Sample records for gaseous diffusion coefficients

  1. Validity of the Ruff–MKW boiling point method: Vapor pressures, diffusion coefficients in argon and helium, and viscosity coefficients for gaseous cadmium and zinc

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Wahlbeck; D. L. Myers; V. V. Truong

    1985-01-01

    The Ruff–MKW boiling point method is used to determine equilibrium vapor pressures greater than 660 Pa (5 Torr). Samples are vaporized from a Ruff cell, which has a capillary exit, in the presence of an inert gas. Viscosity coefficients and gaseous interdiffusion coefficients may be determined also. This is a second study of the method using Cd(l) and Zn(l) as

  2. Calculation of Viscosity and Diffusion Coefficients for Two Binary Gaseous Mixtures Using the Semi-empirical Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Hamid Reza; Rastgar, Mina; Heidari, Neda

    2011-08-01

    The accurate reduced potential energies for two binary gas mixtures including benzene-methanol and methane-tetrafluoromethane at low density have been obtained by direct inversion of the viscosity collision integral equations. The kinetic theory along with the extended principle of corresponding-states has been used to calculate the viscosity and diffusion coefficients over a wide range of temperature and composition. Good agreements between calculated and experimental data are obtained.

  3. Diffusion Coefficients in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumon, D.; Starrett, C. E.; Daligault, J.

    2015-06-01

    Models of diffusion in white dwarfs universally rely on the coefficients calculated by Paquette et al. (1986). We present new calculations of diffusion coefficients based on an advanced microscopic theory of dense plasmas and a numerical simulation approach that intrinsically accounts for multiple collisions. Our method is validated against a state-of-the-art method and we present results for the diffusion of carbon ions in a helium plasma.

  4. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  5. Band Formation during Gaseous Diffusion in Aerogels

    E-print Network

    M. A. Einarsrud; F. A. Maao; A. Hansen; M. Kirkedelen; J. Samseth

    1997-06-18

    We study experimentally how gaseous HCl and NH_3 diffuse from opposite sides of and react in silica aerogel rods with porosity of 92 % and average pore size of about 50 nm. The reaction leads to solid NH_4Cl, which is deposited in thin sheet-like structures. We present a numerical study of the phenomenon. Due to the difference in boundary conditions between this system and those usually studied, we find the sheet-like structures in the aerogel to differ significantly from older studies. The influence of random nucleation centers and inhomogeneities in the aerogel is studied numerically.

  6. Radiant Extinction Of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Atreya, A.; Baum, Howard R.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2003-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu:g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and :g flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames [1, 2], flame spread over solids [3, 4], droplet combustion [5,6], and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the Aweak@ (low burning rate per unit flame area) :g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in :g will burn indefinitely [1]. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the :g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one-dimensional. (ii) The spherical diffusion flame completely encloses the soot which is formed on the fuel rich side of the reaction zone. This increases the importance of flame radiation because now both soot and gaseous combustion products co-exist inside the high temperature spherical diffusion flame. (iii) For small fuel injection velocities, as is usually the case for a pyrolyzing solid, the diffusion flame in :g around the solid naturally develops spherical symmetry. Thus, spherical diffusion flames are of interest to fires in :g and identifying conditions that lead to radiation-induced extinction is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  7. Viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, H. J. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Sengers, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Equations and tables are presented for the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of gaseous and liquid oxygen at temperatures between 80 K and 400 K for pressures up to 200 atm. and at temperatures between 80 K and 2000 K for the dilute gas. A description of the anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity in the critical region is included. The tabulated coefficients are reliable to within about 15% except for a region in the immediate vicinity of the critical point. Some possibilities for future improvements of this reliability are discussed.

  8. 78 FR 66779 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ...Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Including On-Site Leased Workers...Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, including on-site leased workers...Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, including on-site leased...

  9. 78 FR 30342 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Compliance (CoC) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The existing CoC (No...Paducah, Kentucky, using the gaseous diffusion process. The USEC requests that...

  10. Determination of diffusion coefficient for unsaturated soils 

    E-print Network

    Sood, Eeshani

    2005-08-29

    resulting in failure of slopes of embankments constructed with these soils. Therefore, it is very important to study the diffusion properties of unsaturated soils. Study of the diffusion properties requires the determination of the diffusion coefficient...

  11. Favorite Demonstrations: Gaseous Diffusion: A Demonstration of Graham's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Ebner, Ronald D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which gaseous ammonia and hydrochloric acid are used to illustrate rates of diffusion (Graham's Law). Simple equipment needed for the demonstration include a long tube, rubber stoppes, and cotton. Two related demonstrations are also explained. (DH)

  12. 78 FR 65389 - United States Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...Enrichment Corporation, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...Compliance (CoC) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The current CoC for...using the gaseous [[Page 65390

  13. S. Subramaniam Minimum error Fickian diffusion coefficients Minimum Error Fickian Diffusion Coefficients for Mass

    E-print Network

    Subramaniam, Shankar

    which are usually ex­ pressed as functions of the binary diffusion coefficients of each species pair of components with identical binary diffusivities. While these minimum error effective diffusion coefficients binary diffusion coefficients, thereby reducing computational expense. The necessary background for mass

  14. Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

  15. Plant air systems safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Air System facilities and operations are reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. Information is presented under the following section headings: facility and process description (general); air plant equipment; air distribution system; safety systems; accident analysis; plant air system safety overview; and conclusion. (JGB)

  16. Fluidized bed biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalchuk, M.L.; Hancher, C.W.

    1982-10-24

    Decontamination and uranium recovery operations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant generate nitrate containing raffinates. A biodenitrification process will be used to meet more stringent EPA nitrate emission constraints soon in effect. Fluidized bed reactor studies at ORNL provided data necessary to characterize bioreactor performance and generate design criteria. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure.

  18. An introduction to technetium in the gaseous diffusion cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    The radioisotope technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) was introduced into the gaseous diffusion plants (GDP) as a contaminant in uranium that had been reprocessed from spent nuclear reactor fuel. {sup 99}Tc is a product of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 ({sup 235}U). The significantly higher emitted radioactivity of {sup 99}Tc generates concern in the enrichment complex and warrants increased attention (1) to the control of all site emissions, (2) to worker exposures and contamination control when process equipment requires disassembly and decontamination, and (3) to product purity when the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) product is marketed to the private sector. A total of 101,268 metric tons of RU ({approximately}96% of the total) was fed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) between FY1953 and FY1976. An additional 5600 metric tons of RU from the government reactors were fed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), plus an approximate 500 tons of foreign reactor returns. Only a small amount of RU was fed directly at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The slightly enriched PGDP product was then fed to either the ORGDP or PORTS cascades for final enrichment. Bailey estimated in 1988 that of the 606 kg of Tc received at PGDP from RU, 121 kg was subsequently re-fed to ORGDP and 85 kg re-fed to PORTS.

  19. Seismic issues at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fricke

    1989-01-01

    A seismic expert workshop was held at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) on March 13--15, 1989. the PGDP is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). During the last twenty years the design criteria for natural phenomenon hazards has steadily become more demanding at all of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations

  20. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Licensing Authority Note —In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Licensing Authority Note —In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Licensing Authority Note: In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Licensing Authority Note —In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix C to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... false Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Part 110—Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components...Licensing Authority Note —In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope...

  5. Molecular Diffusion Coefficients: Experimental Determination and Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fate, Gwendolyn; Lynn, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are laboratory methods which allow the demonstration and determination of the diffusion coefficients of compounds ranging in size from water to small proteins. Included are the procedures involving the use of a spectrometer, UV cell, triterated agar, and oxygen diffusion. Results including quantification are described. (CW)

  6. 77 FR 3255 - Notice of 229 Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...Boundary Revision at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant AGENCY: Department of Energy...other facilities of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County...real property of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant located in McCracken County,...

  7. Nuclear criticality safety guide for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Feuerbacher, J.L. (comp.)

    1981-03-15

    Safe geometrical, mass, and concentration limits are presented, together with the criticality control methods currently in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Basic information presented includes technical background, experimental data, and the best values inferred from experiments. Various tables and graphs are included. Design criteria include basic assumptions, fundamentals, concepts, applicable methods, and maintenance of safe geometry. Operating criteria include the operating philosophy at the Goodyear Atomic Corporation Gaseous Diffusion Plant and applied operating techniques. The appendices contain graphs, figures, a chart showing Goodyear organization for nuclear safety, a glossary, tables of critical values, methods for calculating solid angles, and the bases for safe handling of high-uranium-density compounds and uranium metal in various forms.

  8. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Bundy; E. B. Munday; D. W. Simmons; D. W. Neiswander

    1994-01-01

    D&D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D&D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment

  9. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    E-print Network

    G. Cristadoro

    2005-09-28

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  10. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Jessica Furrer; Or, Dani; Sukop, Michael C.; Steinberg, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Liquid distributions in unsaturated porous media under different gravitational accelerations and corresponding macroscopic gaseous diffusion coefficients were investigated to enhance understanding of plant growth conditions in microgravity. We used a single-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media at varying water contents for different gravity conditions and measured gas diffusion through the media using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann code. The relative diffusion coefficients (D rel) for simulations with and without gravity as functions of air-filled porosity were in good agreement with measured data and established models. We found significant differences in liquid configuration in porous media, leading to reductions in D rel of up to 25% under zero gravity. The study highlights potential applications of the lattice Boltzmann method for rapid and cost-effective evaluation of alternative plant growth media designs under variable gravity.

  11. Notes on Updated Diffusion Coefficients* University of Delaware

    E-print Network

    Wang, Hai

    these diffusion coefficients in flame modeling, the temperature dependence of binary diffusion coefficients at 1 9, pp. 353-363 (2005). #12;Table 1 Summary of polynomial coefficients for updated binary diffusionNotes on Updated Diffusion Coefficients* Hai Wang University of Delaware December 10, 2003 The need

  12. Reliability study: maintenance facilities Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Post, B.E.; Sikorski, P.A.; Fankell, R.; Johnson, O.; Ferryman, D.S.; Miller, R.L.; Gearhart, E.C.; Rafferty, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    A reliability study of the maintenance facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been completed. The reliability study team analyzed test data and made visual inspections of each component contributing to the overall operation of the facilities. The impacts of facilities and equipment failures were given consideration with regard to personnel safety, protection of government property, health physics, and environmental control. This study revealed that the maintenance facilities are generally in good condition. After evaluating the physical condition and technology status of the major components, the study team made several basic recommendations. Implementation of the recommendations proposed in this report will help assure reliable maintenance of the plant through the year 2000.

  13. Binary diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids: Recent progress in measurements and correlations for binary diffusion coefficients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Aydin Akgerman greatly contributed to studies on diffusion in liquids and supercritical fluids, in particular, measurements by the Taylor dispersion method. Based on his work, this article describes recent progress in measurements for binary diffusion coefficients in supercritical fluids by using the chromatographic impulse response technique as well as the Taylor dispersion method, and in the predictive empirical correlations.

  14. Precision of diffusion coefficients by the isotope exchange technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masao Nanba; Y. Oishi; Ken Ando

    1981-01-01

    The precision of diffusion coefficients determined by the gas–solid isotope exchange technique was analyzed for planar sheet diffusion, rate controlled by the isotope exhange reaction. An objective function was employed to estimate the degree of fit of a theoretical calculation to the experimental diffusion profile as a function of the sample size (l), the diffusion coefficient (D), the surface exchange

  15. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr. (Battelle Columbus (USA)); McGinnis, B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (USA))

    1990-08-31

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, C.M. [ed.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

  17. Decommissioning of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant at BNFL Capenhurst

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, S.G. [BNFL, Chester (United Kingdom). Capenhurst Works; Bradbury, P. [BNFL Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Capenhurst Gaseous Diffusion Plant was built in the early 1950s. It was originally built to produce highly enriched uranium for defense purposes but in the early 1960s the section of the plant which had been used for dealing with high U235 enrichments, the HSD section, was isolated, emptied of its process gas and put into a care and surveillance state. The rest of the plant, the LSD section, then underwent a modification program for low enrichment uranium production for civil use. The plant was shut down in 1982, by which time Urenco Centrifuge Enrichment Plants were built and operating successfully at Capenhurst and the Diffusion Plant was no longer economic. Since that time a program of decommissioning and dismantling has been in progress dealing with over 160,000 tons of surface contaminated metal, concrete and other, potentially hazardous, material. By the middle of 1994 less than 2% of the total volume of the whole project will have been consigned for burial as LLW. Over 98% will have been successfully treated and recycled as clean materials. This paper describes progress on the project, with specific examples of volume reduction and decontamination techniques. The paper demonstrates how BNFL is able to tackle dismantling, volume reduction and decontamination of a large scale nuclear processing plant safely and cost effectively.

  18. Extraction of Thermodynamic Data from Ternary Diffusion Coefficients. Use of Precision Diffusion Measurements for Aqueous

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    (Lij)0 for each composition at pH 4.5 and 6.0. Binary diffusion coefficients of aqueous lysozyme not be the case. For example, binary diffusion coefficient measurements in dilute solutions have long been usedExtraction of Thermodynamic Data from Ternary Diffusion Coefficients. Use of Precision Diffusion

  19. Diffusion coefficient measurements of transparent liquid solutions using Moiré deflectometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazem Jamshidi-Ghaleh; Mohammad Taghi Tavassoly; Nastaran Mansour

    2004-01-01

    In this study the Moiré deflectometry technique is applied to the investigation of diffusion dynamics in transparent liquid mixtures. We describe the experimental details and present theoretical analysis for obtaining the magnitude of diffusion coefficient using the Moiré fringe patterns. The theoretical aspects of the method are presented and the relationship between the Moiré fringes shift and the diffusion coefficient

  20. On measurement of thermal diffusion coefficients in multicomponent mixtures

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    for measuring thermal diffusion coefficients analogous to the existing equations for a binary mixture for the thermal diffusion coefficient of binary liquids in a thermogravitational column is from the work of Furry parameter positive thermal diffusion ratio in a binary and one for the negative parameter. In this work

  1. Binary Diffusion Coefficients for Aqueous Solutions of Lactic Acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana C. F. Ribeiro; Victor M. M. Lobo; Derek G. Leaist; Joaquim J. S. Natividade; Luís P. Veríssimo; Marisa C. F. Barros; Ana M. T. D. P. V. Cabral

    2005-01-01

    Taylor dispersion equipment installed at the University of Coimbra for the measurement of diffusion in liquids has been tested to ensure adequate accuracy and precision by measuring mutual diffusion coefficients for binary aqueous solutions of sucrose, glycine, lithium chloride, potassium chloride, and hydrochloric acid at 298.15 K. In addition, binary mutual diffusion coefficients for aqueous solutions of lactic acid (not

  2. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  3. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Northwest Plume interceptor system evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Laase, A.D.; Clausen, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) recently installed an interceptor system consisting of four wells, evenly divided between two well fields, to contain the Northwest Plume. As stated in the Northwest Plume Record of Decision (ROD), groundwater will be pumped at a rate to reduce further contamination and initiate control of the northwest contaminant plume. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the optimum (minimal) well field pumping rates required for plume hotspot containment. Plume hotspot, as defined in the Northwest Plume ROD and throughout this report, is that portion of the plume with trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations greater than 1,000 {micro}g/L. An existing 3-dimensional groundwater model was modified and used to perform capture zone analyses of the north and south interceptor system well fields. Model results suggest that the plume hotspot is not contained at the system design pumping rate of 100 gallons per minute (gal/min) per well field. Rather, the modeling determined that north and south well field pumping rates of 400 and 150 gal/min, respectively, are necessary for plume hotspot containment. The difference between the design and optimal pumping rates required for containment can be attributed to the discovery of a highly transmissive zone in the vicinity of the two well fields.

  4. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Portsmouth, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; Adams, J.G. [United States Enrichment Corp. (United States); Cherry, R.C. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Whiting, N.E. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    1998-08-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF{sub 6}. This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date.

  5. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

  6. Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity with lattice Boltzmann methods

    E-print Network

    Shor, Leslie McCabe

    Simulation of gaseous diffusion in partially saturated porous media under variable gravity under variable gravity. Citation: Chau, J. F., D. Or, and M. C. Sukop (2005), Simulation of gaseous-component, multiphase lattice Boltzmann code to simulate liquid configurations in two-dimensional porous media

  7. Optical determination of molecule diffusion coefficients in polymer films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Podgorsek; H. Franke

    1998-01-01

    We present a method using surface-plasmon leaky mode spectroscopy for the analysis of the vapor-molecule diffusion process in polymer films leading to the diffusion coefficients of the molecules. The solution of the diffusion differential equation in the case of thin films yields a molecule concentration profile. Linearity between refractive index increase and molecule concentration gives the same variation for the

  8. Validity of the Ruff-MKW-boiling point method: Vapor pressure of liquid cesium chloride, viscosity coefficient of gaseous cesium chloride, and gaseous interdiffusion coefficient for cesium chloride in argon and helium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Wahlbeck; D. L. Myers; T. L. Hendrixson; F. D. Pierson; S. A. Pyles

    1984-01-01

    The Ruff-MKW-boiling point method is used to determine equilibrium vapor pressures, viscosity coefficients of the sample vapor, and the gaseous interdiffusion coefficients of the sample vapor in an inert gas. The experimental data are mass flow rates from a sample container which has a capillary exit, in the presence of an inert gas at a measured pressure, under isothermal conditions.

  9. Apparent Diffusion Coefficients from High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging: Estimation and

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    Apparent Diffusion Coefficients from High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging: Estimation resolution diffusion imaging has recently been of great interest in characterizing non-Gaussian diffusion pro- cesses. One important goal is to obtain more accurate fits of the apparent diffusion processes

  10. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic

  11. Improved diffusion coefficients generated from Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, B. R.; Forget, B.; Smith, K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Aviles, B. N. [Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo codes are becoming more widely used for reactor analysis. Some of these applications involve the generation of diffusion theory parameters including macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients. Two approximations used to generate diffusion coefficients are assessed using the Monte Carlo code MC21. The first is the method of homogenization; whether to weight either fine-group transport cross sections or fine-group diffusion coefficients when collapsing to few-group diffusion coefficients. The second is a fundamental approximation made to the energy-dependent P1 equations to derive the energy-dependent diffusion equations. Standard Monte Carlo codes usually generate a flux-weighted transport cross section with no correction to the diffusion approximation. Results indicate that this causes noticeable tilting in reconstructed pin powers in simple test lattices with L2 norm error of 3.6%. This error is reduced significantly to 0.27% when weighting fine-group diffusion coefficients by the flux and applying a correction to the diffusion approximation. Noticeable tilting in reconstructed fluxes and pin powers was reduced when applying these corrections. (authors)

  12. Heavy Quark Momentum Diffusion Coefficient from Lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Rajiv Gavai; Pushan Majumdar

    2011-12-13

    The momentum diffusion coefficient for heavy quarks is studied in a deconfined gluon plasma in the static approximation by investigating a correlation function of the color electric field using Monte Carlo techniques. The diffusion coefficient is extracted from the long distance behavior of such a correlator. For temperatures Tc < T <~ 2 Tc, our nonperturbative estimate of the diffusion coefficient is found to be very different from the leading order perturbation theory, and is in the right ballpark to explain the heavy quark flow seen by PHENIX at RHIC.

  13. Estimation of effective diffusion coefficients in porous catalysts 

    E-print Network

    Kulkarni, Shrikant Ulhas

    1991-01-01

    OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS IN POROUS CATALYSTS A Thesis by SHRIKANT ULHAS KLLKARXI Approved as to style and content by: R. HL Anthony (Chair ot' Conrmit tee) M.... Nikolaou (Member) M. R osynek (Member) R. %. Plumer elt (Head of Department) August 1991 ABSTRACT Estimation of Effective Diffusion Coefficients in Porous Catalysts. (August 1991) Shrikant Ulhas Kulkarni, B. Chem. Engg. , University of Bombay...

  14. Upscaling matrix diffusion coefficients for heterogeneous fractured rocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenxue Dai; Andrew Wolfsberg; Zhiming Lu; Paul Reimus

    2007-01-01

    The scale dependence of the matrix diffusion coefficient (Dm) for fractured media has been observed at variable scales from column experiments to field tracer tests. In this paper, we derive an effective Dm for multimodal heterogeneous fractured rocks using characteristic distributions of matrix properties and volume averaging of the mass transfer coefficient. The effective field-scale Dm is dependent on the

  15. Effect of Macromolecular Polydispersity on Diffusion Coefficients Measured by Rayleigh Interferometry

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    determination of diffusion coefficients for binary and ternary liquid mixtures. For ternary mixtures, the 2 × 2Effect of Macromolecular Polydispersity on Diffusion Coefficients Measured by Rayleigh matrix of multicomponent diffusion coefficients is obtained. Polydispersity adds complexity

  16. Onsager coefficients for binary mixture diffusion in nanopores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Krishna; J. M. van Baten

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a critical appraisal of current estimation methods for the Onsager coefficients L11, L22, and L12 for binary mixture diffusion inside nanopores using pure component diffusivity data inputs. The appraisal is based on extensive sets of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation data on Lij for a variety of mixtures in zeolites (MFI, AFI, TON, FAU, CHA, DDR, MOR, and

  17. Determination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers

    E-print Network

    Kandlikar, Satish

    at higher temperature operation. Diffusion in porous media results in a reduction in the free stream binary used in fuel cell literature is the Bruggeman equation [4] which adjusts the binary diffusionDetermination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers Jacob M

  18. Predictive correlation of binary diffusion and self-diffusion coefficients under supercritical and liquid conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamic equation D\\/T=???, where D is the infinite dilution binary diffusion or self-diffusion coefficient, T is the temperature, ? is the fluid viscosity, and ? and ? are constants, were demonstrated to be effective for predicting both binary diffusion and self-diffusion coefficients in high density fluids, i.e. liquid and supercritical states. When a solute was specified, the correlation well

  19. Exploring non-linear cosmological matter diffusion coefficients

    E-print Network

    Hermano Velten; Simone Calogero

    2014-07-16

    Since microscopic velocity diffusion can be incorporated into general relativity in a consistent way, we study cosmological background solutions when the diffusion phenomena takes place in an expanding universe. Our focus here relies on the nature of the diffusion coefficient $\\sigma$ which measures the magnitude of such transport phenomena. We test dynamics where $\\sigma$ has a phenomenological dependence on the scale factor, the matter density, the dark energy and the expansion rate.

  20. Calculation of self-diffusion coefficients in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Baohua, E-mail: zhangbh148@qq.com [Laboratory for High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth's Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China and Institute for Study of the Earth's Interior, Okayama University, Misasa, Tottori-ken 682-0193 (Japan)] [Laboratory for High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth's Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China and Institute for Study of the Earth's Interior, Okayama University, Misasa, Tottori-ken 682-0193 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    On the basis of available P-V-T equation of state of iron, the temperature and pressure dependence of self-diffusion coefficients in iron polymorphs (?, ?, ? and ? phases) have been successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk properties. The calculated diffusion parameters, such as self-diffusion coefficient, activation energy and activation volume over a broad temperature range (500-2500 K) and pressure range (0-100 GPa), compare favorably well with experimental or theoretical ones when the uncertainties are considered.

  1. Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazi, Sami; Bo?an, Alexandru; Salanne, Mathieu; Marry, Virginie; Turq, Pierre; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    We report the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: two non-polarizable ones (SPC/E with three sites, and TIP4P/2005 with four sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, four sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size (Yeh and Hummer 2004 J. Phys. Chem. B 108 15873) to obtain the size-independent value. This also provides an estimate of the viscosity of all water models, which we compare to the Green-Kubo result. In all cases, a good agreement is found. The TIP4P/2005 model is in better agreement with the experimental data for both diffusion and viscosity. The SPC/E and Dang-Chang models overestimate the diffusion coefficient and underestimate the viscosity.

  2. Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water models.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Sami; Bo?an, Alexandru; Salanne, Mathieu; Marry, Virginie; Turq, Pierre; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2012-07-18

    We report the diffusion coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: two non-polarizable ones (SPC/E with three sites, and TIP4P/2005 with four sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, four sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size (Yeh and Hummer 2004 J. Phys. Chem. B 108 15873) to obtain the size-independent value. This also provides an estimate of the viscosity of all water models, which we compare to the Green-Kubo result. In all cases, a good agreement is found. The TIP4P/2005 model is in better agreement with the experimental data for both diffusion and viscosity. The SPC/E and Dang-Chang models overestimate the diffusion coefficient and underestimate the viscosity. PMID:22739097

  3. Ion diffusion coefficient measurements in nanochannels at various concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Li; Xue, Jianming; Hu, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion is one of the most fundamental properties of ionic transport in solutions. Here, we present experimental studies and theoretical analysis on the ion diffusion in nanochannels. Based on Fick's second law, we develop a current monitoring method to measure ion diffusion coefficient of high solution concentrations in nanochannels. This method is further extended to the cases at medium and low concentrations. Through monitoring ionic current during diffusion, we obtain diffusion coefficients of potassium chloride solution at different concentrations in nanochannels. These diffusion coefficients within the confined space are close to theirs bulk values. It is also found that the apparent ion diffusion equilibrium in the present experiments is very slow at low concentration, which we attribute to the slow equilibrium of the nanochannel surface charge. Finally, we get a primary acknowledge of the equilibrium rate between the nanochannel surface charge and electrolyte solution. The results in this work have improved the understanding of nanoscale diffusion and nanochannel surface charge and may be useful in nanofluidic applications such as ion-selective transport, energy conversion, and nanopore biosensors. PMID:24803967

  4. CONTINUOUS SEPARATION OF GASEOUS MIXTURES BY THERMAL GRAVIATIONAL DIFFUSION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. D. Jr. Frame; J. R. Kuszewski; J. F. Binder; H. H. Strain

    1961-01-01

    For the continuous separation of gases by thermal gravitational ; diffusion, a rectangular diffusion cell (internal dimensions, 51 x 51 x 1 cm) was ; constructed and tested. For the thermal gradient, one large wall was provided ; with a water jacket and cooled with tap water. The opposite large wall was ; heated against a specially wound, vertical electric

  5. Diffusion of gaseous products through a particle surface layer in a fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Daggupati; G. F. Naterer; K. S. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines a solid conversion process during hydrolysis and decomposition of cupric chloride in a thermochemical copper–chlorine (Cu–Cl) cycle of hydrogen production. Reaction rate constants and the time required for complete solid conversion are determined by a shrinking-core model. Diffusion of gaseous reactant occurs through a film surrounding the particle, after which the reactant penetrates and diffuses through a

  6. Application of a Kalman filter to UF sub 6 gaseous diffusion plant freezer\\/sublimer systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruppel

    1992-01-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UFâ in gaseous diffusion plant freezer\\/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer\\/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal

  7. Application of a Kalman filter to UFâ gaseous diffusion plant freezer\\/sublimer systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruppel

    1992-01-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UFâ in gaseous diffusion plant freezer\\/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer\\/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal

  8. THE DETERMINATION OF DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF INVERT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Heller and J. Wright

    2000-01-11

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Testing Department is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various means for increasing the time for breakthrough of radionuclides from the waste package to the base of the invert. This includes testing various barriers in the invert as a means of increasing breakthrough time through the process of diffusion. A diffusion barrier may serve as an invert material for the emplacement drifts. The invert material may consist of crushed tuff from the repository excavation at Yucca Mountain or silica sand. The objective of this report is to determine the diffusion coefficient of the crushed tuff and silica sand invert materials specified by the EBS Testing Department. The laboratory derived information from the testing was used in the Nernst-Einstein equation (Jurinak et al. 1987, p. 626) to determine the diffusion coefficient of the invert material. This report transmits the results and describes the methodology and interpretation. The scope of this report is to determine the diffusion coefficients of the invert materials mentioned above using the centrifuge at UFA Ventures. Standard laboratory procedures, described in Section 2 of this report, were used. The diffusion coefficients are to be determined over a range of moisture contents. The report contains the diffusion coefficients calculated by the Nernst-Einstein equation (Jurinak et al. 1987, p. 626) that become a part of the Technical Database. Raw data is also included in the report, however this data does not become part of the Technical Database as per Section 3.23 of AP-SIII.3Q ''Submittal and Incorporation of Data to the Technical Data Management System''. A sieve analysis of the samples was not conducted as part of this report, but sieve analysis may be accomplished as part of other reports. Two samples of crushed tuff and two samples of silica sand were tested.

  9. A pumping system for measuring coastal diffusion coefficients 

    E-print Network

    Bolen, Zane Kevin

    1980-01-01

    ) Tsung om Su, Eng. Sc. D. , P. E, (Member) Thomas N. Spen e, P'n. D. ( Mer. . b e r) Donald McDonald, Ph. D. , P. E. (Head of Department) May 19SO ASST. RACT A Pumping System for Neasuring Coastal Diffusion Coefficients. (Nay 1980) Zane Kevin... horizontal diffusion coefficients is described, De- sign calculations are discussed which were used to select the compatible equipmeut consisting of a suction hose, hose reel, pump, and flow board. The pumping system was designed to collect continuous...

  10. Exact curvilinear diffusion coefficients in the repton model.

    PubMed

    Buhot, A

    2005-10-01

    The Rubinstein-Duke or repton model is one of the simplest lattice model of reptation for the diffusion of a polymer in a gel or a melt. Recently, a slightly modified model with hardcore interactions between the reptons has been introduced. The curvilinear diffusion coefficients of both models are exactly determined for all chain lengths. The case of periodic boundary conditions is also considered. PMID:16235000

  11. Influence of diffusion coefficient on chloride ion penetration of concrete structure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Hun Han

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a modified diffusion coefficient that considers the effect of chloride binding and evaporable water on the diffusion coefficient. A finite element method (FEM) program based on the modified diffusion coefficient estimates chloride concentration according to concrete depth, and external and internal conditions. The predicted chloride concentrations were compared with experimental values.The modified diffusion coefficient, which is a

  12. Application of diffusion cells to the production of known concentrations of gaseous hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Altshuller, A.P.; Cohen, I.R.

    1980-06-01

    Diffusion coefficients have been determined for a number of hydrocarbons, including 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, hexane, 1-hexene, heptane, 1-octene, decane, benzene, and toluene. Diffusion coefficients at a number of temperatures have been determined for hexane, 1-hexene, heptane, 1-octene, decane, and benzene. The effect of turbulence at the end of the diffusion tube, resulting from the rapid flow of carrier gas over the top of the tube, has been investigated as a function of gas flow rate, temperature, diffusion tube diameter, and tube length. These results, with related data in the literature, should aid in defining the experimental limits within which a diffusion tube apparatus may be operated so that calculated values of diffusion rate can be used, if one experimental value of the diffusion coefficient is available for the liquid compound of interest.

  13. Diffusion coefficients and particle transport in synthetic membrane channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, S.; Dettmer, S. L.; Misiunas, K.; Lea, L.; Tan, Y.; Keyser, U. F.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion in constrained geometries is paramount to transport across biological membranes and in mesoporous materials. Although the transported species vary from system to system, the underlying physical mechanisms are universal. However, there is an imbalance between theory and quantitative experimental model systems. We have recently introduced a new synthetic approach to mimic molecular diffusion based on colloidal particles, digital video microscopy, particle tracking, microfluidics and holographic optical tweezers. In this paper we report useful guidelines for the fabrication, handling and characterisation of the microfluidic chips and a study of diffusion coefficients, particle attempt and translocation rates through microfluidic channels with cross sections of different dimensions.

  14. Asymptotic diffusion coefficient of particles in a random medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Hailemariam; Kehr, Klaus W.

    1995-05-01

    Avramov, Milchev, and Argyrakis [Phys. Rev. E 47, 2303 (1993)] have investigated the mean-square displacements of particles that perform random walks in two- and three-dimensional lattices with random barriers with uniform distributions of activation energies. They discussed the crossover between anomalous and normal diffusion, but they did not analyze the behavior of the mean-square displacements at long times where normal diffusion occurs. We point out that the asymptotic diffusion coefficients are well described by the effective-medium theory in the range of parameters investigated; they are in disagreement with the predictions of critical-path arguments in dimension d=3.

  15. Physical modeling of 2,4-DNT gaseous diffusion through unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Alexander; Padilla, Ingrid; Hwang, Sangchul

    2007-04-01

    Chemical detection of buried explosives devices (BEDs) through chemical sensing is influenced by factors affecting the transport of chemical components associated with the devices. Explosive-related chemicals, such as 2,4-dinitrotolune (DNT), are somewhat volatile and their overall transport is influenced by vapor-phase diffusion. Gaseous diffusion depends on environmental and soil conditions. The significance of this mechanism is greater for unsaturated soil, and increases as water content decreases. Other mechanisms, such as sorption and degradation, which affect the overall fate and transport, may be more significant under diffusion transport due to the higher residence time of ERCs in the soil system. Gaseous diffusion in soil was measured using a one-dimensional physical model (1-D column) to simulate the diffusion flux through soil under various environmental conditions. Samples are obtained from the column using solid phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed with a gas chromatography. Results suggest that DNT overall diffusion is influenced by diffusive and retention processes, water content, source characteristics, and temperature. DNT effective gas phase diffusion in the soil decreases with increasing soil water content. Vapor transport retardation was more dominant at low water contents. Most of the retardation is associated to the partition of the vapor to the soil-water. DNT vapor flux is higher near the explosive source (mine) than at the soil surface. This flux also increases with higher soil water content and temperature. Results also suggest non-equilibrium transport attributed to mass transfer limitations and non-linear sorption.

  16. Long-range global warming impact of gaseous diffusion plant operation

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1992-09-01

    The DOE gaseous diffusion plant complex makes extensive use of CFC-114 as a primary coolant. As this material is on the Montreal Protocol list of materials scheduled for production curtailment, a substitute must be found. In addition to physical cooling properties, the gaseous diffusion application imposes the unique requirement of chemical inertness to fluorinating agents. This has narrowed the selection of a near-term substitute to two fully fluorinated material, FC-318 and FC-3110, which are likely to be strong, long-lived greenhouse gases. In this document, calculations are presented showing, for a number of plausible scenarios of diffusion plant operation and coolant replacement strategy, the future course of coolant use, greenhouse gas emissions (including coolant and power-related indirect CO{sub 2} emissions), and the consequent global temperature impacts of these scenarios.

  17. Nitrogen-system safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy has primary responsibility for the safety of operations at DOE-owned nuclear facilities. The guidelines for the analysis of credible accidents are outlined in DOE Order 5481.1. DOE has requested that existing plant facilities and operations be reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. This review is being conducted by investigating individual facilities and documenting the results in Safety Study Reports which will be compiled to form the Existing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report which is scheduled for completion in September, 1984. This Safety Study documents the review of the Plant Nitrogen System facilities and operations and consists of Section 4.0, Facility and Process Description, and Section 5.0, Accident Analysis, of the Final Safety Analysis Report format. The existing nitrogen system consists of a Superior Air Products Company Type D Nitrogen Plant, nitrogen storage facilities, vaporization facilities and a distribution system. The system is designed to generate and distribute nitrogen gas used in the cascade for seal feed, buffer systems, and for servicing equipment when exceptionally low dew points are required. Gaseous nitrogen is also distributed to various process auxiliary buildings. The average usage is approximately 130,000 standard cubic feet per day.

  18. A local composition model for the prediction of mutual diffusion coefficients in binary liquid mixtures from tracer diffusion coefficients

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Qingyu; Moggridge, Geoff D.; D’Agostino, Carmine

    2015-04-29

    . However, in general, it is more correct to state that the diffusion flux originates from the deviation from equilibrium between molecular friction and thermodynamic interactions (Taylor and Krishna, 1993). Thus, from a thermodynamic perspective... and frictional coefficients for the systems benzene–chlorobenzene, benzene–n-hexane and benzene n-heptane at 25 oC. J. Phys. Chem 74 (19), 3518–3529. Hartley, G.S., J. Crank, J., 1949. Some fundamental definitions and concepts in diffusion processes. Trans...

  19. Does the photon-diffusion coefficient depend on absorption?

    E-print Network

    Boas, David

    Does the photon-diffusion coefficient depend on absorption? T. Durduran and A. G. Yodh Department independent of absorption, i.e., D0 v/3 s . After presentation of the general theoretical arguments underlying this assertion, Monte Carlo simulations are performed and explicitly reveal that the absorption- independent

  20. On the Diffusion Coefficient: The Einstein Relation and Beyond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Goran Peskir

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the closed-form expression for the diffusion coefficient that was initially obtained by Einstein.[4] The present derivation does not make use of a fictitious force as did the original Einstein derivation, but instead concentrates directly on establishing a dynamic equilibrium between the forces of pressure and friction acting on a Brownian particle. This approach makes

  1. In situ carbonyl extraction of Ni from gaseous diffusion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Visnapuu, A. [USBM Salt Lake Research Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hollenberg, G.W. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bundy, R.D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the use of carbonyl processing technology for recovery of nickel from uranium isotope separation diffusion cells, and potential applications to recover nickel, iron, chromium, cobalt, and other carbonyl forming metals from nuclear waste while reducing the volume of the high level residue for more economic disposal. Nickel powder was carbonylated under static and dynamic conditions using only carbon monoxide to determine if the nickel powder would react rapidly enough to require no promoter. Nickel to Ni(CO){sub 4} conversion was realized in all cases and nickel metal was vapor deposited in the thermal decomposer, but the conversion rates in all cases the reaction were too slow for practical recovery. Addition of hydrogen sulfide gas as a promoter increased the conversion rate more than 500-fold over conversion with no promoter. Test summaries are provided in the paper; results indicate that promoter activated carbonylation is a viable approach for recovery of nickel from uranium isotope diffusion cells.

  2. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm/sup 2//s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm/sup 2//s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site.

  3. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  4. Do thermal diffusion and Dufour coefficients satisfy Onsager's reciprocity relation?

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2014-10-01

    It is commonly admitted that in liquids the thermal diffusion and Dufour coefficients D(T) and D(F) satisfy Onsager's reciprocity. From their relation to the cross-coefficients of the phenomenological equations, we are led to the conclusion that this is not the case in general. As illustrative and physically relevant examples, we discuss micellar solutions and colloidal suspensions, where D(T) arises from chemical reactions or viscous effects but is not related to the Dufour coefficient D(F). The situation is less clear for binary molecular mixtures; available experimental and simulation data do not settle the question whether D(T) and DF are reciprocal coefficients. PMID:25341414

  5. Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kocsis, F.J. III

    1994-12-31

    Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

  6. Measurements of uranium holdup in an operating gaseous diffusion enrichment plant

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, R.H.; Walton, R.B.; Harris, R.; Harbarger, W.; Hicks, J.; Timmons, G.; Shissler, D.; Tayloe, R.; Jones, S.; Fields, L.

    1983-01-01

    Holdup of nuclear material in process equipment is one of the major sources of uncertainty in materials balances, particularly for high-throughput facilities with large equipment and extensive piping, such as gaseous diffusion uranium-enrichment plants. Locating and measuring the holdup while the plant is operating is a challenging problem because of background from the process material and the neighboring equipment. This paper reports NDA measurements performed at the Goodyear Atomic Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio, on enrichment equipment at the higher enrichment and (>10% /sup 235/U isotopic abundance) of the cascade. Both neutron and gamma-ray measurements were made to locate anomalously large deposits in converters and compressors and, within the limitations of the techniques, to quantify the amount of the deposit.

  7. Effects of diffusive property heterogeneity on effective matrix diffusion coefficient for fractured rock

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Quanlin

    rock Yingqi Zhang,1 Hui-hai Liu,1 Quanlin Zhou,1 and Stefan Finsterle1 Received 16 August 2005; revised diffusion coefficient for fractured rock, Water Resour. Res., 42, W04405, doi:10.1029/2005WR004513. 1 in fractured rock. Understand- ing the diffusion of contaminants from fractures into the matrix is essential

  8. Vertical eddy diffusion coefficient from the LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanadham, Y. (principal investigator); Torsani, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of five stable cases of the smoke plumes that originated in eastern Cabo Frio (22 deg 59'S; 42 deg 02'W), Brazil using LANDSAT imagery is presented for different months and years. From these images the lateral standard deviation (sigma sub y) and the lateral eddy diffusion coefficient (K sub y) are obtained from the formula based on Taylor's theory of diffusion by continuous moment. The rate of kinetic energy dissipation (e) is evaluated from the diffusion parameters sigma sub y and K sub y. Then, the vertical diffusion coefficient (K sub z) is estimated using Weinstock's formulation. These results agree well with the previous experimental values obtained over water surfaces by various workers. Values of e and K sub z show the weaker mixing processes in the marine stable boundary layer. The data sample is apparently to small to include representative active turbulent regions because such regions are so intermittent in time and in space. These results form a data base for use in the development and validation of mesoscale atmospheric diffusion models.

  9. Gaseous reduction of iron oxides: Part IV. mathematical analysis of partial internal reduction-diffusion control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Tien; E. T. Turkdogan

    1972-01-01

    In this mathematical analysis of gaseous reduction of iron oxides, the partial internal reduction of the porous oxide and\\u000a gas diffusion in the porous iron layer are considered simultaneously in deriving the rate equation. The rate equation, derived\\u000a by partly analytical and partly numerical solutions, is well substantiated by the experimental results obtained previously.\\u000a The following parameters, determined previously, are

  10. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-09-20

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

  11. Validation of KENO V. a for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. D. Felsher; A. W. Fentiman; R. W. Tayloe; D. DAquila

    1992-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KENO V.a is used to make criticality calculations for complex configurations and a wide range of ²³⁵U enrichments. It is essential that the calculated critical conditions either accurately reflect the true critical state or that the bias from the true critical conditions are well known. Accordingly, a study has been initiated to validate KENO

  12. The DEFUZE code for modeling gaseous diffusion of volatile contaminants in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    The DEFUSE computer model is a convenient and simple tool for calculating the subsurface gaseous diffusion of volatile contaminants in the vadose zone for the purposes of guiding vadose zone characterization and data collection efforts and for determining the need for site remediation. The reader is referred to Nitao (1990) for further details on the conceptual model for contaminant transport in the vadose zone and an application of DEFUZE to a site at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an axisymmetric diffusion experiment coupled with tracer profiling may be a promising approach to estimate of diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks.

  14. Continuum estimate of the heavy quark momentum diffusion coefficient $?$

    E-print Network

    Olaf Kaczmarek

    2014-09-12

    Among quantities playing a central role in the theoretical interpretation of heavy ion collision experiments at RHIC and LHC are so-called transport coefficients. Out of those heavy quark diffusion coefficients play an important role e.g. for the analysis of the quenching of jets containing c or b quarks (D or B mesons) as observed at RHIC and LHC. We report on a lattice investigation of heavy quark momentum diffusion within pure SU(3) plasma above the deconfinement transition with the quarks treated to leading order in the heavy mass expansion. We measure the relevant colour-electric Euclidean correlator and based on several lattice spacings perform the continuum extrapolation. This extends our previous studies progressing towards a removal of lattice artifacts and a physical interpretation of the results. We find that the correlation function clearly exceeds its perturbative counterpart which suggests that at temperatures just above the critical one, non-perturbative interactions felt by the heavy quarks are stronger than within the weak-coupling expansion. Using an Ansatz for the spectral function which includes NNLO perturbative contributions we were able to determine, for the first time, a continuum estimate for the heavy quark momentum diffusion coefficient.

  15. Translational diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient of a spin-labeled solute in lecithin bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Dix, J A; Diamond, J M; Kivelson, D

    1974-02-01

    The translational diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient of a spin-labeled solute, di-t-butyl nitroxide, in an aqueous suspension of dipalmitoyl lecithin vesicles have been studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. When the lecithin is cooled through its phase transition temperature near 41 degrees C, some solute is "frozen out" of the bilayer, and the standard partial molar enthalpy and entropy of partition go more positive by a factor of 8 and 6, respectively. However, the apparent diffusion constant in the lecithin phase is only slightly smaller than that in water, both above and below the transition temperature. The fraction of bilayer volume within which solute is distributed may increase with temperature, contributing to the positive enthalpy of partition. Comparison of time constants suggests that there is a permeability barrier to this solute in the periphery of the bilayer. PMID:4360944

  16. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  17. CALCULATION OF THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF DILUTE GASES AND OF THE SELF DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF DENSE GASES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Slattery; R. Byron Bird

    1958-01-01

    A corresponding-states correlation of low-density binary- and self-diffusion coefficients is presented. The equations are simple to use, are sdciently accurate for most calculations, and correlate those data used in their derivation somewhat better than calculations based on the Lennard-Jones potential if potential parameters have to be estimated from the critical properties. The Enskog kinetic theory of dense gases is used

  18. Network modeling of diffusion coefficients for porous media: II. Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, D.D. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States); Nieber, J.L. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Gas diffusion often dominates constituent in porous media (PM) and it dependent on pore geometry, water content, and water distribution in PM. Network models of PM offer the ability to investigate the influence and interaction of pore-scale PM properties and fluid properties on macroscopic properties of the system. This study was conducted to investigate the macroscopic relative gas diffusion coefficient vs. air-filled porosity relationship or diffusion characteristic (DC) of PM using a network model. The network model was used to simulate DCs in wetting and drying PM containing air and water. A network size of nine by nine spheres was used; increasing the network size to 19 by 19 by 19 produced essentially no change in the DC. The DC was independent of Henry`s law gas-liquid partition coefficient (H) for H values of 0.1, 1.0, and 5.0. The product HR{sub W}, where R{sub W} is the ratio between the bulk gas- and liquid-phase diffusion coefficients, strongly influences the DC when H values of 1000 to 10 000 are considered; this indicates that certain organic compounds have DCs independent of air-filled porosity. Hysteresis in DCs was found in selected network cases, with the wetting DCs being greater than the drying DCs for most air-filled porosities, in accord with some experimental results reported in the literature. Spatial correlation of network pore space was shown to bring the simulated DCs into better agreement with some experimental DCs. 23 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Comparison of radon diffusion coefficients measured by transient-diffusion and steady-state laboratory methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kalwarf, D.R.; Nielson, K.K.; Rich, D.C.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-11-01

    A method was developed and used to determine radon diffusion coefficients in compacted soils by transient-diffusion measurements. A relative standard deviation of 12% was observed in repeated measurements with a dry soil by the transient-diffusion method, and a 40% uncertainty was determined for moistures exceeding 50% of saturation. Excellent agreement was also obtained between values of the diffusion coefficient for radon in air, as measured by the transient-diffusion method, and those in the published literature. Good agreement was also obtained with diffusion coefficients measured by a steady-state method on the same soils. The agreement was best at low moistures, averaging less than ten percent difference, but differences of up to a factor of two were observed at high moistures. The comparison of the transient-diffusion and steady-state methods at low moistures provides an excellent verification of the theoretical validity and technical accuracy of these approaches, which are based on completely independent experimental conditions, measurement methods and mathematical interpretations.

  20. Characterization of process holdup material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.E.; Miller, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cascade material balance area at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is characterized by continuous, large, in-process inventories of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) and very large inputs and outputs of UF/sub 6/ over a complete range of /sup 235/U enrichments. monthly inventories are conducted to quantify the in-place material, but the inventory techniques are blind to material not in the gas phase. Material is removed from the gas phase by any one of four mechanisms: (1) freeze-outs which are the solidification of UF/sub 6/, (2) inleakage of wet air which produces solid uranium oxyfluorides, (3) consumption of uranium through UF/sub 6/ reaction with internal metal surfaces, and (4) adsorption of UF/sub 6/ on internal surfaces. This presentation describes efforts to better characterize and, where possible, to eliminate or reduce the effects of these mechanisms on material accountability.

  1. Estimation of diffusion coefficients for electrolytes in hot water. Final report. [PWR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Jr

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients are calculated for electrolytes dissolved in water at temperatures 25 to 300°C and saturation pressures. Plots and tables are given of estimated diffusion coefficients for NaCl at concentrations from infinite dilution to 4 molal, limiting diffusion coefficients for divalent metal chlorides and for sodium phosphates of several compositions, and tracer diffusion coefficients for hydrochloric acid in sodium chloride

  2. New Thermal Diffusion Coefficient Measurements for Hydrocarbon Binary Mixtures: Viscosity and Composition Dependency

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    New Thermal Diffusion Coefficient Measurements for Hydrocarbon Binary Mixtures: ViscosityVised Manuscript ReceiVed: February 22, 2008 New thermal diffusion coefficients of binary mixtures are measured the recently observed nonmonotonic behavior of thermal diffusion coefficients with molecular weight for binary

  3. Form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix J. Wambui Mutoru, Abbas Firoozabadi

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    . Further, Cullinan argues that these eigenvalues are pseudo-binary diffusion coefficients; thus, they are analogous to diffusion coefficients in binary mixtures which are real positive numbers that are equivalentForm of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix J. Wambui Mutoru, Abbas Firoozabadi

  4. Modeling Infinite Dilution and Fickian Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Dioxide in Water

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    also accurately predicts infinite dilution diffusion coefficients for other binary water mixtures whereModeling Infinite Dilution and Fickian Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Dioxide in Water J. Wambui infinite dilution diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide and water mixtures. The model takes

  5. Calculation of combined diffusion coefficients in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Murphy, Anthony B. [CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion coefficients play an important role in the description of the transport of metal vapours in gas mixtures. This paper is devoted to the calculation of four combined diffusion coefficients, namely, the combined ordinary diffusion coefficient, combined electric field diffusion coefficient, combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and combined pressure diffusion coefficient in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures at temperatures up to 30?000?K. These four coefficients describe diffusion due to composition gradients, applied electric fields, temperature gradients, and pressure gradients, respectively. The influence of copper fluoride and sulfide species on the diffusion coefficients is shown to be negligible. The effect of copper proportion and gas pressures on these diffusion coefficients is investigated. It is shown that increasing the proportion of copper generally increases the magnitude of the four diffusion coefficients, except for copper mole fractions of 90% or more. It is further found that increasing the pressure reduces the magnitude of the coefficients, except for the combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and shifts the maximum of all four coefficients towards higher temperatures. The results presented in this paper can be applied to the simulation of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs.

  6. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  7. Radon diffusion coefficients in soils of varying moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papachristodoulou, C.; Ioannides, K.; Pavlides, S.

    2009-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is generated in the Earth's crust and is free to migrate through soil and be released to the atmosphere. Due to its unique properties, soil gas radon has been established as a powerful tracer used for a variety of purposes, such as exploring uranium ores, locating geothermal resources and hydrocarbon deposits, mapping geological faults, predicting seismic activity or volcanic eruptions and testing atmospheric transport models. Much attention has also been given to the radiological health hazard posed by increased radon concentrations in the living and working environment. In order to exploit radon profiles for geophysical purposes and also to predict its entry indoors, it is necessary to study its transport through soils. Among other factors, the importance of soil moisture in such studies has been largely highlighted and it is widely accepted that any measurement of radon transport parameters should be accompanied by a measurement of the soil moisture content. In principle, validation of transport models in the field is encountered by a large number of uncontrollable and varying parameters; laboratory methods are therefore preferred, allowing for experiments to be conducted under well-specified and uniform conditions. In this work, a laboratory technique has been applied for studying the effect of soil moisture content on radon diffusion. A vertical diffusion chamber was employed, in which radon was produced from a 226Ra source, was allowed to diffuse through a soil column and was finally monitored using a silicon surface barrier detector. By solving the steady-state radon diffusion equation, diffusion coefficients (D) were determined for soil samples of varying moisture content (m), from null (m=0) to saturation (m=1). For dry soil, a D value of 4.1×10-7 m2s-1 was determined, which increased moderately by a factor of ~3 for soil with low moisture content, i.e. up to m ~0.2. At higher water fractions, a decrease in D was initiated and became particularly pronounced approaching complete saturation; at m =0.9, D was as low as 2×10-9 m2s-1. A series of field experiments has also been conducted using alpha-track CR-39 detectors to follow the moisture-dependence of radon diffusion through soil under natural conditions. Diffusion coefficients were determined as a function of surface soil moisture assuming a one-dimensional diffusive radon transport model. Comparison between results obtained by the two methods showed that laboratory studies may provide a good indication of radon diffusion coefficients to be expected in the field. However, values determined in the field were systematically lower than those assessed in the laboratory. This finding could be attributed to soil-dependent parameters, such as differences in pore space geometry between the soil used in laboratory experiments and the undisturbed soil. In the latter case, the higher degree of compaction imposes a more tortuous pathway to soil gas, while at the same time the diffusive gas flux is hindered by local-scale zones of higher bulk density or water content.

  8. The limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products in near-critical hydrocarbons 

    E-print Network

    Noel, James Michael

    1994-01-01

    is the molecular diffusivity of the organic in the supercritical fluid. However, data for diffusivities in supercritical fluids are scarce. Because diffusion coefficients cannot be determined a priofi, it is necessary to measure them. We have utilized the Taylor...

  9. Diffusion transport coefficients for granular binary mixtures at low density. Thermal diffusion segregation

    E-print Network

    Vicente Garzó; J. Aaron Murray; Francisco Vega Reyes

    2013-03-26

    The mass flux of a low-density granular binary mixture obtained previously by solving the Boltzmann equation by means of the Chapman-Enskog method is considered further. As in the elastic case, the associated transport coefficients $D$, $D_p$ and $D'$ are given in terms of the solutions of a set of coupled linear integral equations which are approximately solved by considering the first and second Sonine approximations. The diffusion coefficients are explicitly obtained as functions of the coefficients of restitution and the parameters of the mixture (masses, diameters and concentration) and their expressions hold for an arbitrary number of dimensions. In order to check the accuracy of the second Sonine correction for highly inelastic collisions, the Boltzmann equation is also numerically solved by means of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to determine the mutual diffusion coefficient $D$ in some special situations (self-diffusion problem and tracer limit). The comparison with DSMC results reveals that the second Sonine approximation to $D$ improves the predictions made from the first Sonine approximation. We also study the granular segregation driven by a uni-directional thermal gradient. The segregation criterion is obtained from the so-called thermal diffusion factor $\\Lambda$, which measures the amount of segregation parallel to the temperature gradient. The factor $\\Lambda$ is determined here by considering the second-order Sonine forms of the diffusion coefficients and its dependence on the coefficients of restitution is widely analyzed across the parameter space of the system. The results obtained in this paper extend previous works carried out in the tracer limit (vanishing mole fraction of one of the species) by some of the authors of the present paper.

  10. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  11. Cleanup operations at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant contaminated metal scrapyard

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cleanup operations at the contaminated metal storage yard located at the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Gaseous Diffusion Plant have been completed. The storage yard, in existence since the early 1970s, contained an estimated 35,000 tons of mixed-type metals spread over an area of roughly 30 acres. The overall cleanup program required removing the metal from the storage yard, sorting by specific metal types, and size reduction of specific types for future processing. This paper explains the methods and procedures used to accomplish this task.

  12. Effective diffusion coefficient in tilted disordered potentials: optimal relative diffusivity at a finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Salgado-García, R

    2014-09-01

    In this work we study the transport properties of non-interacting overdamped particles, moving on tilted disordered potentials, subjected to Gaussian white noise. We give exact formulas for the drift and diffusion coefficients for the case of random potentials resulting from the interaction of a particle with a "random polymer". In our model the polymer is made up, by means of some stochastic process, of monomers that can be taken from a finite or countable infinite set of possible monomer types. For the case of uncorrelated random polymers we found that the diffusion coefficient exhibits a non-monotonous behavior as a function of the noise intensity. Particularly interesting is the fact that the relative diffusivity becomes optimal at a finite temperature, a behavior which is reminiscent of stochastic resonance. We explain this effect as an interplay between the deterministic and noisy dynamics of the system. We also show that this behavior of the diffusion coefficient at a finite temperature is more pronounced for the case of weakly disordered potentials. We test our findings by means of numerical simulations of the corresponding Langevin dynamics of an ensemble of noninteracting overdamped particles diffusing on uncorrelated random potentials. PMID:25314393

  13. Direct estimation of diffuse gaseous emissions from coal fires: current methods and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, Mark A.; Olea, Ricardo A.; O'Keefe, Jennifer M. K.; Hower, James C.; Geboy, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Coal fires occur in nature spontaneously, contribute to increases in greenhouse gases, and emit atmospheric toxicants. Increasing interest in quantifying coal fire emissions has resulted in the adaptation and development of specialized approaches and adoption of numerical modeling techniques. Overview of these methods for direct estimation of diffuse gas emissions from coal fires is presented in this paper. Here we take advantage of stochastic Gaussian simulation to interpolate CO2 fluxes measured using a dynamic closed chamber at the Ruth Mullins coal fire in Perry County, Kentucky. This approach allows for preparing a map of diffuse gas emissions, one of the two primary ways that gases emanate from coal fires, and establishing the reliability of the study both locally and for the entire fire. Future research directions include continuous and automated sampling to improve quantification of gaseous coal fire emissions.

  14. A multispectral scanner survey of the United States Department of Energy's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) and surrounding area were acquired during late spring 1990. This survey was conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) which is operated by EG G Energy Measurements (EG G/EM) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Operations Office. It was requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Audit Team which was reviewing environmental conditions at the facility. The objectives of this survey were to: (1) Acquire 12-channel, multispectral scanner data of the PGDP from an altitude of 3000 feet above ground level (AGL); (2) Acquire predawn, digital thermal infrared (TIR) data of the site from the same altitude; (3) Collect color and color-infrared (CIR) aerial photographs over the facilities; and (4) Illustrate how the analyses of these data could benefit environmental monitoring at the PGDP. This report summarizes the two multispectral scanner and aerial photographic missions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Selected examples of the multispectral data are presented to illustrate its potential for aiding environmental management at the site. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-27

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant all effluent streams are sampled regularly and analyzed to assess compliance with applicable environmental standards. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses to the public are calculated. All public radiation doses from process effluents are well within Department of Energy and US EPA standards. Non-radioactive effluents either presently comply with federal standards or will comply upon completion of planned projects. CY-1982 was the second full year under a new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for liquid effluents; compliance with the permit's discharge limits, with the exception of the high suspended solids in effluent from the South Holding Pond, did not present any significant problems. Engineering is proceeding on projects to be constructed through 1985 to further reduce the impact of liquid effluents. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluoride in the atmosphere or in vegetation, fluorides are monitored because they are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process.

  16. Measurement of diffusion coefficient of propylene glycol in skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genin, Vadim D.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical clearing of the rat skin under the action of propylene glycol was studied ex vivo. It was found that collimated transmittance of skin samples increased, whereas weight and thickness of the samples decreased during propylene glycol penetration in skin tissue. A mechanism of the optical clearing under the action of propylene glycol is discussed. Diffusion coefficient of propylene glycol in skin tissue ex vivo has been estimated as (1.35±0.95)×10-7 cm2/s with the taking into account of kinetics of both weight and thickness of skin samples. The presented results can be useful for enhancement of many methods of laser therapy and optical diagnostics of skin diseases and localization of subcutaneous neoplasms.

  17. Diffusion coefficient of vegetation: measurements and Y. Smyrnova, J. Kang, C. Blackford and C. Cheal

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Diffusion coefficient of vegetation: measurements and simulation Y. Smyrnova, J. Kang, C. Blackford reports the initial results of an investigation of the diffuse sound reflection from two typical bedding at reducing noise from urban traffic. Directional diffusion coefficients of the plants have been measured

  18. DETERMINATION OF DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS AND STUDY OF THE KIRKENDALL EFFECT ON THE URANIUM-TITANIUM COUPLE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Adda; J. Philibert

    1958-01-01

    The concentration-penetration curves were established for the Ti--U ; diffusion couple between 950 and 1075 d C. The coefficient of ; chemical diffusion was determined as a function of the concentration. The ; Kirkendall effect was studied quantitatively, and the coefficients of intrinsic ; diffusion were calculated for uranium and titaniuun. (tr-auth);

  19. Author's personal copy Assessment of satellite-derived diffuse attenuation coefficients and euphotic depths

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    sensing MODIS SeaWiFS Bio-optical algorithm Diffuse attenuation coefficient Euphotic depth Optical data to MODIS/Aqua, MODIS/Terra, and SeaWiFS satellite observations. The products included the diffuse attenuAuthor's personal copy Assessment of satellite-derived diffuse attenuation coefficients

  20. Effective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    -resolved Raman scattering measurements to determine composition-dependent binary diffusion coefficientsEffective Diffusion Coefficients for Methanol in Sulfuric Acid Solutions Measured by Raman 17, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: August 17, 2008 The diffusion of methanol into 0-96.5 wt

  1. Precision Measurements of Binary and Multicomponent Diffusion Coefficients in Protein Solutions Relevant to Crystal Growth

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    Precision Measurements of Binary and Multicomponent Diffusion Coefficients in Protein Solutions binary diffusion coefficients Dv for lysozyme chloride/water at concentrations from 0.43 to 3.08 mM (6 Naples, Italy ReceiVed October 1, 1998 Abstract: Accurate models of protein diffusion are important

  2. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  3. THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF ALKALI METAL NITRATES AND PERCHLORATES IN DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS AT 25 FROM DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Harned; J. A. Shropshire

    1958-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients of lithium and cesium nitrates have been ; measured at 25 deg over a concentration range from 0.003 to 0.015 molar. From ; these data, the activity coefficients of these electrolytes have been compated at ; low concentrations. Similar calculations have been carried cat for lithium and ; potassium perchlorates and potassium nitrate solutions and the results

  4. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm, but fades off beyond 15 atm. In flame stability experiments, the extinction strain rates increased with decreasing dilution. In general, the fuels with higher carbon number and fuels with more compact structures were found to be more prone to extinction. Counterflow laminar diffusion flames established at the impingement of reactants with a top-hat (axially uniform) velocity profile were found to be more resistant to extinction than those with a parabolic exit velocity profile. Multiple solutions to the flame stability were observed for certain hydrocarbons.

  5. Characterization of process holdup material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.E.; Miller, R.R.

    1986-06-23

    The cascade material balance area at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is characterized by continuous, large, in-process inventories of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) and very large inputs and outputs of UF/sub 6/ over a complete range of /sup 235/U enrichments. Monthly inventories are conducted to quantify the in-place material, but the inventory techniques are blind to material not in the gas phase. Material is removed from the gas phase by any one of four mechanisms: (1) freeze-outs which are the solidification of UF/sub 6/, (2) inleakage of wet air which produces solid uranium oxyfluorides, (3) consumption of uranium through UF/sub 6/ reaction with internal metal surfaces, and (4) adsorption of UF/sub 6/ on internal surfaces. This presentation describes efforts to better characterize and, where possible, to eliminate or reduce the effects of these mechanisms on material accountability. Freeze-outs and wet air deposits occur under absormal operating conditions, and techniques are available to prevent, detect and reverse them. Consumption and adsorption occur under normal operating conditions and are more complex to manage, however, computer models have been developed to quantify monthly the net effects due to consumption and adsorption. These models have shown that consumption and adsorption effects on inventory differences are significant.

  6. Analysis and evalaution in the production process and equipment area of the low-cost solar array project. [including modifying gaseous diffusion and using ion implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, H.; Wolf, M.

    1979-01-01

    The manufacturing methods for photovoltaic solar energy utilization are assessed. Economic and technical data on the current front junction formation processes of gaseous diffusion and ion implantation are presented. Future proposals, including modifying gaseous diffusion and using ion implantation, to decrease the cost of junction formation are studied. Technology developments in current processes and an economic evaluation of the processes are included.

  7. Prediction of Self-Diffusion Coefficients of Fluids Based on Friction and Free Volume Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiu; Yang, Liping; Tao, Ye; Luo, Caiyun; Xu, Zijun; Xi, Tonggeng

    2015-05-01

    With a combination of friction and free volume theories, a new equation for calculating the self-diffusion coefficient is presented based on molecular dynamics simulation data in the literature. The equation could be applied to calculate the self-diffusion coefficient of real fluids in the gas or liquid phase. The equation was used to calculate the self-diffusion coefficients of 18 substances. The absolute average relative deviation was 13.79 %.

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals.

  9. Staff management of security personnel at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. , Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-25

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Security and Police Operations Department is responsible for protecting the US Department of Energy interests at the Portsmouth Plant from theft, sabotage, and other hostile acts that may adversely affect national security, the public health and safety, or property at the Department of Energy facility. This audit's purpose was to evaluate Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.'s staff management at the Portsmouth Plant Security Department. The Portsmouth Plant Security Department could reduce operating cost up to an estimated $4.4 million over 5 years by: (1) Eliminating up to 14 unnecessary staff positions, and (2) reducing the length of relief breaks. These economies could be realized through implementing written operating procedures and negotiating removal of certain labor union restrictions. 2 tabs.

  10. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  11. Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Acox, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10/sup 10/ Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed.

  12. Diffusion coefficient using pausing time of hydrogen in a-Si:H with exponential energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikita, Harumi; Morigaki, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    The diffusion coefficient of hydrogen is obtained for exponential energy distribution in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). It is shown that the diffusion coefficient follows the form of ??-1 (?: diffusion time) in the case of ? < 1 and a larger ?, in which ? is the ratio of hydrogen temperature to width for energy distribution function. In the case of ? ? 1, as ? reaches infinity at the limit, the hydrogen diffusion approaches Brownian motion.

  13. SIMPLE ANALYTICAL FORMS OF THE PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR TWO-COMPONENT TURBULENCE. I. MAGNETOSTATIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A., E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2013-09-01

    We explore perpendicular diffusion based on the unified nonlinear transport theory. We derive simple analytical forms for the perpendicular mean free path and investigate the influence of different model spectra. We show that for cases where the field line random walk is normal diffusive, the perpendicular diffusion coefficient consists of only two transport regimes. Details of the spectral shape are less important, especially those of the inertial range. Only the macroscopic properties of the turbulence spectrum control the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. Simple formulae for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient are derived which can easily be implemented in solar modulation or shock acceleration codes.

  14. Author's personal copy Quaternary diffusion coefficients for the sucroseNaClKClwater system at 25 C

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    to describe solute diffusion transport in terms of only N solute pseudo-binary diffusion coefficientsAuthor's personal copy Quaternary diffusion coefficients for the sucrose­NaCl­KCl­water system: Diffusion electrolyte carbohydrates cross diffusion coupled diffusion Transport properties of saccharide

  15. NITRIC ACID-AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT: EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace gaseous HNO3 in air is removed in a laminar flow nylon tube. The HNO3 deposition pattern was obtained by sectioning the tube, extracting with an aqueous solution, and measuring the concentration by ion chromatography. Mass transport analysis of the deposition pattern demons...

  16. Simulating the Gas Diffusion Coefficient in Macropore Network Images: Influences of Soil Pore Morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the diffusion coefficient is necessary for modeling gas transport in soils and other porous media. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between the diffusion coefficient and pore structure parameters, such as the fractal dimension of pores (Dmp), the shortest path leng...

  17. MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

  18. The remote sensing algorithm of spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient of ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiankun Zhu; Xianqiang He; Zhihua Mao; Fang Gong

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse attenuation coefficient is an apparent optical property (AOP) which directly links to the inherent optical properties in ocean color remote sensing. So far, the study on the satellite retrieve algorithm of water diffuse attenuation coefficient has not been deeply-going, which is mainly discussed using the bands-ratio methods based on the in situ data. Only a few scientists apply the

  19. Electrodeless discharge as detector in the rapid determination of binary diffusion coefficient of gases†

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. ARNIKAR; H. M. GHULE

    1969-01-01

    It has been recently shown that an electrodeless discharge can servo as a detector of high sensitivity in the chromatography of gases and vapours. The technique has also been used for the determination of inter-diffusion coefficients of gases. This procedure, however, being found lengthy, has been modified in the present work to permit a rapid determination of the diffusion coefficients.

  20. Impulse response techniques to measure binary diffusion coefficients under supercritical conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2004-01-01

    This review describes impulse response techniques with a curve-fitting method to measure thermodynamic properties, such as binary diffusion coefficient, retention factor, and partial molar volume, under supercritical conditions. Theoretical background, parameter sensitivity, sources of experimental error, noise elimination technique, and the correction of apparent binary diffusion coefficients due to column coiling are discussed based on recent studies, together with data

  1. Liquid-phase Mutual Diffusion Coefficients for Heavy Oil + Light Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Zhang; J. M. Shaw

    2007-01-01

    Liquid-phase mutual diffusion coefficients are a key parameter in reservoir simulation models related to both primary production and envisioned secondary recovery processes for heavy oil and bitumen. The measurement of liquid-phase mutual diffusion coefficients in bitumen and heavy oil + light hydrocarbon or gas mixtures present numerous experimental and data analysis challenges due to the viscosity and opacity of the

  2. Self-Diffusion and Binary Maxwell–Stefan Diffusion Coefficients of Quadrupolar Real Fluids from Molecular Simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Fernández; Jadran Vrabec; Hans Hasse

    2005-01-01

    Self- and binary Maxwell–Stefan (MS) diffusion coefficients were determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with the Green–Kubo method. This study covers self-diffusion coefficients at liquid states for eight pure fluids, i.e., F2, N2, CO2, CS2, C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, and SF6 as well as MS diffusion coefficients for three binary mixtures N2+CO2, N2+C2H6, and CO2+C2H6. The fluids were modeled by the

  3. Shear viscosity coefficients of compressed gaseous and liquid carbon dioxide at temperatures between 220 and 320 K and at pressures to 30 MPa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Diller; M. J. Ball

    1985-01-01

    The shear viscosity coefficients of compressed gaseous and liquid carbon dioxide hav been measured with the torsional piezoelectric crystal method at temperatures between 220 and 320 K and at pressures to 30 MPa. The dependencies of the viscosity on pressure, density, and temperature and the dependencies of the fluidity (inverse viscosity) on molar volume and temperature have been examined. The

  4. Temperature effects on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol in subcritical water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilia Anisa, Nor; Azian, Noor; Sharizan, Mohd; Iwai, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    6-gingerol and 6-shogaol are the main constituents as anti-inflammatory or bioactive compounds from zingiber officinale Roscoe. These bioactive compounds have been proven for inflammatory disease, antioxidatives and anticancer. The effect of temperature on diffusion coefficient for 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol were studied in subcritical water extraction. The diffusion coefficient was determined by Fick's second law. By neglecting external mass transfer and solid particle in spherical form, a linear portion of Ln (1-(Ct/Co)) versus time was plotted in determining the diffusion coefficient. 6-gingerol obtained the higher yield at 130°C with diffusion coefficient of 8.582x10-11 m2/s whilst for 6-shogaol, the higher yield and diffusion coefficient at 170°C and 19.417 × 10-11 m2/s.

  5. Diffusion coefficient of an inclusion in a liquid membrane supported by a solvent of arbitrary thickness

    E-print Network

    Kazuhiko Seki; Sanoop Ramachandran; Shigeyuki Komura

    2011-07-22

    The diffusion coefficient of a circular shaped inclusion in a liquid membrane is investigated by taking into account the interaction between membranes and bulk solvents of arbitrary thickness. As illustrative examples, the diffusion coefficients of two types of inclusions - a circular domain composed of fluid with the same viscosity as the host membrane and that of a polymer chain embedded in the membrane are studied.The diffusion coefficients are expressed in terms of the hydrodynamic screening lengths which vary according to the solvent thickness. When the membrane fluid is dragged by the solvent of finite thickness, via stick boundary conditions, multiple hydrodynamic screening lengths together with the weight factors to the diffusion coefficients are obtained from the dispersion relation. The condition for which the diffusion coefficients can be approximated by the expression including only a single hydrodynamic screening length are also shown.

  6. Study of diffusion coefficients of glasses under zero-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Diffusion studies of the glass forming ion are examined in zero-g environments and diffusion data obtained from these experiments are unique because of earth based experimental problems. The choice of system for diffusion studies is discussed along with the lab processing. The space processing is described consisting of a heating cycle designed to maximize time exposed to the diffusion temperature without exposing the low viscosity melt to gravitational forces.

  7. Methodology for using prompt gamma activation analysis to measure the binary diffusion coefficient of a gas in a porous medium

    E-print Network

    Deinert, Mark

    Methodology for using prompt gamma activation analysis to measure the binary diffusion coefficient to determine the binary diffusion coefficients of a gas in a porous system. Argon diffusion experiments were- suring the binary diffusion coefficient of a gas in a geological med- ium using prompt gamma activation

  8. Measurements of molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients in ternary mixtures

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    the estimation of thermal diffusion factors in binary and ternary mixtures. However, in the ternaries one also of the binary and ternary thermal diffusion factors for the mixtures comprised of octane-decane-1-methylnaphthalene reveals a remarkable difference in the thermal diffusion behavior in binary and ternary mixtures

  9. Correlation of high-pressure diffusion and viscosity coefficients for n-alkanes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Dymond; M. A. Awan

    1989-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity coefficient data for liquid n-alkanes over the whole pressure range at different temperatures are satisfactorily correlated simultaneously by a method which is just an extension of that previously used to apply the smooth hard-sphere theory of transport properties to individual transport coefficients. Universal curves are developed for reduced quantities D * and eta * as a

  10. Determination of Binary Diffusion Coefficients of Gases Using Holographic Interferometry in a Loschmidt Cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Baranski; E. Bich; E. Vogel; J. K. Lehmann

    2003-01-01

    A measuring system for the determination of binary diffusion coefficients of gases has been developed. The lower and upper half cells of the Loschmidt diffusion cell are fixed, one upon the other, contrary to the usual shearing cells. A sliding component between the half cells is moved to connect them and to start the diffusion. The concentration changes due to

  11. Diffusion coefficients of water in biobased hydrogel polymer matrices by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diffusion coefficient of water in biobased hydrogels were measured utilizing a simple NMR method. This method tracks the migration of deuterium oxide through imaging data that is fit to a diffusion equation. The results show that a 5 wt% soybean oil based hydrogel gives aqueous diffusion of 1.37...

  12. Modeling the vertical distributions of downwelling plane irradiance and diffuse attenuation coefficient in optically deep waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoju Pan; Richard C. Zimmerman

    2010-01-01

    The diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) is critical to understand the vertical distribution of underwater downwelling irradiance (Ed). Theoretically Ed is composed of the direct solar beam and the diffuse sky irradiance. Applying the statistical results from Hydrolight radiative transfer simulations, Kd is expressed into a mathematical equation (named as PZ06) integrated from the contribution of direct solar beam and diffuse

  13. Comparative study of methods used to estimate ionic diffusion coefficients using migration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Narsilio, G.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: narsilio@unimelb.edu.au; Li, R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Institute of Geotechnical Engineering, Southeast University (SEU), Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)], E-mail: lirenmin@seu.edu.cn; Pivonka, P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: ppivonka@unimelb.edu.au; Smith, D.W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: david.smith@unimelb.edu.au

    2007-08-15

    Ionic diffusion coefficients are estimated rapidly using electromigration tests. In this paper, electromigration tests are accurately simulated by numerically solving the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation (coupled with the electroneutrality condition (EN)) using the finite element method. Numerical simulations are validated against experimental data obtained elsewhere [E. Samson, J. Marchand, K.A. Snyder, Calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients on the basis of migration test results, Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions 36 (257) (2003) 156-165., H. Friedmann, O. Amiri, A. Ait-Mokhtar, A direct method for determining chloride diffusion coefficient by using migration test, Cement and Concrete Research 34 (11) (2004) 1967-1973.]. It is shown that migration due to the non-linear electric potential completely overwhelms diffusion due to concentration gradients. The effects of different applied voltage differences and chloride source concentrations on estimations of chloride diffusion coefficients are explored. We show that the pore fluid within concrete and mortar specimens generally differs from the curing solution, lowering the apparent diffusion coefficient, primarily due to interactions of chloride ions with other ions in the pore fluid. We show that the variation of source chloride concentration strongly affects the estimation of diffusion coefficients in non-steady-state tests; however this effect vanishes under steady-state conditions. Most importantly, a comparison of diffusion coefficients obtained from sophisticated analyses (i.e., NP-EN) and a variety of commonly used simplifying methods to estimate chloride diffusion coefficients allows us to identify those methods and experimental conditions where both approaches deliver good estimates for chloride diffusion coefficients. Finally, we demonstrate why simultaneous use and monitoring of current density and fluxes are recommended for both the non-steady and steady-state migration tests.

  14. Diffusion-weighted EPI of cystic ovarian lesions: evaluation of cystic contents using apparent diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Moteki, T; Ishizaka, H

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted echoplanar imaging (EPI) was performed to evaluate the contents of cystic ovarian lesions [33 endometrial cysts, 16 ovarian cysts, 5 serous cystadenomas, 6 mucinous cystadenomas, 13 malignant cystic ovarian tumors, and 3 benign cystic lesions mimicking malignant cystic ovarian tumor (BMMs)]. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for the cystic contents. Many lesions showed unrealistically high ADC greater than water at body temperature (0.00324 mm(2)/sec), especially in lesions more than 12 cm in diameter. The higher ADC values were attributed to the sloshing effect: intermittent compression of large ovarian lesions by abdominal breathing before the breath-hold scan. When limited to lesions with ADC less than 0. 00324 mm(2)/sec, endometrial cysts and malignant cystic ovarian tumors showed lower ADC values than ovarian cysts and serous cystadenomas (P < 0.03). When further limited to lesions less than 12 cm in axial diameter, an additional ADC difference between malignant cystic ovarian BMMs was demonstrated (P < 0.03). Diffusion-weighted EPI showed the possibility that calculated ADC values might be useful in evaluating small to medium cystic ovarian lesions. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2000;12:1014-1019. PMID:11105044

  15. Impurity Diffusion Coefficients of Al and Zn in Mg Determined from Solid-to-Solid Diffusion Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerer, Catherine [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Perry, Kelly A [ORNL; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida

    2013-08-01

    Increasing use and development of lightweight Mgalloys have led to the desire for more fundamental research in and understanding of Mg-based systems. As property enhancing components, Al and Zn are two of the most important and common alloying elements for Mg-alloys. We have investigated the concentration dependent interdiffusion of Al and Zn in Mg using diffusion couples of pure polycrystalline Mg mated to Mg solid solutions containing either <9 at.% Al or <3 at.% Zn. Concentration profiles were determined by electron micro-probe microanalysis of the diffusion zone. The interdiffusion coefficients were determined by the classical Boltzmann-Matano method within the Mg solid solution. As the concentration of Al or Zn approaches the dilute ends, we employ an analytical approach based on the Hall method to estimate the impurity diffusion coefficients. Results of Al and Zn impurity diffusion in Mg are reported and compared to published impurity diffusion coefficients typically determined by thin film techniques.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) conducted March 14 through 25, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental risk associated with ORGDP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ORGDP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during is on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the ORGDP Survey findings for in inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 120 refs., 41 figs., 74 tabs.

  17. Development of the simplified compressor model (SCM) for performance analysis of gaseous diffusion compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report documents the progress on the FY 87 K-site Milestone (for the Process Equipment and System Performance (PESP) team of the Process and Long Range Technical Support (PandLRTS) program) which calls for the formulation of ''simplified compressor performance prediction codes for use in GDP cascade models.'' In particular, the features, benefits, steps in the development, and results of a simplified compressor model (referred to as the SCM) for predicting the off-design performance of compressors used in the gaseous diffusion process are discussed. Calculations for the T7 compressor were performed at 1700 hp and at discharge temperatures of 265/degree/F, 290/degree/F, and 315/degree/F (these temperatures representing all temperatures at 1700 hp for which experimental data is available). The results of these calculations are shown in Figures 8--10. Note that the SCM does a much improved job in predicting the efficiency and A-stream volume flow rate than the larger, more complex code, DYNADEC. Agreement between test data and the SCM calculations for static pressure ratios and B-stream equivalent volume flow is comparable to that obtained by DYNADEC. Each set of four performance maps required approximately one minute of CPU on a VAX 8600 using the SCM (compared to nearly one hour of CPU using DYNADEC). 10 figs.

  18. Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

  19. Application of a Kalman filter to UF sub 6 gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs.

  20. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W. [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, CA 92014-5672 (United States); Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C. [PSFC, MIT, Boston, MA (United States); Smithe, D.N. [ATK-Mission Research (United States)

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  1. Determination of diffusion coefficients and diffusion characteristics for chlorferon and diethylthiophosphate in Ca-alginate gel beads.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jiyeon; Engler, Cady R; Lee, Seung Jae

    2008-07-01

    Diffusion characteristics of chlorferon and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) in Ca-alginate gel beads were studied to assist in designing and operating bioreactor systems. Diffusion coefficients for chlorferon and DETP in Ca-alginate gel beads determined at conditions suitable for biodegradation studies were 2.70 x 10(-11) m(2)/s and 4.28 x 10(-11) m(2)/s, respectively. Diffusivities of chlorferon and DETP were influenced by several factors, including viscosity of the bulk solution, agitation speed, and the concentrations of diffusing substrate and immobilized cells. Diffusion coefficients increased with increasing agitation speed, probably due to poor mixing at low speed and some attrition of beads at high speeds. Diffusion coefficients also increased with decreasing substrate concentration. Increased cell concentration in the gel beads caused lower diffusivity. Theoretical models to predict diffusivities as a function of cell weight fraction overestimated the effective diffusivities for both chlorferon and DETP, but linear relations between effective diffusivity and cell weight fraction were derived from experimental data. Calcium-alginate gel beads with radii of 1.65-1.70 mm used in this study were not subject to diffusional limitations: external mass transfer resistances were negligible based on Biot number calculations and effectiveness factors indicated that internal mass transfer resistance was negligible. Therefore, the degradation rates of chlorferon and DETP inside Ca-alginate gel beads were reaction-limited. PMID:18080347

  2. Measurement of gas diffusion coefficient using photonic crystal fiber

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. L. Hoo; W. Jin; H. L. Ho; D. N. Wang

    2003-01-01

    We report the use of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for the measurement of gas diffusion constant. PCF has uniform airhole columns along the fiber length that provide the basis for the study of gas diffusion based on the capillary method. The gas concentration within the airhole columns is monitored by measuring the attenuation of light through the PCF caused by

  3. Diffusion-weighted MRI derived apparent diffusion coefficient identifies prognostically distinct subgroups of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Lober, Robert M; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Tang, Yujie; Barnes, Patrick D; Edwards, Michael S; Vogel, Hannes; Fisher, Paul G; Monje, Michelle; Yeom, Kristen W

    2014-03-01

    While pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) remain fatal, recent data have shown subgroups with distinct molecular biology and clinical behavior. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted MRI can be used as a prognostic marker to stratify DIPG subsets with distinct clinical behavior. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values derived from diffusion-weighted MRI were computed in 20 consecutive children with treatment-naïve DIPG tumors. The median ADC for the cohort was used to stratify the tumors into low and high ADC groups. Survival, gender, therapy, and potential steroid effects were compared between the ADC groups. Median age at diagnosis was 6.6 (range 2.3-13.2) years, with median follow-up seven (range 1-36) months. There were 14 boys and six girls. Seventeen patients received radiotherapy, five received chemotherapy, and six underwent cerebrospinal fluid diversion. The median ADC of 1,295 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s for the cohort partitioned tumors into low or high diffusion groups, which had distinct median survivals of 3 and 13 months, respectively (log-rank p < 0.001). Low ADC tumors were found only in boys, whereas high ADC tumors were found in both boys and girls. Available tissue specimens in three low ADC tumors demonstrated high-grade histology, whereas one high ADC tumor demonstrated low-grade histology with a histone H3.1 K27M mutation and high-grade metastatic lesion at autopsy. ADC derived from diffusion-weighted MRI may identify prognostically distinct subgroups of pediatric DIPG. PMID:24522717

  4. Scale Dependence of Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient Evidence and Preliminary Interpertation

    SciTech Connect

    H.H. Liu; Y. Zhang

    2006-06-20

    The exchange of solute mass (through molecular diffusion) between fluid in fractures and fluid in the rock matrix is called matrix diffusion. Owing to the orders-of-magnitude slower flow velocity in the matrix compared to fractures, matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured rock, and therefore is an important process for a variety of problems, including remediation of subsurface contamination and geological disposal of nuclear waste. The effective matrix diffusion coefficient (molecular diffusion coefficient in free water multiplied by matrix tortuosity) is an important parameter for describing matrix diffusion, and in many cases largely determines overall solute transport behavior. While matrix diffusion coefficient values measured from small rock samples in the laboratory are generally used for modeling field-scale solute transport in fractured rock (Boving and Grathwohl, 2001), several research groups recently have independently found that effective matrix diffusion coefficients much larger than laboratory measurements are needed to match field-scale tracer-test data (Neretnieks, 2002; Becker and Shapiro, 2000; Shapiro, 2001; Liu et al., 2003,2004a). In addition to the observed enhancement, Liu et al. (2004b), based on a relatively small number of field-test results, reported that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient might be scale dependent, and, like permeability and dispersivity, it seems to increases with test scale. This scale-dependence has important implications for large-scale solute transport in fractured rock. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the enhancement of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, the potential scale dependence and its mechanisms are not fully investigated at this stage. The major objective of this study is to again demonstrate (based on more data published in the literature than those used in Liu et al. [2004b]) the potential scale dependence of the effective matrix-diffusion coefficient, and to -develop a preliminary explanation for this scale-dependent behavior.

  5. Scale dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient:Evidence and preliminary interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, Yingqi; Molz, Fred J.

    2006-04-30

    The exchange of solute mass (through molecular diffusion) between fluid in fractures and fluid in the rock matrix is called matrix diffusion. Owing to the orders-of-magnitude slower flow velocity in the matrix compared to fractures, matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured rock, and therefore is an important process for a variety of problems, including remediation of subsurface contamination and geological disposal of nuclear waste. The effective matrix diffusion coefficient (molecular diffusion coefficient in free water multiplied by matrix tortuosity) is an important parameter for describing matrix diffusion, and in many cases largely determines overall solute transport behavior. While matrix diffusion coefficient values measured from small rock samples in the laboratory are generally used for modeling field-scale solute transport in fractured rock (Boving and Grathwohl, 2001), several research groups recently have independently found that effective matrix diffusion coefficients much larger than laboratory measurements are needed to match field-scale tracer-test data (Neretnieks, 2002; Becker and Shapiro, 2000; Shapiro, 2001; Liu et al., 2003, 2004a). In addition to the observed enhancement, Liu et al. (2004b), based on a relatively small number of field-test results, reported that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient might be scale dependent, and, like permeability and dispersivity, it seems to increases with test scale. This scale-dependence has important implications for large-scale solute transport in fractured rock. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the enhancement of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, the potential scale dependence and its mechanisms are not fully investigated at this stage. The major objective of this study is to again demonstrate (based on more data published in the literature than those used in Liu et al. [2004b]) the potential scale dependence of the effective matrix-diffusion coefficient, and to develop a preliminary explanation for this scale-dependent behavior.

  6. Effective diffusion coefficient of a Brownian particle in a periodically expanded conical tube.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Anatoly E; Barzykin, Alexander V; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Zitserman, Vladimir Yu; Aldoshin, Sergei M

    2013-11-01

    Diffusion in a tube of periodically varying diameter occurs slower than that in a cylindrical tube because diffusing particles get trapped in wells of the periodic entropy potential which is due to variation of the tube cross-section area. To quantify the slowdown one has to establish a relation between the effective diffusion coefficient of the particle and the tube geometry, which is a very complicated problem. Here we show how to overcome the difficulties in the case of a periodically expanded conical tube, where we find an approximate solution for the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the parameters determining the tube geometry. PMID:24329385

  7. Diffusion coefficient anisotropy near the liquid-vapour interface for simple fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, N. I.; Mank, V. V.

    1990-07-01

    The estimation of the translation diffusion-coefficient profiles D(z) near the liquid-vapour interface of a simple Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid is done. The calculations are based on the Kirkwood-Rice model for the diffusion in fluids. The diffusion process is shown to reveal the anisotropic behaviour in the vicinity of the interface. In the liquid phase, the diffusion coefficient normal to the interface exceeds the parallel one, and the situation is vice versa in the vapour phase.

  8. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in ?-Fe temperature region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the ?-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the ?-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  9. Determination of pollutant diffusion coefficients in naturally formed biofilms using a single tube extractive membrane bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.F.; Splendiani, A.; Freitas dos Santos, L.M.; Livingston, A.G. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology] [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

    1998-07-05

    A novel technique has been used to determine the effective diffusion coefficients for 1,1,2-trichloroethane (TCE), a nonreacting tracer, in biofilms growing on the external surface of a silicone rubber membrane tube during degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) by Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and monochlorobenzene (MCB) by Pseudomonas JS150. Experiments were carried out in a single tube extractive membrane bioreactor (STEMB), whose configuration makes it possible to measure the transmembrane flux of substrates. A video imaging technique (VIT) was employed for in situ biofilm thickness measurement and recording. Diffusion coefficients of TCE in the biofilms and TCE mass transfer coefficients in the liquid films adjacent to the biofilms were determined simultaneously using a resistances-in-series diffusion model. It was found that the flux and overall mass transfer coefficient of TCE decrease with increasing biofilm thickness, showing the importance of biofilm diffusion on the mass transfer process. Similar fluxes were observed for the nonreacting tracer (TCE) and the reactive substrates (MCB or DCE), suggesting that membrane-attached biofilm systems can be rate controlled primarily by substrate diffusion. The TCE diffusion coefficient in the JS150 biofilm appeared to be dependent on biofilm thickness, decreasing markedly for biofilm thicknesses of >1 mm. The values of the TCE diffusion coefficients in the JS150 biofilms <1-mm thick are approximately twice those in water and fall to around 30% of the water value for biofilms >1-mm thick.

  10. Diffusion Coefficients of Water and Leachables in Methacrylate-based Crosslinked Polymers using Absorption Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Park, Jonggu; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    The diffusion of water into dentin adhesive polymers and leaching of unpolymerized monomer from the adhesive are linked to their mechanical softening and hydrolytic degradation. Therefore, diffusion coefficient data are critical for the mechanical design of these polymeric adhesives. In this study, diffusion coefficients of water and leachables were obtained for sixteen methacrylate-based crosslinked polymers using absorption experiments. The experimental mass change data was interpreted using numerical solution of the two-dimensional diffusion equations. The calculated diffusion coefficients varied from 1.05 × 10?8 cm2/sec (co-monomer TMTMA) to 3.15 × 10?8 cm2/sec (co-monomer T4EGDMA). Correlation of the diffusion coefficients with crosslink density and hydrophilicity showed an inverse trend (R2 = 0.41). The correlation of diffusion coefficient with crosslink density and hydrophilicity are closer for molecules differing by simple repeat units (R2 = 0.95). These differences in the trends reveal mechanisms of interaction of the diffusing water with the polymer structure. PMID:22430592

  11. From free to effective diffusion coefficients in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Ipiña, Emiliano Pérez; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2013-02-01

    Diffusion is one of the main transport processes that occur inside cells determining the spatial and time distribution of relevant action molecules. In most cases these molecules not only diffuse but also interact with others as they get transported. When these interactions occur faster than diffusion the resulting transport can be characterized by "effective diffusion coefficients" that depend on both the reaction rates and the "free" diffusion coefficients. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) gives information on effective rather than free diffusion coefficients under this condition. In the present paper we investigate what coefficients can be drawn from FCS experiments for a wide range of values of the ratio of reaction to diffusion time scales, using different fitting functions. We find that the effective coefficients can be inferred with relatively small errors even when the condition of fast reactions does not exactly hold. Since the diffusion time scale depends on the size of the observation volume and the reaction time scale depends on concentrations, we also discuss how by changing either one or the other property one can switch between the two limits and extract more information on the system under study. PMID:23496547

  12. On the determinatino of high-pressure mass-diffusion coefficients for binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    2003-01-01

    A model for high-pressure binary diffusion coefficient calculation is proposed based on considerations originating from recasting both the low pressure kinetic theory and the Stokes-Einstein infinite dilution expressions into forms consistent with corresponding states theory.

  13. Numerical results using the conforming VEM for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation with variable coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cangiani, Andrea [University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Sutton, Oliver [University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-02

    This document presents the results of a set of preliminary numerical experiments using several possible conforming virtual element approximations of the convection-reaction-diffusion equation with variable coefficients.

  14. A new procedure to measure effective molecular diffusion coefficients of salts solutions in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. M. P. Q.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to present a mathematical and experimental formulation of a new simple procedure for the measurement of effective molecular diffusion coefficients of a salt solution in a water-saturated building material. This innovate experimental procedure and mathematical formulation is presented in detail and experimental values of "effective" molecular diffusion coefficient of sodium chloride in a concrete sample ( w/ c = 0.45), at five different temperatures (between 10 and 30 °C) and four different initial NaCl concentrations (between 0.1 and 0.5 M), are reported. The experimental results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical and experimental values of molecular diffusion coefficient presented in literature. An empirical correlation is presented for the prediction of "effective" molecular diffusion coefficient over the entire range of temperatures and initial salt concentrations studied.

  15. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients in supercritical carbon dioxide using a coated capillary column

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.C.; Tan, C.S. (National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of ethyl acetate, toluene, phenol, and caffeine in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by a chromatographic peak broadening technique in a coated capillary column at temperatures of 308, 318, and 328 K and pressures up to 145 bar. A linear adsorption in the polymer layer coated on the inner wall of the capillary column was observed. The experimentally determined diffusion coefficients showed substantial agreement with those reported in the literature. The diffusion coefficients were in the order of 10[sup [minus]4] cm[sup 2]/s and decreased with increasing carbon dioxide density. Based on the molecular diffusion coefficient data reported here and those published elsewhere, an empirically modified Wilke-Chang equation was proposed which was found to be more quantitative than some existing equations such as the Stokes-Einstein and Wilke-Chang equations.

  16. Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, P.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Doll, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phillips, B.E. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

  17. Proposed sale of radioactively contaminated nickel ingots located at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to sell 8,500 radioactively contaminated nickel ingots (9.350 short tons), currently in open storage at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), to Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) for decontamination and resale on the international market. SEG would take ownership of the ingots when they are loaded for transport by truck to its facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. SEG would receive approximately 200 short tons per month over approximately 48 months (an average of 180 ingots per month). The nickel decontamination process specified in SEG`s technical proposal is considered the best available technology and has been demonstrated in prototype at SEG. The resultant metal for resale would have contamination levels between 0.3 and 20 becquerel per gram (Bq/g). The health hazards associated with release of the decontaminated nickel are minimal. The activity concentration of the end product would be further reduced when the nickel is combined with other metals to make stainless steel. Low-level radioactive waste from the SEG decontamination process, estimated to be approximately 382 m{sup 3} (12,730 ft), would be shipped to a licensed commercial or DOE disposal facility. If the waste were packaged in 0.23 m{sup 3}-(7.5 ft{sup 3}-) capacity drums, approximately 1,500 to 1,900 drums would be transported over the 48-month contract period. Impacts from the construction of decontamination facilities and the selected site are minimal.

  18. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Central Engineering

    1993-12-31

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched greater than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 and 178, or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. The generally accepted method for securing the overpack during shipment is to bolt its base to the trailer bed. International shipments typically are not made using dedicated trailers, and numerous trailers have been received at PORTS with improperly and potentially dangerously secured overpacks. Also, many trailers have not been loaded at PORTS for international shipment because of mechanical problems, rotten flooring, bald tires, no brakes or brake lights, or broken springs. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the review is documented in Reference 4 [Report No. WHC-MR-0233].

  19. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

  20. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  1. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 30% in 45% potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 25% in 40% sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half-cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite-size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  2. Limiting diffusion coefficients of heavy molecular weight organic contaminants in supercritical carbon dioxide 

    E-print Network

    Orejuela, Mauricio

    1994-01-01

    LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted...

  3. Note on coefficient matrices from stochastic Galerkin methods for random diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Tao, E-mail: tzhou@lsec.cc.ac.c [Institute of Computational Mathematics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tang Tao, E-mail: ttang@hkbu.edu.h [Department of Mathematics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-11-01

    In a recent work by Xiu and Shen [D. Xiu, J. Shen, Efficient stochastic Galerkin methods for random diffusion equations, J. Comput. Phys. 228 (2009) 266-281], the Galerkin methods are used to solve stochastic diffusion equations in random media, where some properties for the coefficient matrix of the resulting system are provided. They also posed an open question on the properties of the coefficient matrix. In this work, we will provide some results related to the open question.

  4. An estimate of heavy quark momentum diffusion coefficient in gluon plasma

    E-print Network

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Rajiv V. Gavai; Pushan Majumdar

    2012-11-11

    We calculate the momentum diffusion coefficient for heavy quarks in SU(3) gluon plasma at temperatures 1-2 times the deconfinement temperature. The momentum diffusion coefficient is extracted from a Monte Carlo calculation of the correlation function of color electric fields, in the leading order of expansion in heavy quark mass. Systematics of the calculation are examined, and compared with perturbtion theory and other estimates.

  5. Diffusion Coefficients in a Lamellar Lyotropic Phase: Evidence for Defects Connecting the Surfactant Structure

    E-print Network

    Doru Constantin; Patrick Oswald

    2015-04-09

    We measure diffusion coefficients in the lamellar phase of the nonionic binary system C$_{12}$EO$_6$/H$_2$O using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The diffusion coefficient across the lamellae shows an abrupt increase upon approaching the lamellar-isotropic phase transition. We interpret this feature in terms of defects connecting the surfactant structure. An estimation of the defect density and of the variation in defect energy close to the transition is given in terms of a simple model.

  6. Effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of titanium dioxide powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Astafyev, A. L.; Zarubin, A. N.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work a model of light scattering is shown which explains the result about effect of particle size on the diffuse reflection coefficient of initial titanium dioxide powders. The diffuse reflection coefficient depending on particle size for TiO2 pigment varies on the curve with maximum. The experimental results and the model can be used for technology development of manufacturing pigment for light-reflecting temperature-control coatings of spacecraft

  7. The Diffusion Coefficient For Piecewise Expanding Maps Of The Interval With Metastable States

    E-print Network

    Dmitry Dolgopyat; Paul Wright

    2010-11-24

    Consider a piecewise smooth expanding map of the interval possessing several invariant subintervals and the same number of ergodic absolutely continuous invariant probability measures (ACIMs). After this system is perturbed to make the subintervals lose their invariance in such a way that there is a unique ACIM, we show how to approximate the diffusion coefficient for an observable of bounded variation by the diffusion coefficient of a related continuous time Markov chain.

  8. Binary mutual diffusion coefficients of aqueous ammonium and potassium sulfates at 25°C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek G. Leaist; Ling Hao

    1992-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients of aqueous ammonium and potassium ions at infinite dilution differ by only 0.01% at 25C, so, according\\u000a to Nernst's law, the binary mutual diffusion coefficients D of pairs of dilute aqueous ammonium and potassium salts should\\u000a be nearly identical. Yet precise optical interferometric data for ammonium and potassium sulfates contradict this rule: the\\u000a value of D reported

  9. Binary mutual diffusion coefficients of aqueous alcohols. Methanol to 1-heptanol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ling Hao; Derek G. Leaist

    1996-01-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients, measured by Taylor dispersion at 25 C, are reported for binary aqueous solutions of methanol, ethanol, isomeric propanols and butanols, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-heptanol. Limiting diffusion coefficients (D°) for the 1-alkanols are found to decrease with alcohol molar volume V approximately as V⁻¹². Although values of D° for aqueous 1-propanol and 2-propanol are nearly identical within experimental

  10. Binary mutual diffusion coefficient of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol and dipropylene glycol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Hung Wang; Allan N. Soriano; Alvin R. Caparanga; Meng-Hui Li

    2010-01-01

    Binary mutual diffusion coefficient data for aqueous solutions of propylene and dipropylene glycols were measured using the Taylor dispersion technique for each aqueous binary system at different concentrations (x1=0.2–0.80) and temperatures (303.2–323.2K). The measured data were fit to different empirical and semi-theoretical models and compared with the values predicted from such models. The measured mutual diffusion coefficient data are well

  11. Cation diffusion in aluminosilicate garnets: experimental determination in spessartine-almandine diffusion couples, evaluation of effective binary diffusion coefficients, and applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumit Chakraborty; Jibamitra Ganguly

    1992-01-01

    We present new experimental data on diffusion of divalent cations in almandine-spessartine diffusion couples in graphite capsules in the P-T range of 14–35 kb, 1100–1200° C. The tracer diffusion coefficients of the major divalent cations, viz. Fe, Mg and Mn, retrieved from the multicomponent diffusion profiles, have been combined with earlier data from our laboratory at 29–43 kb, 1300–1480° C

  12. Comparison of ICRF-Induced Ion Diffusion Coefficients Calculated with the DC and AORSA Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. [CompX, P.O. Box 2672, Del Mar, CA 92014-5672 (United States); Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Batchelor, D. B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge (United States)

    2009-11-26

    The DC (Diffusion Coefficient) code obtains RF diffusion coefficients by direct numerical integration of the Lorentz force equation for ion motion in the combined equilibrium fields and the RF full wave EM fields from the AORSA full-wave code. Suitable averaging over initial gyro- and toroidal-angle of coordinate 'kicks' after a bounce-period, gives noise-free bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. For direct comparison with zero-banana-width coefficients from AORSA, perpendicular-drift terms in the Lorentz equation are subtracted off the integration. The DC code has been coupled to the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. For a C-Mod minority ion ICRF heating test case, the total power absorption using the diffusion coefficients agree well, and the profiles are similarly close. This supports the DC calculation and the Kennel-Engelmann-based, no-correlations, coefficient calculation in AORSA. However, resonance correlations cause large differences in the pitch angle variations of the diffusion coefficients, and in the resulting evolution of the ion distribution functions.

  13. Diffusion coefficient in a semi-dilute solution measured by concentration gradient technique

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-435 Diffusion coefficient in a semi-dilute solution measured by concentration gradient technique coefficient of a coil without hydrodynamic interactions between its elements. LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE - LETTRES-dilute solution is characterized by an inter- penetration of the coils, when the monomer concen- tration c

  14. Determination of the Tracer Diffusion Coefficient of Soft Polystyrene Nanoparticles using Neutron Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imel, Adam; Miller, Brad; Holley, Wade; Baskaran, Durairaj; Mays, Jimmy; Dadmun, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The diffusion properties of nanoparticles in polymer nanocomposites are largely unknown and depend intimately on the dispersion of the nanoparticles. We examine the diffusion of soft, organic nanoparticles, which disperse in a polymer matrix due to the interpenetration of polymer chains and particles and the reduction in the depletion of entropy in the system. The impact of the presence of soft nanoparticles on the diffusion coefficient of polystyrene chains has recently been determined with neutron reflectivity. This was completed by monitoring the interdiffusion of deuterated and protonated polystyrene nanocomposite bilayers with and without the soft nanoparticles dispersed throughout both layers and extracting the diffusion coefficient from the one-dimensional solution to Fick's second law of diffusion. In this work, we extend this method to bilayer systems with only the soft nanoparticles as one of the layers and a linear deuterated polystyrene as an adjacent layer. The development of this method allows us to determine the tracer diffusion coefficient of the soft polystyrene nanoparticles for the first time by analyzing the mutual diffusion coefficient from Fick's second law and the fast and slow modes theories for diffusion.

  15. Spreading Waves of a Reduced Diffusion Coefficient of Water in Normal and Ischemic Rat Brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuhiro Hasegawa; Lawrence L. Latour; James E. Formato; Christopher H. Sotak; Marc Fisher

    1995-01-01

    Summary: Using echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we measured three-dimensional changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in eight contiguous coronal slices, encompassing the entire rat brain, before and after local cortical stimulation. We applied chemical (potassium chloride application; n = 6) and mechanical (needle stab; n = 4) stimulations to the right posterior parietal rat cortex.

  16. Propagator for the Fokker-Planck equation with an arbitrary diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chern; Zhu, Ka-Di; Chen, Ji-Gen

    2013-11-01

    We consider a general diffusion process that is force-free and the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation with an arbitrary diffusion coefficient. A propagator for the Fokker-Planck equation of the Stratonovich form is obtained based on random walks. The characteristics of the solution are analyzed. PMID:24329387

  17. Propagator for the Fokker-Planck equation with an arbitrary diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chern; Zhu, Ka-Di; Chen, Ji-Gen

    2013-11-01

    We consider a general diffusion process that is force-free and the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation with an arbitrary diffusion coefficient. A propagator for the Fokker-Planck equation of the Stratonovich form is obtained based on random walks. The characteristics of the solution are analyzed.

  18. Velocity and diffusion coefficient of a random asymmetric one-dimensional hopping model

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    899 Velocity and diffusion coefficient of a random asymmetric one-dimensional hopping model C hopping rates are calculated in a simple way through a recursion relation method, which allows of drift and diffusion on one-dimensional lattices with random asymmetric hopping rates has recently

  19. An alternative model for estimating liquid diffusion coefficients requiring no viscosity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1993-01-01

    An equation, based on the free volume of a liquid solvent, was derived via dimensional analysis, to predict binary diffusion coefficients. The equation assumed that interaction between the solute and liquid solvent molecules followed a Lennard-Jones potential. The equation was compared to other diffusivity equations and was found to give good results over the temperature range examined.

  20. First principles calculations of alloying element diffusion coefficients in Ni using the five-frequency model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Shu-Suo; Ma, Yue; Gong, Sheng-Kai

    2012-10-01

    The diffusion coefficients of several alloying elements (Al, Mo, Co, Ta, Ru, W, Cr, Re) in Ni are directly calculated using the five-frequency model and the first principles density functional theory. The correlation factors provided by the five-frequency model are explicitly calculated. The calculated diffusion coefficients show their excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Both the diffusion pre-factor (D0) and the activation energy (Q) of impurity diffusion are obtained. The diffusion coefficients above 700 K are sorted in the following order: DAl > DCr > DCo > DTa > DMo > DRu > DW > DRe. It is found that there is a positive correlation between the atomic radius of the solute and the jump energy of Ni that results in the rotation of the solute-vacancy pair (E1). The value of E2-E1 (E2 is the solute diffusion energy) and the correlation factor each also show a positive correlation. The larger atoms in the same series have lower diffusion activation energies and faster diffusion coefficients.

  1. Correlation of high-pressure diffusion and viscosity coefficients for n -alkanes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Dymond; M. A. Awan

    1989-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity coefficient data for liquid n-alkanes over the whole pressure range at different temperatures are satisfactorily correlated simultaneously by a method which is just an extension of that previously used to apply the smooth hard-sphere theory of transport properties to individual transport coefficients. Universal curves are developed for reduced quantities D* and ?* as a function of

  2. Determination of binary diffusion coefficients of gases using photothermal deflection technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Rohling; J. Shen; C. Wang; J. Zhou; C. E. Gu

    2007-01-01

    A photothermal deflection (PD) technique was applied to measure the binary diffusion coefficients of various gases (CO2–N2, CO2–O2, N2–He, O2–He, and CO2–He). With an in-house-made Loschmidt diffusion cell, a transverse PD system was employed to measure the time-resolved PD\\u000a signal associated with the variation of the thermal diffusivity and the temperature coefficient of the refractive index of\\u000a the gas mixture

  3. Entropy-scaling laws for diffusion coefficients in liquid metals under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qi-Long; Shao, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Pan-Pan; Wang, Fan-Hou

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations on the liquid copper and tungsten are used to investigate the empirical entropy-scaling laws D*=A exp(B Se x) , proposed independently by Rosenfeld and Dzugutov for diffusion coefficient, under high pressure conditions. We show that the scaling laws hold rather well for them under high pressure conditions. Furthermore, both the original diffusion coefficients and the reduced diffusion coefficients exhibit an Arrhenius relationship DM=DM0 exp(-EM/KBT ) , ( M =u n ,R ,D ) and the activation energy EM increases with increasing pressure, the diffusion pre-exponential factors ( DR0 and DD0 ) are nearly independent of the pressure and element. The pair correlation entropy, S2, depends linearly on the reciprocal temperature S2=-ES/T , and the activation energy, ES, increases with increasing pressure. In particular, the ratios of the activation energies (Eun, ER, and ED) obtained from diffusion coefficients to the activation energy, ES, obtained from the entropy keep constants in the whole pressure range. Therefore, the entropy-scaling laws for the diffusion coefficients and the Arrhenius law are linked via the temperature dependence of entropy.

  4. A novel method for effective diffusion coefficient measurement in gas diffusion media of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linlin; Sun, Hai; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Gongquan

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for measuring effective diffusion coefficient of porous materials is developed. The oxygen concentration gradient is established by an air-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The porous sample is set in a sample holder located in the cathode plate of the PEMFC. At a given oxygen flux, the effective diffusion coefficients are related to the difference of oxygen concentration across the samples, which can be correlated with the differences of the output voltage of the PEMFC with and without inserting the sample in the cathode plate. Compared to the conventional electrical conductivity method, this method is more reliable for measuring non-wetting samples.

  5. Determination of Diffusion Coefficients of Fluorescently Labelled Molecules in Lipid Membranes Using Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öncan, N.; Player, M. A.; Macdonald, A. G.

    2004-10-01

    A series of liposomes has been studied by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching technique using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Both mobile and immobile specimens of lipid membranes have been examined. The specimens consisted of liposomal suspensions incorporating mixtures of the phospholipids dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) with the aminolipid dihexadecanol glycerophospho-ethanolamine (DHPE). The measurements reported provide information about the effective diffusion coefficients, which vary from 0.2 · 10-10 cm2s-1 to 3.2 · 10-10 cm2s-1. They were highly dependent on the ratio DSPC:DOPC. A simple theoretical model of 1-D diffusion was applied for the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficients. The measurements show that it is possible to use straightforward procedures with an unmodified commercial confocal microscope to determine diffusion coefficients of biological specimens.

  6. Effects of molecular weight on the diffusion coefficient of aquatic dissolved organic matter and humic substances.

    PubMed

    Balch, J; Guéguen, C

    2015-01-01

    In situ measurements of labile metal species using diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) passive samplers are based on the diffusion rates of individual species. Although most studies have dealt with chemically isolated humic substances, the diffusion of dissolved organic matter (DOM) across the hydrogel is not well understood. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) and molecular weight (MW) of 11 aquatic DOM and 4 humic substances (HS) were determined. Natural, unaltered aquatic DOM was capable of diffusing across the diffusive gel membrane with D values ranging from 2.48×10(-6) to 5.31×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). Humic substances had diffusion coefficient values ranging from 3.48×10(-6) to 6.05×10(-6) cm(2) s(-1), congruent with previous studies. Molecular weight of aquatic DOM and HS samples (?500-1750 Da) measured using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) strongly influenced D, with larger molecular weight DOM having lower D values. No noticeable changes in DOM size properties were observed during the diffusion process, suggesting that DOM remains intact following diffusion across the diffusive gel. The influence of molecular weight on DOM mobility will assist in further understanding and development of the DGT technique and the uptake and mobility of contaminants associated with DOM in aquatic environments. PMID:25112575

  7. Development of measuring diffusion coefficients by digital holographic interferometry in transparent liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    He, M G; Zhang, S; Zhang, Y; Peng, S G

    2015-05-01

    As for the measurement of diffusion coefficient in transparent liquids by digital holographic interferometry, there are many kinds depending on the mathematical model and experimental setup. The method of using the distance of the peaks in concentration difference profile to determine diffusion coefficient by Mach-Zehnder interferometric experimental setup, is easy to handle. In order to improve the accuracy and convenience of measurement in this method, we combine procedures of hologram analysis used by Mialdun et al (2011) and those by He et al (2009). By using polynomial to fit the continuous phase difference (interference phase) of object beam, it can be more convenient and accurate to determine the distance between the two peaks. Besides, the shift of initial time has been discussed as a separated topic at the first time and two functions for minimization have been given for determination of the initial time in this paper. With the development, diffusion coefficient of KCl in water at 0.33mol/L and 25 °C has been measured. The diffusion coefficient is 1.844 × 10-9 m2/s with the uncertainty of ± 0.012 × 10-9 m2/s. Our measurement has more similar result with other methods than holographic interferometry. The relative uncertainty of diffusion coefficient in our experiment is less than 1% and total uncertainty of temperature is within ± 0.04 K. PMID:25969184

  8. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature. PMID:24840410

  9. Kinetic theory of point vortices: diffusion coefficient and systematic drift

    E-print Network

    P. H. Chavanis

    2001-07-11

    We develop a kinetic theory for point vortices in two-dimensional hydrodynamics. Using standard projection operator technics, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation describing the relaxation of a ``test'' vortex in a bath of ``field'' vortices at statistical equilibrium. The relaxation is due to the combined effect of a diffusion and a drift. The drift is shown to be responsible for the organization of point vortices at negative temperatures. A description that goes beyond the thermal bath approximation is attempted. A new kinetic equation is obtained which respects all conservation laws of the point vortex system and satisfies a H-theorem. Close to equilibrium this equation reduces to the ordinary Fokker-Planck equation.

  10. A first-principles methodology for diffusion coefficients in metals and dilute alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantina, Manjeera

    This work is a study exploring the extent of suitability of static first-principles calculations for studying diffusion in metallic systems. Specifically, vacancy-mediated volume diffusion in pure elements and alloys with dilute concentration of impurities is studied. A novel procedure is discovered for predicting diffusion coefficients that overcomes the shortcomings of the well-known transition state theory, by Vineyard. The procedure that evolves from Eyring's reaction rate theory yields accurate diffusivity results that include anharmonic effects within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Alongside, the procedure is straightforward in its application within the conventional harmonic approximation, from the results of static first-principles calculations. To prove the extensibility of the procedure, diffusivities have been computed for a variety of systems. Over a wide temperature range, the calculated self-diffusion and impurity diffusion coefficients using local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory (DFT) are seen to be in excellent match with experimental data. Self-diffusion coefficients have been calculated for: (i) fcc Al, Cu, Ni and Ag (ii) bcc W and Mo (v) hcp Mg, Ti and Zn. Impurity diffusion coefficients have been computed for: (i) Mg, Si, Cu, Li, Ag, Mo and 3d transition elements in fcc Al (ii) Mo, Ta in bcc W and Nb, Ta and W in bcc Mo (iii) Sn and Cd in hcp Mg and Al in hcp Ti. It is also an observation from this work, that LDA does not require surface correction for yielding energetics of vacancy-containing system in good comparison with experiments, unlike generalized gradient approximation (GGA). It is known that first-principles' energy minimization procedures based on electronic interactions are suited for metallic systems wherein the valence electrons are freely moving. In this thesis, research has been extended to study suitability of first-principles calculations within LDA/GGA including the localization parameter U, for Al system with transition metal solutes, in which charges are known to localize around the transition metal element. U parameter is determined from matching the diffusivities of 3d transition metal impurity in aluminum with reliable experimental data. The effort yielded activation energies in systematic agreement with experiments and has proved useful in obtaining insights into the complex interactions in these systems. Besides the prediction of diffusion coefficients, this research has been helpful in understanding the physics underlying diffusion. Within the scope of observations from the systems studied, certain diffusion related aspects that have been clarified are: (i) cause for non-Arrnenius' nature of diffusion plots (ii) definitions of atom migration properties (iii) magnitude and sign of diffusion parameters enthalpy and entropy of formation and migration and characteristic vibrational frequency (iv) trends in diffusivities based on activation energy and diffusion prefactor (vi) cause for anomalous diffusion behavior of 3d transition metals in Al, and their magnetic nature (vii) contributions from electronic contributions to curvature at very high temperatures of bcc refractory elements (viii) temperature dependence of impurity diffusion correlation factors. Finally, the double-well potential of diffusion by vacancy mechanism has been calculated from first-principles. This aided calculation of entropy of migration and thus free energy of migration along with characteristic vibrational frequency. Also for the first time, temperature dependence of enthalpy of migration and thus atom jump frequency has been accurately predicted. From the broad perspective of predicting diffusion coefficients from computational methodologies, it can be stated as a result of this work that: static first-principles extend an irreplaceable contribution to the future of diffusion modeling. The procedure obviated the use of (i) redundant approximations that limit its accuracy and (ii) support from other computational techniques that restrict its extensibility due to insufficient i

  11. Relationships between atomic diffusion mechanisms and ensemble transport coefficients in crystalline polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Benjamin J; Madden, Paul A

    2014-04-11

    Ionic transport in conventional ionic solids is generally considered to proceed via independent diffusion events or "hops." This assumption leads to well-known Arrhenius expressions for transport coefficients, and is equivalent to assuming diffusion is a Poisson process. Using molecular dynamics simulations of the low-temperature B1, B3, and B4 AgI polymorphs, we have compared rates of ion hopping with corresponding Poisson distributions to test the assumption of independent hopping in these common structure types. In all cases diffusion is a non-Poisson process, and hopping is strongly correlated in time. In B1 the diffusion coefficient can be approximated by an Arrhenius expression, though the physical significance of the parameters differs from that commonly assumed. In low temperature B3 and B4, diffusion is characterized by concerted motion of multiple ions in short closed loops. Diffusion coefficients cannot be expressed in a simple Arrhenius form dependent on single-ion free energies, and intrinsic diffusion must be considered a many-body process. PMID:24765989

  12. Effective molecular diffusion coefficient in a two-phase gel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Owen A.; Mercier, Jean-François; Gauthier, Michel G.; Tessier, Frédéric; Bekhechi, Smaine; Slater, Gary W.

    2006-05-01

    We derive a mean-field expression for the effective diffusion coefficient of a probe molecule in a two-phase medium consisting of a hydrogel with large gel-free solvent inclusions, in terms of the homogeneous diffusion coefficients in the gel and in the solvent. Upon comparing with exact numerical lattice calculations, we find that our expression provides a remarkably accurate prediction for the effective diffusion coefficient, over a wide range of gel concentration and relative volume fraction of the two phases. Moreover, we extend our model to handle spatial variations of viscosity, thereby allowing us to treat cases where the solvent viscosity itself is inhomogeneous. This work provides robust grounds for the modeling and design of multiphase systems for specific applications, e.g., hydrogels as novel food agents or efficient drug-delivery platforms.

  13. Ion diffusion coefficients model and molar conductivities of ionic salts in aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Leoncio; Mejía, Alberto; García, Nuria; Tiemblo, Pilar; Guzmán, Julio

    2015-02-19

    In the study of the electric properties of electrolytes, the determination of the diffusion coefficients of the species that intervene in the charge transport process is of great importance, particularly that of the free ions (D(+) and D(-)), the only species that contribute to the conductivity. In this work we propose a model that allows, with reasonable assumptions, determination of D(+) and D(-), and the degree of dissociation of the salt, ?, at different concentrations, using the diffusion coefficients experimentally obtained with NMR. Also, it is shown that the NMR data suffice to estimate the conductivity of the electrolytes. The model was checked by means of experimental results of conductivity and NMR diffusion coefficients obtained with solutions of lithium triflate in ethylene and propylene carbonates, as well as with other results taken from the literature. PMID:25603311

  14. Freeform determination of a nonlinear diffusion coefficient by a reduced adjoint system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malengier, B.; Houbaert, Y.

    2008-07-01

    In this article we deal with the determination of a diffusion coefficient function in a quasi-linear parabolic system. The motivation comes from a metallurgy setting. The solution method is based on the output least-squares approach (OLS) with minimization applying the adjoint equation. As the diffusion coefficient has an a-priori unknown form, we apply freeform determination in which the coefficient is defined by a linear interpolation. To avoid higher order of interpolation of the coefficient, as well as to enable the use of an adjoint system which is of the same complexity as the original partial differential equation, a reduced adjoint equation is used, applying a mapping strategy. This method is compared with a standard Levenberg-Marquardt approach.

  15. APPLICATION OF THE LASAGNA{trademark} SOIL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY AT THE DOE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, Barry D.; Tarantino, Joseph J., P. E.

    2003-02-27

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), has been enriching uranium since the early 1950s. The enrichment process involves electrical and mechanical components that require periodic cleaning. The primary cleaning agent was trichloroethene (TCE) until the late 1980s. Historical documentation indicates that a mixture of TCE and dry ice were used at PGDP for testing the integrity of steel cylinders, which stored depleted uranium. TCE and dry ice were contained in a below-ground pit and used during the integrity testing. TCE seeped from the pit and contaminated the surrounding soil. The Lasagna{trademark} technology was identified in the Record of Decision (ROD) as the selected alternative for remediation of the cylinder testing site. A public-private consortium formed in 1992 (including DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, Monsanto, DuPont, and General Electric) developed the Lasagna{trademark} technology. This innovative technology employs electrokinetics to remediate soil contaminated with organics and is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils. This technology uses direct current to move water through the soil faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods. Electrokinetics moves contaminants in soil pore water through treatment zones comprised of iron filings, where the contaminants are decomposed to basic chemical compounds such as ethane. After three years of development in the laboratory, the consortium field tested the Lasagna{trademark} process in several phases. CDM installed and operated Phase I, the trial installation and field test of a 150-square-foot area selected for a 120-day run in 1995. Approximately 98 percent of the TCE was removed. CDM then installed and operated the next phase (IIa), a year-long test on a 600-square-foot site. Completed in July 1997, this test removed 75 percent of the total volume of TCE down to a depth of 45 feet. TCE in the test sites. Based on the successful field tests (Phases I and IIa), the ROD was prepared and the Lasagna{trademark} alternative was selected for remediation of TCE contaminated soils at the cylinder testing site Solid Waste Management Unit 91(SWMU 91). Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC contracted CDM to construct and operate a full-scale Lasagna{trademark} remediation system at the site (Phase IIb). Construction began in August 1999 and the operational phase was initiated in December 1999. The Lasagna{trademark} system was operated for two years and reduced the average concentration of TCE in SWMU 91 soil from 84 ppm to less than 5.6 ppm. Verification sampling was conducted during May, 2002. Results of the verification sampling indicated the average concentration of TCE in SWMU 91 soil was 0.38 ppm with a high concentration of 4.5 ppm.

  16. Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

  17. Measurement of the local particle diffusion coefficient in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.

    1987-02-01

    Local impurity particle diffusion coefficients have been measured in a low temperature plasma by the injection of test particles at the center of the plasma. The injection is accomplished by a high voltage discharge between two small graphite electrodes on a probe. The probe can be located anywhere in the plasma. The diffusion is observed spectroscopically. An analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the CII radiation from the carbon discharge can determine the parallel and perpendicular diffusion of the impurity ions. Results with the diagnostic have been obtained in the Proto S-1/C spheromak. The measured value of the diffusion coefficient in the afterglow plasma is in good agreement with classical predictions.

  18. Approximation of effective moisture-diffusion coefficient to characterize performance of a barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Shingo

    2013-11-01

    We report estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient of moisture through a barrier coating to develop an encapsulation technology for the thin-film electronics industry. This investigation targeted a silicon oxide (SiOx) film that was deposited on a plastic substrate by a large-process-area web coater. Using the finite difference method based on diffusion theory, our estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient of a SiOx film corresponded to that of bulk glass that was previously reported. This result suggested that the low diffusivities of barrier films can be obtained on a mass-production level in the factory. In this investigation, experimental observations and mathematical confirmation revealed the limit of the water vapor transmission rate on the single barrier coating.

  19. A New Method for the Calculation of Diffusion Coefficients with Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new Monte Carlo-based method for the calculation of diffusion coefficients. One distinctive feature of this method is that it does not resort to the computation of transport cross sections directly, although their functional form is retained. Instead, a special type of tally derived from a deterministic estimate of Fick's Law is used for tallying the total cross section, which is then combined with a set of other standard Monte Carlo tallies. Some properties of this method are presented by means of numerical examples for a multi-group 1-D implementation. Calculated diffusion coefficients are in general good agreement with values obtained by other methods.

  20. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  1. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Meier, R; Rachocki, A; Korpa?a, A; Singh, R K; Rössler, E A

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of (1)H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(?) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by (19)F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the (1)H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the (19)F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids. PMID:24985656

  2. Broadening of polymer chromatographic signals: Analysis, quantification and correction through effective diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Inmaculada; Coto, Baudilio

    2015-08-14

    Average molecular weights and polydispersity indexes are some of the most important parameters considered in the polymer characterization. Usually, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and multi angle light scattering (MALS) are used for this determination, but GPC values are overestimated due to the dispersion introduced by the column separation. Several procedures were proposed to correct such effect usually involving more complex calibration processes. In this work, a new method of calculation has been considered including diffusion effects. An equation for the concentration profile due to diffusion effects along the GPC column was considered to be a Fickian function and polystyrene narrow standards were used to determine effective diffusion coefficients. The molecular weight distribution function of mono and poly disperse polymers was interpreted as a sum of several Fickian functions representing a sample formed by only few kind of polymer chains with specific molecular weight and diffusion coefficient. Proposed model accurately fit the concentration profile along the whole elution time range as checked by the computed standard deviation. Molecular weights obtained by this new method are similar to those obtained by MALS or traditional GPC while polydispersity index values are intermediate between those obtained by the traditional GPC combined to Universal Calibration method and the MALS method. Values for Pearson and Lin coefficients shows improvement in the correlation of polydispersity index values determined by GPC and MALS methods when diffusion coefficients and new methods are used. PMID:26163929

  3. Prediction of Diffusion Coefficients in Porous Media using Tortuosity Factors Based on Interfacial Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2002-08-01

    Determination of aqueous phase diffusion coefficients of solutes through porous media is essential for understanding and modeling contaminant transport. Prediction of diffusion coefficients in both saturated and unsaturated zones requires knowledge of tortuosity and constrictivity factors. No methods are available for the direct measurement of these factors, which are empirical in their definition. In this paper, a new definition for the tortuosity factor is proposed, as the real to ideal interfacial area ratio. We define the tortuosity factor for saturated porous media (ts) as the ratio S/So (specific surface of real porous medium to that of an idealized capillary bundle). For unsaturated media, tortuosity factor (ta) is defined as aaw/aaw,o (ratio of the specific air-water interfacial area of real and the corresponding idealized porous medium). This tortuosity factor is suitably measured using sorptive tracers (e.g., nitrogen adsorption method) for saturated media and interfacial tracers for unsaturated media. A model based on this new definition of tortuosity factors, termed the Interfacial Area Ratio (IAR) model, is presented for the prediction of diffusion coefficients as a function of the degree of water saturation. Diffusion coefficients and diffusive resistances measured in a number of saturated and unsaturated granular porous media, for solutes in dilute aqueous solutions, agree well with the predictions of the IAR model. A comparison of permeability of saturated sands estimated based on ts and the same based on the Kozeny-Carman equation confirm the usefulness of the ts parameter as a measure of tortuosity.

  4. Moisture Loss from Wood Products During Drying—Part I: Moisture Diffusivities and Moisture Transfer Coefficients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    IBRAHIM DINCER

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the development of an analytical technique for determining the moisture diffusivities and moisture transfer coefficients for wood products subjected to drying. The wood products are idealized in the modeling as either infinite plates or long cylinders. The analysis of transient moisture diffusion is carried out on the basis of two important practical criteria: 0.1

  5. Application of the clustering method in molecular dynamics simulation of the diffusion coefficient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qingzhi Liu; Yangdong Hu

    2008-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the diffusion of oxygen, methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide in water was simulated\\u000a in the canonical NVT ensemble, and the diffusion coefficient was analyzed by the clustering method. By comparing to the conventional\\u000a method (using the Einstein model) and the differentiation-interval variation method, we found that the results obtained by\\u000a the clustering method used in

  6. Diffusion coefficient, correlation function, and power spectral density of velocity fluctuations in monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, R.; Martín, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the diffusivity in suspended monolayer graphene at low and high electric fields is investigated. The knowledge of this quantity and its dependence on the electric field is of primary importance not only for the investigation of the electronic transport properties of this material but also for the development of accurate drift-diffusion models. The results have been obtained by means of an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. For the calculation of the diffusion coefficient, two different methods are considered, one based on the second central moment and the other one based on the Fourier analysis of velocity fluctuations, which are directly related to the noise behaviour at high frequencies. The diffusion coefficient is analyzed considering both parallel and transversal directions with regard to the applied field. Taking into account the importance of degeneracy in this material, the calculations are properly performed by considering an excess electron population obeying a linearized Boltzmann transport equation, which allows studying in an adequate fashion the diffusivity phenomena. The results show the importance of degeneracy effects at very low fields in which transport is mainly dominated by acoustic phonon scattering. Values of the diffusion coefficient larger than 40 000 cm2/Vs are obtained for a carrier concentration equal to 1012 cm-2. The correlation function of instantaneous velocity fluctuation is explained in terms of the wavevector distribution, and their power spectral density is evaluated in the THz range, showing an important dependence on the applied field and being strongly related to microscopic transport processes.

  7. Reorientational angle distribution and diffusion coefficient for nodal and cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewczy?ski, D.; Ho?yst, R.

    2000-12-01

    We present a catalogue of diffusion coefficients and reorientational angle distribution (RAD) for various periodic surfaces, such as I-WP, F-RD, S, and S1 nodal surfaces; cylindrical structures like simple, undulated, and spiral cylinders, and a three-dimensional interconnected-rod structures. The results are obtained on the basis of a simulation algorithm for a diffusion on a surface given by the general equation ?(r)=0 [Ho?yst et al., Phys Rev. E 60, 302 (1999)]. I-WP, S, and S1 surfaces have a spherelike RAD, while F-RD has a cubelike RAD. The average of the second Legendre polynomial with RAD function for all nodal surfaces, except the F-RD nodal surface, decays exponentially with time for short times. The decay time is related to the Euler characteristic and the area per unit cell of a surface. This analytical formula, first proposed by B. Halle, S. Ljunggren, and S. Lidin in J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1401 (1992), is checked here on nodal surfaces, and its range of validity is determined. RAD function approaches its stationary limit exponentially with time. We determine the time to reach stationary state for all surfaces. In the case of the value of the effective diffusion coefficient the mean curvature and a connectivity between parts of surfaces have the main influence on it. The surfaces with low mean curvature at every point of the surface are characterized by high-diffusion coefficient. However if a surface has globally low mean curvature with large regions of nonzero mean curvature (negative and positive) the effective diffusion coefficient is low, as for example, in the case of undulated cylinders. Increasing the connectivity, at fixed curvatures, increases the diffusion coefficient.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of imidazolium-based ionic liquids. I. Dynamics and diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowsari, M. H.; Alavi, Saman; Ashrafizaadeh, Mahmud; Najafi, Bijan

    2008-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dynamics and transport properties of 12 room-temperature ionic liquids of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium [amim]+ (alkyl=methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl) family with PF6-, NO3-, and Cl- counterions. The explicit atom transferable force field of Canongia Lopes et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 2038 (2004)] is used in the simulations. In this first part, the dynamics of the ionic liquids are characterized by studying the mean-square displacement (MSD) and the velocity autocorrelation function (VACF) for the centers of mass of the ions at 400 K. Trajectory averaging was employed to evaluate the diffusion coefficients at two temperatures from the linear slope of MSD(t) functions in the range of 150-300 ps and from the integration of the VACF(t) functions at 400 K. Detailed comparisons are made between the diffusion results from the MSD and VACF methods. The diffusion coefficients from the integration of the VACFs are closer to experimental values than the diffusion coefficients calculated from the slope of MSDs. Both methods can show good agreement with experiment in predicting relative trends in the diffusion coefficients and determining the role of the cation and anion structures on the dynamical behavior of this family of ionic liquids. The MSD and self-diffusion of relatively heavier imidazolium cations are larger than those of the lighter anions from the Einstein results, except for the case of [bmim][Cl]. The cationic transference number generally decreases with temperature, in good agreement with experiments. For the same anion, the cationic transference numbers decrease with increasing length of the alkyl chain, and for the same cation, the trends in the cationic transference numbers are [NO3]-<[Cl]-<[PF6]-. The trends in the diffusion coefficient in the series of cations with identical anions are [emim]+>[pmim]+>[bmim]+ and those for anions with identical cations are [NO3]->[PF6]->[Cl]-. The [dmim]+ has a relatively low diffusion coefficient due to its symmetric structure and good packing in the liquid phase. The major factor for determining the magnitude of the self-diffusion is the geometric shape of the anion of the ionic liquid. Other important factors are the ion size and the charge delocalization in the anion.

  9. Measurement and modeling of CO2 diffusion coefficient in Saline Aquifer at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azin, Reza; Mahmoudy, Mohamad; Raad, Seyed; Osfouri, Shahriar

    2013-12-01

    Storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is a promising techniques to mitigate global warming and reduce greenhouse gases (GHG). Correct measurement of diffusivity is essential for predicting rate of transfer and cumulative amount of trapped gas. Little information is available on diffusion of GHG in saline aquifers. In this study, diffusivity of CO2 into a saline aquifer taken from oil field was measured and modeled. Equilibrium concentration of CO2 at gas-liquid interface was determined using Henry's law. Experimental measurements were reported at temperature and pressure ranges of 32-50°C and 5900-6900 kPa, respectively. Results show that diffusivity of CO2 varies between 3.52-5.98×10-9 m2/s for 5900 kPa and 5.33-6.16×10-9 m2/s for 6900 kPa initial pressure. Also, it was found that both pressure and temperature have a positive impact on the measures of diffusion coefficient. Liquid swelling due to gas dissolution and variations in gas compressibility factor as a result of pressure decay was found negligible. Measured diffusivities were used model the physical model and develop concentration profile of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. Results of this study provide unique measures of CO2 diffusion coefficient in saline aquifer at high pressure and temperature conditions, which can be applied in full-field studies of carbon capture and sequestration projects.

  10. An analytic approximation to the Diffusion Coefficient for the periodic Lorentz Gas

    E-print Network

    C. Angstmann; G. P. Morriss

    2012-02-14

    An approximate stochastic model for the topological dynamics of the periodic triangular Lorentz gas is constructed. The model, together with an extremum principle, is used to find a closed form approximation to the diffusion coefficient as a function of the lattice spacing. This approximation is superior to the popular Machta and Zwanzig result and agrees well with a range of numerical estimates.

  11. Fit Algorithm Performance Comparison (Supporting Information for "Optimal Diffusion Coefficient Estimation in Single-Particle Tracking"

    E-print Network

    Michalet, Xavier

    Fit Algorithm Performance Comparison (Supporting Information for "Optimal Diffusion Coefficient but are best used as follows: q Fig. S1 shows a comparison of execution time for the MLE and OLSF algorithms of "Success Maps" for D, 2 or D and 2 obtained by either the OLSF or MLE algorithm, as described

  12. The measurement of the diffusion coefficient and the sorption isotherm of water in paint films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. J. van der Zanden; E. L. J. Goossens

    2003-01-01

    An experimental technique together with a numerical model is proposed with which the diffusion coefficient and the sorption isotherm of water in paint can be measured. Inside a closed vessel, paint films are on stainless-steel plates. Water is present as water vapour in the air and in the paint. After blowing dry or wet air through the vessel for some

  13. Plasma loss and associated diffusion coefficients to an isolated internal octupole ring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Cavallo

    1976-01-01

    Measurement of particle transport is made in the magnetohydrodynamically stable region near a completely isolated internal ring in a levitated octupole by telemetering the collected plasma signal. With a toroidal field of 10% of the poloidal field and with the parameters of a specified gun-injected plasma a derived diffusion coefficient of D = 60 sq cm per sec results. With

  14. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  15. Correlation of high-pressure thermal conductivity, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients for n-alkanes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Assael; J. H. Dymond; V. Tselekidou

    1990-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficient data for liquid n-alkanes are satisfactorily correlated simultaneously by a method based on the hard-sphere theory of transport properties. Universal curves are developed for the reduced transport properties lambda *, eta *, and D * as a function of the reduced volume. A consistent set of equations is derived for the characteristic volume and

  16. Correlation of high-pressure thermal conductivity, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients for n -alkanes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Assael; J. H. Dymond; V. Tselekidou

    1990-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficient data for liquid n-alkanes are satisfactorily correlated simultaneously by a method based on the hard-sphere theory of transport properties. Universal curves are developed for the reduced transport properties ?*, ?*, and D* as a function of the reduced volume. A consistent set of equations is derived for the characteristic volume and for the parameters

  17. Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

  18. Journal of Crystal Growth 232 (2001) 273284 Precision measurement of ternary diffusion coefficients and

    E-print Network

    Annunziata, Onofrio

    2001-01-01

    Journal of Crystal Growth 232 (2001) 273­284 Precision measurement of ternary diffusion coefficients and implications for protein crystal growth: lysozyme chloride in aqueous ammonium chloride at 258 the driving force for nucleation and crystal growth of lysozyme chloride. # 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All

  19. THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR PIECEWISE EXPANDING MAPS OF THE INTERVAL WITH METASTABLE STATES

    E-print Network

    Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR PIECEWISE EXPANDING MAPS OF THE INTERVAL WITH METASTABLE STATES. Introduction Metastable dynamics arise in a number of physical systems. In such systems, the phase space can be divided into a finite number of components, called metastable states, that are nearly invariant under

  20. Diffusion Coefficient of Fission Gas in Uranium Dioxide Powder Formed by Carbon Dioxide Oxidation of Uranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiyoaki TAKETANI; Katsuichi IKAWA

    1965-01-01

    In connection with a program to study the behavior of punctured fuel elements for the Tokai Atomic Power Reactor, the diffusion coefficient of fission gas in uranium oxide powder formed by CO2 oxidation of U was determined by post-irradiation experiment, in which the fractional release of fission gas during isothermal heating of the powder was measured. The U was oxidized

  1. Water diffusion coefficients during copper electropolishing and IAN IVAR SUNI2*

    E-print Network

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    Water diffusion coefficients during copper electropolishing BING DU1 and IAN IVAR SUNI2* 1, including several with ethanol and other species added as diluents. Diluents allow a wider range of water in the mass transfer limited regime are shown to depend on both the number of water acceptor molecules

  2. Unsteady-state evaporation and the measurement of a binary diffusion coefficient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Slattery; Vijay R. Mhetar

    1997-01-01

    A solution for the isothermal evaporation of a pure volatile liquid that accounts for the moving liquid-vapor interface is presented. This solution is compared with new experimental data for the evaporation of methanol and methyl formate into air at 25.4°C. The resulting diffusion coefficients for these systems are in excellent agreement with reported values (corrected for temperature and pressure).

  3. Measurement of molecular diffusion coefficients in supercritical carbon dioxide using a coated capillary column

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Chih Lai; Chung-Sung Tan

    1995-01-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of ethyl acetate, toluene, phenol, and caffeine in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by a chromatographic peak broadening technique in a coated capillary column at temperatures of 308, 318, and 328 K and pressures up to 145 bar. A linear adsorption in the polymer layer coated on the inner wall of the capillary column was observed. The

  4. Solubilities and diffusion coefficients of high boiling compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hidenori Higashi; Yoshio Iwai; Yasuhiko Arai

    2001-01-01

    A brief introduction of the data sources and the applications of correlation methods for the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of high-boiling compounds (mainly in solid state) in supercritical carbon dioxide are reviewed. Empirical equations, equations of state, solution models, and the Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of solubilities in supercritical carbon dioxide are discussed. The application of empirical equation

  5. Extending Coastal Zone Color Scanner estimates of the diffuse attenuation coefficient into Case II waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard W. Gould; Robert A. Arnone

    1994-01-01

    An iterative technique has been developed to improve coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates of upwelled subsurface water radiances (Lu) in Case II waters. Regional relationships between the diffuse attenuation coefficient measured at 490 nm (K490) and Lu measured at 443, 520, and 550 nm were developed using data collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico in April 1993. These

  6. Measurements of Diffusion Coefficients in Particles Using Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenyakin, Y.; Kamal, S.; Bertram, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are formed in the atmosphere via gas-to-particle conversion of low and semi volatile organic compounds. They are abundant in the atmosphere and can directly contribute to climate change by scattering solar radiation or indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. There is also a health concern associated with SOA particles because they can make up a large fraction of suspended submicron particulate mass. In addition, a reduction in visibility in both polluted and rural areas can be due to SOA particles. Knowledge of diffusion coefficients of organic species within SOA particles is needed to predict the atmospheric behaviour and environmental impacts of these particles. Here we introduce a new method to determine diffusion coefficients of organic probes in particles made up of organic species as a function of relative humidity (RH). Our method involves using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion coefficients of organic fluorescent dyes in organic particles with dimensions of approximately 25 ?m. We validated this method by measuring diffusion coefficients of organic dyes of varied size in sucrose-water solutions as a function of RH and comparing these results with data from the literature. In the future this method will be applied to SOA particles.

  7. Scaling of the diffusion coefficient on the normal form remainder in doubly resonant domains

    E-print Network

    C. Efthymiopoulos

    2008-12-04

    An outline of theoretical estimates is given regarding the dependence of the value of the diffusion coefficient $D$ on the size $R$ of the remainder of the normal form in doubly or simply resonant domains of the action space of 3dof Hamiltonian systems.

  8. Calculation of effective diffusion coefficient in even approximations of the surface pseudo source method

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalishin, A. A., E-mail: kaa@adis.vver.kiae.ru; Laletin, N. I. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The preference of even approximations of the surface pseudo source method for calculation of the diffusion coefficient is substantiated. The homogenization limit for the G{sub 0} approximation in the case of the cell size tending to zero is analytically proved.

  9. Transport diffusion coefficient for a Knudsen gas in a random tube

    E-print Network

    Francis Comets; Serguei Popov; Gunter M. Schütz; Marina Vachkovskaia

    2010-04-10

    We consider transport diffusion in a stochastic billiard in a random tube which is elongated in the direction of the first coordinate (the tube axis). Inside the random tube, which is stationary and ergodic, non-interacting particles move straight with constant speed. Upon hitting the tube walls, they are reflected randomly, according to the cosine law: the density of the outgoing direction is proportional to the cosine of the angle between this direction and the normal vector. Steady state transport is studied by introducing an open tube segment as follows: We cut out a large finite segment of the tube with segment boundaries perpendicular to the tube axis. Particles which leave this piece through the segment boundaries disappear from the system. Through stationary injection of particles at one boundary of the segment a steady state with non-vanishing stationary particle current is maintained. We prove (i) that in the thermodynamic limit of an infinite open piece the coarse-grained density profile inside the segment is linear, and (ii) that the transport diffusion coefficient obtained from the ratio of stationary current and effective boundary density gradient equals the diffusion coefficient of a tagged particle in an infinite tube. Thus we prove Fick's law and equality of transport diffusion and self-diffusion coefficients for quite generic rough (random) tubes.

  10. The effects of deionization processes on meteor radar diffusion coefficients below 90 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younger, J. P.; Lee, C. S.; Reid, I. M.; Vincent, R. A.; Kim, Y. H.; Murphy, D. J.

    2014-08-01

    The decay times of VHF radar echoes from underdense meteor trails are reduced in the lower portions of the meteor region. This is a result of plasma neutralization initiated by the attachment of positive trail ions to neutral atmospheric molecules. Decreased echo decay times cause meteor radars to produce erroneously high estimates of the ambipolar diffusion coefficient at heights below 90 km, which affects temperature estimation techniques. Comparisons between colocated radars and satellite observations show that meteor radar estimates of diffusion coefficients are not consistent with estimates from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder satellite instrument and that colocated radars operating at different frequencies estimate different values of the ambipolar diffusion coefficient for simultaneous detections of the same meteors. Loss of free electrons from meteor trails due to attachment to aerosols and chemical processes were numerically simulated and compared with observations to determine the specific mechanism responsible for low-altitude meteor trail plasma neutralization. It is shown that three-body attachment of positive metal ions significantly reduces meteor radar echo decay times at low altitudes compared to the case of diffusion only that atmospheric ozone plays little part in the evolution of low-altitude underdense meteor trails and that the effect of three-body attachment begins to exceed diffusion in echo decay times at a constant density surface.

  11. Simultaneous Measurement of Tracer and Interdiffusion Coefficients: An Isotopic Phenomenological Diffusion Formalism for the Binary Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new development of the classic Onsager phenomenological formalism is derived using relations based on linear response theory. The development concerns the correct description of the fluxes of the atomic isotopes. The resulting expressions in the laboratory frame are surprisingly simple and consist of terms coming from the standard interdiffusion expressions and from Fick s first law where the tracer diffusion coefficient is involved thus providing a better understanding of the relationship between the two approaches - Fick s first law and the Onsager phenomenological formalism. From an experimental application perspective, the new development is applied to the binary alloy case. The formalism provides the means to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient and tracer diffusion coefficients simultaneously from analysis of the interdiffusion concentration profiles in a single experiment.

  12. Estimation of the radial diffusion coefficient using REE-associated ground Pc 5 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-12-01

    Pc 5 pulsations with frequencies between 1.67 and 6.67 mHz are believed to contribute to the REE in the outer radiation belt during magnetic storms, by means of the observations [Baker et al., 1998; Rostoker et al., 1998; Mathie and Mann, 2000; O'Brien et al., 2001, 2003] and several theoretical studies. The latter studies are roughly categorized into two themes: in-situ acceleration at L lower than 6.6 by wave-particle interactions [Liu et al., 199 9; Summers et al., 1999; Summers and Ma, 2000] and acceleration by radial diffusion from the outer to the inner magnetosphere [Elkington et al., 1999, 2003; Hudson et al., 2000; Kim et al., 2001]. One possible acceleration mechanism is the resonant interaction with Pc 5 toroidal and poloidal pulsations, referred as the radial diffusion mechanism. One of unsolved problems is where and which Pc 5 pulsation mode (toroidal and/or poloidal) play effective role in the radial diffusion process. In order to verify Pc 5 pulsation as the major roles for REEs, we have to examine the time variation of electron phase space density (cf. Green et al., 2004). Electron phase space density is not directly measured, but we can estimate radial diffusion coefficients which determine the electron transportation efficiency, using ground-based magnetic field data. We estimated the radial diffusion coefficient of ground Pc 5 pulsations associated with the Relativistic Electron Enhancement (REE) in the geosynchronous orbit. In order to estimate the radial diffusion coefficient D_LL, we need the value of in-situ Pc 5 electric field power spectral density. In this paper, however, we estimated the equatorial electric field mapped from Pc 5 pulsations power spectral density on the ground. Reciprocal of radial diffusion coefficient describes the timescale T_LL for an electron to diffuse 1 Re. Applying a superposed epoch analysis about timescales T_LL of the radial diffusion for 12 REE events in 2008, we found that when the relativistic electron enhancements occur, T_LL at higher latitude (L larger than 5) is predominantly diffusional, whereas T_LL at lower latitude (L less than 4) is mainly convectional. We concluded that higher-latitude Pc 5 pulsations play more effective roles than lower latitude Pc 5 pulsations in the radial diffusion process.

  13. Kinks in experimental diffusion profiles of a dissolving semi-crystalline polymer explained by a concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Helen E; Sitta, Christoph E; Schillinger, Burkhard; Löwen, Hartmut; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2015-06-28

    The dissolution of polyethylene oxide (PEO) tablets in water has been followed in situ by neutron radiography. When in contact with water, the crystalline phase of semi-crystalline PEO melts once a certain water content is attained. Polymer concentration profiles obtained from the neutron transmission images exhibited a pronounced kink which corresponds to a sharp front in the images and which is related to the melting transition. Sharp diffusion fronts and phase transitions are often linked to non-Fickian behaviour. However, by considering the time evolution of the complete concentration profiles in detail it is shown that the dissolution process can be explained using Fickian diffusion equations with a concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient. PMID:26018995

  14. Correlation between heavy metals and turtle abundance in ponds near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky, USA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Halbrook, Richard S; Sparling, Donald W

    2013-10-01

    Reptiles are declining globally, and environmental contamination has been suggested as a contributing factor; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between contamination and reptile populations. We performed a mark-recapture study at ponds near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky, to determine if heavy metals had an impact on turtle populations. We measured concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and mercury in red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) tissues and pond sediment and determined the correlation between metal concentrations and red-eared slider density. Metal concentrations measured in the current study were low, and turtle density was not significantly correlated with metal concentrations in tissues or sediment. However, we observed a trend of decreasing turtle density in ponds that had greater metal concentrations. Sex ratio and proportion of juveniles were significantly different among ponds, but it is unclear if these differences are related to contamination associated with the PGDP. PMID:23644581

  15. Correlation of binary diffusion coefficients of organic substances in supercritical carbon dioxide based on equations of state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kraska; S. E. Quiñones-Cisneros; U. K. Deiters

    2007-01-01

    An easy applicable and accurate method for the correlation of the infinite dilution diffusion coefficient of organic solutes in supercritical fluids is proposed. The method is applicable to all supercritical fluids; in this work, however, only supercritical carbon dioxide is considered. The infinite dilution diffusion coefficient is calculated from the solvent viscosity by means of a modified Stokes–Einstein relation. The

  16. Bond lifetime and diffusion coefficient in colloids with short-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Ndong Mintsa, E; Germain, Ph; Amokrane, S

    2015-03-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of short-range structures in the interaction potential between hard-sphere-like colloidal particles. Starting from model potentials and effective potentials in binary mixtures computed from the Ornstein-Zernike equations, we investigate the influence of the range and strength of a possible tail beyond the usual core repulsion or the presence of repulsive barriers. The diffusion coefficient and mean "bond" lifetimes are used as indicators of the effect of this structure on the dynamics. The existence of correlations between the variations of these quantities with the physical parameters is discussed to assess the interpretation of dynamics slowing down in terms of long-lived bonds. We also discuss the question of a universal behaviour determined by the second virial coefficient B ((2)) and the interplay of attraction and repulsion. While the diffusion coefficient follows the B ((2)) law for purely attractive tails, this is no longer true in the presence of repulsive barriers. Furthermore, the bond lifetime shows a dependence on the physical parameters that differs from that of the diffusion coefficient. This raises the question of the precise role of bonds on the dynamics slowing down in colloidal gels. PMID:25813606

  17. An interpretation of potential scale dependence of the effectivematrix diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Zhang, Y.Q.; Zhou, Q.; Molz, F.J.

    2005-11-30

    Matrix diffusion is an important process for solutetransport in fractured rock, and the matrix diffusion coefficient is akey parameter for describing this process. Previous studies indicatedthat the effective matrix diffusion coefficient values, obtained from alarge number of field tracer tests, are enhanced in comparison with localvalues and may increase with test scale. In this study, we have performednumerical experiments to investigate potential mechanisms behind possiblescale-dependent behavior. The focus of the experiments is on solutetransport in flow paths having geometries consistent with percolationtheories and characterized by local flow loops formed mainly bysmall-scale fractures. The water velocity distribution through a flowpath was determined using discrete fracture network flow simulations, andsolute transport was calculated using a previously derivedimpulse-response function and a particle-tracking scheme. Values foreffective (or up-scaled) transport parameters were obtained by matchingbreakthrough curves from numerical experiments with an analyticalsolution for solute transport along a single fracture. Results indicatethat a combination of local flow loops and the associated matrixdiffusion process, together with scaling properties in flow pathgeometry, seems to be the dominant mechanism causing the observed scaledependence of theeffective matrix diffusion coefficient (at a range ofscales).

  18. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, S?oneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Rachocki, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Pozna? (Poland); Korpa?a, A. [Department of Biophysics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, ?azarza 16, 31-530 Kraków, Poland and Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singh, R. K. [Ionic Liquid and Solid State Ionics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(?) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  19. A new in-situ method to determine the apparent gas diffusion coefficient of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laemmel, Thomas; Paulus, Sinikka; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor for the biological activity in the soil and soil respiration. Generally, gas exchange between soil and atmosphere is assumed to be governed by diffusion and Fick's Law is used to describe the fluxes in the soil. The "apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient" represents the proportional factor between the flux and the gas concentration gradient in the soil and reflects the ability of the soil to "transport passively" gases through the soil. One common way to determine this coefficient is to take core samples in the field and determine it in the lab. Unfortunately this method is destructive and needs laborious field work and can only reflect a small fraction of the whole soil. As a consequence insecurity about the resulting effective diffusivity on the profile scale must remain. We developed a new in-situ method using new gas sampling device, tracer gas and inverse soil gas modelling. The gas sampling device contains several sampling depths and can be easily installed into vertical holes of an auger, which allows for fast installation of the system. At the lower end of the device inert tracer gas is injected continuously. The tracer gas diffuses into the surrounding soil. The resulting distribution of the tracer gas concentrations is used to deduce the diffusivity profile of the soil. For Finite Element Modeling of the gas sampling device/soil system the program COMSOL is used. We will present the results of a field campaign comparing the new in-situ method with lab measurements on soil cores. The new sampling pole has several interesting advantages: it can be used in-situ and over a long time; so it allows following modifications of diffusion coefficients in interaction with rain but also vegetation cycle and wind.

  20. Drag and diffusion coefficients of $B$ mesons in hot hadronic matter

    E-print Network

    Santosh K Das; Sabyasachi Ghosh; Sourav Sarkar; Jan-e Alam

    2012-04-27

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of a hot hadronic medium consisting of pions, kaons and eta using open beauty mesons as a probe have been evaluated. The interaction of the probe with the hadronic matter has been treated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. It is observed that the magnitude of both the transport coefficients are significant, indicating substantial amount of interaction of the heavy mesons with the thermal bath. The results may have significant impact on the experimental observables like the suppression of single electron spectra originating from the decays of heavy mesons produced in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

  1. Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures: Effect of Shape and Size of Molecules

    E-print Network

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures Form: October 27, 2006 New molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients of binary mixtures of normal-molecular diffusion coefficient for nC10 from binary data. I. Introduction Molecular and thermal diffusion processes

  2. Diffusion MRI: apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the normal brain and a classification of brain disorders based on ADC values

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Sener

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging, dependent on motion of water molecules, provides information regarding tissue integrity. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the normal brain parenchyma, and those in a variety of lesions were studied by echo-planar diffusion MRI in 310 cases. Brain disorders were classified based on their ADC values, taking the ADC values of the normal brain white matter as the

  3. In Situ Effective Diffusion Coefficient Profiles in Live Biofilms Using Pulsed-Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Majors, Paul D.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ahmed, B.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2010-08-15

    Diffusive mass transfer in biofilms is characterized by the effective diffusion coefficient. It is well-documented that the effective diffusion coefficient can vary by location in a biofilm. The current literature is dominated by effective diffusion coefficient measurements for distinct cell clusters and stratified biofilms showing this spatial variation. Regardless of whether distinct cell clusters or surface-averaging methods are used, position-dependent measurements of the effective diffusion coefficient are currently: 1) invasive to the biofilm, 2) performed under unnatural conditions, 3) lethal to cells, and/or 4) spatially restricted to only certain regions of the biofilm. Invasive measurements can lead to inaccurate results and prohibit further (time dependent) measurements which are important for the mathematical modeling of biofilms. In this study our goals were to: 1) measure the effective diffusion coefficient for water in live biofilms, 2) monitor how the effective diffusion coefficient changes over time under growth conditions, and 3) correlate the effective diffusion coefficient with depth in the biofilm. We measured in situ two-dimensional effective diffusion coefficient maps within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1biofilms using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods, and used them to calculate surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreased from the top of the biofilm to the bottom, 2) Drs profiles differed for biofilms of different ages, 3) Drs profiles changed over time and generally decreased with time, 4) all the biofilms showed very similar Drs profiles near the top of the biofilm, and 5) the Drs profile near the bottom of the biofilm was different for each biofilm. Practically, our results demonstrate that advanced biofilm models should use a variable effective diffusivity which changes with time and location in the biofilm.

  4. In situ effective diffusion coefficient profiles in live biofilms using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Renslow, Ryan S; Majors, Paul D; McLean, Jeffrey S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2010-08-15

    Diffusive mass transfer in biofilms is characterized by the effective diffusion coefficient. It is well documented that the effective diffusion coefficient can vary by location in a biofilm. The current literature is dominated by effective diffusion coefficient measurements for distinct cell clusters and stratified biofilms showing this spatial variation. Regardless of whether distinct cell clusters or surface-averaging methods are used, position-dependent measurements of the effective diffusion coefficient are currently: (1) invasive to the biofilm, (2) performed under unnatural conditions, (3) lethal to cells, and/or (4) spatially restricted to only certain regions of the biofilm. Invasive measurements can lead to inaccurate results and prohibit further (time-dependent) measurements which are important for the mathematical modeling of biofilms. In this study our goals were to: (1) measure the effective diffusion coefficient for water in live biofilms, (2) monitor how the effective diffusion coefficient changes over time under growth conditions, and (3) correlate the effective diffusion coefficient with depth in the biofilm. We measured in situ two-dimensional effective diffusion coefficient maps within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods, and used them to calculate surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (D(rs)) profiles. We found that (1) D(rs) decreased from the top of the biofilm to the bottom, (2) D(rs) profiles differed for biofilms of different ages, (3) D(rs) profiles changed over time and generally decreased with time, (4) all the biofilms showed very similar D(rs) profiles near the top of the biofilm, and (5) the D(rs) profile near the bottom of the biofilm was different for each biofilm. Practically, our results demonstrate that advanced biofilm models should use a variable effective diffusivity which changes with time and location in the biofilm. PMID:20589671

  5. Effects of MR Parameter Changes on the Quantification of Diffusion Anisotropy and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Evaluation Using a Diffusional Anisotropic Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Jeong Kon; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Jeong, Ha-Kyu; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate the usefulness of a diffusional anisotropic capillary array phantom and to investigate the effects of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter changes on diffusion fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using the phantom. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging of a capillary array phantom was performed with imaging parameter changes, including voxel size, number of sensitivity encoding (SENSE) factor, echo time (TE), number of signal acquisitions, b-value, and number of diffusion gradient directions (NDGD), one-at-a-time in a stepwise-incremental fashion. We repeated the entire series of DTI scans thrice. The coefficients of variation (CoV) were evaluated for FA and ADC, and the correlation between each MR imaging parameter and the corresponding FA and ADC was evaluated using Spearman's correlation analysis. Results The capillary array phantom CoVs of FA and ADC were 7.1% and 2.4%, respectively. There were significant correlations between FA and SENSE factor, TE, b-value, and NDGD, as well as significant correlations between ADC and SENSE factor, TE, and b-value. Conclusion A capillary array phantom enables repeated measurements of FA and ADC. Both FA and ADC can vary when certain parameters are changed during diffusion experiments. We suggest that the capillary array phantom can be used for quality control in longitudinal or multicenter clinical studies. PMID:25741191

  6. Oxygen diffusion coefficient and solubility in a new proton exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, A.T.; White, R.E.

    2000-03-01

    The electrochemical monitoring technique is used to measure the solubility and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in a new proton exchange membrane that is being developed by Cape Cod Research, Inc., Using the method of least squares, the data were fit to an analytical solution of Fick's second law to determine D and c{sub 0}. Values of 0.40 x 10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 2}/s and 4.98 x 10{sup {minus}6} mol/cm{sup 3} were obtained for the diffusion coefficient and solubility, respectively, of the Cape Cod membrane. These values are significantly less than those of Nafion 117 tested under identical conditions.

  7. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of <3%. We also quantified the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a live mouse. Compared with the conventional amplitude method, the acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed. PMID:22734767

  8. A comprehensive study of diffusion, thermodiffusion, and Soret coefficients of water-isopropanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mialdun, A; Yasnou, V; Shevtsova, V; Königer, A; Köhler, W; Alonso de Mezquia, D; Bou-Ali, M M

    2012-06-28

    We report on the measurement of diffusion (D), thermodiffusion (D(T)), and Soret (S(T)) coefficients in water-isopropanol mixtures by three different instrumental techniques: thermogravitational column in combination with sliding symmetric tubes, optical beam deflection, and optical digital interferometry. All the coefficients have been measured over the full concentration range. Results from different instruments are in excellent agreement over a broad overlapping composition (water mass fraction) range 0.2 < c < 0.7, providing new reliable benchmark data. Comparison with microgravity measurements (SODI/IVIDIL (Selected Optical Diagnostic Instrument/Influence of VIbration on DIffusion in Liquids)) onboard the International Space Station and with literature data (where available) generally gives a good agreement. Contrary to theoretical predictions and previous experimental expectations we have not observed a second sign change of S(T) at low water concentrations. PMID:22755592

  9. Thermal diffusivity coefficient of glycerin determined on an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, K; Rednikov, A; Sadhal, S S

    2002-10-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids that exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in the shape of a flattened drop using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a CO2 laser. The heated drop is then allowed to cool naturally by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, heat loss is highly non-uniform and appears to mainly occur at the drop circumference (equatorial region). This fact allows us to relate the heat loss rate with a heat transfer model to determine the thermal diffusion coefficient. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. PMID:12446319

  10. A Monte Carlo model for determination of binary diffusion coefficients in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Panarese, A. [Department Physics, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Bruno, D.; Colonna, G. [CNR IMIP Bari (Italy); Diomede, P. [Department Chemistry, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Laricchiuta, A. [CNR IMIP Bari (Italy); Longo, S., E-mail: savino.longo@ba.imip.cnr.i [Department Chemistry, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); CNR IMIP Bari (Italy); Capitelli, M. [Department Chemistry, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); CNR IMIP Bari (Italy)

    2011-06-20

    A Monte Carlo method has been developed for the calculation of binary diffusion coefficients in gas mixtures. The method is based on the stochastic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation obtained for the transport of one component in a thermal bath of the second one. Anisotropic scattering is included by calculating the classical deflection angle in binary collisions under isotropic potential. Model results are compared to accurate solutions of the Chapman-Enskog equation in the first and higher orders. We have selected two different cases, H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} and O in O{sub 2}, assuming rigid spheres or using a model phenomenological potential. Diffusion coefficients, calculated in the proposed approach, are found in close agreement with Chapman-Enskog results in all the cases considered, the deviations being reduced using higher order approximations.

  11. Eddy diffusion coefficient for the atmosphere of Venus from radio scintillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, R.; Ishimaru, A.

    1981-01-01

    Estimates are obtained of the vertical mass eddy diffusion coefficient of the Venus atmosphere in the region of turbulence near 60 km on the basis of radio scintillations observed during radio occultation by the atmosphere. The structure constant estimated from Pioneer Venus orbit 18 entrance radio occultation measurements is used, under the assumption that the turbulence is generated by wind-shear, to derive a value of 40,000 sq cm/sec for the vertical mass eddy diffusion coefficient, together with an energy dissipation rate of 20 sq cm/sec and a temperature fluctuation dissipation rate of 0.001 K-squared/sec. Results are noted to fall within the range measured for the earth's troposphere, however, indicate that small-scale turbulence is probably the dominant mechanism for vertical transport near the tropopause in the Venus atmosphere.

  12. Determination of the Solute Diffusion Coefficient by the Droplet Migration Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Liu; Jing Teng; Jeongyun Choi

    2007-07-01

    Further analysis of droplet migration in a temperature gradient field indicates that different terms can be used to evaluate the solute diffusion coefficient in liquid (D{sub L}) and that there exists a characteristic curve that can describe the motion of all the droplets for a given composition and temperature gradient. Critical experiments are subsequently conducted in succinonitrile (SCN)-salol and SCN-camphor transparent alloys in order to observe dynamic migration processes of a number of droplets. The derived diffusion coefficients from different terms are the same within experimental error. For SCN-salol alloys, D{sub L} = (0.69 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, and for SCN-camphor alloys, D{sub L} = (0.24 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s.

  13. Derivation of diffusion coefficient of N2 gas in rubber based on measurement using laser heterodyne interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaxiong Gu; Seiichi Washio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper it is reported that the diffusion coefficient of N2 gas in a rubber sheet is derived based on combination of measurement using U-tube and laser heterodyne interferometry and one dimension diffusion theory successfully. Experiments were carried out under different pressure and temperature conditions to investigate the dependency of diffusion of gas in rubber. A conclusion has been

  14. Effective Diffusion Coefficients of CO2 and HCFC22 in Polyurethane and Polyisocyanurate Foams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bhattacharjee; J. R. Booth

    1995-01-01

    Thin-slice accelerated desorption of gases using a gravimetric methodology has been used to determine effective diffusion coefficients of both carbon dioxide and HCFC-22 in thermoset foam structures. Foam samples consisting of a polyurethane appliance foam and a polyisocyanurate boardstock foam both blown with CFC-11, and polyurethane foams blown with HCFC-22 and carbondioxide have been employed as polymer substrates for the

  15. Temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient of soluble substances during ethanol extraction of clove

    Microsoft Academic Search

    San Myint; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Abu Bakar Mohamad; Abdul Amir H. Kadhum

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of ethanol-soluble substances from ground cloves (particle size 250\\u000a ?m) during extraction was estimated by fitting batch extraction data at several temperatures (27.8, 40, 50, and 60C) to a\\u000a previously developed mass transfer model. The model was based on spherical geometry of particles. Nonlinear regression analysis\\u000a was used to develop an equation that

  16. THE PARALLEL DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT AND ADIABATIC FOCUSING OF COSMIC-RAY PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P.B. 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2012-01-20

    In this paper, the problem of focused particle transport is revisited. A description in terms of a system of stochastic differential equations, completely equivalent to the Fokker-Planck equation, is suggested. The coefficient for spatial diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field is calculated. The case of isotropic pitch angle scattering and weak focusing is analyzed in detail. The disagreement between a recent analysis by Shalchi and other treatments of the same problem is discussed.

  17. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of acetone in succinonitrile at its melting point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, M. A.; Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of acetone in liquid succinonitrile at 331.1 K was determined using the method of McBain and Dawson (1935). Only dilute mixtures of SCN-acetone were studied. The interdiffusion constant was determined to be 0.0000127 sq cm/s and was essentially independent of the acetone concentration over the range investigated (0.5 to 18 mol pct acetone).

  18. Application of Molecular Dynamics Simulations in Molecular Property Prediction II: Diffusion Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have evaluated how well the General AMBER force field (GAFF) performs in studying the dynamic properties of liquids. Diffusion coefficients (D) have been predicted for 17 solvents, 5 organic compounds in aqueous solutions, 4 proteins in aqueous solutions, and 9 organic compounds in non-aqueous solutions. An efficient sampling strategy has been proposed and tested in the calculation of the diffusion coefficients of solutes in solutions. There are two major findings of this study. First of all, the diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in aqueous solution can be well predicted: the average unsigned error (AUE) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) are 0.137 and 0.171 ×10?5 cm?2s?1, respectively. Second, although the absolute values of D cannot be predicted, good correlations have been achieved for 8 organic solvents with experimental data (R2 = 0.784), 4 proteins in aqueous solutions (R2 = 0.996) and 9 organic compounds in non-aqueous solutions (R2 = 0.834). The temperature dependent behaviors of three solvents, namely, TIP3P water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and cyclohexane have been studied. The major MD settings, such as the sizes of simulation boxes and with/without wrapping the coordinates of MD snapshots into the primary simulation boxes have been explored. We have concluded that our sampling strategy that averaging the mean square displacement (MSD) collected in multiple short-MD simulations is efficient in predicting diffusion coefficients of solutes at infinite dilution. PMID:21953689

  19. Pressure and temperature dependence of viscosity and diffusion coefficients of a glassy binary mixture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnab Mukherjee; Sarika Bhattacharyya; Biman Bagchi

    2002-01-01

    Extensive isothermal-isobaric (NPT) molecular dynamics simulations at many different temperatures and pressures have been carried out in the well-known Kob-Andersen binary mixture model to monitor the effect of pressure (P) and temperature (T) on the dynamic properties such as the viscosity (?) and the self-diffusion (Di) coefficients of the binary system. The following results have been obtained: (i) Compared to

  20. Diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance: An evaluation of remote sensing methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhong-Ping Lee; Miroslaw Darecki; Kendall L. Carder; Curtiss O. Davis; Dariusz Stramski; W. Joseph Rhea

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of downwelling irradiance at wavelength ? from surface to a depth (z) in the ocean is governed by the diffuse attenuation coefficient, $\\\\bar{K}_{d}$(?). There are two standard methods for the derivation of $\\\\bar{K}_{d}$(?) in remote sensing, which both are based on empirical relationships involving the blue-to-green ratio of ocean color. Recently, a semianalytical method to derive $\\\\bar{K}_{d}$(?) from

  1. Binary diffusion coefficients of ?-pinene and ?-pinene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos M. Silva; Cláudio A. Filho; Marintho B. Quadri; Eugénia A. Macedo

    2004-01-01

    ?-Pinene and ?-pinene are two important structural isomers, which appear as major components of the pine tree essential oil. In this work, their binary diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution in supercritical CO2 were measured at 313.15, 323.15 and 333.15K and pressures ranging from 12 to 20MPa using the Capillary Peak Broadening technique. The experimental errors found for ? and ?

  2. A new method for determining binary diffusion coefficients in dilute condensable vapors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. M. Luijten; K. J. Bosschaart; M. E. H. Van Dongen

    1997-01-01

    A new method for determining binary diffusion coefficients in dilute condensable vapors is outlined. The method is based on condensational droplet growth. It can be used in a large range of pressures and temperatures, even below the freezing point of the condensing vapor. Results are obtained for the mixtures water-nitrogen and water-helium in the pressure range 11–44 bar. The product

  3. Influence of voltage on chloride diffusion coefficients from chloride migration tests

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, P.F.; Hooton, R.D. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-08-01

    A chloride migration test method is described and test results are given for concrete subjected to a range of potential gradients. A method for setting the potential across the sample length using reference electrodes and Luggin capillaries is described. Apparent and effective diffusion coefficients were calculated from chloride break-through time and steady state chloride flux respectively at each potential. Accounting for polarization and IR drop losses is significant particularly at lower applied potentials.

  4. Measurement of mass diffusion coefficients using nonexponential forced Rayleigh scattering signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, D. R.; Marshall, A. H.; Jukam, N. T.; Park, H. S.; Chang, T.

    1998-07-01

    Recent reports on mass-diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering (FRS) experiments have emphasized that the detected signal arises as a difference between two exponentially decaying fields diffracted from "complementary" ground-state and photoproduct population gratings. A mass-diffusion coefficient has nevertheless often been extracted by forcing a single-exponential fit to the data, especially in cases where the decay appears to be monotonic. In this paper, we use simulations and experiments to evaluate the accuracy of single-exponential fits for FRS profiles, and we propose a useful alternative method for obtaining a meaningful rate constant in cases in which the error in the single-exponential analysis is large. We begin by noting from the complementary grating model that (1) severe deviations from single-exponential decay can occur for an arbitrarily small (but nonzero) difference in the ground-state/photoproduct rate constants, and (2) the first cumulant of a FRS decay—in contrast to that of a dynamic light scattering profile—does not (in general) represent a physically useful decay rate. These statements apply to both monotonic and nonmonotonic decays. We then show that a combination of the first two FRS cumulants provides a physically useful mean rate constant. Finally, to address these issues experimentally, we have reexamined the diffusion of methyl red (MR) through 2-propanol at room temperature, a system previously analyzed using single-exponential fits. The new experiments, carried out at higher sensitivity than the previous studies, show that the MR/2-propanol signal is nonmonotonic. The geometric-mean diffusion coefficient obtained from the curvature of the local maximum is compared to the diffusion coefficient inferred from single-exponential fits, and it is found that the latter is larger by nearly a factor of 2. The results reported here should prove important in improving the accuracy of the FRS technique.

  5. Radial diffusion coefficients and the distance to the modulation boundary for galactic and anomalous cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Z.; McDonald, F. B.

    When cosmic ray streaming in the heliosphere is negligible, the basic transport equation gives a simple approximation for the diffusion coefficient of cosmic ray particles, Krr = CVSW/ gr, where C is the Compton-Getting factor, VSW is the solar wind velocity and gr is the radial intensity gradients. Using this equation we calculated the particle diffusion coefficients from 1974 to 1995 out to heliocentric distances of ˜70 AU, using the measured gr for galactic 180-450 MeV/n He, 130-220 MeV H and anomalous 30-57 MeV/n He and 10-20 MeV/n He. Further we made first order estimates of the distance to the modulation boundary, using these diffusion coefficients and the modulation function for galactic 180-450 MeV/n He. It was shown that the distance is from about 65 AU to 110 AU varying inversely proportional to the solar activity for the period from 1978 to 1990. After 1990 these estimation were not significant because of the very small gradients in the outer heliosphere.

  6. Computing quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the delta-f particle-in-cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, T. M.; Smithe, D. N.; Ranjbar, V. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2009-11-26

    Linear wave codes AORSA and TORIC couple to the bounce-averaged nonlinear Fokker-Planck code CQL3D through quasi-linear diffusion coefficients. Both linear wave codes rely on the quasi-local approximation that includes only first-order parallel and perpendicular gradient variations of cyclotron frequency and ignores field line curvature along with temperature and density gradient effects. The delta-f particle-in-cell (DFPIC) method has been successfully used for simulating ion-cyclotron fast wave behavior. This method also permits particle behavior such as multiple pass resonance, banana orbits, and superadiabaticity. We present new work on generating quasi-linear diffusion coefficients using the DFPIC method that will permit the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EMPIC) code, VORPAL, to couple to CQL3D and to compare to AORSA and TORIC. A new multiple weight delta-f approach will be presented that converts velocity derivatives to action derivatives and yields a full tensor quasi-linear diffusion coefficient.

  7. Diffusion coefficients in CO2/n-alkane binary liquid mixtures by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Damelys; Nieto-Draghi, Carlos; de Hemptinne, Jean Charles; López de Ramos, Aura L

    2008-12-25

    The objective of this work was to determine Fick diffusion coefficients in CO2/n-alkane binary mixtures without experimental test. For doing so, Maxwell-Stefan (MS) diffusivity was calculated by molecular simulation. Simultaneously, a thermodynamic factor was estimated using the PC-SAFT (perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory) equation of state (eos). The binary Fick diffusivities are calculated as the product of both quantities. The binary mixtures investigated contain CO2 and various n-alkanes (nC10, nC16, nC22, nC28, nC44), at their bubble pressure at varying temperatures between 298 and 373 K. The calculated values of Fick diffusivities were compared against the experimental ones for the systems where literature data exist. An average deviation of 26% was found for the CO2/n-decane and 15% for CO2/n-hexadecane mixtures. These results support that molecular simulation can be employed as a tool for the determination of Fick diffusivities in high pressure systems, like in oil reservoirs, without the need to construct a complicated and expensive experimental setup. This method only requires the phase behavior of the desired system, and it can be used for multicomponent mixtures. As an example, predictions of Fick diffusivities were done for CO2 binary mixtures with heavy n-alkanes (nC22, nC28, nC44). PMID:19367942

  8. Photothermal techniques applied to the determination of the water vapor diffusion coefficient and thermal diffusivity of edible films.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mendez, M A; Martin-Martinez, E San; Morales, J E; Cruz-Orea, A; Jaime-Fonseca, M R

    2007-04-01

    Water vapor diffusion coefficient (WVDC) and thermal diffusivity (alpha) were determined in gelatin-starch films through photothermal techniques. The effect of different variables in the elaboration of these films, such as starch and glycerol concentrations and pH, were evaluated through the response surface methodology. The results indicated that an increase in the glycerol concentration and pH favored the WVDC of the films. On the other hand, alpha was influenced principally by the starch content and pH of the film-forming solution. The minimum alpha value was 4.5 x 10(-4) cm2/s, which is compared with alpha values reported for commercial synthetic polymers. PMID:17420552

  9. Fluoride levels in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Battelle initiated a survey of vegetation samples at new and established sites in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffision Plant. Forty-nine vegetation samples were collected and analyzed for fluoride. Three samples from inside the plant boundaries contained fluoride in concentrations great enough to be of concern to grazing livestock (>40 ppm). All other samples were below the action level. Fluoride concentrations in vegetation reported by Battelle were somewhat greater than identical samples analyzed by GAT. This differences may be accounted for by the fact that GAT rinsed their samples prior to the analysis for fluoride while Battelle did not. Battelles' samples were not washed because fluoride containing particulates on the surface of vegetation can be readily ingested by livestock and may contribute to the total amount of fluoride absorbed by the livestock. Results of the vegetational survey were not correlated with the deposition pattern modeled by Battelle. Apparently, levels of fluoride in vegetation near the plant are not greatly influenced by plant emissions. Extraneous sources such as dust and other forms of atmospheric fluoride appear to be the predominant influence governing fluoride in vegetation. Results from the fluoride deposition model indicate that a deficiency of sampling points may exist in the northwest sector immediately adjacent to the plant perimeter. The addition of new sampling stations in this area would create closer surveillance of potential fluoride emissions from the plant.

  10. Molecular dynamics calculation of rotational diffusion coefficient of a carbon nanotube in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bing-Yang; Dong, Ruo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Rotational diffusion processes are correlated with nanoparticle visualization and manipulation techniques, widely used in nanocomposites, nanofluids, bioscience, and so on. However, a systematical methodology of deriving this diffusivity is still lacking. In the current work, three molecular dynamics (MD) schemes, including equilibrium (Green-Kubo formula and Einstein relation) and nonequilibrium (Einstein-Smoluchowski relation) methods, are developed to calculate the rotational diffusion coefficient, taking a single rigid carbon nanotube in fluid argon as a case. We can conclude that the three methods produce same results on the basis of plenty of data with variation of the calculation parameters (tube length, diameter, fluid temperature, density, and viscosity), indicative of the validity and accuracy of the MD simulations. However, these results have a non-negligible deviation from the theoretical predictions of Tirado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 2047 (1984)], which may come from several unrevealed factors of the theory. The three MD methods proposed in this paper can also be applied to other situations of calculating rotational diffusion coefficient.

  11. Molecular dynamics calculation of rotational diffusion coefficient of a carbon nanotube in fluid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bing-Yang; Dong, Ruo-Yu

    2014-01-21

    Rotational diffusion processes are correlated with nanoparticle visualization and manipulation techniques, widely used in nanocomposites, nanofluids, bioscience, and so on. However, a systematical methodology of deriving this diffusivity is still lacking. In the current work, three molecular dynamics (MD) schemes, including equilibrium (Green-Kubo formula and Einstein relation) and nonequilibrium (Einstein-Smoluchowski relation) methods, are developed to calculate the rotational diffusion coefficient, taking a single rigid carbon nanotube in fluid argon as a case. We can conclude that the three methods produce same results on the basis of plenty of data with variation of the calculation parameters (tube length, diameter, fluid temperature, density, and viscosity), indicative of the validity and accuracy of the MD simulations. However, these results have a non-negligible deviation from the theoretical predictions of Tirado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 2047 (1984)], which may come from several unrevealed factors of the theory. The three MD methods proposed in this paper can also be applied to other situations of calculating rotational diffusion coefficient. PMID:25669403

  12. Retrieving the translational diffusion coefficient of water from experiments on single levitated aerosol droplets.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, Daniel M; Huisman, Andrew J; Bones, David L; Te, Yiea-Funk; Luo, Bei P; Krieger, Ulrich K; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-08-21

    The time-dependent growth and shrinkage of aqueous aerosol particles trapped in an electrodynamic balance exposed to changes in relative humidity (RH) depend on the translational diffusion coefficient of water (DH2O). Resonances in the Mie scattering patterns of the illuminated micrometre-sized droplets are used to follow the compositional evolution through stepwise changes in RH. Under conditions where the diffusion of water molecules becomes sufficiently slow, e.g. in the highly viscous or even glassy regime, the concentration and temperature dependent values of DH2O can be determined iteratively by comparing the observed shifts in the Mie resonant wavelengths with predicted shifts from a diffusion model of a multi-layered sphere. It is shown that condensation and evaporation of water vapour from or to highly viscous or glassy droplets follow different kinetic regimes, a result that is consistent with previous studies of adsorption and desorption on glassy surfaces. PMID:24998384

  13. Electrochemical methods for the determination of the diffusion coefficient of ionophores and ionophore-ion complexes in plasticized PVC membranes.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Sándor; Zook, Justin M; Lindner, Erno; Tóth, Klára; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2008-05-01

    The diffusion coefficients of active components in ion-selective membranes have a decisive influence on the life-time and detection limit of the respective ion-selective electrodes, as well as influencing the rate of polarization and relaxation processes of electrically perturbed ion sensors. Therefore, the rational design of mass transport controlled ion-selective electrodes with sub-nanomolar detection limits requires reliable data on the diffusion coefficients. We have implemented electrochemical methods for the quantitative assessment of both the diffusion coefficients of free ionophores and ion-ionophore complexes. The diffusion coefficients of the pH-sensitive chromoionophore ETH 5294 and the calcium-selective ionophore ETH 5234 were determined in plasticized PVC membranes with different PVC to plasticizer ratios. The diffusion coefficient of the free chromoionophore determined by a chronoamperometric method was validated with optical methods for a variety of membrane compositions. The calcium-selective ionophore ETH 5234 was used as a model compound to assess the diffusion coefficient of the ion-ionophore complex calculated from the time required for the complexes to cross a freshly prepared membrane during potentiometric ion-breakthrough experiments. The difference between the diffusion coefficients of the free ionophore ETH 5234 and the ion-ionophore complex was found to be significant and correlated well with the geometry of the respective species. PMID:18427685

  14. Consequences of using nonlinear particle trajectories to compute spatial diffusion coefficients. [for cosmic ray propagation in interstellar and interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    In a study of cosmic ray propagation in interstellar and interplanetary space, a perturbed orbit resonant scattering theory for pitch angle diffusion in a slab model of magnetostatic turbulence is slightly generalized and used to compute the diffusion coefficient for spatial propagation parallel to the mean magnetic field. This diffusion coefficient has been useful for describing the solar modulation of the galactic cosmic rays, and for explaining the diffusive phase in solar flares in which the initial anisotropy of the particle distribution decays to isotropy.

  15. Atmospheric Escape by Magnetically Driven Wind from Gaseous Planets II --Effects of Magnetic Diffusion--

    E-print Network

    Tanaka, Yuki A; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate roles of Alfvenic waves in the weakly-ionized atmosphere of hot Jupiters by carrying out non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with Ohmic diffusion in one-dimensional magnetic flux tubes. Turbulence at the surface excites Alfven waves and they propagate upward to drive hot (~ 10^4 K) outflows. The magnetic diffusion plays an important role in the dissipation of the Alfvenic waves in the weakly ionized atmosphere of hot Jupiters. The mass-loss rate of the spontaneously driven planetary wind is considerably reduced, in comparison with that obtained from ideal MHD simulations because the Alfvenic waves are severely damped at low altitudes in the atmosphere, whereas the wave heating is still important in the heating of the upper atmosphere. Dependence on the surface temperature, planetary radius, and velocity dispersion at the surface is also investigated. We find an inversion phenomenon of the transmitted wave energy flux; the energy flux carried by Alfven waves in the upper atmosphere h...

  16. Three FORTRAN programs for finite-difference solutions to binary diffusion in one and two phases with composition-and time-dependent diffusion coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Geological examples of binary diffusion are numerous. They are potential indicators of the duration and rates of geological processes. Analytical solutions to the diffusion equations generally do not allow for variable diffusion coefficients, changing boundary conditions, and impingement of diffusion fields. The three programs presented here are based on Crank-Nicholson finite-difference approximations, which can take into account these complicating factors. Program 1 describes the diffusion of a component into an initially homogeneous phase that has a constant surface composition. Specifically it is written for Fe-Mg exchange in olivine at oxygen fugacities appropriate for the lunar crust, but other components, phases, or fugacities may be substituted by changing the values of the diffusion coefficient. Program 2 simulates the growth of exsolution lamellae. Program 3 describes the growth of reaction rims. These two programs are written for pseudobinary Ca-(Mg, Fe) exchange in pyroxenes. In all three programs, the diffusion coefficients and boundary conditions can be varied systematically with time. To enable users to employ widely different numerical values for diffusion coefficients and diffusion distance, the grid spacing in the space dimension and the increment by which the grid spacing in the time dimension is increased at each time step are input constants that can be varied each time the programs are run to yield a solution of the desired accuracy. ?? 1982.

  17. Diffusion coefficients for crystal nucleation and growth in deeply undercooled glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Fokin, Vladimir M; Schmelzer, Jürn W P; Nascimento, Marcio L F; Zanotto, Edgar D

    2007-06-21

    We calculate, employing the classical theory of nucleation and growth, the effective diffusion coefficients controlling crystal nucleation of nanosize clusters and the subsequent growth of micron-size crystals at very deep undercoolings, below and above Tg, using experimental nucleation and growth data obtained for stoichiometric Li2O.2SiO2 and Na2O.2CaO.3SiO2 glasses. The results show significant differences in the magnitude and temperature dependence of these kinetic coefficients. We explain this difference showing that the composition and/or structure of the nucleating critical clusters deviate from those of the stable crystalline phase. These results for diffusion coefficients corroborate our previous conclusion for the same glasses, based on different experiments, and support the view that, even for the so-called case of stoichiometric (polymorphic) crystallization, the nucleating phase may have a different composition and/or structure as compared to the parent glass and the evolving macroscopic crystalline phase. This finding gives a key to explain the discrepancies between calculated (by classical nucleation theory) and experimentally observed nucleation rates in these systems, in particular, and in deeply undercooled glass-forming liquids, in general. PMID:17600425

  18. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients in the Tsyganenko field model for oblique chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri

    We present the results of computations of bounce-averaged quasi-linear momentum Dpp, pitch-angle D?? and mixed D?p diffusion coefficients in the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. We assume that electrons are scattered by oblique whistler mode chorus waves of Gaussian spread of wave power spectral density and wave normal angle outside the plasmasphere. The scat-tering rates are computed using the full electromagnetic dispersion relation and up to 5-order resonance condition including Landau resonance. The diffusion coefficients are calculated for quiet conditions and storm-time conditions for the day and night sides. We compare scattering rates bounce-averaged in the Tsyganenko field model with those in the dipole field and discuss the differences. The results are followed by a physical explanation of how the magnetic field model can change the bounce-averaged scattering rates. The calculations show that, during active conditions, the pitch-angle scattering by chorus waves in the realistic magnetic field can diffuse relativistic electrons to the loss cone not only on the day side, but also on the night side. Our study shows that while there are still a number of unknown parameters that determine scattering rates, inclusion of bounce-averaging in the realistic field will be crucially important for future radiation belt modeling.

  19. Measurement of Retinalamin diffusion coefficient in human sclera by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Zubkova, Elena A.; Kamenskikh, Tatiana G.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2008-12-01

    The use of cytomedines (such as Retinalamin) in clinical practice has shown high effectiveness of the medicaments in ophthalmology. The study of diffusion of Retinalamin in scleral tissue is important for estimation of a drug dose delivered into inner tissue of eye, time of drug action, etc. In vitro measurements of spectral reflectance of sclera interacting with aqueous solution of Retinalamin have been carried out. Ten human sclera samples were included in the study. The results of the experiments have shown that penetration of Retinalamin into scleral tissue leads to the decrease of scleral reflectance due to optical immersion. Estimation of diffusion coefficient of studied solution has been made on the basis of analysis of optical reflectance dynamics of the sclera samples. The diffusion coefficient of Retinalamin in human scleral tissue was evaluated as (1.82±0.14)×10 -6 cm 2/s. The results are important for treatment of partial optic atrophy observed at primary open-angle glaucoma and others eye diseases.

  20. The measurement of self-diffusion coefficients in liquid metals with quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering (QENS) has proven to be a versatile tool to study self diffusion of atoms in liquid metals. Here it is shown, that coherent contributions to the signal in the small q limit appear as a flat and energy independent constant to the QENS signal in single-component liquid metals even for systems with a small incoherent scattering cross section, like aluminum. Container-less processing via electromagnetic or electrostatic levitation devices, especially designed for QENS, enables the in-situ measurement on liquid metallic droplets of sizes between 5 mm to 10 mm in diameter. This gives access to the study of chemically reactive, refractory metallic melts and extends the accessible temperature range to undercoolings of several hundred Kelvin below the respective melting point. Compared to experiments using a thin-walled crucible giving hollow-cylindrical sample geometry it is shown that multiple scattering on levitated droplets is negligible for the analysis of the self-diffusion coefficient. QENS results of liquid germanium and 73germanium isotope mixtures, titanium, nickel, copper and aluminum are reviewed. The self-diffusion coefficients of these systems are best described by an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence around their respective melting points.

  1. Measuring diffusion coefficients via two-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelley D; Brown, Edward B

    2010-01-01

    Multi-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is a microscopy technique used to measure the diffusion coefficient (or analogous transport parameters) of macromolecules, and can be applied to both in vitro and in vivo biological systems. Multi-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching is performed by photobleaching a region of interest within a fluorescent sample using an intense laser flash, then attenuating the beam and monitoring the fluorescence as still-fluorescent molecules from outside the region of interest diffuse in to replace the photobleached molecules. We will begin our demonstration by aligning the laser beam through the Pockels Cell (laser modulator) and along the optical path through the laser scan box and objective lens to the sample. For simplicity, we will use a sample of aqueous fluorescent dye. We will then determine the proper experimental parameters for our sample including, monitor and bleaching powers, bleach duration, bin widths (for photon counting), and fluorescence recovery time. Next, we will describe the procedure for taking recovery curves, a process that can be largely automated via LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX) for enhanced throughput. Finally, the diffusion coefficient is determined by fitting the recovery data to the appropriate mathematical model using a least-squares fitting algorithm, readily programmable using software such as MATLAB (The Mathworks, Natick, MA). PMID:20190730

  2. A Device To Emulate Diffusion and Thermal Conductivity Using Water Flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harvey F. Blanck

    2005-01-01

    Time places severe limitations on which experiments can be demonstrated in the classroom. Since diffusion in liquids is a slow process, most classroom demonstrations of diffusion involve gaseous diffusion. They do not show quantitatively the relative concentrations of the diffusing substances nor do they demonstrate the various different general methods of determining diffusion coefficients. An acrylic plastic device has been

  3. Interdiffusion in Ni-rich, Ni-Cr-Al alloys at 1100 and 1200 C. I - Diffusion paths and microstructures. II - Diffusion coefficients and predicted concentration profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Interdiffusion in Ni-rich Ni-Cr-Al alloys is investigated experimentally after annealing at 1100 and 1200 C using gamma/gamma, gamma/gamma+beta, gamma/gamma+gamma prime, and gamma/gamma+alpha diffusion couples. The amount and location of Kirkendall porosity suggests that Al diffuses more rapidly than Cr which diffuses more rapidly than Ni in the gamma phase of Ni-Cr-Al alloys. The location and extent of maxima and minima in the concentration profiles of the diffusion couples indicate that both cross-term diffusion coefficients are positive. Measurements are also presented of the ternary interdiffusion coefficients of the gamma phase in the Ni-Cr-Al system. It is shown that the interdiffusion coefficients can be accurately predicted by using a ternary finite-difference interdiffusion model.

  4. Application of a Kalman filter to UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-03-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a bias is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerent is not steady state, a bias exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by the measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and bias problem and provide an improve estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development and the current status of a Kalman filter used for this application is given. 5 refs.

  5. Investigation of Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 fault and fire, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, March 24, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    On March 24, 1982, an electrical fault and resultant fire in the 480 volt Auxiliary Power Substation 95A4 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant destroyed that substation. There were no personal injuries, the overall loss was limited to the Substation, and the cost of replacing the Substation with repaired and new components has been estimated at $184,000. At the time of the incident, Goodyear was involved in a project to replace the obsolete 480 volt circuit breaker of the Auxiliary Power System. This project involved the disassembly, refurishing, and reassembly of 480 volt circuit breaker carriages by Goodyear personnel. The fault occurred in a circuit breaker upgraded under this project. The investigation of this accident is reported. The evidence suggests the fault resulted from the improper assembly of an upgraded 480 volt circuit breaker. Compounding the problem and leading to the extensive damage was the failure of the transformer secondary breaker to trip open as designed and interrupt the flow of power to the substation. It is surmised that inadequate testing during preventive maintenance contributed to this condition. Additional factors which may have contributed to the accident included: no requirements for assuring the competence of the electricians who installed the circuit breakers, no specific assembly instructions to the electricians, inadequate procedure instructions, and an inadequate procedure governing operational or load testing of the breaker. (LCL)

  6. Evaluation of apparent diffusion coefficient thresholds for diagnosis of medulloblastoma using diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Theodore Thomas; Provenzale, James M

    2014-02-01

    We assess a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) analysis technique as a potential basis for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of pediatric posterior fossa tumors. A retrospective medical record search identified 103 children (mean age: 87 months) with posterior fossa tumors having a total of 126 preoperative MR scans with DWI. The minimum ADC (ADCmin) and normalized ADC (nADC) values [ratio of ADCmin values in tumor compared to normal tissue] were measured by a single observer blinded to diagnosis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to determine the optimal threshold for which the nADC and ADCmin values would predict tumor histology. Inter-rater reliability for predicting tumor type was evaluated using values measured by two additional observers. At histology, ten tumor types were identified, with astrocytoma (n=50), medulloblastoma (n=33), and ependymoma (n=9) accounting for 89%. Mean ADCmin (0.54 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and nADC (0.70) were lowest for medulloblastoma. Mean ADCmin (1.28 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and nADC (1.64) were highest for astrocytoma. For the ROC analysis, the area under the curve when discriminating medulloblastoma from other tumors using nADC was 0.939 and 0.965 when using ADCmin. The optimal ADCmin threshold was 0.66 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, which yielded an 86% positive predictive value, 97% negative predictive value, and 93% accuracy. Inter-observer variability was very low, with near perfect agreement among all observers in predicting medulloblastoma. Our data indicate that both ADCmin and nADC could serve as the basis for a CAD program to distinguish medulloblastoma from other posterior fossa tumors with a high degree of accuracy. PMID:24571835

  7. Thermodiffusion, molecular diffusion and Soret coefficient of binary and ternary mixtures of n-hexane, n-dodecane and toluene.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Wang, Zilin; Lapeira, Estela; Klein, Michael; Wiegand, Simone; Mounir Bou-Ali, M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the thermodiffusion, molecular diffusion, and Soret coefficients of 12 binary mixtures composed of toluene, n-hexane and n-dodecane in the whole range of concentrations at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 298.15 K and 308.15 K have been determined. The experimental measurements have been carried out using the Thermogravitational Column, the Sliding Symmetric Tubes and the Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering techniques. The results obtained using the different techniques show a maximum deviation of 9% for the thermodiffusion coefficient, 8% for the molecular diffusion coefficient and 2% for the Soret coefficient. For the first time we report a decrease of the thermodiffusion coefficient with increasing ratio of the thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity for a binary mixture of an organic ring compound with a short n-alkane. This observation is discussed in terms of interactions between the different components. Additionally, the thermogravitational technique has been used to measure the thermodiffusion coefficients of four ternary mixtures consisting of toluene, n-hexane and n-dodecane at 298.15 K. In order to complete the study, the values obtained for the molecular diffusion coefficient in binary mixtures, and the thermodiffusion coefficient of binary and ternary mixtures have been compared with recently derived correlations. PMID:25376978

  8. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  9. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50% and 70% RH). A dynamic dual-chamber test meth...

  10. In Situ Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Diffusion Coefficients and Solubility:Indicates to Carbon Dioxide Injection into Hexadecane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Lu, Wanjun

    2015-04-01

    Injecting CO2 into lean-oil reservoirs is not only a way to geological storage but also enhanced oil recovery. In the secondary displacements of oil reservoir by CO2-injection, diffusion coefficients and solubility of CO2 are key parameters to calculate the volume of CO2 injected and the time to achieve the desired viscosity in the numerical simulation. Unfortunately, the experimental data on the CO2 diffusion coefficient and solubility in liquid hydrocarbons under high pressure conditions are scarce. Hexadecane has properties similar to the average properties of Brazilian heavy oil. Experimental data on the diffusion coefficients and solubility of CO2 in hexadecane were reviewed by Nieuwoudt and Rand (2002), Rincon and Trejo (2001) and Breman et al (1994), indicating that the data in the literature were limited at relatively low temperatures and/or low pressures. In this paper, the diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in hexadecane at different temperature and pressure were determined with in situ Raman spectroscopy. A model was established to describe relationship among diffusion coefficients, temperature, and pressure. The solubility of CO2 in hexadecane was obtained from 298.15 to 473.15 K and 10 to 45 MPa. The experimental results show that:(1) Solubility of CO2 decreases with increasing temperature.(2) Increasing pressure increases the CO2 solubility. in terms of the degree of influence,100K is similar with 10MPa.(3) Diffusion coefficients of CO2 increases with increasing temperature. (4) Increasing pressure decreases the CO2 diffusion coefficients, whereas the pressure effect on CO2 diffusion coefficients is very weak. Compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for solubility measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis. (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely.

  11. ON THE DIFFERENT ANALYTICAL RESULTS OBTAINED FOR THE PARALLEL DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF COSMIC PARTICLES WITH ADIABATIC FOCUSING

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.; Danos, R. J., E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2013-03-10

    A spatially varying mean magnetic field gives rise to so-called adiabatic focusing of energetic particles propagating through the universe. In the past, different analytical approaches have been proposed to calculate the particle diffusion coefficient along the mean field with focusing. In the present paper, we show how these different results are related to each other. New results for the parallel diffusion coefficient that are more general than previous results are also presented.

  12. Intercentre reproducibility of cardiac apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor cardiac magnetic resonance (DT-CMR) enables probing of the microarchitecture of the myocardium, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) reported in healthy volunteers have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to validate a stimulated-echo diffusion sequence using phantoms, and to assess the intercentre reproducibility of in-vivo diffusion measures using the sequence. Methods and results A stimulated-echo, cardiac-gated DT-CMR sequence with a reduced-field-of-view, single-shot EPI readout was used at two centres with 3 T MRI scanners. Four alkane phantoms with known diffusivities were scanned at a single centre using a stimulated echo sequence and a spin-echo Stejskal-Tanner diffusion sequence. The median (maximum, minimum) difference between the DT-CMR sequence and Stejskal-Tanner sequence was 0.01 (0.04, 0.0006) × 10-3 mm2/s (2%), and between the DT-CMR sequence and literature diffusivities was 0.02 (0.05, 0.006) × 10-3 mm2/s (4%). The same ten healthy volunteers were scanned using the DT-CMR sequence at the two centres less than seven days apart. Average ADC and FA were calculated in a single mid-ventricular, short axis slice. Intercentre differences were tested for statistical significance at the p??0.05), and only the diastolic ADC showed a statistically significant, but numerically small, difference of 0.07 × 10-3 mm2/s (p?=?0.047). The intercentre, intrasubject coefficients of variance were: systolic ADC 7%, FA 6%; diastolic ADC 7%, FA 3%. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the accuracy of a stimulated-echo DT-CMR sequence in phantoms, and demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining reproducible ADC and FA in healthy volunteers at separate centres with well-matched sequences and processing. PMID:24886285

  13. The Determination of the `Diffusion Coefficients' and the Stellar Wind Velocities for X-Ray Binaries

    E-print Network

    V. M. Lipunov; S. B. Popov

    1995-04-20

    The distribution of neutron stars (NS's) is determined by stationary solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. In this work using the observed period changes for four systems: Vela X-1, GX 301-2, Her X-1 and Cen X-3 we determined D, the 'diffusion coefficient',-parameter from the Fokker-Planck equation. Using strong dependence of D on the velocity for Vela X-1 and GX 301-2, systems accreting from a stellar wind, we determined the stellar wind velocity. For different assumptions for a turbulent velocity we obtained $V=(660-1440) km s ^{-1}$. It is in good agreement with the stellar wind velocity determined by other methods. We also determined the specific characteristic time scales for the 'diffusion processes' in X-ray pulsars. It is of order of 200 sec for wind-fed pulsars and 1000-10000 sec for the disk accreting systems.

  14. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of silver 110-m in a nuclear grade graphite 

    E-print Network

    McMillan, Thad Calhoun

    1980-01-01

    Ag. B DESCRIPTION OF GRAPHITES. 87 89 92 94 B. 1 Graphite Structure. B. 2 Manufacture of Graphite. 8. 3 Nuclear Grade Graphites. 94 94 97 C DATA FOR THE CYLINDRICAL EXPERIMENTS. . 99 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) Appendix D SOLUTIONS... 7710 data. 20. Fitted profile of FRIZCCC and IZIRCCC through trial I/ll data. 75 21, Arrhenius plot of diffusion coefficients. . . . . . 110 m A. 1. Gamma spectra of Ag using 3 x 3 in. Nal 78 detector. 93 0. 1. Concentration profile of trial /71...

  15. Viscoelastic Properties of Carbopol 940 Gels and Their Relationships to Piroxicam Diffusion Coefficients in Gel Bases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rathapon A-sasutjarit; Anuvat Sirivat; Panida Vayumhasuwan

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a Purpose  This study was conducted to determine the effect of formula compositions on viscoelastic properties of piroxicam gels using\\u000a Carbopol 940 as a gelling agent and to determine the relationships between viscoelastic properties of Carbopol 940 gel bases\\u000a and diffusion coefficients of piroxicam in gel bases.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Piroxicam gels (1.0% w\\/w) were prepared by using Carbopol 940 as a gelling agent and

  16. Determination of the bulk moisture diffusion coefficient for corn starch using an automated water sorption instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Schmidt, Arthur R; Bello-Perez, Luis A; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2008-01-01

    The bulk moisture diffusion coefficient (Db) is an important physical parameter of food ingredients and systems. However, the traditional method of measuring Db using saturated salt solutions is very time-consuming and cumbersome. New automated water sorption instruments, which can be used to conveniently and precisely control both relative humidity and temperature, provide a faster, more robust method for collecting the data needed for determining Db. Thus, the objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the use of the DVS instrument for collecting the data needed for determining the adsorption (Dba) and desorption (Dbd) bulk moisture diffusion coefficients for dent corn starch as a function of relative humidity and (2) determine the effect of temperature on Dba for dent corn starch at a constant relative humidity. Kinetic water sorption profiles of dent corn starch were obtained at eight relative humidity values ranging from 10 to 80% at 10% intervals at 25 degrees C and at five temperatures, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees C, at 50% relative humidity using a DVS instrument. Db was calculated from the kinetic water sorption profiles using the full solution of Fick's second law for the thin slab model, as well as the slope method, a simplification of the full model. The Dba of dent corn starch at 25 degrees C reached a maximum at intermediate relative humidity values, after which Dba decreased due to a change in the moisture diffusion mechanism from vapor to liquid diffusion. The Dbd of dent corn starch at 25 degrees C remained nearly constant as a function of relative humidity. The Dba for dent corn starch increased as temperature increased from 15 to 35 degrees C, with an activation energy of 38.85 +/- 0.433 kJ/mol. PMID:18078318

  17. Diffusion coefficients of humic substances in agarose gel and in water.

    PubMed

    Lead, J R; Starchev, K; Wilkinson, K J

    2003-02-01

    Measurements of the diffusion coefficients of five different humic substances (HS) have been performed in water and in agarose hydrogels at several pH values (in the range of 3-10) and gel concentrations (in the range of 0.7-3% w/w). Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and classical diffusion cells were used in parallel to probe diffusion over both microscopic and mesoscopic distance scales. In general, agreement between the techniques was reasonable, which indicated that local nonhomogenities in the gel did not play an important role. Diffusion coefficients (D) in the gel were generally in the range of 0.9-2.5 x 10(-10) m2 s(-1) but were generally only 10-20% lower than in solution. At low pH values, one of the studied humic substances (a peat humic acid, PPHA) formed large aggregates that could not penetrate into the gel and therefore could not be defined by a single D value. The observed decreases of D in the gel for other HS were too large to be explained by the tortuousity and obstructive effects of the gel alone. D decreased slightly with increasing gel concentration and increased slightly with pH. Because modifications of D due to pH were similar in both the gel and the free solution, it is unlikely that complexation with the gel was greatly influenced by the pH. Rather, the main effect that appeared to decrease the diffusive flux in gels was likely small increases in the hydrodynamic radii of the humic macromolecules. An anomalous diffusion model was used to describe the FCS data in the gel. The characteristic exponent determined by fitting the autocorrelation functions with this model decreased only slightly (from 0.96 to 0.90) with increasing gel concentration providing support that HS complexation with the gel fibers was not very important. The results have important implications for our understanding of the fate and behavior of the HS and their associated pollutants and for interpreting metal speciation data obtained using gel-covered analytical sensors. PMID:12630462

  18. Quantification of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) in the detection of acute stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulipano, P. Karina; Millar, William S.; Imielinska, Celina; Liu, Xin; Rosiene, Joel; D'Ambrosio, Anthony L.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an imaging modality that is used in the management and diagnosis of acute stroke. Common MR imaging techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) are used routinely in the diagnosis of acute infarcts. However, advances in radiology information systems and imaging protocols have led to an overload of image information that can be difficult to manage and time consuming. Automated techniques to assist in the identification of acute ischemic stroke can prove beneficial to 1) the physician by providing a mechanism for early detection and 2) the patient by providing effective stroke therapy at an early stage. We have processed DW images and ADC maps using a novel automated Relative Difference Map (RDM) method that was tailored to the identification and delineation of the stroke region. Results indicate that the technique can delineate regions of acute infarctions on DW images and ADC maps. A formal evaluation of the RDM algorithm was performed by comparing accuracy measurements between 1) expert generated ground truths with the RDM delineated DWI infarcts and 2) RDM delineated DWI infarcts with RDM delineated ADC infarcts. The accuracy measurements indicate that the RDM delineated DWI infarcts are comparable to the expert generated ground truths. The true positive volume fraction value (TPVF), between RDM delineated DWI and ADC infarcts, is nonzero for all cases with an acute infarct while the value for non-acute cases remains zero.

  19. Effect of cation on diffusion coefficient of ionic liquids at onion-like carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Aken, Katherine L.; McDonough, John K.; Li, Song; Feng, Guang; Chathoth, Suresh M.; Mamontov, Eugene; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dai, Sheng; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-07-01

    While most supercapacitors are limited in their performance by the stability of the electrolyte, using neat ionic liquids (ILs) as the electrolyte can expand the voltage window and temperature range of operation. In this study, ILs with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Tf2N) as the anion were investigated as the electrolyte in onion-like carbon-based electrochemical capacitors. To probe the influence of cations on the electrochemical performance of supercapacitors, three different cations were used: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium and 1,6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl). A series of electrochemical characterization tests was performed using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Diffusion coefficients were measured using EIS and correlated with quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation. These three techniques were used in parallel to confirm a consistent trend between the three ILs. It was found that the IL with the smaller sized cation had a larger diffusion coefficient, leading to a higher capacitance at faster charge-discharge rates. Furthermore, the IL electrolyte performance was correlated with increasing temperature, which limited the voltage stability window and led to the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase on the carbon electrode surface, evident in both the CV and EIS experiments.

  20. Group Analysis of Variable Coefficient Diffusion--Convection Equations. III. Conservation Laws

    E-print Network

    N. M. Ivanova; R. O. Popovych; C. Sophocleous

    2007-10-16

    The notions of generating sets of conservation laws of systems of differential equations with respect to symmetry groups and equivalence groups are introduced and applied. This allows us to generalize essentially the procedure of finding potential symmetries for the systems with multidimensional spaces of conservation laws. A class of variable coefficient (1+1)-dimensional nonlinear diffusion-convection equations of general form $f(x)u_t=(g(x)A(u)u_x)_x+h(x)B(u)u_x$ is investigated. Using the most direct method, we carry out two classifications of local conservation laws up to equivalence relations generated by both usual and enhanced equivalence groups. Equivalence with respect to $\\hat G^{\\sim}$ and correct choice of gauge coefficients of equations play the major role for simple and clear formulation of the final results. The notion of contractions of conservation laws and one of characteristics of conservation laws are introduced and contractions of conservation laws of diffusion-convection equations are found.

  1. Mass transfer of SCWO processes: Molecular diffusion and mass transfer coefficients of inorganic nitrate species in sub- and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Goemans, M.G.E.; Gloyna, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Buelow, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Molecular diffusion coefficients of lithium-, sodium-, potassium-, cesium-, calcium-, and strontium nitrate in subcritical water were determined by analysis of Taylor dispersion profiles. Pressures ranged from 300 to 500 bar at temperatures ranging from 25{degrees}C to 300{degrees}C. The reported diffusion values were determined at infinite dilution. Molecular diffusion coefficients were 10 to 20 times faster in near-critical subcritical water than in water at ambient temperature and pressure (ATP). These findings implied that the diffusion rates were more liquid like than they were gas like, hence experimental results were correlated with diffusion models for liquids. The subcritical diffusion data presented in this work, and supercritical diffusion results published elsewhere were correlated with hydrodynamic diffusion equations. Both the Wilke-Chang correlation and the Stokes-Einstein equation yielded predictions within 10% of the experimental results if the structure of the diffusing species could be estimated. The effect of the increased diffusion rates on mass transfer rates in supercritical water oxidation applications was quantified, with emphasis on heterogeneous oxidation processes. This study and results published elsewhere showed that diffusion limited conditions are much more likely to be encountered in SCWO processes than commonly acknowledged.

  2. An assessment of the ability of the obstruction-scaling model to estimate solute diffusion coefficients in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Nicholas A; Amsden, Brian G

    2015-02-10

    The ability to estimate the diffusion coefficient of a solute within hydrogels has important application in the design and analysis of hydrogels used in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. A number of mathematical models have been derived for this purpose; however, they often rely on fitted parameters and so have limited predictive capability. Herein we assess the ability of the obstruction-scaling model to provide reasonable estimates of solute diffusion coefficients within hydrogels, as well as the assumption that a hydrogel can be represented as an entangled polymer solution of an equivalent concentration. Fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran solutes were loaded into sodium alginate solutions as well as hydrogels of different polymer volume fractions formed from photoinitiated cross-linking of methacrylate sodium alginate. The tracer diffusion coefficients of these solutes were measured using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The measured diffusion coefficients were then compared to the values predicted by the obstruction-scaling model. The model predictions were within ±15% of the measured values, suggesting that the model can provide useful estimates of solute diffusion coefficients within hydrogels and solutions. Moreover, solutes diffusing in both sodium alginate solutions and hydrogels were demonstrated to experience the same degree of solute mobility restriction given the same effective polymer concentration, supporting the assumption that a hydrogel can be represented as an entangled polymer solution of equivalent concentration. PMID:25499554

  3. Diffusion coefficient of yttrium ion in YCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Kenichi; Saiki, Atushi; Maruyama, Toshio; Nagata, Kazuhiro [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    The solid-state reaction; 1/2 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 1/2 Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} = YCrO{sub 3} was conducted between 1,458 and 1,719 K in air (P{sub O{sub 2}} = 0.21 atm). The reaction obeyed the parabolic rate law and the diffusion of yttrium ion controlled the reaction. According to Wagner`s theory, the diffusion coefficient of yttrium ion Y{sup 3+} in YCrO{sub 3} was evaluated using the Gibbs free energy change of the reaction and the parabolic rate constant. The defect reaction, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 3/2 O{sub 2} in the presence of YCrO{sub 3} yields 2 V{prime}{double_prime}{sub Y} + 2Cr{sub Cr}{sup x} + 6O{sub O}{sup X} + 6h{sup {sm_bullet}}, is predominant in the formation of yttrium vacancy. The diffusion coefficient of yttrium ion is given D{sub Y{sup 3+}}/m{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} = [8.36 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} exp ({minus} 272/kJ/mol/RT)] P{sub O{sub 2}}{sup 3/16}a{sub Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{sup 1/8} where a{sub Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}} is activity of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub O{sub 2}} is oxygen pressure.

  4. Conformational changes of PYP monitored by diffusion coefficient: effect of N-terminal alpha-helices.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javaid Shahbaz; Imamoto, Yasushi; Harigai, Miki; Kataoka, Mikio; Terazima, Masahide

    2006-05-15

    Conformational changes in the light illuminated intermediate (pB) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) were studied from a viewpoint of the diffusion coefficient (D) change of several N-truncated PYPs, which lacked the N-terminal 6, 15, or 23 amino acid residues (T6, T15, and T23, respectively). For intact PYP (i-PYP), D of pB (D(pB)) was approximately 11% lower than that (D(pG)) of the ground state (pG) species. The difference in D (D(pG) - D(pB)) decreased upon cleavage of the N-terminal region in the order of i-PYP>T6>T15>T23. This trend clearly showed that conformational change in the N-terminal group is the main reason for the slower diffusion of pB. This slower diffusion was interpreted in terms of the unfolding of the two alpha-helices in the N-terminal region, increasing the intermolecular interactions due to hydrogen bonding with water molecules. The increase in friction per one residue by the unfolding of the alpha-helix was estimated to be 0.3 x 10(-12) kg/s. The conformational change in the N-terminal group upon photoillumination is discussed. PMID:16500975

  5. Conformational Changes of PYP Monitored by Diffusion Coefficient: Effect of N-Terminal ?-Helices

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Javaid Shahbaz; Imamoto, Yasushi; Harigai, Miki; Kataoka, Mikio; Terazima, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    Conformational changes in the light illuminated intermediate (pB) of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) were studied from a viewpoint of the diffusion coefficient (D) change of several N-truncated PYPs, which lacked the N-terminal 6, 15, or 23 amino acid residues (T6, T15, and T23, respectively). For intact PYP (i-PYP), D of pB (DpB) was ?11% lower than that (DpG) of the ground state (pG) species. The difference in D (DpG ? DpB) decreased upon cleavage of the N-terminal region in the order of i-PYP>T6>T15>T23. This trend clearly showed that conformational change in the N-terminal group is the main reason for the slower diffusion of pB. This slower diffusion was interpreted in terms of the unfolding of the two ?-helices in the N-terminal region, increasing the intermolecular interactions due to hydrogen bonding with water molecules. The increase in friction per one residue by the unfolding of the ?-helix was estimated to be 0.3 × 10?12 kg/s. The conformational change in the N-terminal group upon photoillumination is discussed. PMID:16500975

  6. Modeling the vertical distributions of downwelling plane irradiance and diffuse attenuation coefficient in optically deep waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoju; Zimmerman, Richard C.

    2010-08-01

    The diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) is critical to understand the vertical distribution of underwater downwelling irradiance (Ed). Theoretically Ed is composed of the direct solar beam and the diffuse sky irradiance. Applying the statistical results from Hydrolight radiative transfer simulations, Kd is expressed into a mathematical equation (named as PZ06) integrated from the contribution of direct solar beam and diffuse sky irradiance with the knowledge of sky and water conditions. The percent root mean square errors (RMSE) for the vertical distribution of Ed(z) under various sky and water conditions between PZ06 and Hydrolight results are typically less than 4%. Field observations from the southern Middle Atlantic Bight (SMAB) and global in situ data set (NOMAD) also confirmed the validity of PZ06 in reproducing Kd. PZ06 provides an alternative and improvement to the simpler models (e.g., Gordon, 1989; and Kirk, 1991) and an operational ocean color algorithm, while the latter two kinds of models are valid to limited sky and water conditions. PZ06 can be applied to study Kd from satellite remotely sensed images and seems to improve Kd derivation over current operational ocean color algorithm.

  7. Variations in apparent diffusion coefficient values following chemotherapy in pediatric neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Senay; Altinkaya, Naime; Kocer, Nazim Emrah; Erbay, Ayse; Oguzkurt, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In children the assessment of solid tumors’ response to chemotherapy is based primarily on size reduction, which can be unreliable and a late marker, in the presence of necrosis. We aimed to establish whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of childhood neuroblastomas show proportional changes in relation to chemotherapy response. METHODS We evaluated 15 pediatric patients with abdominopelvic neuroblastomas, who had undergone MRI before and after chemotherapy. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed all images by drawing a round uniform region-of-interest in the solid/contrast-enhancing portion of the lesions in consensus. The ADC values from pre- and postchemotherapy images were compared. RESULTS Postchemotherapy ADC values were significantly higher than those obtained before treatment (P < 0.05, for minimum, maximum, and median ADC values). CONCLUSION Our results support diffusion-weighted MRI as a promising noninvasive biomarker of therapeutic responses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to compare diffusion-weighted imaging findings before and after chemotherapy in childhood neuroblastic tumors. PMID:25519453

  8. Neurite beading is sufficient to decrease the apparent diffusion coefficient after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Matthew D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is a sensitive and reliable marker of cerebral ischemia. Within minutes of an ischemic event in the brain, the microscopic motion of water molecules measured with DWI, termed the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), decreases within the infarcted region. However, although the change is related to cell swelling, the precise pathological mechanism remains elusive. We show that focal enlargement and constriction, or beading, in axons and dendrites are sufficient to substantially decrease ADC. We first derived a biophysical model of neurite beading, and we show that the beaded morphology allows a larger volume to be encompassed within an equivalent surface area and is, therefore, a consequence of osmotic imbalance after ischemia. The DWI experiment simulated within the model revealed that intracellular ADC decreased by 79% in beaded neurites compared with the unbeaded form. To validate the model experimentally, excised rat sciatic nerves were subjected to stretching, which induced beading but did not cause a bulk shift of water into the axon (i.e., swelling). Beading-induced changes in cell-membrane morphology were sufficient to significantly hinder water mobility and thereby decrease ADC, and the experimental measurements were in excellent agreement with the simulated values. This is a demonstration that neurite beading accurately captures the diffusion changes measured in vivo. The results significantly advance the specificity of DWI in ischemia and other acute neurological injuries and will greatly aid the development of treatment strategies to monitor and repair damaged brain in both clinical and experimental settings. PMID:20660718

  9. In vivo measurement of apparent diffusion coefficients of hyperpolarized ¹³C-labeled metabolites.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Lise Vejby; Schilling, Franz; Janich, Martin A; Menzel, Marion I; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The combination of hyperpolarized MRS with diffusion weighting (dw) allows for determination of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which is indicative of the intra- or extracellular localization of the metabolite. Here, a slice-selective pulsed-gradient spin echo sequence was implemented to acquire a series of dw spectra from rat muscle in vivo to determine the ADCs of multiple metabolites after a single injection of hyperpolarized [1- ¹³C]pyruvate. An optimal control optimized universal-rotation pulse was used for refocusing to minimize signal loss caused by B1 imperfections. Non-dw spectra were acquired interleaved with the dw spectra and these were used to correct for signal decay during the acquisition as a result of T1 decay, pulse imperfections, flow etc. The data showed that the ADC values for [1- ¹³C]lactate (0.4-0.7?µm² /ms) and [1- ¹³C]alanine (0.4-0.9 µm² /ms) were about a factor of two lower than the ADC of [1- ¹³C]pyruvate (1.1-1.5 µm²/ms). This indicates a more restricted diffusion space for the former two metabolites consistent with lactate and alanine being intracellular. The higher ADC for pyruvate (similar to the proton ADC) reflected that the injected substance was not confined inside the muscle cells but also present extracellular. PMID:24664927

  10. Blackness coefficients, effective diffusion parameters, and control rod worths for thermal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bretscher, M.M.

    1984-09-01

    Simple diffusion theory cannot be used to evaluate control rod worths in thermal reactors because of the strongly absorbing character of the control material. However, good results can be obtained from a diffusion calculation by representing the absorber slab by means of a suitable pair of internal boundary conditions, ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.., which are ratios of neutron flux to neutron current. Methods for calculating ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. in the P/sub 1/, P/sub 3/, and P/sub 5/ approximations, with and without scattering, are presented. By appropriately weighting the fine-group blackness coefficients, broad group values, <..cap alpha..> and <..beta..>, are obtained. The technique is applied to the calculation of control rod worths of Cd, Ag-In-Cd, and Hf control elements. Results are found to compare very favorably with detailed Monte Carlo calculations. For control elements whose geometry does not permit a thin slab treatment, other methods are needed for determining the effective diffusion parameters. One such method is briefly discussed and applied to the calculation of control rod worths in the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan. Calculated and measured worths are found to be in good agreement.

  11. Diffusion coefficients of endogenous cytosolic proteins from rabbit skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Brian E; Vigoreaux, Jim O; Maughan, David W

    2014-02-18

    Efflux time courses of endogenous cytosolic proteins were obtained from rabbit psoas muscle fibers skinned in oil and transferred to physiological salt solution. Proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis and compared to load-matched standards for quantitative analysis. A radial diffusion model incorporating the dissociation and dissipation of supramolecular complexes accounts for an initial lag and subsequent efflux of glycolytic and glycogenolytic enzymes. The model includes terms representing protein crowding, myofilament lattice hindrance, and binding to the cytomatrix. Optimization algorithms returned estimates of the apparent diffusion coefficients, D(r,t), that were very low at the onset of diffusion (?10(-10) cm(2) s(-1)) but increased with time as cytosolic protein density, which was initially high, decreased. D(r,t) at later times ranged from 2.11 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) (parvalbumin) to 0.20 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) (phosphofructose kinase), values that are 3.6- to 12.3-fold lower than those predicted in bulk water. The low initial values are consistent with the presence of complexes in situ; the higher later values are consistent with molecular sieving and transient binding of dissociated proteins. Channeling of metabolic intermediates via enzyme complexes may enhance production of adenosine triphosphate at rates beyond that possible with randomly and/or sparsely distributed enzymes, thereby matching supply with demand. PMID:24559981

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the head and neck region: usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient values for characterization of lesions

    PubMed Central

    ?erifo?lu, ?smail; Oz, ?brahim ?lker; Damar, Murat; Tokgöz, Özlem; Yazgan, Ömer; Erdem, Zuhal

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the role of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values calculated from diffusion-weighted imaging for head and neck lesion characterization in daily routine, in comparison with histopathological results. METHODS Ninety consecutive patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a university hospital for diagnosis of neck lesions were included in this prospective study. Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI was performed on a 1.5 T unit with b factor of 0 and 1000 s/mm2 and ADC maps were generated. ADC values were measured for benign and malignant whole lesions seen in daily practice. RESULTS The median ADC value of the malignant tumors and benign lesions were 0.72×10?3 mm2/s, (range, 0.39–1.51×10?3 mm2/s) and 1.17×10?3 mm2/s, (range, 0.52–2.38×10?3 mm2/s), respectively, with a significant difference between them (P < 0.001). A cutoff ADC value of 0.98×10?3 mm2/s was used to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions, yielding 85.3% sensitivity and 78.6% specificity. The median ADC value of lymphomas (0.44×10?3 mm2/s; range, 0.39–0.58×10?3 mm2/s) was significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than that of squamous cell carcinomas (median ADC value 0.72×10?3 mm2/s; range, 0.65–1.06×10?3 mm2/s). There was no significant difference between median ADC values of inflammatory (1.13×10?3 mm2/s; range, 0.85–2.38×10?3 mm2/s) and noninflammatory benign lesions (1.26×10?3 mm2/s; range, 0.52–2.33×10?3 mm2/s). CONCLUSION Diffusion-weighted imaging and the ADC values can be used to differentiate and characterize benign and malignant head and neck lesions. PMID:25910284

  13. Universality of Viscosity Dependence of Translational Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Monoxide, Diphenylacetylene, and Diphenylcyclopropenone in Ionic Liquids under Various Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Kida, Y; Matsushita, Y; Yasaka, Y; Ueno, M; Takahashi, K

    2015-06-25

    Translational diffusion coefficients of diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP), diphenylacetylene (DPA), and carbon monoxide (CO) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([BMIm][NTf2]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([EMIm][NTf2]) were determined by the transient grating (TG) spectroscopy under pressure from 0.1 to 200 MPa at 298 K and from 298 to 373 K under 0.1 MPa. Diffusion coefficients of these molecules at high temperatures in tributylmethylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P4441][NTf2]), and tetraoctylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P8888][NTf2]), and also in the mixtures of [BMIm][NTf2], N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Pp13][NTf2]), and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P66614][NTf2]) with ethanol or chloroform have been determined. Diffusion coefficients except in ILs of phosphonium cations were well scaled by the power law of T/?, i.e., (T/?)(P), where T and ? are the absolute temperature and the viscosity, irrespective of the solvent species, pressure and temperature, and the compositions of mixtures. The values of the exponent P were smaller for the smaller size of the molecules. On the other hand, the diffusion coefficients in ILs of phosphonium cations with longer alkyl chains were larger than the values expected from the correlation obtained by other ILs and conventional liquids. The deviation becomes larger with increasing the number of carbon atoms of alkyl-chain of cation, and with decreasing the molecular size of diffusing molecules. The molecular size dependence of the diffusion coefficient was correlated by the ratio of the volume of the solute to that of the solvent as demonstrated by the preceding work (Kaintz et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2013 , 117 , 11697 ). Diffusion coefficients have been well correlated with the power laws of both T/? and the relative volume of the solute to the solvent. PMID:26061826

  14. Effect of the transition of networks from floppy to rigid on the diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, N; Argyrakis, P; Avramov, I

    2010-02-01

    We investigate a tracer particle moving on a two-dimensional square lattice created by network formers (NF). The positions of all network formers are randomly displaced by a small amount from the nodes of the network. Each NF can be in a "floppy" or "rigid" state, depending on the number of bonds connecting it to neighboring network formers. The NF that have more than a specified number of m bonds are in rigid state, the remaining ones are in a floppy state. The energy of the tracer particle depends on its distance from those of the four nearest NF that are in "rigid" state. The NF in floppy state do not contribute to the energy. We here demonstrate that the a priori increase in the diffusion coefficient with the concentration of the floppy states goes through a crossover point, after which the increase is much sharper. PMID:20365613

  15. Surface diffusion coefficient of Au atoms on single layer graphene grown on Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Cacciato, G.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Universitá di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania, Italy and MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    A 5?nm thick Au film was deposited on single layer graphene sheets grown on Cu. By thermal processes, the dewetting phenomenon of the Au film on the graphene was induced so to form Au nanoparticles. The mean radius, surface-to-surface distance, and surface density evolution of the nanoparticles on the graphene sheets as a function of the annealing temperature were quantified by scanning electron microscopy analyses. These quantitative data were analyzed within the classical mean-field nucleation theory so to obtain the temperature-dependent Au atoms surface diffusion coefficient on graphene: D{sub S}(T)=[(8.2±0.6)×10{sup ?8}]exp[?(0.31±0.02(eV)/(at) )/kT]?cm{sup 2}/s.

  16. A comparative study on temperature dependent diffusion coefficient of liquid Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosh, R. C.; Syed, Ishtiaque M.; Amin, Zahurul; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2013-10-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients, D, of liquid Fe at different temperatures have been investigated using hard sphere (HS) theory and universal scaling laws (USLs). Inter-ionic interaction is derived from both pseudopotential proposed by Brettonet-Silbert (BS) and many body potential obtained from embedded atom method (EAM). Temperature dependent effective HS diameter, ?(T), and excess entropy, Sex, are the premier ingredients of the study. The former ingredient is calculated using both variational modified hypernetted chain, VMHNC, integral equation theory and Linearized Weeks-Chandler-Andersen, LWCA, thermodynamic perturbation theory together with an empirical relation of Protopapas et al. (1973) [2] whereas the later one is calculated using VMHNC theory alone, with BS and EAM potentials. We observe that D increases with increasing temperatures. The obtained results are compared with those predicted by Protopapas et al. The comparison suggests that USL of Dzugutov and HS theory with BS potential are better choices to predict D(T) of liquid Fe.

  17. Energetic particle diffusion coefficients upstream of quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.; Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of about 30 to 130-keV/e protons and alpha particles upstream of six quasi-parallel interplanetary shocks that passed by the ISEE 3 spacecraft during 1978-1979 were analyzed, and the values for the upstream energegic particle diffusion coefficient, kappa, in these six events were deduced for a number of energies and upstream positions. These observations were compared with predictions of Lee's (1983) theory of shock acceleration. It was found that the observations verified the prediction of the A/Q dependence (where A and Q are the particle atomic mass and ionization state, respectively) of kappa for alpha and proton particles upstream of the quasi-parallel shocks.

  18. Concentration-dependent self-diffusion coefficients in amorphous Si1-xGex solid solutions: An interdiffusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Martin A.; Flötotto, David; Wang, Zumin; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2015-04-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients of Si and Ge in amorphous Si1-xGex (a-Si1-xGex) solid solutions were determined quantitatively in the temperature range of 440 °C - 460 °C by the investigation of interdiffusion in amorphous Si/Si0.52Ge0.48 multilayers using Auger electron spectroscopy sputter-depth profiling. The determined concentration dependent self-diffusion coefficients of Si and Ge in a-Si1-xGex with 0 ? x ? 0.48 at. % Ge are about ten orders of magnitude larger than in the corresponding crystalline phases, due to the inherent, excess free volume in the amorphous phase. The self-diffusion coefficient of Si (or Ge) in a-Si1-xGex increases in association with a decreasing activation enthalpy with increasing Ge concentration. This concentration dependence has been related to an overall decrease of the average bond strength with increasing Ge concentration.

  19. Diffusion Coefficient of Fluorescent Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the Plasma Membrane of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Urszula; Nyako, Marian; Woturski, William; Zaitseva, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) controls a surprisingly large number of processes in cells. Thus, many investigators have suggested that there might be different pools of PIP2 on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. If a significant fraction of PIP2 is bound electrostatically to unstructured clusters of basic residues on membrane proteins, the PIP2 diffusion constant, D, should be reduced. We microinjected micelles of Bodipy TMR-PIP2 into cells, and we measured D on the inner leaflet of fibroblasts and epithelial cells by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The average ± SD value from all cell types was D = 0.8 ± 0.2 ?m2/s (n = 218; 25°C). This is threefold lower than the D in blebs formed on Rat1 cells, D = 2.5 ± 0.8 ?m2/s (n = 26). It is also significantly lower than the D in the outer leaflet or in giant unilamellar vesicles and the diffusion coefficient for other lipids on the inner leaflet of these cell membranes. The simplest interpretation is that approximately two thirds of the PIP2 on inner leaflet of these plasma membranes is bound reversibly. PMID:18256277

  20. A uniqueness result for the identification of a time-dependent diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraguela, A.; Infante, J. A.; Ramos, A. M.; Rey, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of determining the time-dependent thermal diffusivity coefficient of a medium, when the evolution of the temperature in a part of it is known. Such situations arise in the context of food technology, when thermal processes at high pressures are used for extending the shelf life of the food, in order to preserve its nutritional and organoleptic properties (Infante et al 2009 On the Modelling and Simulation of High Pressure Processes and Inactivation of Enzymes in Food Engineering pp 2203-29 and Otero et al 2007 J. Food Eng. 78 1463-70). The phenomenon is modeled by the heat equation involving a term which depends on the source temperature and pressure increase, and appropriate initial and boundary conditions. We study the inverse problem of determining time-dependent thermal diffusivities k, when some temperature measurements at the border and inside the medium are known. We prove the uniqueness of the inverse problem solution under suitable a priori assumptions on regularity, size and growth of k.

  1. The Course of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values following Perinatal Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    van der Aa, Niek E.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Vincken, Koen L.; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffusion weighted MR imaging (DWI) plays an important role in the diagnosis of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) during the acute phase. Its derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can be used to quantify the diffusion restriction. Aim of the current study was to identify the changes in ADC values in the acute phase following PAIS. Methods A cohort of 36 infants with a confirmed PAIS who were examined once during the first ten days of life was studied. ADC values in the core of the ischemic tissue (iADC) were determined and correlated with postnatal age. ADC ratios (rADC) were calculated by dividing the iADC value by the ADC value of the corresponding area in the contralateral ‘healthy’ hemisphere. Results Infants were scanned between days two and ten. A non-linear increase in iADC and rADC values was observed over time and large middle cerebral artery strokes resulted in lower iADC and rADC values. Normalisation of rADC values was observed after day seven. rADC values were lower when compared to previously published rADC values of infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, suggesting more severe injury. Conclusions Following PAIS, DWI showed decreased ADC values with a non-linear increase during the first week, and pseudonormalization after day 7, which limits the use of DWI to assess PAIS to the first week. Compared to previous studies, ADC values were lower when compared to infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, most likely due to more severe injury. PMID:23457613

  2. Numerical convergence of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity obtained with Thomas-Fermi-Dirac molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Danel, J-F; Kazandjian, L; Zérah, G

    2012-06-01

    Computations of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity in warm dense matter are presented with an emphasis on obtaining numerical convergence and a careful evaluation of the standard deviation. The transport coefficients are computed with the Green-Kubo relation and orbital-free molecular dynamics at the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac level. The numerical parameters are varied until the Green-Kubo integral is equal to a constant in the t?+? limit; the transport coefficients are deduced from this constant and not by extrapolation of the Green-Kubo integral. The latter method, which gives rise to an unknown error, is tested for the computation of viscosity; it appears that it should be used with caution. In the large domain of coupling constant considered, both the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity turn out to be well approximated by simple analytical laws using a single effective atomic number calculated in the average-atom model. PMID:23005237

  3. Numerical convergence of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity obtained with Thomas-Fermi-Dirac molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.; Zérah, G.

    2012-06-01

    Computations of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity in warm dense matter are presented with an emphasis on obtaining numerical convergence and a careful evaluation of the standard deviation. The transport coefficients are computed with the Green-Kubo relation and orbital-free molecular dynamics at the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac level. The numerical parameters are varied until the Green-Kubo integral is equal to a constant in the t?+? limit; the transport coefficients are deduced from this constant and not by extrapolation of the Green-Kubo integral. The latter method, which gives rise to an unknown error, is tested for the computation of viscosity; it appears that it should be used with caution. In the large domain of coupling constant considered, both the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity turn out to be well approximated by simple analytical laws using a single effective atomic number calculated in the average-atom model.

  4. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H2, and four normal alkanes + N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Ahren W.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2014-09-01

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for CnH2n+2 + N2, n = 2-4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R-12 repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R-12 interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard-Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ˜700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard-Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. A straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N2 is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%.

  5. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H?, and four normal alkanes + N?.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Kamarchik, Eugene; Miller, James A; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2014-09-28

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N2. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N2 and H2 + N2 and with recent experimental results for CnH(2n+2) + N2, n = 2-4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R(-12) repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N2 and H2 + N2 (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N2 by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R(-12) interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N2 and H2 + N2, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N2, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard-Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ?700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard-Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N2. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. A straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N2 is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%. PMID:25273443

  6. Precise measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient for poly(ethylene glycol) in aqueous solution using uniform oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kayori; Kato, Haruhisa; Saito, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Shigetomo; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2005-06-01

    Uniform poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers, with a degree of polymerization n =1-40, were separated by preparative supercritical fluid chromatography from commercial monodispersed samples. Diffusion coefficients, D, for separated uniform PEG oligomers were measured in dilute solutions of deuterium oxide (D2O) at 30 ° C, using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance. The measured D for each molecular weight was extrapolated to infinite dilution. Diffusion coefficients obtained at infinite dilution follow the scaling behavior of Zimm-type diffusion, even in the lower molecular weight range. Molecular-dynamics simulations for PEG in H2O also showed this scaling behavior, and reproduced close hydrodynamic interactions between PEG and water. These findings suggest that diffusion of PEG in water is dominated by hydrodynamic interaction over a wide molecular weight range, including at low molecular weights around 1000.

  7. Basic principles for the development of a common standardised method for determining the radon diffusion coefficient in waterproofing materials.

    PubMed

    Jiránek, Martin; Rovenská, Kate?ina

    2012-04-01

    Paper presents the principles for unified test methods for determining the radon diffusion coefficient in waterproof materials in order to increase the accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility of the results. We consider this very important, because an assessment of the radon diffusion coefficient is required by several national technical standards when waterproofing acts as a radon-proof membrane. The requirements for key parameters for one test method performed under non-stationary conditions and for two methods performed under stationary conditions are described in this paper. PMID:22245288

  8. Electrochemical Characterization of 1Ethyl3-methylimidazolium Thiocyanate and Measurement of Triiodide Diffusion Coefficients in Blends of two Ionic Liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zistler; C. Schreiner; P. Wachter; P. Wasserscheid; D. Gerhard; H. J. Gores

    According to literature, binary mixtures of ionic liquids (ILs) such as 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as an iodide source and another IL of low viscosity such as 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMISCN) may be used to increase the diffusion coefficients of redox-active species (I-\\/I3 - ). As dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are diffusion limited a better performance may result with blends when

  9. Spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance measurements for noninvasive determination of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienle, Alwin; Lilge, Lothar; Patterson, Michael S.; Hibst, Raimund; Steiner, Rudolf; Wilson, Brian C.

    1996-05-01

    The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of biological tissues determine the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance that is due to a point source. A system is described for making remote measurements of spatially resolved absolute diffuse reflectance and hence noninvasive, noncontact estimates of the tissue optical properties. The system incorporated a laser source and a CCD camera. Deflection of the incident beam into the camera allowed characterization of the source for absolute reflectance measurements. It is shown that an often used solution of the diffusion equation cannot be applied for these measurements. Instead, a neural network, trained on the results of Monte Carlo simulations, was used to estimate the absorption and scattering coefficients from the reflectance data. Tests on tissue-simulating phantoms with transport scattering coefficients between 0.5 and 2.0 mm-1 and absorption coefficients between 0.002 and 0.1 mm -1 showed the rms errors of this technique to be 2.6% for the transport scattering coefficient and 14% for the absorption coefficients. The optical properties of bovine muscle, adipose, and liver tissue, as well as chicken muscle (breast), were also measured ex vivo at 633 and 751 nm. For muscle tissue it was found that the Monte Carlo simulation did not agree with experimental measurements of reflectance at distances less than 2 mm from the incident beam. Carlo, neural network.

  10. Early Changes in Apparent Diffusion Coefficient From Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging During Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Yoon [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo, E-mail: chankyokim@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Kwan [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won; Park, Hee Chul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Deok Hyun [Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bohyun [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) as an early and reproducible change indicator in patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Eight consecutive patients with biopsy-proven PC underwent DWI at 3T. All patients who received external-beam radiotherapy had four serial MR scans, as follows: before therapy (PreTx); after 1 week of therapy (PostT1); after 3 weeks of therapy (PostT2); and 1 month after the completion of therapy (PostT3). At each time, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in tumors and normal tissues. For reproducibility of the ADC measurement, five patients also had two separate pretreatment DWI scans at an interval of <2 weeks. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated at the same time as MR scans. Results: Thirteen tumors (peripheral zone = 10; transition zone = 3) were found. The mean ADC values for the tumors from PreTx to PostT3 were 0.86, 1.03, 1.15, and 1.26 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Compared with PreTx, PostT1 (p = 0.005), PostT2 (p = 0.003), and PostT3 (p < 0.001) showed a significant increase in ADC values. The mean ADC values of the benign tissues from PreTx to PostT3 were 1.60, 1.58, 1.47, and 1.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Reproducibility of ADC measurements was confirmed with a mean difference in ADC of -0.04 in peripheral zone and -0.017 in transition zone between two separate pretreatment MR scans. The mean PSA levels from PreTx to PostT3 were 9.05, 9.18, 9.25, and 4.11 ng/mL in sequence, respectively. Conclusions: DWI, as a reproducible biomarker, has the potential to evaluate the early therapeutic changes of PC to radiotherapy.

  11. Diffusion Coefficient Calculations With Low Order Legendre Polynomial and Chebyshev Polynomial Approximation for the Transport Equation in Spherical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya?a, F.; Anli, F.; Güngör, S.

    2007-04-01

    We present analytical calculations of spherically symmetric radioactive transfer and neutron transport using a hypothesis of P1 and T1 low order polynomial approximation for diffusion coefficient D. Transport equation in spherical geometry is considered as the pseudo slab equation. The validity of polynomial expansionion in transport theory is investigated through a comparison with classic diffusion theory. It is found that for causes when the fluctuation of the scattering cross section dominates, the quantitative difference between the polynomial approximation and diffusion results was physically acceptable in general.

  12. Diffusion Coefficient Calculations With Low Order Legendre Polynomial and Chebyshev Polynomial Approximation for the Transport Equation in Spherical Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yasa, F.; Anli, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Art, KSUe 46100 K.Maras (Turkey); Guengoer, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Art, CUe Balcali-Adana (Turkey)

    2007-04-23

    We present analytical calculations of spherically symmetric radioactive transfer and neutron transport using a hypothesis of P1 and T1 low order polynomial approximation for diffusion coefficient D. Transport equation in spherical geometry is considered as the pseudo slab equation. The validity of polynomial expansionion in transport theory is investigated through a comparison with classic diffusion theory. It is found that for causes when the fluctuation of the scattering cross section dominates, the quantitative difference between the polynomial approximation and diffusion results was physically acceptable in general.

  13. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients for relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Mann, Ian; Baker, Daniel N.; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ozeke, Louis; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam

    Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interactions of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate the effect of changing a diffusion coefficient on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes geomagnetically quiet and active time. The simulations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. 1. Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 2. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  14. Early changes in apparent diffusion coefficient as an indicator of response to sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-lei; Guo, Qing-qu; Yang, Gen-ren; Wang, Qi-dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and chemotherapy has been established. However, whether ADC could be considered as a measure for monitoring response to sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not been demonstrated. This study was to investigate the ADC changes of advanced HCC under sorafenib treatment. Methods: Athymic mice with HepG2 xenografts were allocated to two groups: control and sorafenib (40 mg/kg, bid). T2 and diffusion images were acquired at each time point (0, 10, 14, and 18 d post-therapy). Tumor volume and changes in ADC were calculated. Results: Tumor volumes on Days 10, 14, and 18 after treatment showed significant decreases in the sorafenib-treated group compared with the control. Pretreatment ADC values were not significantly different between the control and treated groups. A slow increase in ADC in the peripheral zone of tumors appeared in the treated group, which was significantly higher compared with the control group on Days 10, 14, and 18. In the central part of tumors on Day 10 after treatment, an increase in ADC appeared in the treated and control groups, the ADC of the control group being significantly lower compared with the treated tumors. From Day 10 to Day 14, the ADC map showed a progressive decrease in the central region of tumors in the treated and control groups. However, this change is more significant in the treated groups. Conclusions: Early changes in mean ADC correlated with sorafenib treatment in HCC, which are promising indicators for predicting sorafenib response in this carcinoma. PMID:25091989

  15. Association between apparent diffusion coefficient and intervertebral disc degeneration in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Gokmen, Ferhat; Resorlu, Hatice; Adam, Gurhan; Akbal, Ayla; Cevizci, Sibel; Sariyildirim, Abdullah; Savas, Yilmaz; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relation between ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and degenerative disc disease emerging in association with various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and to evaluate the correlation between degree of degeneration in intervertebral discs and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Thirty-five patients with AS and a control group of 35 patients were included in the study. Three hundred fifty intervertebral discs were assessed in terms of degeneration by analyzing signal intensities and morphologies on T2 weighted series of a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. ADC values were determined in diffusion weighted images (DWI) using a “b value of 500 s/mm2”. Patients in the AS and control groups were compared in terms of intervertebral disc degeneration, and association between degree of degeneration and ADC values was analyzed. Results: The mean of total degeneration degrees for five lumbar intervertebral discs was significantly higher in the patients with AS compared to the control group (16.77±4.67 vs 13.00±4.08, respectively; P=0.001). When intervertebral discs were analyzed separately, disc degeneration was again significantly higher in patients with AS compared to the control group, with the exception of L5-S1. Age, cholesterol level, triglyceride level, duration of disease and BASFI index were significantly associated with degree of degeneration in patients with AS. A negative correlation was determined between disc degeneration and ADC value. Conclusion: AS is a risk factor for degenerative disc disease due to its systemic effects, the fact it leads to posture impairment and its inflammatory effects on the vertebrae. A decrease in ADC values is observed as degeneration worsens in degenerative disc disease. PMID:25785119

  16. Lower apparent diffusion coefficients indicate distinct prognosis in low-grade and high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Ma, Li; Chen, Xuzhu; Zhang, Zhe; Jiang, Haihui; Lin, Song

    2014-09-01

    Tumor grade and molecular variants influence the survival of patients with glioma. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map is a non-invasive tool for evaluating the outcomes and response to therapy in glioma. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the tumor grade and prognostic biomarkers with the ADC in glioma patients. Eighty-two patients with supratentorial glioma were identified via analysis of surgical specimens and neuroradiological data. Using the World Health Organization grade, histological subtype, and molecular variants (1p/19q codeletion, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation, Ki-67 index, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase, P53, and vascular endothelial growth factor immunoactivity) as prognostic biomarkers, we performed receiver operating characteristic analysis and multiple linear regression to assess the association between the magnetic resonance diffusion parameter and mean ADC and the prognostic factors of glioma pathology. Univariate analysis and multiple linear regression revealed inverse correlations between the ADC values and the tumor grade, oligodendrocytoma histology, and 1p/19q codeletion. A threshold mean ADC value could predict the 1p/19q chromosomal status in WHO II gliomas with 72 % sensitivity and 88 % specificity (area under the curve 0.82, 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.97) and could distinguish low-grade glioma with low-risk factors from the high-risk group (P < 0.01). The mean ADC value could be used as a non-invasive tool to evaluate the prognosis of supratentorial glioma patients. A threshold mean ADC value could be used to predict the 1p/19q codeletion and to identify low-risk low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Lower ADC values are indicative of a favorable prognosis in LGGs. PMID:24874469

  17. Changes in apparent diffusion coefficients in the normal uterus during different phases of the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kido, A; Kataoka, M; Koyama, T; Yamamoto, A; Saga, T; Togashi, K

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of the uterine zonal structures (myometrium, endometrium and junctional zone) among reproductive women, and their changes during the menstrual cycle. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven healthy females (aged 24–31 years) were obtained during the periovulatory, luteal and menstrual phases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with a single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence in the midsagittal plane of the uterus using three b-values (b = 0, 500 or 1000 s mm?2). The ADC values of the three uterine zonal structures were measured on an ADC map by placing two regions of interest (ROI) on the corresponding zonal structures. The average changes of ADC values (intra-individual ADC value variation) over three menstrual phases were 0.41 × 10?3 mm2 s?1 (range, 0.08–0.91) for myometrium, 0.55 × 10?3 mm2 s?1 (0.35–0.84) for endometrium, and 0.40 × 10?3 mm2 s?1 (0.18–0.59) for the junctional zone. The ADC values for myometrium and endometrium were lower in the menstrual phase, although there was some overlap of individual values. Interindividual variation in ADC value for a given zone or phase ranged from 0.48 × 10?3 mm2 s?1 to 0.85 × 10?3 mm2 s?1. Intermeasurement variation between the two ROIs ranged from 0 to 0.48 × 10?3 mm2 s?1 per measurement. The magnitude of these variations was comparable to reported differences between malignant and non-malignant tissues. These preliminary results, from a small number of subjects, suggest that the menstrual cycle and individual variation in pre-menopausal women should be considered when interpreting the ADC values of uterine structures. PMID:20505034

  18. Changes in apparent diffusion coefficients in the normal uterus during different phases of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Kido, A; Kataoka, M; Koyama, T; Yamamoto, A; Saga, T; Togashi, K

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of the uterine zonal structures (myometrium, endometrium and junctional zone) among reproductive women, and their changes during the menstrual cycle. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven healthy females (aged 24-31 years) were obtained during the periovulatory, luteal and menstrual phases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed with a single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence in the midsagittal plane of the uterus using three b-values (b = 0, 500 or 1000 s mm(-2)). The ADC values of the three uterine zonal structures were measured on an ADC map by placing two regions of interest (ROI) on the corresponding zonal structures. The average changes of ADC values (intra-individual ADC value variation) over three menstrual phases were 0.41 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (range, 0.08-0.91) for myometrium, 0.55 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (0.35-0.84) for endometrium, and 0.40 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) (0.18-0.59) for the junctional zone. The ADC values for myometrium and endometrium were lower in the menstrual phase, although there was some overlap of individual values. Interindividual variation in ADC value for a given zone or phase ranged from 0.48 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) to 0.85 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1). Intermeasurement variation between the two ROIs ranged from 0 to 0.48 x 10(-3) mm(2) s(-1) per measurement. The magnitude of these variations was comparable to reported differences between malignant and non-malignant tissues. These preliminary results, from a small number of subjects, suggest that the menstrual cycle and individual variation in pre-menopausal women should be considered when interpreting the ADC values of uterine structures. PMID:20505034

  19. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  20. Determination of diffusion coefficient through laboratory tests and analytically validating it using empirical relations for unsaturated soils 

    E-print Network

    Thakur, Anshuman Bramhanand

    2005-11-01

    of soils exert a critical influence on the depth to which seasonal variations of moisture and suction at the ground surface extend into the soil mass. Hence, a study of moisture diffusion coefficient is pivotal. In this research the drying test originally...

  1. The measurement of the diffusion coefficient of water in paints and polymers from their swelling by using an interferometric technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. J. Goossens; A. J. J. van der Zanden; H. L. M. Wijen; W. H. van der Spoel

    2003-01-01

    An interferometric technique has been used to measure the swelling of a paint film caused by its absorption of water vapour. The diffusion coefficient of water in paint is obtained from the time evolution of the thickness of the paint film, when the paint film is subjected to an almost stepwise change in the relative humidity of the surrounding air.

  2. Electrochemical measurement of lateral diffusion coefficients of ubiquinones and plastoquinones of various isoprenoid chain lengths incorporated in model bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, D; Boireau, W; Laval, J M; Moiroux, J; Bourdillon, C

    1998-01-01

    The long-range diffusion coefficients of isoprenoid quinones in a model of lipid bilayer were determined by a method avoiding fluorescent probe labeling of the molecules. The quinone electron carriers were incorporated in supported dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine layers at physiological molar fractions (<3 mol%). The elaborate bilayer template contained a built-in gold electrode at which the redox molecules solubilized in the bilayer were reduced or oxidized. The lateral diffusion coefficient of a natural quinone like UQ10 or PQ9 was 2.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) at 30 degrees C, two to three times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of a lipid analog in the same artificial bilayer. The lateral mobilities of the oxidized or reduced forms could be determined separately and were found to be identical in the 4-13 pH range. For a series of isoprenoid quinones, UQ2 or PQ2 to UQ10, the diffusion coefficient exhibited a marked dependence on the length of the isoprenoid chain. The data fit very well the quantitative behavior predicted by a continuum fluid model in which the isoprenoid chains are taken as rigid particles moving in the less viscous part of the bilayer and rubbing against the more viscous layers of lipid heads. The present study supports the concept of a homogeneous pool of quinone located in the less viscous region of the bilayer. PMID:9545054

  3. Estimation of CO2 diffusion coefficient at 0-10 cm depth in undisturbed and tilled soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion coefficients (D) of CO2 at 0 – 10 cm layers in undisturbed and tilled soil conditions were estimated using Penman, Millington-Quirk, Ridgwell et al. (1999), Troeh et al., and Moldrup et al. models. Soil bulk density and volumetric soil water content ('v) at 0 – 10 cm were measured on April...

  4. Source term evaluation for postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plants -- Summer ventilation mode (non-seismic cases)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Wendel, M.W.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Dyer, R.H. [Dyer Enterprises, Harriman, TN (United States)

    1996-12-30

    Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. For the current study, gaseous UF{sub 6} is assumed to get released in the cell housing atmosphere through B-line break at 58.97 kg/s for 10 min and 30 min duration at the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The released UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) while it disperses throughout the process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. To characterize leakage flow through the cell housing wall, 3-D CFD tool (CFDS-FLOW3D) was used. About 57% of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} was predicted to be released into the environment. Since HF was treated as vapor, close to 100% was estimated to get released into the environment.

  5. Characterization of the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) standard Rhodamine 6G and calibration of its diffusion coefficient in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, G., E-mail: majer@is.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Melchior, J. P. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    Precise diffusion measurements of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) dissolved in D{sub 2}O at concentrations between 50 and 200 ?M were carried out in the temperature range from 280 to 320 K using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). The obtained diffusion coefficients can be used as a calibration reference in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Besides measuring the diffusivity of Rh6G, the diffusion coefficient of the solvent in the same system could be determined in parallel by PFG-NMR as the resonances of water and Rh6G are well separated in the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. To analyze the differences due to the isotope effect of the solvent (D{sub 2}O vs. H{sub 2}O), the correlation time ?{sub D} of Rh6G was measured by FCS in both D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O. The obtained isotopic correction factor, ?{sub D}(D{sub 2}O)/?{sub D}(H{sub 2}O) = 1.24, reflects the isotope effect of the solvent´s self-diffusion coefficients as determined previously by PFG-NMR.

  6. In situ estimation of the effective chemical diffusion coefficient of a rock matrix in a fractured aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gebrekristos, R.A.; Shapiro, A.M.; Usher, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    An in situ method of estimating the effective diffusion coefficient for a chemical constituent that diffuses into the primary porosity of a rock is developed by abruptly changing the concentration of the dissolved constituent in a borehole in contact with the rock matrix and monitoring the time-varying concentration. The experiment was conducted in a borehole completed in mudstone on the campus of the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Numerous tracer tests were conducted at this site, which left a residual concentration of sodium chloride in boreholes that diffused into the rock matrix over a period of years. Fresh water was introduced into a borehole in contact with the mudstone, and the time-varying increase of chloride was observed by monitoring the electrical conductivity (EC) at various depths in the borehole. Estimates of the effective diffusion coefficient were obtained by interpreting measurements of EC over 34 d. The effective diffusion coefficient at a depth of 36 m was approximately 7.8??10-6 m2/d, but was sensitive to the assumed matrix porosity. The formation factor and mass flux for the mudstone were also estimated from the experiment. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  7. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM Federal Services, P.O. Box 789, Piketon, OH 45661 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct relationship between plant transpiration, soil moisture, and groundwater flow in a phyto-remediation system. The existing monitoring program was expanded in 2004 in order to evaluate the interactions among these processes. The purpose of this monitoring program was to determine the rate of contaminant removal and to more accurately predict the amount of time needed to remediate the contaminated groundwater. Initial planting occurred in 1999 at the X-740 area, with additional replanting in 2001 and 2002. In 2003, coring of selected trees and chemical analyses illustrated the presence of TCE; however, little impact was observed in groundwater levels, analytical monitoring, and periodic tree diameter monitoring at the X-740 area. To provide better understanding of how these phyto-remediation systems work, a portable weather station was installed at the X-740 area to provide data for estimating transpiration and two different systems for measuring sap flow and sap velocity were outfitted to numerous trees. After evaluating and refining the groundwater flow and contaminant transport models, the data gathered by these two inventive methods can be used to establish a rate of contaminant removal and to better predict the time required in order to meet remediation goals for the phyto-remediation systems located at the PORTS site. (authors)

  8. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2012-08-28

    Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

  9. COMBINED GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES TO IDENTIFY BURIED WASTE IN AN UNCONTROLLED LANDFILL AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Peter T.; Starmer, R. John

    2003-02-27

    The primary objective of the investigation was to confirm the presence and determine the location of a cache of 30 to 60 buried 55-gallon drums that were allegedly dumped along the course of the pre-existing, northsouth diversion ditch (NSDD) adjacent to permitted landfills at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky. The ditch had been rerouted and was being filled and re-graded at the time of the alleged dumping. Historic information and interviews with individuals associated with alleged dumping activities indicated that the drums were dumped prior to the addition of other fill materials. In addition, materials alleged to have been dumped in the ditch, such as buried roofing materials, roof flashing, metal pins, tar substances, fly ash, and concrete rubble complicated data interpretation. Some clean fill materials have been placed over the site and graded. This is an environment that is extremely complicated in terms of past waste dumping activities, construction practices and miscellaneous landfill operations. The combination of site knowledge gained from interviews and research of existing site maps, variable frequency EM data, classical total magnetic field data and optimized GPR lead to success where a simpler less focused approach by other investigators using EM-31 and EM-61 electromagnetic methods and unfocused ground penetrating radar (GPR)did not produce results and defined no real anomalies. A variable frequency electromagnetic conductivity unit was used to collect the EM data at 3,030 Hz, 5,070 Hz, 8,430 Hz, and 14,010 Hz. Both in-phase and quadrature components were recorded at each station point. These results provided depth estimates for targets and some information on the subsurface conditions. A standard magnetometer was used to conduct the magnetic survey that showed the locations and extent of buried metal, the approximate volume of ferrous metal present within a particular area, and allowed estimation of approximate target depths. The GPR survey used a 200 megahertz (MHz) antenna to provide the maximum depth penetration and subsurface detail yielding usable signals to a depth of about 6 to 10 feet in this environment and allowed discrimination of objects that were deeper, particularly useful in the southern area of the site where shallow depth metallic debris (primarily roof flashing) complicated interpretation of the EM and magnetic data. Several geophysical anomalies were defined on the contour plots that indicated the presence of buried metal. During the first phase of the project, nine anomalies or anomalous areas were detected. The sizes, shapes, and magnitudes of the anomalies varied considerably, but given the anticipated size of the primary target of the investigation, only the most prominent anomalies were considered as potential caches of 30 to 60 buried drums. After completion of a second phase investigation, only two of the anomalies were of sufficient magnitude, not identifiable with existing known metallic objects such as monitoring wells, and in positions that corresponded to the location of alleged dumping activities and were recommended for further, intrusive investigation. Other important findings, based on the variable frequency EM method and its combination with total field magnetic and GPR data, included the confirmation of the position of the old NSDD, the ability to differentiate between ferrous and non-ferrous anomalies, and the detection of what may be plumes emanating from the landfill cell.

  10. Diffusion in heterogeneous media: An iterative scheme for finding approximate solutions to fractional differential equations with time-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Mauro; Svenkeson, Adam; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion processes in heterogeneous media, and biological systems in particular, are riddled with the difficult theoretical issue of whether the true origin of anomalous behavior is renewal or memory, or a special combination of the two. Accounting for the possible mixture of renewal and memory sources of subdiffusion is challenging from a computational point of view as well. This problem is exacerbated by the limited number of techniques available for solving fractional diffusion equations with time-dependent coefficients. We propose an iterative scheme for solving fractional differential equations with time-dependent coefficients that is based on a parametric expansion in the fractional index. We demonstrate how this method can be used to predict the long-time behavior of nonautonomous fractional differential equations by studying the anomalous diffusion process arising from a mixture of renewal and memory sources.

  11. Probability distribution of financial returns in a model of multiplicative Brownian motion with stochastic diffusion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Antonio

    2005-03-01

    It is well-known that the mathematical theory of Brownian motion was first developed in the Ph. D. thesis of Louis Bachelier for the French stock market before Einstein [1]. In Ref. [2] we studied the so-called Heston model, where the stock-price dynamics is governed by multiplicative Brownian motion with stochastic diffusion coefficient. We solved the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation exactly and found an analytic formula for the time-dependent probability distribution of stock price changes (returns). The formula interpolates between the exponential (tent-shaped) distribution for short time lags and the Gaussian (parabolic) distribution for long time lags. The theoretical formula agrees very well with the actual stock-market data ranging from the Dow-Jones index [2] to individual companies [3], such as Microsoft, Intel, etc. [] [1] Louis Bachelier, ``Th'eorie de la sp'eculation,'' Annales Scientifiques de l''Ecole Normale Sup'erieure, III-17:21-86 (1900).[] [2] A. A. Dragulescu and V. M. Yakovenko, ``Probability distribution of returns in the Heston model with stochastic volatility,'' Quantitative Finance 2, 443--453 (2002); Erratum 3, C15 (2003). [cond-mat/0203046] [] [3] A. C. Silva, R. E. Prange, and V. M. Yakovenko, ``Exponential distribution of financial returns at mesoscopic time lags: a new stylized fact,'' Physica A 344, 227--235 (2004). [cond-mat/0401225

  12. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David A.; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  13. Diffusion Coefficients and Viscosities of CO2 + H2O, CO2 + CH3OH, NH3 + H2O, and NH3 + CH3OH Liquid Mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco J. W. Frank; Johannes A. M. Kuipers; Swaaij van W. P. M

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate quantitatively the results of gas-liquid absorption experiments, accurate liquid-phase diffusion coefficients and viscosities are needed. In this paper experimental values of these quantities will be reported for the binary systems carbon dioxide + water, carbon dioxide + methanol, ammonia + water, and ammonia + methanol. The diffusion coefficients have been measured using the Taylor-Aris dispersion method, and the

  14. Diffusion coefficients and viscosities of COâ + HâO, COâ + CHâOH, NHâ + HâO, and NHâ + CHâOH liquid mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. W. Frank; J. A. M. Kuipers; W. P. M. van Swaaij

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate quantitatively the results of gas-liquid absorption experiments, accurate liquid-phase diffusion coefficients and viscosities are needed. In this paper experimental values of these quantities will be reported for the binary systems carbon dioxide + water, carbon dioxide + methanol, ammonia + water, and ammonia + methanol. The diffusion coefficients have been measured using the Taylor-Aris dispersion method, and the

  15. Overestimated diffusion coefficients for the prediction of worst case migration from PET: application to recycled PET and to functional barriers assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Y. Pennarun; P. Dole; A. Feigenbaum

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper defines parameters which can be used to predict worst case migration from recycled PET bottles, with and without a functional barrier. Starting with a set of diffusion coefficients determined in well defined experimental conditions (temperature, presence or not of a solvent, with and without swelling effect), empirical equations for the diffusion coefficient of a migrant or a

  16. Use of apparent diffusion coefficient values for diagnosis of pediatric posterior fossa tumors.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Theodore; Kranz, Peter G; Roth, Christopher; Leong, Dalun; Wei, Peter; Provenzale, James M

    2014-04-01

    We prospectively compared the ability of neuroradiologists to diagnose medulloblastoma with novice raters using only apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured on ADC maps. One hundred and three pediatric patients with pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging scans showing a posterior fossa tumor with histological verification were retrospectively identified from a ten-year period at a tertiary care medical center. A single observer measured the lowest ADC values in all tumors to determine the mean minimum ADC (ADCmin) value that provided greatest accuracy in distinguishing medulloblastomas from other tumors, which was determined to be 0.66×10(-3) mm(2)/s. Imaging studies, including ADC maps, from 90 patients were provided to two neuroradiologists, who provided a diagnosis, which was later dichotomized as medulloblastoma or other. Two medical students measured ADCmin within tumors and those with ADCmin < 0.66×10(-3) mm(2)/s were recorded as medulloblastoma; any other value was recorded as other. Diagnostic accuracy was measured. ADCmin values allowed a correct identification of lesions as either medulloblastoma or other in 91% of cases. After diagnoses by the two neuroradiologists were categorized as either medulloblastoma or other, their diagnoses were correct in 90% and 84% of cases, respectively. In 19 cases, at least one neuroradiologist was incorrect; the addition of ADC values to clinical interpretation would have allowed a correct diagnosis in 63% of such cases. Diagnostic accuracy based on ADC values by medical students was comparable to that of subspecialty-trained neuroradiologists. Our findings suggest that the addition of ADC values to standard film interpretation may improve the diagnostic rate for these tumors. PMID:24750714

  17. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Correlation of diffusion coefficients with the electronic structure of interacting atoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. V. Samsonov; I. S. Kiva; N. G. Kaidash; E. G. Borisenko

    1976-01-01

    spect to the electron-phonon structure of solids, the interaction between the diffusion parameters and the electronic structure of atoms interecting during the diffusion was followed. An analysis of diagrams constructed from experimental data on the activation energy A and the preexponential factor D o of elements diffusing into the matrix shows that both quantities are very sensitive to the electronic

  19. A light scattering study of non equilibrium fluctuations in liquid mixtures to measure the Soret and mass diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Croccolo, F; Bataller, H; Scheffold, F

    2012-12-21

    We use dynamic near field scattering to measure the dynamics of concentration non equilibrium fluctuations at the steady-state of Soret separation. The analysis reveals that above a threshold wave vector q(c), the dynamics is governed by diffusion while at smaller wave vectors, gravity dominates. From the measurements, we extract both the mass diffusion and the Soret coefficients. Comparing our results with literature data, we find good agreement confirming that the proposed experimental technique can be considered a sound approach for the study of thermodiffusion processes. PMID:23267479

  20. Measurements of binary diffusion coefficients for some low volatile compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide by input–output response technique with two diffusion columns connected in series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2002-01-01

    Binary diffusion coefficients (D12) for low volatile compounds such as Vitamin K3, ubiquinone (UQ-10), ?-tocopherol, ?-carotene, and phenol in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by the Taylor dispersion method with two columns connected in series: a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated capillary column followed by a stainless steel uncoated capillary column, at 313.15K and pressures from 9 to 30MPa. The tracer

  1. Kinetics of nonisothermal adsorption by biporous adsorbents. Communication 6. Description of kinetic adsorption curves with account of the temperature dependence of the intracrystalline diffusion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Broddak, R.; Voloshchuk, A.M.; Gorlov, V.A.; Dubinin, M.M.; Kochirzhik, M.

    1987-01-10

    An analytical description has been given of the kinetic adsorption curves with account of the influence of the change in adsorbent temperature due to the evolution of heat and adsorption on the coefficient of intracrystalline diffusion of the adsorbate. The deviation of the experimental kinetic curves for the adsorption of trans-2-butene by finely crystalline NaA zeolite from those calculated from the equation of isothermal diffusion is due to the influence of temperature on the coefficient of intracrystalline diffusion.

  2. Measurement setup for the simultaneous determination of diffusivity and Seebeck coefficient in a multi-anvil apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, M K; Liu, W; Li, B

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a high pressure setup is presented for performing simultaneous measurements of Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity in multianvil apparatus for the purpose of enhancing the study of transport phenomena. Procedures for the derivation of Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity/conductivity, as well as their associated sources of errors, are presented in detail, using results obtained on the filled skutterudite, Ce(0.8)Fe(3)CoSb(12,) up to 12 GPa at ambient temperature. Together with recent resistivity and sound velocity measurements in the same apparatus, these developments not only provide the necessary data for a self-consistent and complete characterization of the figure of merit of thermoelectric materials under pressure, but also serve as an important tool for furthering our knowledge of the dynamics and interplay between these transport phenomena. PMID:23020390

  3. Self-diffusion coefficients obtained from proton-decoupled carbon-13 spectra for analyzing a mixture of terpenes.

    PubMed

    Yemloul, Mehdi; Castola, Vincent; Leclerc, Sébastien; Canet, Daniel

    2009-08-01

    In the limit of sufficient sensitivity, natural abundance 13C offers a much better spectral resolution than proton NMR. This is due to an important chemical shift range and to proton-decoupling conditions that yield one peak per carbon with practically no overlap. However, pulsed gradient spin echo experiments, which lead to the diffusion coefficient associated with each peak, have scarcely been employed. In this article, we present and compare different ways to access this quantity and we have effectively verified that, without any precaution, diffusion coefficients cannot be properly determined from standard procedures. The cause of such a failure is decoupling during the gradient pulses. We have used a very simple remedy that proved to be very successful on a model mixture of three monoterpenes and that appears as being of general applicability. PMID:19431152

  4. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L. [and others] [and others

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  5. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky: Volume 1 -- Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN.

  6. Application of Photothermal Techniques in the Determination of the Water-Vapor Diffusion Coefficient and Thermal Effusivity of Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymundo-Ortiz, A. I.; Ramos-Ramirez, E. G.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Salazar-Montoya, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the effect of different sodium alginate concentrations in hydrogels on their water-vapor diffusion coefficient (WVDC) and thermal effusivity (. These physical parameters were measured by photoacoustic and pyroelectric techniques, respectively. The results indicate that the higher values for the WVDC are presented at a concentration of 2 % sodium alginate. At lower concentrations of sodium alginate, the sample thermal effusivity increases, with a value close to the water thermal effusivity.

  7. Constant-potential electrolysis: determination of diffusion coefficients of thallium by using a hanging mercury drop electrode.

    PubMed

    Mendez, J H; Martinez, R C

    The technique of constant-potential electrolysis at a stationary spherical electrode (hanging mercury drop) was investigated for the determination of the diffusion coefficient of Tl(I) in sodium citrate-sodium hydroxide medium and of Tl in mercury. Current-time curves, at controlled potential, were obtained, covering periods from 1 to 25 sec after the start of the electrolysis. The influence of applied potential, time of electrolysis, convection and shielding of the electrode was studied. PMID:18962006

  8. Diffusion Coefficients of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Polydimethylsiloxane and Low-Density Polylethylene Polymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatsiana P. Rusina; Foppe Smedes; Jana Klanova

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients (D) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined by film-stacking technique in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and two types of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) (also known as silicone rubber, SR) with the trade names AlteSil (TM) and Silastic. The estimated values of D for PCBs and PAHs over a wide range of hydrophobicity were 2-2.5 orders of

  9. Changes of the surface-to-volume ratio and diffusion coefficient of fission gas in fuel pellets during irradiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaki Amaya; Viktors Grismanovs; Terje Tverberg

    2010-01-01

    Short-lived fission gas release from fuel pellets during irradiation was investigated based on the experimental results of the gas-flow rigs irradiated in the Halden Heavy Water Reactor (HBWR).The release-to-birth (R\\/B) rates of short-lived fission gas were measured by means of gas-flow measurement during the irradiation experiments. Surface-to-volume (S\\/V) ratios of fuel pellets and diffusion coefficients of short-lived fission gas release

  10. Effects of molecular weight and degree of unsaturation on binary diffusion coefficients for lipids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Funazukuri; C. Y. Kong; S. Kagei

    2004-01-01

    Infinite dilution binary diffusion coefficients and retention factors for the oleic acid family such as oleic acid, methyl- and ethyl esters, and mono-, di-, and triglycerides at 313.21K and 8–30MPa, and for other 13 lipids consisting of C18–C22 unsaturated fatty acid constituents at 313.21K and 11MPa were measured in carbon dioxide by a chromatographic impulse response method with a polymer

  11. Binary diffusion coefficients and retention factors for polar compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide by chromatographic impulse response method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang Yi Kong; Toshitaka Funazukuri; Seiichiro Kagei

    2006-01-01

    The chromatographic impulse response (CIR) method with curve fitting was employed for measuring binary diffusion coefficients D12 at infinite dilution for polar compounds such as benzoic acid and C1 to C3 mono-alcohols in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide at 313.2K and pressures higher than 9.5MPa. The measured D12 values for the polar compounds were expressed with two correlations which well represent

  12. Binary diffusion coefficients and retention factors for ?-linolenic acid and its methyl and ethyl esters in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang Yi Kong; Nirosha R. W. Withanage; Toshitaka Funazukuri; Seiichiro Kagei

    2006-01-01

    Infinite dilution binary diffusion coefficients D12 and retention factors k for ?-linolenic acid were measured by chromatographic impulse response technique in supercritical carbon dioxide over the ranges of temperature from 308 to 343K and pressure from 9 to 30MPa, together with those for the methyl and ethyl esters at 313 and 343K and pressures from 8 to 16MPa. In comparison

  13. Binary diffusion coefficients, partition ratios and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution for ?-carotene and ?-tocopherol in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2003-01-01

    Binary diffusion coefficients D12 and partition ratios k at infinite dilution for ?-carotene and ?-tocopherol in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured at temperatures from 308.15 to 333.15 K and pressures from 9 to 30 MPa by a tracer response technique with a poly(ethylene glycol) coated capillary column. Both parameters, simultaneously determined by fitting the calculated response curve to that measured

  14. Divergence of the Long Wavelength Collective Diffusion Coefficient in Quasi-one and Quasi-two Dimensional Colloid Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Binhua; Cui, Bianxiao; Xu, Xinliang; Zangi, Ronen; Diamant, Haim; Rice, Stuart A.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of the short time-long wavelength behavior of collective particle displacements in q1D and q2D colloid suspensions. Our results are reported via the q->0 behavior of the hydrodynamic function H (q) that relates the effective collective diffusion coefficient, De (q) , with the static structure factor S (q) and the self-diffusion coefficient of isolated particles Do: H (q) De (q) S (q) /Do. We find an apparent divergence of H (q) as q->0 with the form H(q)q-(1.7 < ?<1.9), for both q1D and q2D colloid suspensions. Given that S (q) does not diverge as we infer that De (q) does. This behavior is qualitatively different from that of the three-dimensional H (q) and De (q) as q->0, and the divergence is of a different functional form from that predicted for the diffusion coefficient in one component 1D and 2D fluids not subject to boundary conditions that define the dimensionality of the system. The research was supported by the NSF MRSEC at the U of Chicago (NSF/DMR-MRSEC 0820054), NSF/CHE 0822838 (ChemMatCARS), and Israel Science Foundation (Grant No. 8/10).

  15. A new family of implicit fourth order compact schemes for unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient

    E-print Network

    Shuvam Sen

    2012-01-16

    In this paper, a new family of implicit compact finite difference schemes for computation of unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient is proposed. The schemes are fourth order accurate in space and second or lower order accurate in time depending on the choice of weighted time average parameter. The proposed schemes, where transport variable and its first derivatives are carried as the unknowns, combine virtues of compact discretization and Pad\\'{e} scheme for spatial derivative. These schemes which are based on five point stencil with constant coefficients, named as \\emph{(5,5) Constant Coefficient 4th Order Compact} [(5,5)CC-4OC], give rise to a diagonally dominant system of equations and shows higher accuracy and better phase and amplitude error characteristics than some of the standard methods. These schemes are capable of using a grid aspect ratio other than unity and are unconditionally stable. They efficiently capture both transient and steady solutions of linear and nonlinear convection-diffusion equations with Dirichlet as well as Neumann boundary condition. The proposed schemes can be easily implemented and are applied to problems governed by incompressible Navier-Stokes equations apart from linear convection-diffusion equation. Results obtained are in excellent agreement with analytical and available numerical results in all cases, establishing efficiency and accuracy of the proposed scheme.

  16. Measuring translational diffusion coefficients of peptides and proteins by PFG-NMR using band-selective RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Weber, Daniel K; Separovic, Frances; Keizer, David W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular translational self-diffusion, a measure of diffusive motion, provides information on the effective molecular hydrodynamic radius, as well as information on the properties of media or solution through which the molecule diffuses. Protein translational diffusion measured by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) has seen increased application in structure and interaction studies, as structural changes or protein-protein interactions are often accompanied by alteration of their effective hydrodynamic radii. Unlike the analysis of complex mixtures by PFG-NMR, for monitoring changes of protein translational diffusion under various conditions, such as different stages of folding/unfolding, a partial region of the spectrum or even a single resonance is sufficient. We report translational diffusion coefficients measured by PFG-NMR with a modified stimulated echo (STE) sequence where band-selective pulses are employed for all three (1)H RF pulses. Compared with conventional non-selective sequence, e.g. the BPP-LED sequence, the advantage of this modified band-selective excitation short transient (BEST) version of STE (BEST-STE) sequence is multi-fold, namely: (1) potential sensitivity gain as in generalized BEST-based sequences, (2) water suppression is no longer required as the magnetization of solvent water is not perturbed during the measurement, and (3) dynamic range problems due to the presence of intense resonances from molecules other than the protein or peptide of interest, such as non-deuterated detergent micelles, are avoided. PMID:24824112

  17. Improved Algorithms for Accurate Retrieval of UV - Visible Diffuse Attenuation Coefficients in Optically Complex, Inshore Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Fang; Fichot, Cedric G.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Miller, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical processes driven by high-energy ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in inshore, estuarine, and coastal waters play an important role in global bio geochemical cycles and biological systems. A key to modeling photochemical processes in these optically complex waters is an accurate description of the vertical distribution of UVR in the water column which can be obtained using the diffuse attenuation coefficients of down welling irradiance (Kd()). The Sea UV Sea UVc algorithms (Fichot et al., 2008) can accurately retrieve Kd ( 320, 340, 380,412, 443 and 490 nm) in oceanic and coastal waters using multispectral remote sensing reflectances (Rrs(), Sea WiFS bands). However, SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms are currently not optimized for use in optically complex, inshore waters, where they tend to severely underestimate Kd(). Here, a new training data set of optical properties collected in optically complex, inshore waters was used to re-parameterize the published SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, resulting in improved Kd() retrievals for turbid, estuarine waters. Although the updated SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms perform best in optically complex waters, the published SeaUVSeaUVc models still perform well in most coastal and oceanic waters. Therefore, we propose a composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms, optimized for Kd() retrieval in almost all marine systems, ranging from oceanic to inshore waters. The composite algorithm set can retrieve Kd from ocean color with good accuracy across this wide range of water types (e.g., within 13 mean relative error for Kd(340)). A validation step using three independent, in situ data sets indicates that the composite SeaUVSeaUVc can generate accurate Kd values from 320 490 nm using satellite imagery on a global scale. Taking advantage of the inherent benefits of our statistical methods, we pooled the validation data with the training set, obtaining an optimized composite model for estimating Kd() in UV wavelengths for almost all marine waters. This optimized composite set of SeaUVSeaUVc algorithms will provide the optical community with improved ability to quantify the role of solar UV radiation in photochemical and photobiological processes in the ocean.

  18. Determination of the diffusion coefficient of proton in CVD gamma aluminum oxide thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George T. Yu; S. K. Yen

    2003-01-01

    Proton diffusion in aluminum oxide thin films is of significant interest because of its importance in barrier, sensor and catalytic coating applications. In this study, a novel method based on potential-pH response measurement was used to determine proton diffusivity in CVD produced gamma aluminum oxide thin films. This technique based on the model of diffusion-controlled transport at the oxide surface,

  19. Multi-system repeatability and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient measurement using an ice-water phantom

    PubMed Central

    Malyarenko, Dariya; Galbán, Craig J.; Londy, Frank J.; Meyer, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative quality control procedures were sought to evaluate technical variability in multi-center measurements of the diffusion coefficient of water as a prerequisite to use of the biomarker apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in multi-center clinical trials. Materials and Methods A uniform data acquisition protocol was developed and shared with 18 participating test sites along with a temperature-controlled diffusion phantom delivered to each site. Usable diffusion weighted imaging data of ice water at 5 b-values were collected on 35 clinical MRI systems from 3 vendors at 2 field strengths (1.5 and 3T) and analyzed at a central processing site. Results Standard deviation of bore-center ADCs measured across 35 scanners was <2%; error range: ?2% to +5% from literature value. Day-to-day repeatability of the measurements was within 4.5%. Intra-exam repeatability at the phantom center was within 1%. Excluding one outlier, inter-site reproducibility of ADC at magnet isocenter was within 3%, though variability increased for off-center measurements. Significant (>10%) vendor-specific and system-specific spatial non-uniformity ADC bias was detected for the off-center measurement that was consistent with gradient non-linearity. Conclusion Standardization of DWI protocol has improved reproducibility of ADC measurements and allowed identifying spatial ADC non-uniformity as a source of error in multi-site clinical studies. PMID:23023785

  20. Calculation of the second self-diffusion and viscosity virial coefficients of Lennard-Jones fluid by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Ding, Hongbin; Behnejad, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    The second self-diffusion and viscosity virial coefficients of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid were calculated by a detailed evaluation of the velocity and shear-stress autocorrelation functions using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at low and moderate densities. Accurate calculation of these coefficients requires corresponding transport coefficient values with low degrees of uncertainty. These were obtained via very long simulations by increasing the number of particles and by using the knowledge of correlation functions in the Green-Kubo method in conjunction with their corresponding generalized Einstein relations. The values of the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients have been evaluated for systems with reduced densities between 0.0005 and 0.05 and reduced temperatures from 0.7 to 30.0. This provides a new insight into the transport coefficients beyond what can be offered by the Rainwater-Friend theory, which has not been developed for the self-diffusion coefficient.

  1. Calculation of the second self-diffusion and viscosity virial coefficients of Lennard-Jones fluid by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Ding, Hongbin; Behnejad, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    The second self-diffusion and viscosity virial coefficients of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid were calculated by a detailed evaluation of the velocity and shear-stress autocorrelation functions using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at low and moderate densities. Accurate calculation of these coefficients requires corresponding transport coefficient values with low degrees of uncertainty. These were obtained via very long simulations by increasing the number of particles and by using the knowledge of correlation functions in the Green-Kubo method in conjunction with their corresponding generalized Einstein relations. The values of the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients have been evaluated for systems with reduced densities between 0.0005 and 0.05 and reduced temperatures from 0.7 to 30.0. This provides a new insight into the transport coefficients beyond what can be offered by the Rainwater-Friend theory, which has not been developed for the self-diffusion coefficient. PMID:21797351

  2. Use of NMR Imaging to Determine the Diffusion Coefficient of Water in Bio-based Hydrogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diffusion of liquid in a hydrogel material is a fundamental property which must be controlled in order to create effective delivery systems for the agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine the diffusion of water and deuterium oxide in a bio-based h...

  3. Self-assembly urethane architecture: Free volume, Connolly surface and diffusion coefficients investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarek M. Madkour; Rasha Azzam

    The efficiency of polyurethane foams as thermal insulators depends to a great deal on the permeability of various gas molecules through the urethane polymer with higher temperatures enhancing the diffusion of gas molecules through the polymer. In order to increase the efficiency of these insulators, the design of new urethane polymers with low affinity for diffusing gas molecules such as

  4. Comparison of diffusion coefficients of electroactive species in aqueous fluid electrolytes and polyacrylate gels: Step generation-collection diffusion measurements and operation of electrochemical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tatistcheff, H.B.; Fritsch-Faules, I.; Wrighton, M.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States))

    1993-03-18

    The authors report electrochemical measurement of diffusion coefficients and operation of electrochemical devices in aqueous polyacrylate gels formed by neutralization of poly(acrylic acid), MW = 4 [times] 10[sup 6]. Upon neutralization, dilute aqueous solutions become gels with viscosities as high as 5 [times] 10[sup 4] cP at low shear rates. Diffusivity was measured using potential step generation-collection on arrays of closely spaced microelectrodes. The diffusion coefficient, D, of 1,1[prime]-bis(hydroxymethyl)ferrocenium was found to be (5.8 [+-] 0.4) [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup 2]/s in the gel electrolyte (aqueous 0.5% poly(acrylic acid) at pH 7) and (8.8 [+-] 0.8) [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup 2]/s in the aqueous fluid electrolyte 0.1 M NaCH[sub 3]CO[sub 2] (pH 7). The small decrease observed in D for the gel vs the fluid with such a large increase in viscosity is contrary to the Stokes-Einstein mode for diffusion in viscous solutions but is in accord with the structure of polyacrylate gels which consists of two phases. The continuous, aqueous phase allows for high diffusivity. Electrochemical transistors based on ruthenium oxide exhibit similar operating characteristics in both polyacrylate gel and aqueous fluid electrolytes. Response times of electrochromic polymer films made from N,N[prime]-bis[p-(trimethoxysilyl)benzyl]-4,4[prime]-bipyridinium are slower in gel by about a factor of 10 compared to aqueous fluid electrolytes. The slow electrochromic switching is likely due to sluggish ion motion, owing to the effects of charge compensation by the polyacrylate. 30 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Impact of SeaWIFS derived diffuse attenuation coefficients (K d_490) on the dynamics and thermodynamics of OGCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Sharma, Rashmi; Agarwal, Vijay K.

    2006-12-01

    The realism of the impact of penetrative solar radiation, an effect we refer to as biological heating, on the upper ocean thermodynamics has been studied using an Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM). Daily fields of winds, air temperature, specific humidity, net long-wave and shortwave radiation from NCEP were used to force the model. In the control run (cntl-R), diffuse attenuation coefficient (K d) which signifies the visible radiation penetration is parameterized for clear water condition. In the experimental run (exp-R), attenuation coefficient for blue-green wavelength (K d_490) obtained from SeaWiFS sensor was used to determine the penetrative depth of solar radiation. Use of satellite derived K d_490 alters the upper ocean thermodynamics quite significantly. Model simulated parameters sea surface temperature (SST), current and mixed layer depth (MLD) were found to be sensitive to the choice of diffuse attenuation coefficients that limit the penetration of solar radiation into the ocean. The SST cools and MLD deepens in clear water regions (large attenuation depths) due to heat penetration in deeper layers, while the surface gets heated and MLD shoals in regions of high turbidity (low attenuation depths) due to heat trapping.

  6. Application of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck Theory with Space-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients to KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Simone; Zerbetto, Francesco; Cavalcanti, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    The Poisson-Nernst-Planck electrodiffusion theory serves to compute charge fluxes and is here applied to the ion current through a protein channel. KcsA was selected as an example because of the abundance of experimental and theoretical data. The potassium channels MthK and KvAP were used as templates to define two open channel models for KcsA. Channel boundary surfaces and protein charge distributions were defined according to atomic radii and partial atomic charges. To establish the sensitivity of the results to these parameters, two different sets were used. Assigning the potassium diffusion coefficients equal to the value for free-diffusion in water (1.96 × 10?9 m2/s), the computed currents overestimated the experimental data. Ion distributions inside the channel suggest that the overestimate is not due to an excess of charge shielding. A good agreement with the experimental data was achieved by reducing the potassium diffusion coefficient inside the channel to 1.96 × 10?10 m2/s, a value of substantial motility but nonetheless in accord with the intuitive notion that the channel has a high affinity for the ions and therefore slows them down. These results are independent of the open channel model and the parameterization adopted for atomic radii and partial atomic charges. The method offers a reliable estimate of the channel current with low computational effort. PMID:16877513

  7. Diffusion coefficient and activation energy of Irganox 1010 in poly(propylene- co-ethylene) copolymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Ferrara; Monica Bertoldo; Marco Scoponi; Francesco Ciardelli

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion of a thermal stabiliser, Irganox 1010, has been studied both in a commercially available polypropylene homopolymer (HomoQ) and in a poly(propylene-co-ethylene) copolymer (RacoS). The diffusion experiments were carried out by using the Roe method formed by a stack of several polymer films having 60–70 ?m as thickness under nitrogen atmosphere. The concentration profile of stabiliser in every film

  8. Automatic detection and quantification of acute cerebral infarct by fuzzy clustering and histographic characterization on diffusion weighted MR imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Peng, Syu-Jyun; Chen, Yu-Wei; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Wu, Hsiao-Kuang; Lin, Yun-Yu; Lee, Ying-Ying; Chen, Chi-Jen; Lin, Huey-Juan; Smith, Eric Edward; Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Hsin, Yue-Loong

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the volumes of acute cerebral infarct in the magnetic resonance imaging harbors prognostic values. However, semiautomatic method of segmentation is time-consuming and with high interrater variability. Using diffusion weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient map from patients with acute infarction in 10 days, we aimed to develop a fully automatic algorithm to measure infarct volume. It includes an unsupervised classification with fuzzy C-means clustering determination of the histographic distribution, defining self-adjusted intensity thresholds. The proposed method attained high agreement with the semiautomatic method, with similarity index 89.9 ± 6.5%, in detecting cerebral infarct lesions from 22 acute stroke patients. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed computer-assisted prompt segmentation method, which appeared promising to replace the laborious, time-consuming, and operator-dependent semiautomatic segmentation. PMID:24738080

  9. Diffusion coefficients of C60 and C60- in benzonitrile and dichloromethane solutions containing tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, measured by potential-step chronoamperometry.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Yukihiro; Nishi, Minako; Baba, Yukie; Ikeuchi, Haruko

    2006-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of C(60) in dichloromethane and benzonitrile solutions containing 0.1 M tetrabutylammonium perchlorate were determined by single potential-step chronoamperometry at small disk electrodes. The diffusion coefficients of C(60) were obtained by curve fitting of the chronoamperograms to a theoretical equation by Shoup and Szabo. The values were (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10(-9) and (4.1 +/- 0.3) x 10(-10) m(2) s(-1), respectively (the errors are 95% confidence limits). The diffusion coefficients of C(60)(-) in these solutions were measured by double potential-step chronoamperometry. The ratios of the diffusion coefficients of C(60) to those of C(60)(-) were obtained from theoretical curves of the ratios of the current at the second potential step to the current at the first one. The values of the ratios were 1.2 +/- 0.2 and 1.0 +/- 0.3, respectively. PMID:16837741

  10. Diffusion coefficients and molar conductivities in aqueous solutions of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-Li Wong; Allan N. Soriano; Meng-Hui Li

    2008-01-01

    Here, we presented new experimental data of diffusion coefficients of five [Emim, (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium)]-based ionic liquids in water at infinite dilution for temperatures ranging from 303.2 to 323.2K using Taylor dispersion method. The investigated ILs were [Emim][C2N3 (dicyanamide)], [Emim][BF4 (tetrafluoroborate)], [Emim][C2H5SO4 (ethylsulfate)], [Emim][CF3SO3 (trifluoromethanesulfonate)], and [Emim][MDEGSO4 (2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethylsulfate)]. The molar conductivities of these ionic liquids were also measured and the infinite

  11. Self-intermediate scattering function of strongly interacting three-dimensional lattice gases: time- and wave-vector-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Skarpalezos, Loukas; Argyrakis, Panos; Vikhrenko, Vyacheslav S

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the self-intermediate scattering function (SISF) in a three-dimensional (3D) cubic lattice fluid (interacting lattice gas) with attractive nearest-neighbor interparticle interactions at a temperature slightly above the critical one by means of Monte Carlo simulations. A special representation of SISF as an exponent of the mean tracer diffusion coefficient multiplied by the geometrical factor and time is considered to highlight memory effects that are included in time and wave-vector dependence of the diffusion coefficient. An analytical expression for the diffusion coefficient is suggested to reproduce the simulation data. It is shown that the particles' mean-square displacement is equal to the time integral of the diffusion coefficient. We make a comparison with the previously considered 2D system on a square lattice. The main difference with the two-dimensional case is that the time dependence of particular characteristics of the tracer diffusion coefficient in the 3D case cannot be described by exponentially decreasing functions, but requires using stretched exponentials with rather small values of exponents, of the order of 0.2. The hydrodynamic values of the tracer diffusion coefficient (in the limit of large times and small wave vectors) defined through SIFS simulation results agree well with the results of its direct determination by the mean-square displacement of the particles in the entire range of concentrations and temperatures. PMID:25353925

  12. Use of the Stokes-Einstein equation to estimate the diffusion coefficient in metallic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, V.N.; Natanzon, Ya.V.

    1987-06-01

    The Stokes-Einstein equation is often used to estimate the effective radius of a diffusing particle. The values of the interatomic distances in liquid metals, determined by x-ray diffraction, are evidence that the atomic radii should be assumed as the characteristic dimension of the particles in metallic metals. The effective radius of the diffusing particle as a rule differs from the atomic radius, and this difference is considerably greater than the experimental error. The goal of this paper was to determine the conditions under which the effective radius of the diffusing particle has the least deviation from the atomic radius of the metal under consideration. Determinations were made for Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ag, In, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Re, Li, Na, K, Rb, Zn, Cd, and Pb.

  13. Generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation for solutions with drastically different diffusion coefficients. Application to exsolution in ternary feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishcheva, E.; Abart, R.

    2012-04-01

    We address mathematical modeling and computer simulations of phase decomposition in a multicomponent system. As opposed to binary alloys with one common diffusion parameter, our main concern is phase decomposition in real geological systems under influence of strongly different interdiffusion coefficients, as it is frequently encountered in mineral solid solutions with coupled diffusion on different sub-lattices. Our goal is to explain deviations from equilibrium element partitioning which are often observed in nature, e.g., in a cooled ternary feldspar. To this end we first adopt the standard Cahn-Hilliard model to the multicomponent diffusion problem and account for arbitrary diffusion coefficients. This is done by using Onsager's approach such that flux of each component results from the combined action of chemical potentials of all components. In a second step the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation is solved numerically using finite-elements approach. We introduce and investigate several decomposition scenarios that may produce systematic deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning. Both ideal solutions and ternary feldspar are considered. Typically, the slowest component is initially "frozen" and the decomposition effectively takes place only for two "fast" components. At this stage the deviations from the equilibrium element partitioning are indeed observed. These deviations may became "frozen" under conditions of cooling. The final equilibration of the system occurs on a considerably slower time scale. Therefore the system may indeed remain unaccomplished at the observation point. Our approach reveals the intrinsic reasons for the specific phase separation path and rigorously describes it by direct numerical solution of the generalized Cahn-Hilliard equation.

  14. Prediction of collective diffusion coefficient of bovine serum albumin in aqueous electrolyte solution with hard-core two-Yukawa potential.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Xin; Tian, Ai-Wei; Gao, Guang-Hua

    2005-06-21

    A new method to predict concentration dependence of collective diffusion coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous electrolyte solution is developed based on the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation which relates the diffusion coefficient to the osmotic pressure. The concentration dependence of osmotic pressure is evaluated using the solution of the mean spherical approximation for the two-Yukawa model fluid. The two empirical correlations of sedimentation coefficient are tested in this work. One is for a disordered suspension of hard spheres, and another is for an ordered suspension of hard spheres. The concentration dependence of the collective diffusion coefficient of BSA under different solution conditions, such as pH and ionic strength is predicted. From the comparison between the predicted and experimental values we found that the sedimentation coefficient for the disordered suspension of hard spheres is more suitable for the prediction of the collective diffusion coefficients of charged BSA in aqueous electrolyte solution. The theoretical predictions from the hard-core two-Yukawa model coupled with the sedimentation coefficient for a suspension of hard spheres are in good agreement with available experimental data, while the hard sphere model is unable to describe the behavior of diffusion due to its neglect of the double-layer repulsive charge-charge interaction between BSA molecules. PMID:15962025

  15. Prediction and validation of diffusion coefficients in a model drug delivery system using microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and vapour sorption analysis.

    PubMed

    Forrey, Christopher; Saylor, David M; Silverstein, Joshua S; Douglas, Jack F; Davis, Eric M; Elabd, Yossef A

    2014-10-14

    Diffusion of small to medium sized molecules in polymeric medical device materials underlies a broad range of public health concerns related to unintended leaching from or uptake into implantable medical devices. However, obtaining accurate diffusion coefficients for such systems at physiological temperature represents a formidable challenge, both experimentally and computationally. While molecular dynamics simulation has been used to accurately predict the diffusion coefficients, D, of a handful of gases in various polymers, this success has not been extended to molecules larger than gases, e.g., condensable vapours, liquids, and drugs. We present atomistic molecular dynamics simulation predictions of diffusion in a model drug eluting system that represent a dramatic improvement in accuracy compared to previous simulation predictions for comparable systems. We find that, for simulations of insufficient duration, sub-diffusive dynamics can lead to dramatic over-prediction of D. We present useful metrics for monitoring the extent of sub-diffusive dynamics and explore how these metrics correlate to error in D. We also identify a relationship between diffusion and fast dynamics in our system, which may serve as a means to more rapidly predict diffusion in slowly diffusing systems. Our work provides important precedent and essential insights for utilizing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to predict diffusion coefficients of small to medium sized molecules in condensed soft matter systems. PMID:25115846

  16. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pons and in Corona Radiata and Relation with the Neurophysiologic Measurement and the Outcome in Very Preterm Infants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tuula Kaukola; Marja Perhomaa; Leena Vainionpää; Uolevi Tolonen; Jukka Jauhiainen; Eija Pääkkö; Mikko Hallman

    2010-01-01

    Background: New imaging techniques allow a detailed visualization of the brain and the findings possibly correlate with neurophysiologic measurements and neurosensory and motor outcomes. Postnatal clinical factors known to associate with neurologic disabilities may contribute to brain abnormalities not visible to the naked eye. Objectives: We evaluated whether quantitative measurement of organized water diffusion on MR imaging, apparent diffusion coefficient

  17. Matrix diffusion coefficients in volcanic rocks at the Nevada test site: Influence of matrix porosity, matrix permeability, and fracture coating minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul W. Reimus; Timothy J. Callahan; S. Doug Ware; Marc J. Haga; Dale A. Counce

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion cell experiments were conducted to measure nonsorbing solute matrix diffusion coefficients in forty-seven different volcanic rock matrix samples from eight different locations (with multiple depth intervals represented at several locations) at the Nevada Test Site. The solutes used in the experiments included bromide, iodide, pentafluorobenzoate (PFBA), and tritiated water (3HHO). The porosity and saturated permeability of most of the

  18. Combined experiments to measure low sublimation pressures and diffusion coefficients of organometallic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Aslam Siddiqi; Burak Atakan

    2007-01-01

    Vapor pressures and sublimation pressures of organometallic (metalorganic) compounds are needed in several processes like chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Thermobalances at ambient pressures are often used to study the evaporation of such compounds. At least three strategies are found in the literature to evaluate the results using different theoretical approaches. In some of the frequently used approaches the diffusion out

  19. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures.

    PubMed

    Werts, Martinus H V; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R G

    2012-02-21

    A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three colour channels of the camera, a linear relation between the measured optical density and dye concentration is established under certain conditions. An optimised collection of dye solutions for the quantitative optical microscopic characterisation of microfluidic devices is proposed. Using the methodology for optical concentration measurement we then implement and validate a simplified and robust method for the microfluidic measurement of diffusion coefficients using an H-filter architecture. It consists of measuring the ratio of the concentrations of the two output channels of the H-filter. It enables facile determination of the diffusion coefficient, even for non-fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles, and is compatible with non-optical detection of the analyte. PMID:22228225

  20. Albedo and flux extinction coefficient of impure snow for diffuse shortwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Mo, T.; Wang, J. R.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    Impurities enter a snowpack as a result of fallout of scavenging by falling snow crystals. Albedo and flux extinction coefficient of soot contaminated snowcovers were studied using a two stream approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The effect of soot was calculated by two methods: independent scattering by ice grains and impurities and average refractive index for ice grains. Both methods predict a qualitatively similar effect of soot; the albedo is decreased and the extinction coefficient is increased compared to that for pure snow in the visible region; the infrared properties are largely unaffected. Quantitatively, however, the effect of soot is more pronounced in the average refractive index method. Soot contamination provides a qualitative explanation for several snow observations.

  1. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms applicable'' and relevant and appropriate'' is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

  2. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remedial actions at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant: A compendium of environmental laws and guidance. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Etnier, E.L.; Eaton, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Section 121 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 specifies that remedial actions for cleanup of hazardous substances found at sites placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must comply with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or standards under federal and state environmental laws. To date, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) has not been on the NPL. Although DOE and EPA have entered into an Administrative Consent Order (ACO), the prime regulatory authority for cleanup at PGDP will be the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This report supplies a preliminary list of available federal and state ARARs that might be considered for remedial response at PGDP in the event that the plant becomes included on the NPL or the ACO is modified to include CERCLA cleanup. A description of the terms ``applicable`` and ``relevant and appropriate`` is provided, as well as definitions of chemical-, location-, and action-specific ARARS. ARARs promulgated by the federal government and by the state of Kentucky are listed in tables. In addition, the major provisions of RCRA, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, and other acts, as they apply to hazardous and radioactive waste cleanup, are discussed.

  3. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant] [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  4. Recommendations for a Kalman filter to estimate and control freeze and sublime rates of gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, F.R.

    1992-09-01

    A signal is required to control the flow of UF{sub 6} in gaseous diffusion plant freezer/sublimer systems. The original strategy envisioned for deriving a flow signal was to take the derivative of the freezer/sublimer weigh cell signal. However, the derivative of the digitized weight signal is noisy, preventing good control. In addition, a disturbance is introduced into the weight derivative signal because a refrigerant is circulated through a shell-and-tube heat exchanger inside the freezer/sublimer. The weight of the refrigerant is included in the weight measured by the weigh cell. If the circulation rate of the refrigerant is not steady state, a disturbance exists. Measurements of upstream pressure, vessel pressure, and output to the system control valve are available to the control system. Thus, if the flow through the control valve is characterized properly by these measurements, a Kalman filter can be used in conjunction with these auxiliary inputs and the weigh cell input to overcome the noise and disturbance problem and provide an improved estimate of flow rate. A discussion of the development of a Kalman filter that could be used for this application is given, and recommendations are given for its implementation.

  5. Dual wall reverse circulation drilling with multi-level groundwater sampling for groundwater contaminant plume delineation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.; Morti, E.E.; Zutman, J.L.; Pickering, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Dual wall reverse circulation (DWRC) drilling was used to drill 48 borings during a groundwater contaminant investigation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. This method was selected as an alternative to conventional hollow stem auger drilling for a number of reasons, including the expectation of minimizing waste, increasing the drilling rate, and reducing the potential for cross contamination of aquifers. Groundwater samples were collected from several water-bearing zones during drilling of each borehole. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds using a field gas chromatograph. This approach allowed the investigation to be directed using near-real-time data. Use of downhole geophysical logging, in conjunction with lithologic descriptions of borehole cuttings, resulted in excellent correlation of the geology in the vicinity of the contaminant plume. The total volume of cuttings generated using the DWRC drilling method was less than half of what would have been produced by hollow stem augering; however, the cuttings were recovered in slurry form and had to be dewatered prior to disposal. The drilling rate was very rapid, often approaching 10 ft/min; however, frequent breaks to perform groundwater sampling resulted in an average drilling rate of < 1 ft/min. The time required for groundwater sampling could be shortened by changing the sampling methodology. Analytical results indicated that the drilling method successfully isolated the various water bearing zones and no cross contamination resulted from the investigation.

  6. Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

  7. Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-08-01

    As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

  8. Optimal estimates of the diffusion coefficient of a single Brownian trajectory

    E-print Network

    Denis Boyer; David S. Dean; Carlos Mejía-Monasterio; Gleb Oshanin

    2012-03-22

    Modern developments in microscopy and image processing are revolutionizing areas of physics, chemistry and biology as nanoscale objects can be tracked with unprecedented accuracy. The goal of single particle tracking is to determine the interaction between the particle and its environment. The price paid for having a direct visualization of a single particle is a consequent lack of statistics. Here we address the optimal way of extracting diffusion constants from single trajectories for pure Brownian motion. It is shown that the maximum likelihood estimator is much more efficient than the commonly used least squares estimate. Furthermore we investigate the effect of disorder on the distribution of estimated diffusion constants and show that it increases the probability of observing estimates much smaller than the true (average) value.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion coefficients and structural properties of some alkylbenzenes in supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinyang; Zhong, Haimin; Feng, Huajie; Qiu, Wenda; Chen, Liuping

    2014-03-01

    The binary infinite dilute diffusion coefficients, D_{12}^infty, of some alkylbenzenes (Ph-Cn, from Ph-H to Ph-C12) from 313 K to 333 K at 15 MPa in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD values agree well with the experimental ones, which indicate MD simulation technique is a powerful way to predict and obtain diffusion coefficients of solutes in supercritical fluids. Besides, the local structures of Ph-Cn/CO2 fluids are further investigated by calculating radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. It qualitatively convinces that the first solvation shell of Ph-Cn in scCO2 is significantly influenced by the structure of Ph-Cn solute. Meanwhile, the mean end-to-end distance, the mean radius of gyration and dihedral angle distribution are calculated to gain an insight into the structural properties of Ph-Cn in scCO2. The abnormal trends of radial distribution functions and coordination numbers can be reasonably explained in term of molecular flexibility. Moreover, the computed results of dihedral angle clarify that flexibility of long-chain Ph-Cn is the result of internal rotation of C-C single bond (?c-c) in alkyl chain. It is interesting that compared with n-alkane, because of the existence of benzene ring, the flexibility of alkyl chain in Ph-Cn with same carbon atom number is significantly reduced, as a result, the carbon chain dependence of diffusion behaviors for long-chain n-alkane (n ? 5) and long-chain Ph-Cn (n ? 4) in scCO2 are different.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion coefficients and structural properties of some alkylbenzenes in supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinyang; Zhong, Haimin; Qiu, Wenda; Chen, Liuping, E-mail: cesclp@mail.sysu.edu.cn [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)] [KLGHEI of Environment and Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Feng, Huajie [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China)] [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China)

    2014-03-14

    The binary infinite dilute diffusion coefficients, D{sub 12}{sup ?}, of some alkylbenzenes (Ph-C{sub n}, from Ph-H to Ph-C{sub 12}) from 313 K to 333 K at 15 MPa in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) have been studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The MD values agree well with the experimental ones, which indicate MD simulation technique is a powerful way to predict and obtain diffusion coefficients of solutes in supercritical fluids. Besides, the local structures of Ph-C{sub n}/CO{sub 2} fluids are further investigated by calculating radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. It qualitatively convinces that the first solvation shell of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2} is significantly influenced by the structure of Ph-C{sub n} solute. Meanwhile, the mean end-to-end distance, the mean radius of gyration and dihedral angle distribution are calculated to gain an insight into the structural properties of Ph-C{sub n} in scCO{sub 2}. The abnormal trends of radial distribution functions and coordination numbers can be reasonably explained in term of molecular flexibility. Moreover, the computed results of dihedral angle clarify that flexibility of long-chain Ph-C{sub n} is the result of internal rotation of C-C single bond (?{sub c-c}) in alkyl chain. It is interesting that compared with n-alkane, because of the existence of benzene ring, the flexibility of alkyl chain in Ph-C{sub n} with same carbon atom number is significantly reduced, as a result, the carbon chain dependence of diffusion behaviors for long-chain n-alkane (n ? 5) and long-chain Ph-C{sub n} (n ? 4) in scCO{sub 2} are different.

  11. Neutron scattering study on dynamics of water molecules in MCM-41. 2. Determination of translational diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shuichi; Sumiyama, Naoya; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Toshio; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2005-06-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra of water-filled MCM-41 samples (pore diameters: 21.4 and 28.4 Angstrom) were measured over the temperature range 238-298 K and the momentum transfer range 0.31-0.99 A(-1) to investigate the dynamics of confined water molecules. The spectra, which consist mainly of contributions from the translational diffusion of water molecules, were analyzed by using the Lorentzian and the stretched exponential functions. Comparison of the fits indicated that the latter analysis is more reliable than the former one. The fraction of immobile water molecules located in the vicinity of the pore walls, which give an elastic component, was found to be 0.044-0.061 in both pores. The stretch exponent beta was determined as 0.66-0.80. It was shown that the translational diffusion of water molecules in the pores is decelerated by confinement and that the deceleration becomes marked with a decrease in pore size. The ratios of the translational diffusion coefficient D(T) of confined water to that of bulk water at room temperature were within a range of 0.47-0.63. PMID:16852371

  12. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Tunariu, Nina; Orton, Matthew R; Padhani, Anwar R; Leach, Martin O; Koh, Dow-Mu

    2014-01-01

    We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI) using a Markov random field (MRF) model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV) and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC); and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3) mm2/s) after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3) mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test), whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284%) compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test). Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment. PMID:24710083

  13. Assessment of Treatment Response by Total Tumor Volume and Global Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Using Diffusion-Weighted MRI in Patients with Metastatic Bone Disease: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Blackledge, Matthew D.; Collins, David J.; Tunariu, Nina; Orton, Matthew R.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Leach, Martin O.; Koh, Dow-Mu

    2014-01-01

    We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI) using a Markov random field (MRF) model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV) and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC); and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change?=?+0.18, range?=??0.07 to +0.78×10?3 mm2/s) after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change?=??0.02, range?=??0.10 to +0.05×10?3 mm2/s, p?=?0.05, Mann-Whitney test), whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change?=?+26%, range?=?+3 to +284%) compared to responding patients (median change?=??50%, range?=??85 to +27%, p?=?0.02, Mann-Whitney test). Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment. PMID:24710083

  14. Quantitative relationship between the octanol/water partition coefficient and the diffusion limitation of the exchange between adipose and blood

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The goal of physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) is to predict drug kinetics from an understanding of the organ/blood exchange. The standard approach is to assume that the organ is "flow limited" which means that the venous blood leaving the organ equilibrates with the well-stirred tissue compartment. Although this assumption is valid for most solutes, it has been shown to be incorrect for several very highly fat soluble compounds which appear to be "diffusion limited". This paper describes the physical basis of this adipose diffusion limitation and its quantitative dependence on the blood/water (Kbld-wat) and octanol/water (Kow) partition coefficient. Methods Experimental measurements of the time dependent rat blood and adipose concentration following either intravenous or oral input were used to estimate the "apparent" adipose perfusion rate (FA) assuming that the tissue is flow limited. It is shown that the ratio of FA to the anatomic perfusion rate (F) provides a measure of the diffusion limitation. A quantitative relationship between this diffusion limitation and Kbld-wat and Kow is derived. This analysis was applied to previously published data, including the Oberg et. al. measurements of the rat plasma and adipose tissue concentration following an oral dose of a mixture of 13 different polychlorinated biphenyls. Results Solutes become diffusion limited at values of log Kow greater than about 5.6, with the adipose-blood exchange rate reduced by a factor of about 30 for a solute with a log Kow of 7.36. Quantitatively, a plot of FA/F versus Kow is well described assuming an adipose permeability-surface area product (PS) of 750/min. This PS corresponds to a 0.14 micron aqueous layer separating the well-stirred blood from the adipose lipid. This is approximately equal to the thickness of the rat adipose capillary endothelium. Conclusions These results can be used to quantitate the adipose-blood diffusion limitation as a function of Kow. This is especially important for the highly fat soluble persistent organic chemicals (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins) whose pharmacokinetics are primarily determined by the adipose-blood exchange kinetics. PMID:20055995

  15. Mg in plagioclase: Experimental calibration of a new geothermometer and diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faak, Kathrin; Chakraborty, Sumit; Coogan, Laurence A.

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-sensitive exchange of Mg between plagioclase (Pl) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) has been studied experimentally, accounting for different anorthite-contents in plagioclase (XAn) and various silica activities (aSiO2) in the system. The partitioning of Mg between plagioclase and clinopyroxene was determined over a temperature range of 1100-1200 °C, using plagioclase single crystals of different compositions (XAn = 0.5-0.8), surrounded by different clinopyroxene-bearing matrix powders to account for different silica activities from 0.55 to 1.0. The experimental design also allows the diffusivity (DMgPl) of Mg in plagioclase under these conditions to be determined. Both KMgPl/Cpx (defined as KMgPl/Cpx=CMgPl/CMgCpx) and DMgPl decrease with temperature and increase with aSiO2. Isothermal data for different XAn in plagioclase show a linear increase of ln KMgPl/Cpx with increasing XAn, but DMgPl appears to be insensitive to XAn. The partitioning data allow a new geothermometer to be calibrated, which may be widely applicable to terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks where plagioclase and clinopyroxene coexist: T[K]=(-9219+2034XAn)/(ln KMgPl/Cpx-1.6-ln aSiO2). Application of this geothermometer to experimental data from this study reproduces the experimental temperatures within ±20 °C. Diffusion of Mg in plagioclase is described by DMgPl[m s]=1.25×10-4[ms]·exp(-320,924[J mol]/(RT))·(.

  16. The Utility of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) Using Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Values in Discriminating Between Prostate Cancer and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    ?uczy?ska, El?bieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Domalik, Agnieszka; ?wierz, Anna; Kasperkiewicz, Hanna; Blecharz, Pawe?; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) using Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values in discriminating between patients with tumors and normal prostate tissue before the initial systematic core biopsy. The relationship between histological grade of prostate cancer and ADC values in the peripheral zone was also investigated. Material/Methods Our study included 62 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pelvis. The examinations were performed in T1-, T2-weighted, DWI and T1 after dynamic contrast administration sequences. In all patients there were abnormal foci within the peripheral zone determined in DWI/ADC. ADC values were compared with the Gleason score (GS) after core needle biopsy (CNB) in patients with low, medium and high stage tumors. Results Within the examined group of patients, ADC was statistically higher for normal tissue than for cancerous tissue (p=0.00). Mean ADC values for patients with low, intermediate and high GS were 0.85±0.03, 0.72±0.03, and 0.61±0.04, respectively. Conclusions DWI/ADC is useful in differentiating high-risk patients from those at low and intermediate risk, since there is a significant correlation between ADC values determined in patients included in three different groups according to their Gleason score. This information may be helpful in the assessment of prostate cancer aggressiveness. PMID:25484999

  17. A study of the relationship between gender/age and apparent diffusion coefficient values in spleen of healthy adults using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nazarlou, Ali Kiani; Abdolmohammadi, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) systems are very effective in detecting strokes, and they also have shown significant promise in the detection of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver. However, such systems have the disadvantages of poor reproducibility and noise, which can diminish the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) provided by the DWI process. The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the age and gender of healthy adults in terms of the ADC values of the spleen measured by DWI. Methods: Sixty-nine subjects selected for this study from people who were referred to the Tabesh Medical Imaging Center in Tabriz, Iran, in 2013. Each subject underwent echo-planar DWI for her or his ADC values of the spleen with b-values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm2, and the resulting ADC values were evaluated. Results: No significant differences were observed in ADC values of the spleen among the female and male participants or those from various ages (P>0.05). Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that the effect of age and gender on the spleen’s ADC values can be omitted from the spleen-diagnosis procedure. In other words, the spleen’s ADC values are not related to the age or the gender of healthy adults.

  18. Comparison of Dynamic and Liver-Specific Gadoxetic Acid Contrast-Enhanced MRI versus Apparent Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, John N.; Michaely, Henrik J.; Meyer, Mathias M.; Rustemeyer, Thassilo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Attenberger, Ulrike I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatic lesions often present diagnostic connundrums with conventional MR techniques. Hepatobiliary phase contrast-enhanced imaging with gadoxetic acid can aid in the characterization of such lesions. However, quantitative measures describing late-phase enhancement must be assessed relative to their accuracy of hepatic lesion classification. Purpose: To compare quantitative parameters in gadoxetic acid contrast-enhanced dynamic and hepatobiliary phase imaging versus apparent diffusion coefficients in hepatic lesion characterization. Material and Methods 57 patients with focal hepatic lesions on gadoxetic acid MR were included. Lesion enhancement at standard post-contrast time points and in the hepatobiliary phase (HB; 15 and 25 minutes post-contrast) was assessed via calculation of contrast (CR) and enhancement ratios (ER). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were also obtained. Values for these parameters were compared among lesions and ROC analyses performed. Results: HB enhancement was greatest with FNH and adenomas. HB ER parameters but not HB CR could distinguish HCC from benign entities (0.9 ER ROC AUC versus 0.5 CR ROC AUC). There was no statistically significant difference found between the 15 and 25 minutes HB time points in detection of any lesion (p>0.4). ADC values were statistically significantly higher with hemangiomas (p<0.05) without greater accuracy in lesion detection relative to HB phase parameters. Conclusion Hepatobiliary phase gadoxetic acid contrast-enhanced MR characterizes focal hepatic lesions more accurately than ADC and conventional dynamic post-contrast time point enhancement parameters. ER values are generally superior to CR. No discernible benefit of 25 minute versus 15 minute delayed imaging is demonstrated. PMID:23805174

  19. Region of interest demarcation for quantification of the apparent diffusion coefficient in breast lesions and its interobserver variability

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Luísa; Brandão, Sofia; Matos, Eduarda; Nunes, Rita Gouveia; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre; Loureiro, Joana; Ramos, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to compare two different methods of region of interest (ROI) demarcation and determine interobserver variability on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in breast lesions. METHODS Thirty-two patients with 39 lesions were evaluated with a 3.0 Tesla scanner using a diffusion-weighted sequence with several b-values. Two observers independently performed the ADC measurements using: 1) a small fixed area of 10 mm2 ROI within the area with highest restriction; 2) a large ROI so as to include the whole lesion. Differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon-rank test. Bland-Altman method and Spearman coefficient were applied for interobserver variability and correlation analysis. RESULTS ADC values measured using the two ROI demarcation methods were significantly different for both observers (P = 0.026; P = 0.033). There was no interobserver variability in ADC values using either method (large ROI, P = 0.21; small ROI, P = 0.64). ADC values of malignant lesions were significantly different between the two methods (P < 0.001). Variability in ADC was ?0.008×10?3 mm2/s for both methods. When using the same method, ADC values were significantly correlated between the observers (small ROI: r=0.990, P < 0.001; large ROI: r=0.985, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION The choice of ROI demarcation method influences ADC measurements. Small ROIs show less overlap in ADC values and higher ADC reproducibility, suggesting that this method may improve lesion discrimination. Interobserver variability was low for both methods. PMID:25698095

  20. 17beta-estradiol matrixpatch removal and reapplication in postmenopausal women: theoretical predictions with an oscillating diffusion coefficient model.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Uwe D; Saeger-Lorenz, Katrin

    2002-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic performance of a matrix system for transdermal beta-estradiol (E(2)) delivery after multiple consecutive dosing in postmenopausal women undergoing hormone replacement therapy was investigated. The E(2) plasma profiles determined during the third application in 16 postmenopausal women were compared with results obtained in a published clinical study using the same patch in 24 postmenopausal women without E(2) pretreatment; they were compared with a theoretical diffusion/pharmacokinetic model. A conventional theoretical model with constant model parameter (CPM) obtained from in vitro mass balance experiments in a Franz cell type set up described successfully the transdermal E(2) bioavailability parameter AUC(0-96h) (4341.9 +/- 1513.1; calculated 4250.8) and C(average) (45.0 +/- 13.2; calculated 41.2). Also, experimentally, there was no significant drop in E(2) plasma values after patch removal and reapplication; this was corroborated by calculations. Accumulation of E(2) did not occur when several patches were applied consecutively over a period of 3 weeks. Steady state was achieved following application of the first patch. However, the differences between recorded E(2) plasma profiles and theoretical results detected at specific measurement points cannot be explained by the CPM model. Experimentally obtained plasma profiles were always lower in the morning and higher in the evening than predicted on the basis of the model. Measurements of in vivo skin temperature in the postmenopausal women showed oscillating temperature profiles in the form of a cosinor function: The temperature mesor of untreated postmenopausal women was 34.8 degrees C with an acrophase at 17.0 o'clock (95% CI: 14.30-19.30) and an amplitude of +/- 0.4 degrees C (p = 0.1). During the application of the patch the average temperature next to a patch rose 0.3 degrees C, which was statistically significant (p = 0.1). In the skin under the application of the matrix patch a mesor temperature was detected as 35.6 degrees C with an amplitude of +/- 0.5 degrees C with an acrophase at 17.51 o'clock (95% CI: 14.30-21.00) (p = 0.05). The temperature period was 24 h for all measurements and the maximum temperature was observed at about 16.30 h, and a minimum at about 5.00 h. A linear dependency was detected in in vitro experiments between the log of E(2) permeability and the temperature for stripped skin, epidermis/dermis layer, as well as for the matrix. Modeling of E(2) plasma profiles with oscillating diffusion coefficients (ODM1) with a sine wave function results in this equation: D(1) = D(0x) + Da(x).sin(k.t). D(0x) is the diffusion coefficient determined at 35.6 degrees C, k is 1/24 h, D(a) is the diffusion coefficient of the temperature amplitude, h is hour, and x stands for the respective diffusion layer. It was shown that the experimental E(2) plasma profile variations are more pronounced than can simply be explained by skin temperature variations alone (ODM1 model). A simplex fit with an oscillating diffusion coefficient in the form of a sine wave function for the stratum corneum (ODM2 model) resulted in a temperature amplitude of 1.1 degrees C, about twice as high as was determined in the in vivo measurements (ODM2 model). Therefore, other circadian parameterlike blood flow might superimpose the temperature profile. The improvement in data analysis by incorporating oscillating diffusion coefficients (ODM1 and 2) over CPM was judged from a comparison of experimental data with the calculated plasma profiles with the AIC, Akaikes model selection criterion, which allows ranking between models because it is independent of the scaling of the data points. ODM1 and ODM2 improved the data analysis over CPM by allowing better calculation of experimental C(max), t(max), the time to reach to C(max), and the fluctuation, f. No difference between CPM, ODM1, or ODM2 was found for the bioavailability parameter C(average) and AUC(0-96h). PMID:11920768

  1. Differentiation between hemangiomas and hepatocellular carcinomas with the apparent diffusion coefficient calculated from turboFLASH MR images.

    PubMed

    Moteki, T; Ishizaka, H; Horikoshi, H; Matsumoto, M

    1995-01-01

    Serial turboFLASH (fast low-angle shot) images with and without diffusion-perfusion (DP) gradients were used for the evaluation of and differentiation between hemangiomas and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of the liver. Twenty-six patients with 27 hemangiomas, and 19 patients with 21 HCCs were studied. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images, serial turboFLASH images with and without DP gradients (b = 294.8 and 0 sec/mm2, respectively) were obtained, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated for all lesions. Hemangiomas were detected as well-defined areas of decreased signal intensity on turboFLASH images obtained with DP gradients; HCCs showed slight or no obvious decrease in signal intensity on serial turboFLASH images obtained with DP gradients compared with turboFLASH images obtained without DP gradients, while a considerable percentage (76.5%) of nodular HCCs showed an obvious decrease in signal intensity at the margins. Hemangiomas had large ADC values compared with HCCs. Both ADC and T2 values were significantly different between hemangiomas and HCCs (P < .01). However, there was no obvious correlation between ADC and T2 values for either hemangiomas or HCCs (r = .18 and .48, respectively). On the basis of these results, the calculated ADC should be helpful for distinguishing hemangiomas from HCCs, and the ADC values may be useful even when T2 values are not helpful for making the distinction. PMID:7766981

  2. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 1: Diffusion coefficients and timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Lyons, L. R.

    1994-01-01

    Protons that are convected into the inner magnetosphere in response to enhanced magnetic activity can resonate with ducted plasmaspheric hiss in the outer plasmasphere via an anomalous Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Plasmaspheric hiss is a right-hand-polarized electromagnetic emission that is observed to fill the plasmasphere on a routine basis. When plasmaspheric hiss is confined within field-aligned ducts or guided along density gradients, wave normal angles remain largely below 45 deg. This allows resonant interactions with ions at typical ring current and radiation belt energies to take place. Such field-aligned ducts have been observed both within the plasmasphere and in regions outside of the plasmasphere. Wave intensities are estimated using statistical information from studies of detached plasma regions. Diffusion coefficients are presented for a range of L shells and proton energies for a fixed wave distribution. Harmonic resonances in the range N = +/-100 are considered in order to include interactions between hiss at 100 Hz to 2 kHz frequencies, and protons in the energy range between approximately 10 keV and 1000 keV. Diffusion timescales are estimated to be of the order of tens of days and comparable to or shorter than lifetimes for Coulomb decay and charge exchange losses over most of the energy and spatial ranges of interest.

  3. Prognostic value of the primary lesion apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study of 541 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yun; Li, Wen-Fei; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Shen, Jing-Xian; Zhang, Fan; Peng, Hao; Liu, Qing; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic value of the primary lesion pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which is obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MR-DWI), remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thus, to investigate whether the pretreatment ADC value as measured from the primary site on MR-DWI is an independent prognostic factor in NPC, we retrospectively reviewed a cohort of 541 patients with histologically-proven stage I-IVB NPC. All patients underwent MRI using a 3-Tesla system (Trio Tim; Siemens, Erlangen Germany). To calculate ADC, the primary lesion was designated on the ADC map at the level of the largest tumor diameter to cover most of the lesion, avoiding cystic or necrotic components. Median and mean (±SD) pretreatment ADC were 0.713 and 0.716?±?0.079?×?10(-3)?mm(2)/s, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed high pretreatment ADC was a good prognostic factor for poor local relapse-free survival and disease-free survival. Furthermore, the area under the ROC curve for prediction of local failure significantly increased when pretreatment ADC was combined with T classification (P?=?0.004). Thus, pretreatment ADC might provide useful information for predicting outcome and selecting high-risk patients appropriate for more aggressive therapy. Further studies are warranted to investigate the biological basis of this observation. PMID:26184509

  4. Prognostic value of the primary lesion apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study of 541 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yun; Li, Wen-Fei; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Shen, Jing-Xian; Zhang, Fan; Peng, Hao; Liu, Qing; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic value of the primary lesion pretreatment apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which is obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MR-DWI), remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thus, to investigate whether the pretreatment ADC value as measured from the primary site on MR-DWI is an independent prognostic factor in NPC, we retrospectively reviewed a cohort of 541 patients with histologically-proven stage I-IVB NPC. All patients underwent MRI using a 3-Tesla system (Trio Tim; Siemens, Erlangen Germany). To calculate ADC, the primary lesion was designated on the ADC map at the level of the largest tumor diameter to cover most of the lesion, avoiding cystic or necrotic components. Median and mean (±SD) pretreatment ADC were 0.713 and 0.716?±?0.079?×?10?3?mm2/s, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed high pretreatment ADC was a good prognostic factor for poor local relapse-free survival and disease-free survival. Furthermore, the area under the ROC curve for prediction of local failure significantly increased when pretreatment ADC was combined with T classification (P?=?0.004). Thus, pretreatment ADC might provide useful information for predicting outcome and selecting high-risk patients appropriate for more aggressive therapy. Further studies are warranted to investigate the biological basis of this observation. PMID:26184509

  5. Correlation of minimum apparent diffusion coefficient with maximum standardized uptake on fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Er, Hale Çolako?lu; Erden, Ay?e; Özlem Küçük, N.; Geçim, Ethem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the correlation between minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) values obtained from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) obtained from positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-one patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma were included in this study. For preoperative staging, PET-CT and pelvic MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging were performed within one week (mean time interval, 3±1 day). For ADC measurements, the region of interest (ROI) was manually drawn along the border of each hyperintense tumor on b=1000 s/mm2 images. After repeating this procedure on each consecutive tumor-containing slice to cover the entire tumoral area, ROIs were copied to ADC maps. ADCmin was determined as the lowest ADC value among all ROIs in each tumor. For SUVmax measurements, whole-body images were assessed visually on transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images. ROIs were determined from the lesions observed on each slice, and SUVmax values were calculated automatically. The mean values of ADCmin and SUVmax were compared using Spearman’s test. RESULTS The mean ADCmin was 0.62±0.19×10?3 mm2/s (range, 0.368–1.227×10?3 mm2/s), the mean SUVmax was 20.07±9.3 (range, 4.3–49.5). A significant negative correlation was found between ADCmin and SUVmax (r=?0.347; P = 0.026). CONCLUSION There was a significant negative correlation between the ADCmin and SUVmax values in rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:24100063

  6. The Role of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Renal Masses by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Bozkurt, Ya?ar; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Kuday, Suzan; Gümü?, Hatice; Türkçü, Gül; Hattapo?lu, Salih; Bilici, Aslan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a widely-accepted diagnostic modality whose efficacy has been investigated by numerous past studies in the differentiation of malignant lesions from benign entities. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of renal lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: A total of 137 patients with renal lesions were included in this study. The median apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as well as the b 800 and b 1600 signal intensities of normal kidneys, solid components of mixed renal masses, and total cystic lesions were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences between the ADC values of lesions and normal renal parenchyma, and between the ADC values of benign and malignant renal lesions on DWIs at b values of 800 and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). There were significant differences between the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 2 cysts and the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 3 cysts on DWIs at b values of 800 s/mm2 (p<0.001) and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001). A cutoff value of 1.902 × 10?3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 800 s/mm2 provided 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity for differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. A cutoff value of 1.623 × 10?3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 1600 s/mm2 provided 79% sensitivity and 96% specificity (p<0.001) for the differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. Conclusion: Accurate assessment of renal masses is important for determining the necessity for surgical intervention. DWI provides additional value by differentiating benign from malignant renal tumors and can be added to routine kidney MRI protocols. PMID:26185715

  7. First-principles binary diffusion coefficients for H, H{sub 2}, and four normal alkanes + N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, Ahren W., E-mail: ajasper@sandia.gov; Kamarchik, Eugene [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    Collision integrals related to binary (dilute gas) diffusion are calculated classically for six species colliding with N{sub 2}. The most detailed calculations make no assumptions regarding the complexity of the potential energy surface, and the resulting classical collision integrals are in excellent agreement with previous semiclassical results for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} and with recent experimental results for C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} + N{sub 2}, n = 2–4. The detailed classical results are used to test the accuracy of three simplifying assumptions typically made when calculating collision integrals: (1) approximating the intermolecular potential as isotropic, (2) neglecting the internal structure of the colliders (i.e., neglecting inelasticity), and (3) employing unphysical R{sup ?12} repulsive interactions. The effect of anisotropy is found to be negligible for H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} (in agreement with previous quantum mechanical and semiclassical results for systems involving atomic and diatomic species) but is more significant for larger species at low temperatures. For example, the neglect of anisotropy decreases the diffusion coefficient for butane + N{sub 2} by 15% at 300 K. The neglect of inelasticity, in contrast, introduces only very small errors. Approximating the repulsive wall as an unphysical R{sup ?12} interaction is a significant source of error at all temperatures for the weakly interacting systems H + N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} + N{sub 2}, with errors as large as 40%. For the normal alkanes in N{sub 2}, which feature stronger interactions, the 12/6 Lennard–Jones approximation is found to be accurate, particularly at temperatures above ?700 K where it predicts the full-dimensional result to within 5% (although with somewhat different temperature dependence). Overall, the typical practical approach of assuming isotropic 12/6 Lennard–Jones interactions is confirmed to be suitable for combustion applications except for weakly interacting systems, such as H + N{sub 2}. For these systems, anisotropy and inelasticity can safely be neglected but a more detailed description of the repulsive wall is required for quantitative predictions. A straightforward approach for calculating effective isotropic potentials with realistic repulsive walls is described. An analytic expression for the calculated diffusion coefficient for H + N{sub 2} is presented and is estimated to have a 2-sigma error bar of only 0.7%.

  8. Calculation of the fractional interstitial component of boron diffusion and segregation coefficient of boron in Si0.8Ge0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tilden T.; Fang, Wingra T. C.; Griffin, Peter B.; Plummer, James D.

    1996-02-01

    Investigation of boron diffusion in strained silicon germanium buried layers reveals a fractional interstitial component of boron diffusion (fBI) in Se0.8Ge0.2 approximately equal to the fBI value in silicon. In conjunction with computer-simulated boron profiles, the results yield an absolute lower-bound of fBI in Si0.8Ge0.2 of ˜0.8. In addition, the experimental methodology provides a unique vehicle for measuring the segregation coefficient; oxidation-enhanced diffusion is used instead of an extended, inert anneal to rapidly diffuse the dopant to equilibrium levels across the interface, allowing the segregation coefficient to be measured more quickly.

  9. Binary diffusion coefficients for 2,3-dimethylaniline, 2,6-dimethylaniline, 2-methylanisole, 4-methylanisole and 3-nitrotoluene in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Consuelo Pizarro; Octavio Suárez-Iglesias; Ignacio Medina; Julio L. Bueno

    2009-01-01

    The measurement and correlation of the experimental binary diffusion coefficients of 2,3-dimethylaniline, 2,6-dimethylaniline, 2-methylanisole, 4-methylanisole and 3-nitrotoluene in supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Results were obtained using the Taylor-Aris dispersion technique, at 313, 323, and 333K, and in a pressure range from 15.0 to 35.0MPa. The diffusivity experimental data were correlated with temperature, pressure and carbon dioxide density and viscosity.

  10. Experimental determination of HONO mass accommodation coefficients using two different techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bongartz; J. Kames; U. Schurath; Ch. George; Ph. Mirabel; J. L. Ponche

    1994-01-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient aHONO of gaseous nitrous acid on water surfaces has been determined in a cooperation between the Universities of Strasbourg and Bonn. The droplet train technique (Strasbourg) yielded 0.04HONOHONO<0.15 for a surface temperature of 297 K. The uncertainty ranges allow for experimental scatter and estimated uncertainties in diffusion coefficients. The same HONO source and analytical equipment were

  11. Using the apparent diffusion coefficient to identifying MGMT promoter methylation status early in glioblastoma: importance of analytical method

    PubMed Central

    Rundle-Thiele, Dayle; Day, Bryan; Stringer, Brett; Fay, Michael; Martin, Jennifer; Jeffree, Rosalind L; Thomas, Paul; Bell, Christopher; Salvado, Olivier; Gal, Yaniv; Coulthard, Alan; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate knowledge of O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter subtype in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) is important for treatment. However, this test is not always available. Pre-operative diffusion MRI (dMRI) can be used to probe tumour biology using the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC); however, its ability to act as a surrogate to predict MGMT status has shown mixed results. We investigated whether this was due to variations in the method used to analyse ADC. Methods We undertook a retrospective study of 32 patients with GBM who had MGMT status measured. Matching pre-operative MRI data were used to calculate the ADC within contrast enhancing regions of tumour. The relationship between ADC and MGMT was examined using two published ADC methods. Results A strong trend between a measure of ‘minimum ADC’ and methylation status was seen. An elevated minimum ADC was more likely in the methylated compared to the unmethylated MGMT group (U = 56, P = 0.0561). In contrast, utilising a two-mixture model histogram approach, a significant reduction in mean measure of the ‘low ADC’ component within the histogram was associated with an MGMT promoter methylation subtype (P < 0.0246). Conclusion This study shows that within the same patient cohort, the method selected to analyse ADC measures has a significant bearing on the use of that metric as a surrogate marker of MGMT status. Thus for dMRI data to be clinically useful, consistent methods of data analysis need to be established prior to establishing any relationship with genetic or epigenetic profiling.

  12. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient within enhancing and nonenhancing tumor volumes in recurrent glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rifaquat; Hamdan, Alhafidz; Zweifler, Rebecca; Jiang, Han; Norden, Andrew D; Reardon, David A; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Wen, Patrick Y; Huang, Raymond Y

    2014-08-01

    While patients with recurrent glioblastoma receiving anti-angiogenic therapy demonstrate significant response rates, the benefit on patient survival is less clear. We assessed whether histogram analysis of diffusion weighted MRI can stratify for progression-free and overall survival. Baseline and 3-6 week post-treatment MRI exams of 91 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab were retrospectively evaluated. Histograms of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) within the volume of contrast enhancing and nonenhancing T2/FLAIR lesions were analyzed using curve-fit analysis. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed using ADC parameters in a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for clinical variables. Baseline ADC(L)/ADC(M) within nonenhancing T2/FLAIR volume (> or ?0.64) can stratify OS (HR = 2.24, p = 0.002) and PFS (HR = 1.90, p = 0.005). %ADC(H) within enhancing T1+C volume (> or ?25 %) can also stratify OS (HR = 0.59, p = 0.034) and PFS (HR = 0.56, p = 0.01). Stratification of patient survival can be improved by merging these two ADC parameters into a single combined ADC factor (HR = 0.17, p < 0.0001). The median OS ratio of patient groups stratified by this combined factor was 2.03, larger than median OS ratio when stratifying by either %ADC(H) within T1+C volume alone (1.3) or ADC(L)/ADC(M) within T2/FLAIR alone (1.86). ADC histogram analysis within both enhancing and nonenhancing components of tumor can be used to stratify for PFS and OS in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. PMID:24805151

  13. Fissible Deposit Characterization at the Former Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant by {sup 252}CF-Source-Driven Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, T.F.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.; Wyatt, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    The Deposit Removal Project was undertaken with the support of the U. S. Department of Energy at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The project team performed the safe removal of the hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits from the K-29 Building of the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The deposits had developed as a result of air leakage into UF{sub 6} gas process pipes; UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} became hydrated by moisture from the air and deposited inside the pipes. The mass, its distribution, and the hydrogen content [that is, the ratio of H to U (H/U)], were the key parameters that controlled the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Earlier gamma-ray spectrometry measurements in K-29 had identified the largest deposits in the building. The first and third largest deposits in the building were measured in this program. The first deposit, found in the Unit 2, Cell 7, B-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Hockey Stick'') was about 1,300 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.34 wt% {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-}50% uncertainty) and according to the gamma-ray spectroscopy was uniformly distributed. The second deposit (the third-largest deposit in the building), found in the Unit 2, Cell 6, A-Line Outlet process pipe (called the ''Tee-Pipe''), had a uranium deposit estimated to be about 240 kg ({+-} 50% uncertainty) at 3.4 wt % {sup 235}U enrichment ({+-} 20% uncertainty). Before deposit removal activities began, the Deposit Removal Project team needed to survey the inside of the pipes intrusively to assess the nuclear criticality safety of the deposits. Therefore, the spatial distribution of the deposits, the total uranium deposit mass, and the moderation level resulting from hydration of the deposits, all of which affect nuclear criticality safety were required. To perform the task safely and effectively, the Deposit Removal Project team requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) characterize the two largest deposits with the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven transmission (CFSDT) technique, an active neutron interrogation method developed for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to identify nuclear weapons components in containers. The active CFSDT measurement technique uses CFSDT time-of-flight measurements of prompt neutrons and gamma rays from an externally introduced {sup 252}Cf source.

  14. Chromatographic impulse response technique with curve fitting to measure binary diffusion coefficients and retention factors using polymer-coated capillary columns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang Yi Kong; Toshitaka Funazukuri; Seiichiro Kagei

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical basis of a Gaussian-like approximate solution was applied to a chromatographic impulse response technique with curve fitting for measuring binary diffusion coefficients and retention factors using a polymer-coated capillary column. The formulae were derived for evaluating both the accuracy of the approximate solution and the sensitivity of the parameters. The validity of the solution also was confirmed experimentally

  15. Experimental binary diffusion coefficients of benzene and derivatives in supercritical carbon dioxide and their comparison with the values from the classic correlations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Bueno; J. J. Suárez; I. Medina

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data for diffusion coefficients obtained by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) according to the Taylor–Aris dispersion method are compared with results from predictive equations for dense fluids. The goodness of fit and the bias of the correlation only suggest a slight empirical correction in these equations not specifically formulated for supercritical fluids (SCFs) and justify a persevering effort in experimentation

  16. Diffusion and partition coefficients of minor and trace elements in San Carlos olivine at 1,300°C with some geochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandler, Carl; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2009-11-01

    Lattice diffusion coefficients have been determined for 19 elements (Li, Be, Na, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, Zr, Eu, Gd, Lu and Hf) in a single crystal of San Carlos olivine as a function of crystallographic orientation, at 1,300°C, 1 bar and fO2 = 10-8.3 bars, by equilibration with a synthetic silicate melt. Results for Li, Na, V, Cr, Fe and Zn are from diffusion of these elements out of the olivine, starting from their indigenous concentrations; those for all other elements are from diffusion into the olivine, from the silicate melt reservoir. Our 25-day experiment produced diffusion profiles 50 to > 700 ?m in length, which are sufficiently long that precise analyses could be achieved by scanning laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, even at concentration levels well below 1 ?g g-1. For the divalent cations Ca, Mn, Fe and Ni, profiles were also obtained by electron microprobe analysis. The results of the two methods agree well with each other, and are consistent with divalent cation diffusion coefficients previously determined using different experimental methodologies. Olivine/melt partition coefficients retrieved from the data are also consistent with other published partitioning data, indicating that element incorporation and transport in olivine in our experiment occurred via mechanisms appropriate to natural conditions. Most of the examined trace elements diffuse through olivine at similar rates to the major octahedral cations Fe and Mg, showing that cation charge and radius have little direct influence on diffusion rates. Aluminium and P remain low and constant in the olivine, implying negligible transport at our analytical scale, hence Al and P diffusion rates that are at least two orders of magnitude slower than the other cations studied here. All determined element diffusivities are anisotropic, with diffusion fastest along the [001] axis, except Y and the REEs, which diffuse isotropically. The results suggest that element diffusivity in olivine is largely controlled by cation site preference, charge balance mechanisms and point-defect concentrations. Elements that are present on multiple cation sites in olivine (e.g. Be and Ti) and trivalent elements that are charge-balanced by octahedral site vacancies tend to diffuse at relatively fast rates.

  17. Use of LARS system for the quantitative determination of smoke plume lateral diffusion coefficients from ERTS images of Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blais, R. N.; Copeland, G. E.; Lerner, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for measuring smoke plume of large industrial sources observed by satellite using LARSYS is proposed. A Gaussian plume model is described, integrated in the vertical, and inverted to yield a form for the lateral diffusion coefficient, Ky. Given u, wind speed; y sub l, the horizontal distance of a line of constant brightness from the plume symmetry axis a distance x sub l, downstream from reference point at x=x sub 2, y=0, then K sub y = u ((y sub 1) to the 2nd power)/2 x sub 1 1n (x sub 2/x sub 1). The technique is applied to a plume from a power plant at Chester, Virginia, imaged August 31, 1973 by LANDSAT I. The plume bends slightly to the left 4.3 km from the source and estimates yield Ky of 28 sq m/sec near the source, and 19 sq m/sec beyond the bend. Maximum ground concentrations are estimated between 32 and 64 ug/cu m. Existing meteorological data would not explain such concentrations.

  18. Differentiation between Primary Cerebral Lymphoma and Glioblastoma Using the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient: Comparison of Three Different ROI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Jun; Shin, Hyun Joo; Chang, Jong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) can help differentiate between central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and Glioblastoma (GBM). However, overlap between ADCs for GBM and lymphoma have been reported because of various region of interest (ROI) methods. Our aim is to explore ROI method to provide the most reproducible results for differentiation. Materials and Methods We studied 25 CNS lymphomas and 62 GBMs with three ROI methods: (1) ROI1, whole tumor volume; (2) ROI2, multiple ROIs; and (3) ROI3, a single ROI. Interobserver variability of two readers for each method was analyzed by intraclass correlation(ICC). ADCs were compared between GBM and lymphoma, using two-sample t-test. The discriminative ability was determined by ROC analysis. Results ADCs from ROI1 showed most reproducible results (ICC >0.9). For ROI1, ADCmean for lymphoma showed significantly lower values than GBM (p?=?0.03). The optimal cut-off value was 0.98×10?3 mm2/s with 85% sensitivity and 90% specificity. For ROI2, ADCmin for lymphoma was significantly lower than GBM (p?=?0.02). The cut-off value was 0.69×10?3 mm2/s with 87% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Conclusion ADC values were significantly dependent on ROI method. ADCs from the whole tumor volume had the most reproducible results. ADCmean from the whole tumor volume may aid in differentiating between lymphoma and GBM. However, multi-modal imaging approaches are recommended than ADC alone for differentiation. PMID:25393543

  19. Quantifying the rate of biofilm growth of S. meliloti strains in microfluidics via the diffusion coefficient of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorian, Matthew; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the rate of biofilm growth is essential for studying genes and preventing unwanted biofilms. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) of polystyrene microspheres was used to quantify biofilm growth rates of Sinorhizobia meliloti, a nitrogen fixing bacteria that forms a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa plants. Five strains were studied, two wild types (8530 expR+ and 1021) and three mutants in the exopolysaccharide (EPS I, EPS II) synthesis (8530 exoY , 9034 expG , and 9030-2 expA 1); 1021 and 9030-2 expA 1 are known to be unable to form biofilms. Each strain was inserted into a microfluidic channel with the microspheres. As the cultures grew, the spheres' D values were obtained every 24 hours for 4 days using fluorescence microscopy. Although the D values for 9030-2 expA 1 were inconclusive, 8530 expR+ , 8530 exoY , and 9034 expG showed significant decreases in D between 3 days of growth (| z | > 2 . 25 , p < 0 . 025). The data also indicated that 8530 expR+ and 8530 exoY grew at similar rates. There was no significant change in D for 1021 (?2(2) = 5 . 76 , p > 0 . 05), which shows the lack of a structured biofilm community. Thus, D can be used as an indicator of the presence of a biofilm and its development.

  20. Quantitative Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Measurements Obtained by 3-Tesla MRI Are Correlated with Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer Proliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sevcenco, Sabina; Haitel, Andrea; Ponhold, Lothar; Susani, Martin; Fajkovic, Harun; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Hiess, Manuela; Spick, Claudio; Szarvas, Tibor; Baltzer, Pascal A. T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values and cell cycle and proliferative biomarkers (p53, p21, Ki67,) in order to establish its potential role as a noninvasive biomarker for prediction of cell cycle, proliferative activity and biological aggressiveness in bladder cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with bladder cancer who underwent 3,0 Tesla DW-MRI of the bladder before TUR-B or radical cystectomy were eligible for this prospective IRB-approved study. Histological specimen were immunohistochemically stained for the following markers: p53, p21 and ki67. Two board-certified uropathologists reviewed the specimens blinded to DW-MRI results. Histological grade and T-stage were classified according to the WHO 2004 and the 2009 TNM classification, respectively. Nonparametric univariate and multivariate statistics including correlation, logistic regression and ROC analysis were applied. Results Muscle invasive bladder cancer was histologically confirmed in 10 out of 41 patients. All examined tissue biomarkers were significantly correlated with ADC values (p<0.05, respectively). Based on multivariate analysis, p53 and ADC are both independent prognostic factors for muscle invasiveness of bladder cancer (>/?=?T2). (p?=?0.013 and p?=?0.018). Conclusion ADC values are associated with cell cycle and proliferative biomarkers and do thereby reflect invasive and proliferative potential in bladder cancer. ADC and p53 are both independent prognostic factors for muscle invasiveness in bladder cancer. PMID:25202965

  1. Diffusion coefficients for Tl, Pb, Cd, In, Zn, Bi, As, Mo and Sb in hydrous rhyolite at 100-200 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, Kim; Brooker, Richard; Wilke, Max

    2014-05-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to determine the diffusivities of Tl, Pb, Cd, In, Zn, Bi, As, Mo and Sb in hydrous rhyolitic melt. Diffusion experiments used two adjoining glass cylinder of the same hydrous composition, one doped with the elements of interest at ~ 100 ppm. These couples were rapidly heated to 850, 1000 and 1150°C at 100-200 MPa for a few hours. After quenching the sectioned charges were analyzed by both synchrotron XRF (The Diamond Light Source) and LA-ICP-MS (University of Oxford). The data shows excellent correlation between these two techniques. The diffusion profiles were fitted to a 1-D diffusion couple equation to determine the diffusivities and fitting to the different temperature runs defined the Arrhenius parameters. We find that for 850°C the diffusion coefficients follow the trend Tl>Pb>Cd>Zn>In>Bi>As>Sb>Mo. Additional experiments were performed with either S or Cl added (to both sides of the diffusion couple). In general S increases the diffusion rate of all metals except Mo and Sb, which diffuse slower in the presence of S. Chlorine also speeds up the diffusion of metals with the exception of In, Mo and Sb. The systematic change in diffusivities of these metals and their different behaviour in the presence of the ligands that are also observed to be significant in volcanic gases, are important in determining the distribution of these metals during degassing (e.g. MacKenzie and Canil, 2008). This is particularly important in a dynamic environment such as a volcanic conduit. There are also implications for economic exploration and well as hazard mitigation.

  2. Pre-Treatment Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging for Predicting Tumor Recurrence in Uterine Cervical Cancer Treated with Concurrent Chemoradiation: Value of Histogram Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Lim, Hyo Soon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Woo Dae; Kim, Seok Mo; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis for predicting tumor recurrence in patients with uterine cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Our institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent from each patient. Forty-two patients (mean age, 56 ± 14 years) with biopsy-proven uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma who underwent both pre-treatment pelvic magnetic resonance imaging with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance scanner and concurrent CRT were included. All patients were followed-up for more than 6 months (mean, 36.4 ± 11.9 months; range 9.0-52.8 months) after completion of CRT. Baseline ADC parameters (mean ADC, 25th percentile, 50th percentile, and 75th percentile ADC values) of tumors were calculated and compared between the recurrence and no recurrence groups. Results In the recurrence group, the mean ADC and 75th percentile ADC values of tumors were significantly higher than those of the no recurrence group (p = 0.043 and p = 0.008, respectively). In multivariate analysis, the 75th percentile ADC value of tumors was a significant predictor for tumor recurrence (p = 0.009; hazard ratio, 1.319). When the cut-off value of the 75th percentile ADC (0.936 × 10-3 mm2/sec) was used, the overall recurrence free survival rate above the cut-off value was significantly lower than that below the cut-off value (51.9% vs. 91.7%, p = 0.003, log-rank test). Conclusion Pre-CRT ADC histogram analysis may serve as a biomarker for predicting tumor recurrence in patients with uterine cervical cancer treated with CRT. PMID:23901319

  3. Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

  4. A new optical coefficient of biological tissue that determines the diffuse reflectance light distribution on the tissue surface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lianshun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    When a light beam is incident normally upon a tissue, the spatial distribution of diffuse reflectance on the tissue surface is affected by the optical properties of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to find the relationship between the spatial distribution of diffuse reflectance on the tissue surface and optical properties of the tissue. The diffuse reflected light

  5. Characterisation of DSSC-electrolytes based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide: Measurement of triiodide diffusion coefficient, viscosity, and photovoltaic performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philipp Wachter; Markus Zistler; Christian Schreiner; Marko Berginc; Urša Opara Krašovec; Dirk Gerhard; Peter Wasserscheid; Andreas Hinsch; Heiner J. Gores

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive characterisation of an ionic liquid based electrolyte for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) was performed by determination of triiodide diffusion coefficients, viscosities and photovoltaic performances. The electrolyte, consisting of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide, 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII), and iodine, was examined at varying ionic liquid molar ratio and fixed iodine concentration, as well as at fixed ionic liquid molar ratio and varying

  6. The evaluation of surface diffusion coefficients of gold and platinum atoms at electrochemical interfaces from combined STM-SEM imaging and electrochemical techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Alonso; R. C. Salvarezza; J. M. Vara; A. J. Arvia; L. Vazquez; A. Bartolome; A. M. Baro

    1990-01-01

    A simple method is presented for measuring the surface diffusion coefficients of Au and Pt atoms at electrodispersed electrodes of the same metals in contact with 0.5{ital M} HâSOâ. The technique is based upon the time dependence of the surface roughness factor of electrodispersed metal overlayers. The method requires a model for the surface roughness of the metal structure. The

  7. Binary diffusion coefficient, partition ratio, and partial molar volume for docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and ?-linolenic acid at infinite dilution in supercritical carbon dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshitaka Funazukuri; Chang Yi Kong; Seiichiro Kagei

    2003-01-01

    A tracer response technique with a poly(ethylene glycol) coated capillary column was employed to measure binary diffusion coefficient and partition ratio for the ?3 group of long chain unsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and ?-linolenic acid at infinite dilution in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide at temperatures from 308.15 to 343.15K and pressures from 9 to 30MPa.

  8. Binary Diffusion Coefficients of Acetone in Carbon Dioxide at 308.2 and 313.2 K in the Pressure Range from 7.9 to 40 MPa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Funazukuri; C. Y. Kong; S. Kagei

    2000-01-01

    Binary diffusion coefficients of acetone in carbon dioxide were measured by the Taylor dispersion method at 308.2 K and 7.9 to 40 MPa and at 313.2 K and 8.0 to 37 MPa. The D12 values obtained from the response curves by the method of fitting in the time domain were more accurate than those obtained by the moment method. At

  9. Estimation of the diffusion coefficient of a model food dye (malvidin 3,5-diglucoside) in a high pressure CO 2+methanol system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Mantell; M. Rodr??guez; E. Mart??nez de la Ossa

    2004-01-01

    Experimental data for the diffusion coefficient of malvidin 3,5-diglucoside in carbon dioxide and methanol as cosolvent at high pressure are compared with the values estimated by predictive equations. Those equations studied are based on the Stokes–Einstein theory and the rough-hard-sphere theory. The values predicted using these equations are, in general, higher than experimental values and these differences become more marked

  10. Effect of sorption intensities on dispersivity and macro-dispersion coefficient in a single fracture with matrix diffusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Suresh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Matrix diffusion and sorption are among the key processes impacting the efficiency of natural attenuation in the subsurface.\\u000a While these processes have been studied extensively in fractured media, limited information exists on the sorption nonlinearity.\\u000a To address this shortfall, a numerical model has been developed that couples matrix diffusion and nonlinear sorption at the\\u000a scale of a single fracture using

  11. Contribution to the benchmark for ternary mixtures: Measurement of diffusion and Soret coefficients of ternary system tetrahydronaphtalene-isobutylbenzene-n-dodecane with mass fractions 80-10-10 at 25 °C.

    PubMed

    Galand, Quentin; Van Vaerenbergh, Stéfan

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides the molecular diffusion and Soret coefficients of the ternary system 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphtalene, isobutylbenzene, n -dodecane system at mass fractions 0.8-0.1-0.1 and temperature 25 (°)C for implementation into the benchmark presented in this topical issue. The Soret coefficients are determined by digital interferometry using the data of DSC-DCMIX microgravity experiment. The method used takes into account the influence of the thermal field on the Soret separations and the selection of the image processing techniques results in reproducible Soret coefficients.The diffusion coefficients are obtained by the Open Ended Capillary technique The fitting of the data collected through a set of two complementary experimental runs allows retrieving the four Fickian diffusion coefficients. PMID:25916231

  12. Determination of Binary Diffusion Coefficients of Benzene, Phenol, Naphthalene and Caffeine in Supercritical CO2 between 308 and 933 K in the Pressure Range 90 to 160 gar with Supercritical Fluid Chromatography (SFC)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhard Feist; Gerhard M. Schneider

    1982-01-01

    Binary diffusion coefficients D12 have been determined for benzene, phenol, naphthalene and caffeine in supercritical CO2 at 40°C between 80 and 160 bar using the chrpmatographic peak-broadening method (CPB). The observed diffusion coefficients are of the order of 10 cm\\/s and decrease by about 50% for a pressure rise from 80 to 160 bar. For naphthalene in CO2 the effect

  13. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments under conditions of uniform disk illumination. Critical comparison of analytical solutions, and a new mathematical method for calculation of diffusion coefficient D.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A; Dupou, L; Altibelli, A; Trotard, J; Tocanne, J F

    1988-01-01

    A simple fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) apparatus using a fluorescence microscope with a conventional mercury arc lamp, working under conditions of "uniform disk illumination" is described. This set-up was designed essentially for the use of anthracene as fluorescent probe, which is bleached (photodimerization reaction) by illumination in the near ultraviolet range (360 nm). It is shown that the lateral diffusion coefficients D can be readily calculated from fluorescence recovery curves using a finite differentiate method in combination with statistical analysis of the data. In contrast to the analytical solutions so far described, this numerical approach is particularly versatile. With a minimization algorithm, D and the probe mobile fraction can be readily calculated for any recovery time under various experimental conditions. These include different probe concentration profiles in the illuminated area after the bleaching step, and situations of infinite or noninfinite reservoir in the diffusion area outside the illuminated area. PMID:3395663

  14. Prediction of self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of water and its binary mixtures with methanol and ethanol by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2011-02-21

    Density, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity of pure liquid water are predicted for temperatures between 280 and 373 K by molecular dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo method. Four different rigid nonpolarizable water models are assessed: SPC, SPC/E, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005. The pressure dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity for pure liquid water is also calculated and the anomalous behavior of these properties is qualitatively well predicted. Furthermore, transport properties as well as excess volume and excess enthalpy of aqueous binary mixtures containing methanol or ethanol, based on the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 water models, are calculated. Under the tested conditions, the TIP4P/2005 model gives the best quantitative and qualitative agreement with experiments for the regarded transport properties. The deviations from experimental data are of 5% to 15% for pure liquid water and 5% to 20% for the water + alcohol mixtures. Moreover, the center of mass power spectrum of water as well as the investigated mixtures are analyzed and the hydrogen-bonding structure is discussed for different states. PMID:21341860

  15. Prediction of self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of water and its binary mixtures with methanol and ethanol by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Carrion, Gabriela; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2011-02-01

    Density, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity of pure liquid water are predicted for temperatures between 280 and 373 K by molecular dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo method. Four different rigid nonpolarizable water models are assessed: SPC, SPC/E, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005. The pressure dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity for pure liquid water is also calculated and the anomalous behavior of these properties is qualitatively well predicted. Furthermore, transport properties as well as excess volume and excess enthalpy of aqueous binary mixtures containing methanol or ethanol, based on the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 water models, are calculated. Under the tested conditions, the TIP4P/2005 model gives the best quantitative and qualitative agreement with experiments for the regarded transport properties. The deviations from experimental data are of 5% to 15% for pure liquid water and 5% to 20% for the water + alcohol mixtures. Moreover, the center of mass power spectrum of water as well as the investigated mixtures are analyzed and the hydrogen-bonding structure is discussed for different states.

  16. Retardation factors and the dispersion-diffusion coefficients of Zn, Cd, Cu, and Pb in soils from Vicosa-MG, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, A.T.; Costa, L.M.; Fontes, M.P.F.; Martinez, M.A.

    1999-08-01

    A mixed solution, composed by 700 {micro}/g/mL of Zn, 20 {micro}g/mL of Cd, 200 {micro}g/mL of Cu, and 300 {micro}g/mL of Pb, was used to obtain the Breakthrough Curves (BTCs) of the displacement of these metals in soil columns under steady-state water flow conditions. These BTCs were used to determine the retardation factors and the coefficient of dispersion-diffusion of those metals in horizons, A, B, and C of two Ultisols and one Oxisol from Brazil. The BTCs of non-limed and limed soils had a sigmoid behavior in the soil materials studied, and the retardation factors presented the following sequence: Zn < Cd < Cu < Pb. Liming caused an increase in the retardation factor of all the metals, although the most sensitive effects were observed for Cu and Pb. The non-limed A horizon of the Oxisol had calculated values of dispersion-diffusion coefficients higher than 301.984 x 10{sup {minus}4} m{sup 2}/h for all studied metals. The solution of the transport of sorbed solutes equation, assuming a purely dispersive system, was adequate for simulation of mobility of metals in limed and non-limed soil studied.

  17. A General Circulation Model for Gaseous Exoplanets with Double-Gray Radiative Transfer

    E-print Network

    Rauscher, Emily

    2011-01-01

    We present a new version of our code for modeling the atmospheric circulation on gaseous exoplanets, now employing a "double-gray" radiative transfer scheme, which self-consistently solves for fluxes and heating throughout the atmosphere, including the emerging (observable) infrared flux. We separate the radiation into infrared and optical components, each with its own absorption coefficient, and solve standard two-stream radiative transfer equations. We use a constant optical absorption coefficient, while the infrared coefficient can scale as a powerlaw with pressure. Here we describe our new code in detail and demonstrate its utility by presenting a generic hot Jupiter model. We discuss issues related to modeling the deepest pressures of the atmosphere and describe our use of the diffusion approximation for radiative fluxes at high optical depths. In addition, we present new models using a simple form for magnetic drag on the atmosphere. We calculate emitted thermal phase curves and find that our drag-free ...

  18. Macropore diffusion dusty-gas coefficient for pelletised zeolites from breakthrough experiments in the O 2 \\/ N 2 system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Todd; Paul A. Webley

    2005-01-01

    Simulation of air separation in zeolites requires an accurate mass transfer model particularly under rapid cycling conditions. An earlier study [Todd et al., 2005. Adsorption 11, 427–432] examined the application of the dusty gas model to the simulation of the adsorption of O2\\/N2 system in lithium-exchanged low silica-to-alumina ratio x-type zeolite (LiLSX) pellets. In that study we characterised Knudsen diffusion

  19. End-to-end diffusion coefficients and distance distributions from fluorescence energy transfer measurements: enhanced resolution by using multiple donors with different lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Kusba, Jozef

    1994-08-01

    We describe a method to improve the resolution of donor-to- acceptor distance distributions in molecules which are flexing on the timescale of the fluorescence lifetime. We measured the time- dependent donor decays of two donor (D)-acceptor (A) pairs, where the donor lifetimes were substantially different. The donors were an indole residue (5.7 ns) and a naphthalene residue (24.4 ns). The same dansyl acceptor was used for both D-A pairs. The donor decays are complex due to both a distribution of D-A distances and D-A diffusion. Using the donor decay data for each D-A pair alone, it is difficult to resolve both the distance distribution and the D-to-A diffusion coefficient. However, these values are unambiguously recovered from global analysis of the data from both D-A pairs. Simulations were also used to demonstrate the increased reduction of global analysis with different lifetime donors to obtain distance distribution parameters in the presence of D-A diffusion.

  20. Development of a semiclassical method to compute mobility and diffusion coefficient of a Brownian particle in a nonequilibrium environment.

    PubMed

    Shit, Anindita; Ghosh, Pradipta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2011-03-01

    We explore the issue of a quantum-noise-induced directed transport of an overdamped Brownian particle that is allowed to move in a spatially periodic potential. The established system-reservoir model has been employed here to study the quantum-noise-induced transport of a Brownian particle in a periodic potential, where the reservoir is being modulated externally by a Gaussian-colored noise. The mobility of the Brownian particle in the linear response regime has been calculated. Then, using Einstein's relation, the analytical expression for the diffusion rate is evaluated for any arbitrary periodic potential for the high-temperature quantum regime. PMID:21517472

  1. Diffusion of ammonia gas in PDMS characterized by ATR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinský, Petr; Kalvoda, Ladislav; Aubrecht, Jan; Fojtíková, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of a chemo-optical transducer layer sensitive to gaseous ammonia are characterized by means of attenuation total reflection method. The tested layer consists of cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane matrix sensitized by quinoline-based organometallic dye showing the selective chemical reaction with ammonia. Upper and lower limits of the ammonia diffusion coefficient and the ammonia-dye reaction constant are derived from the obtained experimental data and compared with other data available in literature and obtained from computer simulations.

  2. DIFFUSION OF WEAK ACIDS ACROSS THE TOAD BLADDER. INFLUENCE OF PH ON NON-IONIC PERMEABILITY COEFFICIENTS.

    PubMed

    ROSEN, H; LEAF, A; SCHWARTZ, W B

    1964-11-01

    Studies have been carried out, using the toad bladder, to determine the influence of pH on the permeability coefficients (K(trans)) of the non-ionic species of (a) a series of aliphatic acids ranging from propionic to octanoic and (b) the aromatic acids, benzoic and acetylsalicylic. The data demonstrate that as the acidity of the mucosal bathing solution is increased by changing pH from 6 to 4, the fluxes of propionic, butyric, and acetylsalicylic acids increase in direct proportion to the increase in the calculated non-ionic concentration; the permeability coefficients, therefore, remain constant. However, the fluxes of the six, seven, and eight carbon aliphatic acids and benzoic acid rise only slightly despite an almost tenfold increase in non-ionic concentration, the K(trans) falling from approximately 20,000 x 10(-7) cm sec.(-1) at pH 6 to approximately 2500 x 10(-1) cm sec.(-1) at pH 4. It has been tentatively proposed that the common characteristic of the compounds exhibiting this anomalous behavior is their non-polarity and high degree of lipid solubility. Possible explanations for the differences observed between the more lipid-soluble and less lipid-soluble compounds have been considered. PMID:14225264

  3. A finite analytic method for solving the 2-D time-dependent advection diffusion equation with time-invariant coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Thomas; Li, Shu-Guang

    2005-02-01

    Difficulty in solving the transient advection-diffusion equation (ADE) stems from the relationship between the advection derivatives and the time derivative. For a solution method to be viable, it must account for this relationship by being accurate in both space and time. This research presents a unique method for solving the time-dependent ADE that does not discretize the derivative terms but rather solves the equation analytically in the space-time domain. The method is computationally efficient and numerically accurate and addresses the common limitations of numerical dispersion and spurious oscillations that can be prevalent in other solution methods. The method is based on the improved finite analytic (IFA) solution method [Lowry TS, Li S-G. A characteristic based finite analytic method for solving the two-dimensional steady-state advection-diffusion equation. Water Resour Res 38 (7), 10.1029/2001WR000518] in space coupled with a Laplace transformation in time. In this way, the method has no Courant condition and maintains accuracy in space and time, performing well even at high Peclet numbers. The method is compared to a hybrid method of characteristics, a random walk particle tracking method, and an Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method using various degrees of flow-field heterogeneity across multiple Peclet numbers. Results show the IFALT method to be computationally more efficient while producing similar or better accuracy than the other methods.

  4. A Comparative Study of the Harmonic and Arithmetic Averaging of Diffusion Coefficients for Non-linear Heat Conduction Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Robert R. Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-03-01

    We perform a comparative study for the harmonic versus arithmetic averaging of the heat conduction coefficient when solving non-linear heat transfer problems. In literature, the harmonic average is the method of choice, because it is widely believed that the harmonic average is more accurate model. However, our analysis reveals that this is not necessarily true. For instance, we show a case in which the harmonic average is less accurate when a coarser mesh is used. More importantly, we demonstrated that if the boundary layers are finely resolved, then the harmonic and arithmetic averaging techniques are identical in the truncation error sense. Our analysis further reveals that the accuracy of these two techniques depends on how the physical problem is modeled.

  5. Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

  6. Lessons-Learned from D and D Activities at the Five Gaseous Diffusion Buildings (K-25, K- 27, K-29, K-31 and K-33) East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN - 13574

    SciTech Connect

    Kopotic, James D. [United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Ferri, Mark S.; Buttram, Claude [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, East Tennessee Technology Park, P. O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, East Tennessee Technology Park, P. O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is the site of five former gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings that were used to enrich uranium from 1945 to 1985. The process equipment in the original two buildings (K-25 and K-27) was used for the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU), while that in the three later buildings (K-29, K-31 and K-33) produced low enriched uranium (LEU). Equipment was contaminated primarily with uranium and to a lesser extent technetium (Tc). Decommissioning of the GDP process buildings has presented several unique challenges and produced many lessons-learned. Among these is the importance of good, up-front characterization in developing the best demolition approach. Also, chemical cleaning of process gas equipment and piping (PGE) prior to shutdown should be considered to minimize the amount of hold-up material that must be removed by demolition crews. Another lesson learned is to maintain shutdown buildings in a dry state to minimize structural degradation which can significantly complicate characterization, deactivation and demolition efforts. Perhaps the most important lesson learned is that decommissioning GDP process buildings is first and foremost a waste logistics challenge. Innovative solutions are required to effectively manage the sheer volume of waste generated from decontamination and demolition (D and D) of these enormous facilities. Finally, close coordination with Security is mandatory to effectively manage Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and classified equipment issues. (authors)

  7. An examination of criticality accident alarm coverage of the X-710, X-760 Buildings and the north half of the X-7745-R storage pad at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skapik, C.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.; Lee, B.L. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an evaluation of Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) coverage of the X-710 and X-760 buildings and the north half of the X-7745-R storage lot located east of the X-7725 building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. In order to evaluate coverage, the facilities were modeled using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Computer Code (MCNP). MCNP was then used to simulate criticality accidents at various locations in the X-710 and X-760 buildings and the north half of the X-7745-R storage lot. The associated neutron flux at current detector locations was calculated. The neutron flux was then converted to an absorbed dose rate (in tissue) and compared with the Portsmouth criticality accident alarm set-point of 5mrad/hr. The parameters defining the simulated criticality accidents have been calculated as ``the minimum accident of concern`` as defined in ANSI Standard ANS 8.3-1986. These calculations are documented in Portsmouth report POEF-SH-31. The results of this evaluation indicate that the X-710 and X-760 buildings and surrounding roads are adequately covered by the CAAS systems that are currently in place in those buildings. The X-7745-R storage pad is also adequately covered by the CAAS in the X-7725 building.

  8. Diffusion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Thomas (None; )

    2006-11-09

    Diffusion is the movement of particles from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration. The molecules move until equilibrium is reached. If a perfume is sprayed on one side of the room, the perfume molecules will eventually spread out all over the room until there are equal concentrations of the molecules throughout the space.

  9. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

  10. Precision measurements of binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients in protein solutions relevant to crystal growth: Lysozyme chloride in water and aqueous NaCl at pH 4.5 and 25°C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John G. Albright; Onofrio Annunziata; Donald G. Miller; Luigi Paduano; Arne J. Pearlstein

    1999-01-01

    Accurate models of protein diffusion are important in a number of applications, including liquid-liquid phase separation and growth of protein crystals for X-ray diffraction studies. In concentrated multicomponent protein systems, significant deviations from pseudobinary behavior can be expected. Rayleigh interferometry is used to measure the four elements (D{sub if}){sub v} of the ternary diffusion coefficient matrix for the extensively investigated

  11. Determination of water self-diffusion coefficient in complex food products by low field 1H PFG-NMR: comparison between the standard spin-echo sequence and the T1-weighted spin-echo sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métais, Angélique; Mariette, François

    2003-12-01

    In 1990, Van Den Enden et al. proposed a method for the determination of water droplet size distributions in emulsions using a pulsed-field-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) T1-weighted stimulated-echo technique. This paper describes both the T1-weighted spin-echo sequence, an improved method based on this earlier work, and, the standard PFG spin-echo sequence. These two methods were compared for water self-diffusion coefficient measurement in the fatty protein concentrate sample used as a 'cheese model.' The transversal and longitudinal relaxation parameters T1 and T2 were determined according to the temperature and investigated for each sample; fat-free protein concentrate sample, pure anhydrous milk fat, and fatty protein concentrate sample. The water self-diffusion in fat-free protein concentrate samples followed a linear behavior. Consequently, the water self-diffusion coefficient could be easily characterized for fat-free protein concentrate samples. However, it seemed more complicated to obtain accurate water self-diffusion in fatty protein concentrate samples since the diffusion-attenuation data were fitted by a bi-exponential function. This paper demonstrates that the implementation of the T1-weighted spin-echo sequence, using the different T1 properties of water and fat phases, allows the accurate determination of water self-diffusion coefficient in a food product. To minimize the contribution of the 1H nuclei in the fat phase on the NMR echo signal, the fat protons were selectively eliminated by an additional 180° pulse. This new method reduces the standard errors of diffusion data obtained with a basic spin-echo technique, by a factor of 10. The effectiveness of the use of the T1-weighted spin-echo sequence to perform accurate water self-diffusion coefficients measurement in fatty products is thus demonstrated.

  12. Diffusion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since the advent of the internet, a number of artists and related organizations have become interested in utilizing the web to promulgate new forms of artistic creation and their subsequent dissemination. Supported by the Arts Council of England, these Diffusion eBooks are essentially pdf files that readers can download, print out and make into booklets. As the site suggests, "the Diffusion format challenges conventions of interactivity-blending the physical and the virtual and breaking the dominance of mouse and screen as the primary forms of human computer interaction...the format's aim is to take the reader away from the screen and computer and engage them in the process of production." There are a number of creative booklets available here for visitors, complete with instruction on how to assemble them for the desired effect. For anyone with even a remote interest in the possibilities afforded by this rather curious new form of expression, this website is worth a look.

  13. Evaluation of natural attenuation processes for trichloroethylene and technetium-99 in the Northeast and Northwest plumes at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, J.L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Heraty, L.J.; Huang, L.; Abrajano,T.

    1997-11-25

    NA processes such as biodegradation, sorption, dilution dispersion, advection, and possibly sorption and diffusion are occurring in the Northeast and Northwest plumes. However, the overall biological attenuation rate for TCE within the plumes is not sufficiently rapid to utilize as remedial option. The mobility and toxicity of {sup 99}Tc is not being reduced by attenuating processes within the Northwest Plume. The current EPA position is that NA is not a viable remedial approach unless destructive processes are present or processes are active which reduce the toxicity and mobility of a contaminant. Therefore, active remediation of the dissolved phase plumes will be necessary to reduce contaminant concentrations before an NA approach could be justified at PGDP for either plume. Possible treatment methods for the reduction of dissolved phase concentrations within the plumes are pump-and-treat bioaugmentation, biostimulation, or multiple reactive barriers. Another possibility is the use of a regulatory instrument such as an Alternate Concentration Limit (ACL) petition. Biodegradation of TCE is occurring in both plumes and several hypothesis are possible to explain the apparent conflicts with some of the geochemical data. The first hypothesis is active intrinsic bioremediation is negligible or so slow to be nonmeasurable. In this scenario, the D.O., chloride, TCE, and isotopic results are indicative of past microbiological reactions. It is surmised in this scenario, that when the initial TCE release occurred, sufficient energy sources were available for microorganisms to drive aerobic reduction of TCE, but these energy sources were rapidly depleted. The initial degraded TCE has since migrated to downgradient locations. In the second scenario, TCE anaerobic degradation occurs in organic-rich micro-environments within a generally aerobic aquifer. TCE maybe strongly absorbed to organic-rich materials in the aquifer matrix and degraded by local Immunities of microbes, perhaps even under anaerobic conditions. Chloride, generated by degradation in such microenvironment is released rapidly into the water, as is CO{sub 2}, from respiration of the microorganisms. TCE and its organic degradation products are retained on the aquifer matrix by sorption, and released more slowly into the groundwater. In this process, chloride produced from the microbial reaction may become separated in the plume from the residual TCE. This may explain why the chloride isotope ratio and dissolved TCE do not correlate with the DIC isotope ratio. The relationship between the {delta}{sup 37}Cl values of TCE and dissolved inorganic chloride is consistent with what would be expected from the degradation of TCE, but is complicated by the elevated levels of background chloride, presumably due to agriculture practice, and complex behavior of TCE in the aquifer.

  14. Solid and Gaseous Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Hyman; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This review covers methods of sampling, analyzing, and testing coal, coke, and coal-derived solids and methods for the chemical, physical, and instrumental analyses of gaseous fuels. The review covers from October 1986, to September 1988. (MVL)

  15. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE FOCUSED FEASIBILITY STUDY AND PROPOSED PLAN FOR DESIGNATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNITS CONTRIBUTING TO THE SOUTHWEST GROUNDWATER PLUME AT THE PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.

    2011-05-31

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  16. Correlation of Standardized Uptake Value and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Integrated Whole-Body PET/MRI of Primary and Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Heusch, Philipp; Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye; Gratz, Marcel; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas; Ruhlmann, Verena; Umutlu, Lale

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate a potential correlation of the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin) in primary and recurrent cervical cancer based on integrated PET/MRI examinations. Methods 19 consecutive patients (mean age 51.6 years; range 30–72 years) with histopathologically confirmed primary cervical cancer (n?=?9) or suspected tumor recurrence (n?=?10) were prospectively enrolled for an integrated PET/MRI examination. Two radiologists performed a consensus reading in random order, using a dedicated post-processing software. Polygonal regions of interest (ROI) covering the entire tumor lesions were drawn into PET/MR images to assess SUVmax and into ADC parameter maps to determine ADCmin values. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated to assess a potential correlation between the mean values of ADCmin and SUVmax. Results In 15 out of 19 patients cervical cancer lesions (n?=?12) or lymph node metastases (n?=?42) were detected. Mean SUVmax (12.5±6.5) and ADCmin (644.5±179.7×10?5 mm2/s) values for all assessed tumor lesions showed a significant but weak inverse correlation (R?=??0.342, p<0.05). When subdivided in primary and recurrent tumors, primary tumors and associated primary lymph node metastases revealed a significant and strong inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmin (R?=??0.692, p<0.001), whereas recurrent cancer lesions did not show a significant correlation. Conclusions These initial results of this emerging hybrid imaging technique demonstrate the high diagnostic potential of simultaneous PET/MR imaging for the assessment of functional biomarkers, revealing a significant and strong correlation of tumor metabolism and higher cellularity in cervical cancer lesions. PMID:24804676

  17. Pretreatment Apparent Diffusion Coefficient of the Primary Lesion Correlates With Local Failure in Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy or Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu, E-mail: mhatake@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Sunami, Shunya; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nakashima, Torahiko [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Nishikawa, Kei [Radiology Center, Kyushu University Hospital, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka City (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of a primary lesion correlates with local failure in primary head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 38 patients with primary HNSCC (12 oropharynx, 20 hypopharynx, 4 larynx, 2 oral cavity) treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy with radiation dose to gross tumor volume equal to or over 60 Gy and who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion-weighted imaging. Ten patients developed local failure during follow-up periods of 2.0 to 9.3 months, and the remaining 28 showed local control during follow-up periods of 10.5 to 31.7 months. The variables that could affect local failure (age, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, N stage, dose, treatment method, tumor location, and overall treatment time) were analyzed using logistic regression analyses for all 38 patients and for 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease. Results: In univariate logistic analysis for all 38 cases, tumor volume, ADC, T stage, and treatment method showed significant (p < 0.05) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC and T stage revealed significance (p < 0.01). In univariate logistic analysis for the 17 patients with Stage T3 or T4 disease, ADC and dose showed significant (p < 0.01) associations with local failure. In multivariate analysis, ADC alone showed significance (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results suggest that pretreatment ADC, along with T stage, is a potential indicator of local failure in HNSCC treated with chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy.

  18. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in fused silica between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy and application of fused silica capillaries in studying redox reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shang, L.; Chou, I.-Ming; Lu, W.; Burruss, R.C.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients (D) of hydrogen in fused silica capillaries (FSC) were determined between 296 and 523 K by Raman spectroscopy using CO2 as an internal standard. FSC capsules (3.25 ?? 10-4 m OD, 9.9 ?? 10-5 m ID, and ???0.01 m long) containing CO2 and H2 were prepared and the initial relative concentrations of hydrogen in these capsules were derived from the Raman peak-height ratios between H2 (near 587 cm-1) and CO2 (near 1387 cm-1). The sample capsules were then heated at a fixed temperature (T) at one atmosphere to let H2 diffuse out of the capsule, and the changes of hydrogen concentration were monitored by Raman spectroscopy after quench. This process was repeated using different heating durations at 296 (room T), 323, 375, 430, 473, and 523 K; the same sample capsule was used repeatedly at each temperature. The values of D (in m2 s-1) in FSC were obtained by fitting the observed changes of hydrogen concentration in the FSC capsule to an equation based on Fick's law. Our D values are in good agreement with the more recent of the two previously reported experimental data sets, and both can be represented by: ln D = - (16.471 ?? 0.035) - frac(44589 ?? 139, RT) (R2 = 0.99991) where R is the gas constant (8.3145 J/mol K), T in Kelvin, and errors at 1?? level. The slope corresponds to an activation energy of 44.59 ?? 0.14 kJ/mol. The D in FSC determined at 296 K is about an order of magnitude higher than that in platinum at 723 K, indicating that FSC is a suitable membrane for hydrogen at temperature between 673 K and room temperature, and has a great potential for studying redox reactions at these temperatures, especially for systems containing organic material and/or sulphur. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Speed of sound in gaseous difluoromethane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsutomu Hozumi; Haruki Sato; Koichi Watanabe

    1994-01-01

    The speed of sound in gaseous difluoromethane (HFC-32, CH[sub 2]F[sub 2]) has been measured by means of a spherical acoustic resonator. Sixty-seven speed of sound values were measured with an accuracy of [+-]0.01% at temperatures from 273 to 343 K and pressures from 20 to 250 kPa. The ideal-gas specific heats and the second acoustic virial coefficients have been determined

  20. Relationship between T2 relaxation and apparent diffusion coefficient in malignant and non-malignant prostate regions and the effect of peripheral zone fractional volume

    PubMed Central

    Simpkin, C J; Morgan, V A; Giles, S L; Riches, S F; Parker, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether T2 relaxation and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in normal prostate and tumour are related and to investigate the effects of glandular compression from an enlarged transition zone (TZ) on peripheral zone (PZ) T2 and ADC by correlating them with the peripheral zone fractional volume (PZFV). Methods: 48 consecutive patients prospectively underwent multiecho T2 weighted (T2W) (echo times 20, 40, 60, 80, 100?ms) and diffusion-weighted (b=0, 100, 300, 500, 800?s?mm?2) endorectal MRI. In 43 evaluable patients, single slice whole PZ, TZ and tumour (focal hypointense signal on T2W images in a biopsy-positive octant) regions of interest were transferred to T2 and ADC maps by slice matching. T2 and ADC values were correlated, and PZ values were correlated with PZFV. Results: T2 and ADC values were significantly different among groups [T2 mean±standard deviation (SD) PZ, 149±49?ms; TZ, 125±26?ms; tumour, 97±23?ms; PZ vs TZ, p=0.002; PZ vs tumour, p<0.0001; TZ vs tumour, p<0.0001; ADC×10?6?mm2?s?1 mean±SD PZ, 1680±215; TZ, 1478±139; tumour, 1030±205; p<0.0001]. Significant positive correlations existed between T2 and ADC for PZ, TZ, PZ and TZ together, but not for tumour (r=0.515, p<0.0001; r=0.300, p=0.03; r=0.526, p<0.0001; and r=0.239, p=0.32, respectively). No significant correlation existed between PZFV and PZ T2 (r=0.10, p=0.5) or ADC (r=0.03, p=0.8). Conclusion: The correlation between T2 and ADC that exists in normal prostate is absent in tumour. PZ compression by an enlarged TZ does not alter PZ T2 or ADC to affect tumour–PZ contrast. Advances in Knowledge: Microstructural features of tumours alter diffusivity independently of their effects on T2 relaxation. PMID:23426849