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Sample records for gases so2 no2

  1. MnFe2O4 as a gas sensor towards SO2 and NO2 gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathore, Deepshikha; Mitra, Supratim

    2016-05-01

    The chemical co-precipitation method was used to synthesize MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique. The average particle size of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was found to be 10.7 nm using Scherrer formula. The ultrafine powder of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was pressed to design pellet of 10 mm diameter and 1mm thickness. Copper electrodes have been deposited on the surface of pellet using silver paste in the form of capacitor. Fabricated gas sensing device of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was tested towards SO2 and NO2 gases. Cole-Cole plot of MnFe2O4 was investigated with the help of electrochemical workstation. The performance of the sensors including sensitivity, response and recovery time was also determined. It was observed that the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles are more sensible for NO2 gas as compared to SO2 gas.

  2. Emission estimates of particulate matter (PM) and trace gases (SO2, NO and NO2) from biomass fuels used in rural sector of Indo-Gangetic Plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saud, T.; Mandal, T. K.; Gadi, Ranu; Singh, D. P.; Sharma, S. K.; Saxena, M.; Mukherjee, A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we present the experimentally determined emission factors and emission estimates of particulate matter (PM), SO2, NO and NO2 emitted from biomass fuels used as energy in rural area of Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), India. Biomass fuel samples were collected at district level from this region. The burning of the collected biomass fuels is performed by using the modified dilution sampler based on studies done by Venkataraman et al. (2005). In this study, the emission factor represents the total period of burning including pyrolysis, flaming and smoldering. The average emission factor of PM from dung cake, fuel-wood and crop residue over Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Uttarakhand and Bihar are estimated as 16.26 ± 2.29 g kg-1, 4.34 ± 1.06 g kg-1 and 7.54 ± 4.17 g kg-1 respectively. Similarly, the average emission factor of SO2, NO and NO2 from dung cake, fuel-wood and crop residue over this region are also determined (SO2: 0.28 ± 0.09 g kg-1, 0.26 ± 0.10 g kg-1 and 0.27 ± 0.11 g kg-1, NO: 0.27 ± 0.21 g kg-1, 0.41 ± 0.25 g kg-1 and 0.54 ± 0.50 g kg-1 and NO2: 0.31 ± 0.23 g kg-1, 0.35 ± 0.28 g kg-1 and 0.54 ± 0.47 g kg-1 respectively). The emission of PM, SO2, NO and NO2 from biomass fuels used as energy in rural household over, IGP are also estimated in this paper. The result shows the regional emission inventory from Indian scenario with spatial variability.

  3. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-08-01

    lower the viscosity of the extracted bitumen (i.e., C4-C9 alkanes, C5-C6 cycloalkanes, C6-C8 aromatics), together with CO; and (2) emissions associated with the mining effort (i.e., CO2, CO, CH4, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2, C2-C4 alkanes, C2-C4 alkenes, C9 aromatics, short-lived solvents such as C2Cl4 and C2HCl3, and longer-lived species such as HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b). Prominent in the second group, SO2 and NO were remarkably enhanced over the oil sands, with maximum enhancements of 38.7 and 5.0 ppbv, or 383 and 319× the local background, respectively. The SO2 enhancements are comparable to maximum values measured in heavily polluted megacities such as Mexico City and are attributed to coke combustion. By contrast, relatively poor correlations between CH4 ethane and propane suggest low natural gas leakage despite its heavy use at the surface mining sites. In addition to the emission of many trace gases, the natural drawdown of OCS by vegetation was absent above the surface mining operations, presumably because of the widespread land disturbance. Unexpectedly, the mixing ratios of α- and β-pinene were much higher over the oil sands (up to 217 and 610 pptv, respectively) than over vegetation in the background boundary layer (20±7 and 84±24 pptv, respectively), and the pinenes correlated well with several industrial tracers that were elevated in the oil sands plumes. Because so few independent measurements from the oil sands mining industry exist, this study provides an important initial characterization of trace gas emissions from oil sands surface mining operations.

  4. Changes in SO2 and NO2 Pollution over the Past Decade Observed by Aura OMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Li, C.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Marchenko, S. V.; Swartz, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Fioletov, V.; McLinden, C. A.; Joiner, J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Duncan, B. N.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a NASA partnership with the Netherlands and Finland, flies on the EOS Aura satellite and uses reflected sunlight to measure two critical atmospheric trace gases, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), characterizing daily air quality. Both gases and the secondary pollutants they produce (particulate matter, PM2.5, and tropospheric ozone) are among USEPA designated criteria pollutants, posing serious threats to human health and the environment (e.g., acid rain, plant damage, and reduced visibility). A new generation of the OMI standard SO2 and NO2 products (based on critically improved DOAS spectral fitting for NO2 and innovative Principal Component Analysis method for SO2) provides a valuable dataset for studying anthropogenic pollution on local to global scales. Here we highlight some of the OMI observed long-term changes in air quality over several regions. Over the US, average NO2 and SO2 pollution levels have decreased dramatically as a result of both technological improvements (e.g., catalytic converters on cars) and stricter regulations of emissions. We see continued decline in NO2 and SO2 pollution over Europe. Over China OMI observed a ~ 60% increase in NO2 pollution between 2005 and 2013, despite a temporary reversal of the growing trend due to both 2008 Olympic Games and the economic recession in 2009. Chinese SO2 pollution seems to have stabilized since peaking in 2007, probably due to government efforts to curb SO2 emissions from the power sector. We have also observed large increases in both SO2 and NO2 pollution particularly in Eastern India where a number of new large coal power plants have been built in recent years. We expect that further improvements in the OMI NO2 and SO2 products will allow more robust quantification of long-term trends in local to global air quality.

  5. Variations in PM2.5, TSP, BC, and trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3) between haze and non-haze episodes in winter over Xi'an, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Shen, Zhenxing; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Renjian; Zhang, Leiming; Huang, R.-J.; Zheng, Chenjia; Wang, Linqing; Liu, Suixin; Xu, Hongmei; Zheng, Chunli; Liu, Pingping

    2015-07-01

    To investigate chemical profiles and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles in winter haze events, daily PM2.5 and TSP, 5-min BC, and 15-min trace gases (SO2, NO2, and O3) were measured continuously during Dec. 1-31, 2012 in Xi'an. Chemical analysis was also conducted for nine water-soluble inorganic ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42-), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and eight carbon fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, EC1, EC2, EC3, and OP) in both PM2.5 and TSP samples. Higher levels of TSP, PM2.5, BC, SO2, and NO2, and lower levels of O3 were observed during haze periods in comparison with non-haze days. The sum of the major secondary ionic species (NH4+, NO3-, and SO42-) in PM2.5 or TSP during haze periods was about 3 times of that during non-haze days. Ion balance calculations showed that PM2.5 samples were acidic during haze periods and were close to neutral during non-haze days. The mean carbon levels were 52.9 μg m-3 and 82.1 μg m-3 in PM2.5 and TSP, respectively, during haze events, which were ∼1.5 times of those during non-haze days. The diurnal variations of BC during non-haze days showed a bimodal distribution with two peaks coincided with traffic rush hours. This was not the case during haze periods, which exhibited a relatively smooth pattern but with high concentration levels, providing evidence of particle accumulation. The ratios of SO42 - /EC, NO3-/EC, and NH4+/EC sharply increased during haze periods, indicating the important pathway of secondary inorganic species formation through aqueous-phase transformation under high relative humidity condition. This study also highlights that wintertime secondary organic carbon (SOC) formation can be an important contributor to carbonaceous aerosol, especially during haze periods.

  6. Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barletta, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Gorham, K.; Huey, L. G.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Vay, S. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    products and/or from the diluent used to lower the viscosity of the extracted bitumen (i.e., C4-C9 alkanes, C5-C6 cycloalkanes, C6-C8 aromatics), together with CO; and (2) emissions associated with the mining effort, such as upgraders (i.e., CO2, CO, CH4, NO, NO2, NOy, SO2, C2-C4 alkanes, C2-C4 alkenes, C9 aromatics, short-lived solvents such as C2Cl4 and C2HCl3, and longer-lived species such as HCFC-22 and HCFC-142b). Prominent in the second group, SO2 and NO were remarkably enhanced over the oil sands, with maximum mixing ratios of 38.7 ppbv and 5.0 ppbv, or 383× and 319× the local background, respectively. These SO2 levels are comparable to maximum values measured in heavily polluted megacities such as Mexico City and are attributed to coke combustion. By contrast, relatively poor correlations between CH4, ethane and propane suggest low levels of natural gas leakage despite its heavy use at the surface mining sites. Instead the elevated CH4 levels are attributed to methanogenic tailings pond emissions. In addition to the emission of many trace gases, the natural drawdown of OCS by vegetation was absent above the surface mining operations, presumably because of the widespread land disturbance. Unexpectedly, the mixing ratios of α-pinene and β-pinene were much greater over the oil sands (up to 217 pptv and 610 pptv, respectively) than over vegetation in the background boundary layer (20±7 pptv and 84±24 pptv, respectively), and the pinenes correlated well with several industrial tracers that were elevated in the oil sands plumes. Because so few independent measurements from the oil sands mining industry exist, this study provides an important initial characterization of trace gas emissions from oil sands surface mining operations.

  7. Next-Generation Aura/OMI NO2 and SO2 Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Yang, Kai; Bucsela, Eric; Lamsal, Lok; Celarier, Edward; Swartz, William; Carn, Simon; Bhartia, Pawan; Gleason, James; Pickering, Ken; Dickerson, Russ

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of both SO2 and NO2 gases are recognized as an essential component of atmospheric composition missions. We describe current capabilities and limitations of the operational Aura/OMI NO2 and SO2 data that have been used by a large number of researchers. Analyses of the data and validation studies have brought to light a number of areas in which these products can be expanded and improved. Major improvements for new NASA standard (SP) NO2 product include more accurate tropospheric and stratospheric column amounts, along with much improved error estimates and diagnostics. Our approach uses a monthly NO2 climatology based on the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry-transport model and takes advantage of OMI data from cloudy scenes to find clean areas where the contribution from the trap NO2 column is relatively small. We then use a new filtering, interpolation and smoothing techniques for separating the stratospheric and tropospheric components of NO2, minimizing the influence of a priori information. The new algorithm greatly improves the structure of stratospheric features relative to the original SP. For the next-generation OMI SO2 product we plan to implement operationally the offline iterative spectral fitting (ISF) algorithm and re-process the OMI Level-2 SO2 dataset using a priori SO2 and aerosol profiles, clouds, and surface reflectivity appropriate for observation conditions. This will improve the ability to detect and quantify weak tropospheric SO2 loadings. The new algorithm is validated using aircraft in-situ data during field campaigns in China (2005 and 2008) and in Maryland (Frostburg, 2010 and DISCOVER-AQ in July 2011). The height of the SO2 plumes will also be estimated for high SO2 loading cases (e.g., volcanic eruptions). The same SO2 algorithm will be applied to the data from OMPS sensor to be launched on NPP satellite later this year. The next-generation NO2 and SO2 products will provide critical information (e

  8. Aura OMI Observations of Global SO2 and NO2 Pollution from 2005 to 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok; Celarier, Edward; Marchenko, Sergey; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric; Fioletov, Vitali; McLinden, Chris; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Duncan, Bryan; Dickerson, Russ

    2014-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a NASA partnership with the Netherlands and Finland, flies on the NASA Aura satellite and uses reflected sunlight to measure the two critical atmospheric trace gases: nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) characterizing daily air quality. Both gases and the secondary pollutants they produce (particulate matter, PM2.5, and tropospheric ozone) are USEPA designated criteria pollutants, posing serious threats to human health and the environment (e.g., acid rain, plant damage and reduced visibility). Our group at NASA GSFC has developed and maintained OMI standard SO2 and NO2 data products. We have recently released an updated version of the standard NO2 L2 and L3 products (SP v2.1) and continue improving the algorithm. We are currently in the process of releasing next generation pollution SO2 product, based on an innovative Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm, which greatly reduces the noise and biases. These new standard products provide valuable datasets for studying anthropogenic pollution on local to global scales. Here we highlight some of the OMI observed changes in air quality over several regions. Over the US average NO2 and SO2 pollution levels had decreased dramatically as a result of both technological improvements (e.g., catalytic converters on cars) and stricter regulations of emissions. We see continued decline in pollution over Europe. Over China OMI observed an increase of about 60 percent in NO2 pollution between 2005 and 2013, despite a temporal reversal of the growing trend due to both 2008 Olympic Games and the economic recession in 2009. Chinese SO2 pollution seems to have stabilized since peaking in 2007, probably due to government efforts to curb SO2 emissions from the power sector. We have also observed large increases in both SO2 and NO2 pollution particularly in Eastern India where a number of large new coal power plants had been built in recent years. We expect that further

  9. Interaction of NO2 and SO2 with ZnO [101 ¯] surface using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satvinder; Singh, Janpreet; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of NO2 and SO2 gases with ZnO non-polar surface are theoretically studied using ab initio calculations for gas sensing applications. The information about the adsorption scenarios of NO2 and SO2 gases are studied using DFT-GGA approximation. A stable reduced surface of ZnO is analyzed and the compatibility of theoretical results with experimental references is presented.

  10. SO2 and NO2 over major urban regions of India: a tempo-spatial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, C.; Lal, S.

    2012-12-01

    Demographic projections show that by the year 2025, 16 of the world's 29 megacities will be located in Asia, many of which have very basic problems in terms of air quality. Apart from being home to a burgeoning population, these regions of the globe are also major players in atmospheric chemistry as a result of myriad emission patterns combined with intense photochemistry. Like most of these Asian megacities, fast-paced development in some of the Indian cities has ramifications in increased emissions from industrial and transport sectors. These emissions release sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), in addition to several pollutants, into the ambient air and have the potential to impact the chemistry and radiative balance on a regional scale. Surface measurements of these two criteria pollutants by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), India during 2005-2010 from 13 urban locations in India have been analyzed to get an insight into their temporal and spatial variability. Stations are chosen to represent the entire Indian region: Indo-Gangetic plain or 'IGP' (Jalandhar, Delhi, Kanpur, Durgapur, Kolkata, Guwahati), western India (Jodhpur, Ahmedabad, Surat), central India (Nagpur, Hyderabad) and southern India (Chennai, Trivandrum). The monthly averaged surface level SO2 and NO2 have also been compared with monthly columnar averages of these gases as detected by the Ozone monitoring Instrument (OMI) over these station grids. Mean SO2 concentrations are found to be the highest for Surat (7.5 ppbv), located in a highly industrialized region. Elevated levels of NO2, observed for Durgapur and Kolkata (31 ppbv each), are close to the 24-hour 'National Ambient Air Quality' standard (30 ppbv). The surface concentrations for both SO2 and NO2 concentrations are found to be the highest during winter. Columnar SO2 over many stations show a maximum during summer monsoon. For most IGP stations, columnar NO2 values are elevated during winter. Wavelet analyses

  11. Aura OMI Observations of Regional SO2 and NO2 Pollution Changes from 2005 to 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A.; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Boersma, K. Folkert; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper, we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2015, by more than 40 and 80 percent, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal-fired power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50 percent reduction in 2012-2015, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 percent, respectively, from 2005 to 2015. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved valuable in documenting rapid changes in air

  12. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; McLinden, C. A.; Li, C.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Marchenko, S. V.; Swartz, W. H.; Bucsela, E. J.; Joiner, J.; Duncan, B. N.; Boersma, K. F.; Veefkind, J. P.; Levelt, P. F.; Fioletov, V. E.; Dickerson, R. R.; He, H.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for the different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2014, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50 % reduction in 2012-2014, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2014. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved to be very valuable in documenting rapid changes in air quality over

  13. Aura OMI observations of regional SO2 and NO2 pollution changes from 2005 to 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; McLinden, Chris A.; Li, Can; Lamsal, Lok N.; Celarier, Edward A.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Swartz, William H.; Bucsela, Eric J.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Folkert Boersma, K.; Pepijn Veefkind, J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Fioletov, Vitali E.; Dickerson, Russell R.; He, Hao; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.

    2016-04-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite has been providing global observations of the ozone layer and key atmospheric pollutant gases, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), since October 2004. The data products from the same instrument provide consistent spatial and temporal coverage and permit the study of anthropogenic and natural emissions on local-to-global scales. In this paper, we examine changes in SO2 and NO2 over some of the world's most polluted industrialized regions during the first decade of OMI observations. In terms of regional pollution changes, we see both upward and downward trends, sometimes in opposite directions for NO2 and SO2, for different study areas. The trends are, for the most part, associated with economic and/or technological changes in energy use, as well as regional regulatory policies. Over the eastern US, both NO2 and SO2 levels decreased dramatically from 2005 to 2015, by more than 40 and 80 %, respectively, as a result of both technological improvements and stricter regulations of emissions. OMI confirmed large reductions in SO2 over eastern Europe's largest coal-fired power plants after installation of flue gas desulfurization devices. The North China Plain has the world's most severe SO2 pollution, but a decreasing trend has been observed since 2011, with about a 50 % reduction in 2012-2015, due to an economic slowdown and government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors. In contrast, India's SO2 and NO2 levels from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by more than 100 and 50 %, respectively, from 2005 to 2015. Several SO2 hot spots observed over the Persian Gulf are probably related to oil and gas operations and indicate a possible underestimation of emissions from these sources in bottom-up emission inventories. Overall, OMI observations have proved valuable in documenting rapid changes in air quality over different

  14. Effect of buffer gases on the performance of SO2 trace measurement based on photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbifar, M. R.; Khalilzadeh, J.; Dibaee, B.; Parvin, P.

    2014-07-01

    In this experimental work a laser photoacoustic spectrometer designed and fabricated. System sensitivity for detection of SO2 and NO2 was measured. Resonance frequency variation versus pressure increase of Nitrogen, Argon, Helium and Air buffer gases was studied. Results show that, sensitivity of system for SO2 and NO2 are 353 ppb and 963 ppb respectively. It was shown that resonance frequency for Nitrogen, Argon, and Air buffer gases was not noticeably varied by buffer gas pressure increasing, but for Helium, resonance frequency not only is not in range of three other gases, but also grows by pressure increasing. The system noises were damped preparing two buffer chambers.

  15. GROWTH RESPONSE IN SPINACH TO SEQUENTIAL AND SIMULTANEOUS EXPOSURE TO NO2 AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was exposed intermittently to NO2 and SO2 (2 hours/week; 0.8 or 1.5ppm) in a simultaneous or sequential fashion over the 42-day growth period. Nighttime simultaneous exposure to NO2 and SO2 reduced growth and altered assimilate partitioning to the root...

  16. Oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and O3 on carbon - Implications to tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Schryer, D. R.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate in air at 65 percent relative humidity on carbon particles was investigated gravimetrically in the presence of NO2 and O3. Approximately 1 mg samples of carbon black were exposed to continuously flowing ppbv mixtures of SO2, SO2 + NO2 and SO2 + O3 for prescribed periods of time before desorption into dry N2. Wet chemical analysis of the particles followed desorption. NO2 and O3 were found to have little, if any, effect relative to air on sulfate yields at the concentrations studied.

  17. Optimal spectral resolution for NO2 and SO2 retrieval by Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Scientific Team of DOAS

    2011-12-01

    Ministry of Environment, Korea is planning an environmental geostationary satellite program as a part of MP-GEOSAT (Multi-Purpose GEOstationary SATellite), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017 (Lee S. et al., 2010). It is supposed to be placed on an orbit of approximately 36,000 kilometers high directly over the equator, which revolves in the same direction the earth rotates. Its missions include meteorological, ocean monitoring, and environmental monitoring. Especially, Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) is to provide atmospheric chemistry measurements of trace gases such as O3, NO2, SO2, HCHO, and aerosol in high temporal (every 1 hour) and spatial (30x30 km2) resolution over Asia, to monitor regional transport events such as transboundary pollution and Asian dust, and to enhance our understanding on interactions between atmospheric chemistry and meteorology. In order to determine the minimum required spectral resolution of GEMS, measurement accuracy has been estimated for different spectral resolutions based on the actual satellite data as well as model simulation data of very fine spectral resolution. Absorption spectra of SCIAMACHY level 2 data (http://www.temis.nl) with spectral resolution of 0.2nm and reconstructed spectra of broader spectral resolution; 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8nm have been utilized to assess the applicability for SO2 and NO2 retrievals over GEMS spatial coverage areas using the DOAS fitting method. The relative fitting error in SO2 retrieval of each spectral resolution over southern China was determined to be 45.1, 56.1, 99.7, and 187.3 %, respectively. The relative fitting errors in NO2 retrieval of each spectral resolution over northern India were 16.2, 24.6, 32.6, and 38.9 %, respectively. Since relative fitting error in SO2 retrieval increases as the spectra resolution increases, the optimal spectrum resolution was determined to be 0.4nm. On the other hand, since the relative fitting error in NO2 retrieval is below

  18. Novel process of simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO2 by sodium humate solution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoxin; Sun, Zhiguo; Gao, Hanyang

    2010-09-01

    A novel simultaneous flue gas desulfurization and denitrification (FGDD) process using sodium humate (HA-Na) solution was proposed. This study relates to the SO2/NO2 absorption efficiency and products of simultaneous removing SO2 and NO2 in a bubbling reactor, especially the effect of recycled water on the SO2/NO2 absorption. Under alkaline conditions, the sulfate content in S-containing compound decreases with the increase of NO2 concentration, whereas there is a contrary result under acidic conditions. Whether the absorption liquid is alkaline or acidic, the presence of NO2 improves the SO2 absorption into HA-Na solution, because NO2 may promote the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. It seems that the presence of SO2 is unfavorable for the NO2 absorption, but the NO2 absorption efficiency can be improved with the cycle number rising due to the increasing amount of sulfite. Although all the ion concentrations of Na+,SO4(2-),SO3(2-), and NO3- have a gradual increase as the cycle number rises, the ion concentrations of SO4(2-) and Na+ are far more than that of the other ions, which results in a slight decrease of the SO2 absorption efficiency. However, the initial pH of HA-Na solution prepared by recycled water decreases from 10 to 8.1 with the cycle number increasing from 1 to 10, whereas the final pH (the pH after absorption reaction is finished) remains almost constant (3.3). The SO2 absorption efficiency is above 98% and the NO2 absorption efficiency may reach above 95% in the optimal condition in this process. The chief byproduct is a compound fertilizer consisting of humic acid (HA), sulfate, and nitrate. PMID:20704283

  19. Satellite observations of SO2, NO2, CO, and aerosol over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, S.; Wu, F.; Krotkov, N.; Levelt, P.; Chu, A.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite observations of SO2, NO2, CO, and aerosol over China are related to demographic population density, emissions inventories, industrial production, and thermal power plant geospatial distributions. Similarities and differences in the geospatial distributions of SO2, NO2, CO, and aerosol are identified. Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) SO2 and NO2 atmospheric columns, Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO columns, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depths over China are analyzed during 2005-2007. A comparison of OMI NO2 and University of Columbia gridded population maps indicates a close correspondence between centers of enhanced NO2 and population, with enhanced NO2 and SO2 co-located along the geospatial arc from Shijiazhuang to Luoyang in Hebei, Shanxi, and Henan provinces of China. The region near 35 N and 112 E in northern Henan and southern Shanxi provinces has maxima in NO2, SO2, and CO, which is co-located with power plant number density and population centers. Trends in Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) NO2 over China from 1996 - 2007, and OMI NO2 from 2004-2008, are compared, and placed in context, to other regions of the world. In accord with previous studies, trends in GOME and SCIAMACHY NO2 over China during 1996-2007 are positive, while trends over Europe and the United States are negative. OMI NO2 columns increase by 8.7 % per year over eastern China (20-30 N, 110-123 E) in the winters of 2004-2008.

  20. Carbon catalyzed SO2 oxidation by NO2 and O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Schryer, D. R.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation of SO2 to sulfate on carbon particles by trace quantities of NO2 and O3 was studied. Particulate carbon black was either: (1) directly exposed on the pan of a microbalance to various humidified mixtures of SO2 and oxidant gas and the resultant weight gains monitored, or (2) the gas mixtures were bubbled through aqueous suspensions of carbon black and pure water blanks. In each set of experiments the run times were varied appropriately and the yields of sulfate were determined analytically. Conversion of SO2 to sulfate was thus characterized as a function of exposure time and of oxidant gas. Carbon black was determined to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 oxidation to sulfate by both NO2 and O3. No saturation effects were observed in either experimental approach. Conversions of SO2 to sulfate did not appear pH dependent.

  1. Satellite and ground based seasonal variability of NO2 and SO2 over New Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Alok K.; Kumar, Ram P.; Kumar, Krishan

    2015-10-01

    Remote sensing technology application emerges as a useful tool for exploring atmospheric pollution revelation in the last two decade. In this study, we used Aura satellite Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) tropospheric NO2 and pbl SO2 retrieval data (October 2004 - September 2013) to generate a composite spatial map of different seasons over New Delhi National Capital Region (NCR). For surface measurements, we used Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) NO2 and SO2 data (January 2005 - December 2013). Further, we compared the satellite retrievals data to the surface measurements. A higher NO2 concentration in both OMI and CPCB stations measurements are obtained in winter season followed by summer and minimum in monsoon months. OMI SO2 concentration is higher in monsoon months and almost comparable in summer and winter seasons. We obtained a statistically significant correlation between OMI tropospheric NO2 and CPCB surface measurements.

  2. Calculation of pressure-broadened linewidths of SO2 and NO2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, G. D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte theory of line broadening (1949, 1962) is applied to calculate the self-broadened and N2- and O2-broadened linewidths of SO2 and NO2. Computed linewidth values are in good agreement with available experimental results and with calculations by Murphy and Boggs (1967, 1969) on four self-broadened and one nitrogen-broadened lines. Air-broadened linewidths are also calculated for SO2 at 200, 250 and 300 K. The results are considered to be useful for predicting theoretical spectra of SO2 under atmospheric conditions.

  3. Transport of gaseous NO2 and SO2 by MAX-DOAS in Beijing and surrounding area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    With the development of industry and urbanization, regional pollution is increasing seriously, and the cross influence between cities is becoming more frequently. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) has been successfully applied in the remote sensing of gaseous pollutants during the past decade, it is based on scattered light of the sun, and can measure spectral in different directions, measure tropospheric and the whole atmospheric column densities of trace gases combining with radiative transfer model (RTM). This approach is very useful for the investigation of the main path of air pollution transportation. Fifteen MAX-DOAS stations which are in urban and in the path of pollution transport are set up in Beijing and surrounding area including Tianjin and Hebei province to observe the spatial and temporal distributions and regional transport of gaseous NO2 and SO2. The NO2 VCDs and profiles and SO2 VCDs are obtained. The results show that the NO2 column densities in urban are higher than surroundings, it shows that the NO2 in Beijing is mainly from the local; The SO2 column densities in other cities to the south of Beijing are obviously higher than in Beijing, so regional transport from the south of Hebei province will have a significant impact on Beijing. From the results of NO2 and SO2, the whole pollution process including incubation, generation, duration, and dispersion was observed. The vertical distribution show that NO2 concentration is mainly near the surface from 0 to 400m, and SO2 is higher in the transport process.

  4. UV Fourier transform measurements of tropospheric O3, NO2, SO2, benzene, and toluene.

    PubMed

    Vandaele, A C; Tsouli, A; Carleer, M; Colin, R

    2002-01-01

    Using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique and a Fourier transform spectrometer, NO2, SO2, O3, benzene. and toluene were measured during three measurement campaigns held in Brussels in 1995, 1996, and 1997. The O3 concentrations could be explained as the results of the local photochemistry and the dynamical properties of the mixing layer. NO2 concentrations were anti-correlated to the O3 concentrations, as expected. SO2 also showed a pronounced dependence on car traffic. Average benzene and toluene concentrations were, respectively 1.7 ppb and between 4.4 and 6.6 pbb, but high values of toluene up to 98.8 ppb were observed. SO2 concentrations and to a lesser extent, those of NO2 and 03, were dependent on the wind direction. Ozone in Brussels has been found to be influenced by the meteorological conditions prevailing in central Europe. Comparisons with other measurements have shown that 03 and SO2 data are in general in good agreement, but our NO2 concentrations seem to be generally higher. PMID:11806447

  5. GROWTH RESPONSE IN RADISH TO SEQUENTIAL AND SIMULTANEOUS EXPOSURES OF NO2 AND SO2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential and simultaneous exposures of radish Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Belle to 0.8 microliters per liter nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 0.8 microliters per liter sulphur dioxide (SO2) were conducted under both day- and night-time conditions to examine the effects on growth a...

  6. Carbon-catalyzed oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Schryer, D. R.; Cofer, W. R., III; Edahl, R. A., Jr.; Munavalli, S.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed using carbon particles (commercial furnace black) as a surrogate for soot particles. Carbon particles were suspended in water, and gas mixtures were bubbled into the suspensions to observe the effect of carbon particles on the oxidation of SO2 by air and NO2. Identical gas mixtures were bubbled into a blank containing only pure water. After exposure each solution was analyzed for pH and sulfate. It was found that NO2 greatly enhances the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate in the presence of carbon particles. The amount of sulfate found in the blanks was significantly less. Under the conditions of these experiments no saturation of the reaction was observed and SO2 was converted to sulfate even in a highly acid medium (pH or = 1.5).

  7. Oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air in an aqueous suspension of carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Schryer, D. R.; Cofer, W. R., III; Edahl, R. A., Jr.; Munavalli, S.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments has been performed using carbon black as a surrogate for soot particles. Carbon black was suspended in water and gas mixtures were bubbled into the suspensions to observe the effect of carbon particles on the oxidation of SO2 by air and NO2. Identical gas mixtures were bubbled into a black containing only pure water. After exposure each solution was analyzed for pH and sulfate. It was found that NO2 greatly enhances the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate in the presence of carbon black. The amount of sulfate in the blanks was significantly less. Under the conditions of the experiments no saturation of the reaction was observed and SO2 was converted to sulfate even in a highly acid medium (pH not less than 1.5).

  8. Two years of MAXDOAS measurements of NO2, HONO, SO2 and HCHO at SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Ding, Aijun; Van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Shen, Yicheng; Valks, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. This work presents two years measurements of air pollutants including NO2, HONO, SO2, HCHO and CHOCHO at a regional back-ground site, the Station for Observing Regional Processes of the Earth System (SORPES), in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in eastern China. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on trace gases vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs). The seasonal and diurnal cycles of trace gases have been studies and compared with in situ measurements. The retrieved tropospheric NO2, HCHO and SO2 VCDs were compared to satellite measurements, while the NO2 and SO2 near surface concentrations (0-200 m layer) were compared to measurements from in situ instruments at SORPES.

  9. The enhanced oxidation of SO2 by NO2 on carbon particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III; Schryer, D. R.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation of SO2 on carbon particles in dry air and in air at 65% relative humidity (RH) was found to be greatly enhanced by the presence of gaseous NO2. Exposures of 20-80ppm SO2 + 10ppm NO2 on 1-mg samples of commercial carbon black were found to produce both sorption and desorption coverages (weight retained after desorption into N2) of over one order of magnitude greater than for corresponding SO2 exposures. Significant agglomeration and wetting were observed to occur progressively during exposures at 65% RH, and samples, even after 150-h exposure, rarely reached steady-state weight gain. The wetting may have regenerated fresh reactive carbon surface. Sorptions conducted in nitrogen atmospheres, rather than in air, appeared to produce slightly higher sorptions and weight retentions for equivalent exposure concentrations and times, indicating that NO2 served as the oxidizer and that molecular oxygen, or some trace constitutents in air, may have weakly inhibited the oxidation by NO2. Wet chemical analysis of the desorbed phase indicated that sulfate, presumably H2SO4 accounted for over half of the retained weight. Measurements of pH from water-quenched samples indicated a highly acidic surface phase, and suggested the oxidation process could proceed in an acidic environment.

  10. Health risks of NO 2, SPM and SO 2 in Delhi (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Jai Shanker; Kumar, Rakesh; Devotta, Sukumar

    There is increasingly growing evidence linking urban air pollution to acute and chronic illnesses amongst all age groups. Therefore, monitoring of ambient concentrations of various air pollutants as well as quantification of the dose inhaled becomes quite important, specially in view of the fact that in many countries, policy decisions for reducing pollutant concentrations are mainly taken on the basis of their health impacts. The dose when gets combined with the likely responses, indicates the ultimate health risk (HR). Thus, as an extension of our earlier studies, HR has been estimated for three pollutants, namely, suspended particulate matter (SPM), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) for Delhi City in India. For estimation and analyses, three zones have been considered, namely, residential, industrial and commercial. The total population has been divided into three age classes (infants, children and adults) with different body weights and breathing rates. The exercise takes into account age-specific breathing rates, body weights for different age categories and occupancy factors for different zones. Results indicate that health risks due to air pollution in Delhi are highest for children. For all age categories, health risks due to SO 2 (HR_SO 2) are the lowest. Hence, HR_SO 2 has been taken as the reference with respect to which HR values due to SPM and NO 2 have been compared. Taking into account all the age categories and their occupancy in different zones, average HR values for NO 2 and SPM turn out to be respectively 22.11 and 16.13 times more than that for SO 2. The present study can be useful in generating public awareness as well as in averting and mitigating the health risks.

  11. Ship emissions of SO2 and NO2: DOAS measurements from airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, N.; Mellqvist, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Balzani, J.

    2012-05-01

    A unique methodology to measure gas fluxes of SO2 and NO2 from ships using optical remote sensing is described and demonstrated in a feasibility study. The measurement system is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy using reflected skylight from the water surface as light source. A grating spectrometer records spectra around 311 nm and 440 nm, respectively, with the telescope pointed downward at a 30° angle from the horizon. The mass column values of SO2 and NO2 are retrieved from each spectrum and integrated across the plume. A simple geometric approximation is used to calculate the optical path. To obtain the total emission in kg h-1 the resulting total mass across the plume is multiplied with the apparent wind, i.e. a dilution factor corresponding to the vector between the wind and the ship speed. The system was tested in two feasibility studies in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat, from a CASA-212 airplane in 2008 and in the North Sea outside Rotterdam from a Dauphin helicopter in an EU campaign in 2009. In the Baltic Sea the average SO2 emission out of 22 ships was (54 ± 13) kg h-1, and the average NO2 emission was (33 ± 8) kg h-1, out of 13 ships. In the North Sea the average SO2 emission out of 21 ships was (42 ± 11) kg h-1, NO2 was not measured here. The detection limit of the system made it possible to detect SO2 in the ship plumes in 60% of the measurements when the described method was used. A comparison exercise was carried out by conducting airborne optical measurements on a passenger ferry in parallel with onboard measurements. The comparison shows agreement of (-30 ± 14)% and (-41 ± 11)%, respectively, for two days, with equal measurement precision of about 20%. This gives an idea of the measurement uncertainty caused by errors in the simple geometric approximation for the optical light path neglecting scattering of the light in ocean waves and direct and multiple scattering in the exhaust plume under various conditions. A tentative

  12. Ship emissions of SO2 and NO2: DOAS measurements from airborne platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, N.; Mellqvist, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Balzani, J.

    2011-10-01

    A unique methodology to measure gas fluxes of SO2 and NO2 from ships has been developed in a Swedish national project using optical remote sensing. The measurement system is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy using reflected skylight from the water surface as light source. A grating spectrometer records spectra around 311 nm and 440 nm, respectively, with the telescope pointed downward at a 30° angle from the horizon. The mass column values of SO2 and NO2 are retrieved from each spectrum and integrated across the plume. To obtain the total emission in kg h-1 the resulting total mass across the plume is multiplied with the apparent wind, i.e. a dilution factor corresponding to the vector between the wind and the ship speed. The system was tested in two feasibility studies in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat, from a CASA-212 airplane in 2008 and in the North Sea outside Rotterdam from a Dauphin helicopter in an EU campaign in 2009. In the Baltic Sea the average SO2 emission out of 22 ships was (54 ± 13) kg h-1, and the average NO2 emission was (33 ± 8) kg h-1, out of 13 ships. In the North Sea the average SO2 emission out of 21 ships was (42 ± 11) kg h-1, NO2 was not measured here. The system was able to detect plumes of SO2 in 60% of the measurements when the described method was used. The optical measurement carried out on a passenger ferry on two consecutive days was compared to onboard emission data obtained from analysed fuel content and power consumption. The comparison shows agreement of (-30 ± 14) % and (-41 ± 11) %, respectively, for two days, with equal measurement precision of about 20%, this indicates the presence of systematic error sources that are yet unaccounted for when deriving the flux. Two such error sources are the difficulty in estimating the optical path of the ocean scattered light due to waves, and direct and multiple scattering in the exhaust plume. Rough estimates of these sources have been accounted for in the total

  13. Measurements of NO2, SO2, NH3, HNO3 and O3 in West African urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adon, Marcellin; Yoboué, Véronique; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Liousse, Catherine; Diop, Babakar; Doumbia, El Hadji Thierno; Gardrat, Eric; Ndiaye, Seydi Ababacar; Jarnot, Christian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the measurements of atmospheric gas concentrations of NO2, SO2, NH3, HNO3, and O3 performed at two traffic sites in the context of the POLCA (Pollution of African Capitals) program. These gases were measured using a passive sampling technique from Jan. 2008 to Dec. 2009 at Dakar and from Jun. 2008 to Dec. 2009 at Bamako. In addition, during these periods there were two intensive measurement campaigns (from 19 Jan. to 2 Feb. 2009 at Bamako and from 30 Nov. to 13 Dec. 2009 at Dakar) where real-time active analysers were used to measure NO2 and SO2. Results show that Dakar has a pollution level for NO2 and SO2 higher than that of Bamako, whereas it is lower for NH3 concentrations. Monthly values of NO2 range between 21.1 and 43.5 ppb in Dakar with an annual mean concentration of 31.7 ppb (59.6 μg/m3). NO2 values in Bamako are 9.4-22.6 ppb with a mean of 16.2 ppb. At Dakar, the mean annual NO2 limit value (21.3 ppb or 40 μg/m3) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) is widely exceeded. The mean annual concentration of SO2 is 15.9 ppb in Dakar and 3.6 ppb in Bamako. These differences may be explained by different sources of traffic between Bamako (with mainly gasoline vehicles) and Dakar (with mainly diesel vehicles). The annual mean NH3 concentration is about two times higher in Bamako (46.7 ppb) than in Dakar (21.1 ppb). In addition to other possible sources, we assume that the ammonia from domestic fires and uncontrolled garbage incineration may have more influence at Bamako than at Dakar. The mean annual concentrations of HNO3 and O3 are 1.3 ppb and 7.7 ppb in Dakar and 0.6 ppb and 5.1 ppb in Bamako, respectively. Seasonal variation in measured gas concentrations are low in Bamako and more pronounced in Dakar, except for HNO3 and NH3. At Dakar, NO2 and SO2 daily mean concentrations are higher during the weekdays than on weekends, when urban activities are reduced, whereas at Bamako, no significant difference was observed

  14. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  15. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  16. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  17. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  18. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  19. REMOVAL OF SO2 FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses technology for sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution control by flue gas cleaning (called 'scrubbing') in the utility industry, a technology that has advanced significantly during the past 5 years. Federal Regulations are resulting in increasingly large-scale applica...

  20. Carbon catalysis in the aqueous oxidation of SO2 by NO2 and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.; Schryer, J.; Cofer, W. R., III; Vay, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide and an oxidant gas (air or NO2) were bubbled through aqueous suspensions of both washed and unwashed carbon black as well as through samples of wash water, which contained whatever soluble species were originally present on the carbon, and high-purity water. The sulfate yields obtained showed the washed and unwashed carbon to be equally catalytic for the oxidation of SO2 to sulfate by both oxidants, whereas little sulfate was generated in either the wash water or high-purity water in the absence of carbon. These results indicate that the sulfate yields produced in aqueous suspensions of the carbon studied are due to catalysis by the carbon particles rather than by soluble species dissolved from them.

  1. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Grutzeck

    1999-04-30

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO{sub 2} from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO{sub 2} from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150 C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO{sub 2} adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. 100 C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO{sub 2} adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the US.

  2. SO2 REMOVAL FROM FLUE GASES USING UTILITY SYNTHESIZED ZEOLITES

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL GRUTZECK

    1998-10-31

    It is well known that natural and synthetic zeolites (molecular sieves) can adsorb gaseous SO2 from flue gas and do it more efficiently than lime based scrubbing materials. Unfortunately their cost ($500-$800 per ton) has deterred their use in this capacity. It is also known that zeolites are easy to synthesize from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The overall objective of the current work has been to evaluate the feasibility of having a utility synthesize its own zeolites, on-site, from fly ash and other recycled materials and then use these zeolites to adsorb SO2 from their flue gases. Work to date has shown that the efficiency of the capture process is related to the degree of crystallinity and the type of zeolite that forms in the samples. Normally, those samples cured at 150°C contained a greater proportion of zeolite and as such were more SO2 adsorptive than their low-temperature counterparts. However, in order for the project to be successful, on site synthesis must remain an option, i.e. _100°C synthesis. In light of this, the experimental focus now has two aspects. First, compositions of the starting materials are being altered by blending the current suite of fly ashes with other fly ashes, ground glass cullet and silica fume to promote the formation and growth of well crystallized and highly adsorptive zeolites. Second, greater degrees of reaction at significantly lower temperatures are being promote by ball milling the fly ash prior to use, by the use of more concentrated caustic solutions, and by the addition of zeolite seeds to the reactants. In all cases studies will focus on the effect of structure type and degree of conversion on SO2 adsorption. Future work will concentrate on the study of the effect of weathering on the suitability of converting fly ash into zeolites. This is an especially important study, considering the acres of fly ash now in storage throughout the country.

  3. Long path monitoring of tropospheric O3, NO2, H2CO and SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; Carleer, M.; Colin, R.; Simon, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    Concentrations of tropospheric O3, NO2, H2CO, and SO2 have been measured on the Campus of the 'Universite Libre de Bruxelles' on a routine basis since October 1990. The long path system consists of a source lamp, a first 30 cm f/8 Cassegrain type telescope which collimates the light onto a slightly parabolic mirror placed on the roof of a building situated 394 m away from the laboratory. The light is sent back into a second 30 cm Cassegrain telescope. This telescope has been modified so that the output beam is a 5 cm diameter parallel beam. This beam is then focused onto the entrance aperture of the BRUKER IFS120HR fourier transform spectrometer. The two telescopes are mounted on alignment devices and the external mirror is equipped with a driving system operated from the laboratory. The choice of the light source (either a 1000 W high pressure 'ozone free' xenon lamp or a 250 W tungsten filament) and of the detector (either a solar blind UV-diode or a silicon diode) depended on the spectral region studied. These regions lie respectively from 26,000 cm(exp -1) to 30,000 cm(exp -1) (260-380 nm) and from 14,000 cm(exp -1) to 30,000 cm(exp -1) (330-700 nm). The spectra have been recorded at the resolution of 16 cm(exp -1) and with a dispersion of 7.7 cm(exp -1). They have been measured during the forward and the backward movements of the mobile mirror, in double sided mode; each spectrum is an average of 2000 scans. The time required to record a spectrum is about 45 minutes. The shape of the raw spectra in the two investigated regions are represented.

  4. Response of needle sulphur and nitrogen concentrations of Scots pine versus Norway spruce to SO2 and NO2.

    PubMed

    Manninen, S; Huttunen, S

    2000-03-01

    The results of two field studies and an open-top chamber fumigation experiment showed that the response of mature Scots pine to SO(2) and NO(2) differed from that of mature Norway spruce. Moreover, the response of pine seedlings to SO(2) and NO(2) differed from that of mature trees. The greater increase in the needle total S concentrations of pine suggested more abundant stomatal uptake of SO(2) compared to spruce. Both pine seedlings and mature trees also seemed to absorb more N from atmospheric deposition. Mature pine was able to assimilate SO(4)(2-) derived from SO(2) into organic S more effectively than mature spruce at the high S and N deposition sites, whereas both pine and spruce seedlings accumulated SO(4)-S under NO(2)+SO(2) exposure. Spruce, in turn, accumulated SO(4)-S even when well supplied with N. Net assimilation of SO(4)(2-) in conifer seedlings was enhanced markedly by elevated temperature. To protect the northern coniferous forests against the harmful effects of S and N deposition, it is recommended that the critical level for SO(2) as a growing season mean be set at 5-10 microg m(-3) and NO(2) at 10-15 microg m(-3), depending on the 'effective temperature sum' and/or whether SO(2) and NO(2) occur alone or in combination. PMID:15092988

  5. MAX-DOAS measurements of tropospheric NO2 and SO2 during the AROMAT-campaign in Rumania in September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, Reza; Wagner, Thomas; Riffel, Katharina; Donner, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaigh took place in Rumania during September 2014. The aim of the AROMAT campaign was to measure the spatial distribution of trace gases (mainly NO2 and SO2) and aerosols. We carried out car-borne Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements using two Mini-MAX-DOAS instruments covering the UV and visible spectral range. During the first week car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried-out on circles around Bucharest. From these observations, together with information on the wind fields, we derive the total NOx emissions from the city. We also provide estimates on the SO2 emissions, but these estimates have rather large uncertainties because the SO2 measurements are close or below the detection limit. We also made measurements within the city to quantify the spatial gradients. This information is especially important for the validation of satellite observations. In the second week, the car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried-out around large power plants at Turceni. During these measurements, very strong SO2 absorptions were observed downwind of the power plants. From these observations, we estimate the SO2 emissions. We also determine the NO2 / SO2 ratio and investigate its dependence on the distance from the power plant.

  6. Electron transfer and multi-atom abstraction reactions between atomic metal anions and NO, NO2 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, J. M.; Curtis, S.; Mayer, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    The atomic metal anions Fe-, Cs-, Cu- and Ag- were reacted with NO, NO2 and SO2 to form intact NO-, NO2- and SO2- with no fragmentation. Yields for the molecular anions ranged from 4 to 97% and were found to correlate to the exothermicity of the electron transfer process. Sequential oxygen atom extraction was found to take place between the metal anions and NO and NO2. Reactions between NO2 and Fe- resulted in FeO-, FeO2- and FeO3- while reactions of Cu- with NO2 resulted in CuO- and CuO2-. Reactions of Cu- and Ag- with NO resulted in CuO- and AgO- respectively.

  7. Measurements of NO2, SO2, O3, benzene and toluene using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yi; Gao, Song; Chen, Limin

    2006-01-01

    NO2, SO2, O3, benzene, and toluene were measured in Taopu industry park of Shanghai during the period June to August 2003 by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The daily average concentrations of SO2, NO2, and O3 ranged from 5.7 ppb to 40 ppb, 22 ppb to 123 ppb, and 10.6 ppb to 23 ppb respectively. SO2 and NO2 concentrations were found to depend on wind direction. The diurnal variation of NO2 concentrations had two peaks due to traffic emission. Our DOAS measurements of NO2, SO2 and O3 were compared with the conventional measurement instruments (API automatic monitoring instrument). The concept of a percent difference (PD) and linear regression methods were employed to study the difference between DOAS and API instruments. The correlation analysis between PD values and meteorological parameters and analysis of abnormal higher absolute PD values indicated that the lower visibility induced the bad compatibility between the two systems. The results showed that both systems exhibited strong compatibility with good correlation, therefore the DOAS system is able to provide reliable information on distribution patterns of major air pollutants. Average benzene and toluene concentrations were 1.4 and 8.0 ppb respectively. PMID:16948427

  8. A Decade of Change in NO2 and SO2 over the Canadian Oil Sands As Seen from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclinden, Chris A.; Fioletov, Vitali; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Li, Can; Boersma, K. Folkert; Adams, Cristen

    2015-01-01

    A decade (20052014) of observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were used to examine trends in nitrogen dioxide(NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) over a large region of western Canada and the northern United States, with a focus on the Canadian oil sands. In the oil sands, primarily over an area of intensive surface mining, NO2 tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) are seen to be increasing by as much as 10year, with the location of the largest trends in a newly developing NO2 lobe well removed from surface monitoring stations. SO2 VCDs in the oil sands have remained approximately constant. The only other significant increase in the region was seen in NO2 over Bakken gas fields in North Dakota which showed increases of up to5yr. By contrast, other locations in the region show substantial declines in both pollutants, providing strong evidence to the efficacy of environmental pollution control measures implemented by both nations. The OMI-derived trends were found to be consistent with those from the Canadian surface monitoring network, although in the case of SO2, it was necessary to apply a correction in order to remove the residual signal from volcanic eruptions present in the OMI data.

  9. A Decade of Change in NO2 and SO2 over the Canadian Oil Sands As Seen from Space.

    PubMed

    McLinden, Chris A; Fioletov, Vitali; Krotkov, Nickolay A; Li, Can; Boersma, K Folkert; Adams, Cristen

    2016-01-01

    A decade (2005-2014) of observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were used to examine trends in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) over a large region of western Canada and the northern United States, with a focus on the Canadian oil sands. In the oil sands, primarily over an area of intensive surface mining, NO2 tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) are seen to be increasing by as much as 10%/year, with the location of the largest trends in a newly developing NO2 "lobe" well removed from surface monitoring stations. SO2 VCDs in the oil sands have remained approximately constant. The only other significant increase in the region was seen in NO2 over Bakken gas fields in North Dakota which showed increases of up to 5%/yr. By contrast, other locations in the region show substantial declines in both pollutants, providing strong evidence to the efficacy of environmental pollution control measures implemented by both nations. The OMI-derived trends were found to be consistent with those from the Canadian surface monitoring network, although in the case of SO2, it was necessary to apply a correction in order to remove the residual signal from volcanic eruptions present in the OMI data. PMID:26642237

  10. Improved Satellite Retrievals of NO2 and SO2 over the Canadian Oil Sands and Comparisons with Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, C. A.; Fioletov, V.; Boersma, K. F.; Kharol, S. K.; Krotkov, N.; Lamsal, L.; Makar, P. A.; Martin, R. V.; Veefkind, J. P.; Yang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing is increasingly being used to monitor air quality over localized sources such as the Canadian oil sands. Following an initial study, significantly low biases have been identified in current NO2 and SO2 retrieval products from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite sensor over this location resulting from a combination of its rapid development and small spatial scale. Air mass factors (AMFs) used to convert line-of-sight "slant" columns to vertical columns were re-calculated for this region based on updated and higher resolution input information including absorber profiles from a regional-scale (15 km × 15 km resolution) air quality model, higher spatial and temporal resolution surface reflectivity, and an improved treatment of snow. The overall impact of these new Environment Canada (EC) AMFs led to substantial increases in the peak NO2 and SO2 average vertical column density (VCD), occurring over an area of intensive surface mining, by factors of 2 and 1.4, respectively, relative to estimates made with previous AMFs. Comparisons are made with long-term averages of NO2 and SO2 (2005-2011) from in situ surface monitors by using the air quality model to map the OMI VCDs to surface concentrations. This new OMI-EC product is able to capture the spatial distribution of the in situ instruments (slopes of 0.65 to 1.0, correlation coefficients of greater than 0.9). The concentration absolute values from surface network observations were in reasonable agreement, with OMI-EC NO2 and SO2 biased low by roughly 30%. Several complications were addressed including correction for the interference effect in the surface NO2 instruments and smoothing and clear-sky biases in the OMI measurements. Overall these results highlight the importance of using input information that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability of the location of interest when performing retrievals.

  11. Present state of eb removal of so2 and nox from combustion flue gases in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, D. C. R.; Osso, J. A.; Rivelli, V.; Vieira, J. M.; Lugão, A. B.

    1995-09-01

    Environmental problems caused by the increased world energy demands are becoming of growing importance and Brazil is now starting to set limits to the emission of toxic gases. The development of technologies for removal of these gases are therefore necessary and this work shows the present state of the technology of SO2 and NOX removal by electron beam irradiation in Brazil. Data concerning the increasing energy demand in Brazil and the environmental governmental measures are presented, along with the design and implementation of a laboratory pilot plant for the electron beam flue gases removal process located at IPEN-CNEN/SP.

  12. Aura OMI observations of changes in SO2 and NO2 emissions at local, regional and global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; McLinden, C. A.; Li, C.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Marchenko, S. V.; Swartz, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Joiner, J.; Duncan, B. N.; Boersma, K. F.; Veefkind, P.; Levelt, P.; Fioletov, V.; Dickerson, R. R.; He, H.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space-based pollution monitoring from current and planned satellite UV-Vis spectrometers play an increasingly important role in studies of tropospheric chemistry and also air quality applications to help mitigate anthropogenic and natural impacts on sensitive ecosystems, and human health. We present long-term changes in tropospheric SO2 and NO2 over some of the most polluted industrialized regions of the world observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard NASA's Aura satellite. Using OMI data, we identified about 400 SO2 "hot spots" and estimated emissions from them. In many regions emissions and their ambient pollution levels have decreased significantly, such as over eastern US, Europe and China. OMI observed about 50% reduction in SO2 and NO2 pollution over the North China plain in 2012-2014 that can be attributed to both government efforts to restrain emissions from the power and industrial sectors and the economic slowdown. While much smaller, India's SO2 and NO2 emissions from coal power plants and smelters are growing at a fast pace, increasing by about 200% and 50% from 2005 to 2014. Over Europe and the US OMI-observed trends agree well with those from available in situ measurements of surface concentrations, deposition and emissions data. However, for some regions (e.g., Mexico, Middle East) the emission inventories may be incomplete and OMI can provide emission estimates for missing sources, such as SO2 sources observed over the Persian Gulf. It is essential to continue long-term overlapping satellite data records of air quality with increased spatial and temporal resolution to resolve point pollution sources using oversampling technique. We discuss how Aura OMI pollution measurements and emission estimates will be continued with the US JPSS and European Sentinel series for the next 20 years and further enhanced by the addition of three geostationary UV-VIS instruments.

  13. Reactions of acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate with SO2, NO2, H2O and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, Alexandre; Chen, Hui; Xiao, Shan; Mellouki, Wahid; Daële, Veronique

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles represent a critical component of the atmosphere, impacting global climate, regional air pollution, and human health. The formation of new atmospheric particles and their subsequent growth to larger sizes are the key processes for understanding of the aerosol effects. Sulphuric acid, H2SO4, has been identified to play the major role in formation of new atmospheric particles and in subsequent particle growth. Until recently the reaction of OH with SO2 has been considered as the only important source of H2SO4 in the atmosphere. However, recently it has been suggested that the oxidation of SO2 by Criegee biradicals can be a significant additional atmospheric source of H2SO4 comparable with the reaction of SO2 with OH. Here we present some results about the reactions of the acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate, (CH3)2=OO, produced in the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-butene (TME) with O3. The formation of the H2SO4 in the reaction of acetone oxide with SO2 was investigated in the specially constructed atmospheric pressure laminar flow reactor. The Criegee intermediate was generated by ozonolysis of TME. The H2SO4, generated by addition of SO2, was directly monitored with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SAMU, LPC2E). Relative rates of reactions of acetone oxide with SO2, NO2, H2O and ozone were determined from the dependencies of the H2SO4 yield at different concentrations of the reactants. Atmospheric applications of the obtained results are discussed in relation to the importance of this additional H2SO4 formation pathway compared to the reaction of OH with SO2.

  14. O3, SO2, NO2, and UVB measurements in Beijing and Baseline Station of northwestern part of China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Song; Zhou, Xiuji; Zhang, Xiachun

    1994-01-01

    A MKII Brewer ozone spectrometer was used in Beijing from Oct. 1990 to June 1991 to measure O3, SO2 and UVB radiation. And since Nov. 1991 a new MKIV Brewer spectrometer, which can take the measurements of O3, SO2, NO2 and UVB radiation, has been set up in Beijing. The MKII Brewer spectrometer was moved to Qinghai baseline station which is on the Qinghai-tibetean plateau in the northwestern part of China. Both the data in Beijing and Qinghai baseline station has been analyzed and some results will be shown here along with the ozone profiles botained through the Umkehr program given by AES of Canada for the Brewer ozone spectrometer.

  15. NO2 and SO2 dispersion modeling and relative roles of emission sources over Map Ta Phut industrial area, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chusai, Chatinai; Manomaiphiboon, Kasemsan; Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Thepanondh, Sarawut

    2012-08-01

    Map Ta Phut industrial area (MA) is the largest industrial complex in Thailand. There has been concern about many air pollutants over this area. Air quality management for the area is known to be difficult, due to lack of understanding of how emissions from different sources or sectors (e.g., industrial, power plant, transportation, and residential) contribute to air quality degradation in the area. In this study, a dispersion study of NO2 and SO2 was conducted using the AERMOD model. The area-specific emission inventories of NOx and SO2 were prepared, including both stack and nonstack sources, and divided into 11 emission groups. Annual simulations were performed for the year 2006. Modeled concentrations were evaluated with observations. Underestimation of both pollutants was Jbund, and stack emission estimates were scaled to improve the modeled results before quantifying relative roles of individual emission groups to ambient concentration overfour selected impacted areas (two are residential and the others are highly industrialized). Two concentration measures (i.e., annual average area-wide concentration or AC, and area-wide robust highest concentration or AR) were used to aggregately represent mean and high-end concentrations Jbfor each individual area, respectively. For AC-NO2, on-road mobile emissions were found to be the largest contributor in the two residential areas (36-38% of total AC-NO2), while petrochemical-industry emissions play the most important role in the two industrialized areas (34-51%). For AR-NO2, biomass burning has the most influence in all impacted areas (>90%) exceptJor one residential area where on-road mobile is the largest (75%). For AC-SO2, the petrochemical industry contributes most in all impacted areas (38-56%). For AR-SO2, the results vary. Since the petrochemical industry was often identified as the major contributor despite not being the largest emitter, air quality workers should pay special attention to this emission group

  16. Four years of ground-based MAX-DOAS observations of aerosols, NO2, SO2 and HCHO in Wuxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Lampel, Johannes; Wagner, Thomas; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Wu, Dexia; Beirle, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the temporal variation and spatial distribution of the abundances of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and aerosols is necessary to study their role in tropospheric chemistry and to estimate their importance among anthropogenic emissions. To accomplish this, we operated a Multi AXis - Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument from May 2011 to Nov 2014 in Wuxi, China. A new inversion algorithm PriAM (profile inversion algorithm of aerosol extinction and trace gas concentration) developed at AIOFM in cooperation with MPIC based on the optimal estimation algorithm is applied to obtain tropospheric profiles of trace gases and aerosols from the long-term observations. The performance of the inversion algorithm is evaluated by comparisons with other independent techniques for a period longer than one year. The cloud effect on the retrieved column densities, surface concentrations and profiles of the trace gases and aerosols is evaluated using of a cloud classification scheme based on the MAX-DOAS measurements themselves. From this study recommendations for the quality of the MAX-DOAS results for different cloud scenarios are given. Further, the MAX-DOAS results are used to characterize the seasonal, diurnal, and weekly variations of NO2, SO2, HCHO and aerosols. Systematic weekly variations are found for all the species, indicating a significant contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the observed abundances. The good correlations between the trace gases and aerosols, especially for HCHO, indicate a significant contribution of secondary aerosols from the precursors to the total aerosol load. We use the wind dependence of the pollutants to identify the dominating sources. High values are observed when the wind comes from the direction of industrial areas.

  17. Evaluating emissions of HCHO, HONO, NO2, and SO2 from point sources using portable Imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikelnaya, O.; Tsai, C.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Fu, D.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J. H.; Stutz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to quantitatively describe urban air pollution to a large extent depends on an accurate understanding of anthropogenic emissions. In areas with a high density of individual point sources of pollution, such as petrochemical facilities with multiple flares or regions with active commercial ship traffic, this is particularly challenging as access to facilities and ships is often restricted. Direct formaldehyde emissions from flares may play an important role for ozone chemistry, acting as an initial radical precursor and enhancing the degradation of co-emitted hydrocarbons. HONO is also recognized as an important OH source throughout the day. However, very little is known about direct HCHO and HONO emissions. Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (I-DOAS), a relatively new remote sensing technique, provides an opportunity to investigate emissions from these sources from a distance, making this technique attractive for fence-line monitoring. In this presentation, we will describe I-DOAS measurements during the FLAIR campaign in the spring/summer of 2009. We performed measurements outside of various industrial facilities in the larger Houston area as well as in the Houston Ship Channel to visualize and quantify the emissions of HCHO, NO2, HONO, and SO2 from flares of petrochemical facilities and ship smoke stacks. We will present the column density images of pollutant plumes as well as fluxes from individual flares calculated from I-DOAS observations. Fluxes from individual flares and smoke stacks determined from the I-DOAS measurements vary widely in time and by the emission sources. We will also present HONO/NOx ratios in ship smoke stacks derived from the combination of I-DOAS and in-situ measurements, and discuss other trace gas ratios in plumes derived from the I-DOAS observations. Finally, we will show images of HCHO, NO2 and SO2 plumes from control burn forest fires observed in November of 2009 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Maria

  18. Interconversion of chromium species during air sampling: effects of O3, NO2, SO2, particle matrices, temperature, and humidity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihui; Fan, Zhihua Tina; Yu, Chang Ho; Hopke, Philip K; Lioy, Paul J; Buckley, Brian T; Lin, Lin; Ma, Yingjun

    2013-05-01

    The interconversion between Cr(VI), a pulmonary carcinogen, and Cr(III), an essential human nutrient, poses challenges to the measurement of Cr(VI) in airborne particles. Chamber and field tests were conducted to identify the factors affecting Cr(VI)-Cr(III) interconversion in the basic filter medium under typical sampling conditions. In the chamber tests, isotopically enriched (53)Cr(VI) and (50)Cr(III) were spiked on diesel particulate matter (DPM) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that were precollected on a basic MCE filter. The filter samples were then exposed to clean air or the air containing SO2 (50 and 160 ppb), 100 ppb O3, or 150 ppb NO2 for 24 h at 16.7 LPM flow rate at designated temperature (20 and 31 °C) and RH (40% and 70%) conditions. Exposure to 160 ppb SO2 had the greatest effect on (53)Cr(VI) reduction, with (53)Cr(VI) recovery of 31.7 ± 15.8% (DPM) and 42.0 ± 7.9% (SOA). DPM and SOA matrix induced (53)Cr(VI) reduction when exposed to clean air while reactive oxygen species in SOA could promote (50)Cr(III) oxidation. Deliquescence when RH increased from 40% to 70% led to conversion of Cr(III) in SOA, whereas oxidized organics in DPM and SOA enhanced hygroscopicity and thus facilitated Cr(VI) reduction. Field tests showed seasonal variation of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) interconversion during sampling. Correction of the interconversion using USEPA method 6800 is recommended to improve accuracy of ambient Cr(VI) measurements. PMID:23550818

  19. Detection of urban O3, NO2, H2CO, and SO2 using Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, Ann Carine; Carleer, M.; Colin, R.; Simon, Paul C.

    1993-02-01

    Concentrations of SO2, NO2, H2CO, and O3 have been measured regularly since October 1990 at the urban site of the Campus of the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique associated with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer. The experimental set up has already been described elsewhere (Vandaele et al., 1992). It consists of a source (either a high pressure xenon lamp or a tungsten filament) and an 800 m long path system. The spectra are recorded in the 26,000 - 38,000 cm-1 and 14,000 - 30,000 cm-1 spectral regions, at the dispersion of 7.7 cm-1. The analytical method of the DOAS technique is based on the fact that in atmospheric measurements, it is impossible to obtain an experimental blank spectrum. Therefore, the Beer-Lambert law has to be rewritten as: I equals I'oen(Delta (sigma) d) where I is the measured intensity, Io the measured intensity from which all absorption structures have been removed, n the concentration, d the optical path length, and (Delta) (sigma) the differential absorption cross section of the molecule. Numerous methods for determining I'o exist. Fourier transform filtering has been used in this work. This method defines I'o as the inverse Fourier transform of the lower frequencies portion of the power spectrum of the experimental data. A least squares procedure is then applied in order to determine the concentration of the desired molecules.

  20. Quantitative observation of boundary-layer NO2/SO2 from total-column measurements. New possibilities for space-based observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepp, T.; Pippin, M. R.; Cowen, L.; Murray, J.; Fishman, J.; Neil, D. O.; Martin, R.; Sorkin, A.; Jennings, T.; Szykamn, J.; Martins, D. K.; Thompson, A. M.; Stauffer, R. M.; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.

    2011-12-01

    NO2 and SO2 are criteria pollutants that play key roles in the formation of O3 and particulate matter. NO2 is significantly associated with mortality, has far reaching effects on crop yield/photosynthesis (Fishman et al. 2010), atmospheric oxidative capacity, and radiation balance either directly or via its role in ozone/radical chemistry. Major sources of NOx (NO + NO2) and SO2 include motor vehicles, power plants, fossil fuel combustion, burning biomass fuel, and natural sources (e.g. wildfires and volcanoes). GEO-CAPE (Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events mission) will be in a geo-stationary orbit over the United States with improved resolution allowing observation of hourly city-scale emissions. However, estimation of surface NO2/SO2 from total-column data is complicated due to meteorological dynamics and dimensional incongruities. NASA's Chemistry And Physics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE; Langley Research Center, Hampton VA) was established to improve our understanding of these relationships. Collocated at CAPABLE are a direct-sun spectrometer (Pandora), which has previously been shown to have good agreement with OMI's NO2 retrieval, from which column NO2 and SO2 are retrieved with two-minute resolution, and surface NO2/SO2 instruments. Using the EDAS40 model for mixed-depth height we present a methodology for estimating surface NO2 from column observations that accounts for approximately 75% of the variability. Furthermore, Pandora is capable of detecting SO2 emissions from a small power plant approximately 10km NNE of the site, while OMI consistently detects no change in its corresponding pixel. Herein we present our methodology and discuss its applicability to future remote sensing missions and space-based emissions monitoring/regulation.

  1. Nocturnal Vertical Gradients of O3, NO2, NO3, HONO, HCHO, and SO2 in Los Angeles, CA, during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, J.; Pikelnaya, O.; Hurlock, S. C.; Wong, K.; Cheung, R.; Haman, C. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nocturnal chemistry, through the conversion and removal of air pollutants, plays an important role in determining the initial condition for photochemistry during the following day. In the stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) the interplay between suppressed vertical mixing and surface emissions of NOx and VOCs can result in pronounced vertical trace gas profiles. The resulting altitude dependence of nocturnal chemistry makes the interpretation of ground observations challenging. In particular, the quantification of the nocturnal loss of NOx, due to NO3 and N2O5 chemistry, requires observations throughout the entire vertical extent of the NBL. The formation of daytime radical precursors, such as HONO, is also altitude dependent. An accurate assessment of their impact on daytime chemistry requires measurements of their profiles during the night and morning. Here we present observations from the CalNex-LA experiment, which took place from May 15 to June 15, 2010 on the east side of the Los Angeles Basin, CA. A Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (LP-DOAS) was set up on the roof of the Millikan library (265 m asl, 35m agl) on the campus of the California Institute of Technology. Four retroreflector arrays were mounted about 5 -7 km North-East of the instrument at 310m, 353m, 487m and 788 m asl. The vertical profiles of NO3, HONO, NO2, O3, HCHO, and SO2 were retrieved at altitude intervals of 35-78m, 78-121m, 121-255m and 255-556m above the ground. During many nights vertical gradients were observed, with elevated NO2 and HONO concentrations near the surface and larger ozone and NO3 concentrations aloft. Simultaneous ceilometer observations of the NBL structure show the impact of meteorology on the vertical trace gas distributions. We will discuss the consequences of trace gases gradients on the nocturnal NOx budget.

  2. Field performance evaluation of Maxxam passive samplers for regional monitoring of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3 concentrations in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Md. Aynul; Curran, Rhonda Lee T.; Kindzierski, Warren B.

    2015-08-01

    A field performance evaluation of Maxxam passive samplers was carried out for ambient concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ground-level ozone (O3). Monthly passive and hourly continuous air monitoring data from four regional air monitoring networks in Alberta, Canada were evaluated over a 5-year period (2006-2010). Monthly concentrations were relatively low, ranging from 0.1 to 3.9 ppb, 0.2-18.1 ppb and 10.1-56.1 ppb for SO2, NO2 and O3, respectively. From duplicate passive sampling, geometric mean precision values were 17.9%, 14.8% and 4.7% for SO2, NO2 and O3, respectively. Geometric mean of the relative error (as a measure of accuracy) was 30% (median = 33%, interquartile range, IQR 15-63%) for SO2 and 32% (median = 40%, IQR = 25-64%) for NO2. O3 measurements had a better measure of accuracy with a geometic mean relative error of 12% (median = 17%, IQR = 8-27%) and met the acceptable level recommended by United States National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the European Union (EU) Directive (±25%). From reduced major axis (RMA) analysis, bias (systematic error) is apparent in the Maxxam passive samplers in the field resulting in overestimation of ambient SO2 and O3 concentrations and underestimation of NO2 concentrations relative to continuous analyzers. Seasonal influences were observed for accuracy of passive SO2 and O3 measurements. A poor association was found between passive versus continuous concentrations for SO2 and O3 during the winter and the summer, respectively.

  3. Effects of SO2 and pH on blood-gas partition coefficients of inert gases.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Mori, M; Kawai, A; Asano, K; Takasugi, T; Umeda, A; Yokoyama, T

    1990-01-01

    Potential effects of SO2 and of pH on blood-gas partition coefficients, lambda, for inert gases, including SF6, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether, acetone and N2, were systematically investigated using human blood. Measurements on lambda were performed at 37 degrees C in conditions of varied SO2 and pH using gas chromatography. Incorporating the experimental data on lambda, multiple inert gas elimination was applied to 18 patients with varied chronic lung diseases, in order to estimate the effects of SO2 and of pH on both inert gas exchange and resultant recovery of VA/Q distribution in the lung. For this purpose, the data obtained by the procedure of multiple inert gas elimination were analyzed with the classical approach but allowance was made for lambda of the indicator gas to vary according to exchange of O2 and of CO2 in the pulmonary capillary. Among the gases studied, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane and diethyl ether showed significantly smaller lambda values in the oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood, whereas SF6, acetone and N2 were little dependent on SO2. An increase in lambda was found for ethane and a decrease for halothane with increasing pH in the blood. The other gases were not significantly influenced by pH. In spite of these experimental findings, regional difference of either SO2 or pH in the lung did not exert important influence on the inert gas exchange or on the predicted VA/Q distribution. In conclusion, blood-gas partition coefficients of some inert gases are consistently altered by SO2 and pH, but their possible effects on inert gas exchange seem to be negligible. PMID:1965757

  4. A model-based analysis of SO2 and NO2 dynamics from coal-fired power plants under representative synoptic circulation types over the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Víctor; Pay, María T; Baldasano, José M

    2016-01-15

    Emissions of SO2 and NO2 from coal-fired power plants are a significant source of air pollution. In order to typify the power plants' plumes dynamics and quantify their contribution to air quality, a comprehensive characterisation of seven coal-fired power plant plumes has been performed under six representative circulation types (CTs) identified by means of a synoptic classification over the Iberian Peninsula. The emission and the transport of SO2 and NO2 have been simulated with the CALIOPE air quality forecasting system that couples the HERMES emission model for Spain and WRF and CMAQ models. For the facilities located in continental and Atlantic areas (As Pontes, Aboño, and Compostilla) the synoptic advection controls pollutant transport, however for power plants located along the Mediterranean or over complex-terrains (Guardo, Andorra, Carboneras, and Los Barrios), plume dynamics are driven by a combination of synoptic and mesoscale mountain-valley and sea-land breezes. The contribution of power plants to surface concentration occurs mainly close to the source (<20 km) related to a fumigation process when the emission injection takes place within the planetary boundary layer reaching up to 55 μg SO2 m(-3) and 32 μg NO2 m(-3). However, the SO2 and NO2 plumes can reach long distances (>250 km from the sources) especially for CTs characterised by Atlantic advection. PMID:26433330

  5. Coal fly ash based carbons for SO2 removal from flue gases.

    PubMed

    Rubio, B; Izquierdo, M T

    2010-07-01

    Two different coal fly ashes coming from the burning of two coals of different rank have been used as a precursor for the preparation of steam activated carbons. The performance of these activated carbons in the SO(2) removal was evaluated at flue gas conditions (100 degrees C, 1000 ppmv SO(2), 5% O(2), 6% H(2)O). Different techniques were used to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the samples in order to explain the differences found in their behaviour. A superior SO(2) removal capacity was shown by the activated carbon obtained using the fly ash coming from a sub-bituminous-lignite blend. Experimental results indicated that the presence of higher amount of certain metallic oxides (Ca, Fe) in the carbon-rich fraction of this fly ash probably has promoted a deeper gasification in the activation with steam. A more suitable surface chemistry and textural properties have been obtained in this case which explains the higher efficiency shown by this sample in the SO(2) removal. PMID:20167465

  6. Operational O3M-SAF trace gas column products: GOME-2 ozone, NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Valks, Pieter; Loyola, Diego; de Smedt, Isabelle; van Roozendael, Michel; Theys, Nicolas; Rix, Meike; Koukouli, Mariliza; Balis, Dimitris; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Pinardi, Gaia; Zimmer, Walter; Emmadi, Sunil

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present an overview of the retrieval algorithms and exemplary results for ozone, NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O. These trace gas column products are retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.x algorithm and the UPAS system. Total ozone and NO2 are retrieved with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method using the UV wavelength region around 330 nm and 435 nm respectively. An additional algorithm is applied to retrieve the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted con-ditions. The operational ozone and NO2 products are available for the users in near real time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 around 320 nm. For BrO and CH2O, optimal DOAS fitting windows have been determined for GOME-2 in the UV wavelength region. The GOME-2 ozone, total and tropospheric NO2, SO2, BrO, CH2O and cloud products from DLR have reached the operational EUMETSAT O3M-SAF status. All these products are routinely available to the users via EUMETCast, WMO/GTS and FTP in HDF5 and BUFR format. We present initial validation results for GOME-2 products using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2, SO2 and CH2O columns for air quality applications will be presented, including temporal evolution analyses for China. Furthermore, we will show examples of BrO under polar winter conditions.

  7. Operational O3M-SAF trace-gas column products: GOME-2 tropospheric NO2, SO2 and BrO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valks, P.; Hao, N.; Rix, M.; Lambert, J.-C.; Pinardi, G.; van Roozendael, M.; Theys, N.; Loyola, D.

    2009-04-01

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace-gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present the algorithms and exemplary results of tropospheric NO2, total BrO and SO2. These trace-gas column products are retrieved from GOME-2 solar backscattered measurements in the UV/VIS wavelength region, using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. Total NO2 is routinely retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.2 using the 425-450 nm wavelength region. An additional algorithm is applied to derive the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted conditions: after subtracting the estimated stratospheric component from the total column, the tropospheric NO2 column is determined using an air mass factor based on monthly climatological NO2 profiles from the MOZART-2 model. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 using the UV wavelength region around 320 nm. With GOME-2, it is possible to detect and track volcanic SO2 in near-real time and on a global scale, which is of particular importance for volcanic early warning services. For the GOME-2 retrieval of the total BrO column, current research focuses on the optimisation of the DOAS fitting window in the UV wavelength region. BrO columns retrieved from the baseline GOME fitting window (344.6-359 nm) show relatively large noise levels. Therefore, the use of an alternative fitting window has been analysed. More than two years of tropospheric NO2, total BrO and SO2 measurements are now available from GOME-2. We present initial validation results using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2 columns for air quality applications will be presented. We will show examples of BrO from volcanic eruptions and under

  8. Benzene, toluene, ozone, NO 2 and SO 2 measurements in an urban street canyon in Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidis, Kostas A.; Ziomas, Ioannis; Zerefos, Christos; Kosmidis, Evangelos; Symeonidis, Panayotis; Christophilopoulos, Epaminondas; Karathanassis, Stavros; Mploutsos, Antonios

    Benzene, toluene, sulphur dioxide, ozone and nitrogen dioxide were measured at a mean level of 13.5 m above ground in a narrow, four-lane street canyon (height 30 m, width 20 m) in Thessaloniki, Greece during the period January-July 1997 by means of a commercial differential optical absorption spectrometer (OPSIS DOAS). Primary pollutant levels were found to be 2.5-4.4 times higher during the cold part of the year than during the warm part of the year, the winter/summer ratio increasing with the reaction rate constant with OH for each of the measured species. Ozone, on the other hand, exhibited a winter/summer ratio of 0.36. NO 2 originates from both primary and secondary sources; its winter/summer concentration ratio of 1.4 lies, therefore, between those of primary pollutants and ozone. Pollution levels were influenced considerably by wind speed, while for the street canyon under study wind direction did not influence pollutant levels considerably. While primary pollution was found to decrease with increasing wind speed, ozone increased. Benzene mean levels during the study period were around 6 ppb and hence much higher than the EU annual limit value of 5 μg m -3 (1.44 ppb at STP). Toluene mean levels were around 14 ppb and hence also several times above the WHO recommendation of 2 ppb for 24 h. The apportionment of traffic emissions in four time zones used in most inventories in urban airshed models was tested using benzene and toluene measurements at low (<1 m s -1) wind speeds. The agreement between model emissions and calculated emissions apportionment into the four time zones was good, except for Zone D (23:00-1:59), where model inventory emissions were somewhat too low.

  9. MAX-DOAS measurements and satellite validation of tropospheric NO2 and SO2 vertical column densities at a rural site of North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Junli; Ma, Jianzhong; Lin, Weili; Zhao, Huarong; Shaiganfar, Reza; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    North China (NC), namely Huabei in Chinese, is one of the most severely polluted regions in China, and the air pollution issues in this region have received a worldwide attention. We performed ground-based Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements at Gucheng, (39°08‧N, 115°40‧E), a rural site of North China about 110 km southwest of Beijing, from September 2008 to September 2010. The tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2 and SO2 were retrieved using the so-called geometric approximation. The results show that the tropospheric NO2 and SO2 VCDs over NC have nearly the same seasonal variation pattern, with the maximum in winter and minimum in summer, while their diurnal variations are different. We also compared the tropospheric NO2 and SO2 VCDs from our MAX-DOAS measurements with several products of corresponding OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) satellite observations. While in summer good agreement is found, the satellite observations systematically underestimate the tropospheric NO2 in winter over the polluted rural area of NC, probably mostly due to the so called aerosol shielding effect. In contrast, for SO2 no such clear conclusion can be drawn, probably owing to the larger uncertainties from MAX-DOAS and in particular satellite retrievals. This indicates that improvements of the retrieval algorithm for MAX-DOAS and off-line corrections of satellite measurements for the tropospheric SO2 VCDs should be given more emphasis in the future.

  10. Satellite-observed NO2, SO2, and HCHO Vertical Column Densities in East Asia: Recent Changes and Comparisons with Regional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Kim, S.; Mok, J.; Yoo, H. L.; Bae, C.; Kim, B. U.; Lim, Y. K.; Woo, J. H.; Park, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the recent changes in tropospheric NO2, SO2, and HCHO vertical column densities (VCD) in East Asia observed from multiple satellites, highlighting especially the annual trend changes of NO2 and SO2 over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China since 2010. Tropospheric VCD data from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and GOME-2, retrieved from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and OMI National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) standard products, are utilized to investigate the annual trends of NO2, SO2, and HCHO VCDs from 2001 to 2015. They are also compared with simulations from Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based forecast system by the Integrated Multi-scale Air Quality System for Korea (IMAQS-K) of Ajou University. Until 2011, the changes in NO2 VCD over East Asian countries agree well with the findings of previous research, including the impact of the economic downturn during 2008-2009 and the subsequent quick recovery in China. After peaking in 2011, the NO2 VCD observations from active instruments (OMI and GOME-2) over China started to show a slower decreasing trend, mostly led by the rapid changes in the BTH region in northern China. On the other hand, SO2 started to decline earlier, from 2007, but inclined back from 2010 to 2012, and then back to declining trend since 2012. While satellite observations show dramatic recent changes, the model could not reproduce those changes mostly due to its use of fixed emission inventory. We conclude that rapid update of latest emission inventory is necessary for an accurate forecast of regional air quality in east Asia, especially for upcoming international sports events in PyeongChang (Korea), Tokyo (Japan) and Beijing (China) in 2018, 2020 and 2022, respectively.

  11. Operational O3M-SAF trace gas column products: GOME-2 NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Valks, P.; de Smedt, I.; Emmadi, S.; Lambert, J.-C.; Loyola, D.; Pinardi, G.; Rix, M.; van Roozendael, M.; They, N.

    2010-05-01

    This contribution focuses on the operational GOME-2 trace gas column products developed at the German Aerospace Centre, in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). We present an overview of the retrieval algorithms and exemplary results for NO2, BrO, SO2 and CH2O. These trace gas column products are retrieved with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.4 using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method in the UV and VIS wavelength regions. Total NO2 is retrieved in the 425-450 nm and an additional algorithm is applied to retrieve the tropospheric NO2 column for polluted conditions. The operational GOME-2 NO2 product is available for the users in near real time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. SO2 emissions from volcanic and anthropogenic sources can be measured by GOME-2 using the UV wavelength region around 320 nm. For BrO and CH2O, optimal DOAS fitting windows have been determined for GOME-2 in the UV wavelength region. The GOME-2 SO2, BrO and CH2O products have reached the operational O3M-SAF status, and are routinely available to the users. More than three years of operational trace gas column measurements are now available from GOME-2. We present initial validation results using ground-based measurements, as well as comparisons with other satellite products, such as those from SCIAMACHY and OMI. The use of tropospheric NO2, SO2 and CH2O columns for air quality applications will be presented, including temporal evolution analyses for China. Furthermore, we will show examples of BrO under polar winter conditions.

  12. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Trace Gases HCl, NO and SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haridass, C.; Aw-Musse, A.; Dowdye, E.; Bandyopadhyay, C.; Misra, P.; Okabe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data have been recorded in the spectral region 400-4000/cm of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide with I/cm resolution and of nitric oxide with 0.25 cm-i resolution, under quasi-static conditions, when the sample gas was passed through tubings of aluminum, copper, stainless steel and teflon. The absorbance was measured for the rotational lines of the fundamental bands of (1)H(35)Cl and (1)H(37)Cl for pressures in the range 100-1000 Torr and for the (14)N(16)O molecule in the range 100-300 Torr. The absorbance was also measured for individual rotational lines corresponding to the three modes of vibrations (upsilon(sub 1) - symmetric stretch, upsilon(sub 2) - symmetric bend, upsilon(sub 3) - anti-symmetric stretch) of the SO2 molecule in the pressure range 25-150 Torr. A graph of absorbance versus pressure was plotted for the observed rotational transitions of the three atmospherically significant molecules, and it was found that the absorbance was linearly proportional to the pressure range chosen, thereby validating Beer's law. The absorption cross-sections were determined from the graphical slopes for each rotational transition recorded for the HCl, NO and SO2 species. Qualitative and quantitative spectral changes in the FT-IR data will be discussed to identify and characterize various tubing materials with respect to their absorption features.

  13. A four-channel portable solar radiometer for measuring particulate and/or aerosol opacity and concentration of NO2 and SO2 in stack plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Gregory, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Solar absorption radiometry has been investigated as a method of measuring stackplume effluents. A simple and inexpensive instrument was constructed for observing the sun at four wavelengths: 800, 600, 400, and 310 nm. Higher wavelength channels measured the effect of the particulates and NO2, and an ultraviolet channel measured the contribution of SO2 to the attenuation. Stack-plume measurements of opacity and concentration of NO2 and SO2 were in basic agreement with in-stack measurements. The major limitation on the use of the radiometer is the requirement for an accessible viewing position which allows the sun-plume-observer relationship to be attained. It was concluded that the solar radiometer offers an inexpensive method for monitoring plume effluents when the viewing position is not restricted.

  14. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ pPM 2 to ____ pPM 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ pPM 2 to ____...

  15. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____...

  16. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____...

  17. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____...

  18. 40 CFR Figure C-1 to Subpart C of... - Suggested Format for Reporting Test Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Results for Methods for SO 2, CO, O 3, NO 2 C Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of Environment... Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-1 Figure C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Suggested Format for Reporting Test... Difference Table C-1 spec. Pass or fail Low 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____ ppm 3 4 5 6 Medium 1 ____ ppm 2 to ____...

  19. Scanning and mobile multi-axis DOAS measurements of SO2 and NO2 emissions from an electric power plant in Montevideo, Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frins, E.; Bobrowski, N.; Osorio, M.; Casaballe, N.; Belsterli, G.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2012 the emissions of NO2 and SO2 from a power station located on the east side of Montevideo Bay (34° 53‧ 10″ S, 56° 11‧ 49″ W) were quantified by simultaneously using mobile and scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (in the following mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS, respectively). The facility produces electricity by means of two technologies: internal combustion motors and steam generators. The motors are powered with centrifuged heavy oil and produce a maximum power of 80 MW approximately. The steam generators produce approximately 305 MW and are powered with heavy fuel oil. We compare the emissions obtained from the measured slant column densities (mobile DOAS and scanning DOAS) with the emissions estimated from fuel mass balance. On one occasion it was possible to distinguish between the two types of sources, observing two plumes with different SO2 and NO2 emission rates. During the period of the campaign the mean SO2 emission flux was determined to be 0.36 (±0.12) kg s-1 and 0.26 (±0.09) kg s-1 retrieved from mobile and scanning DOAS respectively, while the calculated SO2 flux from the sulphur content of the fuel was 0.34 (±0.03) kg s-1. The average NO2 flux calculated from mobile DOAS was determined to be 11 (±3) × 10-3 kg s-1. Using the scanning DOAS approach a mean NO2 flux of 5.4 (±1.7) × 10-3 kg s-1 was obtained, which is significantly lower than by the mobile measurements. The differences between the results of mobile MAX-DOAS measurements and scanning DOAS measurements are most probably caused by the variability and the limited knowledge of the wind speed and direction.

  20. Case studies on summertime measurements of O3, NO2, and SO2 with a DOAS system in an urban semi-industrial region in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Psiloglou, Betaasil E; Larissi, Ioanna K; Petrakis, Muichael; Paliatsos, Athanasios G; Antoniou, Alphantonis; Viras, Loisos G

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the concentrations of SO2, NO2, and O3 measured by a Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) system that was operating at the campus of Technological Education Institute of Piraeus during 2008 and 2009 warm periods (July to September) in relation to the prevailing meteorological conditions. The DOAS system was operating in a particularly polluted area of the West part of Attica basin on a continuous basis, measuring the concentration levels of the main pollutants (O3, NO2, and SO2) as well as aromatic hydrocarbon substances (benzene, toluene, and xylene). According to the analysis, the SO2 concentration levels at this measuring site are rather high and this may be attributed to the characteristics of this measuring site. Proximity of roadways and local circulation are just some of the factors that can affect the concentration levels of monitoring of pollutant concentrations such as NO2 and surface ozone. The results provide evidence for the occurrence of an atmospheric phenomenon that produces higher ozone concentrations during weekends despite lower concentrations of ozone precursors. This phenomenon is known as the weekend effect. PMID:23430070

  1. Evaluation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) attributed to atmospheric O3, NO2, and SO2 using Air Q Model (2011-2012 year).

    PubMed

    Ghanbari Ghozikali, Mohammad; Heibati, Behzad; Naddafi, Kazem; Kloog, Itai; Oliveri Conti, Gea; Polosa, Riccardo; Ferrante, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important disease worldwide characterized by chronically poor airflow. The economic burden of COPD on any society can be enormous if not managed. We applied the approach proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) using the AirQ2.2.3 software developed by the WHO European Center for Environment and Health on air pollutants in Tabriz (Iran) (2011-2012 year). A 1h average of concentrations of ozone (O3), daily average concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were used to assess human exposure and health effect in terms of attributable proportion of the health outcome and annual number of excess cases of Hospital Admissions for COPD (HA COPD). The results of this study showed that 2% (95% CI: 0.8-3.1%) of HA COPD were attributed to O3 concentrations over 10 μg/m(3). In addition, 0.7 % (95% CI: 0.1-1.8%) and 0.5% (95% CI: 0-1%) of HA COPD were attributed to NO2 and SO2 concentrations over 10 μg/m(3) respectively. In this study, we have shown that O3, NO2 and SO2 have a significant impact on COPD hospitalization. Given these results the policy decisions are needed in order to reduce the chronic pulmonary diseases caused by air pollution and furthermore better quantification studies are recommended. PMID:26599588

  2. Removal of SO2 from simulated flue gases using non-thermal plasma-based microgap discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhitao; Bai, Mindong; Bai, Mindi; Bai, Xiyao; Pan, Qiaoyuan

    2006-06-01

    The removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from simulated flue gases streams (N2/O2/H2O/SO2) was experimentally investigated using microgap discharge. In the experiment, the thinner dielectric layers of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) were used to form the microgap discharge. With this physical method, a high concentration of hydroxyl (OH*) radicals were produced using the ionization of O2 and H2O to further the conversion of SO2 into sulfuric acid (H2SO4) at 120 degrees C in the absence of any catalysts and absorbents, which were captured with the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). As a result, the increase of discharge power and concentrations of O2 and H2O increased the production of OH. radicals resulting in enhanced removal of SO2 from gas streams. With the test and analysis, a number of H2SO4 droplets were produced in experiment. Therefore, a new method for removal of SO2 in semidry method without ammonia (NH3) additive was found. PMID:16805405

  3. Simultaneous treatment of SO2 containing stack gases and waste water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A process for simultaneously removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and the like and purifying waste water such as derived from domestic sewage is described. A portion of the gas stream and a portion of the waste water, the latter containing dissolved iron and having an acidic pH, are contacted in a closed loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone to effect absorption of the sulfur dioxide into the waste water. A second portion of the gas stream and a second portion of the waste water are controlled in an open loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone. The second portion of the waste water contains a lesser amount of iron than the first portion of the waste water. Contacting in the openloop scrubbing zone is sufficient to acidify the waste water which is then treated to remove solids originally present.

  4. Ship-based MAX-DOAS measurements of tropospheric NO2 and SO2 in the South China and Sulu Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, S. F.; Peters, E.; Richter, A.; Lampel, J.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    In November 2011, ship-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements were performed within the SHIVA campaign on board RV Sonne in the South China and Sulu Sea. Spectral measurements for a total of eleven days could be used to retrieve tropospheric slant column densities (SCDs) of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the marine environment. The NO2 fit was performed following recommendations developed during the CINDI campaign and adapted for the ship-based measurements. We found that the inclusion of a cross section for liquid water and an empirical correction spectrum accounting for the effects of liquid water and vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) slightly improved the NO2 fit quality, especially at lower elevation angles and for lower NO2 levels. The conversion of SCDs into tropospheric NO2 vertical columns (TVC NO2) has been achieved using both a simple geometric approach and the Bremian advanced MAX-DOAS Retrieval Algorithm (BREAM), which is based on the optimal estimation method and accounts for atmospheric radiative transfer. We found good agreement between the geometric approach using the 15° measurements and BREAM, revealing that measurements at 15° elevation angle can be used for retrieving TVC NO2 in tropical marine environments when SZA is smaller than 75°. As expected, the values of TVC NO2 were generally low (<0.5 × 1015 molec cm-2) when no sources of NOx were in proximity to the RV Sonne. However, we found increased values of TVC NO2 (>2 × 1015 molec cm-2) in the morning when the RV Sonne was heading along the coast of Borneo. This is in good agreement with satellite measurements. The results of the profile retrieval show that the boundary layer values of NO2 are <30 pptv in the open and clean tropical marine environment. Interestingly, we also found elevated tropospheric SO2 amounts for measurements taken in a busy shipping lane, consistent with the time series of tropospheric NO2.

  5. Effect of the greenhouse gases (CO2, H2O, SO2) on Martian paleoclimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postawko, S. E.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    There is general agreement that certain surface features on Mars are indicative of the presence of liquid water at various times in the geologic past. In particular, the valley networks are difficult to explain by a mechanism other than the flow of liquid water. It has been suggested in several studies that a thick CO2 atmosphere on Mars early in its history could have provided a greenhouse warming that would have allowed the flow of water either on the surface or just below the surface. However, this effect was examined with a detailed radiation model, and it was found that if reduced solar luminosity early in the history of the solar system is taken into account, even three bars of CO2 will not provide sufficient greeenhouse warming. The addition of water vapor and sulflur dioxide (both plausible gases that may have been emitted by Martian volcanoes) to the atmosphere also fail to warm the surface above 273 K for reduced solar luminosity conditions. The increase in temperature may be large enough, however, for the formation of these features by brines.

  6. Vertical Profiles of SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands: MAX-DOAS Measurements and Comparison to in-situ Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the levels of industrially emitted gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to making quality environmental management decisions but is currently limited due to scarcity of top-down quantification studies. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) , important tropospheric trace gas pollutants, contributes to improved knowledge of these pollutants' levels, vertical distributions and chemical transformations. A mini-MAX-DOAS instrument measured spectra at multiple viewing elevation angles in order to retrieve NO2 and SO2 differential slant column densities (dSCDs) at an Environment Canada research site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta in the fall of 2013. For the first time in the oil sands, tropospheric vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 were retrieved by applying the optimal estimation technique to the MAX-DOAS measurements. The DOAS fit retrievals of SO2 dSCDs were validated by comparison with retrievals obtained with a quartz calibration cell with known SO2 SCD placed in front of the MAX-DOAS telescope at multiple elevation angles on a clean day. Retrieved SO2 dSCDs varied significantly from the true value depending on the chosen wavelength fitting interval. At the lowest wavelength intervals, interference by stray light and O3 differential structures significantly reduced dSCDs and caused an elevation angle dependence. These results indicate that MAX-DOAS dSCD retrieval settings, particularly for weak absorbers with differential absorption structures in low-intensity spectral regions, must be chosen carefully in order to achieve the most accurate results. Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) and vertical profile retrievals of NO2, SO2 and aerosol extinction during significant pollution events will be illustrated. Trace gas vertical profiles exhibited significant variability between days and at different times of day and were often spatially

  7. A comprehensive study over the recent important reduction in SO2 and NO2 emissions from the power plants located in S-E Europe using space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocǎnealǎ, Corina; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Theys, Nicolas; Merlaud, Alexis; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the recent important reduction of atmospheric SO2 and NO2 emissions from several power plants located in S-E Europe during 2005-2014 using space observations. The study is focused over three large power plants which are located in Romania and Bulgaria: Turceni (44.66°N, 23.38°E), Rovinari (44.9°N, 23.15°E) and Stara Zagora (42.43°N, 25.65°E). The space observations used in this work are based on OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment Measurements) measurements. The results obtained using data from satellites are compared with in-situ observations and calculated emissions. The OMI and GOME-2 observed SO2 and NO2 content is well correlated with the in-situ data and calculated SO2 and NOx emissions. This study investigates the potential of using satellite observations as an instrument to check quality air as a standard procedure by governmental and non-governmental institutions. To this aim, we compared the emissions calculated from ground and space with the European Directive 2001/80/EC which refers to the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants by large combustion plants.

  8. Spatiotemporal variations of air pollutants (O3, NO2, SO2, CO, PM10, and VOCs) with land-use types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Kim, D.; Stockwell, W. R.; Yang, J.-H.; Shin, H.-W.; Lee, M.-I.; Song, C.-K.; Lee, S.-D.

    2015-09-01

    The spatiotemporal variations of surface air pollutants (O3, NO2, SO2, CO, and PM10) with four land-use types, residence (R), commerce (C), industry (I) and greenbelt (G), have been investigated at 283 stations in South Korea during 2002-2013, using routinely observed data. The volatile organic compound (VOC) data at nine photochemical pollutant monitoring stations available since 2007 were utilized in order to examine their effect on the ozone chemistry. The land-use types, set by the Korean government, were generally consistent with the satellite-derived land covers and with the previous result showing anti-correlation between O3 and NO2 in diverse urban areas. The relationship between the two pollutants in the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA) residence land-use areas was substantially different from that outside of the SMA, probably due to the local differences in vehicle emissions. The highest concentrations of air pollutants in the diurnal, weekly, and annual cycles were found in industry for SO2 and PMPM10, in commerce for NO2 and CO, and in greenbelt for O3. The concentrations of air pollutants, except for O3, were generally higher in big cities during weekdays, while O3 showed its peak in suburban areas or small cities during weekends. The weekly cycle and trends of O3 were significantly out of phase with those of NO2, particularly in the residential and commercial areas, suggesting that vehicle emission was a major source in those areas. The ratios of VOCs to NO2 for each of the land-use types were in the order of I (10.2) > C (8.7) > G (3.9) > R (3.6), suggesting that most areas in South Korea were likely to be VOC-limited for ozone chemistry. The pollutants (NO2, SO2, CO, and PMPM10 except for O3 have decreased, most likely due to the effective government control. The total oxidant values (OX = O3 + NO2) with the land-use types were analyzed for the local and regional (or background) contributions of O3, respectively, and the order of OX (ppb) was C (57

  9. Transverse approach between real world concentrations of SO2, NO2, BTEX, aldehyde emissions and corrosion in the Grand Mare tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ameur-Bouddabbous, I; Kasperek, J; Barbier, A; Harel, F; Hannoyer, B

    2012-01-01

    With regard to automotive traffic, a tunnel-type semi enclosed atmosphere is characterized by a higher concentration of gaseous pollutants than on urban traffic roads and highlights the gaseous effluent species having an impact on material degradation. Therefore, a transverse approach between air quality and its consequences upon the longevity of materials is necessary, implying better knowledge of tunnel atmosphere and a better understanding of material degradation inside a tunnel for operating administration. Gaseous pollutant measurements carried out in a road tunnel in Rouen (Normandy) give the real world traffic concentrations of experimental exposure conditions. The sampling campaigns, achieved in summer and winter include SO2, NO2, BTEX and aldehyde analyses. Effluent profiles in the upward and downward tubes have been established. The current work shows that SO2, NO2, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal and butanal must be considered in the degradation process of materials in a stuffy environment. As regards NO2, its concentration depends on the modification of the automotive fleet. The total aldehyde concentrations indicate no particular trend between the two bores. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal and acrolein species are the most abundant species emitted by vehicles and represent 90% to 95% of the total aldehyde emissions. PMID:23513445

  10. In-situ characterisation of aerosol and gases (SO2, HCl, ozone) in Mt Etna volcano plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Vignelles, Damien; Giudice, Gaetano; Liuzzo, Marco; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Chartier, Michel; Coute, Benoit; Lurton, Thibaut; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-05-01

    We present findings from a measurement campaign that deployed a range of in-situ real-time atmospheric measurement techniques to characterise aerosols and gases in Mt Etna plume in October 2013. The LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) instrument for size-resolved particle measurements was deployed alongside two Multi-Gas instruments (measuring SO2, H2S, HCl, CO2) and an ozone sensor. Measurements were performed at the summit craters (in cloudy- and non-cloudy conditions) and in grounding downwind plume on the volcano flank. These high frequency measurements (acid gases: 1 to 0.1 Hz, aerosol: 0.1 Hz) provide a detailed in-situ dataset for time-resolved plume characterisation and volcano monitoring. The LOAC measurement of sized-resolved aerosol (over a 0.2 to 50 µm particle diameter range) alongside SO2 (10's ppbv to 10's ppmv) provides a valuable dataset for determining the volcanic aerosol volume and surface area to SO2 ratios. These parameters are presently poorly defined but are important for atmospheric models of the reactive halogen chemistry that occurs on volcanic aerosol surfaces to convert volcanic HBr into reactive bromine, including BrO. The LOAC's patented optical design can also provide insights into particle properties. The two Multi-Gas SO2 time-series show good agreement, detecting co-varying plume fluctuations in the downwind plume, which also correlate with the LOAC total aerosol volume time-series. An estimate of HCl/SO2 in Etna emissions was made by Multi-Gas electrochemical sensor, using a novel design to limit absorption/desorption effects and low-noise electronics for improved resolution. The detection of volcanic HCl by electrochemical sensor brings new possibilities for Multi-Gas monitoring of volcanic halogen emissions. Electrochemical sensor response times are not instantaneous, particularly for sticky gases such as HCl (T90 ~min), but also even for "fast" response (T90 ~ 10 to 30 s) sensors such as SO2 and H2S. However, in a volcanic

  11. E-Beam SO2 and NOx removal from flue gases in the presence of fine water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calinescu, Ioan; Martin, Diana; Chmielewski, Andrezj; Ighigeanu, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The Electron Beam Flue Gas Treatment (EBFGT) has been proposed as an efficient method for removal of SO2 and NOx many years ago. However, the industrial application of this procedure is limited to just a few installations. This article analyses the possibility of using medium-power EB accelerators for off-gases purification. By increasing electron energy from 0.7 MeV to 1-2 MeV it is possible to reduce the energy losses in the windows and in the air gap between them (transformer accelerators can be applied as well in the process). In order to use these mid-energy accelerators it is necessary to reduce their penetration depth through gas and this can be achieved by increasing the density of the reaction medium by means of dispersing a sufficient amount of fine water droplets (FWD). The presence of FWD has a favorable effect on the overall process by increasing the level of liquid phase reactions. A special reactor was designed and built to test the effect of FWD on the treatment of flue gases with a high concentration of SO2 and NOx using high-energy EBs (9 MeV). By determining the energy efficiency of the process the favorable effect of using FWD and high-energy EB was demonstrated.

  12. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  13. Differential optical absorption spectrometer measurement of NO 2, SO 2, O 3, HCHO and aromatic volatile organics in ambient air of Kaohsiung Petroleum Refinery in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kong Hwa; Sree, Usha; Hong Tseng, Sen; Wu, Chien-Hou; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    UV-differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) technique is considered as a promising technique to detect gaseous pollutants and was applied to conduct one-week continuous measurements in the Chinese Petroleum (CPC) refinery plant located in Lin Yuan industrial park of Kaohsiung, Southern Taiwan. With the combination of local meteorological information, including solar radiation, wind direction and speed, the results showed that the concentrations of aromatic compounds and formaldehyde (HCHO) were higher at night while the values of ozone, NO 2 and SO 2 were high during the day. The major source of aromatics was the aromatic extraction unit in the refinery while NO 2 and SO 2 were mainly emitted from chimneys with not very high average concentrations. Formaldehyde concentration was above 50 ppbv during night. There exists an apparent correlation between the variation of ground-level ozone concentration and photochemical reactions. The results indicate that in addition to benzene and toluene, ozone is a deleterious pollutant. The commercial DOAS system provides reliable information on distribution patterns of major air pollutants depending on their concentration levels in ambient air.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) among Pupils in Relation to SO2, NO2, O3 and PM10 in Schools in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Zhuohui; Norback, Dan

    2014-01-01

    There are fewer longitudinal studies from China on symptoms as described for the sick building syndrome (SBS). Here, we performed a two-year prospective study and investigated associations between environmental parameters such as room temperature, relative air humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM10), and health outcomes including prevalence, incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in junior high schools in Taiyuan, China. Totally 2134 pupils participated at baseline, and 1325 stayed in the same classrooms during the study period (2010–2012). The prevalence of mucosal symptoms, general symptoms and symptoms improved when away from school (school-related symptoms) was 22.7%, 20.4% and 39.2%, respectively, at baseline, and the prevalence increased during follow-up (P<0.001). At baseline, both indoor and outdoor SO2 were found positively associated with prevalence of school-related symptoms. Indoor O3 was shown to be positively associated with prevalence of skin symptoms. At follow-up, indoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, mucosal and general symptoms. CO2 and RH were positively associated with new onset of mucosal, general and school-related symptoms. Outdoor SO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin symptoms, while outdoor NO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms. Outdoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms as well as school-related symptoms. In conclusion, symptoms as described for SBS were commonly found in school children in Taiyuan City, China, and increased during the two-year follow-up period. Environmental pollution, including PM10, SO2 and NO2, could increase the prevalence and incidence of SBS and decrease the remission rate. Moreover, parental asthma and allergy (heredity) and pollen or pet allergy (atopy) can be risk factors

  15. Emission measurements of alkenes, alkanes, SO2, and NO2 from stationary sources in Southeast Texas over a 5 year period using SOF and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, John K. E.; Mellqvist, Johan; Samuelsson, Jerker; Offerle, Brian; Lefer, Barry; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Flynn, James; Yarwood, Greg

    2014-02-01

    A mobile platform for flux measurements of VOCs (alkanes and alkenes), SO2, and NO2 emissions using the Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) method and mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used in four different studies to measure industrial emissions. The studies were carried out in several large conglomerates of oil refineries and petrochemical industries in Southeast and East Texas in 2006, 2009, 2011, and 2012. The measured alkane emissions from the Houston Ship Channel (HSC) have been fairly stable between 2006 and 2011, averaging about 11,500 kg/h, while the alkene emissions have shown greater variations. The ethene and propene emissions measured from the HSC were 1511 kg/h and 878 kg/h, respectively, in 2006, while dropping to roughly 600 kg/h for both species in 2009 and 2011. The results were compared to annual inventory emissions, showing that measured VOC emissions were typically 5-15 times higher, while for SO2 and NO2 the ratio was typically 0.5-2. AP-42 emission factors were used to estimate meteorological effects on alkane emissions from tanks, showing that these emissions may have been up to 35-45% higher during the studies than the annual average. A more focused study of alkene emissions from a petrochemical complex in Longview in 2012 identified two upset episodes, and the elevation of the total emissions during the measurement period due to the upsets was estimated to be approximately 20%. Both meteorological and upset effects were small compared to the factor of 5-15, suggesting that VOC emissions are systematically and substantially underestimated in current emission inventories.

  16. Inter-conversion of Chromium Species During Air Sampling: Effects of O3, NO2, SO2, Particle Matrices, Temperature and Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihui; Fan, Zhihua (Tina); Yu, Chang Ho; Hopke, Philip K.; Lioy, Paul J.; Buckley, Brian T.; Lin, Lin; Ma, Yingjun

    2013-01-01

    The inter-conversion between Cr(VI), a pulmonary carcinogen, and Cr(III), an essential human nutrient, poses challenges to the measurement of Cr(VI) in airborne particles. Chamber and field tests were conducted to identify the factors affecting Cr(VI)-Cr(III) inter-conversion in the basic filter medium under typical sampling conditions. In the chamber tests, isotopically enriched 53Cr(VI) and 50Cr(III) were spiked on diesel particulate matter (DPM) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that were pre-collected on a basic MCE filter. The filter samples were then exposed to clean air or the air containing SO2 (50 and 160 ppb), 100 ppb O3, or 150 ppb NO2 for 24 hours at 16.7 LPM flow rate at designated temperature (20 and 31°C) and RH (40% and 70%) conditions. Exposure to 160 ppb SO2 had the greatest effect on 53Cr(VI) reduction, with 53Cr(VI) recovery of 31.7 ± 15.8% (DPM) and 42.0 ± 7.9% (SOA). DPM and SOA matrix induced 53Cr(VI) reduction when exposed to clean air while reactive oxygen species in SOA could promote 50Cr(III) oxidation. Deliquescence when RH increased from 40% to 70% led to conversion of Cr(III) in SOA, whereas oxidized organics in DPM and SOA enhanced hygroscopicity and thus facilitated Cr(VI) reduction. Field tests showed seasonal variation of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) inter-conversion during sampling. Correction of the inter-conversion using USEPA method 6800 is recommended to improve accuracy of ambient Cr(VI) measurements. PMID:23550818

  17. Theoretical study of the NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and NH3 adsorptions on multi-diameter single-wall MoS2 nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Rongfang; Zhou, Bo; Jia, Cuifang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Zhenyi

    2016-02-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, the ability of a single-wall MoS2 nanotube to detect NO, NO2, CO, SO2, and NH3 gas molecules is studied. The most stable adsorption configurations, adsorption energies, and charge transfers are calculated. Among these gas molecules, the NO molecule has the biggest interaction with the MoS2 nanotube. The adsorption energy of NO on the nanotube is 129.3 meV, which is almost double compared to that for the monolayer (74.4 meV). The charge density difference calculation shows that all the molecules on the MoS2 nanotube act as electron acceptors except NH3. The charge transfer between NO and the nanotube is still one order of magnitude higher than that for the monolayer. Compared with the results for these molecules adsorbed on the MoS2 monolayer, the nanotube is more sensitive, especially for the NO molecule. Moreover, a comparative study of MoS2 nanotubes with different diameters (curvatures) indicates that the NO adsorption capability of the outer surface decreases on the increasing radius. It is predicted that the MoS2 nanotube with a smaller diameter should increase the stability and sensitivity of MoS2-based field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors.

  18. Measurements of industrial emissions of VOCs, NH3, NO2 and SO2 in Texas using the Solar Occultation Flux method and mobile DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Rivera, C.; Lefer, B.; Patel, M.

    2007-12-01

    Solar Occultation Flux (SOF) measurements of olefines and alkanes have been conducted to pin-point and quantify the largest sources of olefines and alkanes in the vicinity of Houston and in south eastern Texas during September 2006. The SOF measurements were part of the extensive summer campaign TexAQS 2006, included in the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS II). The SOF technique is an optical method utilizing the absorption of direct solar infrared radiation in the 1.8-14 micrometer range for retrieval of total columns of various species such as ethylene, propylene, ammonia and alkanes. The instrument is carried on a mobile platform, making it possible to conduct transects of the emission plume downwind an industry, and thus integrate all the molecules of the plume cross section in real time. By multiplying with the plume wind speed, the total flux emerging from the source is obtained. Flux estimates with SOF were obtained for the large petrochemical and refining complexes around the Houston area. This was done in parallell with airborne plume studies by other parties. The primary research goal was to supply a data set for emission inventory comparisons and for input to models looking at the strong ozone production in Texas. The SOF measurements show that the hourly gas emissions from the Houston Ship channel area correspond to about 1 metric ton of ethylene, 1.5 tons of propylene, 12 tons of alkanes, 1/4 ton of NH3 and about 5 tons of SO2 and NO2. For the VOCs this is an order of magnitude or greater than reported VOC emissions in the 2004 inventory.

  19. Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Cycloalkenes: Formation of Highly Oxidized RO2 Radicals and Their Reactions with NO, NO2, SO2, and Other RO2 Radicals.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Torsten; Richters, Stefanie; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2015-10-15

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with C5-C8 cycloalkenes has been investigated in a free-jet flow system at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 297 ± 1 K. Highly oxidized RO2 radicals bearing at least 5 O atoms in the molecule and their subsequent reaction products were detected in most cases by means of nitrate-CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometry. Starting from a Criegee intermediate after splitting-off an OH-radical, the formation of these RO2 radicals can be explained via an autoxidation mechanism, meaning RO2 isomerization (ROO → QOOH) and subsequently O2 addition (QOOH + O2 → R'OO). Time-dependent RO2 radical measurements concerning the ozonolysis of cyclohexene indicate rate coefficients of the intramolecular H-shifts, ROO → QOOH, higher than 1 s(-1). The total molar yield of highly oxidized products (predominantly RO2 radicals) from C5-C8 cycloalkenes in air is 4.8-6.0% affected with a calibration uncertainty by a factor of about two. For the most abundant RO2 radical from cyclohexene ozonolysis, O,O-C6H7(OOH)2O2 ("O,O" stands for two O atoms arising from the ozone attack), the determination of the rate coefficients of the reaction with NO2, NO, and SO2 yielded (1.6 ± 0.5) × 10(-12), (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-11), and <10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The reaction of highly oxidized RO2 radicals with other peroxy radicals (R'O2) leads to detectable accretion products, RO2 + R'O2 → ROOR' + O2, which allows to acquire information on peroxy radicals not directly measurable with the nitrate ionization technique applied here. Additional experiments using acetate as the charger ion confirm conclusively the existence of highly oxidized RO2 radicals and closed-shell products. Other reaction products, detectable with this ionization technique, give a deeper insight in the reaction mechanism of cyclohexene ozonolysis. PMID:26392132

  20. Effect of SO2 on oxidation of metallic materials in CO2/H2O‐rich gases relevant to oxyfuel environments

    SciTech Connect

    Huczkowski, P; Olszewski, T; Schiek, M; Lutz, B; Holcomb, G R; Shemet, V; Nowak, W; Meier, G H; Singheiser, L; Quadakkers, W J

    2014-01-01

    In an oxyfuel plant, heat exchanging metallic components will be exposed to a flue gas that contains substantially higher contents of CO2, water vapor, and SO2 than conventionalflue gases. In the present study, the oxidation behavior of the martensitic steel P92 was studied in CO2‐and/or H2O‐rich gas mixtures with and without addition of SO2. For this purpose, the corrosion of P92 at 550 8C up to 1000 h in Ar–H2O–SO2, Ar–CO2–SO2, Ar–CO2–O2–SO2 and simulated oxyfuel gas (Ar–CO2–H2O–O2–SO2) was compared with the behavior in selected SO2‐free gases. The oxidation kinetics were estimated by a number of methods such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy and wave length dispersive X‐ray analysis, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X‐ray diffraction as well as transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results revealed that the effect of SO2 addition on the materials behavior substantially differed, depending on the prevailing base gas atmosphere. The various types of corrosion attack affected by SO2 could not be explained by solely comparing equilibrium activities of the gas atmospheres with thermodynamic stabilities of possible corrosion products. The results were found to be strongly affected by relative rates of reactions of the various gas species occurring within the frequently porous corrosion scales as well as at the scale/gas‐and scale/alloy interfaces.Whereas SO2 addition to Ar–CO2 resulted in formation of an external mixed oxide/sulfide layer, the presence of SO2 in oxyfuel gas and in Ar–H2O–SO2 resulted in Fe‐sulfide formation near the interface between inner and outer oxide layer as well as Cr‐sulfide formation in the alloy. In the latter gases, the presence of SO2 seemed to have no dramatic effect on oxide scale growth rates.

  1. One year observations of atmospheric reactive gases (O3, CO, NOx, SO2) at Jang Bogo base in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siek Rhee, Tae; Seo, Sora

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a remote area surrounded by the Southern Ocean and far from the influence of human activities, giving us unique opportunity to investigate the background variation of trace gases which are sensitive to the human activities. Korean Antarctic base, Jang Bogo, was established as a unique permanent overwintering base in Terra Nova Bay in February, 2014. One year later, we installed a package of instruments to monitor atmospheric trace gases at the base, which includes long-lived greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O, and reactive gases, O3, CO, NOx, and SO2. The atmospheric chemistry observatory, where these scientific instruments were installed, is located ca. 1 km far from the main building and power plant, minimizing the influence of pollution that may come from the operation of the base. Here we focus on the reactive gases measured in-situ at the base; O3 displays a typical seasonal variation with high in winter and low in summer with seasonal amplitude of ~18 ppb, CO was high in September at ~56 ppb, probably implying the invasion of lower latitude air mass with biomass burning, and low in late summer due to photochemical oxidation. NO did not show clear seasonal variation, but SO2 reveals larger values in summer than in winter. We will discuss potential atmospheric processes behind these first observations of reactive gases in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica.

  2. Estimating Surface NO2 and SO2 Mixing Ratios from Fast-Response Total Column Observations and Potential Application to Geostationary Missions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total-column nitrogen dioxide (NO2) data collected by a ground-based sun-tracking spectrometer system 21 (Pandora) and an photolytic-converter-based in-situ instrument collocated at NASA’s Langley Research Center in 22 Hampton, Virginia were analyzed to study the relationship bet...

  3. Polymer-gas reactions (air pollutants: NO2 and SO2) as function of pressure, UV light, temperature, and morphology: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jellinek, H. H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Reactions of various polymers, such as polystyrene and its stereo-specific isomers, butylrubber, nylon, etc., with nitrogen dioxide and sulfur-dioxide were studied over the past few years. More recently, work has been initiated on the influence of polymer morphology on degradation of polymers in presence of these gases, near UV radiation and oxygen. Unexpected effects have been observed during chain scission near room temperature. Thus, for instance, isotactic polystyrene of various crystallinities, as far as extent and type are concerned, show marked differences in their degradation characteristics. Thus, for instance, crystalline polymers show faster degradation than amorphous ones, which seems to be contrary to expectations. However, this phenomenon can be explained in quite a consistent manner. The importance of all these reactions in connection with air pollution is briefly discussed.

  4. Detecting CO, NO and NO2 gases by Boron-doped graphene nanoribbon molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhen; Zuo, Xi; Zhang, Guang-Ping; Li, Zong-Liang; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2016-07-01

    Combining nonequilibrium Green's function method and density functional theory, an azulene-like dipole molecule sandwiched between two graphene nanoribbon (GNR) electrodes are explored to gas sensors. Both the pristine zigzag edged GNR and Boron-doped armchair-edged GNR are considered in this study. It shows that certain specific toxic molecules CO, NO and NO2 would adsorb on the doped Boron atoms of the GNR, resulting in a dramatic change in the current-voltage profile. Changes in the subbands of electrodes, induced by gas adsorption, are responsible for the variation of current. The devices are thus demonstrated to be sensitive nanosensors for these toxic gases.

  5. Removal of Particles and Acid Gases (SO2 or HCl) with a Ceramic Filter by Addition of Dry Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.; Wang, J.; Schaub, G.

    2002-09-20

    The present investigation intends to add to the fundamental process design know-how for dry flue gas cleaning, especially with respect to process flexibility, in cases where variations in the type of fuel and thus in concentration of contaminants in the flue gas require optimization of operating conditions. In particular, temperature effects of the physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously in the gas-particle dispersion and in the filter cake/filter medium are investigated in order to improve the predictive capabilities for identifying optimum operating conditions. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) are known as efficient sorbents for neutralizing acid flue gas components such as HCl, HF, and SO{sub 2}. According to their physical properties (e.g. porosity, pore size) and chemical behavior (e.g. thermal decomposition, reactivity for gas-solid reactions), optimum conditions for their application vary widely. The results presented concentrate on the development of quantitative data for filtration stability and overall removal efficiency as affected by operating temperature. Experiments were performed in a small pilot unit with a ceramic filter disk of the type Dia-Schumalith 10-20 (Fig. 1, described in more detail in Hemmer 2002 and Hemmer et al. 1999), using model flue gases containing SO{sub 2} and HCl, flyash from wood bark combustion, and NaHCO{sub 3} as well as Ca(OH){sub 2} as sorbent material (particle size d{sub 50}/d{sub 84} : 35/192 {micro}m, and 3.5/16, respectively). The pilot unit consists of an entrained flow reactor (gas duct) representing the raw gas volume of a filter house and the filter disk with a filter cake, operating continuously, simulating filter cake build-up and cleaning of the filter medium by jet pulse. Temperatures varied from 200 to 600 C, sorbent stoichiometric ratios from zero to 2, inlet concentrations were on the order of 500 to 700 mg/m{sup 3}, water vapor contents ranged from

  6. [Research on in-situ monitoring of SO2 concentration in the flue gases with DOAS method based on algorithm fusion].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guang-hua; Xu, Chuan-long; Shao, Li-tang; Yang, Dao-ye; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Shi-min

    2009-04-01

    Valuable achievements on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for monitoring atmospheric pollutants gas have been made in the past decades. Based on the idea of setting the threshold according to the maximum value, symbolized as OD'm, of differential optical density, the algorithm of traditional DOAS was combined with the DOAS algorithm based on the kalman filtering to improve the detection limit without losing measurement accuracy in the present article. Two algorithms have different inversion accuracy at the same ratio of signal to noise and the problem of inversion accuracy was well resolved by combining two algorithms at short light path length. Theoretical and experimental research on the concentration measurement of SO2 in the flue gases was carried out at the normal temperature and atmospheric pressure. The research results show that with the OD'm less than 0.0481, the measurement precision is very high for SO2 with the improved DOAS algorithm. The measurement lower limit of SO2 is less than 28.6 mg x m(-3) and the zero drift of the system is less than 2.9 mg x m(-3). If the OD'm is between 0.0481 and 0.9272, the measurement precision is high with the traditional DOAS algorithm. However, if the OD'm is more than 0.922, the errors of measurement results for both two DOAS algorithms are very large and the linearity correction must be performed. PMID:19626898

  7. NH 4+, NO 3-, and SO 42- in roadside and rural size-resolved particles and transformation of NO 2/SO 2 to nanoparticle-bound NO 3-/SO 42-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Chen, Shui-Jen; Liu, Shaw-Chen; Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    This study investigates ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate (NH 4+, NO 3-, and SO 42-) in size-resolved particles (particularly nano (PM 0.01-0.056)/ultrafine (PM 0.01-0.1)) and NO x/SO 2 collected near a busy road and at a rural site. The average (mass) cumulative fraction of secondary inorganic aerosols (SO 42-+NO 3-+NH 4+) in nano or ultrafine particles at the roadside was found to be three to four times that at the rural site. The above three secondary inorganic aerosol species were present in similar cumulative fractions in particles of size 1-18 μm at both sites; however, dissimilar fractions were observed for Cl -, Na +, and K +. The nitrogen ratios (NRs: NR = NO 3--N/(NO 3--N + NO 2-N)), sulfur ratios (SRs: SR = SO 42--S/(SO 42--S + SO 2-S)), dNR/D P (derivative of NR with respect to D P (particle diameter)), and dSR/D P (derivative of SR with respect to D P) at the roadside were higher than those at the rural site for nano/ultrafine particles. At both sites (particularly the roadside), the nanoparticles had significantly higher dNR/D P and dSR/D P values than differently sized particles, implying that NO 3-/SO 42- (from NO 2/SO 2 transformation or NO 3-/SO 42- deposition) were present on these particles.

  8. Evaluation of gases, condensates, and SO2 emissions from Augustine volcano, Alaska: the degassing of a Cl-rich volcanic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Gerlach, T.M.; Briggs, P.H.; Harmon, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    After the March-April 1986 explosive eruption a comprehensive gas study at Augustine was undertaken in the summers of 1986 and 1987. Airborne COSPEC measurements indicate that passive SO2 emission rates declined exponentially during this period from 380??45 metric tons/day (T/D) on 7/24/86 to 27??6 T/D on 8/24/87. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Augustine magma reservoir has become more degassed as volcanic activity decreased after the spring 1986 eruption. Gas samples collected in 1987 from an 870??C fumarole on the andesitic lava dome show various degrees of disequilibrium due to oxidation of reduced gas species and condensation (and loss) of H2O in the intake tube of the sampling apparatus. Thermochemical restoration of the data permits removal of these effects to infer an equilibrium composition of the gases. Although not conclusive, this restoration is consistent with the idea that the gases were in equilibrium at 870??C with an oxygen fugacity near the Ni-NiO buffer. These restored gas compositions show that, relative to other convergent plate volcanoes, the Augustine gases are very HCl rich (5.3-6.0 mol% HCl), S rich (7.1 mol% total S), and H2O poor (83.9-84.8 mol% H2O). Values of ??D and ??18O suggest that the H2O in the dome gases is a mixture of primary magmatic water (PMW) and local seawater. Part of the Cl in the Augustine volcanic gases probably comes from this shallow seawater source. Additional Cl may come from subducted oceanic crust because data by Johnston (1978) show that Cl-rich glass inclusions in olivine crystals contain hornblende, which is evidence for a deep source (>25km) for part of the Cl. Gas samples collected in 1986 from 390??-642??C fumaroles on a ramp surrounding the inner summit crater have been oxidized so severely that restoration to an equilibrium composition is not possible. H and O isotope data suggest that these gases are variable mixtures of seawater, FMW, and meteoric steam. These samples are much

  9. Spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric VOCs, NO2, SO2, and O3 concentrations at a heavily industrialized region in Western Turkey, and assessment of the carcinogenic risk levels of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civan, Mihriban Yılmaz; Elbir, Tolga; Seyfioglu, Remzi; Kuntasal, Öznur Oğuz; Bayram, Abdurrahman; Doğan, Güray; Yurdakul, Sema; Andiç, Özgün; Müezzinoğlu, Aysen; Sofuoglu, Sait C.; Pekey, Hakan; Pekey, Beyhan; Bozlaker, Ayse; Odabasi, Mustafa; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2015-02-01

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) were measured at 55 locations around a densely populated industrial zone, hosting a petrochemical complex (Petkim), a petroleum refinery (Tupras), ship-dismantling facilities, several iron and steel plants, and a gas-fired power plant. Five passive sampling campaigns were performed covering summer and winter seasons of 2005 and 2007. Elevated concentrations of VOCs, NO2 and SO2 around the refinery, petrochemical complex and roads indicated that industrial activities and vehicular emissions are the main sources of these pollutants in the region. Ozone concentrations were low at the industrial zone and settlement areas, but high in rural stations downwind from these sources due to NO distillation. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was employed to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into six factors, which were associated with emissions sources. Traffic was found to be highest contributor to measured ∑VOCs concentrations, followed by the Petkim and Tupras. Median cancer risk due to benzene inhalation calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation was approximately 4 per-one-million population, which exceeded the U.S. EPA benchmark of 1 per one million. Petkim, Tupras and traffic emissions were the major sources of cancer risk due to benzene inhalation in the Aliaga airshed. Relative contributions of these two source groups changes significantly from one location to another, demonstrating the limitation of determining source contributions and calculating health risk using data from one or two permanent stations in an industrial area.

  10. The effect of anthropogenic activity on BTEX, NO2, SO2, and CO concentrations in urban air of the spa city of Sopot and medium-industrialized city of Tczew located in North Poland.

    PubMed

    Marć, Mariusz; Bielawska, Michalina; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek; Zabiegała, Bożena

    2016-05-01

    The major goal of the present study is to compare the air quality of two urban locations situated in Northern Poland - the spa City of Sopot and the medium-industrialized city of Tczew using chemometric methods. As a criterion for the assessment of atmospheric air quality, measurements of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and total xylenes were used (collected from atmospheric air using diffusion-type passive samplers) as well as measurements of inorganic compounds - CO, NO2 and SO2, which were subject to routine control and determined by means of automatic analysers. Studies related to determination of defined chemical compounds in the urban air in the monitored area were performed from January 2013 to December 2014. By interpreting the results obtained and using basic multivariate statistical tools (cluster analysis and principal components analysis), major sources of emissions of determined pollutants in the air in urbanized areas were defined. The study also shows the potential influence of the sea breeze on concentrations of chemical compounds in the atmospheric air in the spa city of Sopot. PMID:26990845

  11. Application of a long-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (LP-DOAS) on the measurements of NO(2), SO(2), O(3), and HNO(2) in Gwangju, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongsoon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Young J; Lee, Jaihoon

    2008-03-01

    A differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) technique has been applied to monitor airborne trace pollutants including NO(2), SO(2), O(3), and HNO(2) in the ultraviolet (UV) region (290-350 nm) over a 1.5 km beam path (two ways) during an intensive measurement campaign held at Gwangju, Korea (March 2002). Their mean mixing ratios (and standard deviations) were computed as 11.3 (8.8), 1.9 (1.7), 17.1 (19.3), and 0.5 (0.4)ppbv, respectively. As a means to evaluate the performance of the long-path DOAS (LP-DOAS) system with conventional point monitoring systems (PMS), correlation analysis was conducted between the two data sets. These data sets were then inspected to account for the influence of the environmental conditions on the correlation strength between the two systems, especially with respect to light level and wind speed. To facilitate the comparison, correlation analyses were conducted after dividing the data sets for those parameters into several classes. The strength of the correlations between DOAS and meteorological parameters was also examined to evaluate their effects on the DOAS performance. It was found that, among the four pollutant species, O(3) is the most sensitive to changes in meteorological conditions in relation with atmospheric mixing conditions. The overall results of our study indicate that open-path monitoring techniques can be used to effectively diagnose air quality and be substituted for the conventional point monitoring methods with the proper consideration of those parameters affecting the DOAS sensitivity (e.g., light level and wind speed). PMID:17335958

  12. The Performance of a Novel Synthetic Ca-Based Solid Sorbent Suitable for the Removal of CO2 and SO2 from Flue Gases in a Fluidised Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacciani, R.; Müller, C. R.; Davidson, J. F.; Dennis, J. S.; Hayhurst, A. N.

    The extent and mechanism of the sulphation and carbonation of a limestone, dolomite and chalk, have been compared with a novel, synthetic sorbent (85 wt% CaO and 15 wt% Ca12Al14O33), from experiments in a small, electrically-heated fluidised bed. The sorbent particles were either (i) untreated, but then sieved into two particle sizes and reacted with SO2 of two different concentrations, or (ii) cycled 20 times between (a) carbonation in 14 vol.% CO2 in N2, and (b) calcination, in pure N2, at 750°C. The uptake of SO2 by untreated limestone and dolomite was generally low (<0.2 gSO 2/gsorbent) and dependent on particle size, confirming previous results. In comparison with limestone and dolomite, the untreated chalk and the synthetic sorbent were found to be substantially more reactive with SO2; their final uptake was significantly higher (> 0.5 gSO 2/gsorbent) and essentially independent of the particle size. Hg-intrusion porosimetry, performed on calcined sorbents, revealed that the volume inside the pores of limestone and dolomite was entirely in small pores (<200 nm dia.), confirmed by EDAX analysis. The small pores were easily plugged, hindering the diffusion of SO2 through the particle. On the other hand, calcined chalk and fresh synthetic sorbent possessed large volumes in wide pores (> 200 nm dia.); these bigger pores were not blocked by newly formed CaSO4. This allowed sulphation to proceed uniformly throughout the particle. It was also found that the uptake of SO2 by limestone, dolomite and chalk was substantially lower when the particles had been subjected to cycles of calcination and carbonation in CO2 prior to sulphation; this was attributed to a loss of volume inside the small pores during carbonation and calcination, confirmed by Hg-intrusion porosimetry. The uptake of SO2 by the synthetic sorbent, on the other hand, was much closer to that achieved when it was used untreated, because large pores remained accessible after cycling.

  13. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and trace As2O3 from flue gas: mechanism, kinetics study, and effect of main gases on arsenic capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhong; Tong, Huiling; Zhuo, Yuqun; Li, Yan; Xu, Xuchang

    2007-04-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and trace elements are pollutants derived from coal combustion. This study focuses on the simultaneous removal of S02 and trace arsenic oxide (As2O3) from flue gas by calcium oxide (CaO) adsorption in the moderate temperature range. Experiments have been performed on a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The interaction mechanism between As2O3 and CaO is studied via XRD detection. Calcium arsenate [Ca3(AsO4)2] is found to be the reaction product in the range of 600-1000 degrees C. The ability of CaO to absorb As2O3 increases with the increasing temperature over the range of 400-1000 degrees C. Through kinetics analysis, it has been found that the rate constant of arsenate reaction is much higher than that of sulfate reaction. SO2 presence does not affect the trace arsenic capture either in the initial reaction stage when CaO conversion is relatively low or in the later stage when CaO conversion is very high. The product of sulfate reaction, CaS04, is proven to be able to absorb As2O3. The coexisting CO2 does not weaken the trace arsenic capture either. PMID:17533855

  14. Mineral dust and NOx promote the conversion of SO2 to sulfate in heavy pollution days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Wang, Yuesi; Ma, Qingxin; Ma, Jinzhu; Chu, Biwu; Ji, Dongsheng; Tang, Guiqian; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongxing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-02-01

    Haze in China has been increasing in frequency of occurrence as well as the area of the affected region. Here, we report on a new mechanism of haze formation, in which coexistence with NOx can reduce the environmental capacity for SO2, leading to rapid conversion of SO2 to sulfate because NO2 and SO2 have a synergistic effect when they react on the surface of mineral dust. Monitoring data from five severe haze episodes in January of 2013 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions agreed very well with the laboratory simulation. The combined air pollution of motor vehicle exhaust and coal-fired flue gases greatly reduced the atmospheric environmental capacity for SO2, and the formation of sulfate was found to be a main reason for the growth of fine particles, which led to the occurrence of haze. These results indicate that the impact of motor vehicle exhaust on the atmospheric environment might be underestimated.

  15. Mineral dust and NOx promote the conversion of SO2 to sulfate in heavy pollution days

    PubMed Central

    He, Hong; Wang, Yuesi; Ma, Qingxin; Ma, Jinzhu; Chu, Biwu; Ji, Dongsheng; Tang, Guiqian; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongxing; Hao, Jiming

    2014-01-01

    Haze in China has been increasing in frequency of occurrence as well as the area of the affected region. Here, we report on a new mechanism of haze formation, in which coexistence with NOx can reduce the environmental capacity for SO2, leading to rapid conversion of SO2 to sulfate because NO2 and SO2 have a synergistic effect when they react on the surface of mineral dust. Monitoring data from five severe haze episodes in January of 2013 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions agreed very well with the laboratory simulation. The combined air pollution of motor vehicle exhaust and coal-fired flue gases greatly reduced the atmospheric environmental capacity for SO2, and the formation of sulfate was found to be a main reason for the growth of fine particles, which led to the occurrence of haze. These results indicate that the impact of motor vehicle exhaust on the atmospheric environment might be underestimated. PMID:24566871

  16. Volcanological applications of SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. R.; Prata, F.; Platt, U.

    2015-07-01

    Ground-based volcanic gas and ash imaging has the potential to revolutionise the way in which volcanoes are monitored and studied. The ability to track and quantify volcanic emissions in space and time with unprecedented fidelity opens the door to integration with geophysical measurements, allowing breakthroughs in our understanding of the physical processes driving volcanic activity. In May 2013 a European Science Foundation funded Plume Imaging workshop was conducted in Stromboli, Italy, with the objective of bringing the ground-based volcanic plume imaging community together in order to examine the state of the art, and move towards a 'best-practice' for volcanic ash and gas imaging techniques. A particular focus was the development of SO2 imaging systems, or SO2 cameras, with six teams deploying and testing various designs of ultraviolet and infrared-based imaging systems capable of imagining SO2. One conclusion of the workshop was that the term 'SO2 camera' should be applied to any SO2 imaging system, regardless of wavelength of radiation used. This Special Issue on Volcanic Plume Imaging is the direct result of the Stromboli workshop, and together the papers presented here represent the state of the art of ground-based volcano plume imaging science and technology. In this work, we examine in detail the volcanological applications of the SO2 camera, reviewing previous works and placing the new research contained in this Special Issue in context. The development of the SO2 camera, and future developments extending imaging to other volcanic gases, is one of the most exciting and novel research frontiers in volcanology today.

  17. New discoveries enabled by OMI SO2 measurements and future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay

    2010-05-01

    -sulfur coal in its many coal-fired power plants. Recently, China's government has instituted nationwide measures to control SO2 emissions through the adoption of flue-gas desulfurization technology (FGD) on new power plants; and even greater measures were adopted in the Beijing area in anticipation of the Olympic Games. We demonstrate that the OMI can pick up both SO2 and NO2 emissions from large point sources in northern China, where large increases in both gases were observed from 2005 to 2007, over areas with newly established power plants. The OMI SO2/NO2 ratio generally agrees with the estimated emission factors for coal-fired power plants based on a bottom-up approach. Between 2007 and 2008, OMI detected little change in NO2 but dramatic decline in SO2 over the same areas. While the almost constant NO2 levels between the two years imply steady electricity generation from the power plants, the large reduction in SO2 confirms the effectiveness of the FGD units, which likely became operational between 2007 and 2008. Further development of satellite detection and monitoring of point pollution sources requires better than 10km ground resolution. We show how planned Dutch /ESA TROPOMI and NASA GEOCape missions will advance the art of measuring point source emissions in coming decade.

  18. Flux Calculation Using CARIBIC DOAS Aircraft Measurements: SO2 Emission of Norilsk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, D.; Heue, K.-P.; Rauthe-Schoech, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Lamsal, L. N.; Krotkov, N. A.; Platt, U.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a case-study of the nickel smelter in Norilsk (Siberia), the retrieval of trace gas fluxes using airborne remote sensing is discussed. A DOAS system onboard an Airbus 340 detected large amounts of SO2 and NO2 near Norilsk during a regular passenger flight within the CARIBIC project. The remote sensing data were combined with ECMWF wind data to estimate the SO2 output of the Norilsk industrial complex to be around 1 Mt per year, which is in agreement with independent estimates. This value is compared to results using data from satellite remote sensing (GOME, OMI). The validity of the assumptions underlying our estimate is discussed, including the adaptation of this method to other gases and sources like the NO2 emissions of large industries or cities.

  19. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and NO by wet scrubbing using aqueous chlorine dioxide solution.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dong-Seop; Deshwal, Bal-Raj; Park, Young-Seong; Lee, Hyung-Keun

    2006-07-31

    The present study attempts to generate chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas continuously by chlorate-chloride process and to utilize it further to clean up SO(2) and NO(x) gases simultaneously from the flue gas in the lab-scale bubbling reactor. Experiments were carried out to examine the effect of various operating parameters like input SO(2) concentration, input NO concentration, pH of the reaction medium, and ClO(2) feeding rate on the SO(2) and NO(x) removal efficiencies at 45 degrees C. Complete oxidation of NO into NO(2) occurred on passing sufficient ClO(2) gas into the scrubbing solution. SO(2) removal efficiency of about 100% and NO(x) removal efficiency of 66-72% were achieved under optimized conditions. NO(x) removal efficiency decreased slightly with increasing pH and NO concentration. Input SO(2) concentration had marginal catalytic effect on NO(2) absorption. No improvement in the NO(x) removal efficiency was observed on passing excess of chlorine dioxide in the scrubbing solution. PMID:16442222

  20. Episodic vs. epochal release of SO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postawko, S. E.; Fanale, F. P.; Zent, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Erosion of the Martian surface by the flow of liquid water has apparently taken place at different times and locations on the planet. Many attempts were made to explain the valley networks by invoking a strong atmospheric CO2/H2O greenhouse early in the history of the planet. It was assumed that the large amounts of CO2 necessary to cause the greenhouse would have disappeared due to carbonate formation. Carbonates have yet to be positively identified. Volcanism has occurred throughout much of the history of Mars. Presumably gases such as SO2 were released along with CO2 and H2O. Estimates of amounts and rates with which SO2 were released into the Martian atmosphere, and how this would effect the global climate were made. Studies are continuing on the effects of SO2 and other volcanic gases on Martian climatic history.

  1. Canopy stomatal uptake of NOX, SO2 and O3 by mature urban plantations based on sap flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanting; Zhao, Ping; Niu, Junfeng; Sun, Zhenwei; Zhu, Liwei; Ni, Guangyan

    2016-01-01

    Canopy stomatal uptake of NOX (NO, NO2), SO2 and O3 by three mature urban plantations (of Schima superba, Eucalyptus citriodora and Acacia auriculaeformis) were studied using the sap flow-based approach under free atmospheric conditions. The annual mean concentration for NO, NO2, SO2 and O3 were 18.2, 58.1, 12.8 and 42.4 μg m-3, respectively. The atmospheric concentration exhibited a spring or winter maximum for NO, NO2 and SO2, whereas the concentration maximum for O3 occurred in the autumn. Despite the daytime mean canopy stomatal conductance (GC) being positively related with the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and negatively with the vapour pressure deficit (VPD), the maximal daytime mean GC did not appear when the PAR was at its highest level or the VPD was at its lowest level because a positive correlation was noted between the daytime mean PAR and VPD (P < 0.001) under field conditions. The GC value was regulated by the cooperation of the PAR and VPD. When analysing the respective effect of the PAR or VPD on GC separately, a positive logarithmical correlation was noted between the daytime mean GC and PAR as the following equation:Gc = a × lnPAR - b (P < 0.01), and the daytime mean GC was negatively logarithmically correlated with the VPD: Gc =Gsref - m × lnVPD (P < 0.001). The daytime mean GC declined with decreases in the soil water content (SWC) under similar meteorological condition. Differences in the seasonal pattern of the canopy stomatal conductance and atmospheric concentrations led to a differentiated peak flux. The flux for NO, NO2 and SO2 exhibited a spring maximum, whereas the flux maximum for O3 appeared in the autumn or summer. The annual cumulative stomatal flux for NO, NO2, O3 and SO2 was 100.19 ± 3.76, 510.68 ± 24.78, 748.59 ± 52.81 and 151.98 ± 9.33 mg m-2 a-1, respectively. When we focus on the foliar uptake of trace gases, the effect of these gases on the vegetation in turn should be considered, particularly for regions

  2. Monitoring of volcanic emissions of SO2 and ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, Nicolas; Clarisse, Lieven; Brenot, Hugues; van Gent, Jeroen; Campion, Robin; van der A, Ronald; Valks, Pieter; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Van Roozendael, Michel; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Tait, Steve; Ferrucci, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can emit large quantities of fine particles (ash) into the atmosphere as well as several trace gases, such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, sulphur species (SO2, H2S) and halogens (HCl, HBr, HF). These volcanic ejecta can have a considerable impact on the atmosphere, human health and society. Volcanic ash in particular is known to be a major threat for aviation, especially after dispersion over long distances (>1000 km) from the erupting volcano. In this respect, the continuous monitoring of volcanic ash from space is playing an essential role for the mitigation of aviation hazards. Compared to ash, SO2 is less critical for aviation safety, but is much easier to measure. Therefore, SO2 observations are often use as a marker of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. Moreover, SO2 yields information on the processes occurring in the magmatic system and is used as a proxy for the eruptive rate. In this presentation we give an overview of recent developments of the Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The focus is on the near-real time detection and monitoring of volcanic plumes of ash and SO2 using polar-orbiting instruments GOME-2, OMI, IASI and AIRS. The second part of the talk is dedicated to the determination of volcanic SO2 fluxes from satellite measurements. We review different techniques and investigate the temporal evolution of the total emissions of SO2 for recent volcanic events.

  3. STATUS OF SO2 SCRUBBING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents the extent of current sulfur dioxide (SO2) scrubber applications on electricity generating units in the U.S. and abroad. The technical performance of recent SO2 scrubber installations is discussed. Recently reported technical innovations to SO2 scrubbing tech...

  4. On the SO2 problem of solid fuel combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyadjiev, Chr.

    2014-09-01

    Many companies use two-phase absorbents (CaCO3 suspension) for waste gases purification from SO2. A qualitative theoretical analysis of the absorption kinetics in the cases of two-phase absorbent, using the convection-diffusion type of model, is presented. It is shown that the low CaCO3 concentration lead to very small chemical reaction rate and as a result the absorption rate is limited by the physical absorption of SO2 in water, i.e. the process efficiency is very small. An average concentration model for quantitative analysis of the absorption process and an iterative numerical algorithm for the model equations solution is proposed.

  5. Atmospheric SO2 measurements at the Brazilian Antarctic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Ericka; Paes Leme, Neusa Maria; Alvala, Plinio

    For a better comprehension of the atmospheric chemical and radiative properties, it is necessary to understand the behavior of trace gases and aerosols; some of these species are not well studied. Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is found in the troposphere, as a result of both natural and anthropogenic emissions. To study the behavior of this gas in the Antarctic continent, the data collected by the Brewer Spectrophotometer installed in the Brazilian Antarctic Station Comandante Ferraz (62o 05'S, 58o 24'W) were used. With this ground-based instrument, the total column of SO2 was measured from the beginning of springtime, to the beginning of summer, in the years from 2003 to 2009. It was possible to observe that the total columns of SO2 did not show any differences in the time of the development of the ozone hole, as comparing to other periods. The main sources of anthropogenic SO2 pollution in this region are the generation of energy, the operations with ships, and the burning of garbage, being a punctual impact. The natural generation of SO2 in this region is mainly related to the conversion of DMS (dimethyl sulfide) emitted by the ocean. In a few days, the SO2 total column exceeded the values considered normal for remote regions (¿2UD), and these high concentrations must have their sources identified and monitored.

  6. Novel process for simultaneous removal of NO(x) and SO2 from simulated flue gas by using a sustainable Ag(I)/Ag(II) redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Raju, Thasan; Chung, Sang Joon; Moon, Il Shik

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a sustainable process for simultaneous removal of waste gases such as NO, NO2, and SO2 by an electrochemically generated Ag(I)/Ag(II) redox mediator system. High removal efficiency was achieved for NO and SO2 by the wet scrubbing method at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This removal is achieved through oxidation and absorption by contacting the gaseous stream with redox mediator ions that offer specific or selective solubility for the solute gases to be recovered in a wet scrubber. The process parameters such as gas velocity, liquid velocity, Ag(I) concentration, and HNO3 concentration were investigated to explore the possibility of complete removal of waste gases. The Ag(I)/Ag(II)-based mediated electrochemical oxidation process proved to be quite effective for simultaneous removal of NO, NO(x), and SO2 from the simulated flue gas mixtures containing NO and SO2 over a wide concentration range of 100-400 ppm. Studies were carried out with individual gas components for the mixture, and the effect of input NO and input SO2 concentrations on the NO(x) and SO2 removal efficiencies at 20 degrees C was examined. Complete oxidation of NO to NO2 with 100% NO removal efficiency and 92% NO(x) removal efficiency was achieved along with 100% SO2 removal efficiency, highlighting a potentially far greater efficiency of the Ag(I)/Ag(II)-based system in functionality and selectivity. Active research work in this direction is anticipated in the near future. PMID:18939587

  7. Understanding SO2 Capture by Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2016-05-19

    Ionic liquids have generated interest for efficient SO2 absorption due to their low vapor pressure and versatility. In this work, a systematic investigation of the structure, thermodynamics, and dynamics of SO2 absorption by ionic liquids has been carried out through quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MP2 level calculations of several ion pairs complexed with SO2 reveal its preferential interaction with the anion. Results of condensed phase MD simulations of SO2-IL mixtures manifested the essential role of both cations and anions in the solvation of SO2, where the solute is surrounded by the "cage" formed by the cations (primarily its alkyl tail) through dispersion interactions. These structural effects of gas absorption are substantiated by calculated Gibbs free energy of solvation; the dissolution is demonstrated to be enthalpy driven. The entropic loss of SO2 absorption in ionic liquids with a larger anion such as [NTf2](-) has been quantified and has been attributed to the conformational restriction of the anion imposed by its interaction with SO2. SO2 loading IL decreases its shear viscosity and enhances the electrical conductivity. This systematic study provides a molecular level understanding which can aid the design of task-specific ILs as electrolytes for efficient SO2 absorption. PMID:27119562

  8. Simultaneous treatment of NO and SO2 with aqueous NaClO2 solution in a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Sooseok; Park, Dong-Wha

    2015-03-21

    NO and SO2 gases that are generally produced in thermal power plants and incinerators were simultaneously removed by using a wet scrubber combined with a plasma electrostatic precipitator. The wet scrubber was used for the absorption and oxidation of NO and SO2, and non-thermal plasma was employed for the electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles. NO and SO2 gases were absorbed and oxidized by aerosol particles of NaClO2 solution in the wet scrubber. NO and SO2 reacted with the generated NaClO2 aerosol particles, NO2 gas, and aqueous ions such as NO2(-), NO3(-), HSO3(-), and SO4(2-). The aerosol particles were negatively charged and collected on the surface of grounded anode in the plasma electrostatic precipitator. The NO and SO2 removal efficiencies of the proposed system were 94.4% and 100% for gas concentrations of 500 mg/m(3) and a total gas flow rate of 60 Nm(3)/h, when the molar flow rate of NaClO2 and the gas-liquid contact time were /min and 1.25 s, respectively. The total amount and number of aerosol particles in the exhaust gas were reduced to 7.553 μg/m(3) and 210/cm(3) at the maximum plasma input power of 68.8 W, which are similar to the values for clean air. PMID:25497024

  9. Mechanism of SO2 removal by carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of SO2 with carbon (C) in the presence of O2 and H2O involves a series of reactions that leads to the formation of sulfuric acid as the final product. The rate-determining step in the overall process is the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. Three SO2 oxidation reactions are possible. Adsorbed SO2 (C-SO2) can react either with gas phase O2 or with adsorbed oxygen (C-O complex) to form sulfur trioxide (SO3), or gas phase SO2 can react directly with the C-O complex. In optimizing the SO2 removal capabilities of carbon, most studies only assume a given mechanism for SO2 adsorption and conversion to H2SO4 to be operable. The appropriate SO2 oxidation step and role of the C-O complex in this mechanism remain to be determined. The ultimate goal of this study was to prepare activated char from Illinois coal with optimal properties for low-temperature (80-150 ??C) removal of sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. The SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of oxygen adsorbed on its surface. A temperature-programmed desorption technique was developed to titrate those sites responsible for adsorption of SO2 and conversion to H2SO4. On the basis of these results, a mechanism for SO2 removal by carbon was proposed. The derived rate expression showed SO2 adsorption to be dependent only on the fundamental rate constant and concentration of carbon atoms designated as free sites. Recent studies indicate a similar relationship exists between the rate of carbon gasification (in CO2 or H2O) and the number of reactive sites as determined by transient kinetics experiments. Utilizing the concept of active or free sites, it was possible to produce a char from Illinois coal having an SO2 adsorption capacity surpassing that of a commercial catalytic activated carbon.

  10. New developments to improve SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Kern, C.; Klein, A.; Kuhn, J.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2012-12-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote sensing instrument that measures the two-dimensional distribution of SO2 (column densities) in volcanic plumes using scattered solar radiation as a light source. From these data SO2-fluxes can be derived. The high time resolution of the order of 1 Hz allows correlating SO2 flux measurements with other traditional volcanological measurement techniques, i.e., seismology. In the last years the application of SO2 cameras has increased, however, there is still potential to improve the instrumentation. First of all, the influence of aerosols and ash in the volcanic plume can lead to large errors in the calculated SO2 flux, if not accounted for. We present two different concepts to deal with the influence of ash and aerosols. The first approach uses a co-axial DOAS system that was added to a two filter SO2 camera. The camera used Filter A (peak transmission centred around 315 nm) to measures the optical density of SO2 and Filter B (centred around 330 nm) to correct for the influence of ash and aerosol. The DOAS system simultaneously performs spectroscopic measurements in a small area of the camera's field of view and gives additional information to correct for these effects. Comparing the optical densities for the two filters with the SO2 column density from the DOAS allows not only a much more precise calibration, but also to draw conclusions about the influence from ash and aerosol scattering. Measurement examples from Popocatépetl, Mexico in 2011 are shown and interpreted. Another approach combines the SO2 camera measurement principle with the extremely narrow and periodic transmission of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The narrow transmission window allows to select individual SO2 absorption bands (or series of bands) as a substitute for Filter A. Measurements are therefore more selective to SO2. Instead of Filter B, as in classical SO2 cameras, the correction for aerosol can be performed by shifting the transmission window of the Fabry

  11. Industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youwen; Liu, Cheng; Xie, Pinhua; Hartl, Andreas; Chan, Kalok; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Qin, Min; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-03-01

    SO2 variability over a large concentration range and interferences from other gases have been major limitations in industrial SO2 emission monitoring. This study demonstrates accurate industrial SO2 emission monitoring through a portable multichannel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm. The proposed analyzer features a large dynamic measurement range and correction of interferences from other coexisting infrared absorbers such as NO, CO, CO2, NO2, CH4, HC, N2O, and H2O. The multichannel gas analyzer measures 11 different wavelength channels simultaneously to correct several major problems of an infrared gas analyzer including system drift, conflict of sensitivity, interferences among different infrared absorbers, and limitation of measurement range. The optimized algorithm uses a third polynomial instead of a constant factor to quantify gas-to-gas interference. Measurement results show good performance in the linear and nonlinear ranges, thereby solving the problem that the conventional interference correction is restricted by the linearity of the intended and interfering channels. The results imply that the measurement range of the developed multichannel analyzer can be extended to the nonlinear absorption region. The measurement range and accuracy are evaluated through experimental laboratory calibration. Excellent agreement was achieved, with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.99977 with a measurement range from approximately 5 to 10 000 ppmv and a measurement error of less than 2 %. The instrument was also deployed for field measurement. Emissions from three different factories were measured. The emissions of these factories have been characterized by different coexisting infrared absorbers, covering a wide range of concentration levels. We compared our measurements with commercial SO2 analyzers. Overall, good agreement was achieved.

  12. Interspecific Variation in SO2 Flux 1

    PubMed Central

    Olszyk, David M.; Tingey, David T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO2 air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO2 and H2O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea), Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. flacca (mutant of tomato), Geranium carolinianum L. (wild geranium), and Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps. (a native California shrub). Fluxes were measured using the mass-balance approach during exposure to 4.56 micromoles per cubic meter (0.11 microliters per liter) SO2 for 2 hours in a controlled environmental chamber. Flux through adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces with closed stomata ranged from 1.9 to 9.4 nanomoles per square meter per second for SO2, and 0.3 to 1.3 millimoles per square meter per second for H2O vapor. Flux of SO2 into leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 8.5 (dark) and 3.8 to 16.0 (light) millimoles per square meter per second. Flux of H2O vapor from leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 0.6 (dark) to 0.4 to 0.9 (light) millimole per square meter per second. Lycopersicon had internal flux rates for both SO2 and H2O vapor over twice as high as for the other species. Stomatal conductance based on H2O vapor flux averaged from 0.07 to 0.13 mole per square meter per second among the four species. Internal conductance of SO2 as calculated from SO2 flux was from 0.04 mole per square meter per second lower to 0.06 mole per square meter per second higher than stomatal conductance. For Pisum, Geranium, and Diplacus stomatal conductance was the same or slightly higher than internal conductance, indicating that, in general, SO2 flux could be predicted from stomatal conductance for H2O vapor. However, for the Lycopersicon mutant, internal leaf conductance was much higher than stomatal conductance, indicating that factors inside leaves can play a significant role in determining SO2 flux. PMID:16664551

  13. SO2 SCRUBBING TECHNOLOGIES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electricity generating units may use sulfur dioxide (SO2) scrubbers to meet the requirements of Phase II of the Acid Rain S02 Reduction Program. Additionally, the use of scrubbers can result in reduction of mercury emissions. It is timely, therefore, to review the commercially av...

  14. ADVANCED CONCEPTS: SO2 REMOVAL PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of a potassium scrubbing system that recovers useful forms of sulfur from pollutants while using a low-energy process to regenerate the absorbing medium. The report also describes two versions of a new, regenerable process for SO2 scrubbing tha...

  15. SO2 EMISSIONS AND TIME SERIES MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a time series model that permits the estimation of the statistical properties of pounds of SO2 per million Btu in stack emissions. It uses measured values for this quantity provided by coal sampling and analysis (CSA), by a continuous emissions monitor (CEM), ...

  16. Emissions of SO2 and NOx from biofuels in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadi, Ranu; Kulshrestha, U. C.; Sarkar, A. K.; Garg, S. C.; Parashar, D. C.

    2003-07-01

    Concentrations of oxides of S and N in the atmosphere are strongly influenced by the emissions taking place from the burning of biofuels. This is particularly important in the developing countries where most of the energy requirement in the rural sector is met from biofuels. An experimental setup has been built to carry out controlled biomass burning and to derive emission factors for SO2 and NOx (NO and NO2) from various biofuels commonly used in India. Using these emission factors and the consumption data obtained from Tata Energy Research Institute's (TERI) Energy Data Directory and Yearbook 1998-99, the budget of SO2 and NOx from biofuels used in India has been estimated as 0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4 Tg, respectively, for the year 1990.

  17. SO2 and SO in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloteau, S.; Lucas, R.; Omont, A.; Nguyen-Q-Rieu

    1986-09-01

    After its first detection in circumstellar envelopes (Lucas et al. 1986) SO2 has been systematically searched for with the IRAM 30-m telescope. It has been found in 3 new stars, with very strong lines in OH 231.8+4.2 (TA* ≈ 0.7 - 1.4K, Trot ≈ 25K, Δv ≈ 80 km s-1, TA*(SO2) > TA*(CO) ) and relatively strong ones in OH 26.5+0.6. SO has been detected for the first time in a circumstellar shell, in OH 231.8+4.2. H13CN has been observed in the same star, suggesting a very large abundance of 13C.

  18. Water independent SO2 oxidation by Stabilised Criegee Intermediates from Biogenic Alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, Mike; Rickard, Andrew; Vereecken, Luc; Evans, Mat; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic VOCs account for about 90% of global VOC emissions and these are dominated by the unsaturated hydrocarbons: isoprene (600 Tg yr-1) and monoterpenes (100 Tg yr-1). Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) are thought to be formed in the atmosphere mainly from reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone. SCI have been shown in laboratory experiments to rapidly oxidise SO2 (k > 2x10-11 cm3 s-1) and NO2 (k = 7x10-12 cm3 s-1), providing a potentially important gas phase oxidation route for these species in the atmosphere. The importance of the SCI reaction with traces gases has been shown in modelling work to be critically dependent on the ratio of the rate constants for the reaction of the SCI with these trace gases and with H2O. Such modelling work has suggested that the SCI + SO2 reaction is only likely to be important in regions with high alkene emissions, e.g. forests, and that elsewhere SCI are likely to be almost entirely quenched by reaction with water, thus negating their importance as trace gas oxidants. However, it has been shown in laboratory experiments with small SCI that the reaction rate of SCI with water is structure dependent, with anti-CH3CHOO reacting fast with H2O (k > 1x10-14 cm3 s-1), and syn-CH3CHOO reacting orders of magnitude slower (k < 2x10-16 cm3 s-1). Here we present results from a series of ozonolysis experiments performed at the EUPHORE atmospheric simulation chamber in Valencia. These experiments measure the loss of SO2, in the presence of various biogenic alkenes (isoprene and three monoterpenes: α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene), as a function of water vapour. The SO2 loss shows a dependence on relative humidity for all systems studied, decreasing with increasing relative humidity. However, for all species, there also appears to be a fraction of the SO2 loss that shows a much lower sensitivity to relative humidity. We quantify the relative rates of reaction of the SCI produced in the ozonolysis of these biogenics with

  19. Validation of the SO2 camera for high temporal and spatial resolution monitoring of SO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, Jean-François; Burton, Michael R.; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-07-01

    Ground-based measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) are a key part of monitoring networks at many volcanic centers. SO2 camera systems represent an attractive addition to conventional spectroscopic methods such as COSPEC or DOAS, because they offer higher sampling rates (up to 1 Hz) and two-dimensional concentration mapping which provides additional contextual information for emission rate calculation and interpretation. Here we present the results of an SO2 camera development project and corresponding validation experiment conducted at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona (USA), where the emissions are independently measured. Emissions of SO2 and other acid gases are regulated in the United States, and hourly data are publicly reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). We measured the emissions from two exhaust stacks that had an average combined rate of 8.2 ± 2.1 × 10- 2 kg s- 1 (7 ± 1.8 t d- 1) over a period of 3 h. Masses integrated from our dataset are within 10-20% of the emissions reported by the EPA. The contextual information contained in the images allowed the identification and measurement of the individual plumes from each stack. Measured emission rates decrease with increasing distance from the source, pointing to an apparent loss of SO2 primarily by gas dilution processes, with SO2 concentrations dropping below the detection limit at the edge of the plume at distances > 200 m from the source. Cross-sections very close to the vent (within 50 m; ~ 2 vent diameters), through the optically thick condensing part of the plume, yielded emission rates lower than those reported to the EPA. This near-vent discrepancy is interpreted to be the result of light dilution effects due to attenuation and reflections off the surface of the condensing plume. This work is the first reported validation of emission rate measurements produced by an SO2 camera in a volcano-like geometry, and demonstrates that reliable emission rates can be measured, but also

  20. Adsorptions of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 on Pt-modified anatase (1 0 1) surface: Sensing mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Qinchuan; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Jinbin

    2015-10-01

    The type and severity of faults occurring in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) can be assessed by detecting SF6 decomposed gases, which is significant for fault diagnosis and online condition monitoring of GIS. Characteristic decomposition components of SF6 under partial discharge or overheating faults and first-principle density functional theory calculations are adopted to analyze the adsorption of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 on Pt-modified anatase (1 0 1) surface and to examine further the sensing mechanism of Pt-modified anatase-based gas sensor used to detect SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2. Results show that SO2F2 molecule more easily decomposes upon adsorption on the active Pt nanoparticle than SOF2 molecule. Meanwhile, SO2 molecule does not decompose. This finding explains the phenomenon in the sensing experiment of Pt-modified TiO2 nanotube array gas sensor, wherein the response of SO2F2 is higher than that of SOF2 at the optimal temperature of the sensor. Moreover, the responses of SO2F2 and SOF2 significantly change at the optimal temperature, whereas the response of SO2 is nearly unchanged.

  1. SO(2, 3) noncommutative gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M.; Radovanović, V.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper the noncommutative gravity is treated as a gauge theory of the non-commutative SO(2, 3)★ group, while the noncommutativity is canonical. The Seiberg-Witten (SW) map is used to express noncommutative fields in terms of the corresponding commutative fields. The commutative limit of the model is the Einstein-Hilbert action plus the cosmological term and the topological Gauss-Bonnet term. We calculate the second order correction to this model and obtain terms that are zeroth, first, ... and fourth power of the curvature tensor. Finally, we discuss physical consequences of those correction terms in the limit of big cosmological constant.

  2. Fabry-Perot interferometer-based remote sensing of SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jonas; Bobrowski, Nicole; Lübcke, Peter; Pöhler, Denis; Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Vogel, Leif; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    We studied SO2 degassing from volcanoes and monitored the corresponding SO2 fluxes. Besides the effect on climate and the hazardous effects at a local scale, the absolute magnitude of SO2 fluxes or ratios of SO2 with other volcanic gases can be an indicator for volcanic activity and even help to understand and model processes in the interior of volcanoes. Due to its characteristic absorption structure, high abundance in the volcanic plume and low atmospheric background, SO2 can be easily identified and quantified by remote sensing techniques. DOAS and FTIR became standard techniques for volcanic SO2 measurements. Along with the development of portable devices they offer the advantage of simultaneous measurements of multiple gas species. However, both techniques often need complex data evaluation and observations are usually limited to a single viewing direction. Spatially resolved measurements, which are for instance required to determine gas fluxes, frequently have to be obtained sequentially leading to a relatively low time resolution. A further, today nearly established method to determine SO2 emission fluxes is the "SO2 camera". The SO2 camera has the advantage of a high spatial and temporal resolution, but is very limited in spectral information using only two wavelength channels and thus being less selective. Cross-interferences with volcanic plume aerosol, the ozone background, and other trace gases frequently cause problems in SO2 camera measurements. Here we introduce a novel passive remote sensing method for SO2 measurements in the atmosphere using a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) setup. The transmission profile of this FPI consists of periodic transmission peaks that match the periodic SO2 absorption bands in the UV. In principle, this method allows imaging of two-dimensional SO2 distributions similarly to SO2 cameras. Interferences of standard SO2 cameras are greatly reduced with the FPI method. In addition, this technique can also be applied to other

  3. Improved determination of volcanic SO2 emission rates from SO2 camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Angelika; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    SO2 cameras determine the SO2 emissions of volcanoes with a high temporal and spatial resolution. They thus visualize the plume morphology and give information about turbulence and plume dispersion. Moreover, from SO2 camera image series emission rates can be determined with high time resolution (as will be explained below), these data can help to improve our understanding of variations in the degassing regime of volcanoes. The first step to obtain emission rates is to integrate the column amount of SO2 along two different plume cross sections (ideally perpendicular to the direction of plume propagation); combined with wind speed information this allows the determination of SO2 fluxes. A popular method to determine the mean wind speed relies on estimating the time lag of the SO2 signal derived for two cross sections of the plume at different distances downwind of the source. This can be done by searching the maximum cross-correlation coefficient of the two signals. Another, more sophisticated method to obtain the wind speed is to use the optical flow technique to obtain a more detailed wind field in the plume from a series of SO2 camera images. While the cross correlation method only gives the mean wind speed between the two cross sections of the plume, the optical flow technique allows to determine the wind speed and direction for each pixel individually (in other words, a two-dimensional projection of the entire wind field in the plume is obtained). While optical flow algorithms in general give a more detailed information about the wind velocities in the volcanic plume, they may fail to determine wind speeds in homogeneous regions (i.e. regions with no spatial variation in SO2 column densities) of the plume. Usually the wind speed is automatically set to zero in those regions, which leads to an underestimation of the total SO2 emission flux. This behavior was observed more than once on a data set of SO2 camera images taken at Etna, Italy in July, 2014. For those

  4. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  5. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  6. MERCURY SPECIATION IN COMBUSTION SYSTEMS: STUDIES WITH SIMULATED FLUE GASES AND MODEL FLY ASHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a bench-scale study of the effects of flue gas and fly ash parameters on the oxidation of elemental mercury in simulated flue gases containing hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and water vapor (H2O...

  7. High frequency SO2 flux measurements at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, using the SO2 camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Harijoko, A.; Wibowo, H.; Sawyer, G.

    2013-12-01

    SO2 monitoring is a common technique at many volcanic centers. Recently, automated networks of scanning spectrometers have led to great improvement in frequency and accuracy of measurements. Simultaneously a new instrument has been proposed to acquire 2D images of volcanic plumes in the UV spectrum. This imaging technique (hereafter referred to as the SO2 camera) provides additional contextual information, as well as a quantitative way of determining plume velocity from a single remote location, without relying on weather reports. These advantages are to be balanced against a loss of spectroscopic information associated with using band-pass filters that reduce precision in the measurements. We have developed a custom-built acquisition and processing software to be used with the SO2 camera developed by INGV-Pisa for monitoring of Etna and Stromboli, which consists of two Quantum Scientific Imaging CCD cameras equipped with UV filters and a USB2000+ spectrometer. We have tested the instrument at two power plants in Arizona, USA. We were able to successfully measure SO2 fluxes as low as 1-2 tons/day. We also validated our method by comparing the SO2 camera measurements against high-frequency in-situ measurements (1 data point every minute) obtained from chemical sensors within the stacks. We have also used the SO2 camera during a field campaign at Semeru volcano, Indonesia, in May and June of 2013. Semeru is a persistently active explosive volcano, whose latest eruption began in 1967. Its eruptive behavior can be characterized by cyclic dome growth and collapse in the active crater and frequent small magnitude explosions occurring at periods of minutes to hours. We found that the majority of SO2 at Semeru is released during the explosive phases (instantaneous peaks of up to 40 kg/s), with passive emission levels between explosions fluctuating from 0-5 kg/s. After the initial explosive release, emission returns to background levels following an exponential decline over

  8. SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO with methane

    SciTech Connect

    She, Xiaoyan; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Wang, Chong M.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-04-29

    We report on a stabilization effect on the structure and activity of Ag/Al2O3 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with CH4 imparted by the presence of SO2 in the exhaust gasmixture. The reaction is carried out at temperature above 600 8C to keep the surface partially free of sulfates. In SO2-free gases, catalyst deactivation is fast and measurable at these temperatures. Time-resolved TEM analyses of used samples have determined that deactivation is due to sintering of silver from well-dispersed clusters to nanoparticles to micrometer-size particles with time-on-stream at 625 8C. However, sintering of silver was dramatically suppressed by the presence of SO2 in the reaction gas mixture. The structural stabilization by SO2 was accompanied by stable catalyst activity for the NO reduction to N2. The direct oxidation of methane was suppressed, thus the methane selectivity was improved in SO2-laden gas mixtures. In tests with high-content silver alumina with some of the silver present in metallic form, an increase in the SCR activity was found in SO2-containing gas mixtures. This is attributed to redispersion of the silver particles by SO2, an unexpected finding. The catalyst performance was reversible over many cycles of operation at 625 8C with the SO2 switched on and off in the gas mixture.

  9. Monitoring of volcanic SO2 emissions using the GOME-2 instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, Pascal; Valks, Pieter; Loyola, Diego

    2014-05-01

    This contribution focusses on the GOME-2 SO2 column products from the METOP-A and B satellites. The GOME-2 SO2 column product has been developed in the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF). Satellite-based remote sensing measurements of volcanic SO2 provide critical information for reducing volcanic hazards. Volcanic eruptions may bring ash and gases (e.g. SO2) high up into the atmosphere, where a long-range transport can occur. SO2 is an important indicator for volcanic activity and an excellent tracer for volcanic eruption clouds, especially if ash detection techniques fail. SO2 can affect aviation safety: In the cabin it can cause disease and respiratory symptoms, whereas in its hydrogenated form H2SO4 it is highly corrosive and can cause damage to jet engines as well as pitting of windscreens. We will present results for volcanic events retrieved from GOME-2 solar backscattered measurements in the UV wavelength region around 320nm using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. SO2 columns are generated operationally by DLR with the GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.7 and are available in near-real-time, i.e. within two hours after sensing. Using data from both MetOp satellites allows for a daily global coverage. We will furthermore present current improvements to the GOME-2 SO2 column product.

  10. Imaging of SO2 emissions from anthropogenic sources as part of AROMAT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenot, H. H.; Merlaud, A.; Meier, A.; Ruhtz, T.; Van Roozendael, M.; Stebel, K.; Constantin, D.; Belegante, L.; Dekemper, E.; Theys, N.; Campion, R.; Schuettemeyer, D.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents field campaign measurements of SO2 emissions from pollution source in Romania. Three types of instruments (SO2 camera, whisk and push broom imager) proceeded ground-based and airborne data acquisition as part of the AROMAT ESA project (monitoring of SO2 plume from a large thermoelectric plant). The SO2 camera used is an imaging system composed of two UV cameras (synchronised in space and time) allowing fast acquisitions of intensity. Each camera is equipped with the same lens and a specific narrow band-pass filter (one at the wavelength at which SO2 absorbs and one at an off-band wavelength). The combination of two UV cameras provides a 2D image of the integrated content of SO2. The Small Whisk broom Imager for trace gases monitoriNG (SWING) used in this study and developed at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA), is based on a compact ultra-violet visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror. The Airborne imaging instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) constructed at the Institute of Environmental Physics of the University of Bremen (IUP), performed SO2 measurements in the UV-visible spectral range. Both whisk and push broom scanner use the DOAS technique, that is based on the relationship between the quantity of light absorbed and the number of SO2 molecules in the light path. SWING and AirMAP instruments provide scans of SO2 column density. Quantification of 2D field contents and fluxes of anthropogenic SO2 emissions from Turceni power station (Romania) are shown. Preparatory results from data acquisition in the harbour of Antwerp (monitoring of SO2 emissions from refinery and chemical industry) are also presented.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Analyses of CH4 and SO2 over Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Irfan; Imran Shahzad, Muhammad; Farooq Iqbal, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    SO2 and associated compounds are one of main atmospheric pollutant. Moreover, methane - a potent greenhouse gas can also deteriorate the air quality of the region under certain chemical and meteorological conditions. Role of such gases in regional air quality of Pakistan have not been significantly studied. This study involves the analyses of CH4 and SO2 in terms of spatio-temporal distribution over Pakistan from the period 2004 - 2014 using space borne sensors namely Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Advanced Infrared Sounder Instrument (AIRS) respectively. Results show an increase in SO2 concentration attributed to trans-boundary sources. Monthly Methane total column results show an increase in atmospheric concentration of methane for the period 2004-2014. Results of the study are complimented by calculating the back trajectories to identify the transport paths. The study significantly describes the regional description and convection phenomenon for SO2 and CH4.

  12. Mt. Pinatubo SO2 Column Measurements From Mauna Loa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; David, S. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption features of the nu(sub 1) band of SO2 have been identified in high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, on July 9 and 12, 1991, shortly after the arrival of the first eruption plume from the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Phillipines. A total SO2 vertical column amount of (5.1 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 16) molecules/sq cm on July 9 has been retrieved based on nonlinear least- squares spectral fittings of 9 selected SO2 absorption features with an updated set of SO2 spectral parameters. A SO2 total column upper limit of 0.9 x 10(esp 16) molecules/sq cm deduced from measurements on September 20-24, 1991, is consistent with the dispersion of the SO2 cloud and the rapid conversion of the SO2 vapor into volcanic aerosol particles.

  13. 40 CFR 96.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR... October 31 of the control period after the control period in which a CAIR SO2 opt-in unit enters the CAIR SO2 Trading Program under § 96.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting...

  14. 40 CFR 96.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR... October 31 of the control period after the control period in which a CAIR SO2 opt-in unit enters the CAIR SO2 Trading Program under § 96.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting...

  15. 40 CFR 96.288 - CAIR SO 2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO 2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR SO 2 allowance allocations to...) By no later than October 31 of the control period after the control period in which a CAIR SO2 opt-in unit enters the CAIR SO2 Trading Program under § 96.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter,...

  16. 40 CFR 96.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR... October 31 of the control period after the control period in which a CAIR SO2 opt-in unit enters the CAIR SO2 Trading Program under § 96.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting...

  17. Statistical persistence of air pollutants (O3,SO2,NO2 and PM10) in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraz, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Femat, R.; Echeverria, J. C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2015-06-01

    The rescaled range (R / S) analysis was used for analyzing the statistical persistence of air pollutants in Mexico City. The air-pollution time series consisted of hourly observations of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and particulate matter obtained at the Mexico City downtown monitoring station during 1999-2014. The results showed that long-range persistence is not a uniform property over a wide range of time scales, from days to months. In fact, although the air pollutant concentrations exhibit an average persistent behavior, environmental (e.g., daily and yearly) and socio-economic (e.g., daily and weekly) cycles are reflected in the dependence of the persistence strength as quantified in terms of the Hurst exponent. It was also found that the Hurst exponent exhibits time variations, with the ozone and nitrate oxide concentrations presenting some regularity, such as annual cycles. The persistence dynamics of the pollutant concentrations increased during the rainy season and decreased during the dry season. The time and scale dependences of the persistence properties provide some insights in the mechanisms involved in the internal dynamics of the Mexico City atmosphere for accumulating and dissipating dangerous air pollutants. While in the short-term individual pollutants dynamics seems to be governed by specific mechanisms, in the long-term (for monthly and higher scales) meteorological and seasonal mechanisms involved in atmospheric recirculation seem to dominate the dynamics of all air pollutant concentrations.

  18. SO2 camera measurements at Lastarria volcano and Lascar volcano in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Dinger, Florian; Klein, Angelika; Kuhn, Jonas; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote-sensing technique that measures volcanic SO2 emissions via the strong SO2 absorption structures in the UV using scattered solar radiation as a light source. The 2D-imagery (usually recorded with a frame rate of up to 1 Hz) allows new insights into degassing processes of volcanoes. Besides the large advantage of high frequency sampling the spatial resolution allows to investigate SO2 emissions from individual fumaroles and not only the total SO2 emission flux of a volcano, which is often dominated by the volcanic plume. Here we present SO2 camera measurements that were made during the CCVG workshop in Chile in November 2014. Measurements were performed at Lastarria volcano, a 5700 m high stratovolcano and Lascar volcano, a 5600 m high stratovolcano both in northern Chile on 21 - 22 November, 2014 and on 26 - 27 November, 2014, respectively. At both volcanoes measurements were conducted from a distance of roughly 6-7 km under close to ideal conditions (low solar zenith angle, a very dry and cloudless atmosphere and an only slightly condensed plume). However, determination of absolute SO2 emission rates proves challenging as part of the volcanic plume hovered close to the ground. The volcanic plume therefore is in front of the mountain in our camera images. An SO2 camera system consisting of a UV sensitive CCD and two UV band-pass filters (centered at 315 nm and 330 nm) was used. The two band-pass filters are installed in a rotating wheel and images are taken with both filter sequentially. The instrument used a CCD with 1024 x 1024 pixels and an imaging area of 13.3 mm x 13.3 mm. In combination with the focal length of 32 mm this results in a field-of-view of 25° x 25°. The calibration of the instrument was performed with help of a DOAS instrument that is co-aligned with the SO2 camera. We will present images and SO2 emission rates from both volcanoes. At Lastarria gases are emitted from three different fumarole fields and we will attempt

  19. First Global Maps of Stratospheric and Tropospheric NO2 from OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucsela, Eric J.; Celarier, Edward A.; Wenig, Mark O.; Gleason, James F.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn

    2004-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) was launched successfully in July 2004, as one of four instruments on the EOS Aura satellite. OMI makes hyperspectral measurements that are used to retrieve column densities of critical trace gases, including formaldehyde, BrO, SO2 and NO2 . We present the first results from the OM1 operational NO2 algorithm and demonstrate its ability to retrieve the tropospheric and stratospheric components of NO2. The DOAS method is used to determine slant column densities, and initial air mass factors (AMFs) are used. to give initial estimates of the vertical column densities (VCDs). VCDs from up to 15 consecutive orbits are collected, and a spatial filtering technique is applied to extract the synoptic-scale features characteristic of the stratospheric, field. features to be evidence of tropospheric excess NO2 , and apply an AMF appropriate to polluted conditions, to obtain an improved retrieval of the NO2 total VCD. We describe the assumptions underlying the algorithm in detail, and show global maps of NO2 VCDs, based on the first operational data from OMI.

  20. Radiative forcing of SO2 and NOx: A case study in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. A.; Wang, X. Y.; Zeng, X. N.

    2006-03-01

    A case study was performed in Beijing in 2000 to observe concentrations Of SO2 and NO, in the atmosphere and to evaluate their radiative impact. It was found that the concentrations of these gases are usually high in the morning due to a temperature inversion in the boundary layer. The average concentrations obtained from the observations are much higher than those used in the McClatchey reference atmosphere. The radiative impacts of these gases are calculated using a line-by-line radiative transfer model. The results show that the radiative forcing at the surface due to SO2 is 0.0576 W m(-2) and that due to NOx is 0.0032 W m(-2). These figures are almost compatible with that due to CFC11.

  1. Vertical distribution of volcanic SO2 retrieved from IASI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Elisa; Grainger, Roy; Mather, Tamsin; Payle, David; Birch, Charlotte; Dudhia, Anu; Ventress, Lucy; Smith, Andy; Hayer, Caterine

    2014-05-01

    Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is an important atmospheric constituent that plays a rucial role in many atmospheric processes and its effect and lifetime are dependent on the SO2 injection altitude. In the troposphere SO2 production leads to the acidification of rainfall while in the stratosphere it oxidises to form a stratospheric H2SO4 haze that can affect climate for several years. We report applications of IASI high resolution infrared spectra to study volcanic emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2). IASI is a Fourier transform spectrometer that covers the spectral range 645 to 2760 cm-1 (3.62-15.5 um). The IASI field of view consists of four circles of 12 km inside a square of 50 x 50 km, and nominally it can achieve global coverage in 12 hours. From 2013 there were 2 IASI instruments on board both METOP A and B giving up to 4 overpasses a day. The SO2 retrieval algorithm uses measurements from 1000 to 1200 cm-1 and from 1300 to 1410 cm-1 (the 7.3 and 8.7 um SO2 bands) made by IASI on the MetOp satellite. The SO2 retrieval follows the method of Carboni et al. (2012) and retrieves SO2 amount and altitude together with a pixel by pixel comprehensive error budget analysis. It permits the quantification of SO2 amount and estimation of plume altitude, even for small eruptions in the lower troposphere (e.g. Etna lava fountains in 2011 and 2013). We present the SO2 amount described as a function of altitude, and the time evolution of SO2 burden for recent volcanic eruptions. Quantification of the total amount of SO2 over several days allows estimation of daily emission rates, and decay factors.

  2. A Balloon Sounding Technique for Measuring SO2 Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Komhyr, Walter D.; Hirokawa, Jun; Lefer, Barry; Krotkov, Nicholay; Ngan, Fong

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new technique for inexpensive measurements of SO2 profiles using a modified dual-ozonesonde instrument payload. The presence of SO2 interferes with the standard electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde measurement, resulting in -1 molecule of O3 reported for each molecule of SO2 present (provided [O3] > [SO2]). In laboratory tests, an SO2 filter made with Cr03 placed on the inlet side of the sonde removes nearly 100% of the SO2 present for concentrations up to 60 ppbv and remained effective after exposure to 2.8 X 10(exp 16) molecules of SO2 [equivalent to a column approximately 150 DU (1 DU = 2.69 X 10(exp 20) molecules m(exp -2))]. Flying two ECC instruments on the same payload with one filtered and the other unfiltered yields SO2 profiles, inferred by subtraction. Laboratory tests and field experience suggest an SO2 detection limit of approximately 3 pbb with profiles valid from the surface to the ozonopause [i.e., approximately (8-10 km)]. Two example profiles demonstrate the success of this technique for both volcanic and industrial plumes.

  3. Regional climatic effects of atmospheric SO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postawko, S. E.; Fanale, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions under which the valley networks on Mars may have formed remains controversial. The magnitude of an atmospheric greenhouse effect by an early massive CO2 atmosphere has recently been questioned by Kasting. Recent calculations indicate that if solar luminosity were less than about 86 percent of its current value, formation of CO2 clouds in the Martian atmosphere would depress the atmospheric lapse rate and reduce the magnitude of surface warming. In light of recent revisions of magma generation on Mars during each Martian epoch, and the suggestions by Wanke et al. that the role of liquid SO2 should be more carefully explored, we have recalculated the potential greenhouse warming by atmospheric SO2 on Mars, with an emphasis on more localized effects. In the vicinity of an active eruption, the concentration of atmospheric SO2 will be higher than if it is assumed that the erupted SO2 is instantaneously globally distributed. The local steady-state concentration of SO2 is a function of the rate at which it is released, its atmospheric lifetime, and the rate at which local winds act to disperse the SO2. We have made estimates of eruption rates, length of eruption, and dispersion rates of volcanically released SO2, for a variety of atmospheric conditions and atmospheric lifetimes of SO2 to explore the maximum regional climatic effect of SO2.

  4. Effect of SO2 and Photolysis on Photooxidized Diesel Fuel Secondary Organic Aerosol Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, A. C.; Blair, S. L.; Lin, P.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Nizkorodov, S.

    2014-12-01

    Diesel fuel (DSL) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. DSL is often co-emitted with SO2 and NO2, thus it is important to understand the possible effects of SO2 on DSL SOA composition. Additionally, DSL SOA composition can be affected by photochemical aging processes such as photolysis. In this study, DSL SOA was first prepared under dry, high-NOx conditions with various concentrations of SO2 by photooxidation in a smog chamber. The SOA was then stripped of excess oxidants and gaseous organics with a denuder train and the resulting particles were photolyzed at various photolysis times in a quartz flow tube. The SOA composition, photochemical aging, properties, and mass concentration, before and after direct photolysis in the flow tube, were examined using several techniques. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) was performed on DSL SOA samples to investigate the effect of SO2 on molecular level composition. SOA composition as a function of photolysis time was measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). HR-MS results show that organosulfates are produced in DSL SOA. Both AMS and HR-MS results show that photolysis also has an effect on composition; though, this is more apparent in the HR-MS results than in the AMS results. In summary, both the presence of SO2 and solar radiation has an effect on DSL SOA composition.

  5. ACCURACY OF REMOTELY SENSED SO2 MASS EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing data of single-stack power plant emissions and local wind speed have been analyzed to determined SO2 mass flux for comparison with EPA referenced methods. Four days of SO2 data were gathered from a moving platform by three upward-viewing remote sensors -- two ultra...

  6. 40 CFR 74.22 - Actual SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....6 for natural gas For other fuels, the combustion source must specify the SO2 emissions factor. (c... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.22 Actual SO2 emissions rate. (a) Data requirements. The designated representative of a combustion source shall submit...

  7. JAPANESE ACTIVITIES IN SO2 AND NOX CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reviews Japanese activities in SO2 and NOx control. From 1970 to 1985, energy use in Japan increased by 25%, and annual coal consumption rose from virtually nothing to 20 million tons, yet emissions of SO2 declined by 75% and NOx by 40%. While increases in hydroelectric...

  8. AN ADVANCED FLUE GAS MONITOR FOR SO2 - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an instrument for continuously monitoring SO2 levels in flue gas is proposed. The SO2 will be detected by means of an electrochemical sensor cell, which operates in a three-electrode potentiostatic mode. The proposed innovation is develop-ment of an advan...

  9. SO2 ABATEMENT FOR COAL-FIRED BOILERS IN JAPAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a compilation of information on the current status of SO2 abatement technologies for coal-fired boilers in Japan, where strict ambient air quality standards for SO2 and NOx mandate the use of various air pollution control technologies. It focuses on flue gas desulfu...

  10. STATUS OF DRY SO2 CONTROL SYSTEMS: FALL 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, on the status of dry SO2 control for utility and industrial boilers in the U.S., reviews curent and recently completed research, development, and commercial activities. Dry SO2 control systems covered include: (1) spray dryers with a fabric filter or an electrostatic ...

  11. LOW NOX COMBUSTION SYSTEMS WITH SO2 CONTROL USING LIMESTONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes EPA work on low NOx combustion systems with SO2 control using limestone. Although SO2 control in low NOx systems for both stoker and pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is under investigation at EPA, most of the current work is with pulverized coal. EPA's Limestone...

  12. Estimating SO2 emissions from a large point source using 10 year OMI SO2 observations: Afsin Elbistan Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak Tezel, Burcak; Firatli, Ertug

    2016-04-01

    SO2 pollution has still been a problem for parts of Turkey, especially regions with large scale coal power plants. In this study, 10 year Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) SO2 observations are used for estimating SO2 emissions from large point sources in Turkey. We aim to estimate SO2 emissions from coal power plants where no online monitoring is available and improve the emissions given in current emission inventories with these top-down estimates. High-resolution yearly averaged maps are created on a domain over large point sources by oversampling SO2 columns for each grid for the years 2005-2014. This method reduced the noise and resulted in a better signal from large point sources and it was used for coal power plants in U.S and India, previously. The SO2 signal over selected power plants are observed with this method, and the spatiotemporal changes of SO2 signal are analyzed. With the assumption that OMI SO2 observations are correlating with emissions, long-term OMI SO2 observation averages can be used to estimate emission levels of significant point sources. Two-dimensional Gaussian function is used for explaining the relationships between OMI SO2 observations and emissions. Afsin Elbistan Power Plant, which is the largest capacity coal power plant in Turkey, is investigated in detail as a case study. The satellite scans within 50 km of the power plant are selected and averaged over a 2 x 2 km2 gridded domain by smoothing method for 2005-2014. The yearly averages of OMI SO2 are calculated to investigate the magnitude and the impact area of the SO2 emissions of the power plant. A significant increase in OMI SO2 observations over Afsin Elbistan from 2005 to 2009 was observed (over 2 times) possibly due to the capacity increase from 1715 to 2795 MW in 2006. Comparison between the yearly gross electricity production of the plant and OMI SO2 observations indicated consistency until 2009, but OMI SO2 observations indicated a rapid increase while gross electricity

  13. Multi-decadal satellite measurements of passive and eruptive volcanic SO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, Simon; Yang, Kai; Krotkov, Nickolay; Prata, Fred; Telling, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Periodic injections of sulfur gas species (SO2, H2S) into the stratosphere by volcanic eruptions are among the most important, and yet unpredictable, drivers of natural climate variability. However, passive (lower tropospheric) volcanic degassing is the major component of total volcanic emissions to the atmosphere on a time-averaged basis, but is poorly constrained, impacting estimates of global emissions of other volcanic gases (e.g., CO2). Stratospheric volcanic emissions are very well quantified by satellite remote sensing techniques, and we report ongoing efforts to catalog all significant volcanic SO2 emissions into the stratosphere and troposphere since 1978 using measurements from the ultraviolet (UV) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS; 1978-2005), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI; 2004 - present) and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS; 2012 - present) instruments, supplemented by infrared (IR) data from HIRS, MODIS and AIRS. The database, intended for use as a volcanic forcing dataset in climate models, currently includes over 600 eruptions releasing a total of ~100 Tg SO2, with a mean eruption discharge of ~0.2 Tg SO2. Sensitivity to SO2 emissions from smaller eruptions greatly increased following the launch of OMI in 2004, but uncertainties remain on the volcanic flux of other sulfur species other than SO2 (H2S, OCS) due to difficulty of measurement. Although the post-Pinatubo 1991 era is often classified as volcanically quiescent, many smaller eruptions (Volcanic Explosivity Index [VEI] 3-4) since 2000 have injected significant amounts of SO2 into the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS), peaking in 2008-2011. We also show how even smaller (VEI 2) tropical eruptions can impact the UTLS and sustain above-background stratospheric aerosol optical depth, thus playing a role in climate forcing on short timescales. To better quantify tropospheric volcanic degassing, we use ~10 years of operational SO2 measurements by OMI to identify the

  14. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2013-11-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulphur ratios, a~possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given and the influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia encompassing almost four years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This dataset shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  15. BrO/SO2 molar ratios from scanning DOAS measurements in the NOVAC network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Garzón, G.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2014-06-01

    The molar ratio of BrO to SO2 is, like other halogen/sulfur ratios, a possible precursor for dynamic changes in the shallow part of a volcanic system. While the predictive significance of the BrO/SO2 ratio has not been well constrained yet, it has the major advantage that this ratio can be readily measured using the remote-sensing technique differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in the UV. While BrO/SO2 ratios have been measured during several short-term field campaigns, this article presents an algorithm that can be used to obtain long-term time series of BrO/SO2 ratios from the scanning DOAS instruments of the Network for Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change (NOVAC) or comparable networks. Parameters of the DOAS retrieval of both trace gases are given. The influence of co-adding spectra on the retrieval error and influences of radiative transfer will be investigated. Difficulties in the evaluation of spectroscopic data from monitoring instruments in volcanic environments and possible solutions are discussed. The new algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating data from the NOVAC scanning DOAS systems at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, encompassing almost 4 years of measurements between November 2009 and end of June 2013. This data set shows variations of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to the eruption on 30 June 2012.

  16. SO 2 sorption characteristics of air sampling filter media using a new laboratory test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart; Osak, Igor; Gelman, Charles

    A significant factor in the selection of filter media used for air sampling is the formation of artifacts due to the sorption of sulfur and nitrogen oxides on the filter. These artifacts can erroneously increase measured particulate concentrations. A technique is developed to measure the uptake of SO 2 and other gases and vapors on air sampling filter media. The static chamber technique features in-chamber measurements of SO 2 concentrations using FTIR spectrometry. The filter uptake, partition coefficient, and diffusion coefficient are estimated from the loss of gaseous SO 2 in the chamber. The technique provides rapid and precise results over a wide range of filter characteristics and avoids problems related to the extraction of target analytes from the filter. A total of 12 types of filters are evaluated, including glass fiber, Teflon-coated glass fiber, nylon, quartz fiber, Teflon, Supor, Nylasorb, and acrylic copolymer membranes. Results indicate that Teflon, quartz and acrylic copolymer filters have minimal sorption of SO 2 while quartz fiber, Supor and Nylasorb filters have high to moderate uptake of SO 2.

  17. Partial discharge early-warning through ultraviolet spectroscopic detection of SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Xianpei; Dai, Dangdang; Dong, Zhengcheng; Huang, Yunguang

    2014-03-01

    Surveillance of SF6 decomposition products is significant for detection of partial discharge (PD) in gas insulation switchgear (GIS). As a basis in on-site detection and diagnosis, PD early-warning aims to quickly find the abnormalities using a simple and cheap device. In this paper, SO2 is chosen as a feature product and detected through ultraviolet spectroscopy. The derivative method is employed for baseline correction and spectral enhancement. The standard gases of the main decomposition products are qualitatively and quantitatively detected. Then decomposition experiments with different defects are designed to further verify the feasibility. As a stable decomposition product under PD, SO2 is proved to be applicable for PD early-warning in the field. By selecting the appropriate wavelength range, namely 290-310 nm, ultraviolet derivative spectroscopy is sensitive enough to the trace SO2 in the decomposed gas and the interference of other products can be avoided. Fast Fourier transform could be used for feature extraction in qualitative detection. Concentrations of SO2 and other by-products increase with increasing discharge time and could be affected by the discharge energy and PD type. Ultraviolet detection based on SO2 is effective for PD early-warning but the threshold should still be carefully selected in practice.

  18. Measurements of SO2 in the Mount St. Helens debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. B.; Evans, F. J.; Mateer, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    Routine measurements of ozone and SO2 are made with the Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers at the Atmospheric Environment Service in Downsview Ontario. On May 20 and 21, 1980, large values of column SO2 were observed with both spectrophotometers at the time of passage of the Mount St. Helens debris. Enhanced SO2 values were first observed at 1800Z on May 20. The maximum column amount of SO2 measured was 0.06 cm at 2200 Z. On May 21, SO2 values slowly decreased from 0.03 cm at 1100 Z cm to 0.01 cm at 2000Z. Typical SO2 amounts due to pollution at the Downsview site are approximately 0.003 to 0.005 cm. At the same time of maximum SO2 enhancement, both Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers measured a 0.040 cm decrease of total ozone. It is not clear whether the decrease of total ozone was caused by the volcanic cloud or natural ozone variability. Air mass trajectories indicate that the altitude of the debris cloud, which passed over Downsview at the time, was between 10 km and 12 km.

  19. Surface Hydrophobicity Causes SO2 Tolerance in Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The superhydrophobicity of the thallus surface in one of the most SO2-tolerant lichen species, Lecanora conizaeoides, suggests that surface hydrophobicity could be a general feature of lichen symbioses controlling their tolerance to SO2. The study described here tests this hypothesis. Methods Water droplets of the size of a raindrop were placed on the surface of air-dry thalli in 50 lichen species of known SO2 tolerance and contact angles were measured to quantify hydrophobicity. Key Results The wettability of lichen thalli ranges from strongly hydrophobic to strongly hydrophilic. SO2 tolerance of the studied lichen species increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the thallus surface. Extraction of extracellular lichen secondary metabolites with acetone reduced, but did not abolish the hydrophobicity of lichen thalli. Conclusions Surface hydrophobicity is the main factor controlling SO2 tolerance in lichens. It presumably originally evolved as an adaptation to wet habitats preventing the depression of net photosynthesis due to supersaturation of the thallus with water. Hydrophilicity of lichen thalli is an adaptation to dry or humid, but not directly rain-exposed habitats. The crucial role of surface hydrophobicity in SO2 also explains why many markedly SO2-tolerant species are additionally tolerant to other (chemically unrelated) toxic substances including heavy metals. PMID:18077467

  20. Distillation and detection of SO2 using a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Lee, Chia-Lun

    2012-02-01

    A miniaturized distillation system is presented for separating sulfurous acid (H(2)SO(3)) into sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and water (H(2)O). The major components of the proposed system include a microfluidic distillation chip, a power control module, and a carrier gas pressure control module. The microfluidic chip is patterned using a commercial CO(2) laser and comprises a serpentine channel, a heating zone, a buffer zone, a cooling zone, and a collection tank. In the proposed device, the H(2)SO(3) solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and is separated into SO(2) and H(2)O via an appropriate control of the distillation time and temperature. The gaseous SO(2) is then transported into the collection chamber by the carrier gas and is mixed with DI water. Finally, the SO(2) concentration is deduced from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show that a correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.9981 and a distillation efficiency as high as 94.6% are obtained for H(2)SO(3) solutions with SO(2) concentrations in the range of 100-500 ppm. The SO(2) concentrations of two commercial red wines are successfully detected using the developed device. Overall, the results presented in this study show that the proposed system provides a compact and reliable tool for SO(2) concentration measurement purposes. PMID:22159042

  1. Sulfate Formation Enhanced by a Cocktail of High NOx, SO2, Particulate Matter, and Droplet pH during Haze-Fog Events in Megacities in China: An Observation-Based Modeling Investigation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jian; Yuan, Zibing; Griffith, Stephen M; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K H; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-07-19

    In recent years in a few Chinese megacities, fog events lasting one to a few days have been frequently associated with high levels of aerosol loading characterized by high sulfate (as high as 30 μg m(-3)), therefore termed as haze-fog events. The concomitant pollution characteristics include high gas-phase mixing ratios of SO2 (up to 71 ppbv) and NO2 (up to 69 ppbv), high aqueous phase pH (5-6), and smaller fog droplets (as low as 2 μm), resulting from intense emissions from fossil fuel combustion and construction activities supplying abundant Ca(2+). In this work, we use an observation-based model for secondary inorganic aerosols (OBM-SIA) to simulate sulfate formation pathways under conditions of haze-fog events encountered in Chinese megacities. The OBM analysis has identified, at a typical haze-fogwater pH of 5.6, the most important pathway to be oxidation of S(IV) by dissolved NO2, followed by the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on the aerosol surface. The aqueous phase oxidation of S(IV) by H2O2 is a very minor formation pathway as a result of the high NOx conditions suppressing H2O2 formation. The model results indicate that the unique cocktail of high fogwater pH, high concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM, and small fog droplets are capable of greatly enhancing sulfate formation. Such haze-fog conditions could lead to rapid sulfate production at night and subsequently high PM2.5 in the morning when the fog evaporates. Sulfate formation is simulated to be highly sensitive to fogwater pH, PM, and precursor gases NO2 and SO2. Such insights on major contributing factors imply that reduction of road dust and NOx emissions could lessen PM2.5 loadings in Chinese megacities during fog events. PMID:27331615

  2. Influence of O2 and H2O on carbothermal reduction of SO2 by oil-sand fluid coke.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Jia, Charles Q

    2005-12-15

    To develop a new process for removing high-concentration SO2 from industrial flue gases, the carbothermal reduction of SO2 by oil-sand fluid coke at 700 degrees C was investigated by varying the inlet concentration of either O2 or H2O. Concentrations of O2 and H2O ranged from 0 to 20% and from 0 to 30%, respectively, in a stream of SO2 (18%) with the balance helium. Addition of O2 and H2O was found to enhance SO2 reduction. The enhancement was attributed to the reducing gases, CO and H2, produced by solid-gas reactions between carbon and O2 or H2O. The effects of O2 and H2O on sulfur yield, however, were bifacial: adding O2 and/or H2O increased the sulfur yield when SO2 conversion was incomplete, otherwise, it decreased the sulfur yield through the formation of sulfides such as H2S. The results of a thermodynamic analysis were in a good agreementwith the experimental results, suggesting that gas-solid reactions were slow enough to allow gas-phase equilibrium. This study indicates that carbon, such as oil-sand fluid coke, can be utilized to remove SO2 in flue gases containing O2/H2O and to convert it to elemental sulfur. PMID:16475356

  3. Supported polytertiary amines: highly efficient and selective SO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tailor, Ritesh; Abboud, Mohamed; Sayari, Abdelhamid

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary amine containing poly(propyleneimine) second (G2) and third (G3) generation dendrimers as well as polyethyleneimine (PEI) were developed for the selective removal of SO2. N-Alkylation of primary and secondary amines into tertiary amines was confirmed by FTIR and NMR analysis. Such modified polyamines were impregnated on two nanoporous supports, namely, SBA-15PL silica with platelet morphology and ethanol-extracted pore-expanded MCM-41 (PME) composite. In the presence of 0.1% SO2/N2 at 23 °C, the uptake of modified PEI, G2, and G3 supported on SBA-15PL was 2.07, 2.35, and 1.71 mmol/g, respectively; corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.22, 0.4, and 0.3. Under the same conditions, the SO2 adsorption capacity of PME-supported modified PEI and G3 was significantly higher, reaching 4.68 and 4.34 mmol/g, corresponding to SO2/N ratios of 0.41 and 0.82, respectively. The working SO2 adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature, reflecting the exothermic nature of the process. The adsorption capacity of these materials was enhanced dramatically in the presence of humidity in the gas mixture. FTIR data before SO2 adsorption and after adsorption and regeneration did not indicate any change in the materials. Nonetheless, the SO2 working capacity decreased in consecutive adsorption/regeneration cycles due to evaporation of impregnated polyamines, rather than actual deactivation. FTIR and (13)C and (15)N CP-MAS NMR of fresh and SO2 adsorbed modified G3 on PME confirmed the formation of a complexation adduct. PMID:24437448

  4. Formation of HNO 2 on aerosol surfaces during foggy periods in the presence of NO and NO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notholt, J.; Hjorth, J.; Raes, F.

    A commercial Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS), measuring trace gases absorbing in the u.v./vis region was used for obtaining information on aerosol parameters (e.g. total surface) based on the observed Mie scattering. This procedure allows simultaneous measurements of trace gas concentrations and aerosol parameters within the same air volume. A series of measurements of HNO 2, NO 2, NO, SO 2 and aerosol parameters was performed at Ispra in northern Italy. The observations show a rapid formation of gaseous HNO 2 during foggy episodes and give direct evidence of an important contribution of reactions on wet aerosols to the transformation of tropospheric NO x into HNO 2.

  5. Use of sulfate reducing cell suspension bioreactors for the treatment of SO2 rich flue gases.

    PubMed

    Lens, P N L; Gastesi, R; Lettinga, G

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes a novel bioscrubber concept for biological flue gas desulfurization, based on the recycling of a cell suspension of sulfite/sulfate reducing bacteria between a scrubber and a sulfite/sulfate reducing hydrogen fed bioreactor. Hydrogen metabolism in sulfite/sulfate reducing cell suspensions was investigated using batch activity tests and by operating a completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The maximum specific hydrogenotrophic sulfite/sulfate reduction rate increased with 10% and 300%, respectively, by crushing granular inoculum sludge and by cultivation of this sludge as cell suspension in a CSTR. Operation of a sulfite fed CSTR (hydraulic retention time 4 days; pH 7.0; sulfite loading rate 0.5-1.5 g SO3(2-) l(-1) d(-1)) with hydrogen as electron donor showed that high (up to 1.6 g l(-1)) H2S concentrations can be obtained within 10 days of operation. H2S inhibition, however, limited the sulfite reducing capacity of the CSTR. Methane production by the cell suspension disappeared within 20 days reactor operation. The outcompetition of methanogens in excess of H2 can be attributed to CO2 limitation and/or to sulfite or sulfide toxicity. The use of cell suspensions opens perspectives for monolith or packed bed reactor configurations, which have a much lower pressure drop compared to air lift reactors, to supply H2 to sulfite/sulfate reducing bioreactors. PMID:12889613

  6. Spatially resolved SO2 flux emissions from Mt Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aleo, R.; Bitetto, M.; Delle Donne, D.; Tamburello, G.; Battaglia, A.; Coltelli, M.; Patanè, D.; Prestifilippo, M.; Sciotto, M.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a systematic record of SO2 flux emissions from individual vents of Etna volcano (Sicily), which we obtained using a permanent UV camera network. Observations were carried out in summer 2014, a period encompassing two eruptive episodes of the New South East Crater (NSEC) and a fissure-fed eruption in the upper Valle del Bove. We demonstrate that our vent-resolved SO2 flux time series allow capturing shifts in activity from one vent to another and contribute to our understanding of Etna's shallow plumbing system structure. We find that the fissure eruption contributed ~50,000 t of SO2 or ~30% of the SO2 emitted by the volcano during the 5 July to 10 August eruptive interval. Activity from this eruptive vent gradually vanished on 10 August, marking a switch of degassing toward the NSEC. Onset of degassing at the NSEC was a precursory to explosive paroxysmal activity on 11-15 August.

  7. Li/SO2 Cell for Galileo. [process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagdon, L. J.; Marcoux, L.

    1981-01-01

    Some information on the special process controls for lithium sulfur dioxide (Li/SO2) batteries is presented with reference to how those controls affected the Galileo probe program and the instrument test vehicle program. The general considerations that go into any application for basically any type of battery system are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to some of the design tradeoffs which resulted because of the addition of the safety characteristics of the Li/SO2 system.

  8. Effect of Plasma Treatment on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for the Detection of H2S and SO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Yang, Bing; Wang, Xiaojing; Luo, Chenchen

    2012-01-01

    H2S and SO2 are important characteristic gases of partial discharge (PD) generated by latent insulated defects in gas insulated switchgear (GIS). The detection of H2S and SO2 is of great significance in the diagnosis and assessment of the operating status of GIS. In this paper, we perform experiments on the gas sensitivity of unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and those modified by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) air plasma at different times (30, 60 and 120 s) for H2S and SO2, respectively. The results show that the sensitivity and response time of modified MWNTs to H2S are both improved, whereas the opposite effects are observed for SO2. The modified MWNTs have almost zero sensitivity to SO2. Thus, the MWNTs modified by atmospheric pressure DBD air plasma present good selectivity to H2S, and have great potential in H2S detection. PMID:23012548

  9. SO2-rich equatorial basins and epeirogeny of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of Io's large scale topography with an SO2 abundance map shows that SO2 is concentrated in equatorial topographic basins. In these basins, about 30 pct. of the surface is covered by SO2 at all elevations above the mean triaxial figure, and SO2 coverage increases with decreasing elevation to as much as 56 pct. at elevations below -1.5 km. The correlation is not good from long 240 to 360 degs where bright areas are covered by red, Pele type plume fallout, and in the polar regions where the topography is poorly known. The histogram of SO2 abundance binned by elevation appears bimodal, with a secondary concentration of SO2 at high elevations, but it is not certain that this is significant. Additional observations suggest that the basins have relatively little higher frequency topographic relief. The distribution of active plumes and hotspots show no obvious correlation with the topography. However, the Pele type plume all erupted from regions higher than the mean figure, and five of the eight Prometheus type plumes are more energetic and are associated with high temperature hotspots, whereas Prometheus type plumes are long lived and require large volatile reservoirs.

  10. [Aqueous oxidation of SO2 with microbial method].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-ju; Tong, Xiao-shuang; Zhu, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Lian-xi; Jin, Yan

    2006-05-01

    The desulfurizations in dilute sulfuric acid solution, acidic ferric solution, acidic ferrous solution, microbial solution (Thiobacillus ferrooridans) and microbial culture medium solution were conducted to discuss biodesulfurization mechanism. The effect of Fe3+ concentration, Fe2+ concentration, SO2 concentration and temperature on biodesulfurization was examined on SO4(2-) concentration in the solution. Biodesulfurization has two ways: direct oxidation and indirect oxidation. In direct oxidation, Thiobacillus ferrooxridans oxidize S(IV) to S(VI). In indirect oxidation, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans can fast transform Fe2+ to Fe3+ in acidic conditions and then increase aqueous catalytic oxidation capacity of Fe3+ on SO2. It shows that indirect oxidation is the dominant way in biodesulfurization process. The desulfurization efficiency increase with concentration of Fe3+ or Fe2+ in the range of 0-1.2 g/L. Thiobacillus ferrooxidans enforce oxidation of SO2 in Fe3+ /Fe2+ system. The removal of SO2 decrease as concentration of SO2 increase, however, concentrations of SO4(2-) in the solution do not vary much in different inlet concentrations of SO2. Temperature has important effect on biodesulfurization. The optimal operative temperature range is 30-40 degrees C. PMID:16850819

  11. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Illing, S.; Kern, C.; Alvarez Nieves, J. M.; Vogel, L.; Zielcke, J.; Delgado Granados, H.; Platt, U.

    2013-03-01

    Sulphur dioxide emission rate measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 300 and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. One important step for correct SO2 emission rate measurements that can be compared with other measurement techniques is a correct calibration. This requires conversion from the measured optical density to the desired SO2 column density (CD). The conversion factor is most commonly determined by inserting quartz cells (cuvettes) with known amounts of SO2 into the light path. Another calibration method uses an additional narrow field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system (NFOV-DOAS), which measures the column density simultaneously in a small area of the camera's field-of-view. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements. This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different, calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells). Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOV-DOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (I-DOAS), are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective results are compared with measurements from an I-DOAS to verify the calibration curve over the spatial extent of the image. The results show that calibration cells, while working fine in some cases, can lead to an overestimation of the SO2 CD by up to 60% compared with CDs from the DOAS measurements. Besides these errors of calibration, radiative transfer

  12. Special Polymer/Carbon Composite Films for Detecting SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Kisor, Adam; Jewell, April; Shevade, Abhijit; Manatt, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Blanco, Mario; Goddard, William

    2008-01-01

    A family of polymer/carbon films has been developed for use as sensory films in electronic noses for detecting SO2 gas at concentrations as low as 1 part per million (ppm). Most previously reported SO2 sensors cannot detect SO2 at concentrations below tens of ppm; only a few can detect SO2 at 1 ppm. Most of the sensory materials used in those sensors (especially inorganic ones that include solid oxide electrolytes, metal oxides, and cadmium sulfide) must be used under relatively harsh conditions that include operation and regeneration at temperatures greater than 100 C. In contrast, the present films can be used to detect 1 ppm of SO2 at typical opening temperatures between 28 and 32 C and can be regenerated at temperatures between 36 and 40 C. The basic concept of making sensing films from polymer/carbon composites is not new. The novelty of the present family of polymer/carbon composites lies in formulating the polymer components of these composites specifically to optimize their properties for detecting SO2. First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations of the energies of binding of SO2 molecules to various polymer functionalities are used as a guide for selecting polymers and understanding the role of polymer functionalities in sensing. The polymer used in the polymer-carbon composite is a copolymer of styrene derivative units with vinyl pyridine or substituted vinyl pyridine derivative units. To make a substituted vinyl pyridine for use in synthesizing such a polymer, poly(2-vinyl pyridine) that has been dissolved in methanol is reacted with 3-chloropropylamine that has been dissolved in a solution of methanol. The methanol is then removed to obtain the copolymer. Later, the copolymer can be dissolved in an appropriate solvent with a suspension of carbon black to obtain a mixture that can be cast and then dried to obtain a sensory film.

  13. Measurement of SO2 and BrO at Lastarria, Lascar, and Salar de Atacama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinger, Florian; Osorio, Matias; Gliß, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Platt, Ulich; Frins, Erna; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In November 2014 the 12th CCVG (Commission of the Chemistry of Volcanic Gases) gas workshop took place in Northern Chile. Subject of the field trips were Lastarria (25°10' S, 68°30' W) and Lascar (23°22' S, 67°43' W), both stratovolcanoes with a height of 5700 and 5600 a.s.l., respectively. One of the goals was to investigate the SO2 and BrO emissions of these volcanoes by remote-sensing using Multi-AXial Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). The used 'mini MAX-DOAS' instrument measures scattered solar UV radiation recording spectra within a wavelength range of 294-437 nm and with a spectral resolution of 0.9 nm. The instrument took spectra sequentially at various elevation angles scanning the sky from horizon to zenith. The scanning geometry was adapted to each measurement location. At Lastarria volcano we observed SO2 slant column densities (SCDs) in the order of 1018 molecules/cm2 and BrO SCDs up to 5 - 1013 molecules/cm2. At Lascar volcano we observed SO2 SCDs up to 4 - 1017 molecules/cm2 but no significant BrO absorption features (in a preliminary evaluation). We will present SO2 fluxes and upper detection limits of BrO, and present maxima BrO/SO2 ratios of Lastarria and Lascar. Those ratios will be compared to BrO/SO2 ratios of other - previously studied - Andean volcanoes (e.g. Villarica). Furthermore, we measured the SO2 and BrO SCDs above the Salar de Atacama (23°30' S, 68°15' W), a salt pan with an area of 3000 km2. Spectra were taken in a direction where the Salar de Atacama has an extension of about 50 km and no other obvious emission sources were contributing to the SO2 and BrO absorption signals. At the Salar de Atacama we observed SO2 SCDs up to 2 - 1017 molecules/cm2 and BrO SCDs of up to 7 - 1013 molecules/cm2.

  14. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Illing, S.; Kern, C.; Alvarez Nieves, J. M.; Vogel, L.; Zielcke, J.; Delgado Granados, H.; Platt, U.

    2012-09-01

    Sulphur dioxide emission flux measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 305 nm and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. While this approach is simple and delivers valuable insights into the two-dimensional SO2 distribution, absolute calibration has proven to be difficult. An accurate calibration of the SO2 camera (i.e., conversion from optical density to SO2 column density, CD) is crucial to obtain correct SO2 CDs and flux measurements that are comparable to other measurement techniques and can be used for volcanological applications. The most common approach for calibrating SO2 camera measurements is based on inserting quartz cells (cuvettes) containing known amounts of SO2 into the light path. It has been found, however, that reflections from the windows of the calibration cell can considerably affect the signal measured by the camera. Another possibility for calibration relies on performing simultaneous measurements in a small area of the camera's field-of-view (FOV) by a narrow-field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (NFOV-DOAS) system. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements. This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells). Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOV-DOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (IDOAS), are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective

  15. Model simulations of the competing climatic effects of SO2 and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1993-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide-derived cloud condensation nuclei are expected to enhance the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the planet. This effect might counteract the global warming expected from enhanced greenhouse gases. A detailed treatment of the relationship between fossil fuel burning and the SO2 effect on cloud albedo is implemented in a two-dimensional model for assessing the climate impact. Using a conservative approach, results show that the cooling induced by the SO2 emission can presently counteract 50 percent of the CO2 greenhouse warming. Since 1980, a strong warming trend has been predicted by the model: 0.15 C during the 1980-1990 period alone. The model predicts that by the year 2060 the SO2 cooling reduces climate warming by 0.5 C or 25 percent for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) business as usual (BAU) scenario and 0.2 C or 20 percent for scenario D (for a slow pace of fossil fuel burning). The hypothesis is examined that the different responses between the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere can be used to validate the presence of the SO2-induced cooling.

  16. Simultaneous control of Hg0, SO2, and NOx by novel oxidized calcium-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Ghorishi, S Behrooz; Singer, Carl F; Jozewicz, Wojciech S; Sedman, Charles B; Srivastava, Ravi K

    2002-03-01

    Efforts to develop multipollutant control strategies have demonstrated that adding certain oxidants to different classes of Ca-based sorbents leads to a significant improvement in elemental Hg vapor (Hg0), SO2, and NOx removal from simulated flue gases. In the study presented here, two classes of Ca-based sorbents (hydrated limes and silicate compounds) were investigated. A number of oxidizing additives at different concentrations were used in the Ca-based sorbent production process. The Hg0, SO2, and NOx capture capacities of these oxidant-enriched sorbents were evaluated and compared to those of a commercially available activated carbon in bench-scale, fixed-bed, and fluid-bed systems. Calcium-based sorbents prepared with two oxidants, designated C and M, exhibited Hg0 sorption capacities (approximately 100 microg/g) comparable to that of the activated carbon; they showed far superior SO2 and NOx sorption capacities. Preliminary cost estimates for the process utilizing these novel sorbents indicate potential for substantial lowering of control costs, as compared with other processes currently used or considered for control of Hg0, SO2, and NOx emissions from coal-fired boilers. The implications of these findings toward development of multipollutant control technologies and planned pilot and field evaluations of more promising multipollutant sorbents are summarily discussed. PMID:11924858

  17. 40 CFR 52.1923 - Best Available Retrofit Requirements (BART) for SO2 and Interstate pollutant transport provisions...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; and Units 1 and 2 of the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Sooner plant in accordance with 40 CFR 60.8 and 60... gases from other sources. Heat input shall be calculated in accordance with 40 CFR part 75. Owner or... assurance procedures for CEMS found in 40 CFR part 75. Compliance with the emission limits for SO2 shall...

  18. The effect of SO2 on mineral carbonation in batch tests

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    CO2 sequestration is a key element of future emission-free fossil-fueled power plants. Other constituents of flue gas must also be captured and rendered innocuous. Contemporary power plants remove SOx from exit gases, but next-generation plants may simultaneously treat CO2, SOx, and other pollutants. Pioneering tests at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center investigated the combined treatment of CO2 and SO2 in a mineral-carbonation process. SO2 was removed from the gas stream, and as a small fraction of the total volume of mineralizing gas, it did not inhibit the carbonation reaction. The results indicate that this approach to CO2 sequestration could be used to treat multiple pollutants.

  19. HDO and SO2 thermal mapping on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T.; Richter, M.; Lacy, J.; Widemann, T.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Atreya, S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on ground-based thermal observations of Venus using the TEXES imaging spectrometer at IRTF (Mauna Kea, Hawaii) in October 2012. Highresolution data were obtained at 7 μm and 19 μm, probing slightly different layers atop and within the cloud, and were compared with the results of our previous campaign (January 2012, [1]). Three main conclusions can be drawn: (1) An isothermal/inversion layer appears at high latitudes in the October data but not in the January data; (2) The spatial distribution of SO2 seems to show variations within a very short timescale, less than an hour; in contrast, the HDO distribution over the Venus disk shows no noticeable spatial nor temporal variation; (3) The SO2 vertical distribution is strongly depleted a few kilometers above the cloudtop. The high variability of SO2 is probably the result of its very short photodissociation lifetime.

  20. Measuring SO2 ship emissions with an ultraviolet imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last few years fast-sampling ultraviolet (UV) imaging cameras have been developed for use in measuring SO2 emissions from industrial sources (e.g. power plants; typical emission rates ~ 1-10 kg s-1) and natural sources (e.g. volcanoes; typical emission rates ~ 10-100 kg s-1). Generally, measurements have been made from sources rich in SO2 with high concentrations and emission rates. In this work, for the first time, a UV camera has been used to measure the much lower concentrations and emission rates of SO2 (typical emission rates ~ 0.01-0.1 kg s-1) in the plumes from moving and stationary ships. Some innovations and trade-offs have been made so that estimates of the emission rates and path concentrations can be retrieved in real time. Field experiments were conducted at Kongsfjord in Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, where SO2 emissions from cruise ships were made, and at the port of Rotterdam, Netherlands, measuring emissions from more than 10 different container and cargo ships. In all cases SO2 path concentrations could be estimated and emission rates determined by measuring ship plume speeds simultaneously using the camera, or by using surface wind speed data from an independent source. Accuracies were compromised in some cases because of the presence of particulates in some ship emissions and the restriction of single-filter UV imagery, a requirement for fast-sampling (> 10 Hz) from a single camera. Despite the ease of use and ability to determine SO2 emission rates from the UV camera system, the limitation in accuracy and precision suggest that the system may only be used under rather ideal circumstances and that currently the technology needs further development to serve as a method to monitor ship emissions for regulatory purposes. A dual-camera system or a single, dual-filter camera is required in order to properly correct for the effects of particulates in ship plumes.

  1. Volcanic SO2 plume forecasts based on UV satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemming, J.; Inness, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present how SO2 observations from satellites were used to facilitate forecasts of volcanic sulphur dioxide (SO2) plumes. Volcanic SO2 is often co-located with volcanic ash and can in many cases be considered as a proxy for volcanic ash. Satellite retrievals of SO2 total columns from GOME-2, OMI and SCIAMACHY for the eruptions of Grímsvötn and Eyjafjallajökull in May 2011 and 2010 were inter-compared and used to (i) estimate source strength and injection height and (ii) to provide SO2 initial conditions for forecasts by means of data assimilation. The forecasts were carried out as an activity within the European MACC project (Monitoring of atmospheric composition and climate). MACC builds and runs a near-real-time system for the forecast of global atmospheric composition using the integrated forecast system of ECMWF. Our study found that OMI retrievals had the highest maximum values and that GOME-2 observations provided the most complete spatial coverage. Basic estimates of plume parameters were inferred from the satellite retrievals by finding the best match with an ensemble of plume forecasts injected at different levels. Further, the SO2 retrievals were assimilated with ECMWF's 4D-VAR algorithm to obtain initial conditions for the plume forecasts. These initialized plume forecasts were also used to validate the consistency of the satellite observations for consecutive days. The Grímsvötn plume could mostly be predicted by the initialized forecasts, whereas the forecasts of the Eyjafjallajökull plume benefited more from the source term estimate.

  2. Orbifold family unification in SO(2N) gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu; Miura, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    We study the possibility of family unification on the basis of SO(2N) gauge theory on the five-dimensional space-time, M{sup 4}xS{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}. Several SO(10), SU(4)xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}, or SU(5) multiplets come from a single bulk multiplet of SO(2N) after the orbifold breaking. Other multiplets including brane fields are necessary to compose three families of quarks and leptons.

  3. Co-Sequestration Geochemical Modeling: Simple Brine Solution + CO2-O2-SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verba, C.; Kutchko, B. G.; Reed, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Class H well cement (LaFarge) was exposed to supercritical CO2 to evaluate the impact of brine chemistry on the well cement. Simulated experimental downhole conditions include a pressure of 28.6 MPa and a temperature of 50oC. Brine composition was formulated from the NETL NATCARB database, resulting in a simple solution of 1 M (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2). It was determined that the brine chemistry plays a vital role in determining the degree and type of alteration of cement in carbon sequestration conditions. The implications of co-sequestration (CO2/O2/SO2 mixtures) from of oxy-fueled combustion, coal gasification and sour gas have been considered. Geochemical modeling was conducted to understand the interaction between formation brine, cement and co-contaminant gases, using a gas composition of 95.5% CO2, 4% O2, and 1.5% SO2. The modeling results are significant in determining the validity of co-sequestering coal flue gas containing SOx gases or sour hydrocarbon gas which could potentially produce pyrite or other sulfur-bearing species in the cement via mineralization trapping. Thermodynamic components of aqueous species, gases, and minerals were used to calculate the pH and mineral saturation indices using CHIM-XPT. The computed pH of the solution is 4.34. The total sulfate molality within the brine is 0.0095 M. In experimental conditions of 600 mL of brine, 0.0057 moles of sulfate will be converted into 5.7 mL of sulfuric acid. The modeling shows that an excess of 31% O2 forms, indicating that H2S from SO2 disporportionation is oxidized to sulfate, thus no gaseous H2S will form. Remaining SO2 in the experimental headspace has a predicted mole fraction is 10-46. Additional SO2 gas added to the system produces the reaction to precipitate gypsum. Additional gas reactions precipitate gypsum, anhydrite, calcite, and dolomite.

  4. Satellite SO2 retrievals from ash rich volcanic plumes: Comparison between different correction procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, S.; Pugnaghi, S.; Campion, R.; Arvani, B.; Guerrieri, L.; Merucci, L.

    2012-04-01

    Observations of volcanic degassing yield insights into the magmatic processes which control volcanic activity during both quiescent and eruptive phases. SO2 is an important volcanic gas because of its effects on the environment (e.g. acid rain, effects on plants and public health) and also because once it has reached high altitudes it can be transported over long distances, has a great residence time and can be oxidized to form sulphates. The sulphates are capable of reflecting solar radiation and causing surface cooling. For these reasons there is great interest in improving the quality and frequency of volcanic SO2 retrievals. Satellite observations have been used for a long time to monitor globally distributed volcanic activity because they offer a practical and safe source of valuable data. While no satellite sensor has been developed explicitly for volcanic observations, continuous technological improvement has achieved spatial resolutions and acquisition frequencies that allow increasingly detailed volcanological studies at local scales. Monitoring of volcanic SO2 is one of the key facilities offered by satellite remote sensing techniques both in the UV and in the TIR spectral range. During volcanic eruptions ash and gases can be emitted simultaneously. The plume ash particles (from 1 to 10 micron) tend to reduce the top of atmosphere radiance in the entire Thermal InfraRed spectral range (7-14 micron), including the channels used for the SO2 retrieval. The net effect is a significant SO2 column abundance overestimation. In this work three different ash correction procedures for SO2 volcanic plume retrieval are compared. These procedures, applied to MODIS and ASTER TIR measurements, has been used to retrieve the SO2 emission from the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull (Iceland) and the 2011 Mt. Etna (Italy) eruptions. The first procedure (P1), based on Corradini et al. 2009, needs the simultaneous presence of the 8.7 micron SO2 absorption bands, as well as the split

  5. Model Simulations of the Competing Climatic Effects of SO2 and CO2.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1993-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide-derived cloud condensation nuclei are expected to enhance the planetary albedo, thereby cooling the planet. This effect might counteract the global warming expected from enhanced greenhouse gases. A detailed treatment of the relationship between fossil fuel burning and the SO2 effect on cloud albedo is implemented in a two-dimensional model for assessing the climate impact. Although there are large gaps in our knowledge of the atmospheric sources and sinks of sulfate aerosol, it is possible to reach some general conclusions. Using a conservative approach, results show that the cooling induced by the SO2 emission can presently counteract 50% of the CO2 greenhouse warming. Since 1980, a strong warming trend has been predicted by the model, 0.15°C, during the 1980-1990 period alone. The model predicts that by the year 2060 the SO2 cooling reduces climate warming by 0.5°C or 25% for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) business as usual (BAU) scenario and 0.2°C or 20% for scenario D (for a slow pace of fossil fuel burning). The hypothesis is examined that the different responses between the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH) can be used to validate the presence of the SO2-induced cooling. Despite the fact that most of the SO2-induced cooling takes place in the Northern Hemispheric continents, the model-predicted difference in the temperature response between the NH and the SH of 0.2°C in 1980 is expected to remain about the same at least until 2060. This result is a combined effect of the much faster response of the continents than the oceans and of the larger forcing due to CO2 than due to the SO2. The climatic response to a complete filtering of SO2 from the emission products in order to reduce acid rain is also examined. The result is a warming surge of 0.4°C in the first few years after the elimination of the SO2 emission.

  6. Observed levels and trends of gaseous SO2 and HNO3 at Mt. Waliguan, China: results from 1997 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weili; Xu, Xiaobin; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xiaochun; Huang, Jianqing

    2013-04-01

    Long-term measurements of SO2 and HNO3, particularly those from the background sites, are rarely reported. We present for the first time the long-term measurements of SO2 and HNO3 at Waliguan (WLG), the only global baseline station in the back-land of the Eurasian Continent. The concentrations of SO2 and HNO3 were observed at WLG from 1997 to 2009. The observed annual mean concentrations of SO2 and HNO3 at WLG were 1.28 +/- 0.41 and 0.22 +/- 0.19 microg/m3, respectively. The HNO3 concentrations were much higher in warmer seasons than in colder seasons, while the SO2 concentrations showed a nearly reversed seasonal pattern. In most months, the concentration of HNO3 was significantly correlated with that of SO2, suggesting that some common factors influence the variations of both gases and the precursors of HNO3 may partially be from the SO2-emitting sources. The SO2 concentration had a very significant (P < 0.0001) decreasing trend (-0.2 microg/(m3 x yr)) in 1997-2002, but a significant (P < 0.05) increasing trend (+0.06 microg/(m3 x yr)) in 2003-2009. The HNO3 concentration showed no statistically significant trend during 1997-2009. While the decrease of SO2 in 1997-2002 agrees with the trend of global SO2 emissions, the increase in 2003-2009 is not consistent with the decreasing trends in many other regions over the world. Trajectory analysis suggests that the airmasses from the northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and the Takla Makan Desert regions contributed significantly to the increasing trends of SO2 and HNO3 at WLG in 2003-2009, with a rate of +0.13 microg/(m3 x yr) and +0.007 microg/(m3 x yr), respectively. PMID:23923781

  7. BENCH SCALE STUDIES OF LIMESTONE INJECTION FOR SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of experiments in a boiler simulator furnace, indicating that the parameters of major importance to SO2 capture are thermal environment, calcium/sulfur ratio, and sorbent composition. Thermal environment (local temperature) had a strong effect on the util...

  8. 76 FR 61098 - Guidance for 1-Hour SO2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Notice is hereby given that the EPA has posted its draft non- binding guidance titled, ``Guidance for 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS SIP Submissions'' on its Web site. The EPA invites public comments on this guidance document during the comment period specified below, and plans to issue an updated version of the guidance after reviewing timely submitted...

  9. One-Dimensional SO2 Predictions for Duct Injection

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-10-05

    DIAN1D is a one-dimensional model that predicts SO2 absorption by slurry droplets injected into a flue gas stream with two-fluid atomizers. DIANUI is an interactive user interface for DIAN1D. It prepares the input file for DIAN1D from plant design specifications and process requirements.

  10. The role of SO2 in volcanism on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Kieffer, S.W.; Cook, A.F., II

    1979-01-01

    Io and Earth are the only planetary bodies known to be volcanically active; the energetics of the eruptive plumes on Io have important structural implications and are closely linked with the presence of sulphur and SO 2. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF AN SO2 MONITOR FOR MOBILE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An instrument has been designed and built to monitor the concentration of SO2 in the exhaust of mobile sources. A grating assembly disperses the ultraviolet energy from a deuterium-arc source and passes five narrow spectral intervals. Three of the intervals (set A) coincide with ...

  12. Novel retrieval of volcanic SO 2 abundance from ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, G. G.; Burton, M. R.; Oppenheimer, C.; Caltabiano, T.; Tsanev, V. I.; Bruno, N.

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of fixed networks of scanning ultraviolet spectrometers for automatic determination of volcanic SO 2 fluxes has created tremendous opportunities for monitoring volcanoes but has brought new challenges in processing (and interpreting) the copious data flow they produce. A particular difficulty in standard implantation of differential optical absorption (DOAS) methods is the requirement for a clear-sky (plume-free) background spectrum. Our experience after four years of measurements with two UV scanner networks on Etna and Stromboli shows that wide plumes are frequently observed, precluding simple selection of clear-sky spectra. We have therefore developed a retrieval approach based on simulation of the background spectrum. We describe the method here and tune it empirically by collecting clear, zenith sky spectra using calibration cells containing known amounts of SO 2. We then test the performance of this optimised retrieval using clear-sky spectra collected with the same calibration cells but for variable scan angles, time of day, and season (through the course of 1 year), finding acceptable results (~ 12% error) for SO 2 column amounts. We further illustrate the analytical approach using spectra recorded at Mt. Etna during its July 2006 eruption. We demonstrate the reliability of the method for tracking volcano dynamics on different time scales, and suggest it is widely suited to automated SO 2-plume monitoring.

  13. Historical analysis of SO2 pollution control policies in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cailing; Yin, Huaqiang; Ai, Nanshan; Huang, Zhengwen

    2009-03-01

    Coal is not only an important energy source in China but also a major source of air pollution. Because of this, China's national sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) emissions have been the highest in the world for many years, and since the 1990s, the territory of China's south and southwest has become the third largest acid-rain-prone region in the world. In order to control SO(2) emissions, the Chinese government has formulated and promulgated a series of policies and regulations, but it faces great difficulties in putting them into practice. In this retrospective look at the history of SO(2) control in China, we found that Chinese SO(2) control policies have become increasingly strict and rigid. We also found that the environmental policies and regulations are more effective when central officials consistently give environmental protection top priority. Achieving China's environmental goals, however, has been made difficult by China's economic growth. Part of this is due to the practice of environmental protection appearing in the form of an ideological "campaign" or "storm" that lacks effective economic measures. More recently, better enforcement of environmental laws and regulations has been achieved by adding environmental quality to the performance assessment metrics for leaders at all levels. To continue making advances, China needs to reinforce the economic and environmental assessments for pollution control projects and work harder to integrate economic measures into environmental protection. Nonetheless, China has a long way to go before economic growth and environmental protection are balanced. PMID:19159968

  14. Detoxification of Dissolved SO2 (Bisulfite) by Terricolous Mosses

    PubMed Central

    BHARALI, BHAGAWAN; BATES, JEFFREY W.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The widespread calcifuge moss Pleurozium schreberi is moderately tolerant of SO2, whereas Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus is limited to calcareous soils in regions of the UK that were strongly affected by SO2 pollution in the 20th century. The proposition that tolerance of SO2 by these terricolous mosses depends on metabolic detoxification of dissolved bisulfite was investigated. • Methods The capacities of the two mosses to accelerate loss of bisulfite from aqueous solutions of NaHSO3 were studied using DTNB [5, 5-dithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)] to assay bisulfite, and HPLC to assay sulfate in the incubation solutions. Incubations were performed for different durations, in the presence and absence of light, at a range of solution pH values, in the presence of metabolic inhibitors and with altered moss apoplastic Ca2+ and Fe3+ levels. • Key Results Bisulfite disappearance was markedly stimulated in the light and twice as great for R. triquetrus as for P. schreberi. DCMU, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron chain transport, significantly reduced bisufite loss. • Conclusions Bisulfite (SO2) tolerance in these terricolous mosses involves extracellular oxidation using metabolic (photo-oxidative) energy, passive oxidation by adsorbed Fe3+ (only available to the calcifuge) and probably also internal metabolic detoxification. PMID:16319108

  15. High-throughput technology for novel SO2 oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F.

    2011-10-01

    We review the state of the art and explain the need for better SO2 oxidation catalysts for the production of sulfuric acid. A high-throughput technology has been developed for the study of potential catalysts in the oxidation of SO2 to SO3. High-throughput methods are reviewed and the problems encountered with their adaptation to the corrosive conditions of SO2 oxidation are described. We show that while emissivity-corrected infrared thermography (ecIRT) can be used for primary screening, it is prone to errors because of the large variations in the emissivity of the catalyst surface. UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometry was selected instead as a reliable analysis method of monitoring the SO2 conversion. Installing plain sugar absorbents at reactor outlets proved valuable for the detection and quantitative removal of SO3 from the product gas before the UV-Vis analysis. We also overview some elements used for prescreening and those remaining after the screening of the first catalyst generations.

  16. STATUS OF DRY SO2 CONTROL SYSTEMS: FALL 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, updating the status of dry SO2 control systems for coal-fired utility and industrial boilers in the U.S. through the Fall of 1982, is based on current and recent research, research and development, and commercial activities. Systems addressed include: (1) spray dryer/...

  17. BOILER SIMULATOR STUDIES ON SORBENT UTILIZATION FOR SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a program to provide process design information for sorbent utilization as applied to EPA's LIMB process. Specifically, the program was designed to investigate the role of boiler thermal history, sorbent injection location, Ca/S molar ratio, and SO2 pa...

  18. EVALUATION OF SIMULTANEOUS SO2/NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of work concentrating on characterizing three process operational parameters of a technology that combines sorbent injection and selective non-catalytic reduction for simultaneous sulfur dioxide/nitrogen oxide (SO2/NOx) removal from coal-fired industrial ...

  19. SO2 SCRUBBING TECHNOLOGIES: A REVIEW: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-RTP-P-585 Srivastava*, R.K., Jozewicz, W., and Singer, C. SO2 Scrubbing Technologies: a Review. Environmental Progress 20 (4):219-227 (2001). EPA/600/J-02/022, Available: Environmental Progress (journal), http://www.aiche.org/publications/tocs/issuedtl.asp, [NET]. 03...

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED SORBENTS FOR DRY SO2 CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of new flyash/lime sorbents for removing SO2 from coal-fired flue gas. Flyash/lime weight ratios of 1:1 to 10:1 and several additives to these sorbents for promoting their reactivity were evaluated in a bench-scale reactor simulating conditions...

  1. High-resolution SO2 isotopologue spectra as evidence for sulfur MIF due to SO2 self-shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.; Stark, G.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that photolysis of some gas-phase molecules can lead to isotopic mass-independent fractionation (MIF). Several mechanisms for photolytic MIF have been proposed including 1) self-shielding during photon absorption, 2) variations in band oscillator strengths, 3) hyperfine effects, and 4) resonant curve crossing. Self-shielding, a result of line saturation in molecules with line-type absorption spectra, is observed (and predicted) in CO and N2, both of which undergo predissociation. Here, we focus on the role of self-shielding in SO2, also a predissociating molecule. Photolysis of atmospheric SO2 is believed to be the source of sulfur isotope MIF measured in early Earth sedimentary rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000). Quantitative evaluation of this hypothesis requires accurate and high-resolution absorption cross section data. We have completed 1 cm-1 resolution measurements of 32SO2, 33SO2 and 34SO2 isotopologues using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College (IC). A detailed description of the FTS measurements will be presented by D. Blackie et al. (this meeting). Here, we present a brief overview of the data, comparison with recently published lower resolution cross section data of Danielachet et al. (2008), and interpretation via atmospheric modeling. FTS measurements were obtained at 3 pressures (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 torr) on pure xSO2 gas (x = 32, 33 or 34) from 222 to 188 nm. Spectra were coadded to improve S/N. Visual comparison of our spectra with the lower resolution (~ 20 cm-1) spectra of Danielache et al. (2008) reveals good overall agreement for all 3 isotopologues, although the lower resolution data is unable to resolve the dense rotational structure. However, radiative transfer calculations utilizing the two sets of cross section data in a 1-D atmospheric chemistry code (assuming 10 ppb SO2) yield very different photolytic isotope fractionations. The IC cross sections yield increasing δ34S, δ33S and Δ33S values for

  2. Kinetics of the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.; Peterson, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The flash photolysis/ultraviolet absorption technique was used to measure the rate constants for the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M over the pressure range 50-700 torr and temperature range 229-362 K using He, O2, and N2 as diluent gases. The data were fit to the expression derived by Troe (1979) and co-workers for describing the pressure and temperature dependence of reactions in the falloff region. By combining these data with recent measurements of the rate constant for HO2NO2 thermal decomposition values of 73.8 + or - 2 eu for the standard entropy and -12.6 + or - kcal/mol for the standard enthalpy of formation of HO2NO2 were obtained. A significant enhancement in the rate constant was observed when water vapor was added to the system.

  3. Light-Induced SO2 Photochemistry at the Mineral Dust Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styler, S. A.; Doussin, J.; Formenti, P.; Donaldson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The uptake of SO2 by mineral dust is believed to proceed first by formation of surface-bound sulfite, which can subsequently be oxidized to sulfate not only by co-sorbed O3 and NO2 but also by photooxidants such as Fe and Ti present within the dust itself. In the first phase of this study, we investigated the effect of light upon SO2 uptake by Fe2O3, TiO2, illite, feldspar, and mineral dust samples obtained from Niger, Tunisia, and China. We determined the initial uptake coefficient of SO2 at the surface of dust samples under both light and dark conditions using a photochemical Knudsen cell, and then measured the relative quantities of sulfite and sulfate formed at the surface of these films using ion chromatography. In the second phase of this study, which was performed in the CESAM atmospheric chamber, we explored the possibility that light-induced production of surface-sorbed sulfate might result in enhanced dust hygroscopicity by measuring changes in dust particle size distribution as a function of exposure to SO2 and light under a range of relative humidity conditions.

  4. Quenching of the fluorescence of NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslavsky, S.; Heicklen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The fluorescence yield of NO2 was monitored at 25 C with incident wavelengths of 4047, 4358, and 4800A at fluorescence wavelengths of 4860, 5577, and 6300A. The NO2 pressure was varied between 0.004 and 0.080 torr. Measurements were taken both in the absence of foreign gases and in the presence of up to 30 torr. He, N2, and O2 at each NO2 pressure. In the absence of foreign gases, the self quenching follows a Stern-Volmer quenching mechanism, but foreign-gas quenching shows marked deviations from this mechanism. Both from lifetime and kinetic considerations, it is argued that the electronic state formed by absorption of the radiation cannot be the emitting state. Emission occurs from several vibrational levels of the emitting state, the various vibrational levels being formed by collisional cascade reactions. The appropriate quenching rate constant ratios were measured and tabulated. Even the two electronic state mechanism is insufficient to explain all the observations.

  5. Geologic Sequestration of CO2 and Associated H2S and SO2 in Bedded Sandstone-Shale Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Apps, J. A.; Pruess, K.

    2003-12-01

    The injection of CO2 and associated acid gases such as H2S and SO2 into deep sedimentary aquifers is a means by which net anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases might be reduced. Aquifer host rock aluminosilicate minerals alter very slowly under ambient conditions and their study is not amenable to laboratory experiment. We therefore developed a numerical model to investigate the fate of CO2 and other acid gases in bedded sandstone-shale sequences using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions characteristic of Texas Gulf Coast sediments. The simulations were performed using the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code, TOUGHREACT, to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers, the consequent immobilization of gases through mineral precipitation, and the impact of co-contaminated H2S and SO2 gases on CO2 sequestration. The gas sequestration capacity by both aqueous and mineral phases was evaluated. Porosity changes due to mineral dissolution and precipitation were also monitored. The simulations provide useful insights into potential sequestration processes, and their controlling conditions and parameters during long-term containment of acid gases in deep sedimentary formations.

  6. 40 CFR 97.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR....284(g), in accordance with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section. (2) By no later than October 31 of... Trading Program under § 97.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting authority...

  7. 40 CFR 97.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR....284(g), in accordance with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section. (2) By no later than October 31 of... Trading Program under § 97.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting authority...

  8. 40 CFR 97.288 - CAIR SO 2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO 2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CAIR SO 2 allowance allocations to....284(g), in accordance with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section. (2) By no later than October 31 of... Trading Program under § 97.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting authority...

  9. 40 CFR 97.288 - CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR SO2 opt-in units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CAIR SO2 allowance allocations to CAIR....284(g), in accordance with paragraph (b) or (c) of this section. (2) By no later than October 31 of... Trading Program under § 97.284(g) and October 31 of each year thereafter, the permitting authority...

  10. Observations of atmospheric trace gases by MAX-DOAS in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianxin; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Zhou, Haijin; Du, Libin; Qu, Junle; Chen, Chao; An, Quan; Wu, Chengxuan; Wang, Xiufen

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric trace gases exist in the atmosphere of the earth rarely. But the atmospheric trace gases play an important role in the global atmospheric environment and ecological balance by participating in the global atmospheric cycle. And many environmental problems are caused by the atmospheric trace gases such as photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, etc. So observations of atmospheric trace gases become very important. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) developed recently is a kind of promising passive remote sensing technology which can utilize scattered sunlight received from multiple viewing directions to derive vertical column density of lower tropospheric trace gases like ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It has advantages of simple structure, stable running, passive remote sensing and real-time online monitoring automatically. A MAX-DOAS has been developed at Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) for remote measurements of lower tropospheric trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3). In this paper, we mainly introduce the stucture of the instrument, calibration and results. Detailed performance analysis and calibration of the instrument were made at Qingdao. We present the results of NO2, SO2 and O3 vertical column density measured in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay. The diurnal variation and the daily average value comparison of vertical column density during a long-trem observation are presented. The vertical column density of NO2 and SO2 measured during Qingdao oil pipeline explosion on November 22, 2013 by MAX-DOAS is also presented. The vertical column density of NO2 reached to a high value after the explosion. Finally, the following job and the outlook for future possible improvements are given. Experimental calibration and results show that the developed MAX-DOAS system is reliable and credible.

  11. Microwave rotational spectral study of SO2-CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Sprague, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    The microwave spectrum of the molecular complex of sulfur dioxide (SO2) with carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied with a pulsed-beam Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer (FTMW) from a pair of gas samples of 1% by volume of SO2 and CO in Ar, and introduced via separate capillary inputs to the flow nozzle. The frequency coverage was about 7-16 GHz for various isotopomers. The molecular structure was determined with the aid of spectral studies of isotopically substituted monomers containing 13C, 18O and 34S. The rotational analyses provide the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for all of the isotopomers analyzed. The structure determination is compared to detailed ab initio structural calculations. The electric dipole moment components along the a- and c-axis were determined from Stark effect measurements.

  12. Historical Analysis of SO2 Pollution Control Policies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cailing; Yin, Huaqiang; Ai, Nanshan; Huang, Zhengwen

    2009-03-01

    Coal is not only an important energy source in China but also a major source of air pollution. Because of this, China’s national sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions have been the highest in the world for many years, and since the 1990s, the territory of China’s south and southwest has become the third largest acid-rain-prone region in the world. In order to control SO2 emissions, the Chinese government has formulated and promulgated a series of policies and regulations, but it faces great difficulties in putting them into practice. In this retrospective look at the history of SO2 control in China, we found that Chinese SO2 control policies have become increasingly strict and rigid. We also found that the environmental policies and regulations are more effective when central officials consistently give environmental protection top priority. Achieving China’s environmental goals, however, has been made difficult by China’s economic growth. Part of this is due to the practice of environmental protection appearing in the form of an ideological “campaign” or “storm” that lacks effective economic measures. More recently, better enforcement of environmental laws and regulations has been achieved by adding environmental quality to the performance assessment metrics for leaders at all levels. To continue making advances, China needs to reinforce the economic and environmental assessments for pollution control projects and work harder to integrate economic measures into environmental protection. Nonetheless, China has a long way to go before economic growth and environmental protection are balanced.

  13. Correlations between stream sulphate and regional SO2 emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.A.; Alexander, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between atmospheric SO2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. Precipitation sulphate (SO4) records are mostly <5 yr in length and do not account for dry sulphur deposition. Moreover, a variable fraction of wet- and dry-deposited sulphur is retained in soils and vegetation and does not contribute to the acidity of aquatic systems. We have compared annual SO2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1976 to 1980 with stream SO4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. We find that the two forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States (SE) receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States (NE). In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that there are significant regional differences in the fraction of deposited sulphur retained in basin soils and vegetation.The relationship between atmospheric SO//2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. The authors have compared annual SO//2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1967 to 1980 with stream SO//4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. They found that both the wet - and dry-deposited forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States. In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that

  14. Effect of airborne particle on SO 2-calcite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böke, Hasan; Göktürk, E. Hale; Caner-Saltık, Emine N.; Demirci, Şahinde

    1999-02-01

    In modern urban atmosphere, sulphur dioxide (SO 2) attacks calcite (CaCO 3) in calcareous stone-producing gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) which forms crust at rain sheltered surfaces and accelerates erosion at areas exposed to rain. The airborne particles collected on stone surfaces have always been considered to enhance the gypsum crust formation and thus it is believed that they should be removed from the surface to decrease the effects of SO 2. In this study, our aim was to investigate this event by carrying out a series of experiments in laboratory using pure calcium carbonate powder to represent calcareous stone. Sodium montmorillonite, activated carbon, ferric oxide, vanadium pentoxide and cupric chloride were mixed in the pure calcium carbonate powder as substitutes of the airborne particles in the polluted atmosphere. The samples have been exposed at nearly 10 ppmv SO 2 concentrations at 90% relative humidity conditions in a reaction chamber for several days. The mineralogical composition of the exposed samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and infrared spectrometer (IR). Sulphation reaction products, calcium sulphite hemihydrate, gypsum and unreacted calcite, were determined quantitatively using IR. Exposed samples have also been investigated morphologically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental results reveal that calcium sulphite hemihydrate is the main reaction product of the SO 2-calcite reaction. It turns out that airborne particles play an important catalytic role in the oxidation of calcium sulphite hemihydrate into gypsum, although their presence does not very significantly affect the extent of sulphation reaction. This behaviour of airborne particles is explained by the presence of liquid film on the calcium carbonate surface where a series of reactions in the gas-liquid-solid interfaces takes place.

  15. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Illing, Sebastian; Kern, Christoph; Alvarez Nieves, Jose Manuel; Vogel, Leif; Zielcke, Johannes; Delgados Granados, Hugo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different, calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells). Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOVDOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (I-DOAS), are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective results are compared with measurements from an I-DOAS to verify the calibration curve over the spatial extent of the image. The results show that calibration cells, while working fine in some cases, can lead to an overestimation of the SO2 CD by up to 60% compared with CDs from the DOAS measurements. Besides these errors of calibration, radiative transfer effects (e.g. light dilution, multiple scattering) can significantly influence the results of both instrument types. The measurements presented in this work were taken at Popocatepetl, Mexico, between 1 March 2011 and 4 March 2011. Average SO2 emission rates between 4.00 and 14.34 kg s−1 were observed.

  16. Comparative study of the reactions of metal oxides with H2S and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirchos, S. V.

    1991-10-01

    The primary objective of this project is the investigation of the effects of pore structure on the capacity of porous metal oxides for removal of gaseous pollutants from flue gases of power plants (SO2) and hot coal gas (primarily H2S). Specifically, we intend to appropriately exploit the differences of the sulfidation and sulfation reactions (for instance, different molar volumes of solid products) to elucidate the dependence of the sorptive capacity of a porous sorbent on its physical microstructure. The following tasks were identified for the proposed project: (1) literature search and identification of solids to be used in experimental studies; (2) experimental study of the reaction of the chosen solids with SO2 and/or H2S; (3) experimental study of the evolution of the structure of the solids during reaction with SO2 and/or H2S using pore structure analysis and effective diffusivity measurements; and (4) model testing and validation using the obtained experimental data.

  17. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  18. Double photoionization of SO 2 and fragmentation spectroscopy of SO 2++ studied by a photoion-photoion coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, Gérald; Leach, Sydney; Dutuit, Odile; Guyon, Paul-Marie; Richard-Viard, Martine

    1984-08-01

    Doubly charged sulphur dioxide cations (SO 2++) are produced by photoionization with synchrotron radiation from ACO in the excitation-energy range 34-54 eV. A new photoion-photoion coincidence (PIPICO) experiment is described in which coincidences between photoion fragments originating from the dissociation of the doubly charged parent cation are counted. This PIPICO method enables us to study the fragmentation of individual electronically excited states of SO 2++ and to determine the corresponding absolute double-photoionization partial cross sections as a function of the excitation energy. A tentative assignment of the three observed α, β and γ SO 2++ states is given. The dissociation processes of the α and β states into the products SO + + O + are found to be non-statistical in nature; the γ state dissociates completely into three atomic fragments S + + O + + O. Three main observed features of the double-photoionization cross-section curves are discussed in the text: appearance potentials, linear threshold laws, and constant double-photoionization cross sections relative to the total ionization cross section at high energies.

  19. Pulsed sub-microsecond dielectric barrier discharge treatment of simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas: removal of SO2 and NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khacef, A.; Cormier, J. M.

    2006-03-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the removal of SO2 and NOx from simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas containing O2, N2, NO, NO2, CO2, SO2 and H2O using a sub-microsecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. Removal efficiencies of SO2 and NOx (NO+NO2) were achieved as a function of gas temperature for two specific energies and two initial NO, NO2 and SO2 concentrations. The higher SO2 and NOx removal efficiencies were achieved in a gas stream containing 163 ppm of SO2, 523 ppm of NO, 49 ppm of NO2, 14% of CO2, 8% of O2, 16% of H2O and N2 as balance. The experimental results were evaluated using the energy cost or W-value (eV/molecule removed). About 100% of SO2 and 36% of NOx were removed at a gas temperature of 100 °C with an energy cost of about 45 eV/molecule removed and 36 eV/molecule removed, respectively. These results indicate that DBD plasmas have the potential to remove SO2 and NOx from gas streams without additives.

  20. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  1. Reversible reactions between pyrite and pyrrhotite in SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausen, D. M.

    1991-04-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) of iron sulfides in inert atmospheres containing varying amounts of SO2 indicates temperature-dependent reversible reactions between pyrite and pyrrhotite in the range from 350°C to 520°C. Hexagonal pyrrhotite (troilite) and sulfur dioxide interact above 350°C to form pyrite and magnetite. Pyrite decomposes endothermically to pyrrhotite and sulfur above 520°C in the same atmosphere. The sulfurization of hexagonal pyrrhotite to pyrite has been investigated kinetically by DTA and confirmed by x-ray diffraction and wet chemical analyses. The reversibility of this pyrrhotite-pyrite reaction in a sulfur dioxide atmosphere merits further metallurgical consideration.

  2. Laser stark spectroscopy of SO2 with the HCN laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarker, J. C.; Johnston, L. H.; Bhattacharjee, R. L.; Sudhakaran, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The far infrared laser Stark spectrum of SO2 was investigated using the 337-micron line of the HCN laser. Two distinct families, one originating at low field and the other at high field, were observed. The high field transition is identified. A significant fourth-order Stark shift was observed for this transition in the presence of a large second-order Stark shift. The zero-field frequency of the assigned transition was obtained by accounting for the fourth-order contribution.

  3. Supersite synergies improve volcanic SO2 flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Michael; Di Muro, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Both the Etna, Italy, volcano and Piton de la Fournaise (PdF), France, volcano Supersites are monitored with networks of scanning UV spectrometers. An ongoing collaboration between INGV and IPGP researchers has led to a dynamic technology transfer of novel new data analysis procedures to both networks. This new approach has been custom built to account for the particularities of both Supersites. For the Etna Supersite, the large, continuous gas emission, wide plumes and high plume height produce significant challenges for automatic networks of scanning UV spectrometers, due to the lack of a clear sky spectrum and light dilution effects. The novel approach presented here addresses both these issues. In the case of the PdF Supersite, negligible SO2 efflux is observed apart from immediately before, during and after volcanic eruptions. This necessitates a very sensitive and precise automatic analysis in order to detect the first whiffs of SO2 which act as a precursor to eruptive activity. Exactly such a solution has been developed and is demonstrated here. The technology transfer between these two Supersites promotes synergistic advantages, improving the monitoring capacity at both sites. However, until now such synergies have come about exclusively through local support from each site and the initiative of individual researchers. The full potential of such synergies can be greatly enhanced in the future if they are fully recognised and supported within the context of the Supersite initiative.

  4. Photothermal beam deflection applied to SO2 trace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Francisco A.; D'Accurso, V.; Radulovich, O.

    2004-10-01

    We present the application to environmental monitoring of a compact setup for in situ trace gas detection based on photothermal beam deflection (mirage effect) spectroscopy. Gas traces measurements are performed by detecting the time-varying component of the photothermal deflection of a red diode laser beam, propagating inside the region where a pollutant is excited by another laser. In this work, detection of traces of SO2 in a mixture with Nitrogen at atmospheric pressure enclosed in a glass cell, was performed using the fourth-harmonic pulses of a 10 Hz Nd:YAG laser. It was verified by FTIR spectroscopy that negligible SO2 destruction was produced after irradiation of high pressure mixtures with 105 UV pulses. Several beam sizes and propagating angles for the UV and visible laser were tested and evaluated in order to overcome parasitic signals due to unwanted absorption in optical elements. With this setup we reached a detection limit of 5 ppbV in a hundred-second averaging time span but we estimate sub-ppbV levels can be reached by simple changes in the geometry for improving the signal to noise ratio.

  5. An Examination of NOx, SO2, and CO Emissions from East Texas Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Aikin, K. C.; Frost, G. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2007-12-01

    Emissions from several East Texas power plants were measured from aircraft during the 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Studies. One-second measurements were made of NOy, SO2, CO, and CO2 during these flights. NOy (total reactive nitrogen) is used as a proxy for power plant NOx (NO + NO2) emissions to account for any reactions that may have occurred between emission and measurement. Emission ratios of NOy, SO2, and CO to CO2 were calculated from the closest down-wind transects of plumes from seven power plants. Emission ratios were also calculated with hourly data from the Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS). The aircraft data show substantial (25-80 percent) reductions in NOx emissions from four of the power plants between 2000 and 2006, whereas SO2 and CO emissions from all plants appear to be largely unchanged during this time. Emission ratios calculated from the aircraft and from hourly CEMS data in 2006 agree to within an average of approximately 10 percent, which suggests the CEMS data are a fair representation of power plant emissions.

  6. Studies on potential emission of hazardous gases due to uncontrolled open-air burning of waste vehicle tyres and their possible impacts on the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Pawan R.; Shrestha, Pratima; Tamrakar, Chirika S.; Bhattarai, Pradeep K.

    Uncontrolled open-air burning of waste vehicle tyres causing environmental pollution has become a popular practice in Nepal despite official ban considering the environment and public health hazards. In this study, an experimental model was set up in a laboratory scale in an attempt to understand the potential emission of hazardous gases such as CO, SO 2 and NO 2 due to such activities in Kathmandu Valley and their possible impacts on the environment. For this purpose, four types of tyre were collected representing two from passenger car and two from motorbike category. The emission level of CO in the tyre smoke was measured with a CO gas detector tube while SO 2 and NO 2 were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometer. Among the three types of the gases analyzed, SO 2 was emitted in significantly high levels by all the representative tyre samples. The emission levels of CO, SO 2 and NO 2 ranged from 21to 49, 102to 820 and 3to 9 μg g -1, respectively. Results revealed that the emission levels also varied with the tyre types and qualities. The potential emission of the hazardous gases per representative scrap tyre mass was also estimated. Results indicate that the gaseous pollutants due to the tyre fires could make a significant contribution for deterioration of the environmental condition of the Valley or elsewhere.

  7. AOTF-based NO2 camera, results from the AROMAT-2 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Van Opstal, Bert; Maes, Jeroen; Merlaud, Alexis; Stebel, Kerstin; Schuettemeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    A hyperspectral imager based on an acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) has been developed in the frame of the ALTIUS mission (atmospheric limb tracker for the investigation of the upcoming stratosphere). ALTIUS is a three-channel (UV, VIS, NIR) space-borne limb sounder aiming at the retrieval of concentration profiles of important trace species (O3, NO2, aerosols and more) with a good vertical resolution. An optical breadboard was built from the VIS channel concept and is now serving as a ground-based remote sensing instrument. Its good spectral resolution (0.6nm) coupled to its natural imaging capabilities (6° square field of view sampled by a 512x512 pixels sensor) make it suitable for the measurement of 2D fields of NO2, similarly to what is nowadays achieved with SO2 cameras. Our NO2 camera was one of the instruments that took part to the second Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT-2) campaign in August 2015. It was pointed to the smokestacks of the coal and oil burning power plant of Turceni (Romania) in order to image the exhausted field of NO2 and derive slant columns and instantaneous emission fluxes. The ultimate goal of the AROMAT campaigns is to prepare the validation of TROPOMI onboard Sentinel-5P. We will briefly describe the instrumental concept of the NO2 camera, its heritage from the ALTIUS mission, and its advantages compared to previous attempts of reaching the same goal. Key results obtained with the camera during the AROMAT-2 campaign will be presented and further improvements will be discussed.

  8. Noncommutative SO(2,3) gauge theory and noncommutative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Marija; Radovanović, Voja

    2014-06-01

    In this paper noncommutative gravity is constructed as a gauge theory of the noncommutative SO(2,3)⋆ group, while the noncommutativity is canonical (constant). The Seiberg-Witten map is used to express noncommutative fields in terms of the corresponding commutative fields. The commutative limit of the model is the Einstein-Hilbert action with the cosmological constant term and the topological Gauss-Bonnet term. We calculate the second order correction to this model and obtain terms that are of zeroth to fourth power in the curvature tensor and torsion. Trying to relate our results with f(R) and f(T) models, we analyze different limits of our model. In the limit of big cosmological constant and vanishing torsion we obtain an x-dependent correction to the cosmological constant; i.e. noncommutativity leads to an x-dependent cosmological constant. We also discuss the limit of small cosmological constant and vanishing torsion and the teleparallel limit.

  9. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheric at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting.

  10. Reaction of cobalt in SO2 atmospheres at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Worrell, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction rate of cobalt in SO2 argon environments was measured at 650 C, 700 C, 750 C and 800 C. Product scales consist primarily of an interconnected sulfide phase in an oxide matrix. At 700 C to 800 C, a thin sulfide layer adjacent to the metal is also observed. At all temperatures, the rapid diffusion of cobalt outward through the interconnected sulfide appears to be important. At 650 C, the reaction rate slows dramatically after five minutes due to a change in the distribution of these sulfides. At 700 C and 750 C, the reaction is primarily diffusion controlled; values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from this work show favorable agreement with values of diffusivity of cobalt (CoS) calculated from previous sulfidation work. At 800 C, a surface step becomes rate limiting. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35104