Science.gov

Sample records for gaseous helium pressurant

  1. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  2. Modelling and Experimental Verification of Pressure Wave Following Gaseous Helium Storage Tank Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jędrusyna, A.; Wach, J.

    Helium inventory in high energy accelerators, tokamaks and free electron lasers may exceed tens of tons. The gaseous helium is stored in steel tanks under a pressure of about 20 bar and at environment temperature. Accidental rupture of any of the tanks filled with the gaseous helium will create a rapid energy release in form of physical blast. An estimation of pressure wave distribution following the tank rupture and potential consequences to the adjacent research infrastructure and buildings is a very important task, critical in the safety aspect of the whole cryogenic system. According to the present regulations the TNT equivalent approach is to be applied to evaluate the pressure wave following a potential gas storage tank rupture. A special test stand was designed and built in order to verify experimentally the blast effects in controlled conditions. In order to obtain such a shock wave a pressurized plastic tank was used. The tank was ruptured and the resulting pressure wave was recorded using a spatially-distributed array of pressure sensors connected to a high-speed data acquisition device. The results of the experiments and the comparison with theoretical values obtained from thermodynamic model of the blast are presented. A good agreement between the simulated and measured data was obtained. Recommendations regarding the applicability of thermodynamic model of physical blast versus TNT approach, to estimate consequences of gas storage tank rupture are formulated. The laboratory scale experimental results have been scaled to ITER pressurized helium storage tanks.

  3. Thermodynamic Vent System Performance Testing with Subcooled Liquid Methane and Gaseous Helium Pressurant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Tucker, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its high specific impulse and favorable thermal properties for storage, liquid methane (LCH4) is being considered as a candidate propellant for exploration architectures. In order to gain an -understanding of any unique considerations involving micro-gravity pressure control with LCH4, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the performance of a spray-bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS) with subcooled LCH4 and gaseous helium (GHe) pressurant. Thirteen days of testing were performed in November 2006, with total tank heat leak conditions of about 715 W and 420 W at a fill level of approximately 90%. The TVS system was used to subcool the LCH4 to a liquid saturation pressure of approximately 55.2 kPa before the tank was pressurized with GHe to a total pressure of 165.5 kPa. A total of 23 TVS cycles were completed. The TVS successfully controlled the ullage pressure within a prescribed control band but did not maintain a stable liquid saturation pressure. This was likely. due to a TVS design not optimized for this particular propellant and test conditions, and possibly due to a large artificially induced heat input directly into the liquid. The capability to reduce liquid saturation pressure as well as maintain it within a prescribed control band, demonstrated that the TVS could be used to seek and maintain a desired liquid inlet temperature for an engine (at a cost of propellant lost through the TVS vent). One special test was conducted at the conclusion of the planned test activities. Reduction of the tank ullage pressure by opening the Joule-Thomson valve (JT) without operating the pump was attempted. The JT remained open for over 9300 seconds, resulting in an ullage pressure reduction of 30 kPa. The special test demonstrated the feasibility of using the JT valve for limited ullage pressure reduction in the event of a pump failure.

  4. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  5. Analyzing the Use of Gaseous Helium as a Pressurant with Cryogenic Propellants with Thermodynamic Venting System Modelling and Test Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S. L.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Vermilion, D. J.; Tucker, S. P.

    2008-03-01

    Cryogens are viable candidate propellants for NASA's Lunar and Mars exploration programs. To provide adequate mass flow to the system's engines and/or prevent feed system cavitation, gaseous helium (GHe) is frequently considered as a pressurant. A Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) is designed to maintain tank pressure during low gravity operations without propellant resettling. Tests were conducted in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of GHe pressurant on pressure control performance of a TVS with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and nitrogen (LN2) test liquids. The TVS used comprises a recirculation pump, a Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. A small amount of liquid extracted from the tank recirculation line was passed through the J-T valve and then through the heat exchanger, extracting thermal energy from the bulk liquid and ullage and thereby enabling pressure control. The LH2/GHe tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%, and LN2/GHe tests were conducted at fill levels of 50% and 25%. Moreover, each test was conducted with a specified tank ullage pressure control band. A one-dimensional TVS performance program was used to analyze and correlate the test data. Predictions were compared with test data of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature.

  6. Analyzing the Use of Gaseous Helium as a Pressurant with Cryogenic Propellants with Thermodynamic Venting System Modelling and Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.L.; Hastings, L.J.; Flachbart, R.H.; Vermillion, D.J.; Tucker, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogens are viable candidate propellants for NASA's Lunar and Mars exploration programs. To provide adequate mass flow to the system's engines and/or to prevent feed system cavitation, gaseous helium (GHe) is frequently considered as a pressurant. During low gravity operations, a Thermodynamic Venting System (TVS) is designed to maintain tank pressure during low gravity operations without propellant resettling. Therefore, a series of tests were conducted in the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in order to evaluate the effects of GHe pressurant on pressure control performance of a TVS with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and nitrogen (LN2) as the test liquids. The TVS used in these test series consists of a recirculation pump, Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion valve, and a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger combined with a longitudinal spray bar. Using a small amount of liquid extracted from the tank recirculation line, passing it through the J-T valve, and then through the heat exchanger, thermal energy is extracted from the bulk liquid and ullage thereby enabling pressure control. The LH2/GHe tests were performed at fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25% and LN2/GHe tests were conducted at fill levels of 50% and 25%. Moreover, each test was conducted with a specified tank ullage pressure control band. A one-dimensional TVS performance program was used to analyze and correlate the test data. Predictions and comparisons with test data of ullage pressure and temperature and bulk liquid saturation pressure and temperature with test data are presented.

  7. Trace organic impurities in gaseous helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schehl, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    A program to determine trace organic impurities present in helium has been initiated. The impurities were concentrated in a cryogenic trap to permit detection and identification by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric technique. Gaseous helium (GHe) exhibited 63 GC flame ionization response peaks. Relative GC peak heights and identifications of 25 major impurities by their mass spectra are given. As an aid to further investigation, identities are proposed for 16 other components, and their mass spectra are given.

  8. Purge Monitoring Technology for Gaseous Helium (GHe) Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jonathan; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center provides rocket engine propulsion testing for the NASA space programs. Since the development of the Space Shuttle, every Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has gone through acceptance testing before going to Kennedy Space Center for integration into the Space Shuttle. The SSME is a large cryogenic rocket engine that used Liquid Oxygen (LO2) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) as propellants. Due to the extremely cold cryogenic conditions of this environment, an inert gas, helium, is used as a purge for the engine and propellant lines since it can be used without freezing in the cryogenic environment. As NASA moves forward with the development of the new ARES V launch system, the main engines as well as the upper stage engine will use cryogenic propellants and will require gaseous helium during the development testing of each of these engines. The main engine for the ARES V will be similar in size to the SSME.

  9. Liquid Oxygen Thermodynamic Vent System Testing with Helium Pressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of several thermodynamic vent system (TVS) tests with liquid oxygen plus a test with liquid nitrogen. In all tests, the liquid was heated above its normal boiling point to 111 K for oxygen and 100 K for nitrogen. The elevated temperature was representative of tank conditions for a candidate lunar lander ascent stage. An initial test series was conducted with saturated oxygen liquid and vapor at 0.6 MPa. The initial series was followed by tests where the test tank was pressurized with gaseous helium to 1.4 to 1.6 MPa. For these tests, the helium mole fraction in the ullage was quite high, about 0.57 to 0.62. TVS behavior is different when helium is present than when helium is absent. The tank pressure becomes the sum of the vapor pressure and the partial pressure of helium. Therefore, tank pressure depends not only on temperature, as is the case for a pure liquid-vapor system, but also on helium density (i.e., the mass of helium divided by the ullage volume). Thus, properly controlling TVS operation is more challenging with helium pressurization than without helium pressurization. When helium was present, the liquid temperature would rise with each successive TVS cycle if tank pressure was kept within a constant control band. Alternatively, if the liquid temperature was maintained within a constant TVS control band, the tank pressure would drop with each TVS cycle. The final test series, which was conducted with liquid nitrogen pressurized with helium, demonstrated simultaneous pressure and temperature control during TVS operation. The simultaneous control was achieved by systematic injection of additional helium during each TVS cycle. Adding helium maintained the helium partial pressure as the liquid volume decreased because of TVS operation. The TVS demonstrations with liquid oxygen pressurized with helium were conducted with three different fluid-mixer configurations-a submerged axial jet mixer, a pair of spray hoops in the tank

  10. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  11. Characterization of gaseous helium jet dispersion to atmosphere. [due to accidental loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated dewar shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, H. J.; Figueroa, O.; Rhee, M.

    1992-01-01

    A major ground-based experiment to be performed for the Superfluid Helium On Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) program is the accidental loss of the vacuum guard of the super-insulated dewar. The design of the dewar vent-path requires adequate mass removal after a preset pressure is reached due to external heat transfer. The existing helium creates a turbulent buoyant jet, expanding in air with entrainment of the jet interface to the surrounding. Transient analysis is performed for axial and radial jet temperature prediction using the self-similarity assumption applied to mass, momentum, and the energy-balance equations of helium. The predicted jet temperature profiles with vertical and radial expansion up to 1.6 and 1.0 m, respectively, demonstrate the low temperature core established by gaseous helium. For all time steps, the axial and radial temperature predictions are observed to be within 8 and 20 percent, respectively.

  12. Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-03-01

    The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000/sup 0/C (1200 to 1832/sup 0/F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 450 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment A; 200 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 100 ..mu..atm CO, 20 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, 50 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O and 5 ..mu..atm CO/sub 2/ for Environment B; 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and < 0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment C; and 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/ and 1.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys.

  13. Performance of thermal shields of LHD cryostat cooled by gaseous helium with parallel paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imagawa, S.; Tamura, H.; Yanagi, N.; Sekiguchi, H.; Mito, T.; Satow, T.

    2002-05-01

    The Large Helical Device is the largest cryogenic apparatus for a research of fusion plasma. Thermal shields are installed to reduce heat loads to the superconducting coils. Since the total area is very wide, seamless pipes were adopted to reduce the possibility of helium leakage, and parallel cooling path is indispensable to reduce the pressure drop. Temperature differences between parallel paths will be enlarged with the procedure of cool-down, but the final temperature should be determined uniquely by each heat load in the case of gaseous helium. The number of parallel paths of the thermal shields for the plasma vacuum vessel and the cryostat vessel are set to 20 and 10, respectively, to form the periodic symmetry. The pipes were attached on the segmented plates of SUS316 by metal cleats mechanically and by high conductive epoxy resin thermally. The maximum temperature difference between the outlets of the paths was enlarged with the procedure of cool-down, but it was saturated within 40% of the average temperature rise. This difference is allowable in this system, and the temperature differences are coincide the difference of area due to the irregular shape.

  14. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. PTA1 Helium Pressurization System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Todd; Majumdar, Alok; Holt, Kimberly

    1999-01-01

    A transient model of the Propulsion Test Article 1 (PTA1) Helium Pressurization System was developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The model included feed lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSPs capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant and the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 seconds of pre-pressurization operation, 420 seconds of pressurization stand-by operation and 150 seconds of engine operation. Subsequent to the work presented here, the PTA1 model has been updated to include the LOX and RP-1 pumps, while the pressurization option itself has been modified to include the effects of mass transfer. This updated model will be compared with PTA1 test data as it becomes available.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiechao; Li, Min; Wang, Jun; Hou, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the stress field in a tungsten matrix containing a nano-scale helium bubble. A helium bubble in tungsten is found to consist of a core and an interface of finite thickness of approximately 0.6 nm. The core contains only helium atoms that are uniformly distributed. The interface is composed of both helium and tungsten atoms. In the periphery region of the helium bubble, the stress filed is found to follow the stress formula based on the elasticity theory of solid. The pressure difference between both sides of the interface can be well described by the Young-Laplace equation for the core size of a helium bubble as small as 0.48 nm. A comparison was performed between the pressure in the helium bubble core and the pressure in pure helium. For a core size larger than 0.3 nm, the pressure in the core of a helium bubble is in good agreement with the pressure in pure helium of the same helium density. These results provide guidance to larger scale simulation methods, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory.

  17. Phase separation in hydrogen-helium mixtures at Mbar pressures.

    PubMed

    Morales, Miguel A; Schwegler, Eric; Ceperley, David; Pierleoni, Carlo; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle

    2009-02-01

    The properties of hydrogen-helium mixtures at Mbar pressures and intermediate temperatures (4000 to 10000 K) are calculated with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the equation of state as a function of density, temperature, and composition and, using thermodynamic integration, we estimate the Gibbs free energy of mixing, thereby determining the temperature, at a given pressure, when helium becomes insoluble in dense metallic hydrogen. These results are directly relevant to models of the interior structure and evolution of Jovian planets. We find that the temperatures for the demixing of helium and hydrogen are sufficiently high to cross the planetary adiabat of Saturn at pressures approximately 5 Mbar; helium is partially miscible throughout a significant portion of the interior of Saturn, and to a lesser extent in Jupiter. PMID:19171896

  18. Phase separation in hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Miguel A.; Schwegler, Eric; Ceperley, David; Pierleoni, Carlo; Hamel, Sebastien; Caspersen, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    The properties of hydrogen–helium mixtures at Mbar pressures and intermediate temperatures (4000 to 10000 K) are calculated with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the equation of state as a function of density, temperature, and composition and, using thermodynamic integration, we estimate the Gibbs free energy of mixing, thereby determining the temperature, at a given pressure, when helium becomes insoluble in dense metallic hydrogen. These results are directly relevant to models of the interior structure and evolution of Jovian planets. We find that the temperatures for the demixing of helium and hydrogen are sufficiently high to cross the planetary adiabat of Saturn at pressures ≈5 Mbar; helium is partially miscible throughout a significant portion of the interior of Saturn, and to a lesser extent in Jupiter. PMID:19171896

  19. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment.

  20. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Blanco, E; Girone, M; Inglese, V; Pezzetti, M; Piccinelli, F; Serio, L

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves-Part 2-1: Flow capacity-sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported. PMID:26233405

  1. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, P.; Blanco, E.; Inglese, V.; Pezzetti, M.; Serio, L.; Girone, M.; Piccinelli, F.

    2015-07-15

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  2. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, P.; Blanco, E.; Girone, M.; Inglese, V.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.; Serio, L.

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  3. A helium freeze-out cleaner operating at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauvergne, J. P.; Delikaris, D.; Haug, F.; Knoops, S.

    A low pressure helium purification system has been designed at CERN. The helium gas recovered by means of a set of vacuum pumps from subatmospheric cryogenic circuits is cleaned at purity levels permitting direct re-liquefaction into the main cryo-plant cycle. The gas to be cleaned is close to ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. It is cooled down to 33K by counterflow heat exchanger with the processed gas plus a small amount of cold helium gas derived from the main cryoplant. Impurities in the gas to be processed are condensed on the cold surfaces, and purification is secured by a filtering. The processed gas returns directly to the low pressure suction flow of the cryo-plant compressor. So far two freeze-out cleaners have been designed and built and are currently in operation at two independent cryo-plants with liquifaction capacities of approximately 3.5 g/s. The results obtained on purification performance and "lifetime" before subsequent regeneration of the device, pressure drop depending on impurity contents, cold gas requirements and heat exchanger performance compare well with theoretical predictions. Helium gas with impurity levels of up to close to 13000 ppm by weight have been treated. At 2300 ppm and a processed helium gas flow of 0.7 g/s life times of close to 24 hours could be obtained permitting the deposition of 135 g of solid air. Regeneration cycles with respect to life time are short (15 minutes).

  4. Experimental study of ultracold neutron production in pressurized superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Bossy, J.; Farhi, E.; Fertl, M.; Leung, K. K. H.; Rahli, A.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate experimentally the pressure dependence of the production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium in the range from saturated vapor pressure to 20 bar. A neutron velocity selector allows the separation of underlying single-phonon and multiphonon processes by varying the incident cold neutron (CN) wavelength in the range from 3.5 to 10 Å. The predicted pressure dependence of UCN production derived from inelastic neutron scattering data is confirmed for the single-phonon excitation. For multiphonon-based UCN production we found no significant dependence on pressure, whereas calculations from inelastic neutron scattering data predict an increase of 43(6)% at 20 bar relative to saturated vapor pressure. From our data we conclude that applying pressure to superfluid helium does not increase the overall UCN production rate at a typical CN guide.

  5. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY PERFORMANCE OF COMMERCIAL GRADE API PIPELINE STEELS IN HIGH PRESSURE GASEOUS HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Stalheim, Mr. Douglas; Boggess, Todd; San Marchi, Chris; Jansto, Steven; Somerday, Dr. B; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Sofronis, Prof. Petros

    2010-01-01

    The continued growth of the world s developing countries has placed an ever increasing demand on traditional fossil fuel energy sources. This development has lead to increasing research and development of alternative energy sources. Hydrogen gas is one of the potential alternative energy sources under development. Currently the most economical method of transporting large quantities of hydrogen gas is through steel pipelines. It is well known that hydrogen embrittlement has the potential to degrade steel s mechanical properties when hydrogen migrates into the steel matrix. Consequently, the current pipeline infrastructure used in hydrogen transport is typically operated in a conservative fashion. This operational practice is not conducive to economical movement of significant volumes of hydrogen gas as an alternative to fossil fuels. The degradation of the mechanical properties of steels in hydrogen service is known to depend on the microstructure of the steel. Understanding the levels of mechanical property degradation of a given microstructure when exposed to hydrogen gas under pressure can be used to evaluate the suitability of the existing pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen service and guide alloy and microstructure design for new hydrogen pipeline infrastructure. To this end, the 2 Copyright 2010 by ASME microstructures of relevant steels and their mechanical properties in relevant gaseous hydrogen environments must be fully characterized to establish suitability for transporting hydrogen. A project to evaluate four commercially available pipeline steels alloy/microstructure performance in the presences of gaseous hydrogen has been funded by the US Department of Energy along with the private sector. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and then tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 800, 1600 and 3000 psi. Based on measurements of reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best

  6. Effect of Specimen Diameter on Tensile Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Liquid Hydrogen and Gaseous Helium at 20K

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, H.; Ohmiya, S.; Shibata, K.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-31

    Tensile tests using round bar type specimens of 3, 5 and 7 mm in diameter were conducted at 20K in liquid hydrogen and also in gaseous helium at the same temperature for three major austenitic stainless steels, JIS SUS304L, 316L and 316LN, extensively used for cryogenic applications including liquid hydrogen transportation and storage vessels. Stress-strain curves were considerably different between circumstances and also specimen diameter, resulting in differences of strength and ductility. In liquid hydrogen, serrated deformation appeared after considerable work hardening and more active in specimens with larger diameter. Meanwhile serrated deformation was observed from the early stage of plastic deformation in gaseous helium at 20 K and serration was more frequent in specimens with smaller diameter. The serrated deformation behaviors were numerically simulated for 304L steel with taking thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, heat transfer from specimens to cryogenic media into account, and some agreement with the experiments was obtained.

  7. Effect of Specimen Diameter on Tensile Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Liquid Hydrogen and Gaseous Helium at 20K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Ohmiya, S.; Shibata, K.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-01

    Tensile tests using round bar type specimens of 3, 5 and 7 mm in diameter were conducted at 20K in liquid hydrogen and also in gaseous helium at the same temperature for three major austenitic stainless steels, JIS SUS304L, 316L and 316LN, extensively used for cryogenic applications including liquid hydrogen transportation and storage vessels. Stress-strain curves were considerably different between circumstances and also specimen diameter, resulting in differences of strength and ductility. In liquid hydrogen, serrated deformation appeared after considerable work hardening and more active in specimens with larger diameter. Meanwhile serrated deformation was observed from the early stage of plastic deformation in gaseous helium at 20 K and serration was more frequent in specimens with smaller diameter. The serrated deformation behaviors were numerically simulated for 304L steel with taking thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, heat transfer from specimens to cryogenic media into account, and some agreement with the experiments was obtained.

  8. 80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PRESSURE GAUGE IN NITROGEN AND HELIUM STORAGE AND TRANSFER CONTROL SKIDS ON NORTH END OF SLC-3W FUEL APRON - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  10. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  11. A helium refrigerator with features for supercritical pressure cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, K. C.; Brown, D. P.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The cold end of the helium refrigerator with features for supercritical pressure cooling where it deviates from a conventional refrigerator is described. Two methods of transporting cooling from the load are considered. The first uses a cold circulating pump to circulate helium around the load. The second simply uses the J-T flow from the refrigerator to transport cooling. Measurements have been performed to verify refrigerator capacity. The refrigerator configuration is illustrated, and results of the capacity of the refrigerator and performance data for the ejector and the circulating pump are presented. Operating experience is discussed.

  12. Optimization of gaseous helium heater for 2 K cryogenic system for VECC’s superconducting electron linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahammed, Manir; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Saha, Subrata; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Tamal Kumar; DuttaGupta, Anjan; Pal, Gautam; Naik, Vaishali; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-09-01

    Niobium superconducting radiofrequency cavities are generally operated at around 2 K temperature to achieve a high quality factor by reducing residual surface losses. 2 K temperature is produce by lowering down the pressure of the helium by employing a sub-atmospheric vacuum pumping system. The cavities are immersed in liquid helium bath, maintained in the helium chamber. A special heater is optimized for warming up the helium gas coming out from the helium chamber to 300 K before it enters the pumping system. Keeping in view the uninterrupted and reliable operation of the superconducting electron linac and safe running of the liquid helium plant, a tubular heat exchanger type of heater is designed. Current is passed through the tubes of the heater so as to let the tube banks themselves act as heating element. He gas, passing through the tubes, absorbs the heat and warms up to the desired temperature. Unlike common notion, it has been observed that heater with longer length could reduce the requirement of the heater power but at the cost of extra pumping power, required to counter balance the excess pressure drop caused by the additional length of the heater. Pressure drop is kept within 50 Pa for 2 g/s helium flow rate. The whole lot of tubes, divided into 4 bundles, are electrically connected in series so that current rating of the feed-through could be kept within 750 A. This paper discusses the methodology used for optimizing the design of the heater.

  13. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.

  14. Spontaneous Raman Scattering Diagnostics for High-pressure Gaseous Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A high-pressure (up to 60 atm) gaseous burner facility with optical access that provides steady, reproducible flames with high precision, and the ability to use multiple fuel/oxidizer combinations has been developed. In addition, a high-performance spontaneous Raman scattering system for use in the above facility has also been developed. Together, the two systems will be used to acquire and establish a comprehensive Raman scattering spectral database for use as a quantitative high-pressure calibration of single-shot Raman scattering measurements in high-pressure combustion systems. Using these facilities, the Raman spectra of H2-Air flames were successfully measured at pressures up to 20 atm. The spectra demonstrated clear rotational and ro-vibrational Raman features of H2, N2, and H2O. theoretical Raman spectra of pure rotational H2, vibrational H2, and vibrational N2 were calculated using a classical harmonic-oscillator model with pressure broadening effects and fitted to the data. At a gas temperature of 1889 K for a phi = 1.34 H2-Air flame, the model and the data showed good agreement, confirming a ro-vibrational equilibrium temperature.

  15. Raman Scattering from Solid and Fluid Helium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, George Henry, Jr.

    Raman spectra were measured in solid helium at two molar volumes: 7.74 cm('3) ("10 kbar") and 9.06 cm('3) ("5 kbar"). The Raman-active E(,2g) phonon has been observed in the hcp phase of each crystal. The volume dependence measured for this phonon frequency is well represented by the mode Gruneisen parameter (gamma) = 1.06 + 0.097 V. Conventional lattice dynamics, using modern helium potentials, predicts a frequency and volume dependence for the E(,2g) phonon in good agreement with the measurements over this range of volume. Temperature dependence of the E(,2g) phonon frequency and linewidth was measured under isochoric conditions. Over the limited range of temperature in which the hcp phase exists, the thermal shift of frequency was measured to be negative by an amount no more than 1 cm('-1). The phonon linewidth was observed to be non-zero at 0 K, increasing in width with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence is compatible with a strong interaction between the E(,2g) phonon and zone-edge phonons, where the optical phonon combines with a transverse acoustic phonon to create a longitudinal acoustic phonon. In addition, second-order Raman spectra were collected for both high-pressure solid phases, hcp and fcc. Structure has been observed in the two-phonon portion of the solid helium spectra and is remarkably similar in both phases. Significant intensity extends beyond the expected cut-off for two-phonon processes, though to a decreasing extent with increasing pressure. Thus multi-phonon processes remain important in helium even at high pressure. Raman scattering from dense fluid helium shows clear departure from the behavior of collision-induced scattering from the more classical fluids. Even at room temperature, a departure from the usual roughly-exponential behavior is observed at low frequency in helium at high pressure. The departure becomes even more pronounced near the freezing temperature, with a dramatic reduction in low-frequency intensity

  16. Operation of a THGEM-based detector in low-pressure Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, M.; Yurkon, J.; Stolz, A.

    2015-02-01

    In view of a possible application as a charge-particle track readout for an Active Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC), the operating properties of THick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEM) in pure low-pressure Helium were investigated. This paper includes the effective gain dependence on pressure for different detector configurations (single-, double-, triple-cascade setup), long-term gain stability and energy resolution from tracks of 5.5 MeV alpha particles. Stable operational conditions and maximum detector gains of 104-107 have been achieved in pure Helium at pressure ranging from 100 torr up to 760 torr. Energy resolution of 6.65% (FWHM) for 690 keV of energy deposited by 5.5 MeV alpha particles at 350 torr was measured. The expected energy resolution for the full track is around 2.4% (FWHM). These results, together with the robustness of THGEM electrodes against spark damage, make THGEM structures highly competitive compared to other technologies considered for TPC applications in an active target operating with pure noble gases, requiring a high dynamic range and a wide operating pressure range down to few hundred torr.

  17. Quantitative Thermochemical Measurements in High-Pressure Gaseous Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun J.; Fischer, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We present our strategic experiment and thermochemical analyses on combustion flow using a subframe burst gating (SBG) Raman spectroscopy. This unconventional laser diagnostic technique has promising ability to enhance accuracy of the quantitative scalar measurements in a point-wise single-shot fashion. In the presentation, we briefly describe an experimental methodology that generates transferable calibration standard for the routine implementation of the diagnostics in hydrocarbon flames. The diagnostic technology was applied to simultaneous measurements of temperature and chemical species in a swirl-stabilized turbulent flame with gaseous methane fuel at elevated pressure (17 atm). Statistical analyses of the space-/time-resolved thermochemical data provide insights into the nature of the mixing process and it impact on the subsequent combustion process in the model combustor.

  18. Explosive helium burning at constant pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.-A.; Hanawa, T.; Sugimoto, D.

    The results of numerical calculations of nucleosynthesis under adiabatic conditions, i.e., when the only heat exchange with the external regions takes place through neutrinos, are reported. Attention is focused on explosive burning associated with shell flashes, assuming that nuclear energy is deposited in a mass element, followed by expansion and density decrease. Consideration is given to three cases, the shell flash near the surface of a degenerate star, to nuclear burning concentrated in a small region of a star, and to the heat energy being deposited in intermediate layers. A reaction network of 181 nuclear species was constructed and the thermodynamic evolution was calculated assuming constant pressure and adiabatic conditions. The final products of the reactions of H-1 to Cu-62 were projected to by O-16, Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ca-40, Ti-44, Cr-48, and Fe-52.

  19. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  20. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, V.; Chirtsov, Alex; Demidova, Maria; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. Calculations were based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharges. The system of equations was solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles and the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage and power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow for the prediction of the temperature of the gases in atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources. This work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project 14-19-00311).

  1. Contamination of liquid oxygen by pressurized gaseous nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; King, Tracy K.; Ngo, Kim Chi

    1989-01-01

    The penetration of pressurized gaseous nitrogen (GN2) into liquid oxygen (LOX) was investigated experimentally in the 7-inch High Temperature Tunnel, the pilot tunnel for the 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (8'HTT) at Langley Research Center. A preliminary test using a nuclear monitor revealed the extent of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) build-up at the LOX interface as a function of GN2 pressure. Then an adaptation of the differential flash vaporization technique was used to determine the binary diffusivity of the LOX-LN2 system at a temperature of 90.2 K. The measured value D equals 0.000086 sq cm/s + or - 25 percent together with two prior measurements at lower temperatures revealed an excellent fit to the Arrhenius equation, yielding a pre-exponential factor D sub 0 equals 0.0452 sq cm/s and an activation enthalpy H equals 1.08 kcal/mol. At a pressure of 1700 psi and holding time of 15 min, the penetration of LN2 into LOX (to a 1 percent contamination level) was found to be 0.9 cm, indicating but minimal impact upon 8'HTT operations.

  2. High-pressure soot formation and diffusion flame extinction characteristics of gaseous and liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatas, Ahmet Emre

    High-pressure soot formation and flame stability characteristics were studied experimentally in laminar diffusion flames. For the former, radially resolved soot volume fraction and temperature profiles were measured in axisymmetric co-flow laminar diffusion flames of pre-vaporized n-heptane-air, undiluted ethylene-air, and nitrogen and carbon dioxide diluted ethylene-air at elevated pressures. Abel inversion was used to re-construct radially resolved data from the line-of-sight spectral soot emission measurements. For the latter, flame extinction strain rate was measured in counterflow laminar diffusion flames of C1-4 alcohols and hydrocarbon fuels of n-heptane, n-octane, iso-octane, toluene, Jet-A, and biodiesel. The luminous flame height, as marked by visible soot radiation, of the nitrogen- and helium-diluted n-heptane and nitrogen- and carbon dioxide-diluted ethylene flames stayed constant at all pressures. In pure ethylene flames, flame heights initially increased with pressure, but changed little above 5 atm. The maximum soot yield as a function of pressure in nitrogen-diluted n-heptane diffusion flames indicate that n-heptane flames are slightly more sensitive to pressure than gaseous alkane hydrocarbon flames at least up to 7 atm. Ethylene's maximum soot volume fractions were much higher than those of ethane and n-heptane diluted with nitrogen (fuel to nitrogen mass flow ratio is about 0.5). Pressure dependence of the peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel's carbon content converted to soot, was assessed and compared to previous measurements with other gaseous fuels. Maximum soot volume fractions were consistently lower in carbon dioxide-diluted flames between 5 and 15 atm but approached similar values to those in nitrogen-diluted flames at 20 atm. This observation implies that the chemical soot suppression effect of carbon dioxide, previously demonstrated at atmospheric pressure, is also present at elevated pressures up to 15 atm

  3. COOL-IT: A HEAT EXCHANGER SYSTEM TO PROVIDE GASEOUS HELIUM AT INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURES FOR SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Pattalwar, S. M.; Bate, R.

    2010-04-09

    ALICE, a prototype accelerator developed at the Daresbury laboratory UK, has successfully demonstrated the energy-recovery technique by circulating the electron beam to more than 20 MeV. At the heart of ALICE is a superconducting linac operating at 2 K. At high average-current operation the performance of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities suffer from instabilities due to the generation of higher-order modes (HOM) as well as microphonics. HOMs are extracted out of the cavities using HOM absorbers operating at 80 K. This, however, increases the demand for cooling power at intermediate temperatures, i.e. at 80 K and 5 K, by more than an order of magnitude.In order to provide this extra cooling capacity with gaseous helium a new cryogenic system, 'COOL-IT,'(System for cooling to intermediate temperatures) is being developed. It will provide two streams of helium gases at 80 K and 5 K. COOL-IT uses a set of heat exchangers cooled by liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to generate two cold streams. It will be integrated into the existing cryo-system for ALICE for automatic operation. This paper describes the COOL-IT system in detail.

  4. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T.sub.2 to T.sub.3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T.sub.4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T.sub.4 to T.sub.5, while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T.sub.2 in a closed cycle, where T.sub.2 >T.sub.3 and T.sub.5 >T.sub.4, the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg.

  5. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  6. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  7. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  8. Quartz Tuning Fork Pressure Gauge for High-Pressure Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botimer, J.; Velasco, A.; Taborek, P.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the quality factor Q and the frequency f of a 32-kHz quartz tuning fork immersed in liquid ^4 He between 0.9 and 3.0 K, over pressures ranging from the saturated vapor pressure to ≈ 25 atm. At constant pressure, as a function of temperature, the quality factor and frequency have strong features related to the temperature dependence of the superfluid fraction. At constant temperature, Q depends on the superfluid fraction, while the frequency is a smooth function of pressure. The behavior is explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. The liquid helium viscosity is obtained from measured values of Q, and together with tabulated values of the helium density as a function of pressure and temperature, the frequency shift can be parameterized as a function of temperature and pressure. The observed sensitivity is ≈ 7.8 Hz/atm. The quartz tuning fork provides a compact low power method of measuring the pressure in the bulk liquid.

  9. Experimental investigation on pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during high-temperature helium pressurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Yonghua, Jin; Yuan, Ma

    2015-03-01

    Sufficient knowledge of thermal performance and pressurization behaviors in cryogenic tanks during rocket launching period is of importance to the design and optimization of a pressurization system. In this paper, ground experiments with liquid oxygen (LO2) as the cryogenic propellant, high-temperature helium exceeding 600 K as the pressurant gas, and radial diffuser and anti-cone diffuser respectively at the tank inlet were performed. The pressurant gas requirements, axial and radial temperature distributions, and energy distributions inside the propellant tank were obtained and analyzed to evaluate the comprehensive performance of the pressurization system. It was found that the pressurization system with high-temperature helium as the pressurant gas could work well that the tank pressure was controlled within a specified range and a stable discharging liquid rate was achieved. For the radial diffuser case, the injected gas had a direct impact on the tank inner wall. The severe gas-wall heat transfer resulted in about 59% of the total input energy absorbed by the tank wall. For the pressurization case with anti-cone diffuser, the direct impact of high-temperature gas flowing toward the liquid surface resulted in a greater deal of energy transferred to the liquid propellant, and the percentage even reached up to 38%. Moreover, both of the two cases showed that the proportion of energy left in ullage to the total input energy was quite small, and the percentage was only about 22-24%. This may indicate that a more efficient diffuser should be developed to improve the pressurization effect. Generally, the present experimental results are beneficial to the design and optimization of the pressurization system with high-temperature gas supplying the pressurization effect.

  10. Applying Chemical Potential and Partial Pressure Concepts to Understand the Spontaneous Mixing of Helium and Air in a Helium-Inflated Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee-Yon Lee; Hee-Soo Yoo; Jong Sook Park; Kwang-Jin Hwang; Jin Seog Kim

    2005-01-01

    The spontaneous mixing of helium and air in a helium-inflated balloon is described in an experiment in which the partial pressure of the gases in the balloon are determined from the mole factions and the total pressure measured in the balloon. The results described provide a model for teaching concepts of partial pressure, chemical potential, and…

  11. A fiber-optic frequency transducer of variable pressure in gaseous and liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, F. A.; Potapov, V. T.; Melkumov, M. A.; Amelichev, V. V.; Generalov, S. S.; Shamanaev, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Fiber-optic sensors of variable pressure are proposed and implemented on fiber lasers with microoptomechanical resonance structures generating in automodulation regimes. Possibilities of sound pressure monitoring in gaseous and liquid media are considered, and the sensitivity of these fiber-optic sensors is estimated.

  12. 75 FR 53353 - Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 “Pressure and Helium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 ``Pressure and Helium... Guidance Document No. 25 (ISG-25) ``Pressure and Helium Leakage Testing of the Confinement Boundary of... helium leakage testing and ASME Code required pressure (hydrostatic/pneumatic) testing that is...

  13. Multiple (eight) plasma bullets in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet and the role of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghoo; Youn Moon, Se; Choe, Wonho

    2013-11-01

    As many as eight multiple plasma bullets produced at atmospheric pressure were observed in one voltage period in a capillary helium dielectric barrier plasma jet. We found that the number of the bullets strongly depends on the nitrogen fraction added to the helium supply gas. Using optical emission spectroscopy and ionization rate calculation, this study demonstrates that nitrogen gas plays an important role in the generation and dynamics of multiple plasma bullets through Penning ionization of nitrogen by helium metastables.

  14. Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Fayrushin, I.; Kashapov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The circuit has been done, to obtain output currentabout 90mA,and the maximum power was 100W, The frequency of the discharging was f = 40MHz.Twolamps (ГУ-50) were used in power supply. Helium consumption was about 1.5l/m.

  15. Miscibility of hydrogen and helium mixtures at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Klepeis, J.E.; Schafer, K.J.; Barbee, T.W. III; Ross, M.

    1991-09-01

    Models of Jupiter and Saturn postulate a central rock core surrounded by a fluid mixture of hydrogen and helium. These models suggest that the mixture is undergoing phase separation in Saturn but not Jupiter. State-of-the-art total energy calculations of the enthalpy of mixing for ordered alloys of hydrogen and helium confirm that at least partial phase separation has occurred in Saturn and predict that this process has also begun in Jupiter. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Plasma formation in atmospheric pressure helium discharges under different background air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yaoge; Hao Yanpeng; Zheng Bin

    2012-09-15

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges generated between parallel-plate electrodes in helium have been characterized using temporally resolved emission spectra. The variation of typical spectral lines over time has been analyzed. In helium with a low concentration of N{sub 2}, the emission of He at 706.5 nm is dominant and appears 500 ns earlier than N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands, indicating low reaction rates of Penning ionization and charge transfer in the initial stage. During the decay, it is the Penning ionization caused by He metastables with a long lifetime rather than the charge transfer reaction that leads to the long decay of N{sub 2}{sup +} emissions. When helium contains a higher concentration of N{sub 2} molecules, the N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative bands become the most intense, and emissions from He, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and O exhibit similar behavior as they increase. The emissions last for a shorter time under such conditions because of rapid consumption of He metastables and He{sub 2}{sup +}.

  17. Microwave capillary plasmas in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Noël, C.; Belmonte, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    This work uses both simulations and experiments to study helium plasmas (99.999% purity), sustained by surface-wave discharges (2.45 GHz frequency) in capillary tubes (3 mm in-radius) at atmospheric pressure. The simulations use a self-consistent homogeneous and stationary collisional-radiative model (CRM) that solves the rate balance equations for the different species present in the plasma (electrons, He+ and He_2^+ ions, He(n ⩽ 6) excited states and He_2^* excimers) and the gas thermal balance equation, coupled with the two-term electron Boltzmann equation (including direct and stepwise inelastic and superelastic collisions as well as electron-electron collisions). The experiments use optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to measure the electron density ne (from the Hβ Stark broadening), the gas temperature Tg (from the ro-vibrational transitions of OH, present at trace concentrations) and the populations of excited states in the energy region 22.7-24.2 eV, whose spectrum allows determining the excitation temperature Texc. Measurements yield ne ≃ (2.45 ± 1.4) × 1013 cm-3, Tg ≃ 1700 ± 100 K and Texc ≃ 2793 ± 116 K, for a ˜180 ± 10 W power coupled and ˜1 cm length plasma column. The model predictions at ne = 1.7 × 1013 cm-3 are in very good agreement with measurements yielding Tg = 1800 K, Texc = 2792 K (for ˜30% average relative error between calculated and measured excited-state densities), and a power absorbed by the plasma per unit length of 165 W cm-1. The model results depend strongly on ne, and hence on the plasma conductivity and on the power coupled to the plasma. The coupling of a thermal module to the CRM has been shown to be crucial. Increasing the electron density leads to very high gas temperature values, which limits the variation range of (ne, Tg) as input parameters to the model.

  18. Active-mirror-laser-amplifier thermal management with tunable helium pressure at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lucianetti, Antonio; Albach, Daniel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-20

    We illustrate the benefits of a thin, low pressure helium cell for efficient and safe heat removal in cryogenically-cooled active mirror laser amplifiers operating in the [100 J-1 kJ]/[1-10 Hz] range. A homogeneous gain medium temperature distribution averaging 160 K is obtained with a sub-mm helium-filled gap between the gain medium and a copper plate at 77 K. A significant degree of flexibility for tuning the temperature in the amplifier can be achieved by varying the pressure of the helium gas in the 10(2) to 10(5) Pa range. PMID:21716519

  19. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  20. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  1. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  2. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  3. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, Madhav R.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1987-01-01

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon, zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high parity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber.

  4. Method and apparatus for the selective separation of gaseous coal gasification products by pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Ghate, M.R.; Yang, R.T.

    1985-10-03

    Bulk separation of the gaseous components of multi-component gases provided by the gasification of coal including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and acid gases (carbon dioxide plus hydrogen sulfide) are selectively adsorbed by a pressure swing adsorption technique using activated carbon zeolite or a combination thereof as the adsorbent. By charging a column containing the adsorbent with a gas mixture and pressurizing the column to a pressure sufficient to cause the adsorption of the gases and then reducing the partial pressure of the contents of the column, the gases are selectively and sequentially desorbed. Hydrogen, the least absorbable gas of the gaseous mixture, is the first gas to be desorbed and is removed from the column in a co-current direction followed by the carbon monoxide, hydrogen and methane. With the pressure in the column reduced to about atmospheric pressure the column is evacuated in a countercurrent direction to remove the acid gases from the column. The present invention is particularly advantageous as a producer of high purity hydrogen from gaseous products of coal gasification and as an acid gas scrubber. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. CFD Modeling of Helium Pressurant Effects on Cryogenic Tank Pressure Rise Rates in Normal Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, Gary; Lopez, Alfredo; Chandler, Frank; Hastings, Leon; Hedayat, Ali; Brethour, James

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed computational fluid dynamics modeling capability for cryogenic tanks is used to simulate both self-pressurization from external heating and also depressurization from thermodynamic vent operation. Axisymmetric models using a modified version of the commercially available FLOW-3D software are used to simulate actual physical tests. The models assume an incompressible liquid phase with density that is a function of temperature only. A fully compressible formulation is used for the ullage gas mixture that contains both condensable vapor and a noncondensable gas component. The tests, conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, include both liquid hydrogen and nitrogen in tanks with ullage gas mixtures of each liquid's vapor and helium. Pressure and temperature predictions from the model are compared to sensor measurements from the tests and a good agreement is achieved. This further establishes the accuracy of the developed FLOW-3D based modeling approach for cryogenic systems.

  6. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  7. A Study on the Heat Transfer Properties of Pressurized Helium II through Fine Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.; Nakai, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Murakami, M.; Shintomi, T.

    2006-04-27

    An experimental study was carried out on the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium in the Gorter-Mellink heat transfer region. By using channels of hydraulic diameter from 5.6 x 10- through 4.81 x 10-3 m, the heat transfer properties of pressurized superfluid helium were measured in the experiment. The temperature dependence of Gorter-Mellink parameter, AGM, is revealed from the experimental results. It is also proven that AGM depend only on temperature, and not on the channel size and shape. The effect of quantized vortices on heat transfer of pressurized superfluid helium is discussed in comparison of the channel diameter with the mean vortex line spacing.

  8. Regulated In Situ Generation of Molecular Ions or Protonated Molecules under Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma-Ionization Mass Spectrometric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangam, Rekha; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2015-07-01

    In an enclosed atmospheric-pressure helium-plasma ionization (HePI) source engulfed with dehumidified ambient gases, molecular cations are generated from compounds such as toluene, bromobenzene, and iodobenzene. Evidently, the ionization is effected by a direct Penning mechanism attributable to interactions of the gas-phase analyte with metastable helium atoms. It is widely known that secondary ions generated from ambient gases also play an important role in the overall ionization process. For example, when the ambient gases bear even traces of moisture, the analytes are ionized by proton transfer reactions with gaseous H3O+. In this study, we demonstrate how a controlled variation of experimental conditions can manipulate the abundance of molecular ions and protonated molecules in a HePI source.

  9. Design and Test of a Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Thruster with Cold Helium Pressurization Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, John C.; Morehead, Robert L.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    A liquid oxygen / liquid methane 2,000 lbf thruster was designed and tested in conjuction with a nozzle heat exchanger for cold helium pressurization. Cold helium pressurization systems offer significant spacecraft vehicle dry mass savings since the pressurant tank size can be reduced as the pressurant density is increased. A heat exchanger can be incorporated into the main engine design to provide expansion of the pressurant supply to the propellant tanks. In order to study the systems integration of a cold-helium pressurization system, a 2,000 lbf thruster with a nozzle heat exchanger was designed for integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle at NASA Johnson Space Center. The testing goals were to demonstrate helium loading and initial conditioning to low temperatures, high-pressure/low temperature storage, expansion through the main engine heat exchanger, and propellant tank injection/pressurization. The helium pressurant tank was an existing 19 inch diameter composite-overwrap tank, and the targert conditions were 4500 psi and -250 F, providing a 2:1 density advantage compared to room tempatrue storage. The thruster design uses like-on-like doublets in the injector pattern largely based on Project Morpheus main engine hertiage data, and the combustion chamber was designed for an ablative chamber. The heat exchanger was installed at the ablative nozzle exit plane. Stand-alone engine testing was conducted at NASA Stennis Space Center, including copper heat-sink chambers and highly-instrumented spoolpieces in order to study engine performance, stability, and wall heat flux. A one-dimensional thermal model of the integrated system was completed. System integration into the Project Morpheus vehicle is complete, and systems demonstrations will follow.

  10. Freezing and Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium in Vycor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James; Herman, Tobias; Beamish, John

    2005-07-01

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan suggest a supersolid phase transition in solid 4He confined in Vycor. We have used a capacitive technique to directly monitor density changes for helium confined in Vycor at low temperature and have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the pressure-induced flow of solid helium into the Vycor pores. Our measurements showed no indication of a mass redistribution in the Vycor that could mimic supersolid decoupling and put an upper limit of about 0.003 μm/s on any pressure-induced supersolid flow in the pores of Vycor.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Distribution and Pressurization Behavior in Helium Pressurized Cryogenic Tank by Introducing a Multi-component Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wang; Yanzhong, Li; Zhan, Liu; Kang, Zhu

    An improved CFD model involving a multi-component gas mixturein the ullage is constructed to predict the pressurization behavior of a cryogenic tank considering the existence of pressurizing helium.A temperature difference between the local fluid and its saturation temperature corresponding to the vapor partial pressure is taken as the phase change driving force. As practical application of the model, hydrogen and oxygen tanks with helium pressurization arenumerically simulated by using themulti-component gas model. The results presentthat the improved model produce higher ullage temperature and pressure and lower wall temperaturethan those without multi-component consideration. The phase change has a slight influence on thepressurization performance due to the small quantities involved.

  12. Prediction of pressure and flow transients in a gaseous bipropellant reaction control rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowsky, J. J.; Mcmanus, H. N., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic model is developed to predict pressure and flow transients in a gaseous hydrogen-oxygen reaction control rocket engine feed system. The one-dimensional equations of momentum and continuity are reduced by the method of characteristics from partial derivatives to a set of total derivatives which describe the state properties along the feedline. System components, e.g., valves, manifolds, and injectors are represented by pseudo steady-state relations at discrete junctions in the system. Solutions were effected by a FORTRAN IV program on an IBM 360/65. The results indicate the relative effect of manifold volume, combustion lag time, feedline pressure fluctuations, propellant temperature, and feedline length on the chamber pressure transient. The analytical combustion model is verified by good correlation between predicted and observed chamber pressure transients. The developed model enables a rocket designer to vary the design parameters analytically to obtain stable combustion for a particular mode of operation which is prescribed by mission objectives.

  13. Thermophysical properties of helium-4 from 4 to 3000 R with pressures to 15000 psia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Data on many of the properties of helium commonly used in engineering calculations are compiled over as wide a temperature and pressure range as is practical. These properties are presented in a form which is convenient to the engineer. All of these properties have been critically evaluated and represent the best values for that property at this time.

  14. Pressure Gradients and Annealing Effects in Solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhel, Md. Abdul Halim

    The Kim and Chan experiment in 2004 gave the first experimental evidence of a possible supersolid state. Even though the origin of this state is not clear yet, several experimental and theoretical investigations suggest defects are responsible for this curious phase. We have used heat pulses and thermal quenching to study pressure gradients and annealing mechanisms in solid 4He crystals. Large pressure gradients exist in crystals grown at constant volume. These can be enhanced by phase transitions, thermal quenching or by partial melting. Annealing reduces defect densities and hence pressure gradients in crystals. Our measurements show that the pressure at different points in a crystal can behave differently, even if there is little change in the crystal's average pressure. We measured the activation energy that is associated with the annealing process.

  15. Calculation of the pressure rise in the CHL 5000-gallon liquid-helium dewar

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.

    1983-01-04

    The writing of a computer program to calculate the pressure rise in the CHL 5000-gallon dewar was motivated by the writing of a Fermilab engineering note on the safety of the dewar which is presently being installed at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier. The calculation is intended to verify that the pressure in the inner vessel will not rise above a safe level in a catastrophic venting situation.

  16. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  17. Effect of temperature and O2 pressure on the gaseous species produced during combustion of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baijot, Vincent; Ducéré, Jean-Marie; Rouhani, Mehdi Djafari; Rossi, Carole; Estève, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Effect of temperature and O2 pressure on the gaseous species produced during the combustion of aluminum is studied using first principles calculations and considering the thermodynamics of the gas phase equilibrium composed of Al, O2, AlO, Al2O, AlO2, Al2O2 and Al2O3. AlO partial pressure dominates all the range of O2 pressures/temperatures. AlO2 is the second most abundant species at low to intermediate temperatures (1200-1727 °C) and Al2O at higher temperatures (∼3300 °C). Al2O and Al2O2 are stable when ionized into mass spectrometer. Al2O3, AlO2 and, to a lesser extent AlO, will decompose, hindering their quantitative observation using this technique.

  18. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  19. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guo; Li Heping; Wang Sen; Sun Wenting; Bao Chengyu; Wang Liyan; Zhao Hongxin; Xing Xinhui

    2008-06-02

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  20. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  1. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0. 8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, V.D.; Mccarty, R.D.

    1989-11-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  2. Viscosity of gaseous HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Shibasaki-Kitakawa, N.; Takahashi, M.; Yokoyama, C.

    1998-09-01

    The viscosity of gaseous HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) was measured with an oscillating disk viscometer of the Maxwell type from 298.15 to 398.15 K at pressures up to 5.5 MPa. Intermolecular potential parameters for the Lennard-Jones 12-6 model were determined from the viscosity data at 0.1 MPa. The viscosity equation developed by Krauss et al. was applied to correlate the present viscosity data. In addition, the correlations proposed by Stiel and Thodos and by Lee and Thodos were tested for fitting the experimental viscosity data.

  3. Thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at high pressure and finite temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    A technique is reviewed for calculating thermodynamic quantities for mixtures of light elements at high pressure, in the metallic state. Ensemble averages are calculated with Monte Carlo techniques and periodic boundary conditions. Interparticle potentials are assumed to be coulombic, screened by the electrons in dielectric function theory. This method is quantitatively accurate for alloys at pressures above about 10 Mbar. An alloy of equal parts hydrogen and helium by mass appears to remain liquid and mixed for temperatures above about 3000 K, at pressures of about 15 Mbar. The additive volume law is satisfied to within about 10%, but the Gruneisen equation of state gives poor results. A calculation at 1300 K shows evidence of a hydrogen-helium phase separation.

  4. Hydrogen and helium under high pressure - A case for a classical theory of dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebonovic, Vladan

    1989-06-01

    When subject to high pressure, H2 and He-3 are expected to undergo phase transitions, and to become metallic at a sufficiently high pressure. Using a semiclassical theory of dense matter proposed by Savic and Kasanin, calculations of phase transition and metallization pressure have been performed for these two materials. In hydrogen, metallization occurs at p(M) = (3.0 + or - 0.2) Mbar, while for helium the corresponding value is (106 + or - 1) Mbar. A phase transition occurs in helium at p(tr) = (10.0 + or - 0.4) Mbar. These values are close to the results obtainable by more rigorous methods. Possibilities of experimental verification of the calculations are briefly discussed.

  5. Pressure drop measurements on supercritical helium cooled cable in conduit conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, M. A.; Huang, Y.; Vansciver, S. W.

    1988-08-01

    Forced flow cable-in-conduit conductors with large cooled surface areas provide excellent stability margins at the price of high frictional losses and large pumping power requirements. For extensive projects such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design cooperation, it is essential to know the pressure drops to be expected from different conductor geometries and operating conditions. To measure these pressure drops a flow loop was constructed to circulate supercritical helium through different conductors. The loop is surrounded by a 5 K radiation shield to allow for stable operation at the required temperatures. A coil heat exchanger immersed in a helium bath is used to remove the heat generated by the pump. Pressure drops are measured across 1 meter lengths of the conductors for various mass flow rates. Friction factor versus Reynolds number plots are used to correlate the data.

  6. High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) Facility Completed for Quantitative Laser Diagnostics Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2002-01-01

    A gas-fueled high-pressure combustion facility with optical access, which was developed over the last 2 years, has just been completed. The High Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center can operate at sustained pressures up to 60 atm with a variety of gaseous fuels and liquid jet fuel. The facility is unique as it is the only continuous-flow, hydrogen-capable, 60-atm rig in the world with optical access. It will provide researchers with new insights into flame conditions that simulate the environment inside the ultra-high-pressure-ratio combustion chambers of tomorrow's advanced aircraft engines. The facility provides optical access to the flame zone, enabling the calibration of nonintrusive optical diagnostics to measure chemical species and temperature. The data from the HPGB rig enables the validation of numerical codes that simulate gas turbine combustors, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC). The validation of such numerical codes is often best achieved with nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques that meet these goals: information-rich (multispecies) and quantitative while providing good spatial and time resolution. Achieving these goals is a challenge for most nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques. Raman scattering is a technique that meets these challenges. Raman scattering occurs when intense laser light interacts with molecules to radiate light at a shifted wavelength (known as the Raman shift). This shift in wavelength is unique to each chemical species and provides a "fingerprint" of the different species present. The facility will first be used to gather a comprehensive data base of laser Raman spectra at high pressures. These calibration data will then be used to quantify future laser Raman measurements of chemical species concentration and temperature in this facility and other facilities that use Raman scattering.

  7. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  8. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  9. High-Pressure Equipment for Growing Methanogenic Microorganisms on Gaseous Substrates at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Günther; Jaenicke, Rainer; Lüdemann, Hans-Dietrich

    1987-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature investigations on thermophilic microorganisms that grow on hydrogen or other gaseous substrates require instrumentation which provides sufficient substrate for cell proliferation up to 2 × 108 to 3 × 108 cells per ml under isothermal and isobaric conditions. To minimize H2 leakage and to optimize reproducibility at high pressure and high temperature, 10-ml nickel tubes with a liquid/gas ratio of 1:2 were used in a set of autoclaves connected in series. By applying a hydraulic pump and a 2.5-kW heating device, fast changes in temperature (up to 400°C) and pressure (up to 400 MPa) can be accomplished within less than 10 min. To quantify bacterial growth, determinations of cell numbers per unit volume yielded optimum accuracy. Preliminary experiments with the thermophilic, methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus showed that bacterial growth depends on both temperature and pressure. At the optimum temperature, increased hydrostatic pressure up to 50 MPa enhanced the growth yield; at a pressure of >75 MPa, cell lysis dominated. Changes in cell proliferation were accompanied by changes in morphology. PMID:16347413

  10. Testing the Effects of Helium Pressurant on Thermodynamic Vent System Performance with Liquid Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hastings, L. J.; Hedayat, A.; Nelson, S.; Tucker, S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the development of a zero gravity pressure control capability for liquid hydrogen, testing was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) to evaluate the effects of helium pressurant on the performance of a spray bar thermodynamic vent system (TVS). Fourteen days of testing was performed in August - September 2005, with an ambient heat leak of about 70-80 watts and tank fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. The TVS successfully controlled the tank pressure within a +/- 3.45 kPa (+/- 0.5 psi) band with various helium concentration levels in the ullage. Relative to pressure control with an "all hydrogen" ullage, the helium presence resulted in 10 to 30 per cent longer pressure reduction durations, depending on the fill level, during the mixing/venting phase of the control cycle. Additionally, the automated control cycle was based on mixing alone for pressure reduction until the pressure versus time slope became positive, at which time the Joule-Thomson vent was opened. Testing was also conducted to evaluate thermodynamic venting without the mixer operating, first with liquid then with vapor at the recirculation line inlet. Although ullage stratification was present, the ullage pressure was successfully controlled without the mixer operating. Thus, if vapor surrounded the pump inlet in a reduced gravity situation, the ullage pressure can still be controlled by venting through the TVS Joule Thomson valve and heat exchanger. It was evident that the spray bar configuration, which extends almost the entire length of the tank, enabled significant thermal energy removal from the ullage even without the mixer operating. Details regarding the test setup and procedures are presented in the paper. 1

  11. The Role of Helium Metastable States in Radio-Frequency Helium-Oxygen Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Measurement and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Kari; Waskoenig, Jochen; Sadeghi, Nader; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He atoms were measured line-of sight integrated along the plasma channel of a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in helium oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. Dependencies of the He metastable density with oxygen admixtures up to 1 percent were investigated. Results are compared to a 1-d numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (20 species, 184 reactions), and very good agreement is found. The main formation mechanisms for the helium metastables are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  12. Floating Pressure Conversion of Two 3.5 KW, 20 K, Helium Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, J.; Ganni, V.; Sidi-Yekhlef, A.; Creel, J.; Norton, R.; Linza, R.; Vargas, G.; Lauterbach, J.; Urbin, J.; Howe, D.

    2010-04-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle "floating pressure" control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

  13. Quantification and remote detection of nitro explosives by helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS) on a modified atmospheric pressure source designed for electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B

    2012-07-01

    Helium Plasma Ionization (HePI) generates gaseous negative ions upon exposure of vapors emanating from organic nitro compounds. A simple adaptation converts any electrospray ionization source to a HePI source by passing helium through the sample delivery metal capillary held at a negative potential. Compared with the demands of other He-requiring ambient pressure ionization sources, the consumption of helium by the HePI source is minimal (20-30 ml/min). Quantification experiments conducted by exposing solid deposits to a HePI source revealed that 1 ng of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on a filter paper (about 0.01 ng/mm(2)) could be detected by this method. When vapor emanating from a 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) sample was subjected to helium plasma ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS), a peak was observed at m/z 268 for (RDX●NO(2))(-). This facile formation of NO(2)(-) adducts was noted without the need of any extra additives as dopants. Quantitative evaluations showed RDX detection by HePI-MS to be linear over at least three orders of magnitude. TNT samples placed even 5 m away from the source were detected when the sample headspace vapor was swept by a stream of argon or nitrogen and delivered to the helium plasma ion source via a metal tube. Among the tubing materials investigated, stainless steel showed the best performance for sample delivery. A system with a copper tube, and air as the carrier gas, for example, failed to deliver any detectable amount of TNT to the source. In fact, passing over hot copper appears to be a practical way of removing TNT or other nitroaromatics from ambient air. PMID:22791251

  14. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  15. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  16. FLOATING PRESSURE CONVERSION AND EQUIPMENT UPGRADES OF TWO 3.5KW, 20K, HELIUM REFRIGERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Homan, V. Ganni, A. Sidi-Yekhlef, J. Creel, R. Norton, R. Linza, G. Vargas, J. Lauterbach, J. Urbin, D. Howe

    2010-04-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5 KW at 20 K, are used at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryogenic-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. New changes to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the control issues that necessitated the controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle “floating pressure” control technology. The controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology was the first application on a helium gas refrigeration system. Previous implementations of the floating pressure technology have been on 4 K liquefaction and refrigeration systems, which have stored liquid helium volumes that have level indications used for varying the pressure levels (charge) in the system for capacity modulation. The upgrades have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e. at various loads in the vacuum chambers). The performance data of the two systems, pre and post upgrading are presented.

  17. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  18. A computational modeling study on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Yang, Cong-Ying; Liu, San-Qiu; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Lv, Yan; Wang, De-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is employed to investigate the streamer dynamics in a helium plasma needle at atmospheric pressure. A parametric study of the streamer propagation as a function of needle tip curvature radius and helium gas flow rate is presented. The key chemical reactions at the He/air mixing layer which drive the streamer propagation are the direct ionization via collision with electrons, the Penning effect being not so crucial. With increasing the gas flow rate from 0.2 standard liter per minute (SLM) to 0.8 SLM, however, the emissions resulting from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species change from a solid circle to a hollow profile and the average streamer propagation velocity decreases. Air impurities (backdiffusion from ambient air) in the helium jet result in a significant increase in the streamer propagation velocity. Besides, with decreasing the tip curvature radiusfrom 200 μm to 100 μm, the electron avalanche process around the near-tip region is more pronounced. However, the spatially resolved plasma parameters distributions (electron, helium metastables, ground state atomic oxygen, etc.) remain almost the same, except that around the near-tip region where their peak values are more than doubled. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  19. Measurement of the First Townsend's Ionization Coefficients in Helium, Air, and Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Yue, Yang; Wang, Xinxin

    2014-07-01

    In the past the first Townsend’s ionization coefficient α could only be measured with Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure. After realizing Townsend discharge in some gases at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier electrodes, we had developed a new method for measuring α coefficient at atmospheric pressure, a new optical method based on the discharge images taken with ICCD camera. With this newly developed method α coefficient in helium, nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure were measured. The results were found to be in good agreement with the data obtained at lower pressure but same reduced field E/p by other groups. It seems that the value of α coefficient is sensitive to the purity of the working gas.

  20. Numerical Modeling and Test Data Comparison of Propulsion Test Article Helium Pressurization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Kimberly; Majumdar, Alok; Steadman, Todd; Hedayat, Ali; Fogle, Frank R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A transient model of the propulsion test article (PTA) helium pressurization system was developed using the generalized fluid system simulation program (GFSSP). The model included pressurization lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and liquid oxygen (lox) and rocket propellant-1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space, and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant, and the tank wall as well as conduction in the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 sec of lower feed system priming, 420 sec of fuel and lox pump priming, and 150 sec of engine firing.

  1. Atmospheric pressure discharge plasma decomposition for gaseous air contaminants -- Trichlorotrifluoroethane and trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Tetsuji; Yamashita, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Senichi

    1996-03-01

    The decomposition performance of gaseous environmental destructive contaminants in air by using atmospheric pressure discharged plasma including the surface discharge induced plasma chemical processing (SPCP) was examined. The main contaminants tested were chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene, typically. The discharge exciting frequency range studied was wide--50 Hz to 50 kHz. Results showed the low frequency discharge requires high voltage to inject high electric power in the gas and to decompose the contaminants. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was used to analyze discharge products of dense CFC-113 or trichloroethylene. Among the detected products were HCl, CClFO, and CHCl{sub 3}. Two different electrode configurations; the silent discharge (coaxial) electrode and the coil-electrode were also tested and compared to each other as a gas reactor.

  2. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1983-01-01

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode (1) and cathode (2) to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source (3). An array of resistors (4) or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit (5) producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO.sub.2 laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  3. Columnar discharge mode between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge

    2014-01-15

    Using a fast-gated intensified charge-coupled device, end- and side-view photographs were taken of columnar discharge between parallel dielectric barrier electrodes in atmospheric pressure helium. Based on three-dimensional images generated from end-view photographs, the number of discharge columns increased, whereas the diameter of each column decreased as the applied voltage was increased. Side-view photographs indicate that columnar discharges exhibited a mode transition ranging from Townsend to glow discharges generated by the same discharge physics as atmospheric pressure glow discharge.

  4. Temperature- and pressure-dependent absorption cross sections of gaseous hydrocarbons at 3.39 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingbeil, A. E.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2006-07-01

    The pressure- and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of several neat hydrocarbons and multi-component fuels are measured using a 3.39 µm helium-neon laser. Absorption cross section measurements are reported for methane, ethylene, propane, n-heptane, iso-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, JP-10, gasoline and jet-A with an estimated uncertainty of less than 3.5%. The experimental conditions range from 298 to 673 K and from 500 to 2000 Torr with nitrogen as the bath gas. An apparatus is designed to facilitate these measurements, and specific care is taken to ensure the compositional accuracy of the hydrocarbon/N2 mixtures. The absorption cross sections of the smallest hydrocarbons, methane and ethylene, vary with temperature and pressure. The cross sections of larger hydrocarbons show negligible dependence on pressure and only a weak dependence on temperature. The reported data increase the range of conditions and the number of hydrocarbons for which cross section measurements are available at the HeNe laser wavelength.

  5. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though density-functional-theory-based first-principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational efficiency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quantification of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) -based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures at thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC-based force estimators and use them to gain insight into how well the local liquid structure is captured by different density functionals. We find that TPSS, BLYP, and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative differences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and we estimate the magnitudes of these effects when possible.

  6. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Maguel A.

    2016-01-19

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though DFT based rst principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational e ciency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quanti cation of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures atmore » thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC based force estimators and use them to gain insights into how well the local liquid structure is captured by di erent density functionals. We nd that TPSS, BLYP and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative di erences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and estimate the magnitudes of these e ects when possible.« less

  7. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  8. Implementing and Evaluating a Sequence of Instruction on Gaseous Pressure with Pre-Service Primary School Student Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Neil; Lucas, Keith B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a teaching sequence on gaseous pressure implemented in a group of pre-service primary teachers in Fiji that provides subjects with a strong visual model of particle behavior which they then applied to a series of collaborative science activities for which they attempted to construct explanations. Suggests that this teaching sequence…

  9. High pressure liquid and gaseous oxygen impact sensitivity evaluation of materials for use at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of materials in contact with gaseous oxygen (GOX) or liquid oxygen (LOX) was examined. Specifically, the reactivity of materials when in contact with GOX or LOX if subjected to such stimuli as mechanical impact, adiabatic compression (pneumatic impact), or an electrical discharge in the form of a spark were examined. Generally, materials are more sensitive in gaseous oxygen than in liquid oxygen and impact sensitivity is known to increase with increasing pressure. Materials presently being used or considered for use in oxygen systems at KSC were evaluated. Results are given in tabular form.

  10. Equilibrium separation in a high pressure helium plasma and its application to the determination of temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodero, A.; Garcia, M.C.; Gamero, A.

    1995-12-31

    The spectroscopy method based on the Boltzmann-plot of emission lines has been usually employed for measuring the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) in high pressure plasmas. In the present work, it is shown that this method can produce great errors in the temperature determination when equilibrium separation exists. In this way, the suitability of this determination is tested comparing with other alternative methods in a high pressure helium plasma and also studying its separation from the equilibrium situation, via the absolute population measurements of atomic levels and the estimation of its atomic state distribution function (ASDF). We have made this study using a new excitation structure, the axial injection torch (Torche A Injection Axiale or T.I.A.), which produces a high power microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure. The measurements were carried out at the beginning of the flame (the highest line intensity zone) for a 300-900 W power range at 2.45 GHz and 71/min. of helium gas flow.

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Modelling of streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidis, G. V.

    2010-10-01

    The results of a two-dimensional numerical simulation of positive streamer propagation in atmospheric-pressure helium jets injected into ambient air are presented. It is shown that depending on the jet width and the initial radial distribution of electron number density streamer structures of two types can be formed: one with maxima of electric field and electron density at the jet axis and another with maxima of these parameters near the boundary between the jet and surrounding air. The latter structure is similar to the observed ring-shaped structures of plasma bullets.

  12. SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers. [for Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A.; Wilcox, R. A.; Spivak, A. L.; Daney, D. E.; Woodhouse, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    A venturi flowmeter has been designed and constructed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment. The calibration results obtained from the SHOOT venturi demonstrate the ability of the flowmeter to meet the requirements of the SHOOT experiment. Flow rates as low as 20 cu dm/h and as high as 800 cu dm/h have been measured. Performances of the SHOOT differential and absolute pressure transducers, which have undergone calibration and vibration tests, are also included. Throughout the tests, the responses of the transducers remained linear and repeatable to within + or - 1 percent of the full scales of the transducers.

  13. Optical properties of the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet generated by alternative current (a.c.) power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilik, Erkan; Akan, Tamer

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was produced to generate cold flowing post-discharge plasma of pure helium gas. The main aim of this study was to generate cold flowing APPJ of pure helium gas and to determine how their optical emission spectrum change influences varying different flow rates. Lengths of early, middle, and late post-discharge plasma (jet) regions and their fluctuations were determined, respectively. Then, ignition condition dependence of the post-discharge plasma for flow rate was specified at a constant voltage. Spectroscopic studies of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet of helium were presented via analyzing OH, N2, N2+, oxygen, and helium intensities for various flow rates.

  14. Cold Helium Pressurization for Liquid Oxygen / Liquid Methane Propulsion Systems: Fully-Integrated Initial Hot-Fire Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehead, R. L.; Atwell, M. J.; Melcher, J. C.; Hurlbert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype cold helium active pressurization system was incorporated into an existing liquid oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane (LCH4) prototype planetary lander and hot-fire tested to collect vehicle-level performance data. Results from this hot-fire test series were used to validate integrated models of the vehicle helium and propulsion systems and demonstrate system effectiveness for a throttling lander. Pressurization systems vary greatly in complexity and efficiency between vehicles, so a pressurization performance metric was also developed as a means to compare different active pressurization schemes. This implementation of an active repress system is an initial sizing draft. Refined implementations will be tested in the future, improving the general knowledge base for a cryogenic lander-based cold helium system.

  15. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  16. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  17. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy characterization of gaseous atmospheric pressure plasmas with 2 mm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, G.; Vallade, J.; Bazinette, R.; Hernandez, E.; Hernandez, G.; Massines, F.; Nijnatten, P. van

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes an optical setup built to record Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra in an atmospheric pressure plasma with a spatial resolution of 2 mm. The overall system consisted of three basic parts: (1) optical components located within the FTIR sample compartment, making it possible to define the size of the infrared beam (2 mm Multiplication-Sign 2 mm over a path length of 50 mm) imaged at the site of the plasma by (2) an optical interface positioned between the spectrometer and the plasma reactor. Once through the plasma region, (3) a retro-reflector module, located behind the plasma reactor, redirected the infrared beam coincident to the incident path up to a 45 Degree-Sign beamsplitter to reflect the beam toward a narrow-band mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. The antireflective plasma-coating experiments performed with ammonia and silane demonstrated that it was possible to quantify 42 and 2 ppm of these species in argon, respectively. In the case of ammonia, this was approximately three times less than this gas concentration typically used in plasma coating experiments while the silane limit of quantification was 35 times lower. Moreover, 70% of the incoming infrared radiation was focused within a 2 mm width at the site of the plasma, in reasonable agreement with the expected spatial resolution. The possibility of reaching this spatial resolution thus enabled us to measure the gaseous precursor consumption as a function of their residence time in the plasma.

  18. Variable Temperature Setup for Scanning Electron Microscopy in Liquids and Atmospheric Pressure Gaseous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Asadi, Ahmed; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jianbo; Denault, Lauraine; Potyrailo, Radislav; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2014-03-01

    A thermoelectric cooling / heating setup for commercial Quantomix QX WETSEM scanning electron microscopy environmental cells was designed and tested. This addition allows extending ambient pressure in situ studies to be conducted in a wide temperature range both in liquid and gaseous environments. Instead of cooling/heating the entire body of QX-WETCELL, ultrathin polyimide electron transparent membrane window supported by metal mesh on the top of the cell has been used as an agent for heat transfer to/ from the Pelltier element. A butterfly wing of Morph sulkowskyi has been used as a model object in the QX-WETCELL's chamber due to its unique micro/nanostructure and peculiar wettability behavior. The dynamics of the water desorption, condensation and freezing processes were observed complementary using both optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy in vivo. The observations revel that the initial droplet formation were most likely taking place on the top of the wing ridges due to the waxy component of its surface. In addition, The SEM observation showed that the high intensity electron beam can heat the butterfly wing locally delaying the water condensation and freezing processes.

  19. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

  20. Gas Breakdown of Radio Frequency Glow Discharges in Helium at near Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinkun; Xu, Jinzhou; Cui, Tongfei; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2013-07-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was developed for radio frequency glow discharge in helium at near atmospheric pressure, and was employed to study the gas breakdown characteristics in terms of breakdown voltage. The effective secondary electron emission coefficient and the effective electric field for ions were demonstrated to be important for determining the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge at near atmospheric pressure. The constant of A was estimated to be 64±4 cm-1Torr-1, which was proportional to the first Townsend coefficient and could be employed to evaluate the gas breakdown voltage. The reduction in the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge with excitation frequency was studied and attributed to the electron trapping effect in the discharge gap.

  1. The role of helium metastable states in radio-frequency driven helium-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jets: measurement and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, K.; Waskoenig, J.; Sadeghi, N.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-10-01

    Absolute densities of metastable He(23S1) atoms were measured line-of-sight integrated along the discharge channel of a capacitively coupled radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in technologically relevant helium-oxygen mixtures by tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy. The dependences of the He(23S1) density in the homogeneous-glow-like α-mode plasma with oxygen admixtures up to 1% were investigated. The results are compared with a one-dimensional numerical simulation, which includes a semi-kinetical treatment of the pronounced electron dynamics and the complex plasma chemistry (in total 20 species and 184 reactions). Very good agreement between measurement and simulation is found. The main formation mechanisms for metastable helium atoms are identified and analyzed, including their pronounced spatio-temporal dynamics. Penning ionization through helium metastables is found to be significant for plasma sustainment, while it is revealed that helium metastables are not an important energy carrying species into the jet effluent and therefore will not play a direct role in remote surface treatments.

  2. Use of a torsional pendulum as a high-pressure gage and determination of viscosity of helium gas at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.; Webeler, R. W. H.; Grimes, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Three torsional crystal parameters were examined for suitability in sensing pressure in gases up to 131 million newtons per square meter. The best parameters were found to be the change in crystal decrement at resonance and the change in crystal electrical resistance at resonance. The change in crystal resonant frequency did not appear to be a reliable pressure measuring parameter. Pure argon and pure helium gases were studied for use as working fluids. Helium functioned better over a wider pressure range. Calibration of the gage also provided a measure of the viscosity-density product of the gas as a function of pressure. These data, together with known extrapolated density data, permitted the determination of the viscosity of helium to 131 million N/square meter.

  3. Laser diagnostics on atmospheric-pressure low-temperature helium pulsed plasmas in room- and cryogenic-temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Noritaka; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Yasui, Ryoma; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    In atmospheric-pressure low- temperature plasmas, the control of the plasma gas temperature (Tg) by a few kelvin is considered to be crucial for their applications to novel materials processing such as bio-materials. However, there have been only few studies that focused on the influence of Tg on the plasma characteristics. On the other hand, it was reported that helium metastables played a key role in the dependency of chemical reactions on Tg in helium-nitrogen plasmas. In this study, laser diagnostics were carried out in atmospheric-pressure helium pulsed plasmas near or below room temperature, at 340 -100 K. Parallel electrodes of copper rods (diameter: 2 mm) with a gap distance of 535 μm were used and pulsed discharges with a pulse width of a few hundred nanoseconds were generated inside a reactor. The density and lifetime of helium metastables were estimated by laser absorption spectroscopy measurements and Tg was evaluated by near-infrared laser heterodyne interferometry measurements. At 300 K, the helium metastable density was 1.5 × 1013 cm-3 while the lifetime was 3.1 μs, and increase in Tg was up to 70 K. Dependency of the density and lifetime of helium metastables on Tg was observed and also discussed.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Helium Pressurization System of Propulsion Test Article (PTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Todd; Majumdar, Alok; Holt, Kimberly

    2001-01-01

    A transient model of the Propulsion Test Article (PTA) Helium Pressurization System was developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The model included feed lines from the facility interface to the engine purge interface and Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Rocket Propellant 1 (RP-1) tanks, the propellant tanks themselves including ullage space and propellant feed lines to their respective pump interfaces. GFSSP's capability was extended to model a control valve to maintain ullage pressure within a specified limit and pressurization processes such as heat transfer between ullage gas, propellant and the tank wall. The purpose of the model is to predict the flow system characteristics in the entire pressurization system during 80 seconds of lower feed system priming, 420 seconds of fuel and LOX pump priming and 150 seconds of engine firing. Subsequent to the work presented here, the PTA model has been updated to include the LOX and RP-1 pumps, while the pressurization option itself has been modified to include the effects of mass transfer. This updated model will be compared with PTA test data as it becomes available.

  5. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge working in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.

  6. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction at Constant Pressure : Further Data on the Effect of Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1932-01-01

    An investigation of gaseous explosive reactions is discussed in this report. Measurements were taken to calculate the maximum flame temperature attained and making correlations with existing thermal data on this reaction.

  7. Electric field development in γ-mode radiofrequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Zdeněk; Josepson, Raavo; Cvetanović, Nikola; Obradović, Bratislav; Dvořák, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Time development of electric field strength during radio-frequency sheath formation was measured using Stark polarization spectroscopy in a helium γ-mode radio-frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) atmospheric pressure glow discharge at high current density (3 A cm-2). A method of time-correlated single photon counting was applied to record the temporal development of spectral profile of He I 492.2 nm line with a sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. By fitting the measured profile of the line with a combination of pseudo-Voigt profiles for forbidden (2 1P-4 1F) and allowed (2 1P-4 1D) helium lines, instantaneous electric fields up to 32 kV cm-1 were measured in the RF sheath. The measured electric field is in agreement with the spatially averaged value of 40 kV cm-1 estimated from homogeneous charge density RF sheath model. The observed rectangular waveform of the electric field time development is attributed to increased sheath conductivity by the strong electron avalanches occurring in the γ-mode sheath at high current densities.

  8. Effects of the air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of gaseous iodine molecules at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rongwei; He, Ping; Chen, Deying; Xia, Yuanqin; Yu, Xin; Wang, Jialing; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-02-01

    Based on ultrafast laser pulses, time-resolved resonance enhancement coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RE-CARS) is applied to investigate wave-packet dynamics in gaseous iodine. The effects of air pressure on the wave-packet dynamics of iodine molecules are studied at pressures ranging from 1.5 Torr to 750 Torr. The RE-CARS signals are recorded in a gas cell filled with a mixture of about 0.3 Torr iodine in air buffer gas at room temperature. The revivals and fractional revival structures in the wave-packet signal are found to gradually disappear with rising air pressure up to 750 Torr, and the decay behaviors of the excited B-state and ground X-state become faster with increasing air pressure, which is due to the collision effects of the molecules and the growing complexity of the spectra at high pressures.

  9. Helium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: Diagnostics and Application for Burned Wounds Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, Ionut; Nastuta, Andrei

    A new field of plasma applications developed in the last years, entitled plasma medicine, has focused the attention of many peoples from plasma ­community on biology and medicine. Subjects that involve plasma physics and technology (e.g. living tissue treatment or wound healing, cancer cell apoptosis, blood coagulation, sterilization and decontamination) are nowadays in study in many laboratories. In this paper we present results on optical and electrical diagnosis of a helium ­atmospheric pressure plasma jet designed for medical use. This type of plasma jet was used for improvement of the wound healing process. We observed a more rapid macroscopic healing of the plasma treated wounds in comparison with the control group.

  10. Three-dimensional simulation of microwave-induced helium plasma under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. L.; Hua, W.; Guo, S. Y.; Liu, Z. L.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented to investigate helium plasma generated by microwave under atmospheric pressure in this paper, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron and heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The model is based on the fluid approximation calculation and local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The simulation results demonstrate that the maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.79 × 1017 m-3 and 1667 K, respectively, for the operating conditions with microwave power of 500 W, gas flow rate of 20 l/min, and initial gas temperature of 500 K. The electromagnetic field distribution in the plasma source is obtained by solving Helmholtz equation. Electric field strength of 2.97 × 104 V/m is obtained. There is a broad variation on microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial gas temperature to obtain deeper information about the changes of the electron density and gas temperature.

  11. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect

    Algwari, Q. Th.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  12. Helium/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment for hydrophilicity improvement of grey cotton knitted fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Liqiang; Nie, Huali; Chatterton, Nicholas P.; Branford-White, Christopher J.; Qiu, Yiping; Zhu, Limin

    2011-06-01

    The influence of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment on the hydrophilicity of grey cotton knitted fabric (GCKF) was investigated. For comparison, specimens which had undergone different treatments were tested by contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that helium/oxygen APPJ could improve the hydrophilicity of GCKF by modifying the surface properties. In addition, combining dewaxing processes with He/O 2 APPJ treatment was found to tremendously improve the hydrophilicity of GCKF. The mechanism of this was also confirmed by Ruthenium Red staining which showed most of pectic substances inside the cotton fiber existed beneath the waxy layer and on top of the cellulose microfibril.

  13. Methods used to investigate and resolve the Space Shuttle helium pressure regulator instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; Abe, Jimi T.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main propulsion system (MPS) has seven 750-psia regulators used to purge the Space Shuttle main engines to prevent mixture between oxygen and hydrogen and to pneumatically actuate the propellant valves. Methods used to investigate the instability of the MPS regulators which caused a failure of the 750-psia regulator during a test in 1986 are discussed, with special attention given to the analytical tools and the facilities. As a result of this investigation, a well-understood regulator was designed, with excellent stability over a wide range of inlet pressures from 900 to 4500 psia, flow rates from 1 to 2000 scfm, very fast response, minimal overshoot and undershoot, and durable cycle life. Diagrams of the MPS helium system and of a new -0006 fail-safe improved-stability regulator are presented.

  14. CO2-helium and CO2-neon mixtures at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Mallick, B; Ninet, S; Le Marchand, G; Munsch, P; Datchi, F

    2013-01-28

    The properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with helium or neon have been investigated as a function of CO(2) concentration and pressure up to 30 GPa at room temperature. The binary phase diagrams of these mixtures are determined over the full range of CO(2) concentrations using visual observations and Raman scattering measurements. Both diagrams are of eutectic type, with a fluid-fluid miscibility gap for CO(2) concentrations in the range [5, 75] mol. % for He and [8, 55] mol. % for Ne, and a complete separation between the two components in the solid phase. The absence of alloys or stoichiometric compounds for these two binary systems is consistent with the Hume-Rothery rules of hard sphere mixtures. The Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction patterns of solid CO(2) embedded in He or Ne for various initial concentrations have been measured up to 30 GPa and 12 GPa, respectively. The frequencies of the Raman modes and the volume of solid phase I are identical, within error bars, to those reported for 100% CO(2) samples, thus confirming the total immiscibility of CO(2) with He and Ne in the solid phase. These results demonstrate the possibility to perform high-pressure experiments on solid CO(2) under (quasi-)hydrostatic conditions using He or Ne as pressure transmitting medium. PMID:23387603

  15. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  16. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  17. Measurement of O and OH radical produced by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet nearby rat skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is getting much attention because it enables many kinds of plasma applications including biomedical application such as sterilization and cancer treatment. In biomedical plasma applications, it is though that active species like ions and radicals play important role. Especially, OH radical and O atom is very chemically reactive that they are deemed as major factors in cancer treatment. In this study, O and OH density distribution and its temporal behavior nearby rat skin were measured to demonstrate actual application. Plasma discharge was under AC10 kVp-p, 10 kHz with 1.5 slm (standard litter per minute) of helium gas flow. OH density was around 1 ppm and O atom density was around 10 ppm at maximum. We also measured time-evolution of OH and O atom density. Both OH and O density was almost constant between discharge pulses because lifetime of active species could be prolonged in helium. And density distribution of both species varied depending on helium flow rate and water concentration on the surface; on rat skin or on the grass surface. Those results suggest the production mechanisms and provision mechanisms of O atom and OH radical by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet. This work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  18. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  19. Hydrogen Absorption into Austenitic Stainless Steels Under High-Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen and Cathodic Charge in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Masato; Cheng, Lin; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Omura, Tomohiko; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Okuma, Ryuji

    2014-12-01

    Type 316L and Type 304 austenitic stainless steels, both deformed and non-deformed, were hydrogen charged cathodically in an aqueous solution as well as by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen in an attempt to identify suitable conditions of cathodic charge for simulating hydrogen absorption from gaseous hydrogen environments. Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was conducted, and the amount of absorbed hydrogen and the spectrum shape were compared between the two charging methods. Simulations were performed by means of the McNabb-Foster model to analyze the spectrum shape and peak temperature, and understand the effects of deformation on the spectra. It was revealed that the spectrum shape and peak temperature were dependent directly upon the initial distribution of hydrogen within the specimen, which varied widely according to the hydrogen charge condition. Deformation also had a marked effect on the amount of absorbed hydrogen in Type 304 steel due to the strain-induced martensitic transformation.

  20. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1985-04-01

    This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

  1. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  2. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  3. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines in free-piston Stirling engine research is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving the helium-charged free-piston Stirling engines. The underdamped flow regime is described, the primary resonance frequency is derived, and the pressure phase and amplitude distortion are discussed. The scope and limitation of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  4. Thermophysical properties of Helium-4 from 0.8 to 1500 K with pressures to 2000 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arp, Vincent D.; Mccarty, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Tabular summary data of the thermophysical properties of fluid helium are given for temperatures from 0.8 to 1500 K, with pressures to 2000 MPa between 75 and 300 K, or to 100 MPa outside of this temperature band. Properties include density, specific heats, enthalpy, entropy, internal energy, sound velocity, expansivity, compressibility, thermal conductivity, and viscosity. The data are calculated from a computer program which is available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The computer program is based on carefully fitted state equations for both normal and superfluid helium.

  5. Protein destruction by a helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge: Capability and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-04-01

    Biological sterilization represents one of the most exciting applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD). Despite the fact that surgical instruments are contaminated by both microorganisms and proteinaceous matters, sterilization effects of APGD have so far been studied almost exclusively for microbial inactivation. This work presents the results of a detailed investigation of the capability of a helium-oxygen APGD to inactivate proteins deposited on stainless-steel surfaces. Using a laser-induced fluorescence technique for surface protein measurement, a maximum protein reduction of 4.5 logs is achieved by varying the amount of the oxygen admixture into the background helium gas. This corresponds to a minimum surface protein of 0.36 femtomole/mm2. It is found that plasma reduction of surface-borne protein is through protein destruction and degradation, and that its typically biphasic reduction kinetics is influenced largely by the thickness profile of the surface protein. Also presented is a complementary study of possible APGD protein inactivation mechanisms. By interplaying the protein inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, it is shown that the main protein-destructing agents are excited atomic oxygen (via the 777 and 844 nm emission channels) and excited nitride oxide (via the 226, 236, and 246 nm emission channels). It is also demonstrated that the most effective protein reduction is achieved possibly through a synergistic effect between atomic oxygen and nitride oxide. This study is a useful step toward a full confirmation of the efficacy of APGD as a sterilization technology for surgical instruments contaminated by prion proteins.

  6. Protein destruction by a helium atmospheric pressure glow discharge: Capability and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-04-01

    Biological sterilization represents one of the most exciting applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD). Despite the fact that surgical instruments are contaminated by both microorganisms and proteinaceous matters, sterilization effects of APGD have so far been studied almost exclusively for microbial inactivation. This work presents the results of a detailed investigation of the capability of a helium-oxygen APGD to inactivate proteins deposited on stainless-steel surfaces. Using a laser-induced fluorescence technique for surface protein measurement, a maximum protein reduction of 4.5 logs is achieved by varying the amount of the oxygen admixture into the background helium gas. This corresponds to a minimum surface protein of 0.36 femtomole/mm{sup 2}. It is found that plasma reduction of surface-borne protein is through protein destruction and degradation, and that its typically biphasic reduction kinetics is influenced largely by the thickness profile of the surface protein. Also presented is a complementary study of possible APGD protein inactivation mechanisms. By interplaying the protein inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, it is shown that the main protein-destructing agents are excited atomic oxygen (via the 777 and 844 nm emission channels) and excited nitride oxide (via the 226, 236, and 246 nm emission channels). It is also demonstrated that the most effective protein reduction is achieved possibly through a synergistic effect between atomic oxygen and nitride oxide. This study is a useful step toward a full confirmation of the efficacy of APGD as a sterilization technology for surgical instruments contaminated by prion proteins.

  7. Features of the temperature dependence of pressure of solid helium at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisunov, A. A.; Maidanov, V. A.; Rubanskii, V. Y.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskii, E. Y.; Rybalko, A. S.; Syrkin, E. S.

    2012-06-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to investigate the conditions of formation of a disordered (glass-like) state in crystals of 3He. With the help of precise measurements of pressure at constant volume it has been established that a glass phase is formed easily in rapidly cooled crystals grown under homogeneous temperature conditions in the presence of large numbers of nucleation centers. This phase can be removed only by careful annealing. This result has been found in both 3He and 4He, and is independent of type of quantum statistics and determined mainly by crystal growth conditions. An analysis of similar measurements has been performed using a different cell where during the crystal growth a directed temperature gradient was created. In this case, additional defects created as a result of deformation of the crystal were necessary to form a glass-like phase. The degree of deformation of a crystal, achievable in the experiment, was sufficient to form a glass-like phase in solid 4He, but not in a crystal of 3He where the atoms have a large amplitude of zero-point oscillations. Analyzing a temperature dependence of pressure, a study of the features of a phonon contribution to the pressure was also carried out. It was found that in both crystals 3He and 4He at different thicknesses of samples the phonon pressure differs by several times. This effect is qualitatively explained by that that in thin samples an interaction among layers of atoms becomes stronger. This leads to decreasing the phonon contribution to the thermodynamic properties of the helium crystal at low temperatures.

  8. Influence of dielectric materials on radial uniformity in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akinori; Komori, Kyohei

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma has been utilized for various technological applications such as surface treatment, materials processing, bio-medical and bio-logical applications. For optimum control of the plasma for the above applications, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations on the plasma have been reported. Especially, controlling radial uniformity of the plasma are very important for utilizing materials processing. In this paper, an axially-symmetric three-dimensional fluid model, which is composed of the continuity equation for charged and neutral species, the Poisson equation, and the energy conservation equation for electrons, of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma has been developed. Then, influence of dielectric properties (e.g. relative permittivity, secondary electron emission coefficient, etc.) of dielectric materials on radial plasma uniformity (i.e. radial distributions of electron density, ion density, electric field in the plasma) was examined. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (No. 26420247), and a ``Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development (No. 11B06004d)'' in 2011 from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  9. Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan; Linza, Robert; Garcia, Sam; Vargas, Gerardo; Lauterbach, John; Ganni, Venkatarao (Rao); Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Creel, Jonathan; Norton, Robert; Urbin, John; Howe, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two helium refrigerators, each rated for 3.5KW at 20K, are used at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Building No. 32 to provide cryo-pumping within two large thermal-vacuum chambers. These refrigerators were originally commissioned in 1996. Equipment refurbishment and upgrades to the controls of these refrigerators were recently completed. This paper describes some of the mechanical and control issues that necessitated the equipment refurbishment and controls change-over. It will describe the modifications and the new process control which allows the refrigerators to take advantage of the Ganni Cycle "floating pressure" control technology. The upgrades -- the controls philosophy change-over to the floating pressure control technology and the newly refurbished equipment -- have greatly improved the performance, stability, and efficiency of these two refrigerators. The upgrades have also given the operators more information and details about the operational status of the main components (compressors, expanders etc.) of the refrigerators at all operating conditions (i.e.: at various loads in the vacuum chambers). Capabilities, configuration, and performance data pre, and post, upgrading will be presented.

  10. Quantitative deuterium analysis of titanium samples in ultraviolet laser-induced low-pressure helium plasma.

    PubMed

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Tjung Jie; Jobiliong, Eric; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Fukumoto, Ken-Ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On

    2010-04-01

    An experimental study of ultraviolet (UV) laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) on Ti samples with low-pressure surrounding He gas has been carried out to demonstrate its applicability to quantitative micro-analysis of deuterium impurities in titanium without the spectral interference from the ubiquitous surface water. This was achieved by adopting the optimal experimental condition ascertained in this study, which is specified by 5 mJ laser energy, 10 Torr helium pressure, and 1-50 mus measurement window, which resulted in consistent D emission enhancement and effective elimination of spectral interference from surface water. As a result, a linear calibration line exhibiting a zero intercept was obtained from Ti samples doped with various D impurity concentrations. An additional measurement also yielded a detection limit of about 40 ppm for D impurity, well below the acceptable threshold of damaging H concentration in Ti and its alloys. Each of these measurements was found to produce a crater size of only 25 mum in diameter, and they may therefore qualify as nondestructive measurements. The result of this study has therefore paved the way for conducting further experiments with hydrogen-doped Ti samples and the technical implementation of quantitative micro-analysis of detrimental hydrogen impurity in Ti metal and its alloys, which is the ultimate goal of this study. PMID:20412619

  11. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol in helium: the effect of carrier gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Stratmann, Frank

    2006-04-28

    Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor of 1-propanol was studied using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a noncondensable carrier gas and the influence of its pressure on observed nucleation rates was investigated. The isothermal nucleation rates were determined by a photographic method that is independent on any nucleation theory. In this method, the trajectories of growing droplets are recorded using a charge coupled device camera and the distribution of local nucleation rates is determined by image analysis. The nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol were carried out at four isotherms 260, 270, 280, and 290 K. In addition, the pressure dependence was investigated on the isotherms 290 K (50, 120, and 180 kPa) and 280 K (50 and 120 kPa). The isotherm 270 K was measured at 25 kPa and the isotherm 260 K at 20 kPa. The experiments confirm the earlier observations from several thermal diffusion chamber investigations that the homogeneous nucleation rate of 1-propanol tends to increase with decreasing total pressure in the chamber. In order to reduce the possibility that the observed phenomenon is an experimental artifact, connected with the generally used one-dimensional description of transfer processes in the chamber, a recently developed two-dimensional model of coupled heat, mass, and momentum transfer inside the chamber was used and results of both models were compared. It can be concluded that the implementation of the two-dimensional model does not explain the observed effect. Furthermore the obtained results were compared both to the predictions of the classical theory and to the results of other investigators using different experimental devices. Plotting the experimental data on the so-called Hale plot shows that our data seem to be consistent both internally and also with the data of others. Using the nucleation theorem the critical cluster sizes were obtained from the slopes of the individual isotherms

  12. Magnetic roller gas gate employing transonic sweep gas flow to isolate regions of differing gaseous composition or pressure

    DOEpatents

    Doehler, Joachim

    1994-12-20

    Disclosed herein is an improved gas gate for interconnecting regions of differing gaseous composition and/or pressure. The gas gate includes a narrow, elongated passageway through which substrate material is adapted to move between said regions and inlet means for introducing a flow of non-contaminating sweep gas into a central portion of said passageway. The gas gate is characterized in that the height of the passageway and the flow rate of the sweep gas therethrough provides for transonic flow of the sweep gas between the inlet means and at least one of the two interconnected regions, thereby effectively isolating one region, characterized by one composition and pressure, from another region, having a differing composition and/or pressure, by decreasing the mean-free-path length between collisions of diffusing species within the transonic flow region. The gas gate preferably includes a manifold at the juncture point where the gas inlet means and the passageway interconnect.

  13. Collisional-radiative model of helium microwave discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Gadonna, K.; Belmonte, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together

  14. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  15. Parametric Investigations of an Atmospheric pressure Uniform Glow Discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Gadri, Rami

    1997-11-01

    In the cold plasma processing field, applications of the atmospheric pressure uniform glow discharge are numerous. Among them one can mention the increase of the surface energy of materials, the cleaning and etching of surfaces, and the decontamination and sterilization. The development of the glow regime at atmospheric pressure permits to avoid the technical and economical drawbacks of low pressure glow discharge systems. It also increases the efficiency of the surface treatment as compared to the corona discharge. In these conditions, a glow regime is obtained and studied in particular experimental conditions. The working gas is helium, the frequency in the range 1-20 kHz, the gap distance of some mm and the metallic electrodes are covered by a dielectric layer. The current is characterized by one peak per half cycle and is typically in the range of a few tens of mA. Since this discharge involves complex nonlinear processes and is sensitive to the variation of its parameters, detailed experimental (Ph. Decomps (1996), PhD thesis, Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse France, No d'ordre 2538.) and numerical studies, covering wide ranges of system parameters, were required. These investigations allowed the determination of the optimal operating conditions for which the discharge remains of the glow type, and therefore induces a better surface treatment. In this paper the detailed theory ( Ben Gadri R., Rabehi A., Massines F. and Segur P. (1994), XIIth Eur. Sect. Conf. on the At. & Mol. Phy. of Ionized Gases, The Netherlands, 23-26 August, pp. 228-229.) of the one dimensional f luid model and a parametric study of the discharge characteristics are presented. A particular attention will be given to the influence of the different system parameters on the operational mode of the discharge.

  16. On the dynamic response of pressure transmission lines in the research of helium-charged free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric L.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1989-01-01

    In free piston Stirling engine research the integrity of both amplitude and phase of the dynamic pressure measurements is critical to the characterization of cycle dynamics and thermodynamics. It is therefore necessary to appreciate all possible sources of signal distortion when designing pressure measurement systems for this type of research. The signal distortion inherent to pressure transmission lines is discussed. Based on results from classical analysis, guidelines are formulated to describe the dynamic response properties of a volume-terminated transmission tube for applications involving helium-charged free piston Stirling engines. The scope and limitations of the dynamic response analysis are considered.

  17. The Influence of Polymer Film on an Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Helium*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Gagik; Graham, William

    2004-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) have potential in polymer surface modification. Here the affect of low density polyethylene (LDPE) film, placed on the electrodes and in the inter-electrode gap, on the development and the uniformity of pulsed APGDs in helium has been studied using short exposure time images and emission spectroscopy of the gap. The APGD was generated between two parallel, glass-ceramic plates, covering metallic mesh electrodes driven by a sinusoidal (5 kV peak to peak) voltage at a frequency of 30 kHz. The build-up of the APGD started from a weak luminous region near the anode followed by the formation of a bright negative glow. When the film was tightly pressed to one of the dielectric plates the intensity of the negative glow decreased and after about 5 minutes the discharge became spatially non-uniform. When the film was stretched through the middle of the gap, it behaved like a dielectric barrier splitting the gap into two APGD regions i.e. with a negative glow on both sides. The affect of the film on the emission spectroscopy and on the electric characteristics will be discussed.

  18. Helium Pressure Shift of the Hyperfine Clock Transition in Hg-201(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larigani, S. Taghavi; Burt, E. A.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave atomic clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). We are investigating the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+) in a configuration that uses a buffer gas to increase ion loading efficiency and counter ion heating from rf trapping fields. Traditionally, either helium or neon is used as the buffer gas at approx. 10(exp -5) torr to confine mercury ions near room temperature. In addition to the buffer gas, other residual background gasses such as H2O, N2, O2, CO, CO2, and CH2 may be present in trace quantities. Collisions between trapped ions and buffer gas or background gas atoms/molecules produce a momentary shift of the ion clock transition frequency and constitute one of the largest systematic effects in this type of clock. Here we report an initial measurement of the He pressure shift in Hg-201(+) and compare this to Hg-199(+).

  19. Crater effects on H and D emission from laser induced low-pressure helium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pardede, Marincan; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On

    2009-09-15

    An experimental study has been performed on the effects of crater depth on the hydrogen and deuterium emission intensities measured from laser plasmas generated in low-pressure helium ambient gas from zircaloy-4 samples doped with different H and D impurity concentrations as well as a standard brass sample for comparison. The results show that aside from emission of the host atom, the emission intensities of other ablated atoms of significantly smaller masses as well as that of the He atom generally exhibit relatively rapid initial decline with increasing crater depth. This trend was found to have its origin in the decreasing laser power density arriving at the crater bottom and thereby weakened the shock wave generated in the crater. As the crater deepened, the declining trend of the intensity appeared to level off as a result of compensation of the decreasing laser power density by the enhanced plasma confinement at increasing crater depth. Meanwhile, the result also reveals the significant contribution of the He-assisted excitation process to the doped hydrogen and deuterium emission intensities, leading to similar crater-depth dependent variation patterns in contrast to that associated with the surface water, with growing dominance of this common feature at the later stage of the plasma expansion. Therefore, a carefully chosen set of gate delay and gate width which are properly adapted to the crater-depth dependent behavior of the emission intensity may produce the desired intrinsic emission data for quantitative depth profiling of H impurity trapped inside the zircaloy wall.

  20. Array of surface-confined glow discharges in atmospheric pressure helium: Modes and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Liu, D. X. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, H. P.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com

    2014-05-19

    Array of atmospheric pressure surface discharges confined by a two-dimensional hexagon electrode mesh is studied for its discharge modes and temporal evolution so as to a theoretical underpinning to their growing applications in medicine, aerodynamic control, and environmental remediation. Helium plasma surface-confined by one hexagon-shaped rim electrode is shown to evolve from a Townsend mode to a normal and abnormal glow mode, and its evolution develops from the rim electrodes as six individual microdischarges merging in the middle of the hexagon mesh element. Within one hexagon element, microdischarges remain largely static with the mesh electrode being the instantaneous cathode, but move towards the hexagon center when the electrode is the instantaneous anode. On the entire array electrode surface, plasma ignition is found to beat an unspecific hexagon element and then spreads to ignite surrounding hexagon elements. The spreading of microdischarges is in the form of an expanding circle at a speed of about 3 × 10{sup 4} m/s, and their quenching starts in the location of the initial plasma ignition. Plasma modes influence how input electrical power is used to generate and accelerate electrons and as such the reaction chemistry, whereas plasma dynamics are central to understand and control plasma instabilities. The present study provides an important aspect of plasma physics of the atmospheric surface-confined discharge array and a theoretical underpinning to its future technological innovation.

  1. Simulation of Oxygen Disintegration and Mixing With Hydrogen or Helium at Supercritical Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Taskinoglu, Ezgi

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of high-pressure turbulent flows, where the pressure, p, is larger than the critical value, p(sub c), for the species under consideration, is relevant to a wide array of propulsion systems, e.g. gas turbine, diesel, and liquid rocket engines. Most turbulence models, however, have been developed for atmospheric-p turbulent flows. The difference between atmospheric-p and supercritical-p turbulence is that, in the former situation, the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamics is moderate to negligible, but for the latter it is very significant, and can dominate the flow characteristics. The reason for this stems from the mathematical form of the equation of state (EOS), which is the perfect-gas EOS in the former case, and the real-gas EOS in the latter case. For flows at supercritical pressure, p, the large eddy simulation (LES) equations consist of the differential conservation equations coupled with a real-gas EOS. The equations use transport properties that depend on the thermodynamic variables. Compared to previous LES models, the differential equations contain not only the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, but also new SGS terms, each denoted as a correction. These additional terms, typically assumed null for atmospheric pressure flows, stem from filtering the differential governing equations, and represent differences between a filtered term and the same term computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In particular, the energy equation contains a heat-flux correction (q-correction) that is the difference between the filtered divergence of the heat flux and the divergence of the heat flux computed as a function of the filtered flow field. In a previous study, there was only partial success in modeling the q-correction term, but in this innovation, success has been achieved by using a different modeling approach. This analysis, based on a temporal mixing layer Direct Numerical Simulation database, shows that the focus in modeling the q

  2. Liquid Hydrogen Regulated Low Pressure High Flow Pneumatic Panel AFT Arrow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    Project Definition: Design a high flow pneumatic regulation panel to be used with helium and hydrogen. The panel will have two circuits, one for gaseous helium (GHe) supplied from the GHe Movable Storage Units (MSUs) and one for gaseous hydrogen (GH2) supplied from an existing GH2 Fill Panel. The helium will supply three legs; to existing panels and on the higher pressure leg and Simulated Flight Tanks (SFTs) for the lower pressure legs. The hydrogen line will pressurize a 33,000 gallon vacuum jacketed vessel.

  3. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  4. Afterglow chemistry of atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of reactive species in the afterglow of a radio-frequency-driven atmospheric-pressure plasma in a fixed helium-oxygen feed gas mixture (He+0.5%O2) with humid air impurity (a few hundred ppm) is investigated by means of an extensive global plasma chemical kinetics model. As an original objective, we explore the effects of humid air impurity on the biologically relevant reactive species in an oxygen-dependent system. After a few milliseconds in the afterglow environment, the densities of atomic oxygen (O) decreases from 1015 to 1013 cm-3 and singlet delta molecular oxygen (O2(1D)) of the order of 1015 cm-3 decreases by a factor of two, while the ozone (O3) density increases from 1014 to 1015 cm-3. Electrons and oxygen ionic species, initially of the order of 1011 cm-3, recombine much faster on the time scale of some microseconds. The formation of atomic hydrogen (H), hydroxyl radical (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric acid (HNO3) resulting from the humid air impurity as well as the influence on the afterglow chemistry is clarified with particular emphasis on the formation of dominant reactive oxygen species (ROS). The model suggests that the reactive species predominantly formed in the afterglow are major ROS O2(1D) and O3 (of the order of 1015 cm-3) and rather minor hydrogen- and nitrogen-based reactive species OH, H2O2, HNO3 and NO2/NO3, of which densities are comparable to the O-atom density (of the order of 1013 cm-3). Furthermore, the model quantitatively reproduces the experimental results of independent O and O3 density measurements.

  5. Alveolar partial pressures of carbon dioxide and oxygen measured by a helium washout technique.

    PubMed Central

    Jordanoglou, J; Tatsis, G; Danos, J; Gougoulakis, S; Orfanidou, D; Gaga, M

    1990-01-01

    A non-invasive technique was developed for measuring alveolar carbon dioxide and oxygen tension during tidal breathing. This was achieved by solving the Bohr equations for mean alveolar carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions (PACO2, PAO2) from known values of the dead-space:tidal volume ratio measured by helium washout, and from the mixed expired partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen. The derived values of wPACO2 and wPAO2 were compared with PaCO2 obtained from arterial gas analysis and PAO2 calculated from the ideal air equation. Four normal subjects and 58 patients were studied. Calculated and measured PCO2 values agreed closely with a difference in mean values (wPACO2 - PaCO2) of 0.01 kPa; the SD of the differences was 0.7 kPa. The difference in mean values between wPAO2 and PAO2 was 0.02 kPa; the SD of the differences was 0.93 kPa. The method is simple and not time consuming, and requires no special cooperation from the patients. It can be applied in the laboratory or at the bedside to any subject breathing tidally. Physiological deadspace:tidal volume ratio, PAO2 and PACO2, static lung volumes, respiratory exchange ratio, carbon dioxide production, oxygen uptake, tidal volume, and total ventilation can be measured with acceptable accuracy and reproducibility in one test. An arterial blood sample is needed initially to provide an independent measure of PaCO2 and for measurement of the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference. Subsequently, PaCO2 can be estimated from wPACO2 sufficiently well for clinical purposes and PaO2 or SaO2 can be monitored by non-invasive methods. Images PMID:2118690

  6. The breakdown process in an atmospheric pressure nanosecond parallel-plate helium/argon mixture discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-02-01

    The breakdown process in an atmospheric pressure nanosecond helium/argon mixture discharge with parallel-plate electrodes is investigated by temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The spatially resolved electric field is obtained from the Stark splitting of the He i 492.1 nm line. Using the emissions from the He ii 468.6 nm, He i 667.8 nm, and Ar i 750.4 nm lines and a collisional-radiative model, the spatially resolved T e, high and T e, low (representing the effective T e in the high energy and low energy part of the EEDF, respectively) are obtained. It is found that, compared with the average electric field provided by the external pulser, the electric field is greatly enhanced at certain location and is significantly weakened at other places. This observation shows the effect of the ionization wave propagation, as predicted in [1, 2]. The value of T e, high is much larger than that of T e, low, which indicates that an elevated high energy tail in the EEDF is built up under the influence of strong electric field during the breakdown process. Initially, the spatial distribution of the T e, low and the T e, high generally follows that of the electric field. However, at the end of the breakdown period, the location of the highest T e, low and T e, high is shifted away from the cathode sheath, where the electric field is strongest. This indicates the existence of a non-local effect and is supported by the result from a simple Monte-Carlo simulation.

  7. The gaseous explosive reaction at constant pressure : the reaction order and reaction rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1931-01-01

    The data given in this report covers the explosive limits of hydrocarbon fuels. Incidental to the purpose of the investigation here reported, the explosive limits will be found to be expressed for the condition of constant pressure, in the fundamental terms of concentrations (partial pressures) of fuel and oxygen.

  8. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  9. Virial equations of state for gaseous ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, and their mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, G. F.; Genkin, M. V.; Kutsenok, I. B.

    2015-11-01

    The available reference and experimental data on densities of the gaseous solutions, NH3-CO2, NH3-H2O, CO2-H2O, NH3-CO2-H2O and their components, NH3, CO2, H2O have been described as accurately as possible by virial equations of state in the temperature range from ~150 to 300°C and pressure range from 1 to 280 bar. More accurate and reliable values of the gas compressibility for the ternary NH3-CO2-H2O system and new data on the virial coefficients have been obtained. It was concluded that the obtained results are of interest for physical chemical simulations of many natural and technological processes particularly in the production of carbamide and other substances on the basis of urea.

  10. Influence of nitrogen impurities on the population of plasma species in atmospheric-pressure helium microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, J.; Margot, J.; Benhacene-Boudam, M. K.

    2012-02-01

    The characteristics of a helium microwave plasma produced at atmospheric pressure have been studied by means of laser induced fluorescence and emission spectroscopy. The influence of nitrogen impurities on discharge parameters (electron density and gas temperature) has been studied together with the variation of the He metastable (23S and 21S) populations. A strong decrease of the He metastable densities for nitrogen concentrations as small as 1% was found. The dependence of the populations of nitrogen molecular and atomic species has been examined as a function of the electron density and nitrogen concentration in helium. Comparison with a theoretical model accounting for the presence of nitrogen in the discharge shows that Penning ionization by both atomic and molecular nitrogen play an important role on the metastable quenching.

  11. Impact sensitivity of materials in contact with liquid and gaseous oxygen at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    As a result of the Apollo 13 incident, increased emphasis is being placed on materials compatibility in a high pressure GOX environment. It is known that in addition to impact sensitivity of materials, approximately adiabatic compression conditions can contrive to induce materials reactivity. Test runs at high pressure using the ABMA tester indicate the following: (1) The materials used in the tests showed an inverse relationship between thickness and impact sensitivity. (2) Several materials tested exhibited greater impact sensitivity in GOX than in LOX. (3) The impact sensitivity of the materials tested in GOX, at the pressures tested, showed enhanced impact sensitivity with higher pressure. (4) The rank ordering of the materials tested in LOX up to 1000 psia is the same as the rank ordering resulting from tests in LOX at 14.7 psia.

  12. Microballoon pressure sensors for particle imaging manometry in liquid and gaseous media.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, N; Mastrangelo, C H

    2016-02-21

    We present the fabrication and testing of engineered microballoon particles that expand and contract under external pressure changes hence serving as microscopic pressure sensors. The particles consist of 12 μm hollow flexible 0.4 μm-thick parylene-C shells with and without a coating of ultrathin Al2O3 diffusion barriers, and the changes in the particle radius are measured from the particle spectral reflectivity. The microballoons display radial pressure sensitivities of 0.64 nm psi(-1) and 0.44 nm psi(-1), respectively in agreement with theoretical estimates. The microballoon devices were used for mapping the internal pressure drop within microfluidic chips. These devices experience nearly spherical symmetry which could make them potential flow-through sensors for the augmentation of particle-based flow characterization methodologies extending today's capabilities of particle imaging velocimetry. PMID:26811848

  13. A theoretical and experimental study of pressure broadening of the oxygen A-band by helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; Spiering, Frans R.; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Avoird, Ad van der; Zande, Wim J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2014-05-28

    The rotationally resolved magnetic dipole absorption spectrum of the oxygen A-band b{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}(v=0)←X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}(v=0) perturbed by collisions with helium was studied theoretically using the impact approximation. To calculate the relaxation matrix, scattering calculations were performed on a newly computed helium-oxygen (b{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) interaction potential as well as on a helium-oxygen (X{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}) interaction potential from the literature. The calculated integrated line cross sections and broadening coefficients are in good agreement with experimental results from the literature. Additionally, cavity ring-down experiments were performed in the wings of the spectral lines for a quantitative study of line-mixing, i.e., the redistribution of rotational line intensities by helium-oxygen collisions. It is shown that inclusion of line-mixing in the theory is required to reproduce the experimentally determined absolute absorption strengths as a function of the density of the helium gas.

  14. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  15. Functional evaluation of rat hearts transplanted after preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Naoyuki; Inubushi, Masayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Jin, Yong-Nan; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Seki, Kunihiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We recently succeeded in resuscitating an extracted rat heart following 24-48 hours of preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2). This study aimed to examine the function of rat hearts transplanted after being preserved in the high-pressure CO and O2 gas mixture. The hearts of donor rats were preserved in a chamber filled with CO and O2 under high pressure for 24 h (CO24h) or 48 h at 4 °C. For the positive control (PC) group, hearts immediately extracted from donor rats were used for transplantation. The preserved hearts were transplanted into recipient rats by heterotopic cervical heart transplantation. CO toxicity does not affect the grafts or the recipients. Light microscopy and [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed that there were no significant differences in the size of the myocardial infarction or apoptosis of myocardial cells in post-transplant hearts between the PC and CO24h groups. Furthermore, at 100 days after the transplantation, the heart rate, weight and histological staining of the post-transplanted hearts did not differ significantly between the PC and CO24h groups. These results indicate that the function of rat hearts is well preserved after 24 hours of high-pressure preservation in a CO and O2 gas mixture. Therefore, high-pressure preservation in a gas mixture can be a useful method for organ preservation. PMID:27562456

  16. Functional evaluation of rat hearts transplanted after preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Naoyuki; Inubushi, Masayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Jin, Yong-Nan; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Seki, Kunihiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We recently succeeded in resuscitating an extracted rat heart following 24–48 hours of preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2). This study aimed to examine the function of rat hearts transplanted after being preserved in the high-pressure CO and O2 gas mixture. The hearts of donor rats were preserved in a chamber filled with CO and O2 under high pressure for 24 h (CO24h) or 48 h at 4 °C. For the positive control (PC) group, hearts immediately extracted from donor rats were used for transplantation. The preserved hearts were transplanted into recipient rats by heterotopic cervical heart transplantation. CO toxicity does not affect the grafts or the recipients. Light microscopy and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed that there were no significant differences in the size of the myocardial infarction or apoptosis of myocardial cells in post-transplant hearts between the PC and CO24h groups. Furthermore, at 100 days after the transplantation, the heart rate, weight and histological staining of the post-transplanted hearts did not differ significantly between the PC and CO24h groups. These results indicate that the function of rat hearts is well preserved after 24 hours of high-pressure preservation in a CO and O2 gas mixture. Therefore, high-pressure preservation in a gas mixture can be a useful method for organ preservation. PMID:27562456

  17. Use of Heated Helium to Simulate Surface Pressure Fluctuations on the Launch Abort Vehicle During Abort Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; James, George H.; Burnside, Nathan J.; Fong, Robert; Fogt, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid-rocket plumes from the Abort motor of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV, also know as Orion) were simulated using hot, high pressure, Helium gas to determine the surface pressure fluctuations on the vehicle in the event of an abort. About 80 different abort situations over a wide Mach number range, (0.3< or =M< or =1.2) and vehicle attitudes (+/-15deg) were simulated inside the NASA Ames Unitary Plan, 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. For each abort case, typically two different Helium plume and wind tunnel conditions were used to bracket different flow matching critera. This unique, yet cost-effective test used a custom-built hot Helium delivery system, and a 6% scale model of a part of the MPCV, known as the Launch Abort Vehicle. The test confirmed the very high level of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the vehicle expected during an abort. In general, the fluctuations were found to be dominated by the very near-field hydrodynamic fluctuations present in the plume shear-layer. The plumes were found to grow in size for aborts occurring at higher flight Mach number and altitude conditions. This led to an increase in the extent of impingement on the vehicle surfaces; however, unlike some initial expectations, the general trend was a decrease in the level of pressure fluctuations with increasing impingement. In general, the highest levels of fluctuations were found when the outer edges of the plume shear layers grazed the vehicle surface. At non-zero vehicle attitudes the surface pressure distributions were found to become very asymmetric. The data from these wind-tunnel simulations were compared against data collected from the recent Pad Abort 1 flight test. In spite of various differences between the transient flight situation and the steady-state wind tunnel simulations, the hot-Helium data were found to replicate the PA1 data fairly reasonably. The data gathered from this one-of-a-kind wind-tunnel test fills a gap in the manned-space programs

  18. System and process for capture of acid gasses at elevated pressure from gaseous process streams

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Linehan, John C.; Rainbolt, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zheng, Feng

    2016-09-06

    A system, method, and material that enables the pressure-activated reversible chemical capture of acid gasses such as CO.sub.2 from gas volumes such as streams, flows or any other volume. Once the acid gas is chemically captured, the resulting product typically a zwitterionic salt, can be subjected to a reduced pressure whereupon the resulting product will release the captures acid gas and the capture material will be regenerated. The invention includes this process as well as the materials and systems for carrying out and enabling this process.

  19. Slush hydrogen pressurized expulsion studies at the NASA K-Site Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Margaret V.; Hardy, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment test series of the slush hydrogen (SLH2) project at the NASA LeRC Plum Brook K-Site Facility was completed. This testing was done as part of the characterization and technology database development on slush hydrogen required for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) Program. The primary objective of these experiments was to investigate tank thermodynamic parameters during the pressurized expulsion of slush hydrogen. To accomplish this, maintenance of tank pressure control was investigated during pressurized expulsion of slush hydrogen using gaseous hydrogen and gaseous helium pressurant. In addition, expulsion tests were performed using gaseous helium for initial pressurization, then gaseous hydrogen during expulsion. These tests were conducted with and without mixing of the slush hydrogen. Results from the testing included an evaluation of tank pressure control, pressurant requirements, SLH2 density change, and system mass and energy balances.

  20. Viscosity of gaseous nitrous oxide from 298.15 K to 398.15 K at pressure sup to 25 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Mitsuo; Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi; Yokoyama, Chiaki; Takahashi, Shinji

    1996-11-01

    The viscosity of gaseous nitrous oxide was measured using an oscillating disk viscometer of the Maxwell type from 298.15 K to 398.15 K at pressures up to 25 MPa. The results were fitted to an empirical equation as a function of temperature and density. The Chung and Lee-Thodos correlations were tested to fit the experimental viscosity values.

  1. Analysis of gaseous toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agent simulants by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Justes, Dina R; Nanita, Sergio C; Noll, Robert J; Mulligan, Christopher C; Sanders, Nathaniel L; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-04-01

    The suitability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry as sensing instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of low levels of toxic compounds is assessed, especially with respect to public safety applications. Gaseous samples of nine toxic industrial compounds, NH3, H2S, Cl2, CS2, SO2, C2H4O, HBr, C6H6 and AsH3, and two chemical warfare agent simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and methyl salicylate (MeS), were studied. API-MS proves highly suited to this application, with speedy analysis times (<30 seconds), high sensitivity, high selectivity towards analytes, good precision, dynamic range and accuracy. Tandem MS methods were implemented in selected cases for improved selectivity, sensitivity, and limits of detection. Limits of detection in the parts-per-billion and parts-per-trillion range were achieved for this set of analytes. In all cases detection limits were well below the compounds' permissible exposure limits (PELs), even in the presence of added complex mixtures of alkanes. Linear responses, up to several orders of magnitude, were obtained over the concentration ranges studied (sub-ppb to ppm), with relative standard deviations less than 3%, regardless of the presence of alkane interferents. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented to show the performance trade-off between sensitivity, probability of correct detection, and false positive rate. A dynamic sample preparation system for the production of gas phase analyte concentrations ranging from 100 pptr to 100 ppm and capable of admixing gaseous matrix compounds and control of relative humidity and temperature is also described. PMID:16568176

  2. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Gas Helium Storage Tank Pressure Vessel Engineering Note

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1996-11-11

    This is to certify that Beaird Industries, Inc. has done a white metal blast per SSPC-SP5 as required per specifications on the vessel internal. Following the blast, a black light inspection was performed by Beaird Quality Control personnel to assure that all debris, grease, etc. was removed and interior was clean prior to closing vessel for helium test.

  3. Confirmation of the existence of pressure peaks in helium II flow through a series of porous plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.L.; Mord, A.J.; Snyder, H.A. |

    1994-12-31

    Experiments were performed in which superfluid helium (He II) was flowed by thermomechanical pressure through a series of porous plugs. Temperature and pressure measurements were made along the flow path and the flow rate was measured. The pores were geometrically well characterized, with nearly straight, uniform holes 0.3 microns in diameter. The data confirms the existence of a pressure peak in the middle of the flow path under certain conditions, as predicted by the SUPERFLOW numerical model. Model predictions match the data well with no adjustable parameters and the standard bulk values for the Gorter-Mellink interaction parameter. The SUPERFLOW model and the two-fluid theory on which it is based have been verified under extreme conditions.

  4. Voltage and pressure scaling of streamer dynamics in a helium plasma jet with N{sub 2} co-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Leiweke, Robert J.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Scofield, James D.

    2014-08-15

    Positive polarity applied voltage and gas pressure dependent scaling of cathode directed streamer propagation properties in helium gas flow guided capillary dielectric barrier discharge have been quantified from streamer velocity, streamer current, and streamer optical diameter measurements. All measurements of the non-stochastic streamer properties have been performed in a variable gas pressure glass cell with N{sub 2} co-flow and under self-consistent Poisson electric field dominated conditions to permit data comparison with 2-D streamer dynamics models in air/nitrogen. The streamer optical diameter was found to be nearly independent of both gas pressures, from 170 Torr up to 760 Torr, and also for applied voltages from 6 to 11 kV at 520 Torr. The streamer velocity was found to increase quadratically with increased applied voltage. These observed differences in the 2-D scaling properties of ionization wave sustained cathode directed streamer propagation in helium flow channel with N{sub 2} annular co-flow compared to the streamer propagation in air or nitrogen have been shown to be caused by the remnant ionization distribution due to large differences in the dissociative recombination rates of He{sub 2}{sup +} versus N{sub 4}{sup +} ions, for this 5 kHz repetition rate applied voltage pulse generated streamers.

  5. Voltage and pressure scaling of streamer dynamics in a helium plasma jet with N2 co-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiweke, Robert J.; Ganguly, Biswa N.; Scofield, James D.

    2014-08-01

    Positive polarity applied voltage and gas pressure dependent scaling of cathode directed streamer propagation properties in helium gas flow guided capillary dielectric barrier discharge have been quantified from streamer velocity, streamer current, and streamer optical diameter measurements. All measurements of the non-stochastic streamer properties have been performed in a variable gas pressure glass cell with N2 co-flow and under self-consistent Poisson electric field dominated conditions to permit data comparison with 2-D streamer dynamics models in air/nitrogen. The streamer optical diameter was found to be nearly independent of both gas pressures, from 170 Torr up to 760 Torr, and also for applied voltages from 6 to 11 kV at 520 Torr. The streamer velocity was found to increase quadratically with increased applied voltage. These observed differences in the 2-D scaling properties of ionization wave sustained cathode directed streamer propagation in helium flow channel with N2 annular co-flow compared to the streamer propagation in air or nitrogen have been shown to be caused by the remnant ionization distribution due to large differences in the dissociative recombination rates of He2+ versus N4+ ions, for this 5 kHz repetition rate applied voltage pulse generated streamers.

  6. 3D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a dc low-current plasma arc batch reactor at very high pressure in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouvier, A.; Iwarere, S. A.; Ramjugernath, D.; Fulcheri, L.

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with a three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model under peculiar conditions of very high pressures (from 2 MPa up to 10 MPa) and low currents (<1 A). Studies on plasma arc working under these unusual conditions remain almost unexplored because of the technical and technological challenges to develop a reactor able to sustain a plasma at very high pressures. The combined effect of plasma reactivity and high pressure would probably open the way towards new promising applications in various fields: chemistry, lightning, materials or nanomaterial synthesis. A MHD model helps one to understand the complex and coupled phenomena surrounding the plasma which cannot be understood by simply experimentation. The model also provides data which are difficult to directly determine experimentally. The model simulates an experimental-based batch reactor working with helium. The particular reactor in question was used to investigate the Fischer-Tropsch application, fluorocarbon production and CO2 retro-conversion. However, as a first approach in terms of MHD, the model considers the case for helium as a non-reactive working gas. After a detailed presentation of the model, a reference case has been fully analysed (P = 8 MPa, I = 0.35 A) in terms of physical properties. The results show a bending of the arc and displacement of the anodic arc root towards the top of the reactor, due to the combined effects of convection, gravity and electromagnetic forces. A parametric study on the pressure (2-10 MPa) and current (0.25-0.4 A) was then investigated. The operating pressure does not show an influence on the contraction of the arc but higher pressures involve a higher natural convection in the reactor, driven by the density gradients between the cold and hot gas.

  7. Shock tube technique for measuring opacities at high pressures for gaseous-core nuclear rockets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    A new method of opacity determination is described that uses an improved shock tube design and is applicable to measurements of Planck and Rosseland mean opacities in hydrogen or seeded hydrogen at hydrogen partial pressures of 500 atm, at temperatures from 2300 to 8000 K. The selection of seed materials to be added to the gases to make them semiopaque is discussed. Currently favored seeds are silicon and carbon or graphite for reactive seeds, and depleted uranium and tungsten 184 for nonreactive seeds.

  8. Development of a High-Pressure Gaseous Burner for Calibrating Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    In this work-in-progress report, we show the development of a unique high-pressure burner facility (up to 60 atm) that provides steady, reproducible premixed flames with high precision, while having the capability to use multiple fuel/oxidizer combinations. The highpressure facility has four optical access ports for applying different laser diagnostic techniques and will provide a standard reference flame for the development of a spectroscopic database in high-pressure/temperature conditions. Spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) was the first diagnostic applied, and was used to successfully probe premixed hydrogen-air flames generated in the facility using a novel multi-jet micro-premixed array burner element. The SRS spectral data include contributions from H2, N2, O2, and H2O and were collected over a wide range of equivalence ratios ranging from 0.16 to 4.9 at an initial pressure of 10-atm via a spatially resolved point SRS measurement with a high-performance optical system. Temperatures in fuel-lean to stoichiometric conditions were determined from the ratio of the Stokes to anti-Stokes scattering of the Q-branch of N2, and those in fuel-rich conditions via the rotational temperature of H2. The SRS derived temperatures using both techniques were consistent and indicated that the flame temperature was approximately 500 K below that predicted by adiabatic equilibrium, indicating a large amount of heat-loss at the measurement zone. The integrated vibrational SRS signals show that SRS provides quantitative number density data in high-pressure H2-air flames.

  9. Noncavitating Pump For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael; Swift, Walter; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1996-01-01

    Immersion pump features high efficiency in cryogenic service. Simple and reliable centrifugal pump transfers liquid helium with mass-transfer efficiency of 99 percent. Liquid helium drawn into pump by helical inducer, which pressurizes helium slightly to prevent cavitation when liquid enters impeller. Impeller then pressurizes liquid. Purpose of pump to transfer liquid helium from supply to receiver vessel, or to provide liquid helium flow for testing and experimentation.

  10. Combustion of 316 stainless steel in high-pressure gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Janoff, Dwight

    1989-01-01

    Upward combustion of 316 stainless steel (SS) rods is discussed and a combustion model is presented. The effects of varying oxygen pressure and rod diameter on the rate limiting processes for combustion of 316 SS are evaluated. The rate-limiting steps for combustion up 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on the incorporation and mass transport of oxygen in the molten mass, and heat transfer between the molten mass and rod. Both these rate-limiting steps are shown to be dependent on rod diameter. Small (d/r/ = 0.051 cm) 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on convective heat transfer, and larger rods (d/r/ not less than 0.32 cm) are shown to be dependent on oxygen incorporation and mass transport in the molten mass.

  11. Ignition of nonmetallic materials by impact of high-pressure gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Schmidt, Naomi; Williams, Ralph E.; Hirsch, David; Benz, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    The sources of variability in the pneumatic impact test commonly used to screen nonmetallic materials for oxygen service and to rank batches or lots of particular materials were investigated together with the mechanism of ignition. Tests were conducted at the NASA/White Sands Test Facility in which the standard test chamber was replaced by an instrumented chamber to obtain information on the rates of pressurization, specimen heating, and time to ignition. Results showed that much of the variability in test data could be traced to the variability in system cleanliness and in the opening time of the high-speed valve. The prinicipal mechanism of ignition in the test is considered to be the heating of the gas initially in the test chamber by adiabatic compression; the presence of voids in the test materials may also be important.

  12. Production of water mist from electrolyte surface in contact with atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Ishigame, H.; Nishiyama, S.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a new subject which has been opened by developments of atmospheric-pressure plasma sources. In this work, we adopted laser Mie scattering to examine an atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasma in contact with NaCl solution. The plasma was produced by applying a dc voltage between a stainless-steel gas nozzle and the electrolyte via a register of 100 k Ω. The gap distance between the electrolyte surface and the electrode was 4 mm. Helium as a working gas was fed from the nozzle toward the electrolyte surface. The discharge space was illuminated using a cw laser beam at a wavelength of 457 nm, and the scattered laser light was captured using a high-speed camera with an image intensifier via an interference filter at the laser wavelength. The scattered laser light told us the existence of particulates or water mists in the discharge space. The water mists were produced from the electrolyte surface explosively as well as randomly. The trajectories of the mists were basically parabolic. We sometimes observed the expansion of the mist size in the gas phase. The expansion was followed by the disappearance of the mist. This may be due to the evaporation of the mist, and is considered to be the production mechanism of Na in the gas phase.

  13. Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale Space Shuttle orbiter nose at Mach 21.5 in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Bernot, Peter T.; Woods, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a 0.02-scale model of the Space Shuttle orbiter forward fuselage were obtained in the 22-inch aerodynamic leg of the Langley Hypersonic Helium Tunnel Facility at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 21.5 and a ratio of specific heats of 1.67 for inclusion in the database of the Shuttle entry air data system (SEADS). The data were measured at model angles of attack of 0 deg to 50 deg in 5 deg increments for zero sideslip angle and at model sideslip angles of -5 deg to 5 deg for angles of attack equal to 5, 20, 35, and 40 deg. These data displayed trends similar to those observed in other wind tunnels at Mach 6 and 10 in air. Specifically noted is a shift in the location of the stagnation point at angles of attack above 15 deg; this effect did not, however, occur in flight. By comparison, the data obtained at Mach 6 in the Langley Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel, corresponding to a lower ratio of specific heats in the postshock region than those in helium and air, showed some reduction of the stagnation point shift at the higher angles of attack. The differences between flight and wind tunnel pressure distributions are believed due primarily to high-temperature gas chemistry effects in flight, which include lower effective specific heat ratios but which were not completely duplicated in the wind tunnels.

  14. Stabilities of filled ice II structure of hydrogen and helium hydrates at low temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, H.; Umeda, A.; Fujii, T.; Machida, S.; Shinozaki, A.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen hydrate is expected to be a hydrogen storage material, because it can contain relatively high hydrogen and its synthetic condition is mild comparable to industrial production. Three phases of hydrogen hydrate have been known so for. One is a clathrate hydrate sII [1], and others are filled ice II structure and filled ice Ic structure [2]. The ratio of water to hydrogen molecules for these phases are1:3, 1:6, 1:1, respectively. The clathrate sII containing only hydrogen molecules is stable only in a lower temperature region. At room temperature, above about 0.8 GPa filled ice II and above 2.5 GPa filled ice Ic are formed. The latter one survives at least up to 90 GPa [3]. However, investigations in low temperature and high pressure region have been limited. In this study, low temperature and high pressure experiments were performed by using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat in a region of 0.2 to 4.5 GPa and 130 to 300 K. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed a series of phase change from sII to filled ice Ic via filled ice II. For example, at 220K, sII transformed to filled ice II at approximately 0.7 GPa and further transformed to filled ice Ic structure at about 2.0 GPa. The present results experimentally confirmed the previously predicted phase boundaries. For filled ice II structure, Raman spectroscopy revealed that pressure dependency of vibration mode of guest hydrogen molecules and OH stretching mode of host water molecules changed at approximately 2.5 GPa. The XRD also showed change in axial ratio at the same pressure. These result suggested that state of filled ice II structure changed at about 2.5 GPa. Helium hydrate is known to form filled ice II structure [4], but high pressure study has not been yet fully performed. Similar experiments were carried out in a region of 0.2 to 5.0 GPa and 200 to 300 K. The results showed that the filled ice II structure did not transformed to filled ice Ic structure, but decomposed into helium

  15. Thermodynamic properties of a nonideal helium plasma at quasi-isentropic compression by a factor of 575 at a pressure of 3000 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, M. A.; Il'kaev, R. I.; Fortov, V. E.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Arinin, V. A.; Blikov, A. O.; Komrakov, V. A.; Ryzhkov, A. V.; Ogorodnikov, V. A.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The quasi-isentropic compressibility of a nonideal helium plasma has been measured in a two-cascade spherical chamber with separated cavities with the use of an explosive charge with the mass of ≈55 kg. The experiment has been performed on an X-ray diffraction complex consisting of three betatrons and a multichannel optoelectronic system for recording X-ray images. The density of the compressed helium plasma measured at the initial pressures of the gas in the outer and inner cavities P 1 = 36.4 MPa and P 2 = 5.1 MPa, respectively, is ρ = 4.6 g/cm3, which corresponds to the degree of compression σ = 575 at pressure P≈3000 GPa under the condition of strong nonideality (γ ˜ 7) and noticeable degeneracy of electrons ( nλ3 ˜ 5). The pressure of compressed helium has been determined from the results of the gas-dynamics calculation.

  16. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons. PMID:16784271

  17. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Theyse, F.H.; Kelling, F.E.T.

    1980-01-08

    Ultra Centrifuge Nederland N.V.'s improved centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas comprises a hollow cylindrical rotor, designated as a separating drum, within a stationary housing. Natural gas liquids that condense under pressure in the separating drum pass through openings in the drum into the space between the drum and housing. In this space, a series of openings, or throttling restrictors, allows the liquids to expand and return to gas. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum remains separate for drawing off.

  18. Thermal performance of gaseous-helium-purged tank-mounted multilayer insulation system during ground-hold and space-hold thermal cycling and exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine (1) the ground-hold and space-hold thermal performance of a multilayer insulation (MLI) system mounted on a spherical, liquid-hydrogen propellant tank and (2) the degradation to the space-hold thermal performance of the insulation system that resulted from both thermal cycling and exposure to moisture. The propellant tank had a diameter of 1.39 meters (4.57ft). The MLI consisted of two blankets of insulation; each blanket contained 15 double-aluminized Mylar radiation shields separated by double silk net spacers. Nineteen tests simulating basic cryogenic spacecraft thermal (environmental) conditions were conducted. These tests typically included initial helium purge, liquid-hydrogen fill and ground-hold, ascent, space-hold, and repressurization. No significant degradation of the space-hold thermal performance due to thermal cycling was noted.

  19. DC negative corona discharge in atmospheric pressure helium: transition from the corona to the ‘normal’ glow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Nusair; Antao, Dion S.; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2014-06-01

    Direct current (dc) negative corona discharges in atmospheric pressure helium are simulated via detailed numerical modeling. Simulations are conducted to characterize the discharges in atmospheric helium for a pin plate electrode configuration. A self-consistent two-dimensional hybrid model is developed to simulate the discharges and the model predictions are validated with experimental measurements. The discharge model considered consists of momentum and energy conservation equations for a multi-component (electrons, ions, excited species and neutrals) gas mixture, conservation equations for each component of the mixture and state relations. A drift-diffusion approximation for the electron and the ion fluxes is used. A model for the external circuit driving the discharge is also considered and solved along with the discharge model. Many of the key features of a negative corona discharge, namely non-linear current-voltage characteristics, spatially flat cathode current density and glow-like discharge in the high current regime are displayed in the predictions. A transition to the ‘normal’ glow discharge from the corona discharge regime is also observed. The transition is identified from the calculated current-voltage characteristic curve and is characterized by the radial growth of the negative glow and the engulfment of the cathode wire.

  20. Measurement of Electron Density and Ion Collision Frequency with Dual Assisted Grounded Electrode DBD in Atmospheric Pressure Helium Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiujiao; Qi, Bing; Huang, Jianjun; Pan, Lizhu; Liu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    The properties of a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are diagnosed with a dual assisted grounded electrode dielectric barrier discharge device. In the glow discharge, we captured the current waveforms at the positions of the three grounded rings. From the current waveforms, the time delay between the adjacent positions of the rings is employed to calculate the plasma bullet velocity of the helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron density is deduced from a model combining with the time delay and current intensity, which is about 1011 cm‑3. In addition, The ion-neutral particles collision frequency in the radial direction is calculated from the current phase difference between two rings, which is on the order of 107 Hz. The results are helpful for understanding the basic properties of APPJs. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105093), the Technological Project of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201005280485A), and the Planned S&T Program of Shenzhen, China (No. JC201105170703A)

  1. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  2. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-10-15

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs.

  3. Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Helium-Oxygen Mixture at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Tan, Zhenyu; Pan, Jie; Chen, Xinxian

    2016-08-01

    In this work the effects of O2 concentration on the pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in helium-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure have been numerically researched by using a one-dimensional fluid model in conjunction with the chosen key species and chemical reactions. The reliability of the used model has been examined by comparing the calculated discharge current with the reported experiments. The present work presents the following significant results. The dominative positive and negative particles are He2+ and O2‑, respectively, the densities of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) get their maxima nearly at the central position of the gap, and the density of the ground state O is highest in the ROS. The increase of O2 concentration results in increasingly weak discharge and the time lag of the ignition. For O2 concentrations below 1.1%, the density of O is much higher than other species, the averaged dissipated power density presents an evident increase for small O2 concentration and then the increase becomes weak. In particular, the total density of the reactive oxygen species reaches its maximums at the O2 concentration of about 0.5%. This characteristic further convinces the experimental observation that the O2 concentration of 0.5% is an optimal O2/He ratio in the inactivation of bacteria and biomolecules when radiated by using the plasmas produced in a helium oxygen mixture. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds of Shandong University, China (No. 2016JC016)

  4. Experimental Determination of Spatial and Temporal Discharge Parameters for an Ambient Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bures, Brian; Bourham, Mohamed

    2004-11-01

    Ambient pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBD's) are studied for a number of applications. Barrier discharges composed primarily of inert gases are potentially useful for the production of intense excimer light, sterilization of thermally sensitive materials and control of insects for quarantine. The neutral bremsstrahlung technique is used to determine spatial variations of electron density and electron temperature in a parallel plate, helium (99.9% by vol) dielectric barrier discharge operated at an average power density between 50 and 75 mW/cm^3. The applied frequency is varied between 2 kHz and 6 kHz. The time average electron density suggests a more intense discharge near the surface of the electrodes than the bulk of the discharge for all frequencies and power densities. When moving parallel to the electrodes, the electron temperature remains constant, while the electron density is constant within 20% of the average value. A monochromator tuned to a nitrogen ion line (391.4 nm) and a helium line (706.5 nm) has a more intense emission when the electrode is negatively biased.

  5. Helium permeability of different structure pyrolytic carbon coatings on graphite prepared at low temperature and atmosphere pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinliang; Zhao, Yanling; Zhang, Wenting; He, Xiujie; Zhang, Dongsheng; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Yantao; Jin, Chan; Xia, Huihao; Wang, Jianqiang; Huai, Ping; Zhou, Xingtai

    2016-01-01

    Low density isotropic pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) and high density anisotropic pyrolytic carbon (APyC) coatings have been prepared at low temperature and atmosphere pressure. Helium gas permeabilities of nuclear graphite coated with IPyC and APyC of different thickness are studied using a vacuum apparatus. Both the permeation rates of the treated graphite gradually decrease with the increasing thickness of the coatings. The IPyC and APyC coatings can reduce the gas permeability coefficient of the samples by three and five orders of magnitude, respectively. The permeability difference is related to the microscopic structure, i.e., pores, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, mercury injection and X-ray tomography experiments. The changes of the permeability owing to heat cycles are observed to be negligible.

  6. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  7. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  8. PS1 satellite refrigerator heat exchanger: Failure of the LN2 heat exchanger to low pressure helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, B.

    1992-11-01

    The PS1 heat exchanger is one of three prototype heat exchangers built in support of a contract for Satellite Refrigerator Heat Exchanger components. This heat exchanger was first put into operation in Jul. 1983. In Nov. 1991, this heat exchanger experienced a failure in the shell of heat exchanger 1 causing nitrogen to contaminate the helium in the refrigerator. The resulting contamination plugged heat exchanger 3. The break occurred at a weld that connects a 0.25 inch thick ring to heat exchanger 1. The failure appears to be a fatigue of the shell due to temperature oscillations. The flow rate through the break was measured to be 1.0 scfm for a pressure drop over the crack of 50 psi. An ANSYS analysis of the failure area indicates that the stress would be 83,000 psi if the metal did not yield. This is based on cooling down the shell to 80K from 300K with the shell side helium on the outside of the shell at 300K. This is the largest change in temperature that occurs during operation. During normal operations, the temperature swings are not nearly this large, however temperatures down to 80K are not unusual (LN2 overflowing pot). The highest temperatures are typically 260K. The analysis makes no attempt to estimate the stress concentration factor at this weld, but there is no doubt that it is greater than 1. No estimate as to the number of cycles to cause failure was calculated nor any estimate as to the actual number of cycles was made.

  9. Comments on "Sensitive analysis of carbon, chromium and silicon in steel using picosecond laser induced low pressure helium plasma"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Popov, Andrey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Labutin, Timur A.

    2016-04-01

    In the paper "Sensitive analysis of carbon, chromium and silicon in steel using picosecond laser induced low pressure helium plasma" by Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid, Nasrullah Idris, Marincan Pardede, Eric Jobiliong, Rinda Hedwig, Zener Sukra Lie, Hery Suyanto, May On Tjia, Koo Hendrik Kurniawan and Kiichiro Kagawa [Spectrochim. Acta Part B 114 (2015) 1-6], the authors presented experimental study to demonstrate the sensitive detection of C, Cr and Si in low-alloy steels under low pressure He atmosphere. Although the use of only UV-VIS spectral range for determination of these elements seems to be a beneficial, the point that needs to be commented is the result of carbon determination with the use of C I 247.856 nm line. Thermodynamic modeling based on the NIST and R. Kurucz data for the different excitation conditions in plasma demonstrates that it is hardly possible to distinguish any carbon signal due to significantly intensive iron line Fe II 247.857 nm. Authors are kindly requested to re-consider this part of their study.

  10. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lee, Yong Inn; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H--He and F--He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  11. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukra Lie, Zener; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Inn Lee, Yong; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H-He and F-He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  12. A high-pressure van der Waals compound in solid nitrogen-helium mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, W. L.; Finger, L. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Hu, J. Z.; Mao, H. K.; Schouten, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed diamond anvil-cell study using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and optical microscopy has been conducted for the He-N system, with a view to the weakly-bound van der Waals molecule interactions that can be formed in the gas phase. High pressure is found to stabilize the formation of a stoichiometric, solid van der Waals compound of He(N2)11 composition which may exemplify a novel class of compounds found at high pressures in the interiors of the outer planets and their satellites.

  13. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  14. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  15. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina

    2013-06-21

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures

  16. A comparison of polypropylene-surface treatment by filamentary, homogeneous and glow discharges in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massines, F.; Gouda, G.

    1998-12-01

    Three different dielectric barrier-controlled discharge regimes in helium at atmospheric pressure under sinusoidal excitation have been obtained by varying the excitation frequency or the gas chemical composition: the filamentary discharge, which is the discharge that is usually obtained; the glow discharge, which is controlled by cathode secondary emission; and the homogeneous discharge, which is of a nature in between those of the filamentary and the glow discharges. All the characteristics that have been studied, such as the discharge current, the emission spectrum, the wettability and the chemical transformations of a polypropylene film, are related to the discharge-regime variation. The glow discharge is clearly more efficient than the others as a means of increasing the polypropylene-surface energy. Values as high as 62 mJ 0022-3727/31/24/003/img1 are obtained with this discharge whereas the maximum value after interaction with the filamentary one is 45 mJ 0022-3727/31/24/003/img1. This improvement in wettability is due to there being more O atoms implanted at the surface as well as to the addition of N atoms. The differences among in surface transformations have been correlated to the characteristics of these different discharges and more specifically to the localization of the electrical energy transfer into the gas and to the nature of the ions created during the discharge.

  17. Evaluation of candidate Stirling engine heater tube alloys after 3500 hours exposure to high pressure doped hydrogen or helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misencik, J. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The heater head tubes of current prototype automotive Stirling engines are fabricated from alloy N-155, an alloy which contains 20 percent cobalt. Because the United States imports over 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country and resource supplies could not meet the demand imposed by automotive applications of cobalt in the heater head (tubes plus cylinders and regenerator housings), it is imperative that substitute alloys free of cobalt be identified. The research described herein focused on the heater head tubes. Sixteen alloys (15 potential substitutes plus the 20 percent Co N-155 alloy) were evaluated in the form of thin wall tubing in the NASA Lewis Research Center Stirling simulator materials diesel fuel fired test rigs. Tubes filled with either hydrogen doped with 1 percent CO2 or with helium at a gas pressure of 15 MPa and a temperature of 820 C were cyclic endurance tested for times up to 3500 hr. Results showed that two iron-nickel base superalloys, CG-27 and Pyromet 901 survived the 3500 hr endurance test. The remaining alloys failed by creep-rupture at times less than 3000 hr, however, several other alloys had superior lives to N-155. Results further showed that doping the hydrogen working fluid with 1 vol % CO2 is an effective means of reducing hydrogen permeability through all the alloy tubes investigated.

  18. Characteristics in the jet region of helium radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with array generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Bin; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-09-01

    The two-dimensional spatially extended atmospheric plasma arrays by many parallel radio-frequency glow discharge plasma jets packed densely, represent a feature option of large-scale low-temperature atmospheric plasma technologies with distinct capability of directed delivery of reactive species and good insusceptibility to sample variations. However, it is still a challenge to form plasma jet with large area of uniform active species on a downstream substrate due to the complex interactions between individual jets. This paper proposes to numerically study the strategy and mechanism of control/modulation for the array discharge to produce two-dimensional plasma uniformity in the downstream working area. In this work, a two dimensional fluid model is employed to investigate the characteristics in the jet region of helium radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (RF APGD) with array generators. The influences of upstream discharge characteristics, gas flow and their cooperative effects on the distribution of species densities, gas temperatures and the uniformity of active species in the material treating area is studied, and the essential strategy for the modulation method is acquired. The results will be significant for deep understanding of coupling behaviors of multiple plasma plumes in the RF APGD array and applications of the technology.

  19. Investigating the effect of additional gases in an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet using ambient mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu; Bradley, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Using ambient mass spectrometry, positive and negative ions created in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet have been detected for a variation of different traces gases (Ar, N2, and O2) added to the flow, downstream of the main helium discharge plasma. We find that such additions can change the chemistry in the outflow plasma plume. For instance, small amounts of O2 increases the formation of positive ion clusters, e.g., water clusters H+(H2O)n (with n up to 5) through hydration reactions, but decreases the intensity of heavy negative ions detected. With the addition of Ar and N2 we see a marked decrease in the intensity of negative ions in the plume but with increased Ar+ and nitrous oxide ions (e.g., N2O+) for the two cases respectively. From broadband optical emission measurements of the glowing plasma we see that the relative emission intensity of OH radical were changed with addition of the four different gases but the emission spectra were not changed. A calculation of rotational temperature of OH radicals, indicates that the gas temperatures is about 290 K for the four different gas mixture cases.

  20. Correlation of phase resolved current, emission and surface charge measurements in an atmospheric pressure helium jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Torsten; Wild, Robert; Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Wilke, Christian; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Stollenwerk, Lars

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet with two different surfaces (conducting and dielectric) is investigated using a setup with two ring electrodes around a dielectric capillary. For diagnostics, phase resolved ICCD-imaging, current measurements and surface charge measurements are applied. The results show the correlation of plasma dynamics with the deposition of surface charge and electrical current signals. Further, the influence of the distance between surface and jet capillary on the surface charge distribution is presented. A complex discharge dynamic is found with a dielectric barrier discharge between the ring electrodes and back-and-forth bullet propagation outside the capillary. A conducting channel connecting the jet nozzle and the surface is found. This correlates well with the observed charge exchange on the surface. The number of formed channels and the average deposited charge density on the surface is found to be strongly sensitive to the jet distance from the surface. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  1. Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R&D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage < 10{sup -7} cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved.

  2. Density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor, and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Ishigame, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the density distributions of OH, Na, water vapor and water mist in atmospheric-pressure dc helium glow plasmas in contact with NaCl solution. The densities of OH, Na and H2O had different spatial distributions, while the Na density had a similar distribution to mist, suggesting that mist is the source of Na in the gas phase. When the flow rate of helium toward the electrolyte surface was increased, the distributions of all the species densities concentrated in the neighboring region to the electrolyte surface more significantly. The densities of all the species were sensitive to the electric polarity of the power supply. In particular, we never detected Na and mist when the electrolyte worked as the anode of the dc discharge. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  3. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with wet cells: delivery of electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in plasma medicine have produced encouraging results in wound treatment, surface sterilization, deactivation of bacteria, and treatment of cancer cells. It is known that many of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the APPJ are critical to these processes. Other key components to treatment include the ion and photon fluxes, and the electric fields produced in cells by the ionization wave of the APPJ striking in the vicinity of the cells. These relationships are often complicated by the cells being covered by a thin liquid layer—wet cells. In this paper, results from a computational investigation of the interaction of APPJs with tissue beneath a liquid layer are discussed. The emphasis of this study is the delivery of electric fields by an APPJ sustained in He/O2  =  99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air to cells lying beneath water with thickness of 200 μm. The water layer represents the biological fluid typically covering tissue during treatment. Three voltages were analyzed—two that produce a plasma effluent that touches the surface of the water layer and one that does not touch. The effect of the liquid layer thickness, 50 μm to 1 mm, was also examined. Comparisons were made of the predicted intracellular electric fields to those thresholds used in the field of bioelectronics.

  4. Helium-3 and Helium-4 acceleration by high power laser pulses for hadron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.; Haberer, T.

    2015-06-24

    The laser driven acceleration of ions is considered a promising candidate for an ion source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases. Though proton and carbon ion sources are conventionally used for therapy, other light ions can also be utilized. Whereas carbon ions require 400 MeV per nucleon to reach the same penetration depth as 250 MeV protons, helium ions require only 250 MeV per nucleon, which is the lowest energy per nucleon among the light ions. This fact along with the larger biological damage to cancer cells achieved by helium ions, than that by protons, makes this species an interesting candidate for the laser driven ion source. Two mechanisms (Magnetic Vortex Acceleration and hole-boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration) of PW-class laser driven ion acceleration from liquid and gaseous helium targets are studied with the goal of producing 250 MeV per nucleon helium ion beams that meet the hadron therapy requirements. We show that He3 ions, having almost the same penetration depth as He4 with the same energy per nucleon, require less laser power to be accelerated to the required energy for the hadron therapy.

  5. The diffusion of cesium in the graphitic matrix A3-3 in the presence of helium at pressures up to 10 7 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, W.; Hoinkis, E.

    1995-07-01

    The migration of 137CS in the graphitic matrix A3-3 was studied at helium pressures of 4 × 10 6 and 10 7 Pa by use of the thin film technique with vapor deposited carrier-free 137Cs. The penetration profiles did not satisfy Fick's second law, but we applied successfully the solution of the diffusion equation with terms for trapping and re-emission derived by Gaus. Compared to 137Cs migration in a vacuum a high helium pressure lead to a decrease in the coefficient D for diffusion of mobile 137Cs and an increase in the activation energies for diffusion and trapping. D and the trapping coefficient μ are given by D = 10.3 exp (-1.76/kT) cm 2s -1 and μ = 2.2 × 10 3 exp(-1.63/kT) s -1 in the temperature range 1073-1273 K at a helium pressure of 4 × 10 6 Pa, where k = 8.618 × 10 -5 eV/K.

  6. Distortion of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane shock wave.

    PubMed

    Layes, Guillaume; Jourdan, Georges; Houas, Lazhar

    2003-10-24

    The evolution of a spherical gaseous interface accelerated by a plane weak shock wave has been investigated in a square cross section shock tube via a multiple exposure shadowgraph diagnostic. Different gaseous bubbles, i.e., helium, nitrogen, and krypton, were introduced in air at atmospheric pressure in order to study the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the spherical geometry for negative, close to zero, and positive initial density jumps across the interface. We show that the bubble distortion is strongly different for the three cases and we present the experimental velocity and volume of the developed vortical structures. We prove that at late times the bubble velocities reach constant values which are in good agreement with previous calculations. Finally, we point out that, in our flow conditions, the gaseous bubble motion and shape are mainly influenced by vorticity and aerodynamic forces. PMID:14611354

  7. Why Helium Ends in "-Ium"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.; Holme, Thomas; Cooper, Melanie; White, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Edward Frankland and Norman Lockyer researched upon a gaseous spectra in relation to the physical constitution of the sun and named it as "helium" (from Greek "helios" meaning "sun"). Since Lockyer apparently never formally proposed the name in print, it is not known why he chose to use a metallic end "ium".

  8. Hydroformylation of Cyclohexene with Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Using Ruthenium Carbonyl Catalyst: Influence of Pressures of Gaseous Components

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shin-ichiro; Okamura, Shuhei; Akiyama, Yoshinari; Arai, Masahiko

    2007-01-01

    Hydroformylation of cyclohexene was studied with a catalyst system of Ru3(CO)12 and LiCl using H2 and CO2 instead of CO in NMP. The influence of H2 and CO2 pressures on the total conversion and the product distribution was examined. It was shown that increasing total pressure of H2 and CO2 promoted the reverse water gas shift reaction and increased the yield of cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde. Its hydrogenation to cyclohexanemethanol was promoted with increasing H2 pressure but suppressed with increasing CO2 pressure. Cyclohexane was also formed along with those products and this direct hydrogenation was suppressed with increasing CO2 pressure. The roles of CO2 as a promoter as well as a reactant were further examined by phase behavior observations and high pressure FTIR measurements.

  9. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield with high-pressure gaseous mixtures of Xe and TMA for improved neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C.; Renner, J.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid Xe TPCs are among the most popular choices for double beta decay and WIMP dark matter searches. Gaseous Xe has intrinsic advantages when compared to Liquid Xe, specifically, tracking capability and better energy resolution for double beta decay searches. The performance of gaseous Xe can be further improved by molecular additives such as trimethylamine(TMA), which are expected to (1) cool down the ionization electrons, (2) convert Xe excitation energy to TMA ionizations through Penning transfer, and (3) produce scintillation and electroluminescence light in a more easily detectable wavelength (300 nm). These features may provide better tracking and energy resolution for double-beta decay searches. They are also expected to enhance columnar recombination for nuclear recoils, which can be used for searches for WIMP dark matter with directional sensitivity. We constructed a test ionization chamber and successfully measured scintillation and ionization yields at high precision with various Xe and TMA mixtures and pressures. We observed the Penning effect and an increase in recombination with the addition of TMA. However, many undesired features for dark matter searches, such as strong suppression of the scintillation light and no sign of recombination light, were also found. This work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.

  10. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media. [CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse smoother

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, E.J.

    1980-10-17

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode and cathode to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source. An array of resistors or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  11. The Gaseous Explosive Reaction : the Effect of Pressure on the Rate of Propagation of the Reaction Zone and upon the Rate of Molecular Transformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1932-01-01

    This study of gaseous explosive reaction has brought out a number of important fundamental characteristics of the explosive reaction indicating that the basal processes of the transformation are much simpler and corresponds more closely to the general laws and principles of ordinary transformations than is usually supposed. The report calls attention to the point that the rate of molecular transformation within the zone was found in all cases to be proportional to pressure, that the transformation within the zone is the result of binary impacts. This result is of unusual interest in the case of the reaction of heavy hydrocarbon fuels and the reaction mechanism proposed by the recent kinetic theory of chain reactions.

  12. Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support--An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Chin, Brian J; Gentile, Frank; Kunselman, Allen R; Palanzo, David; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10 s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm (500 rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4 mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3 ± 0.1 to -462.0 ± 0.5 mm Hg at 2000-4000 rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10,573 ± 271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000 rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon. PMID:26153848

  13. Promoted combustion of nine structural metals in high-pressure gaseous oxygen - A comparison of ranking methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A.; Rucker, Michelle A.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1989-01-01

    The 316, 321, 440C, and 17-4 PH stainless steels, as well as Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Waspaloy, Monel 400, and Al 2219, have been evaluated for relative nonflammability in a high-pressure oxygen environment with a view to the comparative advantages of four different flammability-ranking methods. The effects of changes in test pressure, sample diameter, promoter type, and sample configuration on ranking method results are evaluated; ranking methods employing velocity as the primary ranking criterion are limited by diameter effects, while those which use extinguishing pressure are nonselective for metals with similar flammabilities.

  14. Explosion bomb measurements of ethanol-air laminar gaseous flame characteristics at pressures up to 1.4 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Mansour, M.S.

    2009-07-15

    The principal burning characteristics of a laminar flame comprise the fuel vapour pressure, the laminar burning velocity, ignition delay times, Markstein numbers for strain rate and curvature, the stretch rates for the onset of flame instabilities and of flame extinction for different mixtures. With the exception of ignition delay times, measurements of these are reported and discussed for ethanol-air mixtures. The measurements were in a spherical explosion bomb, with central ignition, in the regime of a developed stable, flame between that of an under or over-driven ignition and that of an unstable flame. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.4 MPa, temperatures from 300 to 393 K, and equivalence ratios were between 0.7 and 1.5. It was important to ensure the relatively large volume of ethanol in rich mixtures at high pressures was fully evaporated. The maximum pressure for the measurements was the highest compatible with the maximum safe working pressure of the bomb. Many of the flames soon became unstable, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermo-diffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure and the flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. Both the critical Peclet number and the, more rational, associated critical Karlovitz stretch factor were evaluated at the onset of the instability. With increasing pressure, the onset of flame instability occurred earlier. The measured values of burning velocity are expressed in terms of their variations with temperature and pressure, and these are compared with those obtained by other researchers. Some comparisons are made with the corresponding properties for iso-octane-air mixtures. (author)

  15. Comparative results of autogenous ignition temperature measurements by ASTM G 72 and pressurized scanning calorimetry in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, C. J.; Lowrie, R.

    1986-01-01

    The autogenous ignition temperature of four materials was determined by ASTM (G 72) and pressurized differential scanning calorimetry at 0.68-, 3.4-, and 6.8-MPa oxygen pressure. All four materials were found to ignite at lower temperatures in the ASTM method. The four materials evaluated in this program were Neoprene, Vespel SP-21, Fluorel E-2160, and nylon 6/6.

  16. Thermodynamics of a solar mixture of molecular hydrogen and helium at high pressure. [for Jupiter atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slattery, W. L.; Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of a model molecular hydrogen and helium mixture are calculated in the strongly interacting region of 0.005 to 0.3 per cu cm for a range of temperatures that are of interest for the envelopes of the Jovian planets. Computed adiabats fit the gravity data and boundary conditions from model atmospheres of Jupiter.

  17. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  18. Isothermal Gaseous Detonation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, E. S.

    2015-05-01

    We propose an isothermal gaseous detonation model taking into account the initial pressure of the explosive mixture that permits describing in a simplified form both the self-sustaining and the supercompressed and undercompressed detonation regimes. The exactness of this model has been estimated on the basis of a comparative analysis with the results of equilibrium calculations of the gas-dynamic parameters at the front of detonation waves.

  19. Collisional shift and broadening of the transition lines in pionic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2016-06-01

    We calculate the density shift and broadening of selected dipole transition lines of pionic helium in gaseous helium at low temperatures up to T =12 K and pressure up to a few bars. In the approximation of binary collisions the shift and broadening depend linearly on the density; we evaluate the slope of this linear dependence for a few spectral lines of known experimental interest and also investigate its temperature dependence. We find a blueshift of the resonance frequencies of the (n ,l )=(16 ,15 )→(16 ,14 ) , (17 ,16 )→(17 ,15 ) , and (16 ,15 )→(17 ,14 ) unfavored transitions and a redshift for the favored one, (17 ,16 )→(16 ,15 ) . The results are intended to significantly increase the efficiency of the laser spectroscopy investigations of pionic helium and help with the interpretation of the experimental data.

  20. Aliphatic hydrocarbon spectra by helium ionization mass spectrometry (HIMS) on a modified atmospheric-pressure source designed for electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-08-01

    Chemical-ionization techniques that use metastable species to ionize analytes traditionally use a flat pin or a sharp solid needle onto which the high potential needed to generate the discharge plasma is applied. We report here that direct analysis of samples containing volatile and semivolatile compounds, including saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, can be achieved on any electrospray-ionization mass spectrometer by passing helium though the sample delivery metal capillary held at a high potential. In the helium plasma ionization source (HPIS) described here, the typical helium flow required (about 20-30 mL/min), was significantly lower than that needed for other helium-ionization sources. By this procedure, positive ions were generated by nominal hydride ion removal from molecules emanating from heated saturated hydrocarbons as large as tetratetracontane (C(44)H(90)), at capillary voltages ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 kV. Unsaturated hydrocarbons, on the other hand, underwent facile protonation under much lower capillary voltages (0.9 to 2.0 kV). Although saturated and monounsaturated hydrocarbons bearing the same number of carbon atoms generate ions of the same m/z ratio, a gas-phase deuterium exchange method is described to ascertain the identity of these isomeric ions originating from either protonation or hydride abstraction mechanisms. Moreover, mass spectrometric results obtained by exposing unsaturated hydrocarbons to D(2)O vapor in an HPIS-MS instrument confirmed that the proton donor for ionization of unsaturated hydrocarbons is protonated water. PMID:21953194

  1. Laminar Heat-Transfer and Pressure-Distribution Studies on a Series of Reentry Nose Shapes at a Mach Number of 19.4 in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Richard D., Jr.; Pine, W. Clint; Henderson, Arthur, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted in the 2-inch helium tunnel at the Langley Research Center at a Mach number of 19.4 to determine the pressure distributions and heat-transfer characteristics of a family of reentry nose shapes. The pressure and heat-transfer-rate distributions on the nose shapes are compared with theoretical predictions to ascertain the limitations and validity of the theories at hypersonic speeds. The experimental results were found to be adequately predicted by existing theories. Two of the nose shapes were tested with variable-length flow-separation spikes. The results obtained by previous investigators of spike-nose bodies were found to prevail at the higher Mach number of the present investigation.

  2. Expansion of the cathode spot and generation of shock waves in the plasma of a volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Omarov, O. A.; Kurbanismailov, V. S.; Arslanbekov, M. A.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Al-Shatravi, Ali J. G.

    2012-01-15

    The expansion of the cathode spot and the generation of shock waves during the formation and development of a pulsed volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure helium were studied by analyzing the emission spectra of the cathode plasma and the spatiotemporal behavior of the plasma glow. The transition of a diffuse volume discharge in a centimeter-long gap into a high-current diffuse mode when the gas pressure increased from 1 to 5 atm and the applied voltage rose from the statistical breakdown voltage to a 100% overvoltage was investigated. Analytical expressions for the radius of the cathode spot and its expansion velocity obtained in the framework of a spherically symmetric model agree satisfactorily with the experimental data.

  3. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  4. Multipurpose top for liquid helium Dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. S.; Anderholm, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multipurpose top was fabricated for liquid helium Dewar flask which guards against flash vaporization of liquid helium and allows boiling temperature of liquid helium to be lowered by reduction of ambient pressure in Dewar flask. Device is rugged and simple, and does not require frequent calibrations or adjustments.

  5. Fluid helium at conditions of giant planetary interiors

    PubMed Central

    Stixrude, Lars; Jeanloz, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    As the second most-abundant chemical element in the universe, helium makes up a large fraction of giant gaseous planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, and most extrasolar planets discovered to date. Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we find that fluid helium undergoes temperature-induced metallization at high pressures. The electronic energy gap (band gap) closes at 20,000 K at a density half that of zero-temperature metallization, resulting in electrical conductivities greater than the minimum metallic value. Gap closure is achieved by a broadening of the valence band via increased s–p hydridization with increasing temperature, and this influences the equation of state: The Grüneisen parameter, which determines the adiabatic temperature–depth gradient inside a planet, changes only modestly, decreasing with compression up to the high-temperature metallization and then increasing upon further compression. The change in electronic structure of He at elevated pressures and temperatures has important implications for the miscibility of helium in hydrogen and for understanding the thermal histories of giant planets.

  6. Low temperature uses of helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1970-01-01

    Helium is used for purging and pressurizing cryogenic rocket propellants, welding, atmosphere control, leak detection, and refrigeration. It provides the lowest possible liquid-bath temperature and produces superconductivity in certain materials. Its superfluid effects are used in superconducting magnets.

  7. Practical protein removal using atmospheric-pressure helium plasma for densely packed gold nanoparticle arrays assembled by ferritin-based encapsulation/transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Zheng, Bin; Fukuta, Megumi; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Watanabe, Heiji

    2012-08-01

    We propose using atmospheric-pressure helium (AP He) plasma to efficiently remove the ferritin protein shells surrounding gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The high density GNPs assembled on a substrate by using a ferritin-based encapsulation/transport system were exposed to He radicals with a high internal energy to decompose their outer protein shells. In contrast to the conventional methods, AP-plasma treatment was found to suppress the aggregation of adjacent GNPs and produce densely packed and isolated GNP arrays. Consequently, we obtained an intense and sharp surface plasmon band from the plasma-treated GNP arrays. The clear response of their plasmonic behavior according to a refractive index of the surrounding media demonstrated that the proposed method had a significant advantage when fabricating GNP-based plasmonic devices.

  8. Growth process of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced CVD using nitrogen and helium as a dilution gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takanori; Sakurai, Takachika; Sato, Taiki; Shirakura, Akira; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with various thicknesses were synthesized by dielectric barrier discharge-based plasma deposition under atmospheric pressure diluted with nitrogen (N2) and helium (He) at various pulse frequencies. The C2H2/N2 film showed cauliflower-like-particles that grew bigger with the increase in film’s thickness. At 5 kHz, the film with a thickness of 2.7 µm and smooth surface was synthesized. On the other hand, the films synthesized from C2H2/He had a smooth surface and was densely packed with domed particles. The domed particles extended with the increase in the film thickness, enabling it to grow successfully to 37 µm with a smooth surface.

  9. Electron density change of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in helium flow depending on the oxygen/nitrogen ratio of the surrounding atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kentaro; Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Sato, Yuta; Hassaballa, Safwat; Bolouki, Nima; Yoneda, Munehiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2016-06-01

    Laser Thomson scattering was applied to an atmospheric-pressure plasma produced in a helium (He) gas flow for measuring the spatial profiles of electron density (n e) and electron temperature (T e). Aside from the He core flow, the shielding gas flow of N2 or synthesized air (\\text{N}2:\\text{O}2 = 4:1) surrounding the He flow was introduced to evaluate the effect of ambient gas components on the plasma parameters, eliminating the effect of ambient humidity. The n e at the discharge center was 2.7 × 1021 m‑3 for plasma generated with N2/O2 shielding gas, 50% higher than that generated with N2 shielding.

  10. Numerical study of the effect of water content on OH production in a pulsed-dc atmospheric pressure helium-air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu-Yang, Qian; Cong-Ying, Yang; Zhen-dong, Wang; Xiao-Chang, Chen; San-Qiu, Liu; De-Zhen, Wang

    2016-01-01

    A numerical study of the effect of water content on OH production in a pulsed-dc atmospheric pressure helium-air plasma jet is presented. The generation and loss mechanisms of the OH radicals in a positive half-cycle of the applied voltage are studied and discussed. It is found that the peak OH density increases with water content in air (varying from 0% to 1%) and reaches 6.3×1018 m-3 when the water content is 1%. Besides, as the water content increases from 0.01% to 1%, the space-averaged reaction rate of three-body recombination increases dramatically and is comparable to those of main OH generation reactions. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).