted C can occupy, and second, it maintains the stoichiometry of the implanted layer, reducing the number of compensating native defects. In InP, the behavior of C was different from that in GaAs. C acts as n-type dopant in the In site; however, its incorporation by implantation was difficult to control; experiments using P co-implants were inconsistent. The lattice position of inactive C in GaAs in implanted and epitaxial layers is discussed; evidence for formation of C precipitates in GaAs and InP was found. Correlation of the results with literature on C doping in III-V semiconductors led to a phenomenological description of C in III-V compounds (particularly GaAs): The behavior of C is controlled by the chemical nature of C and the instrinsic Fermi level stabilization energy of the material.

  7. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si{sub Ga} shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  8. Type-I GaSb based single lateral mode diode ridge lasers operating at room temperature in 3.1-3.2 ?m spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvid, G.; Hosoda, T.; Chen, J.; Kipshidze, G.; Shterengas, L.; Frez, C.; Soibel, A.; Forouhar, S.; Belenky, G.

    2011-02-01

    Broad area type-I GaSb based diode lasers have recently exceeded 100 mW continuous wave room temperature powers in 3.1-3.2 ?m spectral region. Certain applications such as single frequency sources for spectroscopy and efficient coupling to single mode fiber require single lateral mode laser operation. We characterize and compare two types of lasers with similar structures and various ridge widths emitting at 3.1 and 3.2 ?m. We obtain 35 and 25 mW of continuous wave single lateral mode power from 8 and 13 ?m wide ridge lasers emitting at 3.1 and 3.2 ?m respectively. This constitutes a threefold improvement compared to the previous result. Both devices had ridges etched to the depth leaving approximately 300 nm of the top p-cladding in the areas outside the ridges. For 3.2 ?m emitting lasers the dielectric thickness was 220 nm while it was 510 nm for 3.1 ?m emitting lasers. Gain spectra were measured by Hakki- Paoli technique for various ridge widths. From gain spectra we extract differential gain and internal loss. We find that the internal loss in thin dielectric, 3.2 ?m emitting laser is about 14 cm-1 while it is 7 cm-1 in thick dielectric, 3.1 ?m emitting laser for the ridge widths of 13 and 8 ?m exhibiting single lateral mode operation respectively. Internal losses measured on broad area, 100 ?m wide lasers processed from the same materials are similar and around 6-7 cm-1. We discuss reasons for the internal loss increase with the aid of simulation of optical mode field and loss in our waveguide structures.

  9. Methods for fabricating thin film III-V compound solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Pan, Noren; Hillier, Glen; Vu, Duy Phach; Tatavarti, Rao; Youtsey, Christopher; McCallum, David; Martin, Genevieve

    2011-08-09

    The present invention utilizes epitaxial lift-off in which a sacrificial layer is included in the epitaxial growth between the substrate and a thin film III-V compound solar cell. To provide support for the thin film III-V compound solar cell in absence of the substrate, a backing layer is applied to a surface of the thin film III-V compound solar cell before it is separated from the substrate. To separate the thin film III-V compound solar cell from the substrate, the sacrificial layer is removed as part of the epitaxial lift-off. Once the substrate is separated from the thin film III-V compound solar cell, the substrate may then be reused in the formation of another thin film III-V compound solar cell.

  10. III-V Nanowire Array Growth by Selective Area Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hyung-Joon; Stewart, Lawrence; Yeh, Tingwei; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2011-12-23

    III-V semiconductor nanowires are unique material phase due to their high aspect ratio, large surface area, and strong quantum confinement. This affords the opportunity to control charge transport and optical properties for electrical and photonic applications. Nanoscale selective area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth (NS-SAG) is a promising technique to maximize control of nanowire diameter and position, which are essential for device application. In this work, InP and GaAs nanowire arrays are grown by NS-SAG. We observe enhanced sidewall growth and array uniformity disorder in high growth rate condition. Disorder in surface morphology and array uniformity of InP nanowire array is explained by enhanced growth on the sidewall and stacking faults. We also find that AsH{sub 3} decomposition on the sidewall affects the growth behavior of GaAs nanowire arrays.

  11. Tunable optical buffer based on III-V MEMS design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wing H.; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Wu, Jiang; Liu, Huiyun; Stewart, William J.; Kenyon, Anthony J.

    2015-02-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a tunable optical buffer device based on III-V semiconductor platform for telecommunication applications. The device comprises two indium phosphide suspended parallel waveguides with cross sectional dimension of 200 nm by 300 nm, separated by an air gap. The gap between the waveguides was designed to be adjustable by electrostatic force. Our simulation estimated that only 3 V is required to increase the separation distance from 50 nm to 500 nm; this translates to a change in the propagation delay by a factor of 2. The first generation of the suspended waveguide structure for optical buffering was fabricated. The sample was grown on an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The waveguide pattern is written onto a 300 nm thick InP device layer by electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Electrodes were incorporated into the structure to apply voltages for MEMS actuation.

  12. III-V Compound Detectors for CO2 DIAL Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2005-01-01

    Profiling of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is important for understanding the natural carbon cycle on Earth and its influence on global warming and climate change. Differential absorption lidar is a powerful remote sensing technique used for profiling and monitoring atmospheric constituents. Recently there has been an interest to apply this technique, at the 2 m wavelength, for investigating atmospheric CO2. This drives the need for high quality detectors at this wavelength. Although 2 m detectors are commercially available, the quest for a better detector is still on. The detector performance, regarding quantum efficiency, gain and associated noise, affects the DIAL signal-to-noise ratio and background signal, thereby influencing the instrument sensitivity and dynamic range. Detectors based on the III-V based compound materials shows a strong potential for such application. In this paper the detector requirements for a long range CO2 DIAL profiles will be discussed. These requirements were compared to newly developed III-V compound infrared detectors. The performance of ternary InGaSb pn junction devices will be presented using different substrates, as well as quaternary InGaAsSb npn structure. The performance study was based on experimental characterization of the devices dark current, spectral response, gain and noise. The final results are compared to the current state-of-the-art InGaAs technology. Npn phototransistor structure showed the best performance, regarding the internal gain and therefore the device signal-to-noise ratio. 2-micrometers detectivity as high as 3.9 x 10(exp 11) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W was obtained at a temperature of -20 C and 4 V bias voltage. This corresponds to a responsivity of 2650 A/W with about 60% quantum efficiency.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of III-V semiconductor nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, Shanna Marie

    III-V semiconductor materials form a broad basis for optoelectronic applications, including the broad basis of the telecom industry as well as smaller markets for high-mobility transistors. In a somewhat analogous manner as the traditional silicon logic industry has so heavily depended upon process manufacturing development, optoelectronics often relies instead on materials innovations. This thesis focuses particularly on III-V semiconductor nanomaterials, detailed characterization of which is invaluable for translating the exhibited behavior into useful applications. Specifically, the original research described in these thesis chapters is an investigation of semiconductors at a fundamental materials level, because the nanostructures in which they appear crystallize in quite atypical forms for the given semiconductors. Rather than restricting the experimental approaches to any one particular technique, many different types of optical spectroscopies are developed and applied where relevant to elucidate the connection between the crystalline structure and exhibited properties. In the first chapters, for example, a wurtzite crystalline form of the prototypical zincblende III-V binary semiconductor, GaAs, is explored through polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy and temperature-dependent photoluminescence, as well as second-harmonic generation (SHG). The altered symmetry properties of the wurtzite crystalline structure are particularly evident in the Raman and SHG polarization dependences, all within a bulk material realm. A rather different but deeply elegant aspect of crystalline symmetry in GaAs is explored in a separate study on zincblende GaAs samples quantum-confined in one direction, i.e. quantum well structures, whose quantization direction corresponds to the (110) direction. The (110) orientation modifies the low-temperature electron spin relaxation mechanisms available compared to the usual (001) samples, leading to altered spin coherence times explored through a novel spectroscopic technique first formulated for the rather different purpose of dispersion engineering for slow-light schemes. The frequency-resolved technique combined with the unusual (110) quantum wells in a furthermore atypical waveguide experimental geometry has revealed fascinating behavior of electron spin splitting which points to the possibility of optically orienting electron spins with linearly polarized light---an experimental result supporting a theoretical description of the phenomenon itself only a few years old. Lastly, to explore a space of further-restricted dimensionality, the final chapters describe InP semiconductor nanowires with dimensions small enough to be considered truly one-dimensional. Like the bulk GaAs of the first few chapters, the InP nanowires here crystallize in a wurtzite structure. In the InP nanowire case, though, the experimental techniques explored for characterization are temperature-dependent time-integrated photoluminescence at the single-wire level (including samples with InAsP insertions) and time-resolved photoluminescence at the ensemble level. The carrier dynamics revealed through these time-resolved studies are the first of their kind for wurtzite InP nanowires. The chapters are thus ordered as a progression from three (bulk), to two (quantum well), to one (nanowire), to zero dimensions (axially-structured nanowire), with the uniting theme the emphasis on connecting the semiconductor nanomaterials' crystallinity to its exhibited properties by relevant experimental spectroscopic techniques, whether these are standard methods or effectively invented for the case at hand.

  14. Spectroscopy of III-V narrow gap semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, Diane C.

    The narrow gap III-V semiconductors, InAs/AlSb/GaSb and InSb, exhibit an array of extreme physical properties, from the lightest effective mass and largest nonparabolicity of III-V semiconductors to heterostructure conduction band offsets ranging from -0.15 to +2.0 eV. In this work, I present three spectroscopic techniques which exploit these unusual properties to provide new insight into the physics of these materials. First, my measurement of cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb and InSb/AlInSb quantum wells was the first spectroscopic application of a new laser, the THz quantum cascade laser. The physical properties mentioned above put these materials into an experimentally accessible range, and InAs's high room temperature mobility and low temperature carrier density enabled us to explore a large temperature range. Previous investigations of other materials in limited temperature ranges had suggested what we confirmed: the cyclotron resonance effective mass increases with temperature, contrary to theoretical expectations. Second, we applied time resolved cyclotron resonance to InSb quantum wells for the first time. Because of InSb's large effective g-factor and nonparabolicity, time resolved cyclotron resonance enabled us to monitor the carrier relaxation and recombination from each Landau- and Zeeman-quantized state directly in time. This unprecedented level of detail could be extended to longer times to probe spin-flip relaxation, a significant parasitic process in quantum computation. Finally, I measured intersubband absorption in narrow InAs/AlSb quantum wells with widths from 10.5 to 1.8 nm. I observed the highest energy intersubband resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells: 650 meV at 77 K in a 1.8 nm well. I also performed detailed measurements of the temperature dependence of intersubband absorption and confirmed the correlation between the integrated intensity of intersubband absorption and the carrier distribution inferred from Shubnikov-de Haas and Hall measurements. Because of InAs/AlSb intersubband transitions' large accessible energy and temperature robustness, they are ideal candidates for resonant nonlinear optics. In particular, I discuss the potential of InAs/AlSb double quantum wells as a compact, room temperature, and coherent THz source. Such a source could revolutionize chemical sensing by providing convenient access to the strong fundamental vibrational fingerprints which all molecules have in the THz, potentially transforming applications from medicine to the military.

  15. III-V Compositionaly Graded Buffers for Heterostructure Integration

    E-print Network

    Jandl, Adam Christopher

    2015-01-01

    InyGa?-yAs alloys are critical in commercial applications such as high speed transistors, light emitting diodes, solid state lasers, photovoltaics, and photo-detectors. However, the range of compositions used in these ...

  16. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, S.; Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  17. Surface Sum Frequency Generation of III-V Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Kim, Jisun; Khoury, Rami; Plummer, E. W.; Haber, Louis

    2015-03-01

    Optical sum frequency generation (SFG) is a well-established technique for surface and interface studies but its use has been limited mainly to centrosymmetric materials so far. Here, we demonstrate that femtosecond broadband SFG spectroscopy has the ability to identify surface molecular vibrations on the archetypical non-centrosymmetric semiconductor GaAs (001), in which the bulk SFG signal typically dominates over surface SFG contributions. Azimuthal angle dependence of the second order SFG nonlinear response from GaAs (001) surface in the reflection geometry in vacuum for all eight polarization combinations are detected and analyzed. The results agree with and extend upon previous second harmonic generation (SHG) studies and phenomenological analysis. In addition, carbon monoxide and methanol are employed as molecular-markers on the GaAs (001) surfaces. The C-O stretching mode of carbon monoxide and the methyl group stretching modes of methanol are clearly observed even though the bulk contribution dominates the SFG signal. Coherent heterodyne interference is proposed as the mechanism for the surface signal enhancement. Two other zinc blende type III-V semiconductors, GaP and GaSb, are also studied and compared. Funded by EFRC.

  18. III/V Nanowire-based Devices for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troncale, Valentina; Mensch, Philipp; Karg, Siegfried; Schmid, Heinz; Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Loertscher, Emanuel; Drechsler, Ute; Schmidt, Volker; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd; Nanoscale Electronics Team

    2013-03-01

    The thermo-physical properties of one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures make them suitable for high ZT thermoelectric devices. Theoretical studies indicate that III/V nanowires (NWs) are eligible for ZT enhancement, due to increased phonon scattering resulting in thermal conductivity (k) suppression, without affecting the electrical conductivity (s). We address the thermoelectric properties of III/As NWs grown by selective-area MOVPE on Si (111) substrates, transferred onto micro-fabricated MEMS-based devices, optimized for direct thermal transfer measurements. The NWs were positioned across the gap between adjacent symmetric SiNx membranes, structured on Si. Platinum resistive heaters/thermometers connected to leads, and contacts to the NWs were realized by electron beam lithography and lift-off technique. The structures were then under-etched. For InAs NWs, we compared the k measured by both the direct method and the self-heating technique. Heat loss to the substrate and contact resistance were evaluated by finite elements simulations and compared for different fabrication techniques. We discuss alternative solutions to the technical challenge of precise NW positioning. Science and Technology Department

  19. III-V heterostructures for electronic/photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, C.W. ); Mattera, W.D. ); Gossard, A.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The symposium presented in this book covered a wide range of epitaxial techniques important for III-V compound semiconductors. The topics range from fundamental growth kinetics and models to the production issues of safety and multiple wafers per run. In particular, the symposium held a special session on alternative sources, mainly the less-toxic non-hydride group-V sources. These are important for MOCVD and MOMBE. In terms of materials systems, the symposium covers both lattice-matched heterostructures, such as AlGaAs/GaAs and InGaAs/InP, pseudomorphic heterostructures, such as InGaAs/GaAs, and lattice-mismatched heterostructures, such as GaAs/Si, GaAs/InP, InP/GaAs, II-VI/GaAs, etc. In the characterization area, the techniques include RBS, TEM, X-ray, C-V, photoconductivity, Hall measurements, etc. In terms of device applications, the topics include MODFET, MESFET, laser, photodetector, solar cells, and integrated FET and laser, etc.

  20. Memory effect of Ge in III V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welser, E.; Guter, W.; Wekkeli, A.; Dimroth, F.

    2008-11-01

    Epitaxial growth of germanium is attractive for Ge/III-V hetero devices such as multi-junction solar cells. We investigated the growth of Ge with iso-butyl germane (IBGe) as germanium source and found a strong memory effect in our AIX2600-G3 metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor. The germanium background led to a higher n-type doping of i-GaAs and strongly reduced the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of Al 0.3Ga 0.7As and Ga 0.5In 0.5P. With secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) the quantity of Ge in Al 0.3Ga 0.7As could be determined to be in the range of 2×10 17 cm -3, whereas a Ge-atom concentration in Ga 0.5In 0.5P of up to 2×10 18 cm -3 was measured. The memory effect could be eliminated by changing all contaminated parts inside the MOVPE reactor.

  1. Epitaxial III-V films and surfaces for photoelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Henning; Supplie, Oliver; May, Matthias M; Sippel, Philipp; Heine, Christian; Muñoz, Andrés G; Eichberger, Rainer; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Hannappel, Thomas

    2012-08-27

    Efficient photoelectrochemical devices for water splitting benefit from the highest material quality and dedicated surface preparation achieved by epitaxial growth. InP(100)-based half-cells show significant solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies, but require a bias due to insufficient voltage. Tandem absorber structures may provide both adequate potential and efficient utilization of the solar spectrum. We propose epitaxial dilute nitride GaPNAs photocathodes on Si(100) substrates to combine close-to-optimum limiting efficiency, lattice-matched growth, and established surface preparation. Prior to a discussion of the challenging III-V/Si(100) heterojunction, we describe the closely related epitaxial preparation of InP(100) surfaces and its beneficial impact on photoelectrochemical water-splitting performance. Analogies and specific differences to GaP(100) surfaces are discussed based on in situ reflectance anisotropy and on two-photon photoemission results. Preliminary experiments regarding GaP/Si(100) photoelectrochemistry and dilute nitride GaPN heteroepitaxy on Si(100) confirm the potential of the GaPNAs/Si tandem absorber structure for future water-splitting devices. PMID:22890851

  2. Stable Self-Catalyzed Growth of III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Tersoff, J

    2015-10-14

    Nanowire growth has generally relied on an initial particle of a catalyst such as Au to define the wire diameter and stabilize the growth. Self-catalyzed growth of III-V nanowires avoids the need for a foreign element, with the nanowire growing from the vapor via a droplet of the native group-III liquid. However, as suggested by Gibbs' phase rule, the absence of third element has a destabilizing effect. Here we analyze this system theoretically, finding that growth can be dynamically stable at pressures far above the equilibrium vapor pressure. Steady-state growth occurs via kinetic self-regulation of the droplet volume and wire diameter. In particular, for a given temperature and source-gas pressures there is a unique stable wire diameter and droplet volume, both of which decrease with increasing V/III ratio. We also examine the evolution of the droplet size and wire diameter toward the steady state as the wire grows and discuss implications for structural control. PMID:26389697

  3. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III?=?Al, Ga, and In and V?=?P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  4. Hot-hole lasers in III--V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsler, P.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2001-08-15

    Following the success of p-Ge hot-hole lasers, there is potential for using other semiconductor materials, notably III--V materials such as GaAs and InSb. Previous analysis had suggested that a large effective mass ratio between the heavy and light holes is advantageous, which implies that InSb would make an excellent hot-hole laser. Using our Monte Carlo simulation of both GaAs and InSb hot-hole lasers in combination with a rate equation model, we see that previously accepted criteria used to predict performance are not always reliable, and we suggest suitable alternatives. The simulation results include gain and gain bandwidth as a function of field strength and laser frequency, and alternative field orientations and photon polarizations are considered. Comparisons are made with bulk 1-Ge systems. The optimum conditions predicted by our simulation could then be used in the design of quantum-well hot-hole lasers. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Progress and challenges in the direct monolithic integration of III-V devices and Si CMOS on silicon substrates

    E-print Network

    Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    We present results on the direct monolithic integration of III-V devices and Si CMOS on a silicon substrate. Through optimization of device fabrication and material growth processes III-V devices with electrical performance ...

  6. Numerical investigation of metal-confined hybrid III-V/Si circular nanoresonator with guided emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ming-Ying; Sui, Shao-Shuai; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Metal-confined III-V circular nanoresonator coupled to a waveguide-connected silicon nanoresonator is proposed for realizing guided emission. The mode characteristics are investigated by the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. The output performance can be greatly improved through optimizing the parameters of the III-V and underlying silicon nanoresonators. For a 750-nm-radius hybrid nanoresonator covered by the SiO2 and Ag layers, an output extraction efficiency of 26% and a mode Q factor of 680 are obtained as the radius of the silicon nanoresonator is 75 nm larger than the III-V nanoresonator.

  7. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  8. Substrate engineering for monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS technology

    E-print Network

    Dohrman, Carl Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    Ge virtual substrates, fabricated using Si1-xGex-.Ge, compositionally graded buffers, enable the epitaxial growth of device-quality GaAs on Si substrates, but monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si CMOS ...

  9. Nano-scale metal contacts for future III-V CMOS

    E-print Network

    Guo, Alex

    2012-01-01

    As modem transistors continue to scale down in size, conventional Si CMOS is reaching its physical limits and alternative technologies are needed to extend Moore's law. Among different candidates, MOSFETs with a III-V ...

  10. Nanoscale quantification of stress and strain in III-V semiconducting nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Jones, Eric James, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    III-V semiconducting nanostructures present a promising platform for the realization of advanced optoelectronic devices due to their superior intrinsic materials properties including direct band gap energies that span the ...

  11. Development of X-ray lithography and nanofabrication techniques for III-V optical devices

    E-print Network

    Lim, Michael H. (Michael Hong)

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation covers the development of fabrication techniques for Bragg-grating-based integrated optical devices in III-V materials. Work on this rich family of devices has largely been limited to numerical analysis ...

  12. Platform for monolithic integration of III-V devices with Si CMOS technology

    E-print Network

    Pacella, Nan Yang

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors and Si complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor (CMOS) enables the creation of advanced circuits with new functionalities. In order to merge the two technologies, ...

  13. A ballistic transport model for HEMTs and III-V MOSFETs

    E-print Network

    Warnock, Shireen M

    2013-01-01

    As silicon MOSFETs keep scaling down in size, the continued improvement on their logic performance is threated by their fundamental physical limits. With silicon approaching these limits, MOSFETs designed with III-V ...

  14. Effects of Humidity on Non-Hermetically Packaged III-V Structures and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Martin, S.; Lee, T.; Okuno, J.; Ruiz, R.; Gauldin, R.; Gaidis, M.; Smith, R.

    1999-01-01

    High humidity and temperature test (known as 85/85 tests) were performed on various III-V devices and structures to determine environmental effects in non-hermetically packaged GaAs membrane mixer diodes.

  15. Thermal considerations for advanced SOI substrates designed for III-V/Si heterointegration

    E-print Network

    Bulsara, Mayank

    Silicon-on-lattice engineered substrates (SOLES) are SOI substrates with embedded Ge layers that facilitate III-V compound integration for advanced integrated circuits. The new materials integration scheme in SOLES requires ...

  16. Extraction of Virtual-Source Injection Velocity in sub-100 nm III-V HFETs

    E-print Network

    Brar, B.

    We have experimentally extracted the virtual-source electron injection velocity, vx0, of various III-V HFETs at room temperature. This is the carrier velocity that matters for logic applications of these transistors. Sub-100 ...

  17. Hydrogen incorporation into III-V nitrides during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Vartuli, C.B.

    1995-10-01

    Hydrogen is readily incorporated into GaN and related alloys during wet and dry etching, chemical vapor deposition of dielectric overlayers, boiling in water and other process steps, in addition to its effects during MOCVD or MOMBE growth. The hydrogen is bound at defects or impurities and passivates their electrical activity. Reactivation occurs at 450-550{degrees}C, but evolution from the crystal requires much higher temperatures ({ge} 800{degrees}C).

  18. III-V/Ge channel MOS device technologies in nano CMOS era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shinichi; Zhang, Rui; Suh, Junkyo; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nishi, Koichi; Takenaka, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    CMOS utilizing high-mobility III-V/Ge channels on Si substrates is expected to be one of the promising devices for high-performance and low power advanced LSIs in the future, because of its enhanced carrier transport properties. However, there are many critical issues and difficult challenges for realizing III-V/Ge-based CMOS on the Si platform such as (1) the formation of high-crystal-quality Ge/III-V films on Si substrates, (2) gate stack technologies to realize superior MOS/MIS interface quality, (3) the formation of a source/drain (S/D) with low resistivity and low leakage current, (4) process integration to realize ultrashort channel devices, and (5) total CMOS integration including Si CMOS. In this paper, we review the recent progress in III-V/Ge MOS devices and process technologies as viable approaches to solve the above critical problems on the basis of our recent research activities. The technologies include MOS gate stack formation, high-quality channel formation, low-resistance S/D formation, and CMOS integration. For the Ge device technologies, we focus on the gate stack technology and Ge channel formation on Si. Also, for the III-V MOS device technologies, we mainly address the gate stack technology, III-V channel formation on Si, the metal S/D technology, and implementation of these technologies into short-channel III-V-OI MOSFETs on Si substrates. On the basis of the present status of the achievements, we finally discuss the possibility of various CMOS structures using III-V/Ge channels.

  19. Development of III-V p-MOSFETs with high-kappa gate stack for future CMOS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaiah, Padmaja

    As the semiconductor industry approaches the limits of traditional silicon CMOS scaling, non-silicon materials and new device architectures are gradually being introduced to improve Si integrated circuit performance and continue transistor scaling. Recently, the replacement of SiO2 with a high-k material (HfO2) as gate dielectric has essentially removed one of the biggest advantages of Si as channel material. As a result, alternate high mobility materials are being considered to replace Si in the channel to achieve higher drive currents and switching speeds. III-V materials in particular have become of great interest as channel materials, owing to their superior electron transport properties. However, there are several critical challenges that need to be addressed before III-V based CMOS can replace Si CMOS technology. Some of these challenges include development of a high quality, thermally stable gate dielectric/III-V interface, and improvement in III-V p-channel hole mobility to complement the n-channel mobility, low source/drain resistance and integration onto Si substrate. In this thesis, we would be addressing the first two issues i.e. the development high performance III-V p-channels and obtaining high quality III-V/high-k interface. We start with using the device architecture of the already established InGaAs n-channels as a baseline to understand the effect of remote scattering from the high-k oxide and oxide/semiconductor interface on channel transport properties such as electron mobility and channel electron concentration. Temperature dependent Hall electron mobility measurements were performed to separate various scattering induced mobility limiting factors. Dependence of channel mobility on proximity of the channel to the oxide interface, oxide thickness, annealing conditions are discussed. The results from this work will be used in the design of the p-channel MOSFETs. Following this, InxGa1-xAs (x>0.53) is chosen as channel material for developing p-channel MOSFETs. Band engineering, strain induced valence band splitting and quantum confinement is used to improve channel hole mobility. Experimental results on the Hall hole mobility is presented for InxGa1-xAs channels with varying In content, thickness of the quantum well and temperature. Then, high mobility InxGa 1-xAs heterostructure thus obtained are integrated with in-situ deposited high-k gate oxide required for high performance p-MOSFET and discuss the challenges associated with the gated structure and draw conclusions on this material system. Antimonide based channel materials such as GaSb and InxGa 1-xSb are explored for III-V based p-MOSFETs in last two chapters. Options for Sb based strained QW channels to obtain maximum hole mobility by varying the strain, channel and barrier material, thickness of the layers etc. is discussed followed by the growth of these Sb channels on GaAs and InP substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The physical properties of the structures such as the heterostructure quality, alloy content and surface roughness are examined via TEM, XRD and AFM. Following this, electrical measurement results on Hall hole mobility is presented. The effect of strain, alloy content, temperature and thickness on channel mobility and concentration is reported. Development of GaSb n- and p-MOS capacitor structures with in-situ deposited HfO2 gate oxide dielectric using in-situ deposited amorphous Si (a-Si) interface passivation layer (IPL) to improve the interface quality of high-k oxide and (In)GaSb surface is presented. In-situ deposited gate oxides such as Al2O3 and combination oxide of Al 2O3 and HfO2 with and without the a-Si IPL are also explored as alternate gate dielectrics. Subsequently, MOS capacitor structures using buried InGaSb QWs are demonstrated. Development of an inversion type bulk GaSb with implanted source-drain contacts and in-situ deposited gate oxide HfO2 gate oxide is discussed. The merits of biaxial compressive strain is demonstrated on strained surface and buried channel In0.36 Ga0.64Sb QW MOSFETs with thin top

  20. JY Tsao SSL: The III-V Epi Killer App ICMOVPE 2010 May 24 SAND2010-4049C 1/7 Solid-State Lighting: The III-V Epi "Killer App"

    E-print Network

    JY Tsao · SSL: The III-V Epi Killer App · ICMOVPE 2010 May 24 · SAND2010-4049C · 1/7 Solid-State Lighting: The III-V Epi "Killer App" Jeff Tsao · Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center · Sandia · SSL: The III-V Epi Killer App · ICMOVPE 2010 May 24 · SAND2010-4049C · 2/7 Historical and projected

  1. III-V/Si on silicon-on-insulator platform for hybrid nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prucnal, Slawomir Zhou, Shengqiang; Ou, Xin; Facsko, Stefan; Oskar Liedke, Maciej; Bregolin, Felipe; Liedke, Bartosz; Grebing, Jochen; Fritzsche, Monika; Hübner, Rene; Mücklich, Arndt; Rebohle, Lars; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Helm, Manfred; Turek, Marcin; Drozdziel, Andrzej

    2014-02-21

    The unique properties of SOI wafers enable the integration of heterogeneous materials with distinct functionalities in different layers. In particular, III-V compound semiconductors are very attractive for low-noise and high-speed electronic and photonic components integrated on a single chip. We have developed a CMOS compatible and fully integrated solution for the integration of III-V compound semiconductors with silicon technology for optoelectronic applications. InAs compound semiconductor nanostructures are synthesized in SOI wafers using the combined ion beam implantation and millisecond liquid-phase epitaxial growth. Optoelectronic and microstructural investigations carried out on implanted, annealed, and selectively etched samples confirm the formation of high-quality III-V compound semiconductor nanostructures.

  2. Methods for forming group III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for forming Group III--arsenide-nitride semiconductor materials. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V crystals varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V crystals can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  3. III-V/silicon germanium tandem solar cells on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Kenneth J.

    The development of a cost-effective high voltage tandem solar cell that can be grown directly on a silicon (Si) platform can lead to a 34% increase in efficiency over the present best monocrystalline Si laboratory device. III-V devices are known to yield some of the highest efficiencies in photovoltaics, but the high cost of lattice matched substrates and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and device development make them prohibitively expensive in many markets. By utilizing silicon substrates and limiting the thickness of the III-V MOCVD material growth, this cost can be reduced. The leveraging technology of this initiative is a metamorphic silicon:germanium (SiGe) buffer between the silicon substrate and the active device layers. As developed by AmberWave Inc., it provides a low-dislocation interface for III-V nucleation and a high quality bottom cell grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD). This research first reports on the theoretical limits of a III-V/SiGe tandem solar cell. Results will evaluate multiple III-V materials for the determination of optimal material composition to be lattice-matched with SiGe. Following this, a more complex device simulation, incorporating all major loss mechanisms, is accomplished in order to predict ideal efficiency targets and evaluate present experimental structures. Results demonstrate a robust model capable of simulating a wide range of binary and ternary III-V devices. Predictions show the capability of a tandem device operating at 32.5% 1-sun efficiency without requiring TDD improvement beyond that of the present SiGe layers. Following simulations, experimental III-V structures are grown via MOCVD and characterized, indicating successful process development for growth of III-V materials on the SiGe platform. This growth is then validated via the design and development of experimental solar device structures. Each iteration, beginning with the single-junction windowless GaAsP solar cell and concluding with a GaAsP/SiGe tandem device, is analyzed and reported. GaAsP bandgap-voltage offsets achieve a record best result of 0.54 Volts in single-junction devices while dual-junction devices demonstrate a result toward AM1.5 19.4% efficiency with AR-correction and light trapping.

  4. Monolithic III-V on Silicon Plasmonic Nanolaser Structure for Optical Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Liu, Ke; Sorger, Volker J; Sadana, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V semiconductor lasers with Si circuits can reduce cost and enhance performance for optical interconnects dramatically. We propose and investigate plasmonic III-V nanolasers as monolithically integrated light source on Si chips due to many advantages. First, these III-V plasmonic light sources can be directly grown on Si substrates free of crystallographic defects due to the submicron cavity footprint (250?nm?×?250?nm) being smaller than the average defect free region size of the heteroepitaxial III-V material on Si. Secondly, the small lateral and vertical dimensions facilitate process co-integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) in the front end of the line. Thirdly, combining with monolithically integrated CMOS circuits with low device capacitance and parasitic capacitance, the nano-cavity optoelectronic devices consume orders of magnitude less power than the conventional lasers and reduce the energy consumption. Fourthly, the modulation bandwidth of the plasmonic light-sources is enhanced to significantly higher than conventional lasers due to enhanced photon state density and transition rate. In addition, we show that these device performance are very robust after taking into account the surface recombination and variations in device fabrication processes. PMID:26369698

  5. Monolithic III–V on Silicon Plasmonic Nanolaser Structure for Optical Interconnects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Ke; Sorger, Volker J.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III–V semiconductor lasers with Si circuits can reduce cost and enhance performance for optical interconnects dramatically. We propose and investigate plasmonic III–V nanolasers as monolithically integrated light source on Si chips due to many advantages. First, these III–V plasmonic light sources can be directly grown on Si substrates free of crystallographic defects due to the submicron cavity footprint (250?nm?×?250?nm) being smaller than the average defect free region size of the heteroepitaxial III–V material on Si. Secondly, the small lateral and vertical dimensions facilitate process co-integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) in the front end of the line. Thirdly, combining with monolithically integrated CMOS circuits with low device capacitance and parasitic capacitance, the nano-cavity optoelectronic devices consume orders of magnitude less power than the conventional lasers and reduce the energy consumption. Fourthly, the modulation bandwidth of the plasmonic light-sources is enhanced to significantly higher than conventional lasers due to enhanced photon state density and transition rate. In addition, we show that these device performance are very robust after taking into account the surface recombination and variations in device fabrication processes. PMID:26369698

  6. Effect of low temperature annealing on the crystallinity of III-V based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    E-print Network

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    Effect of low temperature annealing on the crystallinity of III-V based diluted magnetic of Tokyo 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan gensan@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract Low-temperature-V semiconductors was partially overcome by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (LT-MBE) and successful synthesis

  7. III-V Nanowire Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Transistors Monolithically Integrated on Si.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johannes; Dey, Anil W; Jacobsson, Daniel; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2015-12-01

    III-V semiconductors have attractive transport properties suitable for low-power, high-speed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) implementation, but major challenges related to cointegration of III-V n- and p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) on low-cost Si substrates have so far hindered their use for large scale logic circuits. By using a novel approach to grow both InAs and InAs/GaSb vertical nanowires of equal length simultaneously in one single growth step, we here demonstrate n- and p-type III-V MOSFETs monolithically integrated on a Si substrate with high Ion/Ioff ratios using a dual channel, single gate-stack design processed simultaneously for both types of transistors. In addition, we demonstrate fundamental CMOS logic gates, such as inverters and NAND gates, which illustrate the viability of our approach for large scale III-V MOSFET circuits on Si. PMID:26595174

  8. Heterogeneous Integration of III-V Semiconductor Compounds on Silicon for Functional Photonic Circuits

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    a PhD is a long, arduous task littered with unending obstacles and abandoned scholarship, often have helped me grow not only as a researcher, but a better person throughout my past six years hereP/InGaAsP technology and fabrication. Without their guidance, III-V development would have been a much more difficult

  9. Monolithic III-V on Silicon Plasmonic Nanolaser Structure for Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Liu, Ke; Sorger, Volker J.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V semiconductor lasers with Si circuits can reduce cost and enhance performance for optical interconnects dramatically. We propose and investigate plasmonic III-V nanolasers as monolithically integrated light source on Si chips due to many advantages. First, these III-V plasmonic light sources can be directly grown on Si substrates free of crystallographic defects due to the submicron cavity footprint (250?nm?×?250?nm) being smaller than the average defect free region size of the heteroepitaxial III-V material on Si. Secondly, the small lateral and vertical dimensions facilitate process co-integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) in the front end of the line. Thirdly, combining with monolithically integrated CMOS circuits with low device capacitance and parasitic capacitance, the nano-cavity optoelectronic devices consume orders of magnitude less power than the conventional lasers and reduce the energy consumption. Fourthly, the modulation bandwidth of the plasmonic light-sources is enhanced to significantly higher than conventional lasers due to enhanced photon state density and transition rate. In addition, we show that these device performance are very robust after taking into account the surface recombination and variations in device fabrication processes.

  10. alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. B.; Liu, J. J.; Wang, R.; Liu, X. Y.; Wang, J.; Sun, N. K.; Si, P. Z.

    2014-06-01

    Structural, magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb0.4Nd0.6(Fe0.8Co0.2) x (1.50 ? x ? 1.90) alloys have been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), a vibrating sample magnetometer and a standard strain technique. XRD analysis shows the presence of single Laves phase with a cubic MgCu2-type structure for the high Nd content alloy around the composition of x = 1.80, which tends to be formed by curing at relatively low annealing temperature. The easy direction of magnetization at room temperature is observed toward <111> axis, accompanied by a rhombohedral distortion with a large spontaneous magnetostriction ?111. An optimized effect on the linear anisotropic magnetostriction, 360 ppm at 3 kOe, was observed for the high Nd content Tb0.4Nd0.6(Fe0.8Co0.2)1.80 alloy, which can be attributed to its single Laves phase, the large ?111 (~1,520 ppm) of the MgCu2-type (Tb,Nd)(Fe,Co)2 phase and the good soft magnetic behaviors.

  11. Self-aligned via and trench for metal contact in III-V semiconductor devices Jun Fei Zhenga

    E-print Network

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Self-aligned via and trench for metal contact in III-V semiconductor devices Jun Fei Zhenga Intel and trench structures in III-V semiconductor devices in particular, on InP platform is presented, together with fabrication results. As a template for such self-aligned via and trench formations in a surrounding polymer

  12. MBE growth technology for high quality strained III-V layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    III-V films are grown on large automatically perfect terraces of III-V substrates which have a different lattice constant, with temperature and Group II and V arrival rates chosen to give a Group III element stable surface. The growth is pulsed to inhibit Group III metal accumulation to low temperature, and to permit the film to relax to equilibrium. The method of the invention 1) minimizes starting step density on sample surface; 2) deposits InAs and GaAs using an interrupted growth mode (0.25 to 2 mono-layers at a time); 3) maintains the instantaneous surface stoichiometry during growth (As-stable for GaAs, In-stable for InAs); and 4) uses time-resolved RHEED to achieve aspects (1)-14 (3).

  13. Oxidation of Al-bearing III-V materials: A review of key progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallesasse, J. M.; Holonyak, N.

    2013-02-01

    Since the discovery of III-V oxidation by Dallesasse and Holonyak in 1989, significant progress has been made both technically and commercially in the use of oxides in compound semiconductor devices. Devices ranging from lasers to transistors have been fabricated that capitalize on the process-induced modification of refractive index and conductivity, allowing control of the two carriers of information in opto-electronic systems—the photon and the electron. Of particular note has been the use of oxidation for the fabrication of high-speed vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, which have extensive use in optical data links found in enterprise networks, data centers, and supercomputing applications. The discovery of III-V oxidation and key technical milestones in the fabrication of photonic and electronic devices that use oxidation are reviewed.

  14. Growth Mechanism of Self-Catalyzed Group III?V Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Group III?V nanowires offer the exciting possibility of epitaxial growth on a wide variety of substrates, most importantly silicon. To ensure compatibility with Si technology, catalyst-free growth schemes are of particular relevance, to avoid impurities from the catalysts. While this type of growth is well-documented and some aspects are described, no detailed understanding of the nucleation and the growth mechanism has been developed. By combining a series of growth experiments using metal?organic vapor phase epitaxy, as well as detailed in situ surface imaging and spectroscopy, we gain deeper insight into nucleation and growth of self-seeded III?V nanowires. By this mechanism most work available in literature concerning this field can be described. PMID:20939507

  15. High crystalline-quality III-V layer transfer onto Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Peng; Jing Yi; Lau, S. S.; Xu Dapeng; Mawst, Luke; Alford, T. L.; Paulson, Charles; Kuech, T. F.

    2008-03-03

    In this study, an approach combining ion cutting and selective chemical etch for the transfer of high crystalline-quality III-V layers on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate has been investigated. This layer transfer scheme takes advantage of the ion-cutting process by conserving III-V substrates for reuse and simultaneously improving the transferred layer quality and surface condition without using chemical and mechanical polishing. The relocation of the ion-implantation damage maximum enables the transfer of relatively defect-free InP-based layers onto a Si substrate coated with an oxide layer and results in structures ready for further optoelectronic device fabrication or epitaxial growth.

  16. Highly efficient chip-scale III-V/silicon hybrid optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Cheung, S; Kawakita, Y; Shang, Kuanping; Yoo, S J Ben

    2015-08-24

    We discuss the design and demonstration of highly efficient 1.55 µm hybrid III-V/Silicon semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). The optimized III-V wafer stack consists of Al(0.10)In(0.71)Ga(0.18)As multiple quantum wells (MQW) and Al(0.48)In(0.52)As electron stop layers to realize SOAs with high wall-plug efficiency (WPE). We present various designs and experimentally determine WPE values for 2 mW and 0.1 mW input power amplification. The 400 µm long flared SOA achieved the highest WPE value of 12.1% for output power > 10mW and the 400 µm long straight SOA achieved the highest WPE value of 7.3% for output power < 10mW. These are the highest WPE values ever obtained for 1.55 µm SOAs. PMID:26368213

  17. Power-efficient III-V/silicon external cavity DBR lasers.

    PubMed

    Zilkie, A J; Seddighian, P; Bijlani, B J; Qian, W; Lee, D C; Fathololoumi, S; Fong, J; Shafiiha, R; Feng, D; Luff, B J; Zheng, X; Cunningham, J E; Krishnamoorthy, A V; Asghari, M

    2012-10-01

    We report the design and characterization of external-cavity DBR lasers built with a III-V-semiconductor reflective-SOA with spot-size converter edge-coupled to SOI waveguides containing Bragg grating mirrors. The un-cooled lasers have wall-plug-efficiencies of up to 9.5% at powers of 6 mW. The lasers are suitable for making power efficient, hybrid WDM transmitters in a CMOS-compatible SOI optical platform. PMID:23188309

  18. To the understanding of the formation of the droplet-epitaxial III-V based nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nemcsics, Ákos

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we discuss the evolution of the self-assembling III-V based nanostructures. These nano-structures were prepared by droplet epitaxial technique. The different nanostructures such as quantum dot, quantum ring, double quantum ring, or nanohole form similarly from an initial Ga droplet but under different substrate temperature and various arsenic pressures. Started from few atomic courses, we give here a qualitative description of the key processes for all of the aforementioned nanostructures.

  19. To the understanding of the formation of the droplet-epitaxial III-V based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemcsics, Ákos

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we discuss the evolution of the self-assembling III-V based nanostructures. These nano-structures were prepared by droplet epitaxial technique. The different nanostructures such as quantum dot, quantum ring, double quantum ring, or nanohole form similarly from an initial Ga droplet but under different substrate temperature and various arsenic pressures. Started from few atomic courses, we give here a qualitative description of the key processes for all of the aforementioned nanostructures.

  20. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Peng, Xiaogang (Fayetteville, AR); Manna, Liberato (Palo del Colle, IT)

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  1. Natural interface states in coherent and isovalent III-V heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Voicu; Zunger, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Interface states occur in semiconductor heterojunctions whenever a significant perturbation is present, caused by interface defects, lattice mismatch, discontinuities in the effective mass or sharp variations in the potential across the interface. We discuss the natural interface states appearing in perfectly coherent and isovalent III-V heterojunctions when a ? -well and an X -anti-well coexist in the conduction band. We use empirical pseudopotential calculation to illustrate this type of states for a few III-V heterostructures. For InP/GaP the interface localised states lie energetically in the band-gap and possess, because of their mixed ? - X character, a strong optical signature. This allows us to provide a different interpretation of the photoemission data existent in the literature for InP/GaP quantum wells and dots. We further discuss the presence of the interface localised states in other III-V heterojunctions, investigating the conditions under which they might be experimentally observed. Funded by DOE, EFRC for Inverse Design, NREL Subcontract XGC-0-40445-01.

  2. III–V quantum light source and cavity-QED on Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Luxmoore, I. J.; Toro, R.; Pozo-Zamudio, O. Del; Wasley, N. A.; Chekhovich, E. A.; Sanchez, A. M.; Beanland, R.; Fox, A. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Liu, H. Y.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Non-classical light sources offer a myriad of possibilities in both fundamental science and commercial applications. Single photons are the most robust carriers of quantum information and can be exploited for linear optics quantum information processing. Scale-up requires miniaturisation of the waveguide circuit and multiple single photon sources. Silicon photonics, driven by the incentive of optical interconnects is a highly promising platform for the passive optical components, but integrated light sources are limited by silicon's indirect band-gap. III–V semiconductor quantum-dots, on the other hand, are proven quantum emitters. Here we demonstrate single-photon emission from quantum-dots coupled to photonic crystal nanocavities fabricated from III–V material grown directly on silicon substrates. The high quality of the III–V material and photonic structures is emphasized by observation of the strong-coupling regime. This work opens-up the advantages of silicon photonics to the integration and scale-up of solid-state quantum optical systems. PMID:23393621

  3. High mobility CMOS technologies using III-V/Ge channels on Si platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhang, R.; Taoka, N.; Urabe, Y.; Yasuda, T.; Yamada, H.; Ichikawa, O.; Fukuhara, N.; Hata, M.; Takenaka, M.

    2013-10-01

    MOSFETs using channel materials with high mobility and low effective mass have been regarded as strongly important for obtaining high current drive and low supply voltage CMOS under sub 10 nm regime. From this viewpoint, attentions have recently been paid to Ge and III-V channels. In this paper, possible solutions for realizing III-V/Ge MOSFETs on the Si platform are presented. The high quality III-V channel formation on Si substrates can be realized through direct wafer bonding. The gate stack formation is constructed on a basis of atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al2O3 gate insulators for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. As the source/drain (S/D) formation, Ni-based metal S/D is implemented for both InGaAs and Ge MOSFETs. By combining these technologies, we demonstrate successful integration of InGaAs-OI nMOSFETs and Ge p-MOSFETs on a same wafer and their superior device performance.

  4. Progress in the Development of Metamorphic Multi-Junction III-V Space-Solar Cells at Essential Research Incorporated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinharoy, Samar; Patton, Martin O.; Valko, Thomas M., Sr.; Weizer, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical calculations have shown that highest efficiency III-V multi-junction solar cells require alloy structures that cannot be grown on a lattice-matched substrate. Ever since the first demonstration of high efficiency metamorphic single junction 1.1 eV and 1.2 eV InGaAs solar cells by Essential Research Incorporated (ERI), interest has grown in the development of multi-junction cells of this type using graded buffer layer technology. ERI is currently developing a dual-junction 1.6 eV InGaP/1.1 eV InGaAs tandem cell (projected practical air-mass zero (AM0), one-sun efficiency of 28%, and 100-sun efficiency of 37.5%) under a Ballistic Missile Defense Command (BMDO) SBIR Phase II program. A second ongoing research effort at ERI involves the development of a 2.1 eV AlGaInP/1.6 eV InGaAsP/1.2 eV InGaAs triple-junction concentrator tandem cell (projected practical AM0 efficiency of 36.5% under 100 suns) under a SBIR Phase II program funded by the Air Force. We are in the process of optimizing the dual-junction cell performance. In case of the triple-junction cell, we have developed the bottom and the middle cell, and are in the process of developing the layer structures needed for the top cell. A progress report is presented in this paper.

  5. Formation of III-V-on-insulator structures on Si by direct wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Masafumi; Iida, Ryo; Ikku, Yuki; Kim, Sanghyeon; Takagi, Hideki; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Yamada, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Fukuhara, Noboru; Hata, Masahiko; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the formation of III-V-compound-semiconductors-on-insulator (III-V-OI) structures with thin buried oxide (BOX) layers on Si wafers by using developed direct wafer bonding (DWB). In order to realize III-V-OI MOSFETs with ultrathin body and extremely thin body (ETB) InGaAs-OI channel layers and ultrathin BOX layers, we have developed an electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR) O2 plasma-assisted DWB process with ECR sputtered SiO2 BOX layers and a DWB process based on atomic-layer-deposition Al2O3 (ALD-Al2O3) BOX layers. It is essential to suppress micro-void generation during wafer bonding process to achieve excellent wafer bonding. We have found that major causes of micro-void generation in DWB processes with ECR-SiO2 and ALD-Al2O3 BOX layers are desorption of Ar and H2O gas, respectively. In order to suppress micro-void generation in the ECR-SiO2 BOX layers, it is effective to introduce the outgas process before bonding wafers. On the other hand, it is a possible solution for suppressing micro-void generation in the ALD-Al2O3 BOX layers to increase the deposition temperature of the ALD-Al2O3 BOX layers. It is also another possible solution to deposit ALD-Al2O3 BOX layers on thermally oxidized SiO2 layers, which can absorb the desorption gas from ALD-Al2O3 BOX layers.

  6. Solid-state lighting : the III-V Epi Killer App.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien

    2010-06-01

    Throughout its history, lighting technology has made tremendous progress: the efficiency with which power is converted into usable light has increased 2.8 orders of magnitude over three centuries. This progress has, in turn, fueled large increases in the consumption of light and productivity of human society. In this talk, we review an emerging new technology, solid-state lighting: its frontier performance potential; the underlying advances in physics and materials that might enable this performance potential; the resulting energy consumption and human productivity benefits; and the impact on worldwide III-V epi manufacture.

  7. Vertical bridgman and gradient freeze growth of III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bourret, E.D.

    1990-07-01

    Major improvements in the structural and electrical perfection of single crystals of III-V compound semiconductors have been achieved by using new vertical Bridgman-type and vertical gradient freeze techniques. A general review of experimental set-ups used for growth of large diameter crystals of GaP, InP and GaAs is presented. Crystal properties and characteristic features are discussed to illustrate advantages and disadvantages of the vertical Bridgman-type growth techniques. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Ion implantation processing of III-V strained-layer semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ion implantation has had a strong impact on the development of III-V strained-layer semiconductor (SLS) materials and device technologies. Implantation studies have helped delineate the present understanding of strained-layer stability and metastability limits. Resulting ion beam technologies have led to improvements in a variety of SLS discrete devices, including optoelectronic emitters, photodetectors, and field-effect transistors. Both SLS stability criteria and implanted SLS devices are reviewed with respect to future applications in optoelectronics. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The theory of nucleation and polytypism of III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-02-01

    The polytypism between cubic and hexagonal phases in III-V semiconductor nanowires has been analyzed on the basis of nucleation theory. Model calculations have been performed for the parameters of GaAs nanowhiskers grown on Au catalysts according to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. New results are obtained for the critical chemical potentials and the dependence of percentage content of wurtzite phase on the concentration of group III element (Ga) in the liquid drop. These results have been used for the interpretation of some experimental data on the crystalline phase of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by various epitaxial techniques.

  10. Electronic Structure and Valence of Mn impurities in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2003-11-01

    Mn doped III-V semiconductors have recently become very popular materials since they are ferromagnetic at reasonably high temperatures and in some cases show carrier induced magnetism, where the Curie temperature can be altered by changes in the carrier concentration. It is expected that these materials will play an important role in Spintronics devices. Substitutional Mn impurities in III-V semiconductors can acquire either a divalent or a trivalent configuration. For example, it is generally accepted that Mn in GaAs is in a (d^5+h) configuration with five occupied Mn d-orbitals and a delocalized hole in the valence band. In contrast, Mn in GaN is believed to be in a d^4 configuration with a deep impurity state that has d-character. But there have recently been some discussions about the possibility of having some Mn ion in GaN assuming a divalent (d^5+h) type configuration. In order to achieve carrier induced ferromagnetism, the desired state of the Mn ions in III-V semiconductors is the (d^5+h) configuration. We have therefore performed ab-initio calculations of the Mn valence when it substitutes Ga in various III-V semiconductor hosts. We use the self-interaction corrected local spin density (SIC-LSD) method which is able to treat localized impurity orbitals properly. In particular we find that the method is capable of predicting the (d^5+h) state of Mn in GaAs. For Mn in GaP and GaN the calculations predict a trivalent d^4 state in the idealized system. The energy differences between d^4 and (d^5+h) configurations in GaP are, however, very small. Introduction of defects or donors does change the valence of Mn in GaP, favoring the divalent state under certain circumstances. Work done in collaboration with W. Temmerman and S. Szotek, Daresbury Laboratory, G. M. Stocks, ORNL, and W. H. Butler, MINT Center University of Alabama. This work supported by the Defense Advanced Research Agency and by DOE Office of Science trough ASCR/MICS and BES/DMSE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle LLC.

  11. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 ?m InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  12. Calculation of the electron mobility in III-V inversion layers with high-? dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, T. P.; Fischetti, M. V.; Sorée, B.; Jin, S.; Magnus, W.; Meuris, M.

    2010-11-01

    We calculate the electron mobility for a metal-oxide-semiconductor system with a metallic gate, high-? dielectric layer, and III-V substrate, including scattering with longitudinal-optical (LO) polar-phonons of the III-V substrate and with the interfacial excitations resulting from the coupling of insulator and substrate optical modes among themselves and with substrate plasmons. In treating scattering with the substrate LO-modes, multisubband dynamic screening is included and compared to the dielectric screening in the static limit and with the commonly used screening model obtained by defining an effective screening wave vector. The electron mobility components limited by substrate LO phonons and interfacial modes are calculated for In0.53Ga0.47As and GaAs substrates with SiO2 and HfO2 gate dielectrics. The mobility components limited by the LO-modes and interfacial phonons are also investigated as a function of temperature. Scattering with surface roughness, fixed interface charge, and nonpolar-phonons is also included to judge the relative impact of each scattering mechanism in the total mobility for In0.53Ga0.47As with HfO2 gate dielectric. We show that InGaAs is affected by interfacial-phonon scattering to an extent larger than Si, lowering the expected performance, but probably not enough to question the technological relevance of InGaAs.

  13. Research advances on III-V MOSFET electronics beyond Si CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    2009-03-01

    An overview is given on recent advances of science and devices of III-V based and Si MOS and MOSFET. Firstly, we have integrated molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the growth of excellent high- ? dielectrics with abrupt interfaces, critical for further complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) scaling beyond the 45 nm node. Secondly, we showed that epitaxial yttrium-doped HfO 2 films on GaAs(1 0 0) have stabilized the cubic phase, and led to enhancement of ? over 30. Thirdly, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) was applied to probe the phonon modes and charge trappings within the high- ? dielectrics. Fourthly, scaling of the high- ? oxides approaching 1.0 nm capacitance equivalent thickness (CET) is achieved in a Ga 2O 3(Gd 2O 3)[GGO]/In 0.2Ga 0.8As (InGaAs) gate stack that has undergone 850 °C rapid thermal annealing, and which has unpinned the surface Fermi level of the III-V semiconductor. Finally, we have demonstrated a self-aligned inversion-channel In 0.53Ga 0.47As MOSFETs made of Al 2O 3(2 nm)/GGO(7 nm) gate oxide and TiN metal gate at 1-?m gate length, reaching a world record of drain current and transconductance.

  14. Structure, energetics, and electronic states of III-V compound polytypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Belabbes, Abderrezak

    2013-07-01

    Recently several hexagonal polytypes such as 2H, 4H, and 6H have been discovered for conventional III-V semiconductor compounds in addition to the cubic 3C zinc-blende polytype by investigating nanorods grown in the [111] direction in different temperature regimes. Also III-mononitrides crystallizing in the hexagonal 2H wurtzite structure under ambient conditions can be deposited in zinc-blende geometry using various growth techniques. The polytypic crystal structures influence the local electronic properties and the internal electric fields due to the spontaneous polarization in non-cubic crystals. In this paper we give a comprehensive review on the thermodynamic, structural, and electronic properties of twelve Al, Ga, and In antimonides, arsenides, phosphides, and nitrides as derived from ab initio calculations. Their lattice parameters, energetic stability, and characteristic band structure energies are carefully discussed and related to the atomic geometries of the polytypes. Chemical trends are investigated. Band offsets between polytypes and their consequences for heterocrystalline structures are derived. The described properties are discussed in the light of available experimental data and previous computations. Despite several contradictory results in the literature, a unified picture of the III-V polytypes and their heterocrystalline structures is developed.

  15. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 ?m) and nanoscale (<100 nm) particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries. PMID:26549624

  16. GaP-nucleation on exact Si (0 0 1) substrates for III/V device integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz, Kerstin; Beyer, Andreas; Witte, Wiebke; Ohlmann, Jens; Németh, Igor; Kunert, Bernardette; Stolz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes our present knowledge of the defect-free nucleation of III/V semiconductors on exactly oriented Si (0 0 1) surfaces. A defect-free III/V nucleation layer on Si (0 0 1) substrates is important for integrating optoelectronic functions on Si substrates, like III/V-based lasers and solar cells as well as high-mobility III/V-n-channel layers. For applications which rely on CMOS processing and devices, one should choose (0 0 1) Si substrates with no intentional off-cut (exactly oriented ±0.5°). Under high hydrogen pressures and at high annealing temperature, one can maximize the number of double steps even on this Si surface under vapour phase epitaxy (VPE) conditions. A GaP layer free from dislocations, stacking faults, twins and/or antiphase disorder can be grown on a Si homoepitaxial buffer by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a two step process. We show that a thin and low temperature GaP nucleation layer has to be deposited in flow rate modulated growth mode to achieve a charge neutral interface and two-dimensional growth. A GaP layer grown at high temperature on this nucleation layer results in self-annihilation of the remaining antiphase domains. This defect-free GaP layer with a total thickness of only about 50 nm can serve as a template for subsequent integration of III/V device structures on Si (0 0 1) substrates.

  17. The reliability study of III-V solar cell with copper based contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Edward Yi; Chang, Hsun-Jui; Maa, Jer-Shen; Pande, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of III-V solar cell with copper based contacts as low-cost metallurgy option for solar cells including Cu-based Cu/Ge/Pd contact on n-type GaAs and Cu/Pt/Ti/Pt contact on p-type Ge is studied in this paper. The Cu-based contacts have low specific contact resistances of the order of 10-6 ? cm2. The solar cells with the proposed Cu-based structures were subjected to high-temperature annealing (250 °C) and a high DC current (6.5 × 10-4 mA/?m2) stress test. Overall, the solar cell adopting these Cu based contacts remained quite stable and demonstrated excellent performances after these reliability tests.

  18. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  19. Radiative dark current in optically thin III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welser, Roger E.; Sood, Ashok K.; Tatavarti, Sudersena Rao; Wibowo, Andree; Wilt, David M.; Howard, Alex

    2015-03-01

    High-voltage InGaAs quantum well solar cells have been demonstrated in a thin-film format, utilizing structures that employ advanced band gap engineering to suppress non-radiative recombination and expose the limiting radiative component of the diode current. In particular, multiple InGaAs quantum well structures fabricated via epitaxial lift-off exhibit one-sun open circuit voltages as high as 1.05 V. The dark diode characteristics of these high-voltage III-V photovoltaic devices are compared to the radiative current calculated from the measured external quantum efficiency using a generalized detailed balance model specifically adapted for optically-thin absorber structures. The fitted n=1 component of the diode current is found to match the calculated radiative dark current when assuming negligible photon recycling, suggesting this thin-film multiple quantum well structure is operating close to the radiative limit.

  20. Energy-tunable entangled photon sources on a III-V/Silicon chip

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yan; Zopf, Michael; Jung, Kyubong; Zhang, Yang; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-01-01

    Many of the envisioned quantum photonic technologies, e.g. a quantum repeater, rely on an energy- (wavelength-) tunable source of polarization entangled photon pairs. The energy tunability is a fundamental requirement to perform two-photon-interference between different sources and to swap the entanglement. Parametric-down-conversion and four-wave-mixing sources of entangled photons have shown energy tunability, however the probabilistic nature of the sources limits their applications in complex quantum protocols. Here we report a silicon-based hybrid photonic chip where energy-tunable polarization entangled photons are generated by deterministic and scalable III-V quantum light sources. This device is based on a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) incorporating InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) on a PMNPT-on-silicon substrate. The entangled photon emissions from single QDs can be tuned by more than 3000 times of the radiative linewidth without spoiling the entanglement. With a footprint of several hundred micro...

  1. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; O'Bradovich, G.J.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year project. The objective of the research is to examine new design approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program is divided into two areas. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for III-V semiconductors. The second area centers on exploring design approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high quality material. Research activities consisted of an experimental study of minority carrier recombination in n-type, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-deposited GaAs, an assessment of the minority carrier lifetimes in n-GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and developing a high-efficiency cell fabrication process.

  2. Modeling of axial heterostructure formation in ternary III-V nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryakin, A. A.; Sibirev, N. V.; Zeze, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    A model is proposed to depict the formation of axial heterostructure in ternary III-V nanowires (NW) grown by the catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method. Our approach is based on the determination of chemical potential of a four-component liquid using the regular solution model and Stringfellow's scheme for the computation of the interaction coefficients of species present in the droplet. The model allows the estimation of the heterojunction width dependence on the growth temperature. This dependence has not been reported before by any previous theoretical studies. The AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction formation in the Au-catalyzed AlGaAs NWs was considered as an example of ternary system. The heterojunction width was found to increase with the growth temperature with a second-order polynomial dependence.

  3. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; Patkar, M.P.; Young, M.P. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes to examine new solar cell desip approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program consists of two elements. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for M-III semiconductors. Substantial efficiency gains may be possible by employing light trapping techniques to confine the incident photons, as well as the photons emitted by radiative recombination. The thin-film approach is a promising route for achieving substantial performance improvements in the already high-efficiency, single-junction, III-V cell. The second element of the research involves exploring desip approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high-quality material. This work has applications to multiple-junction cells, for which the selection of a component cell often involves a compromise between optimum band pp and optimum material quality. It could also be a benefit manufacturing environment by making the cell's efficiency less dependent on materialquality.

  4. Development of molecular beam epitaxy technology for III–V compound semiconductor heterostructure devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. Y.

    2013-09-15

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is a versatile ultrahigh vacuum technique for growing multiple epitaxial layers of semiconductor crystals with high precision. The extreme control of the MBE technique over composition variation, interface sharpness, impurity doping profiles, and epitaxial layer thickness to the atomic level makes it possible to demonstrate a wide variety of novel semiconductor structures. Since its invention nearly 40 years ago, the MBE technique has evolved from a laboratory apparatus for exploring new materials and novel devices to a favored tool for the mass production of III–V high-speed devices. This paper will review some of the past developments in this technology and propose an outlook of future developments.

  5. Design High-Efficiency III-V Nanowire/Si Two-Junction Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, D; He, S; Li, X

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we report the electrical simulation results of a proposed GaInP nanowire (NW)/Si two-junction solar cell. The NW physical dimensions are determined for optimized solar energy absorption and current matching between each subcell. Two key factors (minority carrier lifetime, surface recombination velocity) affecting power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the solar cell are highlighted, and a practical guideline to design high-efficiency two-junction solar cell is thus provided. Considering the practical surface and bulk defects in GaInP semiconductor, a promising PCE of 27.5 % can be obtained. The results depict the usefulness of integrating NWs to construct high-efficiency multi-junction III-V solar cells. PMID:26123270

  6. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  7. Seebeck Enhancement Through Miniband Conduction in III-V Semiconductor Superlattices at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bahk, JH; Sadeghian, RB; Bian, ZX; Shakouri, A

    2012-02-08

    We present theoretically that the cross-plane Seebeck coefficient of InGaAs/InGaAlAs III-V semiconductor superlattices can be significantly enhanced through miniband transport at low temperatures. The miniband dispersion curves are calculated by self-consistently solving the Schrodinger equation with the periodic potential, and the Poisson equation taking into account the charge transfer between the two layers. Boltzmann transport in the relaxation-time approximation is used to calculate the thermoelectric transport properties in the cross-plane direction based on the modified density of states and group velocity. It is found that the cross-plane Seebeck coefficient can be enhanced more than 60% over the bulk values at an equivalent doping level at 80 K when the Fermi level is aligned at an edge of the minibands. Other thermoelectric transport properties are also calculated and discussed to further enhance the thermoelectric power factor.

  8. Long-wave infrared (LWIR) detectors based on III-V materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Future NASA missions for earth observation and planetary science require large photovoltaic detector arrays with high performance in the long wavelength region to 18 microns and at operating temperatures above 65 K where single-cycle long-life cryocoolers are being developed. Since these detector array requirements exceed the state of current HgCdTe technology, alternative detector materials are being investigated as a possible option for future missions. Advanced growth techniques (e.g., MBE and MOCVD) of column III-V semiconductors have opened opportunities for engineering new detector materials and device structures. The technical approaches under investigation at JPL (with university and industry participation) include: quantum well infrared photodetectors, heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) photodetectors, type-II strained layer superlattices, and nipi doping superlattices. Each of these options are briefly described with some of their pros and cons. A more detailed description is given for the HIP approach being pioneered at JPL.

  9. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  10. Use of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane deposited from aqueous solution for surface modification of III-V materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Daniel B., Jr.; Williams, Kristen S.; Baril, Neil F.; Weiland, Conan; Andzelm, Jan W.; Lenhart, Joseph L.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Tidrow, Meimei Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Henry, Nathan C.

    2014-11-01

    Focal plane arrays of strained layer superlattices (SLSs) composed of InAs/GaSb are excellent candidates for infrared imaging, but one key factor limiting their utility is the lack of a surface passivation technique capable of protecting the mesa sidewall from degradation. Along these lines, we demonstrate the use of aqueous 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) deposited as a surface functionalizing agent for subsequent polymer passivation on InAs and GaSb surfaces following a HCl/citric acid procedure to remove the conductive oxide In2O3. Using atomic force microscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and modeling with density functional theory (DFT), we demonstrate that APTES films can successfully be deposited on III-V substrates by spin coating and directly compare these films to those deposited on silicon substrates. The HCl/citric acid surface preparation treatment is particularly effective at removing In2O3 without the surface segregation of In oxides observed from use of HCl alone. However, HCl/citric acid surface treatment method does result in heavy oxidation of both Ga and Sb, accompanied by segregation of Ga oxide to the surface. Deposited APTES layer thickness did not depend on the substrate choice, and thicknesses between 1 and 20 nm were obtained for APTES solution concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 vol %. XPS results for the N1s band of APTES showed that the content of ionic nitrogen was high (?50%) for the thinnest films (?1 nm), and decreased with increasing film thickness. These results indicate that APTES can indeed be used to form a silane surface layer to cover III-V materials substrates. Such APTES silane layers may prove useful in surface passivation of these materials alone, or as surface functionalizing agents for subsequent covalent binding with polymer overlayers like polyimide.

  11. Advances in Single and Multijunction III-V Photovoltaics on Silicon for Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Ringel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative research effort at MIT, Ohio State University and NASA has resulted in the demonstration of record quality gallium arsenide (GaAs) based single junction photovoltaic devices on silicon (Si) substrates. The ability to integrate highly efficient, radiation hard III-V based devices on silicon offers the potential for dramatic reductions in cell mass (approx.2x) and increases in cell area. Both of these improvements offer the potential for dramatic reductions in the cost of on-orbit electrical power. Recently, lattice matched InGaP/GaAs and metamorphic InGaP/InGaAs dual junction solar cells were demonstrated by MBE and OMVPE, respectively. Single junction GaAs on Si devices have been integrated into a space flight experiment (MISSES), scheduled to be launched to the International Space Station in March of 2005. I-V performance data from the GaAs/Si will be collected on-orbit and telemetered to ground stations daily. Microcracks in the GaAs epitaxial material, generated because of differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between GaAs and Si, are of concern in the widely varying thermal environment encountered in low Earth orbit. Ground based thermal life cycling (-80 C to + 80 C) equivalent to 1 year in LEO has been conducted on GaAs/Si devices with no discernable degradation in device performance, suggesting that microcracks may not limit the ability to field GaAs/Si in harsh thermal environments. Recent advances in the development and testing of III-V photovoltaic devices on Si will be presented.

  12. Bismuth-induced surface structure and morphology in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duzik, Adam J.

    2015-04-01

    Bi is the largest group V element and has a number of advantages in III-V semiconductor properties, such as bandgap reduction, spin-orbit coupling, a preserved electron mobility over III-V-N materials, and nearly ideal surfactant properties resulting in a surface smoothing effect on GaAs. However, the mechanism for this behavior is not well understood. Insight on the mechanism is obtained through study of the Bi-terminated GaAs surface morphology and atomic reconstructions produced via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Experimental scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterization of the Bi/GaAs surface reveal disordered (1x3), (2x3), and (4x3) reconstructions, often sharing the same reflective high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns. Roughness on the micron length scale decreases as the step widen, attributed to the concurrent increase of opposite direction step edges on the nanometer length scale. Corresponding cluster expansion, density functional theory (DFT), and Monte Carlo simulations all point to the stability of the disordered (4x3) reconstruction at finite temperature as observed in experimental STM. The effects of incorporated Bi are determined through epitaxial GaSbBi growth on GaSb with various Ga:Sb:Bi flux ratios. Biphasic surface droplets are observed with sub-droplets, facets, and substrate etching. Despite the rough growth front, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscatter (RBS) measurements show significant Bi incorporation of up to 12% into GaSb, along with a concurrent increase of background As concentration. This is attributed to a strain auto-compensation effect. Bi incorporation of up to 10% is observed for the highest Bi fluxes while maintaining low surface droplet density.

  13. Interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Sun, Zhaoqi

    2013-03-01

    Recently, III-V materials have been extensively studied as potential candidates for post-Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) channel materials. The main obstacle to implement III-V compound semiconductors for CMOS applications is the lack of high quality and thermodynamically stable insulators with low interface trap densities. Due to their excellent thermal stability and relatively high dielectric constants, Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics have been recently highlighted as the most promising high-k dielectrics for III-V-based devices. This paper provides an overview of interface engineering and chemistry of Hf-based high-k dielectrics on III-V substrates. We begin with a survey of methods developed for generating Hf-based high-k gate dielectrics. To address the impact of these hafnium based materials, their interfaces with GaAs as well as a variety of semiconductors are discussed. After that, the integration issues are highlighted, including the development of high-k deposition without Fermi level pinning, surface passivation and interface state, and integration of novel device structure with Si technology. Finally, we conclude this review with the perspectives and outlook on the future developments in this area. This review explores the possible influences of research breakthroughs of Hf-based gate dielectrics on the current and future applications for nano-MOSFET devices.

  14. 30 CFR 57.22218 - Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22218 Seals and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22218 - Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22218 Seals and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22218 - Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22218 Seals and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22218 - Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22218 Seals and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22218 - Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22218 Seals and... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (III, V-A, and V-B...

  19. Analytical Electron Diffraction from Iii-V and II-Vi Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spellward, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a number of new TEM-based techniques for the measurement of composition in ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. New methods of polarity determination in binary and ternary compounds are also presented. The theory of high energy electron diffraction is outlined, with particular emphasis on zone axis diffraction from well-defined strings. An account of TEM microstructural studies of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te and CdTe epitaxial layers, which provided the impetus for developing the diffraction-based analytical techniques, is given. The wide range of TEM-based compositional determination techniques is described. The use of HOLZ deficiency lines to infer composition from a lattice parameter measurement is evaluated. In the case of Cd_{ rm x}Hg_{rm 1-x}Te, it is found to be inferior to other techniques developed. Studies of dynamical aspects of HOLZ diffraction can yield information about the dispersion surface from which a measure of composition may be obtained. This technique is evaluated for Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As, in which it is found to be of some use, and for Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te, in which the large Debye-Waller factor associated with mercury in discovered to render the method of little value. A number of critical voltages may be measured in medium voltage TEMs. The (111) zone axis critical voltage of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te is found to vary significantly with x and forms the basis of an accurate technique for composition measurement in that ternary compound. Other critical voltage phenomena are investigated. In Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As and other light ternaries, a non-systematic critical voltage is found to vary with x, providing a good indicator of composition. Critical voltage measurements may be made by conventional CBED or by various other techniques, which may also simultaneously yield information on the spatial variation of composition. The use of diffraction contrast imaging, large angle CBED and convergent beam imaging is evaluated and shown to have some advantages for flat samples. In studies of growth mechanisms, microstructures and even macroscopic properties, knowledge of the polarity of a zincblende structure crystal may be valuable. Methods of polarity determination are surveyed. Two new TEM-based techniques are described and results from a range of II -VI and III-V semiconductors are presented.

  20. High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrator Application

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Seth

    2012-09-12

    The High Efficiency Nanostructured III-V Photovoltaics for Solar Concentrators project seeks to provide new photovoltaic cells for Concentrator Photovoltaics (CPV) Systems with higher cell efficiency, more favorable temperature coefficients and less sensitivity to changes in spectral distribution. The main objective of this project is to provide high efficiency III-V solar cells that will reduce the overall cost per Watt for power generation using CPV systems.This work is focused both on a potential near term application, namely the use of indium arsenide (InAs) QDs to spectrally "tune" the middle (GaAs) cell of a SOA triple junction device to a more favorable effective bandgap, as well as the long term goal of demonstrating intermediate band solar cell effects. The QDs are confined within a high electric field i-region of a standard GaAs solar cell. The extended absorption spectrum (and thus enhanced short circuit current) of the QD solar cell results from the increase in the sub GaAs bandgap spectral response that is achievable as quantum dot layers are introduced into the i-region. We have grown InAs quantum dots by OMVPE technique and optimized the QD growth conditions. Arrays of up to 40 layers of strain balanced quantum dots have been experimentally demonstrated with good material quality, low residual stain and high PL intensity. Quantum dot enhanced solar cells were grown and tested under simulated one sun AM1.5 conditions. Concentrator solar cells have been grown and fabricated with 5-40 layers of QDs. Testing of these devices show the QD cells have improved efficiency compared to baseline devices without QDs. Device modeling and measurement of thermal properties were performed using Crosslight APSYS. Improvements in a triple junction solar cell with the insertion of QDs into the middle current limiting junction was shown to be as high as 29% under one sun illumination for a 10 layer stack QD enhanced triple junction solar cell. QD devices have strong potential for net gains in efficiency at high concentration.

  1. Ion implantation for high performance III-V JFETS and HFETS

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ion implantation has been an enabling technology for realizing many high performance electronic devices in III-V semiconductor materials. We report on advances in ion implantation processing for GaAs JFETs (joint field effect transistors), AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs (heterostructure field effect transistors), and InGaP or InAlP-barrier HFETs. The GaAs JFET has required the development of shallow p-type implants using Zn or Cd with junction depths down to 35 nm after the activation anneal. Implant activation and ionization issues for AlGaAs are reported along with those for InGaP and InAlP. A comprehensive treatment of Si-implant doping of AlGaAs is given based on donor ionization energies and conduction band density-of-states dependence on Al-composition. Si and Si+P implants in InGaP are shown to achieve higher electron concentrations than for similar implants in AlGaAs due to absence of the deep donor level. An optimized P co- implantation scheme in InGaP is shown to increase the implanted donor saturation level by 65%.

  2. Electroless Deposition of III-V Semiconductor Nanostructures from Ionic Liquids at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Borisenko, Natalia; Olschewski, Mark; Gustus, René; Zahlbach, Janine; Endres, Frank

    2015-09-28

    Group III-V semiconductor nanostructures are important materials in optoelectronic devices and are being researched in energy-related fields. A simple approach for the synthesis of these semiconductors with well-defined nanostructures is desired. Electroless deposition (galvanic displacement) is a fast and versatile technique for deposition of one material on another and depends on the redox potentials of the two materials. Herein we show that GaSb can be directly synthesized at room temperature by galvanic displacement of SbCl3 /ionic liquid on electrodeposited Ga, on Ga nanowires, and also on commercial Ga. In?situ AFM revealed the galvanic displacement process of Sb on Ga and showed that the displacement process continues even after the formation of GaSb. The bandgap of the deposited GaSb was 0.9±0.1?eV compared to its usual bandgap of 0.7?eV. By changing the cation in the ionic liquid, the redox process could be varied leading to GaSb with different optical properties. PMID:26290478

  3. III-V GaAs based plasmonic lasers (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafone, Lucas; Nguyen, Ngoc; Clarke, Ed; Fry, Paul; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonics is a potential route to new and improved optical devices. Many predict that sub wavelength optical systems will be essential in the development of future integrated circuits, offering the only viable way of simultaneously increasing speed and reducing power consumption. Realising this potential will be contingent on the ability to exploit plasmonic effects within the framework of the established semiconductor industry and to this end we present III-V (GaAs) based surface plasmon laser platform capable of effective laser light generation in highly focussed regions of space. Our design utilises a suspended slab of GaAs with a metallic slot printed on top. Here, hybridisation between the plasmonic mode of the slot and the photonic mode of the slab leads to the formation of a mode with confinement and loss that can be adjusted through variation of the slot width alone. As in previous designs the use of a hybrid mode provides strong confinement with relatively low losses, however the ability to print the metal slot removes the randomness associated with device fabrication and the requirement for etching that can deteriorate the semiconductor's properties. The deterministic fabrication process and the use of bulk GaAs for gain make the device prime for practical implementation.

  4. Reliability of III-V electronic devices -- the defects that cause the trouble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2012-02-01

    Degradation of electronic devices by hot electrons is universally attributed to the generation of defects, but the mechanisms for defect generation and the specific nature of the pertinent defects are not known for most systems. Here we describe three recent case studies [1] in III-V high-electron-mobility transistors that illustrate the power of combining density functional calculations and experimental data to identify the pertinent defects and associated degradation mechanisms. In all cases, benign pre-existing defects are either depassivated (irreversible degradation) or transformed to a metastable state (reversible degradation). This work was done in collaboration with R.D. Schrimpf, D.M. Fleetwood, Y. Puzyrev, X. Shen, T. Roy, S. DasGupta, and B.R. Tuttle. Devices were provided by D.F. Brown, J. Speck and U. Mishra, and by J. Bergman and B. Brar. [4pt] [1] Y. S. Puzyrev et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 053505 (2010); T. Roy et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 133503 (2010); X. Shen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 108, 114505 (2010).

  5. Monolithic integration of III-V nanowire with photonic crystal microcavity for vertical light emission.

    PubMed

    Larrue, Alexandre; Wilhelm, Christophe; Vest, Gwenaelle; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo; Soci, Cesare

    2012-03-26

    A novel photonic structure formed by the monolithic integration of a vertical III-V nanowire on top of a L3 two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is proposed to enhance light emission from the nanowire. The impact on the nanowire spontaneous emission rate is evaluated by calculating the spontaneous emission factor ?, and the material gain at threshold is used as a figure of merit of this vertical emitting nanolaser. An optimal design is identified for a GaAs nanowire geometry with r = 155 nm and L~1.1 ?m, where minimum gain at threshold (gth~13×10³ cm?¹) and large spontaneous emission factor (?~0.3) are simultaneously achieved. Modification of the directivity of the L3 photonic crystal cavity via the band-folding principle is employed to further optimize the far-field radiation pattern and to increase the directivity of the device. These results lay the foundation for a new approach toward large-scale integration of vertical emitting nanolasers and may enable applications such as intra-chip optical interconnects. PMID:22453454

  6. Robust Large Gap Two-Dimensional Topological Insulators in Hydrogenated III-V Buckled Honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Crisostomo, Christian P; Yao, Liang-Zi; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Albao, Marvin A; Bansil, Arun

    2015-10-14

    A large gap two-dimensional (2D) topological insulator (TI), also known as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator, is highly desirable for low-power-consuming electronic devices owing to its spin-polarized backscattering-free edge conducting channels. Although many freestanding films have been predicted to harbor the QSH phase, band topology of a film can be modified substantially when it is placed or grown on a substrate, making the materials realization of a 2D TI challenging. Here we report a first-principles study of possible QSH phases in 75 binary combinations of group III (B, Al, Ga, In, and Tl) and group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements in the 2D buckled honeycomb structure, including hydrogenation on one or both sides of the films to simulate substrate effects. A total of six compounds (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, TlAs, TlSb, and TlN) are identified to be nontrivial in unhydrogenated case; whereas for hydrogenated case, only four (GaBi, InBi, TlBi, and TlSb) remains nontrivial. The band gap is found to be as large as 855 meV for the hydrogenated TlBi film, making this class of III-V materials suitable for room temperature applications. TlBi remains topologically nontrivial with a large band gap at various hydrogen coverages, indicating the robustness of its band topology against bonding effects of substrates. PMID:26390082

  7. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  8. Few-body properties of interacting spins in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Ryan

    We perform theoretical analyses of several novel device applications which make use of the distinctive electronic and optical properties of III-V semiconductors. Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are a promising candidate for the physical realization of a solid-state quantum computer. Whenever three or more spins interact simultaneously, the system's full Hamiltonian is found to include nonlinear interactions that significantly influence its dynamics in experimentally relevant parameter regimes. We consider the implications of these results for the proposed implementations of known quantum algorithms; in particular, we describe a method for circumventing the four-body effects in an encoded system (four spins per logical bit) by the appropriate tuning of material parameters. We calculate the spin coherence lifetime of a conduction electron in a semiconductor due to exchange scattering from neutral donors. The average lifetime is computed in two and in three dimensions using the Born approximation. We find that, for realistic values of the impurity concentrations, these lifetimes are comparable to those of spin decoherence mechanisms commonly ascribed to experimentally observed lifetimes. We also develop a numerical model for charge diffusion in a GaAs heterostructure laser. We construct and solve rate equations for conduction electrons coupled to a single optical cavity mode in a microdisk. Our results extend previous theoretical approaches to diffusion and are consistent with applicable experiments.

  9. Understanding the Potential and Limitations of Dilute Nitride Alloys for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Ptak, A.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; McMahon, W.; Kibbler, A.; Olson, J.; Crandall, R.; Branz, H.

    2005-11-01

    Dilute nitride alloys provide a powerful tool for engineering the band gap and lattice constant of III-V alloys. However, nitrogen degrades the performance of GaAs solar cells. This project seeks to understand and demonstrate the limits of performance of GaInNAs alloys by (a) correlating deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data with device performance and (b) using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to reduce background impurity concentrations.

  10. A survey of ohmic contacts to III-V compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Zolper, J.C.; Briggs, R.D.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    A survey of ohmic contact materials and properties to GaAs, InP, GaN will be presented along with critical issues pertaining to each semiconductor material. Au-based alloys (e.g., GeAuNi for n-type GaAs) are the most commonly used contacts for GaAs and InP materials for both n- and p-type contacts due to the excellent contact resistivity, reliability, and usefulness over a wide range of doping levels. Research into new contacting schemes for these materials has focused on addressing limitations of the conventional Au-alloys in thermal stability, propensity for spiking, poor edge definition, and new approaches for a non-alloyed contact. The alternative contacts to GaAs and InP include alloys with higher temperature stability, contacts based on solid phase regrowth, and contacts that react with the substrate to form lower bandgap semiconductors alloys at the interface. A new area of contact studies is for the wide bandgap group III-Nitride materials. At present, low resistivity ohmic contact to p-type GaN has not been obtained primarily due to the large acceptor ionization energy and the resultant difficulty in achieving high free hole concentrations at room temperature. For n-type GaN, however, significant progress has been reported with reactive Ti-based metalization schemes or the use of graded InGaN layers. The present status of these approaches will be reviewed.

  11. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  12. Optimization of the silicon subcell for III-V on silicon multijunction solar cells: Key differences with conventional silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tabarés, Elisa; Martín, Diego; García, Iván; Lelièvre, Jean François; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    Dual-junction solar cells formed by a GaAsP or GaInP top cell and a silicon (Si) bottom cell seem to be attractive candidates to materialize the long sought-for integration of III-V materials on Si for photovoltaic (PV) applications. Such integration would offer a cost breakthrough for PV technology, unifying the low cost of Si and the efficiency potential of III-V multijunction solar cells. The optimization of the Si solar cells properties in flat-plate PV technology is well-known; nevertheless, it has been proven that the behavior of Si substrates is different when processed in an MOVPE reactor In this study, we analyze several factors influencing the bottom subcell performance, namely, 1) the emitter formation as a result of phosphorus diffusion; 2) the passivation quality provided by the GaP nucleation layer; and 3) the process impact on the bottom subcell PV properties.

  13. Vertical-coupled high-efficiency tunable III-V- CMOS SOI hybrid external-cavity laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiyun; Djordjevic, Stevan S; Cunningham, John E; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Yao, Jin; Li, Guoliang; Thacker, Hiren; Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Raj, Kannan; Zheng, Xuezhe; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2013-12-30

    We demonstrate a hybrid III-V/SOI laser by vertically coupling a III-V RSOA chip with a SOI-CMOS chip containing a tunable wavelength selective reflector. We report a waveguide-coupled wall-plug-efficiency of 5.5% and output power of 10 mW. A silicon resistor-based microheater was integrated to thermally tune a ring resonator for precise lasing wavelength control. A high tuning efficiency of 2.2 nm/mW over a range of 18 nm was achieved by locally removing the SOI handler substrate. C-band single mode lasing was confirmed with a side mode suppression ratio of 35 dB. This grating coupler based vertical integration approach can be scaled up in two dimensions for efficient multi-wavelength sources in silicon photonics. PMID:24514836

  14. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    SciTech Connect

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-07

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  15. Study of ultrathin SiO2 Interlayer wafer bonding for heterogeneous III-V/Si photonic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chee-Wei; Liang, Ying Shun; Keh-Ting Ng, Doris; Yang, Yi; Hnin, Yu Yu Ko; Wang, Qian

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated low-temperature bonding of III-V InP-based compound semiconductor on silicon via nano-thin SiO2 interlayer down to thickness of 20 nm, with ultra-smooth surface for heterogeneous photonic integration. The bonding is achieved with chemical cleaning of the sample surface, followed by oxygen plasma surface activation, which gives high quality bonding between the two different materials. Detail analyses on the bonded samples are carried out. From the photoluminescence and the x-ray diffraction measurements, in which no significant peak shift and peak broadening are observed, we conclude that the crystalline quality of the bonded thin film is preserved. The cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that bonded III-V-SiO2-Si interface has no observable defect. These results reinforce that the proposed bonding offers a promising technology for realizing versatile heterogeneous photonics integration.

  16. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-28

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  17. Recent advances on antimony(III/V) compounds with potential activity against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hadjikakou, S K; Ozturk, I I; Banti, C N; Kourkoumelis, N; Hadjiliadis, N

    2015-12-01

    Antimony one of the heavier pnictogens, has been in medical use against microbes and parasites as well. Antimony-based drugs have been prescribed against leishmaniasis since the parasitic transmission of the tropical disease was understood in the beginning of the 20th century. The activity of arsenic against visceral leishmaniasis led to the synthesis of an array of arsenic-containing parasitic agents, among them the less toxic pentavalent antimonials: Stibosan, Neostibosan, and Ureastibamine. Other antimony drugs followed: sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) and melglumine antimoniate (Glucantim or Glucantime); both continue to be in use today despite their toxic side effects and increasing loss in potency due to the growing resistance of the parasite against antimony. Antimony compounds and their therapeutic potentials are under consideration from many research groups, while a number of early reviews recording advances of antimony biomedical applications are also available. However, there are only few reports on the screening for antitumor potential of antimony compounds. This review focuses upon results obtained on the anti-proliferative activity of antimony compounds in the past years. This survey shows that antimony(III/V) complexes containing various types of ligands such as thiones, thiosemicarbazones, dithiocarbamates, carboxylic acids, or ketones, nitrogen donor ligands, exhibit selectivity against a variety of cancer cells. The role of the ligand type of the complex is elucidated within this review. The complexes and their biological activity are already reported elsewhere. However quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling studies have been carried out and they are reported for the first time here. PMID:26092367

  18. A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V photovoltaics

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V photovoltaics Rehan Kapadia1,2 *, Zhibin-films on metal foils as a promising platform for large-area terrestrial PVs overcoming the above obstacles. We- oration or electroplating, followed by e-beam evaporation of a 50 nm silicon oxide (SiOx) cap. The Mo/In/SiOx

  19. Nanometer-Scale Compositional Structure in III-V Semiconductor Heterostructures Characterized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Bi, W.G.; Biefeld, R.M.; Tu, C.W.; Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.

    1998-11-10

    Nanometer-scale compositional structure in InAsxP1.InNYAsxPl.x-Y/InP, grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy and in InAsl-xPJkAsl$b#InAs heterostructures heterostructures grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition has been characterized using cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy. InAsxP1-x alloy layers are found to contain As-rich and P-rich clusters with boundaries formed preferentially within (T 11) and (111) crystal planes. Similar compositional structure is observed within InNYAsxP1-x-Y alloy layers. Imaging of InAsl-xp@Asl#bY superlattices reveals nanometer-scale clustering within both the hAsI-.p and InAsl$bY alloy layers, with preferential alignment of compositional features in the direction. Instances are observed of compositional structure correlated across a heterojunction interface, with regions whose composition corresponds to a smaller unstrained lattice, constant relative to the surrounding alloy material appearing to propagate across the interface.

  20. Generalized valence-force-field model of (Ga,In)(N,P) ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Koushik; Franceschetti, Alberto; Lany, Stephan

    2008-08-01

    We present a generalized valence-force-field (VFF) model for the ternary III V alloys ( III=Ga , In and V=N , P) to predict the formation energies and atomic structures of ordered and disordered alloy configurations. For each alloy (GaInN, GaInP, GaNP, and InNP) the VFF parameters, which include bond-angle/bond-length interactions, are fitted to the first-principles calculated formation energies of 30 ternary structures. Compared to standard approaches where the VFF parameters are transferred from the individual binary III V compounds, our generalized VFF approach predicts alloy formation energies and atomic structures with considerably improved accuracy. Using this generalized approach and random realizations in large supercells (4096 atoms), we determine the temperature-composition phase diagram, i.e., the binodal and spinodal decomposition curves, of the (Ga, In) (N, P) ternary alloys.

  1. Generalized Valence-Force-Field Model of (Ga,In)(N,P) Ternary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, K.; Franceschetti, A.; Lany, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a generalized valence-force-field (VFF) model for the ternary III-V alloys (III=Ga, In and V=N, P) to predict the formation energies and atomic structures of ordered and disordered alloy configurations. For each alloy (GaInN, GaInP, GaNP, and InNP) the VFF parameters, which include bond-angle/bond-length interactions, are fitted to the first-principles calculated formation energies of 30 ternary structures. Compared to standard approaches where the VFF parameters are transferred from the individual binary III-V compounds, our generalized VFF approach predicts alloy formation energies and atomic structures with considerably improved accuracy. Using this generalized approach and random realizations in large supercells (4096 atoms), we determine the temperature-composition phase diagram, i.e., the binodal and spinodal decomposition curves, of the (Ga, In) (N, P) ternary alloys.

  2. III-V nitride micro- and nano-scale cantilevers for multimodal sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quddus, Ehtesham B.

    Recent research trends in chemical and biological sensing have been geared toward developing molecular sensor devices that are fast, label free, miniaturized and portable. The performance of these devices can be dramatically improved by utilizing multimodal detection techniques, new materials and micro-/nanofabrication technologies. This is especially true for micro-/nanoscale cantilever sensors, which undergo changes in mechanical or electrical properties upon the specific binding of molecules. To develop the sensor devices with the above attributes, we utilized III-V nitride materials: InN nanowires for realizing nanoscale cantilevers and AlGaN/GaN heterostuctures with or without embedded HFETs, for developing microcantilevers. There are mainly two approaches of fabricating these sensor devices: bottom-up approach for nanocantilevers, and top-down approach for microcantilevers. InN NWs, which exhibit interesting properties such as high carrier density, superior electron mobility, strong surface charge accumulation, and chemical inertness, were synthesized using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique by Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism. The synthesis process was optimized to obtain growth direction modulation and enhanced performance of the devices, largely avoiding the complexity of nanofabrication/etching typically involved in the realization of nanoscale sensors. With dimensions much smaller than conventional cantilevers, the nanocantilevers are expected to have dramatically improved physical, chemical, and biological sensitivity for sensor applications. The piezoresistive and piezoelectric properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, their wide bandgap, and chemical inertness make the microcantilevers very attractive for developing highly sensitive sensors suitable for harsh environment applications. The large variation in 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface with mechanical strain makes these microcantilevers much more sensitive than conventional Si based piezoresistive microcantilevers. A process was developed to fabricate free standing AlGaN/GaN microcantilevers on Si(111) substrate using various processing steps involving photolithography, GaN and through wafer Si etching, and dielectric and metal deposition. The detection performance of these cantilevers is largely improved by the utilization of a multimodal detection technique.

  3. Electrical and optical characterization of Group III-V heterostructures with emphasis on terahertz devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerasekara, Aruna B.

    Electrical and optical characterizations of heterostructures and thin films based on group III-V compound semiconductors are presented. Optical properties of GaMnN thin films grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on GaN/Sapphire templates were investigated using IR reflection spectroscopy. Experimental reflection spectra were fitted using a non-linear fitting algorithm, and the high frequency dielectric constant (epsiloninfinity), optical phonon frequencies of E1TO and E1 LO, and their oscillator strengths (S) and broadening constants (Gamma) were obtained for GaMnN thin films with different Mn fraction. The high frequency dielectric constant (epsiloninfinity) of InN thin films grown by the high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method was also investigated by IR reflection spectroscopy and the average was found to vary between 7.0--8.6. The mobility of free carriers in InN thin films was calculated using the damping constant of the plasma oscillator. The terahertz detection capability of n-type GaAs/AlGaAs Heterojunction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) structures was demonstrated. A threshold frequency (fc) of 3.2 THz (93 mum) with a peak responsivity of 6.5 A/W at 7.1 THz was obtained using a 0.7 mum thick 1x1018 cm-3 n-type doped GaAs emitter layer and a 1 mum thick undoped Al0.04Ga0.96As barrier layer. Using n-type doped GaAs emitter layers, the possibility of obtaining small workfunctions (Delta) required for terahertz detectors has been successfully demonstrated. In addition, the possibility of using GaN (GaMnN) and InN materials for terahertz detection was investigated and a possible GaN base terahertz detector design is presented. The non-linear behavior of the Inter Pulse Time Intervals (IPTI) of neuron-like electric pulses triggered externally in a GaAs/InGaAs Multi Quantum Well (MQW) structure at low temperature (˜ 10 K) was investigated. It was found that a grouping behavior of IPTIs exists at slow triggering pulse rates. Furthermore, the calculated correlation dimension reveals that the dimensionality of the system is higher than the average dimension found in most of the natural systems. Finally, an investigation of terahertz radiation effect on biological system is reported. Index words. Infrared, Detectors, Terahertz, Optical Phonon, Plasmon, Heterojunction, Homojunction, Free carrier absorption, Quantum efficiency, Responsivity, Dark current, Arrhenius, Absorption coefficient, Dielectric function, High frequency dielectric constant, Plasma frequency, Neuron-like pulses, Negative differential resistance, Correlation dimension, Embedding dimension, Return maps, Bifurcation, and Power spectrum.

  4. Optimized III-V Multijunction Concentrator Solar Cells on Patterned Si and Ge Substrates: Final Technical Report, 15 September 2004--30 September 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ringel, S. A.

    2008-11-01

    Goal is to demo realistic path to III-V multijunction concentrator efficiencies > 40% by substrate-engineering combining compositional grading with patterned epitaxy for small-area cells for high concentration.

  5. Silicon, germanium, and III-V-based tunneling devices for low-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua T.

    While the scaling of transistor dimensions has kept pace with Moore's Law, the voltages applied to these devices have not scaled in tandem, giving rise to ever-increasing power/heating challenges in state-of-the-art integrated circuits. A primary reason for this scaling mismatch is due to the thermal limit---the 60 mV minimum required at room temperature to change the current through the device by one order of magnitude. This voltage scaling limitation is inherent in devices that rely on the mechanism of thermal emission of charge carriers over a gate-controlled barrier to transition between the ON- and OFF-states, such as in the case of conventional CMOS-based technologies. To overcome this voltage scaling barrier, several steep-slope device concepts have been pursued that have experimentally demonstrated sub-60-mV/decade operation since 2004, including the tunneling-field effect transistor (TFET), impact ionization metal-oxide-semiconductor (IMOS), suspended-gate FET (SG-FET), and ferroelectric FET (Fe-FET). These reports have excited strong efforts within the semiconductor research community toward the realization of a low-power device that will support continued scaling efforts, while alleviating the heating issues prevalent in modern computer chips. Literature is replete with claims of sub-60-mV/decade operation, but often with neglect to other voltage scaling factors that offset this result. Ideally, a low-power device should be able to attain sub-60-mV/decade inverse subthreshold slopes (S) employing low supply and gate voltages with a foreseeable path toward integration. This dissertation describes the experimental development and realization of CMOS-compatible processes to enhance tunneling efficiency in Si and Si/Ge nanowire (NW) TFETs for improved average S (S avg) and ON-currents (ION), and a novel, III-V-based tunneling device alternative is also proposed. After reviewing reported efforts on the TFET, IMOS, and SG-FET, the TFET is highlighted as the most promising low-power device candidate, owing to its potential to operate within small supply and gate voltage windows. In a critical analysis of the TFET, the advantages of 1-D systems, such as NWs, that can potentially access the so-called quantum capacitance limit (QCL) are discussed, and the remaining challenges for TFETs, such as source/channel doping abruptness, and material tradeoffs are considered. To this end, substantial performance improvements, as measured by Savg and ION, are experimentally realized in top-down fabricated Si NW-TFET arrays by systematically varying the annealing process used to enhance doping abruptness at the source/channel junction---a critical feature for maximizing tunneling efficiency. A combination of excimer laser annealing (ELA) and a low-temperature rapid thermal anneal (LT-RTA) are identified as an optimum choice, resulting in a 36% decrease in Savg as well as ˜500% improvement in ION over the conventional RTA approach. Extrapolation of these results with simulation shows that sub-60-mV/decade operation is possible on a Si-based platform for aggressively scaled, yet realistic, NW-TFET devices. Back-gated NW-FET measurements are also presented to assess the material quality of Ge/Si core/shell NW heterostructures with an n+-doped shell, and these NWs are found to be suitable building blocks for the fabrication of more efficient TFET systems, owing to the very abrupt doping profile at the shell/core (source/channel) interface and smaller bandgap/effective mass of the Ge channel. Finally, low current levels in conventional TFETs have recently led researchers to re-examine III-V heterostructures, particularly those with a broken-gap band alignment to allow a tunneling probability near unity. Along these lines, a novel tunnel-based alternative is presented---the broken-gap tunnel MOS---that enables a constant S < 60 mV/decade. The proposed device permits the use of 2-D device architectures without degradation of S given the source-controlled operation mechanism, while simultaneously avoiding undesirable nonlinearities in

  6. Metabolomic and proteomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: Chemical-specific porphyrinurias and proteinurias

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A. . E-mail: bxf9@cdc.gov; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-07

    A pressing need exists to develop and validate molecular biomarkers to assess the early effects of chemical agents, both individually and in mixtures. This is particularly true for new and chemically intensive industries such as the semiconductor industry. Previous studies from this laboratory and others have demonstrated element-specific alterations of the heme biosynthetic pathway for the III-V semiconductors gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) with attendant increased urinary excretion of specific heme precursors. These data represent an example of a metabolomic biomarker to assess chemical effects early, before clinical disease develops. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intratracheal or subcutaneous administration of GaAs and InAs particles to hamsters produces the induction of the major stress protein gene families in renal proximal tubule cells. This was monitored by 35-S methionine labeling of gene products followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after exposure to InAs particles. The present studies examined whether these effects were associated with the development of compound-specific proteinuria after 10 or 30 days following subcutaneous injection of GaAs or InAs particles in hamsters. The results of these studies demonstrated the development of GaAs- and InAs-specific alterations in renal tubule cell protein expression patterns that varied at 10 and 30 days. At the 30-day point, cells in hamsters that received InAs particles showed marked attenuation of protein expression, suggesting inhibition of the stress protein response. These changes were associated with GaAs and InAs proteinuria patterns as monitored by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The intensity of the protein excretion patterns increased between the 10- and 30-day points and was most pronounced for animals in the 30-day InAs treatment group. No overt morphologic signs of cell death were seen in renal tubule cells of these animals. Western blot analyses of the urines with antibodies to the 32-, 70-, and 90-kDa stress protein families did not show the presence of these molecules, indicating that these proteins were not excreted in the urine samples. These data suggest that the observed proteinuria patterns were not a result of cell death and that the observed chemical-specific proteinurias were produced before marked cellular toxicity. These findings suggest a hypothesis involving GaAs and InAs interference with stress protein chaperoning of reabsorbed proteins for proteosomic degradation and the probable chaperoning of damaged intracellular proteins from renal proximal tubule cells into the urinary filtrate. Overall, the results of these studies provide further information on the nephrotoxicity of these semiconductor compounds. They also suggest the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with silver staining of urinary protein patterns as a potentially useful proteomic approach to renal damage early in relation to intracellular proteotoxicity in kidney tubule cells.

  7. Ellipsometric study of metal-organic chemically vapor deposited III-V semiconductor structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Sekula-Moise, Patricia A.; Sieg, Robert M.; Drotos, Mark N.; Bogner, Nancy A.

    1992-01-01

    An ellipsometric study of MOCVD-grown layers of AlGaAs and InGaAs in thick films and strained layer complex structures is presented. It is concluded that the ternary composition of thick nonstrained layers can be accurately determined to within experimental errors using numerical algorithms. In the case of complex structures, thickness of all layers and the alloy composition of nonstrained layers can be determined simultaneously, provided that the correlations between parameters is no higher than 0.9.

  8. Continuous-wave quasi-phase-matched waveguide correlated photon pair source on a III–V chip

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrafi, Peyman Zhu, Eric Y.; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Qian, Li; Holmes, Barry M.; Hutchings, David C.

    2013-12-16

    We report on the demonstration of correlated photon pair generation in a quasi-phase-matched superlattice GaAs/AlGaAs waveguide using a continuous-wave pump. Our photon pair source has a low noise level and achieves a high coincidence-to-accidental ratio greater than 100, which is the highest value reported in III–V chips so far. This correlated photon pair source has the potential to be monolithically integrated with on-chip pump laser sources fabricated on the same superlattice wafer structure, enabling direct correlated/entangled photon pair production from a compact electrically powered chip.

  9. Towards large size substrates for III-V co-integration made by direct wafer bonding on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Daix, N. Uccelli, E.; Czornomaz, L.; Caimi, D.; Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Siegwart, H.; Marchiori, C.; Fompeyrine, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Shiu, K.-T.; Cheng, C.-W.; Krishnan, M.; Lofaro, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Sadana, D.

    2014-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of 200 mm InGaAs-on-insulator (InGaAs-o-I) fabricated by the direct wafer bonding technique with a donor wafer made of III-V heteroepitaxial structure grown on 200 mm silicon wafer. The measured threading dislocation density of the In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As (InGaAs) active layer is equal to 3.5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2}, and it does not degrade after the bonding and the layer transfer steps. The surface roughness of the InGaAs layer can be improved by chemical-mechanical-polishing step, reaching values as low as 0.4 nm root-mean-square. The electron Hall mobility in 450 nm thick InGaAs-o-I layer reaches values of up to 6000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and working pseudo-MOS transistors are demonstrated with an extracted electron mobility in the range of 2000–3000 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Finally, the fabrication of an InGaAs-o-I substrate with the active layer as thin as 90 nm is achieved with a Buried Oxide of 50 nm. These results open the way to very large scale production of III-V-o-I advanced substrates for future CMOS technology nodes.

  10. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda Sarkar, Debasree

    2014-04-01

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k?) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg1-xCdxTe, and In1-xGaxAsyP1-y lattice matched to InP, as example of III-V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  11. A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Rehan; Yu, Zhibin; Wang, Hsin-Hua H.; Zheng, Maxwell; Battaglia, Corsin; Hettick, Mark; Kiriya, Daisuke; Takei, Kuniharu; Lobaccaro, Peter; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Ager, Joel W.; Maboudian, Roya; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2013-01-01

    III-V photovoltaics (PVs) have demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiencies for both single- and multi-junction cells. However, expensive epitaxial growth substrates, low precursor utilization rates, long growth times, and large equipment investments restrict applications to concentrated and space photovoltaics (PVs). Here, we demonstrate the first vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of high-quality III-V thin-films on metal foils as a promising platform for large-area terrestrial PVs overcoming the above obstacles. We demonstrate 1–3??m thick InP thin-films on Mo foils with ultra-large grain size up to 100??m, which is ~100 times larger than those obtained by conventional growth processes. The films exhibit electron mobilities as high as 500?cm2/V-s and minority carrier lifetimes as long as 2.5?ns. Furthermore, under 1-sun equivalent illumination, photoluminescence efficiency measurements indicate that an open circuit voltage of up to 930?mV can be achieved, only 40?mV lower than measured on a single crystal reference wafer. PMID:23881474

  12. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure. [GaAs:Si; InP:S

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si[sub Ga] shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  13. Monte Carlo model for the analysis and development of III-V Tunnel-FETs and Impact Ionization-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbo, V.; Mateos, J.; González, T.; Lechaux, Y.; Wichmann, N.; Bollaert, S.; Vasallo, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    Impact-ionization metal-oxide-semiconductor FETs (I-MOSFETs) are in competition with tunnel FETs (TFETs) in order to achieve the best behaviour for low power logic circuits. Concretely, III-V I-MOSFETs are being explored as promising devices due to the proper reliability, since the impact ionization events happen away from the gate oxide, and the high cutoff frequency, due to high electron mobility. To facilitate the design process from the physical point of view, a Monte Carlo (MC) model which includes both impact ionization and band-to-band tunnel is presented. Two ungated InGaAs and InAlAs/InGaAs 100 nm PIN diodes have been simulated. In both devices, the tunnel processes are more frequent than impact ionizations, so that they are found to be appropriate for TFET structures and not for I- MOSFETs. According to our simulations, other narrow bandgap candidates for the III-V heterostructure, such as InAs or GaSb, and/or PININ structures must be considered for a correct I-MOSFET design.

  14. High-coherence semiconductor lasers based on integral high-Q resonators in hybrid Si/III-V platforms

    PubMed Central

    Santis, Christos Theodoros; Steger, Scott T.; Vilenchik, Yaakov; Vasilyev, Arseny; Yariv, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    The semiconductor laser (SCL) is the principal light source powering the worldwide optical fiber network. The ever-increasing demand for data is causing the network to migrate to phase-coherent modulation formats, which place strict requirements on the temporal coherence of the light source that no longer can be met by current SCLs. This failure can be traced directly to the canonical laser design, in which photons are both generated and stored in the same, optically lossy, III-V material. This leads to an excessive and large amount of noisy spontaneous emission commingling with the laser mode, thereby degrading its coherence. High losses also decrease the amount of stored optical energy in the laser cavity, magnifying the effect of each individual spontaneous emission event on the phase of the laser field. Here, we propose a new design paradigm for the SCL. The keys to this paradigm are the deliberate removal of stored optical energy from the lossy III-V material by concentrating it in a passive, low-loss material and the incorporation of a very high-Q resonator as an integral (i.e., not externally coupled) part of the laser cavity. We demonstrate an SCL with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1.55 ?m, achieved using a single-mode silicon resonator with Q of 106. PMID:24516134

  15. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup ?}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1?y} lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  16. III-V-N materials for super high-efficiency multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Bouzazi, Boussairi; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Kazuma; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2012-10-06

    We have been studying concentrator multi-junction solar cells under Japanese Innovative Photovoltaic R and D program since FY2008. InGaAsN is one of appropriate materials for 4-or 5-junction solar cell configuration because this material can be lattice-matched to GaAs and Ge substrates. However, present InGaAsN single-junction solar cells have been inefficient because of low minority-carrier lifetime due to N-related recombination centers and low carrier mobility due to alloy scattering and non-homogeneity of N. This paper presents our major results in the understanding of majority and minority carrier traps in GaAsN grown by chemical beam epitaxy and their relationships with the poor electrical properties of the materials.

  17. Material growth and characterization directed toward improving III-V heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanakos, E. K.; Alexander, W. E.; Collis, W.; Abul-Fadl, A.

    1979-01-01

    In addition to the existing materials growth laboratory, the photolithographic facility and the device testing facility were completed. The majority of equipment for data acquisition, solar cell testing, materials growth and device characterization were received and are being put into operation. In the research part of the program, GaAs and GaA1As layers were grown reproducibly on GaAs substrates. These grown layers were characterized as to surface morphology, thickness and thickness uniformity. The liquid phase epitaxial growth process was used to fabricate p-n junctions in Ga(1-x)A1(x)As. Sequential deposition of two alloy layers was accomplished and detailed analysis of the effect of substrate quality and dopant on the GaA1As layer quality is presented. Finally, solar cell structures were formed by growing a thin p-GaA1As layer upon an epitaxial n-GaA1As layer. The energy gap corresponding to the long wavelength cutoff of the spectral response characteristic was 1.51-1.63 eV. Theoretical calculations of the spectral response were matched to the measured response.

  18. High-Throughput Multiple Dies-to-Wafer Bonding Technology and III/V-on-Si Hybrid Lasers for Heterogeneous Integration of Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianshu; Cao, Yulian; Song, Junfeng; Hu, Xiaonan; Cheng, Yungbing; Li, Chengming; Liu, Chongyang; Liow, Tsung-Yang; Yu, Mingbin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Qijie; Lo, Patrick Guo-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Integrated optical light source on silicon is one of the key building blocks for optical interconnect technology. Great research efforts have been devoting worldwide to explore various approaches to integrate optical light source onto the silicon substrate. The achievements so far include the successful demonstration of III/V-on-Si hybrid lasers through III/V-gain material to silicon wafer bonding technology. However, for potential large-scale integration, leveraging on mature silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication technology and infrastructure, more effective bonding scheme with high bonding yield is in great demand considering manufacturing needs. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a high-throughput multiple dies-to-wafer (D2W) bonding technology which is then applied for the demonstration of hybrid silicon lasers. By temporarily bonding III/V dies to a handle silicon wafer for simultaneous batch processing, it is expected to bond unlimited III/V dies to silicon device wafer with high yield. As proof-of-concept, more than 100 III/V dies bonding to 200 mm silicon wafer is demonstrated. The high performance of the bonding interface is examined with various characterization techniques. Repeatable demonstrations of 16-III/V-die bonding to pre-patterned 200 mm silicon wafers have been performed for various hybrid silicon lasers, in which device library including Fabry-Perot (FP) laser, lateral-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) laser with side wall grating, and mode-locked laser (MLL). From these results, the presented multiple D2W bonding technology can be a key enabler towards the large-scale heterogeneous integration of optoelectronic integrated circuits (H-OEIC).

  19. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (Inventor); Staller, Craig O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  20. Monolithic in-based III-V compound semiconductor focal plane array cell with single stage CCD output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (inventor); Krabach, Timothy N. (inventor); Staller, Craig O. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A monolithic semiconductor imager includes an indium-based III-V compound semiconductor monolithic active layer of a first conductivity type, an array of plural focal plane cells on the active layer, each of the focal plane cells including a photogate over a top surface of the active layer, a readout circuit dedicated to the focal plane cell including plural transistors formed monolithically with the monolithic active layer and a single-stage charge coupled device formed monolithically with the active layer between the photogate and the readout circuit for transferring photo-generated charge accumulated beneath the photogate during an integration period to the readout circuit. The photogate includes thin epitaxial semiconductor layer of a second conductivity type overlying the active layer and an aperture electrode overlying a peripheral portion of the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer, the aperture electrode being connectable to a photogate bias voltage.

  1. Genetic Algorithm for Innovative Device Designs in High-Efficiency III–V Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Schubert, Martin F.; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E. Fred; Crawford, Mary H.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Shim, Hyunwook; Sone, Cheolsoo

    2012-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes are becoming the next-generation light source because of their prominent benefits in energy efficiency, versatility, and benign environmental impact. However, because of the unique polarization effects in III–V nitrides and the high complexity of light-emitting diodes, further breakthroughs towards truly optimized devices are required. Here we introduce the concept of artificial evolution into the device optimization process. Reproduction and selection are accomplished by means of an advanced genetic algorithm and device simulator, respectively. We demonstrate that this approach can lead to new device structures that go beyond conventional approaches. The innovative designs originating from the genetic algorithm and the demonstration of the predicted results by implementing structures suggested by the algorithm establish a new avenue for complex semiconductor device design and optimization.

  2. III-V semiconductor quantum well lasers and related opto-electronic devices on silicon. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Holonyak, N.; Hsieh, K.C.; Stillman, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    For some time interests have been aroused by the III-V quantum well heterostructures (QWHs) and superlattices (SLs) and, in addition to fundamental effects, the special opportunities QWHs and SLs afford in making possible improved forms of lasers, not to mention other devices and optoelectronic systems. In this report, studies have been made of: (1) Al(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs lasers on Si, (2) impurity induced layer disordering (which is an especially advantageous phenomenon in QWHs and SLs), (3) phonon-assisted laser operation and its unambiguous identification by control of the cavity Q of QWH samples, (4) the use of cavity Q to fill the recombination spectrum of QWHs, and (5) hydrolization and reliability of Al(x)Ga(1-x)As-GaAs QWHs and SLs, and (6) various other laser problems associated with higher gap crystals such as In(y)(Al(x)Ga(1-x)(1-y)P).

  3. Performance Evaluation of III-V Hetero/Homojunction Esaki Tunnel Diodes on Si and Lattice Matched Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul M.

    Understanding of quantum tunneling phenomenon in semiconductor systems is increasingly important as CMOS replacement technologies are investigated. This work studies a variety of heterojunction materials and types to increase tunnel currents to CMOS competitive levels and to understand how integration onto Si substrates affects performance. Esaki tunnel diodes were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on Si substrates via a graded buffer and control Esaki tunnel diodes grown on lattice matched substrates for this work. Peak current density for each diode is extracted and benchmarked to build an empirical data set for predicting diode performance. Additionally, statistics are used as tool to show peak to valley ratio for the III-V on Si sample and the control perform similarly below a threshold area. This work has applications beyond logic, as multijunction solar cell, heterojunction bipolar transistor, and light emitting diode designs all benefit from better tunnel contact design.

  4. Au-seeded growth of vertical and in-plane III-V nanowires on graphite substrates.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Jesper; Kriegner, Dominik; Stangl, Julian; Borgström, Magnus T

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is promising as a transparent, flexible, and possibly cost-effective substrate for nanowire-based devices. We have investigated Au-seeded III-V nanowire growth with graphite as a model substrate. The highest yield of undoped vertical nanowires was found for InAs, but we also observed vertical nanowires for the InP, GaP, and GaAs materials. The yield of vertical nanowires for GaP and GaAs was strongly improved by supplying the p-dopant DEZn before nanowire growth but not by supplying H2S or HCl. In-plane GaAs and GaP nanowire growth exhibited an unexpected behavior, where the seed particles seemingly reflected on the side facets of other nanowires. These results pave the way for vertical and in-plane hybrid graphene- nanowire devices. PMID:24592968

  5. Molecular beam epitaxy engineered III-V semiconductor structures for low-power optically addressed spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Device approaches are investigated for optically addressed SLMs based on molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) engineered III-V materials and structures. Strong photooptic effects can be achieved in periodically delta-doped multiple-quantum-well structures, but are still insufficient for high-contrast modulation with only single- or double-pass absorption through active layers of practical thickness. The asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity approach is employed to permit extinction of light due to interference of light reflected from the front and back surfaces of the cavity. This approach is realized with an all-MBE-grown structure consisting of GaAs/AlAs quarter-wave stack reflector grown over the GaAs substrate as the high reflectance mirror and the GaAs surface as the low reflectance mirror. High-contrast modulation is achieved using a low-power InGaAs/GaAs quantum well laser for the control signal.

  6. Comprehensive comparison and experimental validation of band-structure calculation methods in III-V semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerveas, George; Caruso, Enrico; Baccarani, Giorgio; Czornomaz, Lukas; Daix, Nicolas; Esseni, David; Gnani, Elena; Gnudi, Antonio; Grassi, Roberto; Luisier, Mathieu; Markussen, Troels; Osgnach, Patrik; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Schenk, Andreas; Selmi, Luca; Sousa, Marilyne; Stokbro, Kurt; Visciarelli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present and thoroughly compare band-structures computed with density functional theory, tight-binding, k · p and non-parabolic effective mass models. Parameter sets for the non-parabolic ?, the L and X valleys and intervalley bandgaps are extracted for bulk InAs, GaAs and InGaAs. We then consider quantum-wells with thickness ranging from 3 nm to 10 nm and the bandgap dependence on film thickness is compared with experiments for In0.53Ga0.47 As quantum-wells. The impact of the band-structure on the drain current of nanoscale MOSFETs is simulated with ballistic transport models, the results provide a rigorous assessment of III-V semiconductor band structure calculation methods and calibrated band parameters for device simulations.

  7. Au-Seeded Growth of Vertical and in-Plane III–V Nanowires on Graphite Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is promising as a transparent, flexible, and possibly cost-effective substrate for nanowire-based devices. We have investigated Au-seeded III–V nanowire growth with graphite as a model substrate. The highest yield of undoped vertical nanowires was found for InAs, but we also observed vertical nanowires for the InP, GaP, and GaAs materials. The yield of vertical nanowires for GaP and GaAs was strongly improved by supplying the p-dopant DEZn before nanowire growth but not by supplying H2S or HCl. In-plane GaAs and GaP nanowire growth exhibited an unexpected behavior, where the seed particles seemingly reflected on the side facets of other nanowires. These results pave the way for vertical and in-plane hybrid graphene- nanowire devices. PMID:24592968

  8. Nucleation, Growth, and Strain Relaxation of Lattice-Mismatched III-V Semiconductor Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welser, R. E.; Guido, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the early stages of evolution of highly strained 2-D InAs layers and 3-D InAs islands grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on (100) and (111) B GaAs substrates. The InAs epilayer / GaAs substrate combination has been chosen because the lattice-mismatch is severe (approx. 7.20%), yet these materials are otherwise very similar. By examining InAs-on-GaAs composites Instead of the more common In(x)Ga(1-x)As alloy, we remove an additional degree of freedom (x) and thereby simplify data interpretation. A matrix of experiments is described in which the MOCVD growth parameters -- susceptor temperature, TMIn flux, and AsH3 flux -- have been varied over a wide range. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis have been employed to observe the thin film surface morphology. In the case of 3-D growth, we have extracted activation energies and power-dependent exponents that characterize the nucleation process. As a consequence, optimized growth conditions have been identified for depositing approx. 250 A thick (100) and (111)B oriented InAs layers with relatively smooth surfaces. Together with preliminary data on the strain relaxation of these layers, the above results on the evolution of thin InAs films indicate that the (111)B orientation is particularly promising for yielding lattice-mismatched films that are fully relaxed with only misfit dislocations at the epilayer / substrate interface.

  9. Removal of Arsenic (III, V) from aqueous solution by nanoscale zero-valent iron stabilized with starch and carboxymethyl cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, synthetic nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) stabilized with two polymers, Starch and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were examined and compared for their ability in removing As (III) and As (V) from aqueous solutions as the most promising iron nanoparticles form for arsenic removal. Batch operations were conducted with different process parameters such as contact time, nanoparticles concentration, initial arsenic concentration and pH. Results revealed that starch stabilized particles (S-nZVI) presented an outstanding ability to remove both arsenate and arsenite and displayed?~?36.5% greater removal for As (V) and 30% for As (III) in comparison with CMC-stabilized nanoparticles (C-nZVI). However, from the particle stabilization viewpoint, there is a clear trade off to choosing the best stabilized nanoparticles form. Removal efficiency was enhanced with increasing the contact time and iron loading but reduced with increasing initial As (III, V) concentrations and pH. Almost complete removal of arsenic (up to 500 ?g/L) was achieved in just 5 min when the S-nZVI mass concentration was 0.3 g/L and initial solution pH of 7?±?0.1. The maximum removal efficiency of both arsenic species was obtained at pH?=?5?±?0.1 and starched nanoparticles was effective in slightly acidic and natural pH values. The adsorption kinetics fitted well with pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 14 mg/g for arsenic (V), and 12.2 mg/g for arsenic (III). It could be concluded that starch stabilized Fe0 nanoparticles showed remarkable potential for As (III, V) removal from aqueous solution e.g. contaminated water. PMID:24860660

  10. Impact of a Metal-Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy Environment on Silicon Substrates for III-V-on-Si Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tabarés, Elisa; García, Iván; Lelièvre, Jean-Francois; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    With the final goal of integrating III-V materials to silicon for tandem solar cells, the influence of the metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) environment on the minority carrier properties of silicon wafers has been evaluated. These properties will essentially determine the photovoltaic performance of the bottom cell in a III-V-on-Si tandem solar cell device. A comparison of the base minority carrier lifetimes obtained for different thermal processes carried out in a MOVPE reactor on Czochralski silicon wafers has been carried out. The effect of the formation of the emitter by phosphorus diffusion has also been evaluated.

  11. Characteristics of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Source for the Production of Active Nitrogen Species in III-V Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A simple analysis is provided to determine the characteristics of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for the generation of active nitrogen species in the molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nitrides. The effects of reactor geometry, pressure, power, and flow rate on the dissociation efficiency and ion flux are presented. Pulsing the input power is proposed to reduce the ion flux.

  12. Towards vertical III-V nanowire devices on silicon Erik P.A.M. Bakkers, Magnus T. Borgstrom, Wim van den Einden, Maarten van Weert, Ethan D. Minot,

    E-print Network

    Towards vertical III-V nanowire devices on silicon Erik P.A.M. Bakkers, Magnus T. Borgstrom, Wim the strain could be accommodated at the nanowire surface. In addition, since per crystallite there will only-V nanowires by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using the vapor- liquid-solid (VLS)2 growth mechanism

  13. Covalent Attachment to GaP(110) - Engineering the Chemical Functionalization of a III-V Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. J.; Ugeda, M. M.; Liu, Wenjun; Yu, Min; Tilley, T. Don; Pérez, Rubén; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Crommie, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    With its 2.3 eV bulk bandgap, relatively high conduction band edge, and low chemical reactivity, the (110) surface of GaP is an excellent candidate for many UV and visible light applications, such as photo-catalysis and light-induced chemical reduction. However, the reconstruction and resulting charge transfer of the surface makes it difficult to covalently attach the required molecules. Indeed, very little work has been done to understand either covalent functionalization or passivation of this surface. Here we report on a Staudinger-type, thermally-driven covalent attachment of perfluorophenyl azide (pfpa) to GaP(110). We have studied the adsorption of pfpa molecules by means of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combination with first principles calculations. We show a progression from a physisorbed state at room temperature to a covalently attached state after exposure to slightly higher temperatures (~ 50°C). The developed approach is expected to be valid for various other functional groups attached to the azide, as well as other III-V semiconductors.

  14. III-V on silicon: Observation of gallium phosphide anti-phase disorder by low-energy electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döscher, Henning; Borkenhagen, Benjamin; Lilienkamp, Gerhard; Daum, Winfried; Hannappel, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    The formation of anti-phase disorder is a major obstacle in the heteroepitaxy of III-V semiconductors on silicon. For an investigation of the anti-phase domain (APD) structure of GaP/Si(100) samples on mesoscopic length scales, we applied dark-field imaging in a low-energy electron microscope (LEEM) to thin GaP films grown on Si(100) substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). A contamination-free transfer of the samples from the MOVPE ambient to the ultra-high vacuum chamber of the microscope ensured that the atomically well-ordered, P-rich (2 × 2)/c(4 × 2) reconstruction of the surface was preserved. Mutually perpendicular oriented domains of the characteristic GaP(100) reconstruction identify the APDs in the GaP film at the surface and enabled us to achieve high contrast LEEM images. Striped patterns of APDs reflect the regular terrasse structure of the two-domain Si(100)(2 × 1) substrate far away from defects. APDs in the proximity of the defects have larger lateral extensions and are arranged in target pattern-like structures around the defects. In contrast to transmission electron microscopy, which was also applied in a specific dark-field mode for comparison, the characterization of anti-phase disorder by LEEM is non-destructive, does not require elaborate sample preparation, and addresses extended length scales.

  15. Study of Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) semiconductors III-V hyperstructures with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laserna, J. J.; Téllez Lozano, H.; Vadillo, José M.; Padilla, D.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most promising technologies in high efficiency solar cells is based on quaternary structures grown by epitaxial techniques as Metal Organic Chemical Vapour deposition (MOCVD). The semiconductors III-V structures are elaborated under tailored parameters, allowing the use of a broader area of the solar spectrum. Analytical techniques capable of providing accurate and precise information in cross sections about the composition and thickness of the layers are demanded. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) has been used for characterization of these structures due to its high depth resolution and sensitivity, stability and reproducibility. It was detected the diffusion process of Al and In across the cell interfaces and the layer diffusion over GaAs substrates. The Al diffusion was associated at incorrect incorporation of elements during growth process and the layer diffusion was associated at changes of manufacturing parameters. Such studies show the SIMS ability to diagnose of faults during the growth process, detection of impurities and incorrect diffusion of dopants that may affect the layer properties and the structure functionality.

  16. III-V compound semiconductor multi-junction solar cells fabricated by room-temperature wafer-bonding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimochi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Tomomasa; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Tange, Takashi; Nomachi, Ichiro; Ikeda, Masao; Dai, Pan; He, Wei; Ji, Lian; Lu, Shulong; Yang, Hui; Uchida, Shiro

    2015-05-01

    We have developed III-V compound semiconductor multi-junction solar cells by a room-temperature wafer-bonding technique to avoid the formation of dislocations and voids due to lattice mismatch and thermal damage during a conventional high-temperature wafer-bonding process. First, we separately grew an (Al)GaAs top cell on a GaAs substrate and an InGaAs bottom cell on an InP substrate by metal solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Thereafter, we successfully bonded these sub-cells by the room-temperature wafer-bonding technique and fabricated (Al)GaAs ? InGaAs wafer-bonded solar cells. To the best of our knowledge, the obtained GaAs ? InGaAs and AlGaAs ? InGaAs wafer-bonded solar cells exhibited the lowest electrical and optical losses ever reported. The AlGaAs ? InGaAs solar cells reached the maximum efficiency of 27.7% at 120 suns. These results suggest that the room-temperature wafer-bonding technique has high potential for achieving higher conversion efficiencies.

  17. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134?meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121?meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates.

  18. Predicted Growth of Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Thin Films of III-V Compounds on Si(111) Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Liang-Zi; Crisostomo, Christian P.; Yeh, Chun-Chen; Lai, Shu-Ming; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out systematic first-principles electronic structure computations of growth of ultrathin films of compounds of group III (B, Al, In, Ga, and Tl) with group V (N, P, As, Sb, and Bi) elements on Si(111) substrate, including effects of hydrogenation. Two bilayers (BLs) of AlBi, InBi, GaBi, TlAs, and TlSb are found to support a topological phase over a wide range of strains, in addition to BBi, TlN, and TlBi which can be driven into the nontrivial phase via strain. A large band gap of 134?meV is identified in hydrogenated 2 BL film of InBi. One and two BL films of GaBi and 2 BL films of InBi and TlAs on Si(111) surface possess nontrivial phases with a band gap as large as 121?meV in the case of 2 BL film of GaBi. Persistence of the nontrivial phase upon hydrogenations in the III-V thin films suggests that these films are suitable for growing on various substrates. PMID:26537227

  19. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory

    PubMed Central

    El-Atwani, O.; Norris, S. A.; Ludwig, K.; Gonderman, S.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades. PMID:26670948

  20. Intrinsic theta-frequency membrane potential oscillations in layer III/V perirhinal cortex neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Bilkey, D K; Heinemann, U

    1999-01-01

    The firing of a proportion of neurons in the in vivo perirhinal cortex, a brain region involved in object recognition memory, has recently been shown to be synchronized with hippocampal theta activity. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether neurons located in perirhinal cortex have intrinsic properties that might encourage their participation in theta activity. To these ends, current clamp recordings were made from 98 neurons located in layer III/V of the in vitro rat perirhinal cortex. The intrinsic properties of these neurons were investigated, and a subset of 61 neurons were tested for the presence of membrane potential oscillations at threshold levels of depolarization. Thirty-nine percent of these neurons displayed a theta-frequency membrane potential oscillation (MPO; mean frequency = 8.6 Hz). When depolarized past spike threshold, these neurons tended to fire in clusters, with a within-cluster interspike interval close to the peak to peak interval of the MPOs. Neurons that did not generate MPOs generated nonaccomodating action potential trains with a frequency that spanned the theta range. Biocytin staining indicated that MPOs could be generated in cells with both pyramidal and nonpyramidal morphology. These findings demonstrate that a large proportion of perirhinal neurons exhibit intrinsic properties that could assist in the entrainment and synchronization of theta-frequency oscillations. These properties may enhance the communication of information between the perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex, and hippocampus. PMID:10560921

  1. Proteomic and metabolomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: And prospects for application to nano-materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A. Conner, Elizabeth A.; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-11-15

    There has been an increased appreciation over the last 20 years that chemical agents at very low dose levels can produce biological responses in protein expression patterns (proteomic responses) or alterations in sensitive metabolic pathways (metabolomic responses). Marked improvements in analytical methodologies, such as 2-D gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and surface enhanced laser desorption-time of flight (SELDI-TOF) technologies are capable of identifying specific protein patterns related to exposure to chemicals either alone or as mixtures. The detection and interpretation of early cellular responses to chemical agents have also made great advances through correlative ultrastructural morphometric and biochemical studies. Similarly, advances in analytical technologies such as HPLC, proton NMR, MALDI-TOF, and SELDI-TOF have permitted early detection of changes in a number of essential metabolic pathways following chemical exposures by measurement of alterations in metabolic products from those pathways. Data from these approaches are increasingly regarded as potentially useful biomarkers of chemical exposure and early cellular responses. Validation and establishment of linkages to biological outcomes are needed in order for biomarkers of effect to be established. This short review will cover a number of the above techniques and report data from chemical exposures to two binary III-V semiconductor compounds to illustrate gender differences in proteomic responses. In addition, the use of these methodologies in relation to rapid safety evaluations of nanotechnology products will be discussed. (Supported in part by NIH R01-ES4879)

  2. Ion beam nanopatterning of III-V semiconductors: consistency of experimental and simulation trends within a chemistry-driven theory.

    PubMed

    El-Atwani, O; Norris, S A; Ludwig, K; Gonderman, S; Allain, J P

    2015-01-01

    Several proposed mechanisms and theoretical models exist concerning nanostructure evolution on III-V semiconductors (particularly GaSb) via ion beam irradiation. However, making quantitative contact between experiment on the one hand and model-parameter dependent predictions from different theories on the other is usually difficult. In this study, we take a different approach and provide an experimental investigation with a range of targets (GaSb, GaAs, GaP) and ion species (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) to determine new parametric trends regarding nanostructure evolution. Concurrently, atomistic simulations using binary collision approximation over the same ion/target combinations were performed to determine parametric trends on several quantities related to existing model. A comparison of experimental and numerical trends reveals that the two are broadly consistent under the assumption that instabilities are driven by chemical instability based on phase separation. Furthermore, the atomistic simulations and a survey of material thermodynamic properties suggest that a plausible microscopic mechanism for this process is an ion-enhanced mobility associated with energy deposition by collision cascades. PMID:26670948

  3. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell D. Dupuis

    2004-09-30

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers the first year of the three-year program ''Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications''. The first year activities were focused on the installation, set-up, and use of advanced equipment for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of III-nitride films and the characterization of these materials (Task 1) and the design, fabrication, testing of nitride LEDs (Task 4). As a progress highlight, we obtained improved quality of {approx} 2 {micro}m-thick GaN layers (as measured by the full width at half maximum of the asymmetric (102) X-ray diffraction peak of less than 350 arc-s) and higher p-GaN:Mg doping level (free hole carrier higher than 1E18 cm{sup -3}). Also in this year, we have developed the growth of InGaN/GaN active layers for long-wavelength green light emitting diodes, specifically, for emission at {lambda} {approx} 540nm. The effect of the Column III precursor (for Ga) and the post-growth thermal annealing effect were also studied. Our LED device fabrication process was developed and initially optimized, especially for low-resistance ohmic contacts for p-GaN:Mg layers, and blue-green light emitting diode structures were processed and characterized.

  4. Channel length scaling limits of III-V channel MOSFETs governed by source-drain direct tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koba, Shunsuke; Ohmori, Masaki; Maegawa, Y?suke; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya; Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-04-01

    The difference in the impact of source-drain (SD) direct tunneling in In0.53Ga0.47As and InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) was investigated by a quantum Wigner Monte Carlo simulation. It was found that the subthreshold current increase due to SD direct tunneling is more marked in In0.53Ga0.47As MOSFETs owing to their lower effective mass. In addition, the critical channel length at which a drastic increase in subthreshold current occurs owing to SD direct tunneling was found to be about 20 nm for both In0.53Ga0.47As and InP MOSFETs. Since this value is significantly larger than that for Si MOSFETs, SD direct tunneling can be a major obstacle in downscaling III-V MOSFETs into Lch < 20 nm. Hence, to go beyond the end of the roadmap, we will need a selection of materials to suppress SD direct tunneling.

  5. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in III-V semiconductors grown by molecular-beam epitaxy at very low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shantanu; Whitaker, John F.; Mourou, Gerard A.

    1992-10-01

    Ultrashort carrier lifetimes were experimentally observed in a variety of As-based III-V crystalline semiconductor layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy over a range of very low substrate temperatures. Time-resolved optical absorption, reflection, and photoconductive switching measurements with femtosecond resolution have been used to directly measure the ultrafast carrier dynamics in these materials. GaAs and In(0.52)Al(0.48)As grown at temperatures of 200 and 150 C, respectively, exhibited subpicosecond carrier lifetimes, while lattice-mismatched In(x)Ga(1-x)As on GaAs displayed a 7-ps carrier lifetime in material grown at 200 C. A distinct decrease in carrier lifetime with decreasing growth temperature is documented for all three material systems. For epilayers annealed at high-temperature, resistivities are high, and thus these materials were found to be ideally suited for a number of ultrafast optoelectronic applications. A number of applications are reviewed and discussed.

  6. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.; Miller, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi were studied theoretically. Bond energies, bond lengths, and strain coefficients were calculated for pure AlBi, GaBi, and InBi compounds and their alloys, and predictions were made for the mixing enthalpies, miscibility gaps, and critical metastable-to-stable material transition temperatures. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and the InPBi will be the the most difficult to mix. However, calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe.

  7. Influence of the group V element on the chemical potential and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2014-02-03

    We present a kinetic growth model having a particular emphasis on the influence of the group V element on the preferred crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. The model circumvents the uncertainty in the group V contribution into the overall liquid chemical potential. We show why the nanowire elongation rate is limited by the group III transport, while the crystal structure depends on the effective group V to III imbalance. Within the model, we are able to explain some important structural trends in Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires. In particular, we show that high group V flux always favors wurtzite structure in molecular-beam epitaxy. This tendency could be inverted in vapor deposition techniques due to suppression of the group III diffusion at high group V flux.

  8. Soil attenuation of As(III, V) and Se(IV, VI) seepage potential at ash disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seunghun; Lee, Linda S

    2013-11-01

    Leachate from ash landfills is frequently enriched with As and Se but their off-site movement is not well understood. The attenuation potential of As and Se by soils surrounding selected landfills during leachate seepage was investigated in laboratory column studies using simulated ash leachate. As(III, V) and Se(IV, VI) concentrations as well as pH, flow rate, and a tracer were monitored in influent and effluent for up to 800 pore volumes followed by sequential desorption, extraction, and digestion of column segments. Column breakthrough curves (BTCs) were compared to predictions based on previously measured sorption isotherms. Early As(V) breakthrough and retarded As(III) breakthrough relative to predicted BTCs are indicative of oxidative transformation during seepage. For Se(VI), which exhibits linear sorption and the lowest sorption propensity, measured BTCs were predicted fairly well by equilibrium sorption isotherms, except for the early arrival of Se(IV) in one site soil, which in part, may be due to higher column pH values compared to batch isotherms. Most of the As and Se retained by soils during leaching was found to be strongly sorbed (60-90%) or irreversibly bound (10-40%) with <5% readily desorbable. Redox potential favoring transformation to the more sorptive valence states of As(V) and Se(IV) will invoke additional attenuation beyond equilibrium sorption-based predictions. With the exception of Se(IV) on one site soil, results indicate that attenuation by down-gradient soils of As and Se in ash landfill seepage will often be no less than what is predicted by equilibrium sorption capacity with further attenuation expected due to favorable redox transformation processes, thus mitigating contaminant plumes and associated risks. PMID:24054132

  9. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell D. Dupuis

    2006-01-01

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers the second year of the three-year program ''Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications''. The second year activities were focused on the development of p-type layer that has less/no detrimental thermal annealing effect on green LED active region as well as excellent structural and electrical properties and the development of green LED active region that has superior luminescence quality for {lambda} {approx}540nm green LEDs. We have also studied the thermal annealing effect on blue and green LED active region during the p-type layer growth. As a progress highlight, we obtained green-LED-active-region-friendly In{sub 0.04}Ga{sub 0.96}N:Mg exhibiting low resistivity with higher hole concentration (p=2.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a low resistivity of 0.5 {Omega}-cm) and improved optical quality green LED active region emitting at {lambda} {approx}540nm by electroluminescence. The active region of the green LEDs was found to be much more sensitive to the thermal annealing effect during the p-type layer growth than that of the blue LEDs. We have designed grown, fabricated green LED structures for both 520 nm and 540 nm for the evaluation of second year green LED development.

  10. Novel Approaches to High-Efficiency III-V Nitride Heterostructure Emitters for Next-Generation Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Russell Dupuis

    2007-06-30

    We report research activities and technical progress on the development of high-efficiency long wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 540nm) green light emitting diodes which covers whole years of the three-year program 'Novel approaches to high-efficiency III-V nitride heterostructure emitters for next-generation lighting applications'. The research activities were focused on the development of p-type layer that has less/no detrimental thermal annealing effect on as well as excellent structural and electrical properties and the development of green LED active region that has superior luminescence quality for {lambda}{approx}540nm green LEDs. We have also studied (1) the thermal annealing effect on blue and green LED active region during the p-type layer growth; (2) the effect of growth parameters and structural factors for LED active region on electroluminescence properties; (3) the effect of substrates and orientation on electrical and electro-optical properties of green LEDs. As a progress highlight, we obtained green-LED-active-region-friendly In{sub 0.04}Ga{sub 0.96}N:Mg exhibiting low resistivity with higher hole concentration (p=2.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and a low resistivity of 0.5 {omega}-cm) and improved optical quality green LED active region emitting at {approx}540nm by electroluminescence. The LEDs with p-InGaN layer can act as a quantum-confined Stark effect mitigation layer by reducing strain in the QW. We also have achieved (projected) peak IQE of {approx}25% at {lambda}{approx}530 nm and of {approx}13% at {lambda}{approx}545 nm. Visible LEDs on a non-polar substrate using (11-20) {alpha}-plane bulk substrates. The absence of quantum-confined Stark effect was confirmed but further improvement in electrical and optical properties is required.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Optoelectronics Devices Based on III-V Materials for Infrared Applications by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfi, Amin

    Optoelectronic devices based on III-V materials operating in infrared wavelength range have been attracting intensive research effort due to their applications in optical communication, remote sensing, spectroscopy, and environmental monitoring. The novel semiconductor lasers and photodetectors structures and materials investigated in this thesis cover the spectral range from 1.3µm to 12µm. This spectral region includes near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR) and long wavelength infrared. This thesis demonstrated infrared optoelectronic devices, based on III-V compound semiconductors grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), utilizing various combinations of novel III-V materials, device structures and substrate orientations. This thesis will be presented in two parts; the first part focuses on two types of photodetectors; type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice IR detector and AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb mid-infrared heterojunction p-i-n photodetector. The second part of this thesis focuses on the three types of quantum well (QW) lasers; phosphor-free1.3µm InAlGaAs strain-compensated multiple-quantum-well (SCMQW) lasers on InP (100), InGaAsNSb/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaAs (411)A substrates and mid-infrared InGaAsSb lasers with digitally grown tensile-strained AlGaAsSb barriers. Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice IR detectors with various spectral ranges were grown by MBE. Two superlattice structures with 15 monolayers (ML) of InAs/12ML GaSb and 17ML InAs/7ML GaSb are discussed. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements both InAs/GaSb superlattices exhibit excellent material qualities with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the 0th-order peak about 20arcsec, which is among the narrowest ever reported. The 50% cutoff wavelengths at 80K of the two photodiodes with 15ML InAs/12ML GaSb and 17ML InAs/7ML GaSb superlattices are measured to be 10.2µm and 6.6µm, respectively. Mid-infrared heterojunction p-i-n photodetector, AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb lattice-matched to GaSb grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy using As and Sb valved crackers greatly facilitated the lattice-matching of the quaternary InGaAsSb absorbing layer to the GaSb substrates, as characterized by X-ray diffraction. The resulting device exhibited low dark current and a breakdown voltage of 32V at room temperature. A record Johnson-noise-limited detectivity of 9.0 × 1010 cm Hz½/W was achieved at 290K. The 50% cutoff wavelength of the device was 2.57 µm. Thus, our result has clearly demonstrated the potential of very high-performance lattice-matched InGaAsSb p-i-n photodetectors for mid-infrared wavelengths. For phosphor-free1.3 µm InAlGaAs multiple-quantum-well (MQW) lasers, the substrate temperature has been found to be a critical growth parameter for lattice-matched InAl(Ga)As layers in the laser structures. As shown by X-ray diffraction measurements, in the temperature range of 485-520° C, spontaneously ordered superlattices (SLs) with periods around 7-10 nm were formed in the bulk InAl(Ga)As layers. Based on photoluminescence (PL) measurements, a large band gap reduction of 300 meV and a broadened PL peak were observed for the In0.52 Al0.48As layers with SL, as compared to those without SL. The undesirable, spontaneously-ordered SL can be avoided by using MBE growth temperatures higher than 530 °C. This results in a high laser performance. Threshold-current density as low as 690 A/cm2 and T0 as high as 80 K were achieved for InAlGaAs laser bars emitting at 1310 nm. InGaAsNSb/GaAs QWs on GaAs (411)A exhibited remarkably enhanced photoluminescence efficiency compared with the same structures on conventional GaAs (100) substrates. It was further observed that the optimum growth temperature for (411)A was 30 °C higher than that for (100). To explain this phenomenon, a model based on the self-assembling of local rough surface domains into a unique global smooth surface at the lowest energy state of the system is proposed. Lastly, the digital-growth approach for tensile-strained AlGaAsSb barriers improved the reliability and controllability of MBE growth fo

  12. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22202... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22202... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22202... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and...

  15. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22202... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22202 - Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22202... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Main fans (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, III, V-A, and...

  17. Influence of PH3 exposure on silicon substrate morphology in the MOVPE growth of III-V on silicon multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Tabarés, E.; García, I.; Martín, D.; Rey-Stolle, I.

    2013-11-01

    Dual-junction solar cells formed by a GaAsP or GaInP top cell and a silicon bottom cell seem to be attractive candidates to materialize the long sought-for integration of III-V materials on silicon for photovoltaic applications. One of the first issues to be considered in the development of this structure will be the strategy to create the silicon emitter of the bottom subcell. In this study, we explore the possibility of forming the silicon emitter by phosphorus diffusion (i.e. exposing the wafer to PH3 in a MOVPE reactor) and still obtain good surface morphologies to achieve a successful III-V heteroepitaxy as occurs in conventional III-V on germanium solar cell technology. Consequently, we explore the parameter space (PH3 partial pressure, time and temperature) that is needed to create optimized emitter designs and assess the impact of such treatments on surface morphology using atomic force microscopy. Although a strong degradation of surface morphology caused by prolonged exposure of silicon to PH3 is corroborated, it is also shown that subsequent anneals under H2 can recover silicon surface morphology and minimize its RMS roughness and the presence of pits and spikes.

  18. Increased bismuth concentration in MBE GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} films by oscillating III/V flux ratio during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Adam W. Babcock, Susan E.; Li, Jincheng; Brown, April S.

    2015-05-15

    The authors have examined bismuth concentration profiles in GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy using high angle annular dark field imaging (Z-contrast imaging) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in conjunction with x-ray diffraction. Samples were grown with a gradient in each of the component fluxes, and therefore, the III/V ratio across the substrate. Rotating the sample during growth exposed the growth surface to an oscillating III/V flux ratio. Sinusoidal [Bi] profiles resulted in the growth direction, the wavelength and number of which were consistent with the growth rate and the rate of substrate rotation. However, the magnitude of [Bi] in the observed fluctuations was greater than the maximum [Bi] achieved using the same Bi flux and Ga/As flux ratios in steady-state conditions on a stationary substrate, suggesting that varying the III/V flux ratio during growth promotes the incorporation of Bi in GaAs{sub 1?x}Bi{sub x} films. A proposed qualitative model for how this enhancement might occur hypothesizes a critical role for alternating growth and shrinkage of Ga-Bi predroplet clusters on the surface as the growing material is rotated through Ga-rich and As-rich flux compositions.

  19. Liquid phase epitaxy of binary III–V nanocrystals in thin Si layers triggered by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Wutzler, Rene Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Bregolin, Felipe L.; Hübner, Rene; Voelskow, Matthias; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2015-05-07

    The integration of III–V compound semiconductors in Si is a crucial step towards faster and smaller devices in future technologies. In this work, we investigate the formation process of III–V compound semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, GaAs, GaSb, and InP, by ion implantation and sub-second flash lamp annealing in a SiO{sub 2}/Si/SiO{sub 2} layer stack on Si grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to identify the structural and optical properties of these structures. Raman spectra of the nanocomposites show typical phonon modes of the compound semiconductors. The formation process of the III–V compounds is found to be based on liquid phase epitaxy, and the model is extended to the case of an amorphous matrix without an epitaxial template from a Si substrate. It is shown that the particular segregation and diffusion coefficients of the implanted group-III and group-V ions in molten Si significantly determine the final appearance of the nanostructure and thus their suitability for potential applications.

  20. Liquid phase epitaxy of binary III-V nanocrystals in thin Si layers triggered by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutzler, Rene; Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Bregolin, Felipe L.; Hübner, Rene; Voelskow, Matthias; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The integration of III-V compound semiconductors in Si is a crucial step towards faster and smaller devices in future technologies. In this work, we investigate the formation process of III-V compound semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, GaAs, GaSb, and InP, by ion implantation and sub-second flash lamp annealing in a SiO2/Si/SiO2 layer stack on Si grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to identify the structural and optical properties of these structures. Raman spectra of the nanocomposites show typical phonon modes of the compound semiconductors. The formation process of the III-V compounds is found to be based on liquid phase epitaxy, and the model is extended to the case of an amorphous matrix without an epitaxial template from a Si substrate. It is shown that the particular segregation and diffusion coefficients of the implanted group-III and group-V ions in molten Si significantly determine the final appearance of the nanostructure and thus their suitability for potential applications.

  1. Advances in Type-I GaSb Based Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenky, Gregory; Shterengas, Leon; Donetsky, Dmitry; Kisin, Mikhail; Kipshidze, Gela

    2008-10-01

    We show that high level of compressive strain in the optically active quantum wells is a key condition for efficient continuous-wave room-temperature operation of the type-I GaSb-based diode lasers. Lasers with two highly strained InGaAsSb quantum wells and AlGaAsSb barriers demonstrate an output CW power of 1050 mW at 2.4 µm and 85 mW at 3.1 µm.

  2. Nanostructures produced by phase-separation during growth of (III-V).sub.1-x(IV.sub.2).sub.x alloys

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G. (Evergreen, CO); Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-12

    Nanostructures (18) and methods for production thereof by phase separation during metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). An embodiment of one of the methods may comprise providing a growth surface in a reaction chamber and introducing a first mixture of precursor materials into the reaction chamber to form a buffer layer (12) thereon. A second mixture of precursor materials may be provided into the reaction chamber to form an active region (14) on the buffer layer (12), wherein the nanostructure (18) is embedded in a matrix (16) in the active region (14). Additional steps are also disclosed for preparing the nanostructure (18) product for various applications.

  3. Beyond CMOS: heterogeneous integration of III–V devices, RF MEMS and other dissimilar materials/devices with Si CMOS to create intelligent microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Kazior, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in silicon technology continue to revolutionize micro-/nano-electronics. However, Si cannot do everything, and devices/components based on other materials systems are required. What is the best way to integrate these dissimilar materials and to enhance the capabilities of Si, thereby continuing the micro-/nano-electronics revolution? In this paper, I review different approaches to heterogeneously integrate dissimilar materials with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In particular, I summarize results on the successful integration of III–V electronic devices (InP heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) and GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs)) with Si CMOS on a common silicon-based wafer using an integration/fabrication process similar to a SiGe BiCMOS process (BiCMOS integrates bipolar junction and CMOS transistors). Our III–V BiCMOS process has been scaled to 200?mm diameter wafers for integration with scaled CMOS and used to fabricate radio-frequency (RF) and mixed signals circuits with on-chip digital control/calibration. I also show that RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can be integrated onto this platform to create tunable or reconfigurable circuits. Thus, heterogeneous integration of III–V devices, MEMS and other dissimilar materials with Si CMOS enables a new class of high-performance integrated circuits that enhance the capabilities of existing systems, enable new circuit architectures and facilitate the continued proliferation of low-cost micro-/nano-electronics for a wide range of applications. PMID:24567473

  4. A thermodynamic analysis of native point defect and dopant solubilities in zinc-blende III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Hurle, D. T. J.

    2010-06-15

    A thermodynamic model is used to analyze available experimental data relevant to point defects in the binary zinc-blende III-V compounds (Ga,In)-(P,As,Sb). The important point defects and their complexes in each of the materials are identified and included in the model. Essentially all of the available experimental data on dopant solubility, crystal density, and lattice parameter of melt and solution grown crystals and epilayers are reproduced by the model. It extends an earlier study [Hurle, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 6957 (1999)] devoted solely to GaAs. Values for the enthalpy and entropy of formation of both native and dopant related point defects are obtained by fitting to experimental data. In undoped material, vacancies, and interstitials on the Group V sublattice dominate in the vicinity of the melting point (MP) in both the phosphides and arsenides, whereas, in the antimonides, vacancies on both sublattices dominate. The calculated concentrations of the native point defects are used to construct the solidus curves of all the compounds. The charged native point defect concentrations at the MP in four of the six materials are significantly higher than their intrinsic carrier concentrations. Thus the usually assumed high temperature 'intrinsic' electroneutrality condition for undoped material (n=p) is not valid for these materials. In GaSb, the Ga{sub Sb} antisite defect appears to be grown-in from the melt. This contrasts with the As{sub Ga} defect in GaAs for which the concentration grown-in at the MP is negligibly small. Compensation of donor-doped material by donor-Group III vacancy complexes is shown to exist in all the compounds except InP where Group VI doped crystals are uncompensated and in InSb where there is a lack of experimental data. The annealing effects in n{sup +} GaAs, including lattice superdilation, which were shown in the earlier paper to be due to Group III vacancy undersaturation during cooling, are found to be present also in GaSb and InAs. Results for native point defects are compared with reported ''first principles'' calculations for GaAs. It is seen that, while there is some accord with experimental findings for low temperature molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth, they fail totally to predict the behavior under high temperature growth conditions. The analysis of data on liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth of GaAs from Bi solution in the earlier paper has been re-calculated in the light of experimental data that showed that the model used in that paper to represent the Ga-As-Bi phase equilibria was inadequate. An improved model reveals that Ga vacancies exert a greater effect in controlling the extent of the linear range of donor dopant solubility than previously predicted. It has also led to a re-evaluation of the equilibrium EL2 and Ga vacancy concentrations in GaAs during MBE growth under As-rich conditions at low temperatures ({approx}500 K). The amended model predicts that the very high concentrations of EL2 and of Ga vacancies observed experimentally are near equilibrium values. The predicted increase in the equilibrium concentrations of these defects at low temperatures results from coulombic attraction between the two defects. At temperatures somewhat lower than 500 K the rate of increase becomes catastrophic.

  5. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  6. Comment on ``Atomic structure and ordering in semiconducting alloys''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgórny, M.; Czyzyk, M. T.

    1987-08-01

    Recently, an ab initio total-energy calculation for the ordered ternary phases of a III-V zinc-blende semiconductor was reported [G.P. Srivastava, J. L. Martins, and A. Zunger, Phys. Rev. B 31, 2561 (1985)]. We compare these results with those of a simple empirical model. Both models are used in a new approach to the calculation of thermodynamic properties of ternary alloys including the calculation of the cation distribution in the mixed sublattice. The applicability of the models is critically discussed.

  7. Growth rate for the selective epitaxial growth of III-V compounds inside submicron shallow-trench-isolation trenches on Si (001) substrates by MOVPE: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S.; Merckling, C.; Guo, W.; Waldron, N.; Caymax, M.; Vandervorst, W.; Seefeldt, M.; Heyns, M.

    2014-04-01

    A mathematical model was developed to examine the growth rate of III-V compounds inside sub-micron trenches by MOVPE. Based on this model, we theoretically analyzed the possible dependence of the growth rate on the trench width primarily from two aspects, i.e. Knudson diffusion and enhanced equilibrium vapor pressure due to the shrinking trench size. Then, associated with the experimental data from the growth of both InAlAs and InAs, we found that the average growth rate inside submicron trenches is primarily influenced by trench diffusion type under typical growth conditions.

  8. Demonstration of 12.2% wall plug efficiency in uncooled single mode external-cavity tunable Si/III-V hybrid laser.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyoung; Bovington, Jock; Shubin, Ivan; Luo, Ying; Yao, Jin; Lin, Shiyun; Cunningham, John E; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V; Zheng, Xuezhe

    2015-05-01

    A Si/III-V hybrid laser has been a highly sought after device for energy-efficient and cost-effective high-speed silicon photonics communication. We present a high wall-plug efficiency external-cavity hybrid laser created by integrating an independently optimized SOI ring reflector and a III-V gain chip. In our demonstration, the uncooled integrated laser achieved a waveguide-coupled wall-plug efficiency of 12.2% at room temperature with an optical output power of ~10 mW. The laser operated single-mode near 1550 nm with a linewidth of 0.22 pm. This is a tunable light source with 8 nm wavelength tuning range. A proof-of-concept laser wavelength stabilization technique has also been demonstrated. Using a simple feedback loop, we achieved mode-hop-free operation in a packaged external-cavity hybrid laser as bias current was varied by 60mA. PMID:25969296

  9. Temperature dependence of frequency dispersion in III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor C-V and the capture/emission process of border traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vais, Abhitosh; Lin, Han-Chung; Dou, Chunmeng; Martens, Koen; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Xie, Qi; Tang, Fu; Givens, Michael; Maes, Jan; Collaert, Nadine; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; DeMeyer, Kristin; Thean, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion observed in capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The dispersion in the accumulation region of the capacitance data is found to change from 4%-9% (per decade frequency) to ˜0% when the temperature is reduced from 300 K to 4 K in a wide range of MOS capacitors with different gate dielectrics and III-V substrates. We show that such significant temperature dependence of C-V frequency dispersion cannot be due to the temperature dependence of channel electrostatics, i.e., carrier density and surface potential. We also show that the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion, and hence, the capture/emission process of border traps can be modeled by a combination of tunneling and a "temperature-activated" process described by a non-radiative multi-phonon model, instead of a widely believed single-step elastic tunneling process.

  10. Nanoscale opening fabrication on Si (111) surface from SiO2 barrier for vertical growth of III-V nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tuanwei; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Baojun; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Wenyuan; Chen, Qing; Xu, Hongqi; Xu, Shengyong; Yang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    We reported here a selectively additive process to fabricate nanoscale openings of an Si (111) surface from an SiO2 barrier layer. Such nanoscale openings are made for the growth of vertical III-V nanowires. The Si (111) surface protected by a patterned SiNx layer was thermally oxidized, which resulted in a selectively added SiO2 barrier layer. After removing the SiNx, nanoscale openings of the Si (111) surface were exposed for the nanowire growth. Arrays with patterned nanoholes of varied diameters from 60 nm to 334 nm have been used for position-controlled catalyst-free growth of vertical InAs nanowire arrays by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Correlations between the nanohole diameter and the diameter, length and growth yield of as-fabricated nanowire arrays have been investigated, showing a repeatable stability. This technique offers an alternative approach for the fabrication of novel III-V nanowire devices using vertical array configuration. A lateral thermal oxidation effect led to a smaller size of the Si opening than that of the SiNx protection nanoislands; therefore, the technique also offers a controllable way to produce nanoholes with an ultra-small diameter. PMID:26062784

  11. Nanoscale opening fabrication on Si (111) surface from SiO2 barrier for vertical growth of III-V nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Tuanwei; Wang, Xiaoye; Wang, Baojun; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Wenyuan; Chen, Qing; Xu, Hongqi; Xu, Shengyong; Yang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    We reported here a selectively additive process to fabricate nanoscale openings of an Si (111) surface from an SiO2 barrier layer. Such nanoscale openings are made for the growth of vertical III-V nanowires. The Si (111) surface protected by a patterned SiNx layer was thermally oxidized, which resulted in a selectively added SiO2 barrier layer. After removing the SiNx, nanoscale openings of the Si (111) surface were exposed for the nanowire growth. Arrays with patterned nanoholes of varied diameters from 60 nm to 334 nm have been used for position-controlled catalyst-free growth of vertical InAs nanowire arrays by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Correlations between the nanohole diameter and the diameter, length and growth yield of as-fabricated nanowire arrays have been investigated, showing a repeatable stability. This technique offers an alternative approach for the fabrication of novel III-V nanowire devices using vertical array configuration. A lateral thermal oxidation effect led to a smaller size of the Si opening than that of the SiNx protection nanoislands; therefore, the technique also offers a controllable way to produce nanoholes with an ultra-small diameter.

  12. Quasiparticle self-consistent GW theory of III-V nitride semiconductors: Bands, gap bowing, and effective masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E.; Gorczyca, I.; van Schilfgaarde, M.; Chantis, A. N.; Kotani, T.

    2010-09-01

    The electronic band structures of InN, GaN, and a hypothetical ordered InGaN2 compound, all in the wurtzite crystal structure, are calculated using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation. This approach leads to band gaps which are significantly improved compared to gaps calculated on the basis of the local approximation to density functional theory, although generally overestimated by 0.2-0.3 eV in comparison with experimental gap values. Details of the electronic energies and the effective masses including their pressure dependence are compared with available experimental information. The band gap of InGaN2 is considerably smaller than what would be expected by linear interpolation implying a significant band gap bowing in InGaN alloys.

  13. Optical and electrical properties of III-V nitride wide bandgap semiconductors. Annual report, April 1, 1997--May 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The objectives of this project were to investigate the optical and electrical properties of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors (GaN, InGaN, AlGaN) and quantum wells, to understand the fundamental optical transitions and impurity properties of these materials, to study the physics components of GaN-based devices, and to provide input for new approaches toward the improvement of materials quality and the optimization of device design. We were the first group to employ transport measurement techniques on the persistent photoconductivity (PPC) state to study the impurity properties of III-nitrides. We were also one of the few research groups m in the world to employ picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement technique to study mechanisms of optical transitions, LED emission, and lasing m in GaN materials. During this funding period, we have investigated a variety of GaN samples and structures grown by MBE as well as by MOCVD. We have also made a significant progress in MOCVD GaN materials growth. This report briefly discusses the following accomplishments: effects of deep level impurities in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures; materials characterization of III-nitrides alloys; optical studies of III-nitride epilayers and quantum wells; fabrication and optical studies of III-nitride microdisk arrays; and materials growth by MOCVD.

  14. The recombination velocity at III-V compound heterojunctions with applications to Al (x) Ga(1-x)As-GaAs(1-y)Sb(y)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Interface recombination velocity in AlxGa1-xAs-GaAs and A10.85 Ga0.15As-GaAs1-ySby heterojunction systems was studied as a function of lattice mismatch. The results are applied to the design of highly efficient III-V heterojunction solar cells. A horizontal liquid-phase epitaxial growth system was used to prepare p-p-p and p-p-n double heterojunction test samples with specified values of x and y. Samples were grown at each composition, with different GaAs and GaAsSb layer thicknesses. A method was developed to obtain the lattice mismatch and lattice constants in mixed single crystals grown on (100) and (111)B oriented GaAs substrates.

  15. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1990--31 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; O`Bradovich, G.J.; Young, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year project. The objective of the research is to examine new design approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program is divided into two areas. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for III-V semiconductors. The second area centers on exploring design approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high quality material. Research activities consisted of an experimental study of minority carrier recombination in n-type, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-deposited GaAs, an assessment of the minority carrier lifetimes in n-GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and developing a high-efficiency cell fabrication process.

  16. New III-V cell design approaches for very high efficiency. Annual subcontract report, 1 August 1991--31 July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Lush, G.B.; Patkar, M.P.; Young, M.P.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes to examine new solar cell desip approaches for achieving very high conversion efficiencies. The program consists of two elements. The first centers on exploring new thin-film approaches specifically designed for M-III semiconductors. Substantial efficiency gains may be possible by employing light trapping techniques to confine the incident photons, as well as the photons emitted by radiative recombination. The thin-film approach is a promising route for achieving substantial performance improvements in the already high-efficiency, single-junction, III-V cell. The second element of the research involves exploring desip approaches for achieving high conversion efficiencies without requiring extremely high-quality material. This work has applications to multiple-junction cells, for which the selection of a component cell often involves a compromise between optimum band pp and optimum material quality. It could also be a benefit manufacturing environment by making the cell`s efficiency less dependent on materialquality.

  17. Low-driving-current InGaAsP photonic-wire optical switches using III-V CMOS photonics platform.

    PubMed

    Ikku, Yuki; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Hata, Masahiko; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi

    2012-12-10

    Electrically-driven Mach-Zehnder interferometer type InGaAsP photonic-wire optical switches have been demonstrated using a III-V-on-insulator structure bonded on a thermally oxidized Si with an Al(2)O(3)/InP bonding interfacial layer which enables strong wafer bonding and low propagation loss. Lateral p-i-n junctions in the InGaAsP photonic-wire waveguides were formed by using ion implantation for changing refractive index in the InGaAsP waveguide through carrier injection. Optical switching with 10 dB extinction ratio was achieved with driving current of 200 µA which is approximately 10 times smaller than that of Si photonic-wire optical switch owing to larger free-carrier effect in InGaAsP than that in Si. PMID:23262873

  18. TOWARD ACHIEVING EFFICIENT III-V SPACE CELLS ON Ge/GeSi/Si WAFERS S.A. Ringel, R.M. Sieg and J.A. Carlin S. Ting, M. Currie, V. Yang, E.A. Fitzgerald

    E-print Network

    of the outstanding problems in the solar cell community. Indeed, the desire to integrate high-performance minority community for multi-functional device integration. For the specific case of space solar cells-V photovoltaic materials and Si wafers have long hampered the ability to integrate optimum III-V solar cells

  19. Solar photovoltaics is considered as one of the most promising techniques for supplying clean, sustainable and renewable energy. II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials have attracted

    E-print Network

    Solar photovoltaics is considered as one of the most promising techniques for supplying clean, sustainable and renewable energy. II-VI and III-V semiconductor materials have attracted much interests April 16, 2014; 9:00 AM; PSF 306 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy #12;

  20. Revetements antireflet-passivation a base de nitrure de silicium PECVD pour cellules solaires triple-jonction III-V/ Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homier, Ram

    Dans le contexte environnemental actuel, le photovoltaïque bénéficie de l'augmentation des efforts de recherche dans le domaine des énergies renouvelables. Pour réduire le coût de la production d'électricité par conversion directe de l'énergie lumineuse en électricité, le photovoltaïque concentré est intéressant. Le principe est de concentrer une grande quantité d'énergie lumineuse sur des petites surfaces de cellules solaires multi-jonction à haute efficacité. Lors de la fabrication d'une cellule solaire, il est essentiel d'inclure une méthode pour réduire la réflexion de la lumière à la surface du dispositif. Le design d'un revêtement antireflet (ARC) pour cellules solaires multi-jonction présente des défis à cause de la large bande d'absorption et du besoin d'égaliser le courant produit par chaque sous-cellule. Le nitrure de silicium déposé par PECVD en utilisant des conditions standards est largement utilisé dans l'industrie des cellules solaires à base de silicium. Cependant, ce diélectrique présente de l'absorption dans la plage des courtes longueurs d'onde. Nous proposons l'utilisation du nitrure de silicium déposé par PECVD basse fréquence (LFSiN) optimisé pour avoir un haut indice de réfraction et une faible absorption optique pour l'ARC pour cellules solaires triple-jonction III-V/Ge. Ce matériau peut aussi servir de couche de passivation/encapsulation. Les simulations montrent que l'ARC double couche SiO2/LFSiN peut être très efficace pour réduire les pertes par réflexion dans la plage de longueurs d'onde de la sous-cellule limitante autant pour des cellules solaires triple-jonction limitées par la sous-cellule du haut que pour celles limitées par la sous-cellule du milieu. Nous démontrons aussi que la performance de la structure est robuste par rapport aux fluctuations des paramètres des couches PECVD (épaisseurs, indice de réfraction). Mots-clés : Photovoltaïque concentré (CPV), cellules solaires multi-jonction (MJSC), revêtement antireflet (ARC), passivation des semiconducteurs III-V, nitrure de silicium (Si?Ny), PECVD.

  1. Polarity-Driven Quasi-3-Fold Composition Symmetry of Self-Catalyzed III-V-V Ternary Core-Shell Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunyan; Sanchez, Ana M; Wu, Jiang; Aagesen, Martin; Holm, Jeppe V; Beanland, Richard; Ward, Thomas; Liu, Huiyun

    2015-05-13

    A quasi-3-fold composition symmetry has for the first time been observed in self-catalyzed III-V-V core-shell nanowires. In GaAsP nanowires, phosphorus-rich sheets on radial {110} planes originating at the corners of the hexagonal core were observed. In a cross section, they appear as six radial P-rich bands that originate at the six outer corners of the hexagonal core, with three of them higher in P content along ?112?A direction and others along ?112?B, forming a quasi-3-fold composition symmetry. We propose that these P-rich bands are caused by a curvature-induced high surface chemical potential at the small corner facets, which drives As adatoms away more efficiently than P adatoms. Moreover, their polarity related P content difference can be explained by the different adatom bonding energies at these polar corner facets. These results provide important information on the further development of shell growth in the self-catalyzed core-shell NW structure and, hence, device structure for multicomponent material systems. PMID:25822399

  2. Fabrication of HfO2 patterns by laser interference nanolithography and selective dry etching for III-V CMOS application

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructuring of ultrathin HfO2 films deposited on GaAs (001) substrates by high-resolution Lloyd's mirror laser interference nanolithography is described. Pattern transfer to the HfO2 film was carried out by reactive ion beam etching using CF4 and O2 plasmas. A combination of atomic force microscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis was used to characterise the various etching steps of the process and the resulting HfO2/GaAs pattern morphology, structure, and chemical composition. We show that the patterning process can be applied to fabricate uniform arrays of HfO2 mesa stripes with tapered sidewalls and linewidths of 100 nm. The exposed GaAs trenches were found to be residue-free and atomically smooth with a root-mean-square line roughness of 0.18 nm after plasma etching. PACS: Dielectric oxides 77.84.Bw, Nanoscale pattern formation 81.16.Rf, Plasma etching 52.77.Bn, Fabrication of III-V semiconductors 81.05.Ea PMID:21711946

  3. Large-grain (>1-mm), recrystallized germanium films on alumina, fused silica, oxide-coated silicon substrates for III V solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, Michael G.; Balliet, Jeremy R.; Feyock, Bryan W.

    2003-03-01

    Recrystallized germanium films on ceramics and other materials can serve as a low-cost replacement for the single-crystal germanium wafers currently used for high-efficiency III-V semiconductor solar cells. Related work implies that Ge films with large-grain sizes (>1 mm) formed on thermal-expansion matched substrates, such as sintered alumina ceramic, would function as suitable alternative substrates for epitaxy of high-performance GaAs-based solar cells. For this purpose, we describe a process wherein Ge layers, 0.5-5 ?m thick, are deposited by close-spaced vapor transport or sputtering on sintered alumina ceramics, fused silica, or thermally oxidized polysilicon substrates, capped with metal layers deposited by electron-beam evaporation, and recrystallized in an annealing step. Post-growth, the metal cap is stripped with a selective liquid etchant. Recrystallized Ge films have large (1-5 mm) grains and highly oriented textures. These structures provide suitable substrates for epitaxy of GaAs solar cells.

  4. The role of the substrate on the dispersion in accumulation in III-V compound semiconductor based metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Igor; Ritter, Dan; Eizenberg, Moshe

    2015-09-01

    Dispersion in accumulation is a widely observed phenomenon in metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks based on III-V compound semiconductors. The physical origin of this phenomenon is attributed to border traps located in the dielectric material adjacent to the semiconductor. Here, we study the role of the semiconductor substrate on the electrical quality of the first layers at atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics. For this purpose, either Al2O3 or HfO2 dielectrics with variable thicknesses were deposited simultaneously on two technology important semiconductors—InGaAs and InP. Significantly larger dispersion was observed in InP based gate stacks compared to those based on InGaAs. The observed difference is attributed to a higher border trap density in dielectrics deposited on InP compared to those deposited on InGaAs. We therefore conclude that the substrate plays an important role in the determination of the electrical quality of the first dielectric monolayers deposited by ALD. An additional observation is that larger dispersion was obtained in HfO2 based capacitors compared to Al2O3 based capacitors, deposited on the same semiconductor. This phenomenon is attributed to the lower conduction band offset rather than to a higher border trap density.

  5. Large-signal characterizations of DDR IMPATT devices based on group III-V semiconductors at millimeter-wave and terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Aritra; Mallik, Aliva; Banerjee, Debopriya; Ganguli, Suman; Das, Arindam; Dasgupta, Sudeepto; Banerjee, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    Large-signal (L-S) characterizations of double-drift region (DDR) impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) devices based on group III-V semiconductors such as wurtzite (Wz) GaN, GaAs and InP have been carried out at both millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and terahertz (THz) frequency bands. A L-S simulation technique based on a non-sinusoidal voltage excitation (NSVE) model developed by the authors has been used to obtain the high frequency properties of the above mentioned devices. The effect of band-to-band tunneling on the L-S properties of the device at different mm-wave and THz frequencies are also investigated. Similar studies are also carried out for DDR IMPATTs based on the most popular semiconductor material, i.e. Si, for the sake of comparison. A comparative study of the devices based on conventional semiconductor materials (i.e. GaAs, InP and Si) with those based on Wz-GaN shows significantly better performance capabilities of the latter at both mm-wave and THz frequencies.

  6. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  7. Structural properties of bismuth-bearing semiconductor alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The structural properties of bismuth-bearing III-V semiconductor alloys are addressed. Because the Bi compounds are not known to form zincblende structures, only the anion-substituted alloys InPBi, InAsBi, and InSbBi are considered candidates as narrow-gap semiconductors. Miscibility calculations indicate that InSbBi will be the most miscible, and InPBi, with the large lattice mismatch of the constituents, will be the most difficult to mix. Calculations of the hardness of the Bi compounds indicate that, once formed, the InPBi alloy will be harder than the other Bi alloys, and substantially harder than the currently favored narrow-gap semiconductor HgCdTe. Thus, although InSbBi may be an easier material to prepare, InPBi promises to be a harder material. Growth of the Bi compounds will require high effective growth temperatures, probably attainable only through the use of nonequilibrium energy-assisted epitaxial growth techniques.

  8. Peculiarities of the hydrogenated In(AsN) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birindelli, S.; Kesaria, M.; Giubertoni, D.; Pettinari, G.; Velichko, A. V.; Zhuang, Q. D.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.

    2015-10-01

    The electronic properties of In(AsN) before and after post-growth sample irradiation with increasing doses of atomic hydrogen have been investigated by photoluminescence. The electron density increases in In(AsN) but not in N-free InAs, until a Fermi stabilization energy is established. A hydrogen ?+/- transition level just below the conduction band minimum accounts for the dependence of donor formation on N, in agreement with a recent theoretical report highlighting the peculiarity of InAs among III-V compounds. Raman scattering measurements indicate the formation of N-H complexes that are stable under thermal annealing up to ˜500 K. Finally, hydrogen does not passivate the electronic activity of N, thus leaving the band gap energy of In(AsN) unchanged, once more in stark contrast to what has been reported in other dilute nitride alloys.

  9. Multiple doping of silicon-germanium alloys for thermoelectric applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Vining, Cronin B.; Borshchevsky, Alex

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that heavy doping of n-type Si/Ge alloys with phosphorus and arsenic (V-V doping interaction) by diffusion leads to a significant enhancement of their carrier concentration and possible improvement of the thermoelectric figure of merit. High carrier concentrations were achieved by arsenic doping alone, but for a same doping level higher carrier mobilities and lower resistivities are obtained through phosphorus doping. By combining the two dopants with the proper diffusion treatments, it was possible to optimize the different properties, obtaining high carrier concentration, good carrier mobility and low electrical resistivity. Similar experiments, using the III-V doping interaction, were conducted on boron-doped p-type samples and showed the possibility of overcompensating the samples by diffusing arsenic, in order to get n-type behavior.

  10. GaAsPN-based PIN solar cells MBE-grown on GaP substrates: toward the III-V/Si tandem solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, M.; Almosni, S.; Cornet, C.; Létoublon, A.; Levallois, C.; Rale, P.; Lombez, L.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Durand, O.

    2015-03-01

    GaAsPN semiconductors are promising material for the elaboration of high efficiencies tandem solar cells on silicon substrates. GaAsPN diluted nitride alloy is studied as the top junction material due to its perfect lattice matching with the Si substrate and its ideal bandgap energy allowing a perfect current matching with the Si bottom cell. We review our recent progress in materials development of the GaAsPN alloy and our recent studies of some of the different building blocks toward the elaboration of a PIN solar cell. A lattice matched (with a GaP(001) substrate, as a first step toward the elaboration on a Si substrate) 1?m-thick GaAsPN alloy has been grown by MBE. After a post-growth annealing step, this alloy displays a strong absorption around 1.8-1.9 eV, and efficient photoluminescence at room temperature suitable for the elaboration of the targeted solar cell top junction. Early stage GaAsPN PIN solar cells prototypes have been grown on GaP (001) substrates, with 2 different absorber thicknesses (1?m and 0.3?m). The external quantum efficiencies and the I-V curves show that carriers have been extracted from the GaAsPN alloy absorbers, with an open-circuit voltage of 1.18 V, while displaying low short circuit currents meaning that the GaAsPN structural properties needs a further optimization. A better carrier extraction has been observed with the absorber displaying the smallest thickness, which is coherent with a low carriers diffusion length in our GaAsPN compound. Considering all the pathways for improvement, the efficiency obtained under AM1.5G is however promising.

  11. Interacting quasi-band model for electronic states in compound semiconductor alloys: Zincblende structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Yuzo; Oda, Masato

    2015-09-01

    The interacting quasi-band model proposed for electronic states in simple alloys is extended for compound semiconductor alloys with general lattice structures containing several atoms per unit cell. Using a tight-binding model, a variational electronic wave function for quasi-Bloch states yields a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian matrix characterized by matrix elements of constituent crystals and concentration of constituents. Solving secular equations for each k-state yields the alloy’s energy spectrum for any type of randomness and arbitrary concentration. The theory is used to address III-V (II-VI) alloys with a zincblende lattice with crystal band structures well represented by the sp3s* model. Using the resulting 15 × 15 matrix, the concentration dependence of valence and conduction bands is calculated in a unified scheme for typical alloys: Al1-xGaxAs, GaAs1-xPx, and GaSb1-xPx. Results agree well with experiments and are discussed with respect to the concentration dependence, direct-indirect gap transition, and band-gap-bowing origin.

  12. Investigating the growth, structural and electrical properties of III-V semiconductor nanopillars for the next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Andrew

    Extensive research efforts have been devoted to the study and development of III-V compound semiconductor nanowires (NWs) and nanopillars (NPs) because of their unique physical properties and ability to form high quality, highly lattice-mismatched axial and radial heterostructures. These advantages lead to precise nano-bandgap engineering to achieve new device functionalities. One unique and powerful approach to realize these NPs is by catalyst-free, selective-area epitaxy (SAE) via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, in which the NP location and diameter can be precisely controlled lithographically. Early demonstrations of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on these NPs, however, are often inferior compared to their planar counterparts due to a few factors: (1) interface/surface states, (2) inaccurate doping calibration, and (3) increased carrier scattering and trapping from stacking fault formation in the NPs. In this study, the detailed growth mechanisms of different III-As, III-Sb and III-P NPs and their heterostructures are investigated. These NPs are then fabricated into single-NP field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe their electrical properties. It is shown that these devices are highly diameter-dependent, mainly because of the effects of surface states. By growing a high band-gap shell around the NP cores to passivate the surface, the device performance can be significantly improved. Further fabrication and characterization of vertical surround-gate FETs using a high-mobility InAs/InP NP channel is also discussed. Aside from the radial NP heterostructures, different approaches to achieve purely axial heterostructures in InAs/In(As)P materials are also presented with excellent interface quality. Both single barrier and double barrier structures are realized and fabricated into devices that show carrier transport characteristics over a barrier and even resonant tunneling behavior. Antimonide-based NPs are also studied for their immense application in high-speed electronics and mid-IR optoelectronics. Different growth regimes are probed to achieve InSb NPs and InAsSb NPs.

  13. Orthodontic silver brazing alloys.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, P J; Pham, H L

    1989-10-01

    Orthodontic silver brazing alloys suffer from the presence of cadmium, excessive flow temperatures, and crevice corrosion on stainless steel. Seven alloys were examined. Two alloys contained cadmium. The lowest flow temperature observed was 629 degrees C for a cadmium alloy and 651 degrees C for two cadmium free alloys. Three alloys had corrosion resistance superior to the other solders. Addition of low melting temperature elements gallium and indium reduced flow temperature in some cases but produced brittleness in the brazing alloy. PMID:2576971

  14. Nanoscale assembly of silicon-like [Al(As1-xNx)]ySi5-2y alloys: Fundamental theoretical and experimental studies of structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.; Sims, P. E.; Grzybowski, G.; Beeler, R. T.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Smith, D. J.; Kouvetakis, J.; Menéndez, J.

    2013-07-01

    Ab initio theoretical simulations of Al(As1-xNx)Si3 alloys, a new class of optoelectronic materials, confirm that these compounds are likely to be disordered via a mechanism that preserves the integrity of the constituent III-V-Si3 tetrahedra but randomizes their orientation in the average diamond lattice of the compound. This type of disorder is consistent with experimental structural data and with the proposed growth mechanism for such alloys, according to which “III:V(SiH3)3” intermediate complexes are formed in the gas phase from reactions between group-III atomic beams and V(SiH3)3 molecules, delivering the entire III-V-Si3 tetrahedra to the growing film. Experimental optical studies of these Al(As1-xNx)Si3 alloys as well as more general [Al(As1-xNx)]ySi5-2y compounds grown on Si substrates were carried out using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The resulting dielectric functions are found to be similar to broadened versions of their counterparts in pure Si. This broadening may have important practical applications, particularly in photovoltaics, because it dramatically enhances the optical absorption of Si in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. A critical point analysis reveals the existence of direct optical transitions at energies as low as 2.5 eV, well below the lowest direct absorption edge of Si at 3.3 eV. Such transitions are predicted theoretically for perfectly ordered III-V-Si3 compounds, and the experimental results suggest that they are robust against tetrahedra orientational disorder.

  15. III-V semiconductor Quantum Well systems: Physics of Gallium Arsenide two-dimensional hole systems and engineering of mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, YenTing

    This dissertation examines two types of III-V semiconductor quantum well systems: two-dimensional holes in GaAs, and mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers. GaAs holes have a much reduced hyperfine interaction with the nuclei due to the p-like orbital, resulting in a longer hole spin coherence time comparing to the electron spin coherence time. Therefore, holes' spins are promising candidates for quantum computing qubits, but the effective mass and the Lande g-factor, whose product determines the spin-susceptibility of holes, are not well known. In this thesis, we measure the effective hole mass through analyzing the temperature dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in a relatively strong interacting two-dimensional hole systems confined to a 20 nm-wide, (311)A GaAs quantum well. The holes in this system occupy two nearly-degenerate spin subbands whose effective mass we measure to be ˜ 0.2 me. We then apply a sufficiently strong parallel magnetic field to fully depopulate one of the spin subbands, and the spin susceptibility of the two-dimensional hole system is deduced from the depopulation field. We also confine holes in closely spaced bilayer GaAs quantum wells to study the interlayer tunneling spectrum as a function of interlayer bias and in-plane magnetic field, in hope of probing the hole's Fermi contour. Quantum Cascade lasers are one of the major mid-infrared light sources well suited for applications in health and environmental sensing. One of the important factors that affect Quantum Cascade laser performance is the quality of the interfaces between the epitaxial layers. What has long been neglected is that interface roughness causes intersubband scattering, and thus affecting the relation between the lifetimes of the upper and lower laser states, which determines if population inversion is possible. We first utilize strategically added interface roughness in the laser design to engineer the intersubband scattering lifetimes. We further experimentally prove the importance of interface roughness on intersubband scattering by measuring the electron transit time of different quantum cascade lasers and comparing them to the calculated upper laser level lifetimes with and without taking into account interface roughness induced intersubband scattering. A significantly better correlation is found between the experimental results and the calculation when the interface roughness scattering is included. Lastly, we study the effect of growth asymmetry on scattering mechanisms in mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers. Due to the dopant migration of around 10 nm along the growth direction of InGaAs/InAlAs Quantum Cascade laser structures, ionized impurity scattering is found to have a non-negligible influence on the lifetime of the upper laser level when the laser is biased in the polarity that electrons flow along the growth direction, in sharp contrast to the situation for the opposite polarity.

  16. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by K?) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies are necessary to identify ternary complexes, especially at high pH. Adsorption isotherms of As(V), a dominant form of arsenic in adsorptive water treatment systems, in the presence of the co-existing ions under relevant conditions of water treatment systems are also obtained and predicted by the ETLM to study and compare the effect of the co-existing ions on As(V) removal.

  17. Amorphous alloys for brazing copper based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?erban, V. A.; Codrean, C.; U?u, D.; Opri?, C.

    2009-01-01

    Silver based alloys are used widely when brazing copper based alloys. Due to its high cost, researchers try to obtain silver free brazing alloys, in the shape of amorphous structure ribbons, avoiding thus the formation of intermetallic compounds that diminish its ductility and plasticity. In this paper, the authors present their results in trying to obtain brazing alloys from the Cu-Zn-Ni-P family, ribbon shaped with amorphous structure, using the melt spinning method. The amorphous character of the processed alloy is emphasized by X-Ray diffraction, and the brazed joints made with the alloy were submitted to metallographic analysis and shearing tests.

  18. Amorphous metal alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Tiainen, T.J.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is a powder metallurgy method used in commercial production of high temperature superalloys. Under specific conditions, mechanical alloying allows the synthesis of amorphous metal alloys from mixtures of pure metal powders or from the powders of intermetallic compounds. Because the amorphizing transformation during mechanical alloying is a solid state reaction, most of the difficulties related to the amorphization by rapid solidification of melts can be avoided. Mechanical alloying allows the synthesis of amorphous alloys from metals with high melting temperatures and the resulting alloys have interesting properties such as high hardness and high crystallization temperatures. We used mechanical alloying for the synthesis of amorphous alloys in the binary alloy systems Nl-Sn, Nb-Si and Al-Hf. The amorphous alloy powders were characterized by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Produced alloys were compacted by hot pressing and the obtained compacts were characterized by x-ray diffraction, density and hardness measurements and by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the amorphization and compaction studies are presented and discussed together with the characteristics of the mechanical alloying process. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  20. Solution phase synthesis of indium gallium phosphide alloy nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Whitmore, Desiré D; Yu, Yi; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-04-28

    The tunable physical and electronic structure of III-V semiconductor alloys renders them uniquely useful for a variety of applications, including biological imaging, transistors, and solar energy conversion. However, their fabrication typically requires complex gas phase instrumentation or growth from high-temperature melts, which consequently limits their prospects for widespread implementation. Furthermore, the need for lattice matched growth substrates in many cases confines the composition of the materials to a narrow range that can be epitaxially grown. In this work, we present a solution phase synthesis for indium gallium phosphide (In(x)Ga(1-x)P) alloy nanowires, whose indium/gallium ratio, and consequently, physical and electronic structure, can be tuned across the entire x = 0 to x = 1 composition range. We demonstrate the evolution of structural and optical properties of the nanowires, notably the direct to indirect band gap transition, as the composition is varied from InP to GaP. Our scalable, low-temperature synthesis affords compositional, structural, and electronic tunability and can provide a route for realization of broader In(x)Ga(1-x)P applications. PMID:25839336

  1. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, O.B.; Lear, K.L.

    1998-03-10

    The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3--1.6 {mu}m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation. 10 figs.

  2. Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of microtwins and antiphase defects in GaP/Si nanolayers for a III–V photonics platform on silicon using a laboratory X-ray diffraction setup1

    PubMed Central

    Ping Wang, Yan; Letoublon, Antoine; Nguyen Thanh, Tra; Bahri, Mounib; Largeau, Ludovic; Patriarche, Gilles; Cornet, Charles; Bertru, Nicolas; Le Corre, Alain; Durand, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    This study is carried out in the context of III–V semiconductor monolithic integration on silicon for optoelectronic device applications. X-ray diffraction is combined with atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy for structural characterization of GaP nanolayers grown on Si. GaP has been chosen as the interfacial layer, owing to its low lattice mismatch with Si. But, microtwins and antiphase boundaries are still difficult to avoid in this system. Absolute quantification of the microtwin volume fraction is used for optimization of the growth procedure in order to eliminate these defects. Lateral correlation lengths associated with mean antiphase boundary distances are then evaluated. Finally, optimized growth conditions lead to the annihilation of antiphase domains within the first 10?nm. PMID:26089763

  4. Distributed feedback GaSb based laser diodes with buried grating

    SciTech Connect

    Gaimard, Q.; Cerutti, L.; Teissier, R.; Vicet, A.

    2014-04-21

    We report on the growth, fabrication, and experimental study of distributed feed-back antimonide diode lasers with buried grating. A second order index-coupled grating was defined by interferometric lithography on the top of the laser waveguide and dry etched by reactive ion etching. The grating was then buried thanks to an overgrowth of the top cladding layer using molecular beam epitaxy. The wafer was then processed using standard photolithography and wet etching into 15??m-wide laser ridges. Single frequency laser emission at a wavelength of 2.2??m was measured with a side mode suppression ratio of 34?dB, a maximum output power of 30 mW, and a total continuous tuning range of 6.5?nm.

  5. Dual wavelength GaSb based type I quantum well mid-infrared light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seungyong; Suchalkin, Sergey; Kipshidze, Gela; Westerfeld, David; Golden, Eric; Snyder, Donald; Belenky, Gregory

    2010-05-01

    We have designed and developed dual wavelength type I quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) operating at 2 ?m and 3-3.4 ?m wavelengths with independently controlled intensities. The room temperature quasicontinuous wave output power was 2.8 mW at 2 ?m and 0.14 mW at 3 ?m. The design of the dual wavelength structure allows for monolithically integrating LED pixels with different wavelengths opening the way for the fabrication of multiwavelength LED arrays for multispectral and hyperspectral imaging applications.

  6. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  7. Band anticrossing in highly mismatched SnxGe1-x semiconducting alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, K.; Blacksberg, J.; Bell, L. D.; Nikzad, S.; Yu, K. M.; Dubon, O. D.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2008-02-01

    We show that at dilute Sn concentrations (x<10%) , the composition dependence of the direct band gap and spin-orbit splitting energies of SnxGe1-x can be described by a valence band anticrossing model. Hybridization of the extended and localized p -like states of the Ge host matrix and the Sn minority atoms, respectively, leads to a restructuring of the valence band into E+ and E- subbands. The notably large reduction in the band gap follows from an upward shift in the valence band edge by approximately 22meV per x=0.01 . These results demonstrate that like III-V and II-VI compound semiconductors, group IV elements may form highly mismatched alloys in which the band anticrossing phenomenon is responsible for their unique properties.

  8. Scandium in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, L.S.; Tack, W.T.; Fernandes, M.T.

    1997-10-01

    Aluminum alloys that contain dilute scandium additions display upgraded properties in several areas. In conjunction with zirconium, scandium forms very fine, coherent precipitates that impart strength and serve to inhibit recrystallization in aluminum alloys. In addition, these alloys display improved hot-cracking resistance during welding, and enhanced weld strength. Several scandium-aluminum alloys are currently under development, and some of the more interesting properties are presented in this article.

  9. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  10. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  11. Far Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Bulk and Epitaxial Iii-V Iv-Vi and II-Vi Binary, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirtharaj, Paul Manohar

    1981-11-01

    Far infrared (FIR) spectroscopy, in the frequency range 10 cm('-1) to 500 cm('-1), has been used to study the free carriers and their spatial distribution at the epitaxial film/substrate interface in PbSe/NaCl, GaAs/GaAs and InAs/GaAs; the optical phonons in In(,1-x) Ga(,x)As(,y)P(,1 -y); and the interband transitions, free carriers and phonons in Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te. The measurement of both reflection and transmission spectra, using a Fourier Interferometer and a CO(,2) laser pumped FIR laser spectrometer, combined with detailed computer fitting of the spectra yield reliable information on many parameters. A classical multioscillator model, for the dielectric constant is found adequate to describe the optical properties of all the materials except Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te, where the contribution due to the interband transitions had to be taken into account. The epitaxial film/substrate interface in three different systems were studied at 300(DEGREES)K. They are: a 2 (mu)m PbSe film on a highly ionic NaCl substrate; three GaAs films, with thickness ranging from 2 to 3 (mu)m, on high resisitivity GaAs substrates; and a (TURN) 15 (mu)m thick InAs film on a high resistivity GaAs substrate. All the samples were grown by vapor and liquid phase epitaxy. The interface is found to be abrupt, on a scale measurable using FIR wavelengths, in PbSe/NaCl and GaAs/GaAs. Significant interface effects are present in InAs/GaAs. A mixed In(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As interface region is found to be present, the thickness, free carrier density and mobility are determined to be .074 (mu)m, (TURN) 6 x 19('17) cm('-3) and 400 cm('2)/V.sec respectively. The free carrier density is much higher than 4 x 10('15) cm('-3) and the mobility much lower than 16400 cm('2)/V.sec, the values in the epitaxial film. The presence of a (TURN) 0.1 (mu)m thick surface accumulation layer on the InAs film was also detected. The 300(DEGREES)K FIR spectra of the quaternary alloy, In(,1-x)Ga(,x)As(,y)P(,1-y) were analyzed to determine the optimal phonon structure. All the samples were n-type and were grown from the liquid phase on high resistivity InP substrates and ranged in thickness from 1 to 6 (mu)m; the range of y values extended from 0.22 to 0.66, with y/x (TURNEQ) 2.2 to ensure lattice matching to the substrate. The observed longitudinal and transverse optical phonons could be assigned to InP-, GaAs- and InAs-like vibrations. The assignments were made using the phonon and relevant impurity mode frequencies in the constituent binaries. Such a model satisfactorily describes the variations of the phonon frequences with the compositional parameter, y. The FIR reflection spectra of two samples of bulk Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Te, with x values of 0.015 and 0.082, were measured in the temperature range 5(DEGREES)K to 300(DEGREES)K. The transmission of a sample with x = 0.094 was measured at 6(DEGREES)K. The transmission was also measured as a function of the temperature at fixed FIR laser frequencies. All the low temperature (5(DEGREES) to 30(DEGREES)K) show strong evidence of interband transitions between the (GAMMA)(,8) valence and conduction bands. The interband transition effect calculated using a non-parabolic conduction band and a finite heavy hole mass of 0.55 m(,o); m(,o) is the free electron mass. The energy gap, E(,o), determined from the fit to the spectra shows a semimetal-semiconductor transition at x (TURNEQ) 0.10. The Fermi energies and the conduction band bottom effective mass values are also determined. The high temperature spectra (77(DEGREES)K to 300(DEGREES)K) were analyzed to determine the free carrier and phonon parameters. The results are in substantial agreement with previous studies.

  12. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  13. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  14. Alloy 10: A 1300F Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2000-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 13000 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, Allied Signal's Alloy 10, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines to be used on smaller, regional aircraft. For this application, compressor/turbine disks must withstand temperatures of 1300 F for several hundred hours over the life of the engine. In this paper, three key properties of Alloy 10--tensile, 0.2% creep, and fatigue crack growth--will be assessed at 1300 F.

  15. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles methodmore »can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.« less

  16. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  17. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  18. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  19. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  20. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  1. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  4. Nickel base coating alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A. (inventor); Lowell, C. E. (inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Zirconium is added to a Ni-30 Al (beta) intermetallic alloy in the range of 0.05 w/o to 0.25 w/o. This addition is made during melting or by using metal powders. The addition of zirconium improves the cyclic oxidation resistance of the alloys at temperatures above 1100 C.

  5. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shaber, Eric L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DuPont, John N. (Whitehall, PA); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, David B. (Bethlehem, PA)

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  6. Hybrid III-V Silicon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, John

    2014-03-01

    Abstract: A number of important breakthroughs in the past decade have focused attention on Si as a photonic platform. We review here recent progress in this field, focusing on efforts to make lasers, amplifiers, modulators and photodetectors on or in silicon. We also describe optimum quantum well design and distributed feedback cavity design to reduce the threshold and increase the efficiency and power output. The impact active silicon photonic integrated circuits could have on interconnects, telecommunications and on silicon electronics is reviewed. Biography: John Bowers holds the Fred Kavli Chair in Nanotechnology, and is the Director of the Institute for Energy Efficiency and a Professor in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials at UCSB. He is a cofounder of Aurrion, Aerius Photonics and Calient Networks. Dr. Bowers received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University and worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories and Honeywell before joining UC Santa Barbara. Dr. Bowers is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the IEEE, OSA and the American Physical Society. He is a recipient of the OSA/IEEE Tyndall Award, the OSA Holonyak Prize, the IEEE LEOS William Streifer Award and the South Coast Business and Technology Entrepreneur of the Year Award. He and coworkers received the EE Times Annual Creativity in Electronics (ACE) Award for Most Promising Technology for the hybrid silicon laser in 2007. Bowers' research is primarily in optoelectronics and photonic integrated circuits. He has published ten book chapters, 600 journal papers, 900 conference papers and has received 54 patents. He has published 180 invited papers and conference papers, and given 16 plenary talks at conferences. As well as Chong Zhang.

  7. Surface phonons of III-V semiconductors 

    E-print Network

    Das, Pradip Kumar

    1994-01-01

    The surface phonon dispersion curves and polarization vectors have been calculated for the (110) surfaces of nine Ill-V semiconductors. The results for GaAs are in generally good agreement with inelastic helium scattering and high...

  8. Towards III-V solar cells on Si: Improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge-on-Si virtual substrates through low porosity porous silicon buffer layer and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Baricordi, Stefano; Bernardoni, Paolo; Fin, Samuele; Guidi, Vincenzo; Vincenzi, Donato

    2014-09-26

    A comparison between the crystalline quality of Ge grown on bulk Si and on a low porosity porous Si (pSi) buffer layer using low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is reported. Omega/2Theta coupled scans around the Ge and Si (004) diffraction peaks show a reduction of the Ge full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 22.4% in presence of the pSi buffer layer, indicating it is effective in improving the epilayer crystalline quality. At the same time atomic force microscopy analysis shows an increase in root means square roughness for Ge grown on pSi from 38.5 nm to 48.0 nm, as a consequence of the larger surface roughness of pSi compared to bulk Si. The effect of 20 minutes vacuum annealing at 580°C is also investigated. The annealing leads to a FWHM reduction of 23% for Ge grown on Si and of 36.5% for Ge on pSi, resulting in a FWHM of 101 arcsec in the latter case. At the same time, the RMS roughness is reduced of 8.8% and of 46.5% for Ge grown on bulk Si and on pSi, respectively. The biggest improvement in the crystalline quality of Ge grown on pSi with respect to Ge grown on bulk Si observed after annealing is a consequence of the simultaneous reorganization of the Ge epilayer and the buffer layer driven by energy minimization. A low porosity buffer layer can thus be used for the growth of low defect density Ge on Si virtual substrates for the successive integration of III-V multijunction solar cells on Si. The suggested approach is simple and fast –thus allowing for high throughput-, moreover is cost effective and fully compatible with subsequent wafer processing. Finally it does not introduce new chemicals in the solar cell fabrication process and can be scaled to large area silicon wafers.

  9. In situ measurement of CuPt alloy ordering using strain anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Kang, Joongoo; Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.

    2014-02-07

    The optical and electrical properties of many III-V alloys change with the degree of CuPt atomic ordering, which is very sensitive to growth conditions. The bulk ordered alloy is elongated along the normal to the ordered planes, and is asymmetrically strained when coherent to a cubic substrate. Here, we demonstrate in situ measurement of the anisotropic strain due to ordering using two-dimensional wafer curvature. The measurement is sensitive to bulk anisotropies, and so is complementary to other in situ measurements that are sensitive to surface anisotropies. Using ab initio calculations, we determine a maximum strain anisotropy of 0.27% between [110] and [1{sup ¯}10] when perfectly ordered single-variant GaInP{sub 2} is coherent to a (001) cubic substrate. We relate the in situ measurement of strain anisotropy on various GaInP{sub 2} samples to ex situ measurements of the order parameter to validate the measurement and confirm the capability to predict material properties. The measurement monitors change in ordering during growth, useful for quickly determining the growth condition dependence of ordering or monitoring order-disorder transitions. More generally, this measurement technique could, in principle, be used to monitor phase changes in any epitaxial system for which the strain anisotropy of the two phases differs.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Trends in the electronic structure of dilute nitride alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, E. P.; Lindsay, A.; Klar, P. J.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.

    2009-03-01

    The band-anticrossing (BAC) model has been widely applied to analyse the electronic structure of dilute nitride III-V-N alloys such as GaNxAs1-x. The BAC model describes the strong band gap bowing observed at low N composition in GaNxAs1-x in terms of an interaction between the GaAs host matrix conduction band edge and a higher lying band of localized N resonant states. In practice, replacing As by N introduces a range of N-related defect levels, associated with isolated N atoms, N-N pairs and larger clusters of N atoms. We show that the effect of such defect levels on the alloy conduction band structure is strongly dependent on the relative energy of the defect levels and the host conduction band edge. We first consider GaNxAs1-x, where we show that the unexpectedly large electron effective mass and gyromagnetic ratio, and their non-monotonic variation with x, are due to hybridization between the conduction band edge and specific nitrogen states close to the band edge. The N-related defect levels lie below the conduction band edge in GaNxP1-x. We must therefore explicitly treat the interaction between the higher lying GaP host ? conduction band minimum and defect states associated with a random distribution of N atoms in order to obtain a good description of the lowest conduction states in disordered GaPN alloys. Turning to other alloys, N-related defect levels should generally lie well above the conduction band minimum in InNSb, with the band dispersion of InNSb then well described by a two-level BAC model. Both InP and InAs are intermediate between InSb and GaAs. By contrast, we calculate that N-related defect levels lie close to the conduction band minimum in GaNSb, and will therefore strongly perturb the lowest conduction states in this alloy. Overall, we conclude that the BAC model provides a good qualitative explanation of the electronic properties of dilute nitride alloys, but that it is in many cases necessary to include the details of the distribution of N-related defect levels to obtain a quantitative understanding of the conduction band structure in dilute nitride alloys.

  11. Brazing dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalalian, H.

    1979-01-01

    Dip-brazing process joins aluminum castings to aluminum sheet made from different aluminum alloy. Process includes careful cleaning, surface preparation, and temperature control. It causes minimum distortion of parts.

  12. Domain growth in alloys 

    E-print Network

    Hawick, Kenneth Arthur

    1991-01-01

    This thesis describes Monte-Carlo computer simulations of binary alloys, with comparisons between small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data, and numerically integrated solutions to the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook (CHC) equation. ...

  13. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  14. Alloying of liquid aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Shafyei, A.; Guthrie, R.I.L.

    1996-10-01

    The addition of high melting point alloying elements is an integral component in the processing of molten aluminum alloys. In this research, the kinetics of dissolution of manganese and iron particles, freely dispersed in turbulently-stirred baths of liquid aluminum, has been investigated at a laboratory scale. First, the suspension behavior of alloying elements in liquid aluminum was studied via water modeling analogues, using dimensional analysis and similarity techniques. Second, mass transfer coefficients between particles of manganese or iron and stirred liquid aluminum were measured. These high temperature experiments showed that measured mass transfer coefficients of manganese and iron particles were strongly dependent on the intensity of the mixing, until the point at which particles became fully suspended. Further increases in the rate of mixing produced little further rises in mass transfer coefficients. From a practical point of view, therefore, these results suggested that very high rates of melt mixing are not recommended during an alloying process.

  15. Electric dipole (hyper)polarizabilities of selected X2Y2 and X3Y3 (X = Al, Ga, In and Y = P, As): III-V semiconductor clusters. An ab initio comparative study.

    PubMed

    Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Pouchan, Claude; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-12-25

    A systematic ab initio comparative study of the (hyper)polarizabilities of selected III-V stoichiometric semiconductor clusters has been carried out. Our investigation focuses on the ground state structures of the dimers and on two dissimilar trimer configurations of aluminum, gallium, indium phosphide and arsenide. The basis set effect on both the polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of the studied systems has been explicitly taken into account relying on the augmented correlation consistent aug-cc-pVnZ (n = D, T, Q, and 5) basis sets series. In addition, a rough estimation of the effects of the relativistic effects on the investigated properties is provided by extension of the study to include calculations performed with relativistic electron core potentials (or pseudopotentials). Electron correlation effects have been estimated utilizing methods of increasing predictive reliability, e.g., the Møller-Plesset many body perturbation theory and the couple cluster approach. Our results reveal that in the considered semiconductor species the Group III elements (Al, Ga, In) play a vital role on the values of their relative (hyper)polarizability. At all levels of theory employed the most hyperpolarizable clusters are the indium derivatives while the aluminum arsenide clusters also exhibit high, comparable hyperpolarizabilities. The less hyperpolarizable species are those composed of gallium and this is associated with the strong influence of the nuclear charge on the valence electrons of Ga due to the poor shielding that is provided by the semicore d electrons. In addition, the analysis of the electronic structure and the hyperpolarizability magnitudes reveals that clusters, in which their bonding is characterized by strong electron transfer from the electropositive to the electronegative atoms, are less hyperpolarizable than species in which the corresponding electron transfer is weaker. Lastly, from the methodological point of view our results point out that the hyperpolarizabilities of those species converge when an augmented triple-zeta quality basis set is used and, also, that the second order Møller-Plesset approximation (MP2) overestimates considerably their second hyperpolarizabilities with respect to the highest level of coupled cluster theory applied in this study (CCSD(T)). PMID:19093824

  16. Ferromagnetic bulk amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akihisa; Takeuchi, Akira; Zhang, T.

    1998-07-01

    This article reviews the authors recent results on the development of ferromagnetic bulk amorphous alloys prepared by casting processes. The multicomponent Fe-(Al,Ga)-(P,C,B,Si) alloys are amorphized in the bulk form with diameters up to 2 mm, and the temperature interval of the supercooled liquid region before crystallization is in the range of 50 to 67 K. These bulk amorphous alloys exhibit good soft magnetic properties, i.e., high B{sub s} of 1.1 to 1.2 T, low H{sub c} of 2 to 6 A/m, and high {mu}{sub e} of about 7,000 at 1 kHz. The Nd-Fe-Al and Pr-Fe-Al bulk amorphous alloys are also produced in the diameter range of up to 12 mm by the copper mold casting process and exhibit rather good hard magnetic properties, i.e., B{sub r} of about 0.1 T, high H{sub c} of 300 to 400 kA/m, and rather high (JH){sub max} of 13 to 20 kJ/m{sup 3}. The crystallization causes the disappearance of the hard magnetic properties. Furthermore, the melt-spun Nd-Fe-Al and Pr-Fe-Al alloy ribbons exhibit soft-type magnetic properties. Consequently, the hard magnetic properties are concluded to be obtained only for the bulk amorphous alloys. The Nd- and Pr-based bulk amorphous alloys can be regarded as a new type of clustered amorphous material, and the control of the clustered amorphous structure is expected to enable the appearance of novel functional properties which cannot be obtained for an ordinary amorphous structure.

  17. Integration of GaAsP alloys on SiGe virtual substrates for Si-based dual-junction solar cells

    E-print Network

    Sharma, Prithu

    2013-01-01

    Integration of III-V compound semiconductors with silicon is an area that has generated a lot of interest because III-V materials and Si are best suited for different types of devices. Monolithic integration enables the ...

  18. (Si)5-2y(AlP)y alloys assembled on Si(100) from Al-P-Si3 building units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, T.; Jiang, L.; Xu, C.; Chizmeshya, A. V. G.; Smith, D. J.; Menéndez, J.; Kouvetakis, J.

    2012-01-01

    An original class of IV/III-V hybrid (Si)5-2y(AlP)y/Si(100) semiconductors have been produced via tailored interactions of molecular P(SiH3)3 and atomic Al yielding tetrahedral "Al-P-Si3" building blocks. Extensive structural, optical, and vibrational characterization corroborates that these units condense to assemble single-phase, monocrystalline alloys containing 60%-90% Si (y = 0.3-1.0) as nearly defect-free layers lattice-matched to Si. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and density functional theory band structure calculations indicate mild compositional bowing of the band gaps, suggesting that the tuning needed for optoelectronic applications should be feasible.

  19. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ca.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOEpatents

    Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5.mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photovoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of the growing layer.

  20. Lattice constant grading in the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y As.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x alloy system

    DOEpatents

    Moon, Ronald L. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy is employed to grow a lattice matched layer of GaAsSb on GaAs substrates through the compositional intermediary of the III-V alloy system AlGaAsSb which acts as a grading layer. The Al constituent reaches a peak atomic concentration of about 6% within the first 2.5 .mu.m of the transition layer, then decreases smoothly to about 1% to obtain a lattice constant of 5.74 A. In the same interval the equilibrium concentration of Sb smoothly increases from 0 to about 9 atomic percent to form a surface on which a GaAsSb layer having the desired energy bandgap of 1.1 ev for one junction of an optimized dual junction photolvoltaic device. The liquid phase epitaxy is accomplished with a step cooling procedure whereby dislocation defects are more uniformly distributed over the surface of growing layer.

  1. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  2. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter (Houston, TX); Koh, Shirlaine (Houston, TX); Mani, Prasanna (Houston, TX); Ratndeep, Srivastava (Houston, TX)

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  3. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, G W; Davis, J W

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500/sup 0/C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150/sup 0/C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement.

  4. Magnesium and magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Avedesian, M.; Baker, H.

    1998-12-31

    This new handbook is the most comprehensive publication of engineering information on commercial magnesium alloys under one cover in the last sixty years. Prepared with the cooperation of the International Magnesium Association, it presents the industrial practices currently used throughout the world, as well as the properties of the products critical to their proper application. Contents include: general characteristics; physical metallurgy; melting, refining, alloying, recycling, and powder production; casting; heat treatment; forging, rolling, and extrusion; semisolid processing; forming; joining; cleaning and finishing; selection, application, and properties of grades and alloys; design considerations; mechanical behavior and wear resistance; fatigue and fracture-mechanics; high-temperature strength and creep; corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking; specification.

  5. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  6. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  7. Alloyed coatings for dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wermuth, F. R.; Stetson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for applying several diffusion barriers to TD-Ni and TD-NiCr. Barrier coated specimens of both substrates were clad with Ni-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al alloys and diffusion annealed in argon. Measurement of the aluminum distribution after annealing showed that, of the readily applicable diffusion barriers, a slurry applied tungsten barrier most effectively inhibited the diffusion of aluminum from the Ni-Cr-Al clad into the TD-alloy substrates. No barrier effectively limited interdiffusion of the Fe-Cr-Al clad with the substrates. A duplex process was then developed for applying Ni-Cr-Al coating compositions to the tungsten barrier coated substrates. A Ni-(16 to 32)Cr-3Si modifier was applied by slurry spraying and firing in vacuum, and was then aluminized by a fusion slurry process. Cyclic oxidation tests at 2300 F resulted in early coating failure due to inadequate edge coverage and areas of coating porosity. EMP analysis showed that oxidation had consumed 70 to 80 percent of the aluminum in the coating in less than 50 hours.

  8. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  9. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  10. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  11. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  12. Grindability of dental magnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Eisei; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu; Kimura, Kohei

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the grindability of cast magnetic alloys (Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and magnetic stainless steel) was evaluated and compared with that of conventional dental casting alloys (Ag-Pd-Au alloy, Type 4 gold alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy). Grindability was evaluated in terms of grinding rate (i.e., volume of metal removed per minute) and grinding ratio (i.e., volume ratio of metal removed compared to wheel material lost). Solution treated Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy had a significantly higher grinding rate than the aged one at a grinding speed of 750-1500 m x min(-1). At 500 m x min(-1), there were no significant differences in grinding rate between solution treated and aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloys. At a lower speed of 500 m x min(-1) or 750 m x min(-1), it was found that the grinding rates of aged Fe-Pt-Nb magnetic alloy and stainless steel were higher than those of conventional casting alloys. PMID:16022434

  13. 2.2-2.7 ?m side wall corrugated index coupled distributed feedback GaSb based laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaimard, Q.; Larrue, A.; Triki, M.; Adelin, B.; Nguyen-Ba, T.; Rouillard, Y.; Gauthier-Lafaye, O.; Teissier, R.; Vicet, A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the modeling, growth, processing, characterization and integration in a gas detection setup of side wall corrugated distributed feed-back antimonide diode lasers emitting at 2.28 and 2.67 ?m. The laser structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrate. Ridge lasers were fabricated from the grown wafers according to the following process: a second order Bragg grating was defined on the sides of the ridges by interferometric lithography, optical lithography and etched in a Cl-based inductively coupled plasma reactor. The devices exhibit a power reaching 40 mW, a side mode suppression ratio better than 28 dB and a tuning range of 3 nm at room temperature. One of these devices was successfully integrated in a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy setup, thus demonstrating that they are suitable for gas analysis.

  14. GaSb based light emitting diodes with strained InGaAsSb type I quantum well active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchalkin, Sergey; Jung, Seungyong; Kipshidze, Gela; Shterengas, Leon; Hosoda, Takashi; Westerfeld, David; Snyder, Donald; Belenky, Gregory

    2008-08-01

    Mid-IR (? ?3-3.5 ?m) light emitting diodes with quinternary AlInGaAsSb barriers and InGaAsSb strained quantum wells grown on GaSb substrates have been demonstrated. The devices produced a quasi-cw emission power of 0.7 mW at room temperature and 2.5 mW at T =80 K.

  15. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  16. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  17. Band structure properties of novel BxGa1-xP alloys for silicon integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Nadir; Hosea, T. J. C.; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Kunert, Bernardette; Stolz, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    We have grown and investigated the band-structure properties of novel III-V alloys based upon BxGa1-xP. These layers are utilized as strain-compensating layers for the lattice-matched integration of novel direct bandgap Ga(NAsP) quantum well lasers on silicon. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal the dependence of the direct and indirect band gaps for strained BxGa1-xP layers grown on silicon as a function of Boron composition from which we derive the properties of free-standing BxGa1-xP. For Boron fractions up to 6%, we find that the bowing parameter for the lowest (indirect) band gap is - 6.2 ± 0.2 eV. High crystalline quality and promising optical material properties are demonstrated and applied to monolithically integrated Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)P multi-quantum well heterostructures on (001) silicon substrates. Our results show that novel (BGa)P layers are suitable for strain compensation purposes, which pave the way towards a commercial solution for the monolithic integration of long term stable laser diodes on silicon substrates.

  18. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Liu, C. T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  19. Alchemy: Transmuting Base Alloy Specifications into Implementations

    E-print Network

    Dougherty, Daniel J.

    Alchemy: Transmuting Base Alloy Specifications into Implementations Shriram Krishnamurthi Brown to define lightweight models of systems. We present Alchemy, which compiles Alloy specifi- cations into implementations that execute against persistent databases. Alchemy translates a subset of Alloy predicates

  20. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  1. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  2. Surface Segregation in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2000-01-01

    Surface segregation profiles of binary (Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Cu-Au) and ternary (Cu-Au-Ni) alloys are determined via Monte Carlo-Metropolis computer simulations using the BFS method for alloys for the calculation of the energetics. The behavior of Cu or Au in Ni is contrasted with their behavior when both are present. The interaction between Cu and Au and its effect on the segregation profiles for Cu-Au-Ni alloys is discussed.

  3. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  4. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  5. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  6. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  7. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  8. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  9. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  10. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F. (Ogden, UT); Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Paxton, Michael M. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  11. ``Ideal'' Engineering Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Nagasako, N.; Kuramoto, S.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2007-03-01

    A newly discovered group of alloys, called Gum Metals, approaches ideal strength in bulk form, exhibits significant plastic deformation prior to failure, and shows no indications of conventional-dislocation activity. Two conditions must be met for a material to exhibit this “ideal” behavior: (1) the stress required to trigger conventional-dislocation plasticity in the material must exceed its ideal strength, and (2) the material must be intrinsically ductile when stressed to ideal strength. Gum Metals satisfy both criteria, explaining their remarkable mechanical properties.

  12. Stable palladium alloys for diffusion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patapoff, M.

    1973-01-01

    Literature search on hydrogen absorption effect on palladium alloys revealed existence of alloy compositions in which alpha--beta transition does not take place. Survey conclusions: 40 percent gold alloy of palladium should be used in place of palladium; alloy must be free of interstitial impurities; and metallic surfaces of tube must be clean.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  14. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  15. NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY

    E-print Network

    Sander, Evelyn

    NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY Kalea Sebesta Department of Applied Mathematics, known as nucleation, in a two component metal alloy. The motivation behind this study is to use component metal alloys. These alloys are seen in material sciences; therefore, understanding

  16. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  18. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Close-up view of the Binary Colloidal Alloy Test during an experiment run aboard the Russian Mir space station. BCAT is part of an extensive series of experiments plarned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals, which may have many unique properties that may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices that can fuel the evolution of the next generation of computer and communication technologies. This Slow Growth hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera aimed toward a module which contained 10 separate colloid samples. To begin the experiment, one of the astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles. Then the hardware operated autonomously, taking photos of the colloidal samples over a 90-day period. The investigation proved that gravity plays a central role in the formation and stability of these types of colloidal crystal structures. The investigation also helped identify the optimum conditions for the formation of colloidal crystals, which will be used for optimizing future microgravity experiments in the study of colloidal physics. Dr. David Weitz of the University of Pennsylvania and Dr. Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, are the principal investigators.

  19. The entropy of alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Stan, M.

    2004-01-01

    A major problem in simulating thermodynamic properties of alloys is modeling the entropy. While configurational entropy is incorporated in most stability calculations, the other components, such as the vibrational and electronic entropy are often neglected or roughly estimated. In this work we propose a method of accounting for both configurational and vibrational entropy and discuss the electronic contribution for several actinide based alloys. The meaning of entropy in non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes is also discussed and illustrated for the case of phase transformations and diffusion. The influence of temperature on the enthalpy and free energy of delta-Pu-Ga phase, as resulted from Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM), and the influence of Ga content on the enthalpy and free energy of delta-Pu-Ga phase are discussed. The analysis of the thermodynamic properties of the fcc Pu-Ga phase, as calculated with MEAM shows that the vibrational entropy contribution to the free energy is ve ry important and non-linear with temperature. The free energy also changes with the Ga content.

  20. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  1. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  2. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  3. Braze alloy development for zircaloy

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, A.H.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to find a suitable braze alloy to close the ends of a new fuel design for N Reactor, the defense reactor at the Hanford site, Washington. An alloy composed of Zircaloy-2 + 8 wt % chromium + 8 wt % nickel (Zr2-8Cr-8Ni) was successfully used to obtain an acceptable joint with no voids. Suggestions for future work on end closure development for the new fuel are outlined. This alloy has potential use in any Zircaloy joining applications. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Mechanical alloying of biocompatible Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-De Jesús, F; Bolarín-Miró, A M; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Cortés-Escobedo, C A; Betancourt-Cantera, J A

    2010-07-01

    We report on an alternative route for the synthesis of crystalline Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy, which could be used for surgical implants. Co, Cr and Mo elemental powders, mixed in an adequate weight relation according to ISO Standard 58342-4 (ISO, 1996), were used for the mechanical alloying (MA) of nano-structured Co-alloy. The process was carried out at room temperature in a shaker mixer mill using hardened steel balls and vials as milling media, with a 1:8 ball:powder weight ratio. Crystalline structure characterization of milled powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction in order to analyze the phase transformations as a function of milling time. The aim of this work was to evaluate the alloying mechanism involved in the mechanical alloying of Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy. The evolution of the phase transformations with milling time is reported for each mixture. Results showed that the resultant alloy is a Co-alpha solid solution, successfully obtained by mechanical alloying after a total of 10 h of milling time: first Cr and Mo are mechanically prealloyed for 7 h, and then Co is mixed in for 3 h. In addition, different methods of premixing were studied. The particle size of the powders is reduced with increasing milling time, reaching about 5 mum at 10 h; a longer time promotes the formation of aggregates. The morphology and crystal structure of milled powders as a function of milling time were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and XR diffraction. PMID:20364362

  5. Rhenium and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bryskin, B.D. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports on the scarcity and high cost of pure rhenium (Re) which precludes its extensive use for large structural components. Typical applications include wear resistant electrical contacts and mass-spectrometer cathodes. The metal is also being considered for components of the reactor core of space nuclear power systems. Rhenium and rhenium-containing alloys are primarily produced by powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques. Melting of these materials in vacuum or in a high-purity inert-gas atmosphere often is prohibitively expensive and time-consuming, as is their production via chemical vapor deposition. P. M rhenium is characterized by a fine-grain polyhedral crystal structure, whereas arc-cast rhenium has a coarser structure and a grain size that varies with location in the ingot. As-sintered P. M rhenium has a density of 90 to 92% of theoretical.

  6. Alloyed steel wastes utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, I.V.

    1995-12-31

    Alloyed steel chips and swarf formed during metal processing are looked upon as additional raw materials in metallurgical production. This paper presents some new methods for steel waste chips and swarf cleaning. One of them is swarf and steel chips cleaning in tetrachloroethylene with ultrasonic assistance and solvent regeneration. Thermal cleaning of waste chips and swarf provides off gas products utilization. The catalyst influence of the metal surface on the thermal decomposition of liquid hydrocarbons during the cleaning process has been studied. It has been determined that the efficiency of this metal waste cleaning technique depends on the storage time of the swarf. The waste chips and swarf cleaning procedures have been proven to be economically advantageous and environmentally appropriate.

  7. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  8. Design of Stable Nanocrystalline Alloys

    E-print Network

    Chookajorn, Tongjai

    Nanostructured metals are generally unstable; their grains grow rapidly even at low temperatures, rendering them difficult to process and often unsuitable for usage. Alloying has been found to improve stability, but only ...

  9. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  10. An imperative extension to Alloy

    E-print Network

    Near, Joseph Paul

    We extend the Alloy language with the standard imperative constructs; we show the mix of declarative and imperative constructs to be useful in modeling dynamic systems. We present a translation from our extended language ...

  11. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  12. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  13. The stochastic model for ternary and quaternary alloys: Application of the Bernoulli relation to the phonon spectra of mixed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Marchewka, M. Wo?ny, M.; Polit, J.; Sheregii, E. M.; Kisiel, A.; Robouch, B. V.; Marcelli, A.

    2014-03-21

    To understand and interpret the experimental data on the phonon spectra of the solid solutions, it is necessary to describe mathematically the non-regular distribution of atoms in their lattices. It appears that such description is possible in case of the strongly stochastically homogenous distribution which requires a great number of atoms and very carefully mixed alloys. These conditions are generally fulfilled in case of high quality homogenous semiconductor solid solutions of the III–V and II–VI semiconductor compounds. In this case, we can use the Bernoulli relation describing probability of the occurrence of one n equivalent event which can be applied, to the probability of finding one from n configurations in the solid solution lattice. The results described in this paper for ternary HgCdTe and GaAsP as well as quaternary ZnCdHgTe can provide an affirmative answer to the question: whether stochastic geometry, e.g., the Bernoulli relation, is enough to describe the observed phonon spectra.

  14. Choosing An Alloy For Automotive Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes study of chemical compositions and microstructures of alloys for automotive Stirling engines. Engines offer advantages of high efficiency, low pollution, low noise, and ability to use variety of fuels. Twenty alloys evaluated for resistance to corrosion permeation by hydrogen, and high temperature. Iron-based alloys considered primary candidates because of low cost. Nickel-based alloys second choice in case suitable iron-based alloy could not be found. Cobalt-based alloy included for comparison but not candidate, because it is expensive strategic material.

  15. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  16. Space applications of shape memory alloys 

    E-print Network

    Godard, Olivier Jean

    2002-01-01

    This work presents an investigation of two new possible space applications of shape memory alloys. The first application uses these alloys as active devices to optimally reorient solar panels in space. The thermal issues ...

  17. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  18. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  19. Lower-cost tungsten-rhenium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Raffo, P. L.; Witzke, W. R.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten-rhenium alloys with a substantially more dilute rhenium content have ductilities and other mechanical properties which compare favorably with the tungsten-rhenium alloys having much higher concentrations of the costly rhenium.

  20. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  1. Shape memory alloys. Ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy films.

    PubMed

    Chluba, Christoph; Ge, Wenwei; Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Strobel, Julian; Kienle, Lorenz; Quandt, Eckhard; Wuttig, Manfred

    2015-05-29

    Functional shape memory alloys need to operate reversibly and repeatedly. Quantitative measures of reversibility include the relative volume change of the participating phases and compatibility matrices for twinning. But no similar argument is known for repeatability. This is especially crucial for many future applications, such as artificial heart valves or elastocaloric cooling, in which more than 10 million transformation cycles will be required. We report on the discovery of an ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy film system based on TiNiCu that allows at least 10 million transformation cycles. We found that these films contain Ti2Cu precipitates embedded in the base alloy that serve as sentinels to ensure complete and reproducible transformation in the course of each memory cycle. PMID:26023135

  2. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  3. Superconducting compounds and alloys research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G.

    1975-01-01

    Resistivity measurements as a function of temperature were performed on alloys of the binary material system In sub(1-x) Bi sub x for x varying between 0 and 1. It was found that for all single-phase alloys (the pure elements, alpha-In, and the three intermetallic compounds) at temperatures sufficiently above the Debye-temperature, the resistivity p can be expressed as p = a sub o T(n), where a sub o and n are composition-dependent constants. The same exponential relationship can also be applied for the sub-system In-In2Bi, when the two phases are in compositional equilibrium. Superconductivity measurements on single and two-phase alloys can be explained with respect to the phase diagram. There occur three superconducting phases (alpha-In, In2Bi, and In5Bi3) with different transition temperatures in the alloying system. The magnitude of the transition temperatures for the various intermetallic phases of In-Bi is such that the disappearance or occurrence of a phase in two component alloys can be demonstrated easily by means of superconductivity measurements.

  4. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  5. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenior City, TN)

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

  6. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap andp-dseparation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  7. Characterizing Semiconductor Alloys for Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, B. S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Report presents results of continuing program aimed at characterizing mercury/cadmium/tellurium alloys and eventually developing improved methods of preparing alloys for use as infrared sensors. Work covered by report includes series of differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements of alloy compositions with x varied from 9 to 1 in 0.1 increments.

  8. High-temperature nickel-brazing alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. H.; Thompson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    Gold-nickel brazing alloy, with 5 percent indium added to depress the melting point, is used for brazing of nickel-clad silver electrical conductors which operate at temperatures to 1200 deg F. Alloy has low resistivity, requires no flux, and is less corrosive than other gold-nickel, gold-copper alloys.

  9. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  10. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  11. Manufacturing and Microstructural Evolution of Mechanuically Alloyed

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Strengthened Superalloys** By Carlos Capdevila and Harry K. D. H. Bhadeshia* 1. Introduction An alloy can and to the development of a uniform grain structure which is sub-micrometer in size. Following mechanical alloying-base superalloys and the ODS nickel-base superalloys. The chemical compositions of some of the commercial alloys

  12. Directional Recrystallisation in Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    E-print Network

    Baloch, Muhammad Moazam

    1989-12-12

    of Dispersed Particles during Recrystallisation 2.5 Grain Growth 2.6 Rapidly Solidified Aluminium-Chromium-Zirconium Alloys 2.6.1 Production of RS Aluminium Alloys 2.6.2 Gas Atomisation Process 2.6.3 Background to RS AI-Cr-Zr Alloys 2.6.4 Physical Metallurgy...

  13. Economics of neodymium alloy production

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, R.J.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1993-09-01

    Process economics of neodymium alloy (Nd-16%Fe) production are becoming increasingly important to the high-performance iron neodymium boron magnet industry. This paper examines economics of oxide conversion to fluoride, followed by thermite reduction process: {sub 2}/{sup 1} Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} + HF{yields} NdF{sub 3} + {sub 2}/{sup 3} H{sub 2}O, and NdF{sub 3} + {sub 2}/{sup 3} Ca {yields} {sub 2}/{sup 3} CaF{sub 2} + Nd. In the calcium reduction reaction, iron fluoride is co-reduced to obtain a 16%Fe alloy. Resulting regulus is suitable for making magnet alloy powder or it can be vacuum induction melted to provide a low calcium content ingot.

  14. Alloy 718 for Oilfield Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBarbadillo, John J.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-02-01

    Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) was developed for use in aircraft gas turbine engines, but its unique combination of room-temperature strength and aqueous corrosion resistance made it a candidate for oilfield fasteners, valves, drill tools, and completion equipment. As well environments became more severe, stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement failures in production equipment drove the evolution of the composition and microstructure that distinguish today's oilfield-grade 718 from aerospace grades. This paper reviews the development of the grade and its applications and describes some of its unique characteristics, testing, and manufacturing methods as well as newer alloys designed for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  15. Copper-Refractory Metal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, J. D.; Schmidt, F. A.; Gibson, E. D.; Spitzig, W. A.

    1986-09-01

    This research shows that Cu-V, Cu-Nb and Cu-Ta castings may be prepared by consumable are casting. The resulting alloys, consisting of refractory metal dendrites in a Cu matrix, are quite ductile and, when mechanically reduced by large reduction in areas, produce an aligned composite material. The strength, strength/electrical conductivity, superconductivity and surface properties of these composites are reviewed. The scale-up potential of consumable are casting for producing these three alloys as well as Cu-Mo, Cu-Cr and Cu-Fe is also discussed.

  16. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  17. Diffusion phase transitions in alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinovshchikov, Yu I.

    2014-07-01

    We present a critical analysis of research on the thermodynamics, kinetics, and morphology of diffusion phase transitions in alloys. We show that diffusion phase transitions are mainly driven by the chemical potential difference due to a change in the sign of the chemical interaction among the component atoms. We explain how the sign of the chemical interaction energy can be obtained from experimental measurements. Examples are given to illustrate the kinetics and morphology of the ordering-separation phase transition in Ni- and Co-based alloys. We show how introducing the concept of the ordering-separation phase transition may affect our thinking in this area.

  18. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  19. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine softening and hardening behavior in 19 binary iron-alloy systems. Microhardness tests were conducted at four temperatures in the range 77 to 411 K. Alloy softening was exhibited by 17 of the 19 alloy systems. Alloy softening observed in 15 of the alloy systems was attributed to an intrinsic mechanism, believed to be lowering of the Peierls (lattice friction) stress. Softening and hardening rates could be correlated with the atomic radius ratio of solute to iron. Softening observed in two other systems was attributed to an extrinsic mechanism, believed to be associated with scavenging of interstitial impurities.

  20. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Santandrea, Robert P. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR)

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  1. Alloy softening in binary iron solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether alloy softening in Fe alloys is dependent on electron concentration and to provide a direct comparison of alloy softening and hardening in several binary Fe alloy systems having the same processing history. Alloy additions to Fe included the elements in the Periods 4-6 and the Groups IV-VIII with the exception of technetium. A total of 19 alloy systems was investigated, and hardness testing was the primary means of evaluation. Testing was carried out at four temperatures over a homologous temperature range of 0.043-0.227 times the absolute melting temperature of unalloyed Fe. Major conclusions are that the atomic radius ratio of solute-to-Fe is the key factor in controlling low-temperature hardness of the binary Fe alloys and that alloy softening rates at 77 K and alloy hardening rates at 411 K are correlated with this atomic radius ratio for 15 of the binary alloy systems. Mechanisms of alloy softening and hardening are proposed.

  2. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  3. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  4. Recent developments in light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R W

    1920-01-01

    This report is intended to cover the progress that has been made in both the manufacture and utility of light alloys in the United States since the first part of 1919. Duralumin is extensively discussed both as to manufacture and durability.

  5. New developments in hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, R.

    1996-02-01

    The hardfacing industry has matured substantially since its inception in the early 1920s. Numerous welding alloys have been developed and field proven. By developing a strong working knowledge of available alloys, wear conditions and the specific wear situation, the goal of selecting the proper alloy to prolong service life and fight wear is now more attainable than ever. Hardfacing is the process in which a coating or cladding is applied to a substrate for the main purpose of reducing wear or loss of material by abrasion, impact, erosion, galling and cavitation. Most service environments involve a combination of these factors. The choice of an alloy system depends to a great degree on the nature of the wear process encountered. This can range from a simple low-stress condition to a very complex situation that involves abrasion combined with a corrodant and high temperature. The list of possible wear conditions is outlined below: (1) low-stress abrasion, (2) high-stress abrasion, (3) impact, (4) metal-to-metal wear, (5) erosion, and (6) cavitation erosion. In general, service conditions involve a combination of several of the conditions listed above. In addition to the type of wear, three other factors are also important as far as the severity of the wear condition is concerned. These are: (1) type of abradant, (2) service temperature, and (3) service environment. It is clear that in terms of the nature of the wear process as well as the environmental conditions, service conditions are extremely complex. They are, therefore, difficult to simulate in the laboratory. The selection of hardfacing alloys for an application is based primarily on actual field experiences and these are refined with data gathered with time.

  6. III-V solar cells and doping processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, L.M.; Sundaram, V.S.; Avery, J.E.; Gruenhaum, P.E.; Malocsay, E.

    1993-06-08

    A tandem solar cell concentrator module is described comprising: (a) a concentrator lens for focusing incident solar radiation; (b) a tandem solar cell substantially at the focus of the lens, the cell including: (i) an upper AlGaAs/GaAs primary cell having: (1) an AlGaAs window covering a photoactive region of a generally n-type GaAs wafer, and (2) a zinc-diffused, p-type emitter region having a concentration of zinc of between about 10[sup 18]-10[sup 19] atoms/cm[sup 3]; and (ii) a lower GaSb booster cell positioned to receive solar radiation that passes through the primary cell, the booster cell including grid lines on the upper surface for collecting current produced in the booster cell by incident radiation, a heavy concentration of zinc under the rid lines to provide low ohmic contact resistance, and a light concentration of zinc between the grid lines, the light concentration being effective to preserve the minority carrier lifetime in the booster cell to increase the short circuit current; wherein the booster cell includes texture etching to increase the conversion efficiency and to reduce reflection losses, the etching patterning the booster cell in the regions between the grid lines, and includes a backside metallization comprising layers of indium tin oxide, titanium tungsten nitride, and silver overlying one another, the indium tin oxide adjacent the GaSb and the silver at the exposed surface; (c) a heat spreader attached to both the primary cell and booster cell for holding the two in proper spaced relationship and for conveying excess heat away from either to a heat sink; and (d) current collection means connected to the primary cell and booster cell for collecting current generated in both when solar radiation is focused on the module.

  7. Nano-scale ohmic contacts for III-V MOSFETs

    E-print Network

    Lu, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    As modem silicon CMOS has been scaled down to extremely small dimensions, there is an urgent need for technological innovations of new devices architectures that would allow the continuation of Moore's Law into the future. ...

  8. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohummed Noori, Farah T.

    2013-12-01

    Indium- Arsenide (InAs) nanowires were grown in a high vacuum chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) unit on InAs(111) wafers substrates at 425-454°C. Two types of nanogold were used as orientation catalyst, 40nm and 80nm. The measurements were performed using scanning electron microscopy showed that uniform nanowires. The nanowires orient vertically in the InAs nanowire scanning electron microscopy of an array 80nm diameter InAs nanowire with length is in the range 0.5-1 ?m and of an array 40nm diameter with length is in the range 0.3-0.7?m. The nanowire length with growth time shows that the linear increase of nanowires start to grow as soon as TMIn is available. The growth rate with temperature was studied.

  9. Characterization of novel III-V semiconductor devices

    E-print Network

    Young, Sue Y

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the characterization of tunnel junctions and tunnel-junction-coupled lasers. The reverse-biased leakage current in a tunnel junction can be exploited to tunnel electrons from the valence band of one ...

  10. Coherent Twinning Phenomena: Towards Twinning Superlattices in III-V

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Qihua

    Vania 16802 Received July 21, 2006 ABSTRACT We report evidence in GaP and InP nanowires for a coherent the wire. This observation is indeed unexpected, as the vapor-liquid-solid growth conditions used in the growth zone. Future control of the twinning superlattice period should allow significant design

  11. Novel compound semiconductor devices based on III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Ren, F.

    1995-10-01

    New developments in dry and wet etching, ohmic contacts and epitaxial growth of Ill-V nitrides are reported. These make possible devices such as microdisk laser structures and GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors with improved InN ohmic contacts.

  12. Ion implantation and annealing studies in III-V nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Williams, J.S.; Tan, H.H.; Karlicek, R.J. Jr.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation doping and isolation is expected to play an enabling role for the realization of advanced III-Nitride based devices. In fact, implantation has already been used to demonstrate n- and p-type doping of GaN with Si and Mg or Ca, respectively, as well as to fabricate the first GaN junction field effect transistor. Although these initial implantation studies demonstrated the feasibility of this technique for the III-Nitride materials, further work is needed to realize its full potential. After reviewing some of the initial studies in this field, the authors present new results for improved annealing sequences and defect studies in GaN. First, sputtered AlN is shown by electrical characterization of Schottky and Ohmic contacts to be an effect encapsulant of GaN during the 1,100 C implant activation anneal. The AlN suppresses N-loss from the GaN surface and the formation of a degenerate n{sup +}-surface region that would prohibit Schottky barrier formation after the implant activation anneal. Second, they examine the nature of the defect generation and annealing sequence following implantation using both Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Hall characterization. They show that for a Si-dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2} 50% electrical donor activation is achieved despite a significant amount of residual implantation-induced damage in the material.

  13. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of III–V semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mohummed Noori, Farah T.

    2013-12-16

    Indium- Arsenide (InAs) nanowires were grown in a high vacuum chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) unit on InAs(111) wafers substrates at 425–454°C. Two types of nanogold were used as orientation catalyst, 40nm and 80nm. The measurements were performed using scanning electron microscopy showed that uniform nanowires. The nanowires orient vertically in the InAs nanowire scanning electron microscopy of an array 80nm diameter InAs nanowire with length is in the range 0.5–1 ?m and of an array 40nm diameter with length is in the range 0.3–0.7?m. The nanowire length with growth time shows that the linear increase of nanowires start to grow as soon as TMIn is available. The growth rate with temperature was studied.

  14. Carbon films grown from plasma on III-V semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Warner, J. D.; Liu, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric carbon films were grown on n- and p-type GaAs and InP substrates using plasmas generated at 30 KHz from gaseous hydrocarbons. The effect of gas source, flow rate, and power on film growth were investigated. Methane and n-butane gases were utilized. The flow rate and power ranged from 30 to 50 sccm and 25 to 300 W, respectively. AES measurements show only carbon to be present in the films. The relative Ar ion sputtering rate (3 KeV) of carbon depends on the ratio power/pressure. In addition, the degree of asymmetry associated with the carbon-semiconductor interface is approximately power-independent. SIMS spectra indicate different H-C bonding configurations to be present in the films. Band gaps as high as 3.05 eV are obtained from optical absorption studies.

  15. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Michael D.

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55?m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  16. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  17. The Performance of Advanced III-V Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.; Gaddy, Edward; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Test results show triple junction solar cells with efficiencies as high as 27% at 28C and 136.7 mw/sq cm. Triple junction cells also achieve up to 27.5% at -120 C and 5 mw/sq cm, conditions applicable to missions to Jupiter. Some triple junction cells show practically no degradation as a result of Low Intensity Low Temperature (LILT) effects, while others show some; this degradation can be overcome with minor changes to the cell design.

  18. Compensation, interstitial defects and ferromagnetism in III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziman, Timothy; Bouzerar, Georges; Kudrnovský, Josef

    2005-03-01

    In diluted magnetic semi-conductors, e.g. Ga(Mn)As, Ga(Mn)N and In(Mn)As, the observed magnetism depends strongly on methods of preparation and sample history, with correlation between the Curie temperature Tc and the conductivity for the same concentration of magnetic ions. The transport measurements show that the simple picture of substitution of Mn^2+ ions for Ga sites is insufficient and effects of defects, e.g. Mn interstitials and As anti-sites, must be included. We present a quantitative theory, using magnetic exchange interactions from carrier- and impurity- concentration dependent ab initio estimates, and a recently developed semi-analytic theory^1,2. Spin fluctuations are treated in a locally self-consistent RPA approach, and disorder exactly, by sampling. Very good agreement, without ajustable parameters, is obtained for the Tc of different samples. We predict Tc as a function of hole concentration for MnxGa1-xAs and InxGa1-xAs. For fixed x, Tc is non-monotonic in carrier concentration for a restricted region of carrier density and vanishes outside. [1]G. Bouzerar, T. Ziman, J.Kudrnovsk'y, cond-mat/0405322 [2]G. Bouzerar, T. Ziman, J.Kudrnovsk'y, Appl. Phys. Lett. (scheduled Nov. 29 2004), cond-mat/0407101

  19. Method of producing superplastic alloys and superplastic alloys produced by the method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troeger, Lillianne P. (Inventor); Starke, Jr., Edgar A. (Inventor); Crooks, Roy (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing new superplastic alloys by inducing in an alloy the formation of precipitates having a sufficient size and homogeneous distribution that a sufficiently refined grain structure to produce superplasticity is obtained after subsequent PSN processing. An age-hardenable alloy having at least one dispersoid phase is selected for processing. The alloy is solution heat-treated and cooled to form a supersaturated solid solution. The alloy is plastically deformed sufficiently to form a high-energy defect structure useful for the subsequent heterogeneous nucleation of precipitates. The alloy is then aged, preferably by a multi-stage low and high temperature process, and precipitates are formed at the defect sites. The alloy then is subjected to a PSN process comprising plastically deforming the alloy to provide sufficient strain energy in the alloy to ensure recrystallization, and statically recrystallizing the alloy. A grain structure exhibiting new, fine, equiaxed and uniform grains is produced in the alloy. An exemplary 6xxx alloy of the type capable of being produced by the present invention, and which is useful for aerospace, automotive and other applications, is disclosed and claimed. The process is also suitable for processing any age-hardenable aluminum or other alloy.

  20. Alloy substantially free of dendrites and method of forming the same

    DOEpatents

    de Figueredo, Anacleto M. (West Newton, MA); Apelian, Diran (West Boylston, MA); Findon, Matt M. (Monson, MA); Saddock, Nicholas (S. Windson, CT)

    2009-04-07

    Described herein are alloys substantially free of dendrites. A method includes forming an alloy substantially free of dendrites. A superheated alloy is cooled to form a nucleated alloy. The temperature of the nucleated alloy is controlled to prevent the nuclei from melting. The nucleated alloy is mixed to distribute the nuclei throughout the alloy. The nucleated alloy is cooled with nuclei distributed throughout.

  1. Status of Testing and Characterization of CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Santella, Michael L; Battiste, Rick; Terry, Totemeier; Denis, Clark

    2006-08-01

    Status and progress in testing and characterizing CMS Alloy 617 and Alloy 230 tasks in FY06 at ORNL and INL are described. ORNL research has focused on CMS Alloy 617 development and creep and tensile properties of both alloys. In addition to refurbishing facilities to conduct tests, a significant amount of creep and tensile data on Alloy 230, worth several years of research funds and time, has been located and collected from private enterprise. INL research has focused on the creep-fatigue behavior of standard chemistry Alloy 617 base metal and fusion weldments. Creep-fatigue tests have been performed in air, vacuum, and purified Ar environments at 800 and 1000 C. Initial characterization and high-temperature joining work has also been performed on Alloy 230 and CCA Alloy 617 in preparation for creep-fatigue testing.

  2. Progress in ODS Alloys: A Synopsis of a 2010 Workshop on Fe- Based ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, Bimal; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Jones, Andy R.; Vito, Cedro III; Tatlock, Gordon J; Pint, Bruce A; Tortorelli, Peter F; Rawls, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2010, a workshop on the role and future of Fe-based Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys gathered together ODS alloy suppliers, potential industrial end-users, and technical experts in relevant areas. Presentations and discussions focused on the current state of development of these alloys, their availability from commercial suppliers, past major evaluations of ODS alloy components in fossil and nuclear energy applications, and the technical and economic issues attendant to commercial use of ODS alloys. Significant progress has been achieved in joining ODS alloys, with creep resistant joints successfully made by inertia welding, friction stir welding and plasma-assisted pulse diffusion bonding, and in improving models for the prediction of lifetime components. New powder and alloy fabrication methods to lower cost or improve endproduct properties were also described. The final open discussion centered on challenges and pathways for further development and large-scale use of ODS alloys.

  3. Evaluation of zirconium-iron-rhenium alloys as surrogates for a technetium alloy waste form 

    E-print Network

    Mews, Paul Aaron

    2009-05-15

    Stainless steel – zirconium alloys were developed by the US Department of Energy Laboratories as metallic waste forms for noble metal fission products. This thesis evaluates iron–zirconium–rhenium alloys to establish a technical basis for using...

  4. Micro-Structures of Hard Coatings Deposited on Titanium Alloys by Laser Alloying Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Huijun; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Weng, Fei

    2013-02-01

    This work is based on micro-structural performance of the Ti-B4C-C laser alloying coatings on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The test results indicated that laser alloying of the Ti-B4C-C pre-placed powders on the Ti-6Al-4V alloy substrate can form the ceramics reinforced hard alloying coatings, which increased the micro-hardness and wear resistance of substrate. The test result also indicated that the TiB phase was produced in alloying coating, which corresponded to its (101) crystal plane. In addition, yttria has a refining effect on micro-structures of the laser alloying coating, and its refinement mechanism was analyzed. This research provided essential experimental and theoretical basis to promote the applications of the laser alloying technique in manufacturing and repairing of the aerospace parts.

  5. First principles theory of disordered alloys and alloy phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Shelton, W.A.

    1993-06-05

    These lecture notes review the LDA-KKR-CPA method for treating the electronic structure and energetics of random alloys and the MF-CF and GPM theories of ordering and phase stability built on the LDA- KKR-CPA description of the disordered phase. Section 2 lays out the basic LDA-KKR-CPA theory of random alloys and some applications. Section 3 reviews the progress made in understanding specific ordering phenomena in binary solid solutions base on the MF-CF and GPM theories of ordering and phase stability. Examples are Fermi surface nesting, band filling, off diagonal randomness, charge transfer, size difference or local strain fluctuations, magnetic effects; in each case, an attempt is made to link the ordering and the underlying electronic structure of the disordered phase. Section 4 reviews calculations of electronic structure of {beta}-phase Ni{sub c}Al{sub 1-c} alloys using a version of the LDA-KKR-CPA codes generalized to complex lattices.

  6. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  7. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  8. Directionally solidified eutectic alloy gamma-beta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    A pseudobinary eutectic alloy composition was determined by a previously developed bleed-out technique. The directionally solidified eutectic alloy with a composition of Ni-37.4Fe-10.0Cr-9.6Al (in wt%) had tensile strengths decreasing from 1,090 MPa at room temperature to 54 MPa at 1,100 C. The low density, excellent microstructural stability, and oxidation resistance of the alloy during thermal cycling suggest that it might have applicability as a gas turbine vane alloy while its relatively low high temperature strength precludes its use as a blade alloy. A zirconium addition increased the 750 C strength, and a tungsten addition was ineffective. The gamma=beta eutectic alloys appeared to obey a normal freezing relation.

  9. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Alloys for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1.+-.0.8%)Al--(1.0.+-.0.8%)Mo--(0.7.+-.0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section 872...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device with a...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060... Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification . A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 ...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060... Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification . A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060... Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification . A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 ...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification . A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060... Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 ...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification . A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 ...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification . A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060... Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification . A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 ...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification . A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of...

  3. Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Valasek, John

    1 Characterization of Shape Memory Alloys Using Artificial Neural Networks Jim Henrickson, Kenton ­ Shape Memory Alloys ­ Artificial Neural Networks Process ­ Implement Shape Memory Alloy Model ­ Generate Training Data ­ Train Artificial Neural Network Results Conclusion Characterization of Shape

  4. Sulfidation/oxidation resistant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S.

    1989-11-21

    The patent describes a nickel-base, high chromium alloy. It is characterized by excellent resistance to sulfidation and oxidation at elevated temperatures as high as 2000 {degrees} F. (1093 {degrees} C.) and higher, a stress-rupture life of about 200 hours or more at a temperature at least as high as 1800 {degrees} F. (990:0083 {degrees} C.) and under a stress of 2000 psi, good tensile strength and good ductility both at room and elevated temperature. The alloy consists essentially of about 27 to 35% chromium, about 2.5 to 5% aluminum, about 2.5 to about 6% iron, 0.5 to 2.5% columbium, up to 0.1% carbon, up to 1% each of titanium and zirconium, up to 0.05% cerium, up to 0.05% yttrium, up to 1% silicon, up to 1% manganese, and the balance nickel.

  5. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  6. Low-Gold-Content Brazing Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.; Mckown, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two new alloys for brazing at 1,760 degrees to 1,850 degrees F are stronger and have better gap-filling capability. Alloys have lower gold content than other gold brazes for their temperature range and therefore are far less expensive. They are produced in wire, foil, and powder and are excellent for brazing at temperatures where no suitable alloys existed--especially for step brazing copper.

  7. Nickel Aluminide Alloys Made By Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan

    1995-01-01

    Collection of reports describes experimental metallurgical studies of nickel aluminide alloys made by rapid-solidification powder-metallurgy process. Process incorporates ultrafine dispersions of hard, stable refractory compounds and rare-earth oxides into alloys. Effects of dispersoids on high-temperature mechanical properties (flow stress, and compressive and tensile creep) of alloys investigated. Results indicate specific additives result in improved strength and ductility.

  8. Effects of Hydrogen on Experimental Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosi, K. F.; Mucci, J.; Teel, J. R.; Kelly, D. G.; Holley, B. J.; Greenwood, J.

    1987-01-01

    Report presents results of tensile tests on experimental alloys for use in contact with pressurized hydrogen gas. Determined extent tensile strength deteriorated in hydrogen. Specimen materials included Incoloy(R) 907, various Fe/Ni/Co/Cr alloys, and some Cu/Ni alloys. Describes materials, equipment, and procedures. Presents conclusions for program and for individual tests. Includes information from 23 previously issued monthly progress reports.

  9. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M. (Sandia Park, NM); Powers, Dana A. (Albuquerque, NM); Zhang, Zhenyuan (Durham, NC)

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  11. Properties and microstructures for dual alloy combinations of three superalloys with alloy 901

    SciTech Connect

    Harf, F.H.

    1985-01-01

    Dual alloy combinations have potential for use in aircraft engine components such as turbine disks where a wide range of stress and temperature regimes exists during operation. Such alloy combinations may directly result in the conservation of elements which are costly or not available domestically. Preferably, a uniform heat treatment yielding good properties for both alloys should be used. Dual alloy combinations of iron rich Alloy 901 with nickel base superalloys Rene 95, Astroloy, or MERL 76 were not isostatically pressed from prealloyed powders. Individual alloys, alloy mixtures, and layered alloy combinations were given the heat treatments specified for their use in turbine disks or appropriate for Alloy 901. Selected specimens were overaged for 1500 hr at 650 C. Metallographic examinations revealed the absence of phases not originally present in either alloy of a combination. Mechanical tests showed adequate properties in combinations of Rene 95 or Astroloy with Alloy 901 when given the Alloy 901 heat treatment. Combinations with MERL 76 had better properties when given the MERL 76 heat treatment. The results indicate that these combinations are promising candidates for use in turbine disks.

  12. Brazing Alloys Indicate Turbomachinery Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaff, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Foils serve as consumable thermometers. Stainless-steel tab with circular window holds brazing-foil sample in place. Tab tacked to object to be tested with capacitive-discharge spot welder operating in range 10 + 1 joules. After measurements, tabs and samples chiseled off, leaving tested object fairly well intact. Technique used on objects made of alloys with iron, nickel, or cobalt as principal ingredients.

  13. Large warm worked, alloy article

    SciTech Connect

    DeBold, T. A.; Magee, J. H.

    1985-11-19

    A large, austenitic, non-magnetic, stainless steel, alloy article which has been significantly warm worked between about 1500/sup 0/ F. and 1650/sup 0/ F. but not subsequently annealed, which has a 0.2% yield strength of at least about 90 ksi, and which, when formed into a U-bend, does not undergo stress corrosion cracking within about 700 hours in boiling saturated aqueous sodium chloride containing 2 weight percent (w/o) ammonium bisulfite.

  14. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Honnell, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbs, W. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  15. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Honnell, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbs, W. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  16. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  17. Alloy NASA-HR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Po-Shou; Mitchell, Michael

    2005-01-01

    NASA-HR-1 is a high-strength Fe-Ni-base superalloy that resists high-pressure hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE), oxidation, and corrosion. Originally derived from JBK-75, NASA-HR-1 has exceptional HEE resistance that can be attributed to its gamma-matrix and eta-free (Ni3Ti) grain boundaries. The chemistry was formulated using a design approach capable of accounting for the simultaneous effects of several alloy additions. This approach included: (1) Systematically modifying gamma-matrix compositions based on JBK-75; (2) Increasing gamma (Ni3(Al,Ti)) volume fraction and adding gamma-matrix strengthening elements to obtain higher strength; and (3) Obtaining precipitate-free grain boundaries. The most outstanding attribute of NASA-HR-1 is its ability to resist HEE while showing much improved strength. NASA-HR-1 has approximately 25% higher yield strength than JXK-75 and exhibits tensile elongation of more than 20% with no ductility loss in a hydrogen environment at 5 ksi, an achievement unparalleled by any other commercially available alloy. Its Cr and Ni contents provide exceptional resistance to environments that promote oxidation and corrosion. Microstructural stability was maintained by improved solid solubility of the gamma-matrix, along with the addition of alloying elements to retard eta (Ni3Ti) precipitation. NASA-HR-1 represents a new system that greatly extends the compositional ranges of existing HEE-resistant Fe-Ni-base superalloys.

  18. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process.

  19. Clinical evaluation of three amalgam alloys.

    PubMed

    Tyas, M J; Ewers, G J

    1993-06-01

    A total of 117 high-copper amalgams of three types (platinum-modified, palladium-modified and dispersed phase) was placed by two operators in 59 patients. Restorations were assessed for marginal fracture, tarnish, corrosion, and tooth staining on continuous linear photographic rating scales. After one year, the platinum- and palladium-modified alloys showed a significant amount of tarnish, and all three alloys had statistically significant marginal fracture. The only significant difference between alloys at one year was the greater tarnish of the platinum-modified alloy. There was no association between static creep and marginal fracture. PMID:8373297

  20. Transient oxidation of multiphase Ni-Cr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, G.; Meraner, M.; Farrell, P.

    1988-06-01

    Four commercially available Ni-Cr-based alloys used with porcelain enamels were studied. Major alloying elements were Al, Be, Si, B, Nb, and Mo. All alloys were multiphase. During heat treatments simulating enameling conditions, phase changes occurred in most alloys and were detected using hardness testing, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and microscopy. Oxidation of these alloys at 1000/degrees/C for 10 min produced an oxide layer consisting principally of chromium oxide, but the oxide morphology varied with each alloy depending on the alloy microstructure. Controlling alloy microstructure while keeping the overall composition unchanged may be a means of preventing wrinkled poorly adherent scales from forming.

  1. Growth of (indium,aluminum)gallium nitride alloys by RF-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy for application in high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblenz, Christiane

    In this thesis work, growth of (In,Al)GaN alloys by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) was investigated with the goal of developing these materials for application in high electron mobility transistor structures (HEMTs). Growth of InGaN alloys by MBE was investigated in detail with the objective of implementing InGaN channels into HEMT structures to improve device performance. A growth diagram for InGaN growth based on III/V ratio during growth was developed. Control of indium composition was studied in detail and found to be highly dependent upon several growth parameters. Systematic studies resulted in demonstration of complete compositional control during growth of InGaN across the entire compositional range. Implementation of these layers into HEMT structures yielded inferior device properties due to an extremely high level of unintentional background carriers in the InGaN channel. Transport measurements were done on bulk InGaN for the first time demonstrating carrier concentrations as high as 1018 cm-2. An all-MBE growth process for AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on SiC was also developed utilizing an AlN nucleation layer and a two-step growth process for the GaN to reduce and control threading dislocation density. The GaN growth process was structurally and electrically optimized to achieve semi-insulating HEMT buffers. Two methods were developed to reduce buffer leakage. The first was through implementation of carbon doping via CBr4, and the second was by optimization of the AlN nucleation layer growth conditions in unintentionally doped (carbon-free) structures. Optimization of the direct-growth process and elimination of buffer leakage led to record output power densities in MBE-grown AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and device performance which is on par with state-of-the art HEMTs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).

  2. Effect of a microstructure and surface hydrogen alloying of a VT6 alloy on diffusion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkevich, K. S.; Skvortsova, S. V.; Kudelina, I. M.; Knyazev, M. I.; Zasypkin, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a structural type (lamellar, fine, gradient) and additional surface alloying with hydrogen on the diffusion bonding of titanium alloy VT6 samples is studied. It is shown that the surface alloying of VT6 alloy parts with hydrogen allows one to decrease the diffusion welding temperature by 50-100°C, to obtain high-quality pore-free bonding, and to remove the "structural" boundary between materials to be welded that usually forms during welding of titanium alloys with a lamellar structure.

  3. Data set for diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in dilute Mg alloys from first-principles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bi-Cheng; Shang, Shun-Li; Wang, Yi; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in Mg are critical for the development of new Mg alloys for lightweight applications. Here we present the data set of the temperature-dependent dilute tracer diffusion coefficients for 47 substitutional alloying elements in hexagonal closed packed (hcp) Mg calculated from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) by combining transition state theory and an 8-frequency model. Benchmark for the DFT calculations and systematic comparison with experimental diffusion data are also presented. The data set refers to “Diffusion coefficients of alloying elements in dilute Mg alloys: A comprehensive first-principles study” by Zhou et al. [1]. PMID:26702419

  4. Role of alloying elements in adhesive transfer and friction of copper-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in a vacuum with binary-copper alloy riders sliding against a conventional bearing-steel surface with normal residual oxides present. The binary alloys contained 1 atomic percent of various alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy analysis was used to monitor the adhesive transfer of the copper alloys to the bearing-steel surface. A relation was found to exist between adhesive transfer and the reaction potential and free energy of formation of the alloying element in the copper. The more chemically active the element and the more stable its oxide, the greater was the adhesive transfer and wear of the copper alloy. Transfer occurred in all the alloys except copper-gold after relatively few (25) passes across the steel surface.

  5. Structural evolution of Fe80C20 alloy with alloying times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yong-Goo; Paek, Mun-Cheol; Greneche, J. M.; Yang, Dong-Seok; Yu, Seong-Cho

    2005-05-01

    The structural evolution of mechanically alloyed Fe-C alloys was studied as a function of alloying times. The effect of alloying time on local structural changes of Fe-C has been investigated by means of Fe57 Mössbauer spectrometry, extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern from 24h alloyed Fe-C powder indicates at least the mixture of bcc-Fe and Fe3C phases. Mössbauer spectra analysis reveals that bcc-Fe decreases to the detriment of Fe3C phase with increasing alloying time, while both carbon-containing bcc-Fe and amorphouslike phase assigned to Fe located in grain boundaries (estimated at two atomic layers) remain alloying time independent. The variation of Fe3C phase content is in a good agreement with that observed by EXAFS analysis.

  6. Heat storage in alloy transformations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, C E; Gueceri, S I; Farkas, D; Labdon, M B; Nagaswami, N; Pregger, B

    1981-03-01

    A study conducted to determine the feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media is described. The study had the following major elements: (1) the identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements, (2) the development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients, (3) the development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase-change materials, and (4) the identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases have been determined. A new method employing x-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data that are obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase-change media. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide has been identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were considered.

  7. Materials data handbook: Aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for aluminum 2219 alloy is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and joining techniques is developed.

  8. Pressure-composition-isotherms of palladium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T.B.

    1996-11-01

    About one year ago a summary report was submitted covering the previous three years of the contract. This earlier report should be consulted as a useful survey and evaluation of the research carried out by the authors. Because of difficulties during the current contract period arising from the anomalous nature of the melt-spun alloys received from LANL, it is not possible to contribute much beyond that given in last year's summary with regard to the overall picture of the behavior of Pd-rich alloys towards hydrogen and its isotopes. In this contract year deuterium was employed instead of hydrogen and instead of using cycled alloys, the alloys employed for each isotherm measurement were in their virgin condition. Because of the anomalous behavior of the melt-spun alloys, it was not feasible or worthwhile in some cases, e.g., when the alloy behaved anomalously, to carry out all of the originally proposed work. Nonetheless considering these obstacles, some useful data were obtained. For example, the obtaining of deuterium isotherms for the Pd-Rh alloys down to {minus}40 C using internally oxidized melt-spun alloys may prove to be useful.

  9. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  10. Glass forming ranges of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Two main methods of synthesis of amorphous metallic alloys are based on the rapid solidification of molten alloys and on isothermal solid state reactions between pure metals. We discuss recent calculations for the glass forming range for both techniques and we compare the predicted homogeneity ranges of the amorphous phase with experiments. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Alloys of clathrate allotropes for rechargeable batteries

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Candace K; Miller, Michael A; Chan, Kwai S

    2014-12-09

    The present disclosure is directed at an electrode for a battery wherein the electrode comprises clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin. In method form, the present disclosure is directed at methods of forming clathrate alloys of silicon, germanium or tin which methods lead to the formation of empty cage structures suitable for use as electrodes in rechargeable type batteries.

  12. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  13. Progress in High-Entropy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Michael C.

    2013-12-01

    Strictly speaking, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) refer to single-phase, solid-solution alloys with multiprincipal elements in an equal or a near-equal molar ratio whose configurational entropy is tremendously high. This special topic was organized to reflect the focus and diversity of HEA research topics in the community.

  14. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  15. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1992-04-28

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition. 4 figs.

  16. Heats of formation of bcc binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The method of Bozzolo, Ferrante and Smith is applied for the calculation of alloy energies for bcc elements. The heat of formation of several alloys is computed with the help of the Connolly-Williams method within the tetrahedron approximation. The dependence of the results on the choice of different sets of ordered structures is discussed.

  17. Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01

    The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition.

  18. Phase Boundaries in Alloys with Elastic Misfit

    E-print Network

    Garcke, Harald

    Phase Boundaries in Alloys with Elastic Misfit Harald Garcke Abstract. We study a mathematical model describing phase transformations in alloys with kinetics driven by mass transport and stress­Hilliard model, phase boundaries are described by a dif­ fuse interface with small positive thickness

  19. Beryllium-aluminum alloys for investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtrab, W.T.; Levoy, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beryllium-aluminum alloys containing greater than 60 wt % beryllium are very favorable materials for applications requiring light weight and high stiffness. However, when produced by traditional powder metallurgical methods, these alloys are expensive and have limited applications. To reduce the cost of making beryllium-aluminum components, Nuclear Metals Inc. (NMI) and Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles have recently developed a family of patented beryllium-aluminum alloys that can be investment cast. Designated Beralcast, the alloys can achieve substantial weight savings because of their high specific strength and stiffness. In some cases, weight has been reduced by up to 50% over aluminum investment casting. Beralcast is now being used to make thin wall precision investment castings for several advanced aerospace applications, such as the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and F-22 jet fighter. This article discusses alloy compositions, properties, casting method, and the effects of cobalt additions on strength.

  20. A Study of Tungsten-Technetium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltz, J. W.

    1965-01-01

    Technetium is a sister element to rhenium and has many properties that are similar to rhenium. It is predicted that technetium will have about the same effects on tungsten as rhenium in regard to increase in workability, lowered ductile to brittle transition temperature, and improved ductility. The objectives of the current work are to recover technetium from fission product wastes at Hanford Atomic Products Operation and reduce to purified metal; prepare W-Tc alloys containing up to 50 atomic% Tc; fabricate the alloy ingots to sheet stock, assessing the effect of technetium on workability; and perform metallurgical and mechanical properties evaluation of the fabricated alloys. Previous reports have described the separation and purification of 800 g of technetium metal powder, melting of technetium and W-Tc alloys, and some initial observation of the alloy material.

  1. Recent advances and developments in refractory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-11-01

    Refractory metal alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Ta, and Nb (Cb) find applications in a wide range of aerospace applications because of their high melting points and high-temperature strength. This paper, presents recent progress in understanding and applications of these alloys. Recent studies to improve the oxidation and mechanical behavior of refractory metal alloys, and particularly Nb alloys, are also discussed. Some Re structures, for extremely high temperature applications (> 2000C), made by CVD and P/M processes, are also illustrated. Interesting work on the development of new W alloys (W-HfC-X) and the characterization of some commercial refractory metals, e.g., K-doped W, TZM, and Nb-1%Zr, continues. Finally, recent developments in high temperature composites reinforced with refractory metal filaments, and refractory metal-based intermetallics, e.g., Nb{sub 3}Al, Nb{sub 2}Be{sub 17}, and MoSi{sub 2}, are briefly described.

  2. The interaction of hydrogen with metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured for several alloys, and these were determined to be about the same at 25 C for all alloys investigated. The relation of structure, both metallurgical and crystallographic, to the observed hydrogen distribution on charging was investigated, as well as the role of hydride formation in the hydrogen resistance of metal alloys. An attempt was made to correlate the structures and compositions of metal alloys as well as other parameters with the ratios of their notched tensile strengths in hydrogen to that in helium, R(H2/He), which are believed to represent a measure of their hydrogen resistance. Evidence supports the belief that hydrogen permeability and hydrogen resistance are increased by smaller grain sizes for a given alloy composition.

  3. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  4. Annealing studies of amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.D.; Perepezko, J.H.; Nordman, J.E.

    1983-04-01

    Amorphous films of the alloys Ni-Nb, Ni-Mo, Mo-Si, and W-Si were sputter deposited on single-crystal semiconductor substrates. One-hour crystallization temperatures of the films were determined to within +-25/sup 0/C by annealing and x-ray diffraction measurements. Interdiffusion between Au or Cu overlayers and the amorphous films were studied by annealing combined with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) profiling, and by Rutherford Backscatter (RBS) analysis. Supplementary measurements used to study structural relaxation and crystallization included resistivity as a function of temperature; DTA and DSC; and electron microscopy.

  5. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  6. Hydrogen resistant alloy - NASA 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, William B. (inventor); Kuruvilla, A. K. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a high-strength metal alloy that resists hydrogen embrittlement consisting essentially of thirty-seven (37) percent by weight of iron, thirty-two (32) percent by weight of nickel, fifteen (15) percent by weight of cobalt, ten (10) percent by weight of chromium, three (3) percent by weight of niobium, two-and-one-half (2.5) percent by weight of titanium, fifteen hundredths (0.15) percent by weight of aluminum, and an amount of carbon that does not exceed four hundredths (0.04) percent by weight.

  7. Thermal stability of high temperature structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.; Rasefske, R.K.; Castagna, A.

    1999-03-01

    High temperature structural alloys were evaluated for suitability for long term operation at elevated temperatures. The effect of elevated temperature exposure on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a number of alloys was characterized. Fe-based alloys (330 stainless steel, 800H, and mechanically alloyed MA 956), and Ni-based alloys (Hastelloy X, Haynes 230, Alloy 718, and mechanically alloyed MA 758) were evaluated for room temperature tensile and impact toughness properties after exposure at 750 C for 10,000 hours. Of the Fe-based alloys evaluated, 330 stainless steel and 800H showed secondary carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}) precipitation and a corresponding reduction in ductility and toughness as compared to the as-received condition. Within the group of Ni-based alloys tested, Alloy 718 showed the most dramatic structure change as it formed delta phase during 10,000 hours of exposure at 750 C with significant reductions in strength, ductility, and toughness. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy X showed significant M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide precipitation and a resulting reduction in ductility and toughness. Haynes 230 was also evaluated after 10,000 hours of exposure at 850, 950, and 1050 C. For the 750--950 C exposures the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in Haynes 230 coarsened. This resulted in large reductions in impact strength and ductility for the 750, 850 and 950 C specimens. The 1050 C exposure specimens showed the resolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} secondary carbides, and mechanical properties similar to the as-received solution annealed condition.

  8. Comparison of Three Primary Surface Recuperator Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Wendy; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R

    2010-01-01

    Extensive work performed by Capstone Turbine Corporation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and various others has shown that the traditional primary surface recuperator alloy, type 347 stainless steel, is unsuitable for applications above 650 C ({approx}1200 F). Numerous studies have shown that the presence of water vapor greatly accelerates the oxidation rate of type 347 stainless steel at temperatures above 650 C ({approx}1200 F). Water vapor is present as a product of combustion in the microturbine exhaust, making it necessary to find replacement alloys for type 347 stainless steel that will meet the long life requirements of microturbine primary surface recuperators. It has been well established over the past few years that alloys with higher chromium and nickel contents than type 347 stainless steel have much greater oxidation resistance in the microturbine environment. One such alloy that has replaced type 347 stainless steel in primary surface recuperators is Haynes Alloy HR-120 (Haynes and HR-120 are trademarks of Haynes International, Inc.), a solid-solution-strengthened alloy with nominally 33 wt % Fe, 37 wt % Ni and 25 wt % Cr. Unfortunately, while HR-120 is significantly more oxidation resistant in the microturbine environment, it is also a much more expensive alloy. In the interest of cost reduction, other candidate primary surface recuperator alloys are being investigated as possible alternatives to type 347 stainless steel. An initial rainbow recuperator test has been performed at Capstone to compare the oxidation resistance of type 347 stainless steel, HR-120, and the Allegheny Ludlum austenitic alloy AL 20-25+Nb (AL 20-25+Nb is a trademark of ATI Properties, Inc. and is licensed to Allegheny Ludlum Corporation). Evaluation of surface oxide scale formation and associated alloy depletion and other compositional changes has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results of this initial rainbow test will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. La2O3 effects on TZM alloy recovery, recrystallization and mechanical properties

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    ) alloy with different amounts of rare earth lanthanum oxide was prepared by powder metallurgy into 0.5 mm in molybdenum alloys, including the TZM alloy and rare earth molybdenum alloys. TZM is a Mo-based alloy with 0 applications. Rare earth molybdenum alloys is a branch of widely used molybdenum alloys. Doping with rare earth

  10. High-strength age hardening coppertitanium alloys: redivivus

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, David E.

    High-strength age hardening copper­titanium alloys: redivivus W.A. Soffaa , D.E. Laughlinb by an anticipated emergence of these alloys as technologi- cally significant high-strength, high-conductivity, precipitation hardened alloys over the next decade replacing conventional Cu­Be alloys in numerous applications

  11. Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Aluminum Alloys

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    of aluminum alloys are not degraded in dry gaseous hydrogen [1, 2]. However, studies of stressTechnical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Aluminum Alloys: Heat-Treatable Alloys. #12;3230 - 1 Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Aluminum Alloys: Heat

  12. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Determination of the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. A modified microhardness test unit permitted hardness determinations at homologous temperatures ranging from 0.02 to 0.15, where alloy softening normally occurs in bcc alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s + d electrons compared to Mo while those elements having an equal number or fewer s + d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. The magnitude of the softening and the amount of solute element at the hardness minimum diminished rapidly with increasing test temperature. At solute concentrations where alloy softening was observed, the temperature sensitivity of hardness was lowered. For solute elements having an excess of s + d electrons or fewer s + d electrons than Mo, alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s + d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  13. NiAl alloys for structural uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koss, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys based on the intermetallic compound NiAl are of technological interest as high temperature structural alloys. These alloys possess a relatively low density, high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity, and (usually) good oxidation resistance. However, NiAl and NiAl-base alloys suffer from poor fracture resistance at low temperatures as well as inadequate creep strength at elevated temperatures. This research program explored macroalloying additions to NiAl-base alloys in order to identify possible alloying and processing routes which promote both low temperature fracture toughness and high temperature strength. Initial results from the study examined the additions of Fe, Co, and Hf on the microstructure, deformation, and fracture resistance of NiAl-based alloys. Of significance were the observations that the presence of the gamma-prime phase, based on Ni3Al, could enhance the fracture resistance if the gamma-prime were present as a continuous grain boundary film or 'necklace'; and the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was ductile in ribbon form despite a microstructure consisting solely of the B2 beta phase based on NiAl. The ductility inherent in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy was explored further in subsequent studies. Those results confirm the presence of ductility in the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy after rapid cooling from 750 - 1000 C. However exposure at 550 C caused embrittlement; this was associated with an age-hardening reaction caused by the formation of Fe-rich precipitates. In contrast, to the Ni-35Al-20Fe alloy, exploratory research indicated that compositions in the range of Ni-35Al-12Fe retain the ordered B2 structure of NiAl, are ductile, and do not age-harden or embrittle after thermal exposure. Thus, our recent efforts have focused on the behavior of the Ni-35Al-12Fe alloy. A second parallel effort initiated in this program was to use an alternate processing technique, mechanical alloying, to improve the properties of NiAl-alloys. Mechanical alloying in the conventional sense requires ductile powder particles which, through a cold welding and fracture process, can be dispersion strengthened by submicron-sized oxide particles. Using both the Ni-35Al-Fe alloys to contain approx. 1 v/o Y2O3. Preliminary results indicate that mechanically alloyed and extruded NiAl-Fe + Y2O3 alloys when heat treated to a grain-coarsened condition, exhibit improved creep resistance at 1000 C when compared to NiAl; oxidation resistance comparable to NiAl; and fracture toughness values a factor of three better than NiAl. As a result of the research initiated on this NASA program, a subsequent project with support from Inco Alloys International is underway.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of GaSb based thermophotovoltaic cells using Zn diffusion from a doped spin-on glass source

    SciTech Connect

    Dakshinamurthy, S.; Shetty, S.; Bhat, I.; Hitchcock, C.; Gutmann, R.; Charache, G.; Freeman, M.

    1998-06-01

    The GaInSb material system is attractive for application in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells since its band gap can be tuned to match the radiation of the emitter. At present, most of the TPV cells are fabricated using epitaxial layers and hence are expensive. To reduce the cost, Zn diffusion using elemental vapors in a semi-closed diffusion system is being pursued by several laboratories. In this paper, the authors present studies carried out on Zn diffusion into n-type (Te-doped) GaSb substrates in an open tube diffusion furnace. The dopant precursor was a 2,000 {angstrom} thick, zinc doped spin-on glass. The diffusion was carried out at temperatures ranging from 550 to 600 C, for times from 1 to 10 hours. The diffused layers were characterized by Hall measurements using step-and-repeat etching by anodic oxidation, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements and TPV device fabrication. For diffusion carried out at 600 C, the junction depth was 0.3 {micro}m, and the hole concentration near the surface was 5 {times} 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The external quantum efficiency, measured without any anti-reflection coating, of the TPV cells fabricated using mesa-etching had a maximum value of 38%. Masked diffusion was also carried out by opening windows in a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated, GaSb wafer. TPV cells fabricated on these structures had similar quantum efficiency, but lower dark current.

  15. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  16. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  17. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  18. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  19. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  20. Indium Helps Strengthen Al/Cu/Li Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on Al/Cu/Li alloys focus specifically on strengthening effects of minor additions of In and Cd. Indium-bearing alloy combines low density with ability to achieve high strength through heat treatment alone. Tensile tests on peak-aged specimens indicated that alloy achieved yield strength approximately 15 percent higher than baseline alloy. Alloy highly suitable for processing to produce parts of nearly net shape, with particular applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles.

  1. Alloys based on NiAl for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K.; Pathare, V.; Aslanidis, I.; Titran, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The NiAl alloys for potential high temperature applications were studied. Alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Flow stress values at slow strain rates and high temperatures were measured. Some ternary alloying additions (Hf, Ta and Nb) were identified. The mechanism of strengthening in alloys containing these additions appears to be a form of particle dislocation interaction. The effects of grain size and stoichiometry in binary alloys are also presented.

  2. Alloys based on NiAl for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedula, K. M.; Pathare, V.; Aslanidis, I.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The NiAl alloys for potential high temperature applications were studied. Alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy techniques. Flow stress values at slow strain rates and high temperatures were measured. Some ternary alloying additions (Hf, Ta and Nb) were identified. The mechanism of strengthening in alloys containing these additions appears to be a form of particle dislocation interaction. The effects of grain size and stoichiometry in binary alloys are also presented.

  3. Impurity control and corrosion resistance of magnesium-aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M.; Song, GuangLing

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is very sensitive to the contents of impurity elements such as iron. In this study, a series of diecast AXJ530 magnesium alloy samples were prepared with additions of Mn and Fe. Through a comprehensive phase diagram calculation and corrosion evaluation, the mechanisms for the tolerance limit of Fe in magnesium alloy are discussed. This adds a new dimension to control the alloying impurity in terms of alloying composition design and casting conditions.

  4. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  5. New alloys to conserve critical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Based on availability of domestic reserves, chromium is one of the most critical elements within the U.S. metal industry. New alloys having reduced chromium contents which offer potential as substitutes for higher chromium containing alloys currently in use are being investigated. This paper focuses primarily on modified Type 304 stainless steels having one-third less chromium, but maintaining comparable oxidation and corrosion properties to that of type 304 stainless steel, the largest single use of chromium. Substitutes for chromium in these modified Type 304 stainless steel alloys include silicon and aluminum plus molybdenum.

  6. Sucrose/Glucose molecular alloys by cryomilling.

    PubMed

    Megarry, Andrew J; Booth, Jonathan; Burley, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    We report here for the first time a series of amorphous sucrose/glucose molecular alloys prepared by cryomilling. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and solution proton nuclear magnetic resonance showed that cryomilling drives a direct transformation from a two-phase mixture of crystalline sucrose and glucose, to a single-phase amorphous sucrose/glucose molecular alloy. The molecular alloys displayed a single Tg which varied linearly with composition. The effect of atmospheric moisture and the possibility of localised melting of the material because of milling-related friction were also discussed. PMID:24867316

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  8. Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-08-01

    Graded glass and glass-hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been prepared using a simple enameling technique. The composition of the glasses has been tailored to match the thermal expansion of the alloys. By controlling the firing time, and temperature, it has been possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25 to 150 mu m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate, resistant to corrosion and able to precipitate hydroxyapatite during in vitro tests in simulated body fluid.

  9. Heusler-alloy films for spintronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Sagar, James; Lari, Leonardo; Fleet, Luke R.; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of magnetic memories requires an ideal spin-polarised electron source, achievable by using a half-metallic Heusler-alloy film. For Heusler-alloy film implementation, it is critical to realise both large volumes of coherent magnetisation reversal and high interfacial atomic ordering. In this review we present solutions to satisfy these requirements by measuring activation volumes and observing cross-sectional atomic structures. We find that polycrystalline thin films possess 10 times larger activation volumes than epitaxial ones and also form the perfectly ordered crystalline phase. These features are very useful for the application of Heusler-alloy films in a future magnetic memory.

  10. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  11. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Sklad, Philip S; Currie, Kenneth; Vondra, Fred; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Walford, Graham; Nolan, Dennis J; Nedkova, Teodora

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  12. Method for homogenizing alloys susceptible to the formation of carbide stringers and alloys prepared thereby

    DOEpatents

    Braski, David N. (Oak Ridge, TN); Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN)

    1980-01-01

    A novel fabrication procedure prevents or eliminates the reprecipitation of segregated metal carbides such as stringers in Ti-modified Hastelloy N and stainless steels to provide a novel alloy having carbides uniformly dispersed throughout the matrix. The fabrication procedure is applicable to other alloys prone to the formation of carbide stringers. The process comprises first annealing the alloy at a temperature above the single phase temperature for sufficient time to completely dissolve carbides and then annealing the single phase alloy for an additional time to prevent the formation of carbide stringers upon subsequent aging or thermomechanical treatment.

  13. alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharram, A. H.; Abu El-Oyoun, M.

    2014-07-01

    Binary Si12.5Te87.5 glass was prepared using the melt-quench technique. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements of the obtained glass measured at different heating rates (10 ? ? ? 70 K/min) have shown three, one endo- and two exothermic, peaks. The glass transition kinetics have been analyzed using the isoconversional (model-free) methods in addition to the model-fitting method. The analysis of the present data shows that the glass transition kinetics are not constant values but vary with the transformed extent ( x) and hence with temperature of the specimen. Non-linear decrease of E with increase in the transformed extent could be attributed to a complicated mechanism. Based on the peak shape of n( ?) relation, one concludes that two competing mechanisms are working together during transformation of the solid glass to supercooled liquid state. A good agreement between the experimental and the reconstructed ( x- T) curves confirms the validity of the applied models.

  14. Incology alloy 908 data handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, L.S.; Steeves, M.M.; Reed, R.P.

    1994-03-01

    This handbook is a compilation of all available properties of Incoloy alloy 908 as of March, 1994. Data included in this paper cover mechanical, elastic, thermal and magnetic characteristics. The mechanical properties include tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue, and stress-rupture for both the base metal and related weld filler metals. Elastic properties listed are Young`s, shear and bulk moduli and Poisson`s ratio. Thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and specific heat and magnetization are also reported. Data presented are summarized in the main body and presented in detail in the supplements. Areas of ongoing research are briefly described, and topics for future research are suggested. The data have been compiled to assist in the design of large-scale superconducting magnets for fusion reactors.

  15. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  16. Rational Development of Ternary Alloy Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Dongguo; Chi, Miaofang; Pearson, John; Rankin, Rees B; Greeley, Jeff; Duan, Zhiyao; Wang, Guofeng; van der Vliet, Dennis; More, Karren L; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R

    2012-06-21

    Improving the efficiency of electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen represents one of the main challenges for the development of renewable energy technologies. Here, we report the systematic evaluation of Pt-ternary alloys (Pt3(MN)1 with M, N = Fe, Co, or Ni) as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We first studied the ternary systems on extended surfaces of polycrystalline thin films to establish the trend of electrocatalytic activities and then applied this knowledge to synthesize ternary alloy nanocatalysts by a solvothermal approach. This study demonstrates that the ternary alloy catalysts can be compelling systems for further advancement of ORR electrocatalysis, reaching higher catalytic activities than bimetallic Pt alloys and improvement factors of up to 4 versus monometallic Pt. PMID:26285726

  17. Study of high performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The first series of heat treated nickel manganese alloys are tested for mechanical properties at temperatures of 148.9 C (300 F) and 260 C (500 F). All material receives the same heat treatment in order to provide a common basis for comparison of results. Mechanical property performance improves with increasing manganese content in the alloy. Although all manganese bearing alloy is significantly superior to conventional electroformed nickel, samples containing over 3000 ppm manganese display outstanding ultimate and yield strengths while maintaining reasonably satisfactory ductility. Alloy containing over 6000 ppm of manganese is very competitive to Inconel 718 (mill annealed and age hardened) at all temperatures of interest, although ductility is not as great in the electrodeposited counterpart.

  18. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Richard

    for potential fusion alloys. Recommendations on the most fruitful ways of designing future experiments have also been made. In addition, a classical nucleation theory approach was taken to modelling the incubation and nucleation of irradiation-induced voids...

  19. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qingyou; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Sklad, Philip S; Currie, Kenneth; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Vondra, Fred; Walford, Graham; Nolan, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  20. Orthopaedic applications of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    E-print Network

    Guo, Weimin, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) are a new class of magnetic field-actuated active materials with no current commercial applications. By applying a magnetic field of around 0.4 T, they can exert a stress of ...